Texas Instruments | CC2570, CC2571 1- and 8-channel ANT™ RF Network Processors (Rev. A) | Datasheet | Texas Instruments CC2570, CC2571 1- and 8-channel ANT™ RF Network Processors (Rev. A) Datasheet

Texas Instruments CC2570, CC2571 1- and 8-channel ANT™ RF Network Processors (Rev. A) Datasheet
CC2570
CC2571
SWRS095A – FEBRUARY 2011 – REVISED MARCH 2011
www.ti.com
1- and 8-Channel ANT™ RF Network Processors
Check for Samples: CC2570, CC2571
FEATURES
– CC2570 Supports One ANT Channel
– CC2571 Supports Eight ANT Channels
– Support for Both Public, Private and
Managed ANT Networks
– Support for High-Resolution Proximity
Pairing
1
•
2
•
•
•
RF Section
– Single-Chip 2.4-GHz Radio, Including
Embedded ANT Protocol
– Excellent Link Budget, Enabling Long
Range Without External Front-Ends
– Excellent Output Power (4 dBm)
– Suitable for Systems Targeting Compliance
With Worldwide Radio Frequency
Regulations: ETSI EN 300 328 and EN 300
440 Class 2 (Europe), FCC CFR47 Part 15
(US), and ARIB STD-T66 (Japan)
– Accurate Full-Range RSSI Function,
Especially Suited for Accurate Proximity
Pairing
Layout
– Few External Components
– Reference Designs Available
– 40-Pin, 6-mm × 6-mm QFN Package
Low Power
– Powered Down With Low-Power Timer:
1 µA
– Powered Down Without Timer: 0.5 µA
– Wide Supply Voltage Range (2 V–3.6 V)
ANT Protocol Support
– Fully Compatible With the ANT and ANT+™
Protocols and Existing ANT Devices
– Built-In ANT-FS™ Support
– Easy Connection to Host MCU Through
Asynchronous or Synchronous Serial
Interface
APPLICATIONS
•
•
•
•
Sports and Fitness Equipment
Health and Medical Equipment
Consumer Health Devices
Consumer Electronics
DESCRIPTION
The CC2570 and CC2571 are ANT RF network
processors that implement the easy-to-use,
power-efficient ANT protocol. The CC2570 supports
one ANT channel, whereas the CC2571 supports
eight ANT channels. The CC2570/71 can be
connected to a host MCU (such as an MSP430)
through a UART or SPI serial interface and accessed
through a set of API calls. The majority of the ANT
protocol is built into the CC2570/71, including the
ANT-FS file system functionality; only the application
and profile layers must reside on the host MCU, thus
keeping host MCU memory requirements to a
minimum.
The ANT protocol has been designed to be very
power-efficient, yet is flexible enough to support
various network topologies (point-to-point, star,
connected star, 1-to-N, and N-to-1) and data transfer
modes (broadcast, acknowledged, burst data
transfer). Each logical ANT channel can be
independently configured for one-way or two-way
operation, depending on requirements of the
application.
1
2
Please be aware that an important notice concerning availability, standard warranty, and use in critical applications of Texas
Instruments semiconductor products and disclaimers thereto appears at the end of this data sheet.
ANT, ANT-FS are trademarks of Dynastream Innovations Inc.
PRODUCTION DATA information is current as of publication date.
Products conform to specifications per the terms of the Texas
Instruments standard warranty. Production processing does not
necessarily include testing of all parameters.
Copyright © 2011, Texas Instruments Incorporated
CC2570
CC2571
SWRS095A – FEBRUARY 2011 – REVISED MARCH 2011
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This integrated circuit can be damaged by ESD. Texas Instruments recommends that all integrated circuits be handled with
appropriate precautions. Failure to observe proper handling and installation procedures can cause damage.
ESD damage can range from subtle performance degradation to complete device failure. Precision integrated circuits may be more
susceptible to damage because very small parametric changes could cause the device not to meet its published specifications.
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS (1)
over operating free-air temperature range (unless otherwise noted)
VALUE
UNIT
–0.3 to 3.9
V
Voltage on any digital pin
–0.3 to VDD + 0.3, ≤ 3.9
V
Input RF level
10
Storage temperature range
–40 to 125
°C
All pads, according to human-body model,
JEDEC STD 22, method A114
2
kV
According to charged-device model, JEDEC
STD 22, method C101
500
V
Supply voltage
All supply pins must have the same voltage
ESD
(1)
dBm
Stresses beyond those listed under Absolute Maximum Ratings may cause permanent damage to the device. These are stress ratings
only, and functional operation of the device at these or any other conditions beyond those indicated under Recommended Operating
Conditions is not implied. Exposure to absolute-maximum-rated conditions for extended periods may affect device reliability.
RECOMMENDED OPERATING CONDITIONS
over operating free-air temperature range (unless otherwise noted)
MIN
TA
Operating ambient temperature range
Operating supply voltage
NOM
MAX
UNIT
–40
85
°C
2
3.6
V
ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Measured on CC2570/71 reference design with TA = 25°C and VDD = 3 V, unless otherwise noted.
PARAMETER
I
Current consumption
TEST CONDITIONS
MIN
TYP
MAX
UNIT
RX current consumption
23.7
mA
TX current consumption, –6-dBm output power
25.9
mA
TX current consumption, 0-dBm output power
28.8
mA
TX current consumption, 4-dBm output power
34.3
mA
1
µA
0.5
µA
Power-down current, 32-kHz oscillator active
Power-down current, 32-kHz oscillator disabled
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS
Measured on CC2570/71 reference design with TA = 25°C and VDD = 3 V, unless otherwise noted.
PARAMETER
TEST CONDITIONS
MIN
TYP
MAX
UNIT
2495
MHz
RADIO PART
RF frequency range
Programmable in 1-MHz steps
Data rate and modulation format
2
2400
1 Mbps, GFSK, 160-kHz deviation
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RF RECEIVE SECTION
1 Mbps, GFSK, 160-kHz deviation. Measured on Texas Instruments CC2570/71 reference design with TA = 25°C, VDD = 3 V,
and fC = 2440 MHz, unless otherwise noted.
PARAMETER
TEST CONDITIONS
TYP
MAX
UNIT
dBm
Saturation
10
dBm
Co-channel rejection
–9
dB
0.1% BER
Adjacent-channel rejection
±2 MHz
23
dB
Alternate-channel rejection
±4 MHz
39
dB
Frequency error tolerance
(1)
Including both initial tolerance and
drift
Symbol rate error tolerance (2)
Spurious emission. Only largest
spurious emission stated within each
band.
(1)
(2)
MIN
–86
Receiver sensitivity
–150
150
kHz
–50
50
ppm
–70
Conducted measurement with a
50-Ω single-ended load. Complies
with EN 300 328, EN 300 440 class
2, FCC CFR47, Part 15 and ARIB
STD-T-66.
dBm
Difference between center frequency of the received RF signal and local oscillator frequency
Difference between incoming symbol rate and the internally generated symbol rate
RF TRANSMIT SECTION
Measured on CC2570/71 reference design with TA = 25°C, VDD = 3 V, and fC = 2440 MHz, unless otherwise noted.
PARAMETER
(1)
TEST CONDITIONS
MIN
TYP
MAX
UNIT
Output power, maximum setting
Delivered to a single-ended 50-Ω
load through a balun using
maximum recommended output
power setting.
4
dBm
Output power, minimum setting
Delivered to a single-ended 50-Ω
load through a balun using
minimum recommended output
power setting.
–21
dBm
Programmable output power range
Delivered to a single-ended 50-Ω
load through a balun. Conducted
measurement with a 50-Ω
single-ended load.
25
dB
Spurious emissions, conducted
Complies with EN 300 328, EN 300
440 class 2, FCC CFR47, Part 15
and ARIB STD-T-66. (1)
–45
dBm
Designs with antenna connectors that require conducted ETSI compliance at 64 MHz should insert an LC resonator in front of the
antenna connector. Use a 1.6-nH inductor in parallel with a 1.8-pF capacitor. Connect both from the signal trace to a good RF ground.
ANT OVERVIEW
ANT is a proven ultralow-power wireless protocol operating in the license-free 2.4-GHz ISM band. It has been
specifically designed to target battery operated devices that require years of battery life (often on a single coin
cell) without sacrificing the robust features expected of a mature wireless protocol. These features include
sophisticated co-existence mechanisms, practical topologies that go beyond simple peer-to-peer or star, easy
proximity-based pairing methods, and the seamless transfer of bulk data from one coin-cell-operated device to
another. Combined, these features enable products that are easy to use and quickly adopted by the end user.
ANT is also the fundamental building block of ANT+, which further enhances the user experience by allowing
manufacturers to create interoperable wireless devices based on ANT+ device profiles.
ANT provides for an easy development and integration experience. By fully integrating the lower four layers of
the OSI stack onto a single chip, designers can focus on their applications and not the wireless protocol. This
enables quick development cycles, fast time to market, and lower BOM costs.
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OSI Layer 7: Application
Application written to run on the network
OSI Layer 6: Presentation
Data presentation and encryption
OSI Layer 5: Session
Inter-host communication
User Defined
ANT Protocol
OSI Layer 4: Transport
End to end connections and reliability
2.4 GHz Radio
OSI Layer 3: Network
Path determination and IP (e.g. Logical addressing)
OSI Layer 2: Datalink
LLC and MAC sublayers (e.g. Physical addressing)
OSI Layer 1: Physical
Media, signaling and transmission
M0210-01
Figure 1. ANT OSI Layers
The following sections offer a broad overview of the many features of ANT. For a detailed description of ANT and
ANT+, please visit www.thisisant.com or www.ti.com/ant.
ANT NODES
An ANT node is any device that is capable of ANT wireless communications. It typically coconsists of an ANT
chip, such as the TI CC2571, and an application host MCU, such as an MSP-430. The interface between the
ANT chip and the host MCU is serial UART or SPI, depending on the requirements of the application. There is
also a bit-synchronous serial protocol available, which may be fully implemented in software for very
resource-constrained systems. The overhead required to interface to ANT is minimal, typically requiring less than
1K of flash space to implement a simple API. A block diagram of an ANT node is depicted in Figure 2.
Host MCU
(e.g. MSP430)
UART or SPI
ANT
(e.g. CC2571)
M0211-01
Figure 2. ANT Node
ANT nodes may host multiple ANT channel endpoints, up to eight for the CC2571. Examples of ANT nodes
include wireless watches, heart-rate straps, smart phones, glucose meters, blood-pressure monitors, and other
sports and medical sensors.
4
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ANT CHANNELS
ANT channels are the fundamental building blocks of ANT networks. An ANT channel is a logical connection
between two ANT nodes. ANT channels are fully independent, meaning that multiple channels can form a
network without the need for a central coordinator or a network master, with each channel managing itself
relative to other channels in the RF space. A single ANT node can support multiple channel endpoints, each
completely independent of the other, allowing master and slave combinations on a single device. ANT channels
are also ad hoc, allowing connections to be created and destroyed on an as-needed basis.
M
S
M0212-01
Figure 3. ANT Channel
An ANT channel is formed between a master and a slave endpoint (Figure 3). The master endpoint is the
communication initiator and controls the channel. The master is often referred to as the primary transmitter, as it
is always transmitting a data packet at a specific channel period to keep the channel synchronized. The channel
period can vary from 0.5 Hz to 200 Hz and can be changed dynamically by the application host MCU. Each data
packet carries exactly 8 bytes of application data payload. The slave endpoint is the communication acceptor, or
primary receiver. It searches for master transmissions and then synchronizes to the master at the channel period
of the master, or a multiple thereof. The slave only transmits data to the master if it is instructed to do so by the
application MCU. Figure 4 illustrates the behavior of a bidirectional synchronized ANT channel.
tch
tch
tch
Master
Time
Slave
Time
Channel Time Slot
(Always)
Forward
Direction
(Optional)
Reverse
Direction
T0496-01
Figure 4. ANT Channel Timing
The search algorithm used by the slave to find the master has been specifically designed to optimize battery life.
The slave duty-cycles its radio at a specific rate to trade off acquisition latency for power consumption, allowing
for prolonged searches that can still operate on a coin cell battery.
Each packet transmitted by ANT is characterized by the following parameters:
• 8-byte data payload
• Frequency (2400 MHz to 2485 MHz)
• 2-byte network key
• 4-byte channel ID
Each of these parameters can be changed by the application MCU between message periods.
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ANT Channel Types
There are different types of ANT channels, including bidirectional channels, unidirectional channels, shared
channels, and scanning channels. The type of channel chosen for a particular application is dependent on the
application requirements for use case, power consumption, topology, and battery life expectancy.
Bidirectional channels support two-way communication between the master and the slave. The master transmits
a message on every channel period, whereas the slave only transmits a message to the master if required to do
so by the application. For every message that the slave receives from the master, the slave can transmit a
message back. Hence, the effective data through put is the same in both directions. Bidirectional channels are
also necessary to take advantage of ANT’s unique channel co-existence mechanisms.
Unidirectional, or transmit-only, channels allow for communication from the master to the slave only. These types
of channels support the broadcast message type only and do not offer the co-existence mechanisms built into
bidirectional channels. Although unidirectional channels provide the lowest power solution, they are generally not
recommended for systems that require co-existence of several ANT channels in a common RF space.
Shared channels are a special type of bidirectional channel that allow a single master endpoint to address up to
64K slaves. Each slave synchronizes to the channel period of the master. The master can address a different
slave on each channel timeslot by specifying the address of the slave in the first 2 bytes of the data payload. The
master may also send a broadcast message to all of the slaves simultaneously by specifying an address of 0.
Shared channels are an excellent solution for networks that require many of nodes and are sensitive to power
requirements but not to latency requirements.
Unidirectional
Bidirectional
...
Shared
M0213-01
Figure 5. Synchronous ANT Channel Types
Unlike the channel types listed previously, scanning channels are different in that they are asynchronous. That is,
the slave does not synchronize to a master channel. Instead, any message received from a master is passed
onto the application MCU, along with the channel ID of the device received from. This allows a slave to receive
from multiple masters without actually forming a connection to any particular master. Scanning channels come in
two flavors – continuous-scanning and background-scanning. The difference between the two amounts to a
tradeoff between power consumption and latency. A continuous-scanning channel keeps its receiver on all the
time. This means that any transmissions are received immediately, eliminating latency at the cost of power
consumption to keep the radio on all the time. Continuous-scanning channels are an ideal solution for systems
that must be very low power on one side of the link but not the other, for example, a remote control. A
background scanning channel does not keep its receiver on all of the time. Instead, it continually searches for
transmissions, without ever actually synchronizing to a channel. The power consumption is drastically reduced at
the expense of data latency. Background scanning channels are ideal for battery-operated systems where the
hub must be able to communicate with multiple nodes with reasonable latency, for example, a proximity
awareness application.
6
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Message Types
Although the data payload is fixed at 8 bytes per packet, ANT channels do support different types of messages
including broadcast messages, acknowledged messages and burst messages. The choice of message type to
use depends on the needs of a particular application.
Broadcast messages are messages that do not expect a response. This means that the sender of a broadcast
message (whether it be a slave or master) has no way of knowing if the message it sent was successfully
received by its intended recipient. Broadcast messages offer the lowest power consumption of the three different
message types. As these types of messages do not ellicit a response from their target, these messages are
ideally suited for applications where one-to-many type architectures are required. For example, a sport sensor
may broadcast data to a watch and smartphone simultaneously. Broadcast type messages are also useful for
sensor data that changes slowly relative to the channel period, and it is more important to have the latest data
rather than every single packet of data. For example, a temperature sensor is an ideal candidate for a broadcast
data type. Broadcast messages are the default message type used by a master channel and are the only data
type supported by transmit-only channels.
Acknowledged messages are messages that expect and ellicit a response from the receiving device. The
response to an acknowledged message is automatically handled by the ANT protocol (transparent to the
application MCU). On sending an acknowledged message type, the application MCU will be notified whether or
not the message successfully reached its target. Any retries must be handled by the application MCU, as ANT
does not re-transmit any messages that were not acknowledged. Acknowledged type messages are best suited
for control applications where the transmitter must know whether or not a message got through. For example, a
remote control or actuator is an ideal application for an acknowledged message type.
Burst messages are designed to allow the transfer of bulk data as fast as possible without compromising the
ability of a device to run using a coin-cell battery. A burst always starts on a channel-period timeslot and send
packets as fast as possible, potentially extending the channel period. The maximum data throughput for a burst
is 20 kbps. Each burst packet is re-tried by ANT up to five times if necessary. The success or failure of a burst
operation is communicated to the application MCU. The burst message type is most appropriate for sending
large amounts of episodic data. For example, a watch may upload data to a computer after a workout using
burst-type messages.
Pairing
In order to ensure that a slave is talking to the correct master, the slave must know the channel ID of the master.
If the channel ID is not known, the slave must attain the channel ID through a process called pairing. Pairing is
an issue that affects all wireless technologies. There are several methods available for pairing, each with its
merits and drawbacks. Ultimately, the best pairing solution is one that is most seamless to the user. ANT has
many pairing methods built in, ranging from simple to sophisticated, and allowing the designer to customize the
pairing experience for a particular application.
The simplest pairing method is for the slave to wildcard the channel ID (by explicitly setting it to 0). When the
channel ID is wildcarded, the slave connects to the first master it finds (provided it matches non-wildcarded
portions of the ID and the frequency and network number). This method is easy and relatively seamless to the
user. The user generally only must perform a UI operation on the slave device and then wait to connect to the
master. However, if the user is in a crowded environment, where several devices to pair with are available, this
method breaks down. For example, if a user is trying to pair to a heart-rate strap at a gym, the user may easily
pair to a device that is not the user's own. Hence, a wildcard pairing method is generally suitable if pairing is
expected to happen only occasionally and in isolation.
To reduce the chances of pairing to an incorrect device in a crowded environment, ANT allows the user to put
the ANT channel into a pairing mode. This is done by setting a particular bit of the channel ID of the master
device and forcing the slave to only pair to devices that have this bit set. This method reduces the chances of
pairing to the wrong device; however, it forces the user to perform a UI operation on the slave device and on the
master device. This may not be practical both from a user point of view and from a production point of view, as
adding a button or switch may not be feasible for a particular device.
Another, more-powerful, method of pairing is to use the relative proximity of a slave device to a master device to
determine if pairing should occur. This is known as proximity pairing. ANT has a very simple interface that allows
the user to specify a proximity threshold, effectively blocking other devices that are outside of this threshold.
Once pairing has occurred, the effective transmission range is returned to normal, allowing the device to function
normally.
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5
5
4
3
2
1
4
4
M0214-01
Figure 6. Varying Proximity Thresholds
There are 10 proximity bins available to the application. Each bin represents a relative distance from the device.
The actual distance varies from implementation to implementation and is affected by many factors, including
housing, component tolerances, and RF environment. In Figure 6 (third on the left diagram), if the user put the
slave device (center) into proximity pairing mode with a bin of 3, the user would only be able to pair to one
device. All other devices would be outside of the pairing range.
Proximity pairing is a very powerful feature of ANT and is applicable in almost all applications, from simple
sensor pairings that occur occasionally to complex pairing environments such as gyms where pairing may be
done continuously with pieces of equipment in a crowded environment. It is seamless to the user and requires no
special hardware or UI to implement.
ANT NETWORKS
With up to eight independent ANT channels available on a single device, it is possible to connect ANT nodes to
many different types of network topologies. Sophisticated network topologies are just collections of ANT channels
and simple star networks. Figure 7 illustrates some of the possible network arrangements possible with ANT.
8
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PEER
TO
PEER
BROADCAST
ANT-FS
(Secure Authentication)
STAR
Acknowledge
Bidirectional
M
M
14
M
1
12
1
12
1
12
2
11
2
11
2
11
3
10
3
10
3
10
4
9
4
9
4
9
5
8
5
8
6
7
6
7
SHARED
UNIDIRECTIONAL
5 ••••••
6
SHARED
BIDIRECTIONAL
15
16 • • • • • • n
13
1
12
2
11
3
10
4
9
5
8
7
AD-HOC
AUTO
SHARED
8
7
6
SCANNING MODE
PRACTICAL MESH
Relay
Sensor
SHARED CLUSTER
Hub
M0215-01
Figure 7. ANT Network Topologies
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ANT-FS
A powerful feature of ANT is the ability to do efficient, automated, and secure downloads of bulk data from one
device to another. This is enabled using an extension to the ANT protocol called ANT-FS (File Share). While the
ANT-FS protocol can be implemented at the application level, the TI CC257X family has been designed with
ANT-FS integrated on-chip, allowing designers access to this powerful utility with minimal development effort,
enabling quick time to market.
The ability to perform file transfers enables all sorts of interesting use cases. In the personal monitoring
environment, data from sensors may be stored locally on a battery-operated hub and then uploaded to a PC,
cellphone, or other collection device for display, further processing, or transferring of data across a network.
The ANT-FS protocol defines communication between two devices, a client and a host. The host is typically the
higher-power device and may also be a gateway or a hub device. It is implemented as an ANT slave channel,
and its job is to download and upload files from and to client devices. The client is typically the lower-power
device and is the mobile storage device that interfaces to sensors. It is implemented as an ANT master channel.
The distinction between the host and client may not always be easy. For example, an ANT-FS session may
occur between two identical peer devices. The important point to remember is that both the client and the host
may be implemented with minimal resources that can be powered by a coin-cell battery.
ANT-FS defines three layers of communication: the link, authentication, and transport layers. Both the client and
the host traverse through these layers before any data exchange can occur. The purpose of these layers is to
provide a seamless, yet secure interface for transferring files between devices.
In the link layer, the client device advertises its presence by sending out a periodic beacon. The beacon contain
information pertaining to the client’s state and capabilities, as well as manufacturer and device type. This
information is used by the host device in the link layer to determine whether or not it should connect to a
particular device. Once a host detects a client device in the link layer that it wishes to communicate with, it sends
a link command to that device.
On receiving a link command from the host, the client moves to the authentication state. In the authentication
state, the client authenticate the host in order to establish a secure link. The authentication method is flexible and
may depend on a particular application. Three methods are currently defined by the ANT-FS specification:
pass-through, passkey, and pairing.
Pass-through authentication is really no authentication at all. The host simply sends a request to pass through
authentication. If the client supports this method, it accepts this request; otherwise, it is rejected. Passkey
authentication requires that the host send a unique passkey to the client. If the passkey matches that of the
client, authentication passes; otherwise, it is rejected. This method requires that the passkey be attained by the
host at some earlier point. The pairing method of authentication requires that the host send a command to the
client to request pairing. The client either passes this request to the user of the device (requiring a UI) or uses
some other method to determine if the pairing should be accepted (for example, proximity of the host device). If
pairing is accepted, the client may then send a passkey to the client to be used for future authentication
attempts.
Once authentication is accepted by the client, the client and the host move to the transport layer. In the transport
layer, the host can request a directory of files (analogous to a DOS-style directory). It can then request to
download, upload, and erase files stored on the client.
The ability to do secure file downloads is very powerful. While other technologies can support this use case, only
ANT is able to provide a system that is low-power enough to support the seamless use cases provided by
ANT-FS. In addition to performing generic file transfer, ANT-FS is also the base technology used by file-based
device profiles defined within the ANT+ ecosystem.
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DEVICE INFORMATION
PIN ASSIGNMENT
GND
EE_GND
XOSC32K_Q2
XOSC32K_Q1
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
AVDD6
PORTSEL
39
GND
DVDD1
40
GND
DCOUPL
CC2570/CC2571
RHA Package
(Top View)
31
30
GND
1
GND
2
29
AVDD4
GND
3
28
AVDD1
GND
4
27
AVDD2
TxD/SOUT
5
26
RF_N
GND
(Ground Pad)
R_BIAS
BR3/FAST SPI
9
22
XOSC_Q1
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
20
AVDD5
RESET
10
11
RTS/SEN
DVDD2
SLEEP/MRDY
XOSC_Q2
SUSPEND/SRDY
23
GND
8
EE_CLK
AVDD3
BR1/SFLOW
EE_MOSI
RF_P
24
EE_MISO
25
GND
6
7
EE_CS
RxD/SIN
BR2/SCLK
P0076-11
NOTE: The exposed ground pad must be connected to a solid ground plane, as this is the ground connection for the
device.
PIN FUNCTIONS
PIN
NAME
NO.
DIRECTION
AVDD1
28
AVDD2
27
AVDD3
24
AVDD4
29
AVDD5
21
AVDD6
31
BR1/SFLOW
8
IN/IN
BR2/SCLK
7
IN/OUT
BR3/FAST SPI
9
IN
DESCRIPTION
Serial communication pin.
Synchronous: SFLOW (bit- or byte-mode selection – see Table 1)
Asynchronous: Baud-rate configuration pin (see Table 2)
Serial communication pin
Synchronous: SCLK (SPI master clock out)
Asynchronous: Baud-rate configuration pin (see Table 2)
Serial baud rate selection
Synchronous: FAST SPI (selects fast SPI clock)
Asynchronous: BR3 (baud-rate configuration pin for asynchronous serial communication
(see Table 2).
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PIN FUNCTIONS (continued)
PIN
NAME
NO.
DIRECTION
DESCRIPTION
DCOUPL
40
DVDD1
39
DVDD2
10
EE_CLK
16
OUT
EEPROM SPI master clock
EE_CS
12
OUT
EEPROM SPI chip select
EE_GND
34
OUT
EEPROM ground
EE_MISO
14
IN
EE_MOSI
15
OUT
EEPROM SPI master out
1, 2, 3, 4,
13, 17, 35,
37, 38
N/A
Ground
PORTSEL
36
IN/IN
R_BIAS
30
RESET
20
RF_N
26
RF_P
25
RTS/SEN
11
OUT/OUT
Digital output for serial communication
Synchronous: SEN (Serial-enable flow control)
Asynchronous: RTS (UART flow control)
RxD/SIN
6
OUT/OUT
Digital input for serial communication
Synchronous: SIN (SPI master in)
Asynchronous: RxD (UART receive)
SLEEP/MRDY
18
IN/IN
Serial communication pin
Synchronous: MRDY (message-ready flow control signal)
Asynchronous: SLEEP (sleep assert)
SUSPEND/SRDY
19
IN/IN
Serial communication pin
Synchronous: SRDY (bit- or byte-ready flow control)
Asynchronous: SUSPEND (suspend signal)
TxD/SOUT
5
OUT/OUT
XOSC32K_Q1
32
XOSC32K_Q2
33
XOSC_Q1
22
XOSC_Q2
23
GND
I
EEPROM SPI master in
PORTSEL: Configuration pin to select synchronous or asynchronous serial
communication
Reset signal
Digital output for serial communication
Synchronous: SOUT (SPI master out)
Asynchronous: TxD (UART transmit)
SERIAL INTERFACE
The CC257x supports various serial interfaces to accommodate almost any application requirements. These
include asynchronous, byte synchronous, and bit synchronous (bit bashing). The serial interface is selected by
using external configuration pins, as described in Table 1. Because these pins are sampled by the CC257x on
startup to determine serial interface, it is important that these pins retain their state while powered up. Changing
the state of these pins after start-up may result in undefined behavior.
Table 1. Serial Interface Selection
Serial Mode
PORTSEL (Pin 36)
SFLOW (Pin 8)
Asynchronous
0
X
Byte synchronous
1
0
Bit synchronous
1
1
12
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The asynchronous serial interface may be used with a UART peripheral on an external MCU. The baud rates are
selectable via a hardware pin configuration.
Byte-synchronous serial may be used with an SPI peripheral (three-wire), though flow control must be
implemented in software using GPIOs. The bit-synchronous serial interface is designed to be implemented in
software on the external MCU, allowing the interface to be implemented using GPIOs only.
ASYNCHRONOUS SERIAL INTERFACE
The asynchronous serial interface is selected by setting the PORTSEL pin to VSS (GND). The asynchronous
serial interface is functionally equivalent to a standard UART with 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit. Unlike a
standard UART, the asynchronous serial interface supports unidirectional flow control only. Using the
asynchronous serial interface also requires that the host MCU tightly control the SLEEP state of the CC257x by
using the SLEEP and SUSPEND control lines. The following block diagram shows the interconnections required
for the asynchronous serial interface.
1
C208
X3
C209
2
Vcc
C200
Vcc
Vcc
C203
C202
C211
31
AVDD6
32
XOSC32K_Q1
33
XOSC32K_Q2
34
EE_GND
35
GND
36
PORTSEL
37
GND
38
GND
39
DVDD1
AVDD5
L204
29
X203
28
X201
27
L203
26
X200
Antenna
L202
25
24
X207
X202
X208
23
22
Vcc
Vcc
21
RESET
SUSPEND/SRDY
XOSC_Q1
30
C205
C210
20
19
SLEEP/MRDY
DVDD2
GND
BR3/FAST SPI
11
C204
XOSC_Q2
BR1/SFLOW
18
10
AVDD3
BR2/SCLK
EE_CLK
9
RF_P
17
8
16
Set
Baud
Rate
RxD/SIN
EE_MOSI
Vcc
RF_N
U200
CC257X
EE_MISO
7
TxD/SOUT
15
6
AVDD2
GND
UART RX
AVDD4
GND
14
Host MCU
5
R_BIAS
AVDD1
13
UART TX
R200
GND
EE_CS
4
GND
RTS/SEN
3
GND
12
1
2
DCOUPL
40
C201
X1
RTS
1
SLEEP
Host MCU
C206
SUSPEND
2
C207
RESET
Asynchronous Mode
S0505-01
Figure 8. Asynchronous Serial Hardware Setup
The baud rate is selected using a hardware pin configuration using pins BR1, BR2, and BR3. Table 2 lists the
available baud rates and the corresponding pin configurations.
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Table 2. Baud Rate Selection
Baud Rate
BR1
BR2
BR3
57,600
1
1
1
50,000
1
1
0
38,400
1
0
0
19,200
0
1
0
9,600
1
0
1
4,800
0
0
0
The asynchronous serial interface supports unidirectional hardware flow control. As indicated in Figure 8, the
RTS line from the CC257x should be connected to the CTS line of the host MCU. The host MCU must halt the
sending of any messages while the RTS signal is asserted. Note that the RTS signal is briefly asserted following
every message received by ANT on the serial port. The length of this pulse is approximately 50 µs. Any bytes
sent while RTS is high are ignored by ANT. For this reason, it is recommended that two padding bytes or a
reasonable delay be inserted between serial messages. This is especially important when sending burst serial
messages to ANT.
USE OF SLEEP AND SUSPEND
To ensure lowest power operation, the host MCU must control the power state of the CC257x explicitly using the
SLEEP and SUSPEND signal lines. Review the ANT document Interfacing with ANT General Purpose Chipsets
and Modules and the Application note Power States for complete details on how these signals should be used.
The SLEEP signal should be used to put the CC257x into its lowest state when serial communication is not
required. This is accomplished by asserting the SLEEP signal between any serial messages being sent from the
host MCU to ANT. This is illustrated by the timing diagram in Figure 9.
HOST MCU
CC257x
SLEEP
(Output)
SLEEP
(Input)
HOST_CTS
(Input)
RTS
(Output)
HOST_TX
(Output)
RX
(Input)
T0497-01
Figure 9. Use of Sleep
Regardless of the state of the SLEEP signal, ANT sends any messages to the host MCU immediately.
The SUSPEND signal should only be used in USB applications where the USB specification requires that the
MCU be put into a known low power state very quickly. Asserting SUSPEND terminates all RF activity,
regardless of the state of ANT. Entering and exiting the suspend state requires the use of the SLEEP signal as
depicted in Figure 10.
14
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Enter SUSPEND
mode
SUSPEND
Still in SUSPEND mode
Successful exit from
SUSPEND mode
SLEEP
SLEEP must be raised
before SUSPEND is asserted
T0498-01
Figure 10. Coming Out of Suspend
Note that after exiting from the suspend state, ANT is in the power-up reset state. Any channel configurations
must be re-sent.
SYNCHRONOUS SERIAL INTERFACE
The synchronous serial interface may be configured as bit- or byte-synchronous, as defined in Table 1. To
ensure synchronization with the host MCU, the host should reset the CC257x by using the RESET pin. The
CC257x is ready to communicate within 100 ms after the reset is applied. If it is desired to ensure software
compatibility with other ANT chips that do not support the RESET pin, a synchronous reset may be issued
instead. A synchronous reset is depicted in Figure 11.
HOST MCU
tReset > 250μs
Normal
Transaction
Begins
ANT
HOST_MSG_READY
SMSGRDY
HOST_ENABLE
SEN
HOST_SRDY
SRDY
HOST_SCLK
SCLK
HOST_SIN
1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
HOST_SOUT
SOUT
SIN
ANT
Reset
READ FLAG
T0499-01
Figure 11. Synchronous Reset Timing
The synchronous reset may also be used in systems where it is not feasible to route a pin exclusively for reset,
thereby reducing the number of pins required to interface to ANT.
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BYTE-SYNCHRONOUS SERIAL INTERFACE
The byte-synchronous serial interface may be used in conjunction with an SPI (three-wire) peripheral on a host
MCU. Additional control lines are used to control the power states and flow of the data. The CC257x always acts
as the SPI master in the interface. To select the byte-synchronous serial interface, the PORTSEL pin must be set
to VCC and the SFLOW pin must be set to GND. This is illustrated in Figure 12.
1
C208
X3
C209
2
Vcc
C200
Vcc
Vcc
C203
C202
C211
31
AVDD6
32
XOSC32K_Q1
33
XOSC32K_Q2
34
EE_GND
PORTSEL
35
36
37
GND
38
GND
39
DVDD1
GND
25
24
Antenna
X207
X202
X208
23
XOSC_Q1
22
Vcc
Vcc
21
AVDD5
RESET
SUSPEND/SRDY
L203
L202
C205
C210
20
19
GND
EE_CLK
SLEEP/MRDY
18
11
C204
DVDD2
X200
XOSC_Q2
BR3/FAST SPI
17
10
L204
RF_P
BR1/SFLOW
16
9
EE_MOSI
8
X201
26
AVDD3
BR2/SCLK
EE_MISO
Vcc
RxD/SIN
15
7
X203
28
27
RF_N
U200
CC257X
GND
SIN
SCLK
AVDD1
TxD/SOUT
L204
29
AVDD4
AVDD2
14
Host MCU
6
30
R_BIAS
GND
13
5
SOUT
R200
GND
EE_CS
4
GND
RTS/SEN
3
GND
12
1
2
DCOUPL
40
C201
X1
SEN
1
MRDY
Host MCU
C206
SRDY
2
C207
RESET
Byte Synchronous Mode
S0506-01
Figure 12. Byte-Synchronous Serial Hardware Setup
The speed of the SPI clock can be set to either 500 kHz or 4 MHz by setting FAST SPI (pin 9) as specified in
Table 3.
Table 3. Byte-Synchronous Clock Speed Selection
FAST SPI (Pin 9)
16
SPI CLK Speed
HIGH
4 MHz
LOW
500 kHz
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aaa
The byte-synchronous protocol provides flow control at the byte level. If the host MCU has a message to send to
the CC257x, it first asserts the SMSGRDY signal to indicate a readiness to communicate. The CC257x responds
by asserting the SEN signal (if it is not already asserted). The host must then pulse the SRDY signal before each
byte is written or read. Note that the first byte is always sent to the host MCU to indicate if ANT is ready to
receive the message (0xA5), or if ANT has a message that it must send (0xA4). In the latter case, the host
should first read out the message from ANT before attempting to send its own message. All bits are sent
LSB-first. The timing for a host-to-ANT transaction is illustrated in Figure 13.
HOST MCU
ANT
MESSAGE_READY
SMSGRDY
SYNC_ENABLE
SEN
SRDY
SRDY
SCLK
SCLK
SIN
1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
SOUT
SIN
SOUT
READ FLAG
T0500-01
Figure 13. Synchronous ANT-to-Host Transaction
Whenever ANT has a message to send to the host, it asserts SEN to indicate a readiness to communicate. For
this reason, it is recommended that SEN be connected to an interrupt-capable pin on the host processor, so the
host can be woken up from a sleep state anytime ANT requires communication. An ANT-to-host serial
transaction is very similar to a host-to-ANT transaction. A timing diagram is shown in Figure 14. Once SEN is
detected to be asserted, the host pulses SRDY. The first byte received is 0xA4, indicating that ANT has a
message pending. Subsequent bytes are clocked out following each assertion of the SRDY signal.
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HOST MCU
ANT
MESSAGE_READY
SMSGRDY
SYNC_ENABLE
SEN
SRDY
SRDY
SCLK
SCLK
SIN
0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
SOUT
SIN
SOUT
WRITE FLAG
T0501-01
Figure 14. Synchronous Host-to-ANT Transaction
BIT-SYNCHRONOUS SERIAL INTERFACE
The bit synchronous serial protocol is designed to enable a host MCU to communicate with ANT using GPIO’s
only. The protocol on the host side can be implemented entirely in software, allowing the user to select a very
inexpensive MCU, or to dedicate peripherals to other devices in the system. The difference between the bit
synchronous and the byte synchronous protocol is that the bit synchronous protocol controls the flow of serial
information on a ‘per bit’ level as opposed to ‘per byte’. This means that the SRDY signal will need to be pulsed
for each bit that is to be transported. For this reason the bit synchronous serial protocol will generally be higher
power and lower data rate than the byte synchronous protocol. All other timing and characteristics are the same.
To enable bit synchronous serial communications both the PORTSEL and SFLOW pin should be tied to VCC.
See Figure 15 for hardware setup.
18
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1
C208
X3
C209
2
Vcc
C200
Vcc
Vcc
C203
C202
C211
31
AVDD6
32
XOSC32K_Q1
33
XOSC32K_Q2
34
EE_GND
35
GND
36
PORTSEL
37
GND
38
GND
39
DCOUPL
AVDD3
XOSC_Q2
AVDD5
L204
29
X203
28
X201
27
L203
26
X200
Antenna
L202
25
24
X207
X202
X208
23
22
Vcc
Vcc
21
RESET
SUSPEND/SRDY
GND
XOSC_Q1
30
C205
C210
20
19
18
17
DVDD2
EE_CLK
BR3/FAST SPI
SLEEP/MRDY
BR1/SFLOW
11
C204
RF_P
BR2/SCLK
16
10
RxD/SIN
EE_MOSI
9
RF_N
U200
CC257X
EE_MISO
8
TxD/SOUT
15
Vcc
AVDD2
GND
SCLK
7
AVDD4
GND
14
6
SIN
Host MCU
R_BIAS
AVDD1
13
5
SOUT
R200
GND
EE_CS
4
GND
RTS/SEN
3
GND
12
1
2
DVDD1
40
C201
X1
SEN
1
MRDY
Host MCU
2
C206
SRDY
C207
RESET
Bit Synchronous Mode
S0507-01
Figure 15. Bit-Synchronous Serial Hardware Setup
For a host-to-ANT transaction, the host must have the data ready on the SIN pin prior to the falling edge of the
clock prior to the SRDY pulse. This is illustrated in the figure below.
Host MCU
ANT
SCLK
SCLK
SRDY
SRDY
SOUT
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
SIN
T0502-01
Figure 16. Bit-Synchronous Flow Control
For an ANT-to-host transaction, the host must read the SOUT pin following the rising edge of the clock, which is
between the rising edge and the subsequent SRDY pulse. This is illustrated in Figure 17.
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Host MCU
ANT
SCLK
SCLK
SRDY
SRDY
SIN
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
Host
Read
SOUT
T0503-01
Figure 17. Bit Synchronous Read/Write Edge
ANT/HOST INTERFACE PROTOCOL
The host/ANT protocol consists of a simple command/response protocol. With the exception of the reset and
request commands, each message sent to ANT is followed by a response message. Data messages and
channel events are always sent to the host by ANT (there is no need or mechanism to request these messages
explicitly). The general package structure of the serial host/ANT interface is described in Figure 18 and Table 4.
SYNC
LENGTH
ID
DATA1
•••
DATAn
CHECKSUM
M0216-01
Figure 18. ANT Serial Message Structure
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Table 4. ANT Serial Message Format
Byte
Name
Length
Description
0
SYNC
1
Sync byte = 0xA4
1
LENGTH
1
Number of data bytes in message (n)
2
ID
1
Message identifier
3 to n + 2
DATA1–DATAn
n
Message data bytes
n+3
CHECKSUM
1
XOR of all previous bytes.
NOTE
Important: It should be noted that for the asynchronous serial mode, the SYNC byte is
always sent as part of the messages and is always 0xA4. For the synchronous serial
protocol, the SYNC byte is always sent by ANT and is 0xA4 for ANT-to-host transactions
and 0xA5 for host-to ANT-transactions.
For complete details on the ANT/host interface, see the ANT document ANT Message Protocol and Usage.
Table 5 is a list of the command set applicable to the CC257x. The Requested column indicates that the
message must be requested by the host. The Event column indicates that the message is sent by ANT to the
host without any request from the host—for example, after a channel event. The Reply column indicates that the
command elicits a response from ANT.
Table 5. ANT Serial Messages
Message (1)
Class
Config
messages
Notification
Control
Data
messages
Event
(1)
ID
Description
Reply
Requested
Event
UNASSIGN_CHANNEL_ID
0x41
Unassign a channel.
Yes
No
No
ASSIGN_CHANNEL_ID
0x42
Assign a channel.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_ID_ID
0x51
Set channel ID.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_MESG_PERIOD_ID
0x43
Set channel period.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_SEARCH_TIMEOUT_
ID
0x44
Set the channel-search time-out
period.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_RADIO_FREQ_ID
0x45
Set the channel RF frequency.
Yes
No
No
NETWORK_KEY_ID
0x46
Set the network key.
Yes
No
No
RADIO_TX_POWER_ID
0x47
Set the transmit power (all channels)
Yes
No
No
ID_LIST_ADD_ID
0x59
Add channel ID to search list.
Yes
No
No
ID_LIST_CONFIG_ID
0x5A
Configure search list.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_RADIO_TX_POWER_
ID
0x60
Set the channel transmit power.
Yes
No
No
SET_LP_SEARCH_TIMEOUT_ID
0x60
Set the low-priority search time-out.
Yes
No
No
RX_EXT_MESGS_ENABLE_ID
0x66
Enable extended messages.
Yes
No
No
AUTO_FREQ_CONFIG_ID
0x70
Configure frequency agility feature.
Yes
No
No
PROX_SEARCH_CONFIG_ID
0x71
Set proximity search.
Yes
No
No
STARTUP_MESG_ID
0x6F
Startup message (following reset).
No
No
Yes
SYSTEM_RESET_ID
0x4A
Reset system.
No
No
No
OPEN_CHANNEL_ID
0x4B
Open a channel.
Yes
No
No
CLOSE_CHANNEL_ID
0x4C
Close a channel.
Yes
No
No
OPEN_RX_SCAN_ID
0x5B
Open channel in scan mode.
Yes
No
No
REQUEST_ID
0x4D
Request a message from ANT.
–
No
No
BROADCAST_DATA_ID
0x4E
Broadcast message (ANT→host and
host→ANT).
No
No
Yes
ACKNOWLEDGED_DATA_ID
0x4F
Acknowledged message (ANT→host
and host→ANT).
No
No
Yes
BURST_DATA_ID
0x50
Burst message (ANT→host and
host→ANT).
No
No
Yes
RESPONSE_EVENT_ID
0x40
Channel event message.
–
No
Yes
Precede with MESG_
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Table 5. ANT Serial Messages (continued)
Class
Message
(1)
Reply
Requested
Event
0x52
ID
Reports the channel status.
–
Yes
No
CHANNEL_ID_ID
0x51
Reports the channel ID.
–
Yes
No
VERSION_ID
0x3E
Reports the ANT version.
–
Yes
No
CAPABILITIES_ID
0x54
Reports the capabilities.
–
Yes
No
RADIO_CW_INIT_ID
0x53
Initialize CW (continuous-wave) mode.
Yes
No
No
RADIO_CW_MODE_ID
0x48
Start CW mode.
Yes
No
No
CHANNEL_STATUS_ID
Response
messages
Test mode
Description
ANT/HOST INTERFACE PROTOCOL
The CC257x has ANT-FS client functionality embedded directly on the chip. This includes the over-the-air
ANT-FS protocol extension and the required file system utilities to manage stored data in non-volatile storage.
This allows the user to connect an EEPROM directly to the CC257x. Raw files can be sent and managed by the
CC257x and downloaded over ANT-FS as desired. The diagram below depicts how to connect an external
EEPROM to the CC257x. The connection is SPI. Note that only EEPROM (not flash) is supported.
Vcc
Vcc
Vcc
C300
0.1μF
R301
100kΩ
EE_CS
R302
100kΩ
EE_MISO
U301
Vcc
1
2
R304
100kΩ
3
4
S
VCC
Q
HOLD
W
C
Vss
D
8
7
6
EE_CLK
5
EE_MOSI
EEPROM M95XX
R303
100kΩ
EE_GND
EE_GND
S0508-01
Figure 19. EEPROM Hardware Setup
If an EEPROM is NOT used, all EEPROM signals should NC (non-connect). The file system and ANT-FS
protocol are managed by using an extended version of the ANT/host serial protocol. For complete details on how
to use this protocol, see the ANT document FS_ANTFS Serial Message.
The extended host/ANT interface uses a 2-byte message ID to identify FS and ANT-FS specific messages. The
packet structure is detailed in Figure 20 and Table 6.
SYNC
LENGTH
ID
DATA1
•••
DATAn
CHECKSUM
M0216-01
Figure 20. ANT Extended Serial Message Structure
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Table 6. ANT Extended Serial Message Format
Byte
Name
Length
Description
0
SYNC
1
Sync byte = 0xA4
1
LENGTH
1
Number of data bytes in message (n)
2
ID
2
Message identifier
3 to n + 2
DATA1–DATAn
n
Message data bytes
n+3
CHECKSUM
1
XOR of all previous bytes.
All extended message IDs begin with the top 3 MSBs set to 1 (0xE0). Note that responses and events for
ANT-FS also use the extended message ID format. A summary of FS and ANT-FS specific commands are listed
in the table below.
Table 7. FS/ANT-FS Specific Serial Messages
Class
MEMDev
commands
FS
commands
FS requests
(1)
(2)
(3)
Message
(1)
ID
Description
Reply
Requested
Event
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
EEPROM_INIT (2)
Initialize the EEPROM memory
0xE220
device.
INIT_MEMORY
0xE200
FORMAT_MEMORY
0xE201 Format memory.
DIRECTORY_SAVE
0xE207
Saves all open files to memory
device.
Yes
No
No
DIRECTORY_BUILD
0xE209
Rebuild FS directory and condense
directory size.
Yes
No
No
FILE_DELETE
0xE20C Delete existing open file.
Yes
No
No
FILE_CLOSE
0xE20D Close open flag or file.
Yes
No
No
FILE_SET_SPECIFIC_FLAGS
Update application-defined flags on
0xE212
file.
Yes
No
No
REQUEST_ID (3)
0xE100 Extended request message
–
No
No
GET_USED_SPACE
Returns the number of used bytes in
0xE202
FS in sector-sized increments.
–
Yes
No
GET_FREE_SPACE
0xE203
Return the number of free bytes in
sector-sized increments
–
Yes
No
FIND_FILE_INDEX
Returns the file index of first file in
0xE204 directory that matches specified
identifier.
–
Yes
No
DIRECTORY_READ_ABSOLUTE
Read from absolute offset into
0xE205 directory as if it were an ANT-FS
directory.
–
Yes
No
DIRECTORY_READ_ENTRY
Returns ANT-FS directory entry for
0xE206 the file matching the specified file
index.
–
Yes
No
DIRECTORY_GET_SIZE
0xE208
Return size in bytes of ANT-FS
directory.
–
Yes
No
FILE_CREATE
0xE20A
Allocates a free sector and saves
directory entry of new file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_OPEN
0xE20B Open an existing file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_READ_ABSOLUTE
0xE20E Read from absolute offset into a file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_READ_RELATIVE
Read from current read pointer in a
0xE20F
file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_WRITE_ABSOLUTE
0xE210 Write to absolute offset into a file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_WRITE_RELATIVE
0xE211 Write to current write pointer in a file.
–
Yes
No
FILE_GET_SIZE
0xE213 Return size of open file in bytes.
–
Yes
No
FILE_GET_SPECIFIC_FILE_
FLAGS
0xE214 Returns specific flags of open file.
–
Yes
No
Initializes the FS on the memory
device. Saved memory preserved.
Unless otherwise specified, precede with MESG_FS_
Precede with MESG_MEMDEV_
Precede with MESG_EXT_
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SWRS095A – FEBRUARY 2011 – REVISED MARCH 2011
www.ti.com
Table 7. FS/ANT-FS Specific Serial Messages (continued)
Message (1)
Class
FS crypto
commands
ANT-FS
commands
ANT-FS
requests
ANT-FS
events
ID
Description
Reply
Requested
Event
Yes
No
No
Specify stored user key to be used by
FS encryption/decryption process.
Yes
No
No
Specify non-user key to be used by
FS encryption/decryption process
Yes
No
No
0xE231 Opens ANT-FS beacon.
Yes
No
No
0xE232 Closes ANT-FS beacon.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_CONFIG_BEACON
0xE233 Configure ANT-FS beacon.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_SET_AUTH_STRING
0xE234 Set authentication string.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_SET_BEACON_STATE
0xE235 Set beacon state.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_PAIR_RESPONSE
0xE236 Respond to pairing request.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_SET_LINK_FREQ
0xE237 Set Link state RF frequency.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_SET_BEACON_
TIMEOUT
0xE238 Set beacon timeout.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_SET_PAIRING_
TIMEOUT
0xE239 Set pairing timeout.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_REMOTE_FILE_
CREATE_EN
0xE23A Enable creation of remote file.
Yes
No
No
SYSTEM_TIME
0xE23D Set system time.
Yes
No
No
ANTFS_GET_CMD_PIPE
0xE23B Get commands from command pipe.
–
Yes
No
ANTFS_SET_CMD_PIPE
0xE23C Write command to command pipe.
–
Yes
No
SYSTEM_TIME
0xE23D Request system time.
–
Yes
No
RESPONSE_ID
Extended event message with
0xE000 payload. See table xx for list of
ANT-FS events.
–
No
Yes
CRYPTO_ADD_USER_KEY_
INDEX
Adds specified user key to be stored
0xE245
in internal memory.
CRYPTO_SET_USER_KEY_
INDEX
0xE246
CRYPTO_SET_USER_KEY_VAL
0xE247
ANTFS_OPEN
ANTFS_CLOSE
ANT-FS generates events to mark important occurrences during the ANT-FS transaction. These events are
delivered to the host using the 0xE000 message. It is not necessary to request this message; rather, events are
generated and sent by ANT to the host as required. The table below summarizes the ANT-FS events.
Table 8. ANT-FS Event Messages
Event
(1)
Code
Description
PAIR_REQUEST
0x01
A pairing request has been received from the ANT-FS Host.
DOWNLOAD_START
0x02
The download of a file was started by an ANT-FS Host.
UPLOAD_START
0x03
The upload of a file by an ANT-FS Host has started.
DOWNLOAD_COMPLETE
0x04
The download of a file by an ANT-FS Host has completed.
UPLOAD_COMPLETE
0x05
The upload of a file from an ANT-FS Host has completed.
ERASE_COMPLETE
0x06
The erase of a file has been completed.
LINK_STATE
0x07
The ANT-FS client has entered the LINK state.
AUTH_STATE
0x08
The ANT-FS client has entered the AUTH state.
TRANSPORT_STATE
0x09
The ANT-FS client has entered the TRANSPORT state.
CMD_RECEIVED
0x0A
A command was received on the command pipe.
CMD_PROCESSED
0x0B
A command was received and processed on the command pipe.
(1)
24
Precede with MESG_FS_ANTFS_EVENT_
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The general procedure for configuring an ANT-FS channel is as follows:
1. Set network as usual.
2. Assign a master channel and set the channel ID for each desired beacon.
3. Send beacon configuration message (0xE233).
4. Set authentication strings if desired (0xE234). The default is no friendly name and no passkey.
5. Set beacon time-out (0xE238) and pairing timeout (0xE239), if desired. The default settings are 10s and
240s, respectively.
6. Set a link beacon frequency message (0xE237) for each beacon channel. A beacon channel can be disabled
by setting the beacon frequency to 0xFF.
7. Start the session by sending the open ANT-FS message (0xE231).
8. Once an ANT-FS host connects, an AUTH_EVENT on the corresponding channel occurs. At this point, all
other beacons are broadcasting a beacon indicating the BUSY state.
9. If a pairing request occurs (event 0x01), it can be accepted or rejected by sending a pairing request
response (0xE236).
10. Once authentication passes, ANT-FS is in the TRANSPORT state. Events are generated as upload and
download requests are made by the host. The host MCU is also informed if command-pipe commands have
been received and whether or not they have been processed by the CC257x automatically.
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PACKAGE OPTION ADDENDUM
www.ti.com
5-Feb-2014
PACKAGING INFORMATION
Orderable Device
Status
(1)
Package Type Package Pins Package
Drawing
Qty
Eco Plan
Lead/Ball Finish
MSL Peak Temp
(2)
(6)
(3)
Op Temp (°C)
Device Marking
(4/5)
CC2570RHAR
ACTIVE
VQFN
RHA
40
2500
Green (RoHS
& no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-3-260C-168 HR
-40 to 85
CC2570
CC2570RHAT
ACTIVE
VQFN
RHA
40
250
Green (RoHS
& no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-3-260C-168 HR
-40 to 85
CC2570
CC2571RHAR
ACTIVE
VQFN
RHA
40
2500
Green (RoHS
& no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-3-260C-168 HR
-40 to 85
CC2571
CC2571RHAT
ACTIVE
VQFN
RHA
40
250
Green (RoHS
& no Sb/Br)
CU NIPDAU
Level-3-260C-168 HR
-40 to 85
CC2571
(1)
The marketing status values are defined as follows:
ACTIVE: Product device recommended for new designs.
LIFEBUY: TI has announced that the device will be discontinued, and a lifetime-buy period is in effect.
NRND: Not recommended for new designs. Device is in production to support existing customers, but TI does not recommend using this part in a new design.
PREVIEW: Device has been announced but is not in production. Samples may or may not be available.
OBSOLETE: TI has discontinued the production of the device.
(2)
Eco Plan - The planned eco-friendly classification: Pb-Free (RoHS), Pb-Free (RoHS Exempt), or Green (RoHS & no Sb/Br) - please check http://www.ti.com/productcontent for the latest availability
information and additional product content details.
TBD: The Pb-Free/Green conversion plan has not been defined.
Pb-Free (RoHS): TI's terms "Lead-Free" or "Pb-Free" mean semiconductor products that are compatible with the current RoHS requirements for all 6 substances, including the requirement that
lead not exceed 0.1% by weight in homogeneous materials. Where designed to be soldered at high temperatures, TI Pb-Free products are suitable for use in specified lead-free processes.
Pb-Free (RoHS Exempt): This component has a RoHS exemption for either 1) lead-based flip-chip solder bumps used between the die and package, or 2) lead-based die adhesive used between
the die and leadframe. The component is otherwise considered Pb-Free (RoHS compatible) as defined above.
Green (RoHS & no Sb/Br): TI defines "Green" to mean Pb-Free (RoHS compatible), and free of Bromine (Br) and Antimony (Sb) based flame retardants (Br or Sb do not exceed 0.1% by weight
in homogeneous material)
(3)
MSL, Peak Temp. - The Moisture Sensitivity Level rating according to the JEDEC industry standard classifications, and peak solder temperature.
(4)
There may be additional marking, which relates to the logo, the lot trace code information, or the environmental category on the device.
(5)
Multiple Device Markings will be inside parentheses. Only one Device Marking contained in parentheses and separated by a "~" will appear on a device. If a line is indented then it is a continuation
of the previous line and the two combined represent the entire Device Marking for that device.
(6)
Lead/Ball Finish - Orderable Devices may have multiple material finish options. Finish options are separated by a vertical ruled line. Lead/Ball Finish values may wrap to two lines if the finish
value exceeds the maximum column width.
Addendum-Page 1
Samples
PACKAGE OPTION ADDENDUM
www.ti.com
5-Feb-2014
Important Information and Disclaimer:The information provided on this page represents TI's knowledge and belief as of the date that it is provided. TI bases its knowledge and belief on information
provided by third parties, and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of such information. Efforts are underway to better integrate information from third parties. TI has taken and
continues to take reasonable steps to provide representative and accurate information but may not have conducted destructive testing or chemical analysis on incoming materials and chemicals.
TI and TI suppliers consider certain information to be proprietary, and thus CAS numbers and other limited information may not be available for release.
In no event shall TI's liability arising out of such information exceed the total purchase price of the TI part(s) at issue in this document sold by TI to Customer on an annual basis.
Addendum-Page 2
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