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Texas Instruments CC3220 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® LaunchPad™ Development Kit Hardware (Rev. B) User guides
User's Guide
SWRU463B – February 2017 – Revised August 2018
CC3220 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® LaunchPad™ Development
Kit Hardware
The CC3220 device is part of the SimpleLink™ microcontroller (MCU) platform which consists of Wi-Fi®,
Bluetooth® low energy, Sub-1 GHz and host MCUs. All share a common, easy-to-use development
environment with a single core software development kit (SDK) and rich tool set. A one-time integration of
the SimpleLink platform lets you add any combination of devices from the portfolio into your design. The
ultimate goal of the SimpleLink platform is to achieve 100 percent code reuse when your design
requirements change. For more information, visit www.ti.com/simplelink.
The CC3220 SimpleLink LaunchPad™ Development Kit (CC3220-LAUNCHXL) is a low-cost evaluation
platform for ARM® Cortex®-M4-based MCUs. The LaunchPad design highlights the CC3220 Internet-on-a
chip™ solution and Wi-Fi capabilities. The CC3220 LaunchPad also features temperature and
accelerometer sensors, programmable user buttons, three LEDs for custom applications, and onboard
emulation for debugging. The stackable headers of the CC3220 LaunchPad XL interface demonstrate how
easy it is to expand the functionality of the LaunchPad when interfacing with other peripherals on many
existing BoosterPack™ Plug-in Module add-on boards, such as graphical displays, audio codecs, antenna
selection, environmental sensing, and more.
Figure 1 shows the CC3220 LaunchPad development kit.
Figure 1. CC3220 SimpleLink Wi-Fi LaunchPad Development Kit
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1
2
3
4
Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3
Hardware Description ....................................................................................................... 6
Development Environment Requirements .............................................................................. 26
Additional Resources ...................................................................................................... 26
List of Figures
..............................................................
1
CC3220 SimpleLink Wi-Fi LaunchPad Development Kit
2
WEEE Statement ............................................................................................................ 3
3
CC3220 LaunchPad™ EVM Overview
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1
................................................................................... 6
CC3220 Block Diagram ..................................................................................................... 7
Pin 1 Marking on CC3220LP (3V3 Tag) .................................................................................. 8
XDS-110 Debug Probe ..................................................................................................... 9
Default Jumper Configuration for JTAG Lines ........................................................................... 9
JTAG IN Connector (J8)................................................................................................... 10
XDS110 OUT Connector (J4) ............................................................................................ 11
I2C Bus Connections ....................................................................................................... 12
Power Jumpers J14, J21, J20, J19, J17, and J18 ..................................................................... 13
SOP Jumpers (Default Setting Shown) ................................................................................. 15
UART Routed to USB COM Port......................................................................................... 16
UART Routed to 20-Pin Header Connector ............................................................................ 16
CC3220 BoosterPack Header Pin Assignments ....................................................................... 18
Powering From USB Jumper Settings ................................................................................... 19
Powering the CC3220LP From Battery ................................................................................. 20
Only CC3220 and Serial Flash Powered by Battery................................................................... 21
Low-Current Measurement (<1 mA) ..................................................................................... 22
Active Power Measurements (>1 mA) ................................................................................... 23
Using Onboard Antenna (Default Condition) ........................................................................... 24
Board Modified for External Antenna Connections .................................................................... 24
CC3220x LaunchPad Top-Layer Assembly Drawing .................................................................. 25
CC3220 SimpleLink™ Academy ........................................................................................ 27
List of Tables
1
JTAG Header Pin Definitions ............................................................................................. 10
2
I2C Jumper Definitions ..................................................................................................... 12
3
Default I2C Addresses (of Onboard Sensors)
4
Jumper Settings for LaunchPad Power ................................................................................. 13
5
External Supply Connections and LED Enable Jumper............................................................... 14
6
Reset Pullup Jumper....................................................................................................... 14
7
SOP[2:0] (J13 on LaunchPad)............................................................................................ 15
8
Push-Button Definitions
9
LED Indicators .............................................................................................................. 17
..........................................................................
...................................................................................................
12
17
Trademarks
SimpleLink, LaunchPad, Internet-on-a chip, BoosterPack, Code Composer Studio, Tiva are trademarks of
Texas Instruments.
ARM, Cortex are registered trademarks of ARM Limited.
Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG.
IAR Embedded Workbench is a registered trademark of IAR Systems AB.
Wi-Fi is a registered trademark of Wi-Fi Alliance.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
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Introduction
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1
Introduction
1.1
CC3220 LaunchPad™
Created for the Internet of Things (IoT), the SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3220 device is a single-chip
microcontroller (MCU) with built-in Wi-Fi connectivity for the LaunchPad ecosystem, which integrates a
high-performance ARM Cortex-M4 MCU and lets customers develop an entire application with one device.
With on-chip Wi-Fi, Internet, and robust security protocols, no prior Wi-Fi experience is required for fast
development.
The CC3220 LaunchPad, referred to by its part number CC3220-LAUNCHXL, is a low-cost evaluation
platform for ARM Cortex-M4-based MCUs. The LaunchPad design highlights the CC3220 Internet-on-a
chip solution and Wi-Fi capabilities. The CC3220 LaunchPad also features temperature and accelerometer
sensors, programmable user buttons, three LEDs for custom applications, and onboard emulation for
debugging. The stackable headers of the CC3220 LaunchPad XL interface demonstrate how easy it is to
expand the functionality of the LaunchPad when interfacing with other peripherals on many existing
BoosterPack add-on boards, such as graphical displays, audio codecs, antenna selection, environmental
sensing, and more. Figure 3 shows the CC3220 LaunchPad. There are two variants of the LaunchPad:
the CC3220S-LAUNCHXL and the CC3220SF-LAUNCHXL. This user's guide applies to both variants, and
any differences are pointed out in relevant sections.
Multiple development environment tools are also available, including TI’s Eclipse-based Code Composer
Studio™ (CCS) integrated development environment (IDE) and IAR Embedded Workbench®. More
information about the LaunchPad, the supported BoosterPack modules, and the available resources can
be found at TI’s LaunchPad portal. Also visit the CC3220 Wiki page for design resources and example
projects.
NOTE: The maximum RF power transmitted in each WLAN 2.4-GHz band is 17.5 dBM (EIRP
power).
NOTE: The antennas used for this transmitter must be installed to provide a separation distance of
at least 20 cm from all persons, and must not be colocated or operating in conjunction with
any other antenna or transmitter.
NOTE: All figures and references in this document apply to RevA and RevB. Most of the document
also applies to higher revisions, unless otherwise stated. For the exact list of changes made
across board revisions, see the Revision History.
Figure 2. WEEE Statement
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Introduction
1.2
Key Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.3
CC3220S/SF, SimpleLink Wi-Fi, Internet-on-a chip solution with integrated MCU
40-pin LaunchPad standard that leverages the BoosterPack ecosystem
XDS110-based JTAG emulation with serial port for flash programming
Two buttons and three LEDs for user interaction
Back-channel universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) through USB to PC
Onboard chip antenna with U.FL for conducted testing
Onboard accelerometer and temperature sensor for Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE)
Micro USB connector for power and debug connections
What's Included
1.3.1
Kit Contents
•
•
•
1.3.2
CC3220 LaunchPad development tool (CC3220S-LAUNCHXL or CC3220SF-LAUNCHXL)
Micro USB cable
Quick start guide
Software Examples
•
1.4
www.ti.com
Out-of-Box Software
Regulatory Compliance
The SimpleLink CC3220 Wi-Fi LaunchPad is tested for and found to be in compliance with FCC and ISED
regulations regarding unlicensed intentional radiators.
Hereby, Texas Instruments Inc. declares that the radio equipment type CC3220S-LAUNCHXL and
CC3220SF-LAUNCHXL are in compliance with Directive 2014/53/EU. The full text of the EU declaration of
conformity is available at the following internet addresses:
• CC3220S-LAUNCHXL
• CC3220SF-LAUNCHXL
1.5
First Steps: Out-of-Box Experience
An easy way to get started with the EVM is by using its preprogrammed out-of-box code. It demonstrates
some key features of the EVM.
1.5.1
Connecting to the Computer
Connect the LaunchPad development kit by connecting the included USB cable to a computer. A red
power LED should illuminate. For proper operation, the SimpleLink drivers and Service Pack from the
CC3220 Software Development Kit (SDK) are needed. The SDK is available at
www.ti.com/tool/SIMPLELINK-CC3220-SDK.
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1.5.2
Running the Out-of-Box Experience
The CC3220 LaunchPad development kit's Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE) demonstrates and highlights
the following features:
• Easy connection to the CC3220 LaunchPad:
– Using the SimpleLink Wi-Fi Starter Pro application (available on iOS and Android™), users can use
Access Point (AP) provisioning or SmartConfig™ provisioning for a fast CC3220 connection.
– Configuring the device in AP mode gives users a direct connection to the CC3220 LaunchPad.
Once the device is provisioned and connected to an AP in station mode, the profile is stored on the
local file system so that any reset to the CC3220 automatically connects it to the AP.
• Easy access to the CC3220 through its internal web server, using either:
– The SimpleLink Wi-Fi Starter Pro application
– Any browser; web pages stored on the serial flash are loaded on the browser, to provide ease of
use.
This feature demonstrates configuring and reading onboard sensors.
• Over-The-Air (OTA) updates that demonstrate an update of a full image. OTA service enables insystem updates of the MCU application, CC3220 firmware releases (Service Pack) made available by
TI, and other vendor files. An update procedure executed in a full-system integrity fashion, such as
failure to upgrade any image components, results in rolling back to the previous valid version.
See the CC3220 LaunchPad Out-of-Box User's Guide for more details on the Out-of-Box Experience.
1.6
Next Steps: Looking into the Provided Code
After the EVM features have been explored, the user can open an integrated development environment
and start editing the code examples from the SDK. See Section 4.3 for available IDEs and where to
download them. The Out-of-Box source code and more code examples are provided in the CC3220 SDK.
Code is licensed under BSD, and TI encourages reuse and modifications to fit specific needs.
With the onboard XDS110 debug probe, debugging and downloading new code is simple. A USB
connection between the EVM and a PC through the provided USB cable is all that is needed.
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Hardware Description
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Hardware Description
Figure 3 shows the CC3220 LaunchPad EVM.
Figure 3. CC3220 LaunchPad™ EVM Overview
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2.1
Block Diagram
Figure 4 shows the CC3220 block diagram.
U. FL
Filter
USB
Conn
Acceleration
Sensor
BMA222
5V
INT (GPIO13)
I2C
JTAG/SWD
XDS110 JTAG
Debug Probe
UART (Flashing/Log)
S-Flash
32Mbit
40-MHz XTAL
5V
CC3220
32.768-kHz XTAL
VCC
3.3-V LDO
2× AA Battery
Conn
Temp Sensor
TMP006
Push Buttons
LEDs
GPIO 13, 22 GPIO 9,10,11
Reverse
Protection
2× 20 Launchpad Headers
(Compatible with TI MCU Std)
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Figure 4. CC3220 Block Diagram
2.2
Hardware Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CC3220S/SF, SimpleLink Wi-Fi, Internet-on-a chip solution with integrated MCU
40-pin LaunchPad standard that leverages the BoosterPack ecosystem
TI Standard XDS110-based JTAG emulation with serial port for flash programming
Supports both 4-wire JTAG and 2-wire SWD
Two buttons and three LEDs for user interaction
Back-channel universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) through USB to PC
Onboard chip antenna with U.FL for conducted testing selectable using 0-Ω resistors
Onboard accelerometer and temperature sensor for Out-of-Box Experience, with option to isolate them
from the inter-integrated circuit (I2C) bus
Micro USB connector for power and debug connections
Headers for current measurement and external JTAG connection with an option to use the onboard
XDS110 to debug customer platforms
Bus-powered device, with no external power required for Wi-Fi
Long-range transmission with a highly optimized antenna (200-meter typical in open air with a 6-dBi
antenna AP)
Can be powered externally, working down to 2.3 V (typical)
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Hardware Description
2.3
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Connecting a BoosterPack™
A compatible BoosterPack can be stacked on top of the LaunchPad using the 2-pin × 20-pin connectors.
The connectors do not have a key to prevent the misalignment of the pins or reverse connection.
Ensure that the VCC and 5-V pins are aligned with the BoosterPack module header pins. On the CC3220
LaunchPad, a small white 3V3 tag symbol is provided near pin 1 (see Figure 5) to orient all BoosterPack
modules. This same marking, provided on compatible BoosterPack modules, must be aligned before
powering up the boards.
Figure 5. Pin 1 Marking on CC3220LP (3V3 Tag)
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2.4
XDS110-Based JTAG Emulator
To keep development easy and cost effective, TI's LaunchPad development kits integrate an onboard
debug probe, which eliminates the need for expensive programmers. The CC3220 LaunchPad has the
XDS-110-based debug probe (see Figure 6), which is a simple and low-cost debugger that supports
nearly all TI Arm device derivatives.
Figure 6. XDS-110 Debug Probe
2.5
2.5.1
Wired Connections, Jumper Settings, Buttons, and LEDs
JTAG Headers
The headers are provided on the board to isolate the CC3220 device from the onboard XDS110-based
JTAG emulator. These jumpers are shorted by default when the board is shipped from TI. Figure 7 and
Table 1 are for default configurations, and Figure 8 shows the external emulator connection.
Figure 7. Default Jumper Configuration for JTAG Lines
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Table 1. JTAG Header Pin Definitions
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B) (1)
Use
(2)
J8 (TCK)
JTAG / SWD
J3 (TMS) (2)
J8 (TMS)
JTAG / SWD
J3 (TDI)
J8 (TDI)
JTAG
J3(TDO)
J8 (TDO)
JTAG
J3 (TCK)
(1)
(2)
Comments
Jumpers populated: onboard emulator connected
Jumpers not populated: onboard emulator disconnected
The only difference between Rev. A and Rev. B are the reference designators on the board.
For SWD mode, the TCK and TMS headers must be shorted.
To connect an external emulator, remove these jumpers and place the external emulator on the JTAG IN
connector.
Figure 8. JTAG IN Connector (J8)
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2.5.2
Using the XDS110 Debug Probe With a Different Target
The XDS110 debug probe on the LaunchPad development kit can interface to most Arm Cortex-M
devices, not just the onboard target CC3220 device. This functionality is enabled by the J4 10-pin CortexM JTAG connector (See Figure 9) and a 10-pin cable, such as the FFSD-05-D-06.00-01-N (sold
separately from the LaunchPad development kit).
Figure 9. XDS110 OUT Connector (J4)
Header J4 follows the Cortex-M Arm standard; however, pin 1 is not a voltage sense pin. The XDS110
outputs only 3.3-V JTAG signals. If another voltage level is needed, the user must provide level shifters to
translate the JTAG signal voltages.
1. Remove jumpers on the JTAG signals on the isolation block, including RST, TMS, TCK, TDO, and TDI.
2. Plug the 10-pin cable into J4, and connect to an external target.
a. J4 follows the Arm Cortex Debug Connector standard outlined in Cortex-M Debug Connectors.
3. Plug USB power into the LaunchPad development kit, or power it externally.
a. JTAG levels are 3.3-V ONLY
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I2C Connections
2.5.3
The board features an accelerometer and a temperature sensor for the out-of-box demo. These are
connected to the I2C bus, and can be isolated using the jumpers provided (shown as yellow jumpers J15
and J16 in Figure 10).
Figure 10. I2C Bus Connections
By removing J15 and J16, the accelerometer and the temperature sensors are isolated from the I2C bus.
This measure also removes the I2C pullup resistors from the sensor side of the circuit, and therefore any
connection to the circuit requires the user to install external pullup resistors.
Table 2 lists the I2C jumper definitions.
Table 2. I2C Jumper Definitions
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B)
J16
J2
Use
I2C SDA
Comments
Populated: CC3220 SDA connected to onboard sensors with
pullup
Open: CC3220 SDA disconnected from onboard sensors
J15
J3
I2C SCL
Populated: CC3220 SCL connected to onboard sensors with
pullup
Open: CC3220 SCL disconnected from onboard sensors
2.5.3.1
Default I2C Addresses
Table 3 lists the default I2C addresses of the onboard sensors.
Table 3. Default I2C Addresses (of Onboard Sensors)
Reference Designator
on LP (Rev. A)
Reference Designator
on LP (Rev. B)
Part Number
(Manufacturer)
Default Slave
Address (Hex)
Temperature (MEMS
IR Thermopile)
U10
U6
TMP006 (TI)
0x41
Accelerometer
(Triaxial)
U11
U10
BMA222E (Bosch)
0x18
Sensor Type
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2.5.4
Power Connections
The board can be powered by using the onboard micro USB connector. An onboard DC-DC converter
provides 3.3 V for the CC3220 and the rest of the board to operate. This supply can be isolated from the
DC-DC using the jumpers on the board. See the yellow jumpers in Figure 11.
Figure 11. Power Jumpers J14, J21, J20, J19, J17, and J18
NOTE: The blue jumpers in Figure 11 are previously discussed (see Section 2.5.1) and are
populated by default. Figure 11 does not show unpopulated jumpers (which would be
populated normally).
Table 4 lists the jumper settings for the LaunchPad power.
Table 4. Jumper Settings for LaunchPad Power
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B)
Use
Comments
If the jumper is uninstalled, the power supply to the
OPAMP is cut off. This can be used to enable low-current
measurements. Ensure that this jumper is on to use the
OPAMP to drive the input to the ADC. The reference
voltage of the ADC is 1.47 V, so up to 3.48 V can be
applied to the input of the OPAMP. For the configuration
of the OPAMP, see the CC3220 LaunchPad Design Files.
J14
J5
OPAMP EN
J21
J10
GND
J20
J29
+5 VDC power
jumper
Connects J19, +5 VDC to emulator section
J19
J12
Current
measurement
Measures the current flowing into the CC3220 device and
the serial flash.
J17
J13
Board power
Short: Supply the board power from the onboard DC-DC
converter. The board power includes the sensors, LED,
and the OPAMP used to drive the ADC input.
J18
J28
VSENSE
Used to power the level shifters on the emulator side of
the board. The level shifters can be powered by shorting
this jumper. Removing this jumper enables low-current
measurement.
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The board can be powered by an external supply when USB power is not available, by using either J22 or
J23. J24 is also available to remove any current draw from LEDs being driven by the GPIOs, see Table 5.
Table 5. External Supply Connections and LED Enable Jumper
2.5.5
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B)
Use
Comments
J19
J12
Alternative 3.3-V
power input
Can be used to power the board from an external 3.3-V
supply; this can be used to test the VBAT voltage range as
the reverse voltage protection diode on J22 drops the input
by approximately 150 mV.
J23
J19
5-V power input
Used to power the board from an external 5-V supply.
J22
J20
J24
J9
Used to power the board from an external 3.3-V supply. J22
3.3-V power input has built-in reverse voltage protection to prevent the battery
from being plugged in the reverse manner.
LED EN
If uninstalled, the LEDs connected to the GPIO are
disabled; this can be used to enable low-power
measurements.
Reset Pullup Jumper
Table 6 lists the reset pullup jumper.
Table 6. Reset Pullup Jumper
14
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B)
Use
J9
J26
RESET pullup
CC3220 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® LaunchPad™ Development Kit Hardware
Comments
Install this jumper to enable the pullup resistor on the
nRESET pin of the device, when the board is powered from
an external supply.
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2.5.6
Sense on Power (SOP)
The CC3220 can be set to operate in four different modes, based on the state of the sense-on-power
(SOP) lines. These SOP lines are pins 21, 34, and 35 on the CC3220 device. Table 7 describes the state
of the device, and Figure 12 shows the SOP jumpers.
Table 7. SOP[2:0] (J13 on LaunchPad)
Binary
Value
Function
000
Functional mode and 4-wire JTAG
001
Functional mode and 2-wire JTAG
010
Functional mode and flash programming
011
Factory default
100
Flash programming
Figure 12. SOP Jumpers (Default Setting Shown)
NOTE: SOP[2:0] corresponds to J13 in the LaunchPad schematic design.
NOTE: No jumpers on the block ensure that the line is pulled low using 100-kΩ pulldown resistors.
Placing the jumper pulls the pin high using a 270-Ω resistor.
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UART Signals
The board supports a USB-based virtual COM port, using the Tiva™ ARM® MCU. The LaunchPad is
shipped with the UART lines from the CC3220 connected to the UART on the Tiva MCU. The CC3220
UART can also be routed to the 20-pin connector for use as a GPIO or external UART. The selection is
performed using jumpers on the board.
Figure 13 shows the UART routed to USB COM port and Figure 14 shows the UART routed to 20-pin
header connector.
Figure 13. UART Routed to USB COM Port
Figure 14. UART Routed to 20-Pin Header Connector
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2.5.8
Push-Buttons and LED Indicators
Table 8 list the push-button definitions.
Table 8. Push-Button Definitions
Reference (Rev. A)
Reference (Rev. B)
Use
Comments
SW1
SW1
RESET
SW2
SW3
GPIO_13
When pushed, GPIO_13 is pulled to VCC.
SW3
SW2
GPIO_22
When pushed, GPIO_22 is pulled to VCC.
SW4
SW4
Factory default
This is used to reset the CC3220 device. This signal is also output
on the 20-pin connector to reset any external BoosterPack which
may be stacked. The reset can be isolated using the jumper block
at the center of the board.
Pressing this button and toggling RESET restores the factory
default image on the serial flash. This can be used to recover a
corrupted serial flash, provided the s-flash was programmed with a
recovery image.
Table 9 lists the LED indicators.
Table 9. LED Indicators
(1)
Reference
(Rev. A)
Reference
(Rev. B)
Color
Use
D1, D2
D2, D9
Green and
Red
Debug
D3
D1
Yellow
nRESET
D6
D8
Red
Factory Reset
D7
D4
Red
Power
D8
D5
Green
GPIO_11 (1)
On when the GPIO is logic-1.
(1)
On when the GPIO is logic-1.
D9
D6
Yellow
D10
D7
Red
GPIO_10
Comments
Indicates the state of the JTAG emulator. For TI use only.
Indicates the state of the nRESET pin. If this LED is on, the
device is functional.
Indicates that the push-button for the factory reset is pressed.
Indicates when the 3.3-V power is supplied to the board.
GPIO_09
On when the GPIO is logic-1.
GPIO_10 and GPIO_11 are also used as I2C. Thus, when the pullup resistors are enabled, the LEDs are on by default, without
configuring the GPIOs.
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BoosterPack Header Pin Assignment
The TI BoosterPack header pinout specification is at Build Your Own BoosterPack. Also see the BoosterPack Pinout Standard.
The CC3220 LaunchPad follows this standard, with the exception of naming. (P1:P4 is used instead of J1:J4.) See Figure 15 for CC3220 pinmapping assignments and functions.
J1
J2
+3.3 V
58
ANALOG_IN
4
UART_RX
3
UART_TX
GND
GPIO_03 *
GPIO_28
GPIO
GPIO_13
GPIO_17
SPI CS Wls.
8
GPIO_12
GPIO_31
GPIO
45
7
18
61
GPIO
GPIO_06
RST
59
ADC_CH2
GPIO_04 *
GPIO_16
MOSI
5
SPI_CLK
GPIO_14 *
GPIO_15
MISO
6
62
GPIO
GPIO_07
GPIO_25
MOSI
21
1
12C SCL
GPIO_10
GPIO_01
MISO
55
2
12C SDA
GPIO_11
GPIO_22
GPIO
15
CC3220
Wi-Fi
NWP
+5 V
OUT
PWM
GND
OUT
PWM
1
NA
PWM
17
2
57
ANALOG_IN
GPIO_02
60
ANALOG_IN
GPIO_05
IN
PWM
64
58
ANALOG_IN
GPIO_03
OUT
CCAP
21
59
ANALOG_IN
GPIO_04
NA
CCAP/GPIO
18
63
I2C WS
GPIO_08
OUT
GPIO
62
53
12S SCLK
GPIO_30
OUT
GPIO
60
64
I2S SDout
GPIO_09
IN
GPIO
16
50
12S SDin
GPIO_00
GPIO_24
GPIO
17
J3
J4
Copyright © 2017, Texas Instruments Incorporated
Figure 15. CC3220 BoosterPack Header Pin Assignments
NOTE: RESET output is an open-drain-type output and can only drive the pin low. The pullup ensures that the line is pulled back high when the
button is released. No external BoosterPack can drive this pin low.
All the signals are referred to by the pin number in the SDK; Figure 15 shows the default mappings. Some of the pins are repeated across the
connector. For instance, pin 62 is available on P1 and P4, but only P1 is connected by default. The signal on P4 is marked with an asterisk (*) to
signify that it is not connected by default. The signal can be routed to the pin by using a 0-Ω resistor in the path. For the exact resistor placement,
see the CC3220 SimpleLink Wi-Fi Wireless MCU LaunchPad Board Design Files.
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2.6
2.6.1
Power
USB Power
The LaunchPad is designed to work from the USB-provided power supply. The LaunchPad provides
addresses as a bus-powered device on the computer. To power the CC3220 device from the USB, the
jumpers must be placed on the following headers, as shown in Figure 16.
Figure 16. Powering From USB Jumper Settings
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Hardware Description
2.6.2
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Battery Power
The LaunchPad can also be powered from an external battery pack by feeding the voltage on the J22
header. This input features reverse voltage protection to ensure that the board is not damaged due to an
accidental reverse voltage. Perform the following steps before using the board with a battery. The board
would appear as shown in Figure 17.
1. Remove the USB cable.
2. Plug in the battery pack on J22 with the correct polarity.
3. Ensure that a jumper is placed on RST_PU (J9) of the LaunchPad.
4. Connect a jumper across J17 and J19. This is done to supply board power from the battery.
Figure 17. Powering the CC3220LP From Battery
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2.6.3
Battery Powering Only the CC3220 and U8 (Onboard Serial Flash)
In some cases, there may be a requirement to power only the CC3220 and the serial flash from the
battery. The usage may not require LEDs, OPAMP for the ADC, and the sensors. In this case, the other
sections can be powered off by removing the appropriate jumpers. Ensure that a jumper is placed on
RST_PU (J9) of the LaunchPad. The board would appear as shown in Figure 18.
Figure 18. Only CC3220 and Serial Flash Powered by Battery
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Hardware Description
2.7
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Isolated Current Measurement of the CC3220
To measure the current draw of the CC3220 when powering with a USB cable, use the VBAT jumper on
the jumper isolation block (J19). The current measured in this mode includes only the CC3220 current and
the serial flash current, and no external blocks. However, if a GPIO of the CC3220 is driving a high-current
load such as an LED, then that is also included in this measurement.
2.7.1
Low-Current Measurement With USB Power (< 1 mA)
To measure the current draw of the CC3220 MCU and serial flash using a ammeter, use the VBAT jumper
on the isolation block. Follow these steps to measure ultra-low power operation of the CC3220:
1. Remove the VBAT jumper (J19) in the isolation block; attach an ammeter across this jumper, as shown
in Figure 19.
2. Consider the effect that the backchannel UART and any circuitry attached to the CC3220 may have on
current draw. Considering disconnecting these at the isolation jumper block, or at least consider their
sinking and sourcing capability in the final measurement. The CC3220 device should not drive any
high-current loads directly (such as an LED) because this can draw a large current.
Figure 19. Low-Current Measurement (<1 mA)
3. Ensure that there are no floating inputs/outputs (I/Os) on the CC3220. These cause unnecessary extra
current draw. Every I/O should either be driven out or, if it is an input, should be pulled or driven to a
high or low level.
4. Begin target execution and set the device to low-power modes (LPDS or hibernate).
5. Measure the current. If the current levels are fluctuating, it may be difficult to get a stable
measurement. It is easier to measure quiescent states.
More information on how to experience the low-power modes and test cases of the CC3220 LaunchPad
can be found in the CC3120, CC3220 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® Internet-on-a chip™ Networking Subsystem
Power Management (see the Power Measurement Guide section).
NOTE: Placing the CC3220 device in shutdown mode causes an approximately 33-μA leak into the
pull-up resistor (R136) on the nRESET pin. This pull-up resistor must also be removed to
measure the total current below 1 µA in shutdown mode.
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2.7.2
Active Power Measurements (>1 mA)
Follow these steps to measure active operation of the CC3220:
1. Remove the VBAT jumper (J19).
2. Solder a 0.1-Ω resistor on a wire, which can be connected to an oscilloscope, as shown in Figure 20.
Or, attach a jumper wire between J19 so that it can be used with a current probe.
Figure 20. Active Power Measurements (>1 mA)
3. Measure the voltage across the resistor using an oscilloscope with a differential probe. (For the current
probe, coil the wire around the sensor multiple times for good sensitivity.) An ammeter can also be
used for this measurement, but the results may be erroneous due to the switching nature of the
current.
More information on how to experience the low-power modes and test cases of the CC3220 LaunchPad
can be found in the CC3120, CC3220 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® Internet-on-a chip™ Networking Subsystem
Power Management (see the Power Measurement Guide section).
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Hardware Description
2.8
2.8.1
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RF Connections
AP Connection Testing
By default, the board ships with the RF signals routed to the onboard chip antenna, as shown in
Figure 21.
Figure 21. Using Onboard Antenna (Default Condition)
A miniature UMC connector (Murata MM8030-2610) provides a way to test in the lab using a compatible
cable. Alternately, for testing the conducted measurement a U.FL connector is provided on the board. A
rework must be performed before this connector can be used; this involves swapping the position of a
resistor. The modified board would appear as in Figure 22.
Figure 22. Board Modified for External Antenna Connections
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2.9
Assembly Drawing
Figure 23 shows the top layer assembly drawing of the CC3220x LaunchPad (Rev. A).
Figure 23. CC3220x LaunchPad Top-Layer Assembly Drawing
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2.10 Design Files
2.10.1
Hardware Design Files
All design files, including schematics, layout, Bill of Materials (BOM), Gerber files, and documentation are
available for download from CC3220-LAUNCHXL-RD.
2.11 Software
All design files, including firmware patches, software example projects, and documentation are available
from the CC3220 Software Development Kit.
Inside of the SDK, a set of very simple CC3220 code examples can be found that demonstrates how to
use the entire set of CC3220 peripherals. When starting a new project or adding a new peripheral, these
examples serve as a great starting point.
3
Development Environment Requirements
The following software examples with the LaunchPad require an integrated development environment
(IDE) that supports the CC3220 device.
The CC3220, CC3220S, CC3220SF SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® and Internet of Things Solution, A Single-Chip
Wireless MCU programmer's guide has detailed information about software environment setup with
examples. See this document for further details on the software sample examples.
3.1
CCS
CCS 6.0 or higher is required. When CCS is launched, and a workspace directory is chosen, use Project
→ Import Existing CCS Eclipse Project. Direct it to the desired demo project directory containing main.c.
3.2
IAR
IAR 6.70 or higher is required. To open the demo in IAR, choose File → Open → Workspace…, and direct
it to the *.eww workspace file inside the \IAR subdirectory of the desired demo. All workspace information
is within this file.
The subdirectory also has an *.ewp project file; this file can be opened into an existing workspace, using
Project → Add-Existing-Project….
4
Additional Resources
4.1
CC3220 Product Page
For more information on the CC3220 device, visit the CC3220 product page, which includes the CC3220x
SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® Wireless and Internet-of-Things Solution, a Single-Chip Wireless MCU Data Sheet
and key documents such as the CC3220, CC3220S, CC3220SF SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi® and Internet-ofThings Technical Reference Manual and the http://www.ti.com/SimpleLinkWiFi-Wiki, which contains
information on getting started, hardware details, software details including porting information, testing and
certification, support, and the CC3220 community.
4.2
LaunchPad™ Wiki
Most updated information is available on the CC3220 Wiki page.
4.3
Download CCS, IAR
Although the files can be viewed with any text editor, more can be done with the projects if they are
opened with a development environment such as Code Composer Studio (CCS), IAR, or Energia.
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Additional Resources
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CCS and IAR are each available in a full version, or a free, code-size-limited version. The full out-of-box
demo cannot be built with the free version of CCS or IAR (IAR Kickstart), due to the code-size limit. To
bypass this limitation, a code-size-limited CCS version is provided that has most functionality integrated
into a library. The code built into the library is able to be viewed by the user, but it cannot be edited. For
full functionality, download the full version of either CCS or IAR.
4.4
SimpleLink™ Academy for CC3220 SDK
The SimpleLink™ Academy is a collection of curated training modules developed by TI subject matter
experts to help developers get up and running as quickly as possible with a SimpleLink MCU device and
its SDK. The training is delivered using TI Resource Explorer, which offers a powerful cloud-enabled
environment that includes background information, interactive exercises, code snippets, quizzes, and
more.
Experience the SimpleLink™ Academy now using the TI Resource Explorer at dev.ti.com.
Figure 24. CC3220 SimpleLink™ Academy
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Revision History
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Revision History
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Added First Steps: Out-of-Box Experience section. .................................................................................. 4
Added Next Steps: Looking into the Provided Code section. ....................................................................... 5
Updated CC3220 LaunchPad™ EVM Overview image. ............................................................................. 6
Updated Pin 1 Marking on CC3220LP (3V3 Tag) image............................................................................. 8
Updated Default Jumper Configuration for JTAG Lines image. ..................................................................... 9
Updated JTAG IN Connector (J8) image. ............................................................................................ 10
Updated Using the XDS110 Debug Probe With a Different Target section. ..................................................... 11
Updated I2C Bus Connections image.................................................................................................. 12
Updated Power Jumpers J14, J21, J20, J19, J17, and J18 image................................................................ 13
Updated SOP Jumpers (Default Setting Shown) image. ........................................................................... 15
Updated UART Routed to USB COM Port image. .................................................................................. 16
Updated UART Routed to 20-Pin Header Connector image. ...................................................................... 16
Updated Battery Power section. ....................................................................................................... 20
Updated Powering the CC3220LP From Battery image. ........................................................................... 20
Updated Only CC3220 and Serial Flash Powered by Battery image. ............................................................ 21
Updated Low-Current Measurement With USB Power (< 1 mA) section. ........................................................ 22
Updated Low-Current Measurement (<1 mA) image. ............................................................................... 22
Updated Active Power Measurements (>1 mA) image. ............................................................................ 23
Updated Using Onboard Antenna (Default Condition) image. ..................................................................... 24
Updated Board Modified for External Antenna Connections image. .............................................................. 24
Updated Software section. ............................................................................................................. 26
Added Download CCS, IAR section. .................................................................................................. 26
Added SimpleLink™ Academy for CC3220 SDK section........................................................................... 27
Revision History
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