Omega | DP41-B Series | Owner Manual | Omega DP41-B Series Owner Manual

Omega DP41-B Series Owner Manual
RoHS 2 Compliant
User’s Guide
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DP41-B Series
Serial Communication Option
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The information contained in this document is believed to be correct but OMEGA Engineering, Inc. accepts no liability for any errors it contains,
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WARNING: These products are not designed for use in, and should not be used for, patient connected applications.
This device is marked with the international hazard symbol. It is important to read the Setup Guide before installing or commissioning this
device as it contains important information relating to safety and EMC.
Table of Contents
SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................1-1
SECTION 2 HARDWARE ..........................................................................................2-1
2.1
Definition of terms......................................................................................2-1
2.2
RS-232 and RS-485 hardware ..................................................................2-1
SECTION 3 USING THE CONFIGURATION SETUP................................................3-1
SECTION 4 DEFINITIONS.........................................................................................4-1
4.1
Meter or DCE.............................................................................................4-1
4.2
Computer or DTE ......................................................................................4-1
4.3
Point to Point .............................................................................................4-1
4.4
Multi Point (Multi-Drop)..............................................................................4-1
4.5
Simplex......................................................................................................4-1
4.6
Half Duplex ................................................................................................4-1
4.7
Full Duplex.................................................................................................4-1
4.8
RS-232 (CCITT V.24) ................................................................................4-2
4.9
RTS .......................................................................................................4-2
4.10
RS-422 ......................................................................................................4-2
4.11
RS-485 ......................................................................................................4-2
4.12
ASCII .......................................................................................................4-3
4.13
Hex ASCII ..................................................................................................4-4
4.14
Transmission Voltage Levels .....................................................................4-6
4.15
Recognition Character...............................................................................4-6
4.16
RAM .......................................................................................................4-6
4.17
EEPROM ...................................................................................................4-6
SECTION 5 BAUD RATES ........................................................................................5-1
SECTION 6 CHARACTER WAVEFORM ...................................................................5-1
SECTION 7 CLASSES OF OPERATION ..................................................................7-1
7.1
Point to Point .............................................................................................7-1
7.1.1
Continuous Mode ........................................................................7-1
7.1.1.1 Message Handshake ..................................................................7-2
7.1.1.2 Character Handshake .................................................................7-2
7.1.2
Command Mode..........................................................................7-2
7.2
Multi Point..................................................................................................7-2
7.2.1
Command Mode..........................................................................7-2
7.2.2
Alarm Mode.................................................................................7-3
7.3
The Meter as a Remote Display ................................................................7-4
7.4
The Meter as a Double Tasking Remote Meter .........................................7-4
7.4.1
Command Structure for Double Tasking .....................................7-5
i
Table of Contents
SECTION 8 COMMAND AND RESPONSE STRUCTURE ..........................................8-1
8.1
Message String..........................................................................................8-1
8.1.1 “Data” and “Non Data”...................................................................8-1
8.1.2 Brackets and Spaces .....................................................................8-1
8.2
Commands and Structure..........................................................................8-2
8.2.1 Read Communications Configuration Command ...........................8-2
8.2.2 General Command Structure .........................................................8-3
8.2.3 Command Formats.........................................................................8-4
8.2.4 Command Suffix .............................................................................8-6
8.3
Response Structure...................................................................................8-9
8.3.1 No Error..........................................................................................8-9
8.3.2 Echo Mode .....................................................................................8-9
8.3.3 No Echo Mode................................................................................8-9
8.4
Data Length Corresponding to the Response Structure ..........................8-10
8.5
Error Response........................................................................................8-11
8.5.1 Error Response Format ................................................................8-11
8.5.2 Error Message ..............................................................................8-11
8.5.3 Description ...................................................................................8-12
8.6
Status Character Formats .......................................................................8-13
8.6.1 Alarm Status Characters ..............................................................8-13
8.6.2 Peak/Valley (HI/LO) Status Characters ........................................8-14
8.7
"VO1" Response Data Format.................................................................8-15
8.8
“^AE” Response Format ..........................................................................8-16
Examples .................................................................................................8-16
8.9
SECTION 9 METER BUS RESPONSE .....................................................................9-1
9.1
Point to Point or Multi Point Command Mode............................................9-1
9.1.1 Meter’s Response Time..................................................................9-2
9.2
Point to Point Continuous Mode ................................................................9-3
9.2.1 Meter’s Response Time..................................................................9-3
9.2.2 Communicating with the Meter when in Continuous Mode ............9-3
9.3
Multi Point Alarm Mode Response ............................................................9-4
9.4
Watchdog timer for communication ...........................................................9-4
SECTION 10 DATA FORMAT COMMANDS (P, G, R, W) ..........................................10-1
10.1
Reading Configuration (“RdG.CNF”) .......................................................10-2
10.2
Input Configuration (“INP.CNF” and “INPUt”) ..........................................10-3
10.3
Setting Count By (“CNtby”) and Decimal Point (“SEt dP”).......................10-4
10.4
Filter Configuration “FILtER” and “OUt.tyP”)............................................10-5
10.5
Setpoint 1 and 2 Configuration (“SP.CNF”) .............................................10-6
10.6
Alarm (Setpoints 3 and 4) Configuration (“AL.CNF”)...............................10-7
10.7
Alarm Functions (“AL.CNF and AL.MOdE”).............................................10-8
10.8
Alarm Delay: (“NUM.dLy”) .......................................................................10-8
10.9
Output Configuration (“OUt.CNF”) and A to D Rate (“Ad.RAtE”)................10-9
10.10 Input Type (“INPUt”) and Reading Scale & Offset (“Rd.SC.OF”)...........10-10
10.11 Serial Communications Configuration (“COMM”) ..................................10-11
10.12 Data Format (“dAt.FMt”) ........................................................................10-12
10.13 Communications Bus Format (“bUS.FMt”) ............................................10-13
10.14 Lockout Configuration (“LCk.CNF”) .......................................................10-14
10.15 Lockout Configuration (“LCk.CNF”) and Normal Color (“N.COLOR”)....10-15
10.16 Color Configuration (“COLOR”) .............................................................10-16
ii
Table of Contents
10.17
10.18
10.19
10.20
10.21
10.22
10.23
10.24
10.25
10.26
10.27
10.28
10.29
10.30
10.31
10.32
10.33
10.34
10.35
10.36
10.37
Block A...................................................................................................10-17
Block B ..................................................................................................10-19
Block C ..................................................................................................10-21
Block D ..................................................................................................10-22
R/W44 (Block E) ....................................................................................10-23
R/W45 (Block F) ....................................................................................10-23
R46
...................................................................................................10-23
R47
...................................................................................................10-23
R48
...................................................................................................10-23
R/W50 ...................................................................................................10-24
R/W51,R/W52,R/W53,R/W54,R/W55,R/W56,R/W57,R/W58 R/W59 R/W5A....10-25
Set Sign and Decimal Point Format ......................................................10-26
RS-485 Meter “AddRES” .......................................................................10-27
Number of Readings between each Transmission (“SER CNt”)............10-27
Recognition Character (SER.RCG) .......................................................10-28
Units of Measure (SER.UOM) ...............................................................10-28
TX/RX Turnaround Delay (Serial Delay SER.dLy) ................................10-29
Reading, Input, or Output Scale Factor (“RdG SC”, “INP SC”, “OUt SC”)....10-29
Reading Offset(“RdG OF”), Input Offset(“INP OF”), or Output Offset(“OUt OF”)..10-31
Setpoint 1 and 2 Hysteresis (“SP db”) .................................................10-32
Alarm (SP 3 and SP 4) Hysteresis (“AL db”) .........................................10-32
MODBUS SUPPLEMENT .....................................................................................M-1
Figure 2-1
Figure 2-2
Figure 2-3
Figure 2-4A
Figure 2-4B
Figure 2-5
Figure 2-6
Figure 6-1
RS-232 / RS-485 Option Board.............................................................2-1
Main Board with the RS-232/RS-485 Option Board ..............................2-3
Rear of Meter with J4 connection..........................................................2-3
RJ-11 to D9 Connector..........................................................................2-4
RJ-11 to D25 Connector........................................................................2-4
Multipoint, Half-Duplex RS-485 Connection..........................................2-5
Multipoint Full-Duplex RS-485 Connection ...........................................2-6
Character Waveform .............................................................................5-1
iii
Table of Contents
Table 2.1
Table 2.2
Table 2.3
Table 2.4
Meter Hookup (RS-232) to the Computer .............................................2-4
Meter Hookup (RS-232) to the Printer...................................................2-4
Half-Duplex Hookup (RS-485) to the Computer....................................2-5
Full-Duplex Hookup to the Computer ....................................................2-6
Table 4.1
Table 4.2
Table 4.3
The ASCII Character Code....................................................................4-5
Meter Receiving Voltages......................................................................4-6
Meter Transmitting Voltages..................................................................4-6
Table 8.1
Table 8.2
Table 8.3
Table 8.4
Table 8.5
Table 8.6
Command Prefix Letters (Command Classes)......................................8-3
Command Letters and Suffixes .............................................................8-6
Error Messages ...................................................................................8-11
Alarm Status Characters .....................................................................8-13
Peak/Valley Status Characters............................................................8-14
Special Characters ..............................................................................8-15
Table 9.1
Table 9.2
Reading Rate for Command Mode........................................................9-2
Reading Rate for Communication ........................................................9-3
Table 10.1
Table 10.2
Table 10.3
Table 10.4
Table 10.5
Table 10.6
Table 10.7
Table 10.8
Table 10.9
Table 10.10
Table 10.11
Table 10.12
Table 10.13
Table 10.14
Table 10.15
Table 10.16
Table 10.17
Table 10.18
Table 10.19
Table 10.20
Table 10.21
Table 10.22
Table 10.23
Table 10.24
Table 10.25
Table 10.26
Table 10.27
Table 10.28
Table 10.29
Reading Configuration.........................................................................10-2
Input Configuration .............................................................................10-3
Count By and Decimal Point ...............................................................10-4
Filter Configuration and Output Type .................................................10-5
Setpoint Configuration.........................................................................10-6
Alarm Configuration ............................................................................10-7
Alarm Configuration and Mode ...........................................................10-8
Alarm Delay.........................................................................................10-8
Output Configuration ..........................................................................10-9
Input Type and Reading Scale and Offset.........................................10-10
Serial Communications Configuration ...............................................10-11
Data Format .....................................................................................10-12
Bus Format........................................................................................10-13
Lockout Configuration ......................................................................10-14
Lockout Configuration and Normal Color ..........................................10-15
Color Configuration ..........................................................................10-16
R/W40 (Block A) ...............................................................................10-17
R/W41 (Block B)................................................................................10-19
R/W42 (Block C) ...............................................................................10-21
R/W43 (Block D)................................................................................10-22
R/W44 (Block E)................................................................................10-23
R/W45 (Block F) ...............................................................................10-23
R/W50 ...............................................................................................10-24
R/W50 NUM.PNt and MENU selection ............................................10-24
R/W5XXXXX .....................................................................................10-25
Setpoint Values ................................................................................10-26
Serial Delay (“SER.dLy”) ..................................................................10-29
Reading Scale(“RdG SC”),Input Scale(“INP SC”),Output Scale(“OUt SC”)....10-30
Reading Offset(“RdG OF”),Input Offset(“INP OF”),Output Offset(“OUt OF”) ..10-31
iv
1. Introduction
This manual is intended to facilitate digital communication between your computer (or
other controlling device) and one or more meters.
This digital-communications manual is provided for use with the meters’ OWNER’S
MANUAL, which provide details of all applicable inputs, connections, options,
pushbutton controls and programming procedures.
Information that is especially important to note is identified by these labels:
• NOTE
• WARNING
• CAUTION
• IMPORTANT
NOTE: provides you with information that is important to successfully setup
and use the Programmable Digital Meter.
CAUTION or WARNING: tells you about the risk of electric shock.
CAUTION, WARNING or IMPORTANT: tells you of circumstances or
practices that can effect the meter's functionality and must refer to
accompanying documents.
Customer Service
If you need assistance, please call the nearest Customer Service Department, listed in
this manual.
Manuals, Software
The latest Operation and Communication Manual as well as free configuration
software and ActiveX controls are available from the website listed in this manual or
on the CD-ROM enclosed with your shipment.
Communication Menu
The Communication menu only appears with devices purchased with the RS-232C /
RS-485 Serial Communications Option. Purchasing the controller with Serial
Communications permits a controller to be connected directly to the PC’s available
COM port. Device can be configured or monitored from an IBM PC compatible
computer using software available on our CD or on our website.
1-1
2. Hardware
2.1 DEFINITION OF TERMS
RX:
TX:
RTS:
+RX:
+TX:
-RX:
-TX:
RTN:
Received line on RS-232
Transmit line on RS-232
Request to send
First pair received line on RS-422/485
First pair transmit line on RS-422/485
Second pair received line on RS-422/485
Second pair transmit line on RS-422/485
Ground/Return
2.2 RS-232 AND RS-485 HARDWARE
INSTALLATION: The RS-232/485 card is approximately 1" high and 5" long. It is
installed with the meter removed from its case (Refer to Section 5 of your meter’s
Owner’s Guide for instructions on how to open the meter). P11 inserts into J11 of the
main board located next to the transformer (Refer to Figure 2-2). The board is held in
position by a plastic guide on the rear of the display board and plastic assembly at the
rear of the meter. The 6-pin telephone jack, J4, is available at the rear of the meter
case, and accepts a type RJ-11 or RJ-12 telephone plug (Refer to Figure 2-3).
Logic signals are opto-isolated, and drive power is obtained from a galvanically-isolated
transformer winding so that the ±7 V signal levels from the meter can be slaved to the
external controller (computer) ground; earthing that ground is recommended.
2-1
2. Hardware
A
B
C
D
E
A
S3
S2
6
S3
A
J4 1
S4
A
B
S2
S4
1
P1
S1
A
11
S1
11
Figure 2-1. RS-232 / RS-485 Option Board
You should install the option board in such a way the pin “1A” of “P11” is
aligned with pin “1A” of “J11” (on main board, refer to Figure 2-2).
When interfacing the meter to devices that do not have handshaking lines, i.e.
RTS/CTS, the S3-E Jumper should be installed. However, when interfacing to a PC,
the S3-E should be removed.
JUMPER
S1-A
S1-B
S2-A
S3-A
(CLOSE FOR TERMINAL
RESISTOR)
S3-B
S3-C
(CLOSE FOR TERMINAL
RESISTOR)
S3-D
S3-E
(CLOSE FOR RTS TRUE)
S4
(CLOSE FOR
CONTINUOUS MODE)
RS232
CLOSE
OPEN
OPEN
RS485 HALF DUPLEX
OPEN
CLOSE
CLOSE
RS485 FULL DUPLEX
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSE
OPEN
*
*
OPEN
CLOSE
OPEN
OPEN
*
*
OPEN
*
CLOSE
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
*
*
Note: * means optional, select as required.
2-2
2. Hardware
RS232/RS485 BD
P11
1A
11
SIGNAL INPUT BD
POWER BD
J11
J10
1A
11
Figure 2-2. Main Board with the RS-232/RS-485 Option Board
P6
P7
P18A
P18B
P1
P9
J4
P5
P2
P3
Figure 2-3. Rear of Meter with J4 connection.
2-3
2. Hardware
Figures 2-4A and Figure 2-4B show the four-wire RS-232 connections between the
host computer/controller using either a 9-pin or 25-pin “D” connector and the meter
(point-to-point full duplex, with RTS handshake).
432
1
7
2
3
5
D9
RJ-11
Figure 2-4A. RJ-11 to D9 Connector
43
21
4
3
2
7
D25
RJ-11
Figure 2-4B. RJ-11 to D25 Connector
Table 2.1 shows the pin connection assignments between the RS-232 connection on
the meter and the 9-pin or 25-pin “D” connectors of your computer.
Table 2.1. Meter Hookup (RS-232) to the Computer
PIN SIGNAL/FUNCTION
RTS, meter from computer
TX, meter = RX, computer
RX, meter = TX, computer
Return
NC (not connected)
METER
(DCE)
RJ-11
1
2
3
4
RJ-12
2
3
4
5
1,6
COMPUTER
(DTE)
D9
7
2
3
5
(all others)
D25
4
3
2
7
Table 2.2 shows the pin connection assignments between the RS-232 connection on
the meter and the 9-pin or 25-pin “D” connectors of your printer.
Table 2.2. Meter Hookup (RS-232) to the Printer
PIN SIGNAL/FUNCTION
RTS, meter
TX, meter
RX, meter
Return
NC (not connected)
METER
RJ-11
1
2
3
4
2-4
RJ-12
2
3
4
5
1,6
PRINTER
FUNCTIONS
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
Received Data (RXD)
Not Connected
Signal Return
2. Hardware
Logic symbols are opto-isolated, and drive power is obtained from a galvanicallyisolated transformer winding so that the differential signals (minimum ±2 V) will not be
altered by an external ground; earthing of the external transceiver power supply is
recommended to limit common-mode voltage.
The RS-485 hardware may be operated point-to-point (e.g., as RS-422 equipment),
OR
in multipoint, sharing the bus wires with up to 32 other meters.
The RS-485 cabling may be a single pair of wires (usually with a shield) for HALF
DUPLEX (Figure 2-5), or two such pairs for FULL DUPLEX (Figure 2-6). The
configurations shown are for bus operation, with tap-offs for each meter.
METER #1
METER #30
HOST
COMPUTER
DTE
METER #31
RX/TX
RX/TX
TX/RX
A
TX/RX
B
RO
Figure 2-5. Multipoint, Half-Duplex RS-485 Connection
Table 2.3. Half-Duplex Hookup (RS-485) to the Computer
PIN SIGNAL/FUNCTION
METER
(DCE)
RJ-12
COMPUTER
(DTE)
D9/D25
RX
TX
RTN
2
3
5
(SEE MFG DWG)
(SEE MFG DWG)
(SEE MFG DWG)
RS-422/RS-485 multipoint interconnections between the computer (DTE) and the
meter (DCE) are less well defined because different computer/controller manufacturers
use different pins on their D9 or D25 connectors.
2-5
2. Hardware
METER #1
METER #30
HOST
COMPUTER
DTE
RX/TX
METER #31
RECEIVE
B
RO
TRANSMIT
A
B
RO
RECEIVE
A
TRANSMIT
= TWISTED SHIELDED PAIR
Figure 2-6. Multipoint Full-Duplex RS-485 Connection
Table 2.4. Full-Duplex Hookup to the Computer
PIN SIGNAL/FUNCTION
METER
(DCE)
RJ-12
COMPUTER
(DTE)
D9/D25
+TX
–TX
+RX
–RX
RTN
NC (not connected)
1
3
2
4
5
6
(SEE
(SEE
(SEE
(SEE
(SEE
MFG
MFG
MFG
MFG
MFG
DWG)
DWG)
DWG)
DWG)
DWG)
Both HALF DUPLEX (Figure 2-5) and FULL DUPLEX RS-485 (Figure 2-6)
communications require a 6-wire RJ-12 plug to be connected to the RJ-12 jack at the
rear of the meter.
Unlike RS-232, there presently is no established standard D9 or D25 connector pinout for RS-485; refer to your computer or controller manual to insure the right cable
connections.
If communications with your meter has failed, it is recommended that you
check for the receive portion of the RS-485 board on DTE (computer). These
lines should be pulled up for +RX and pulled down for –RX with resistors with
a resistance value from 330 ohms to 1K ohms.
2-6
3. Using The Configuration Setup
The Configuration software is simple to use for both the new style (INF-B) and the
legacy ones (INFP, INFS, INFT and INFU), based on your selection. It is able to read
or write the configuration to a device through Serial or TCP/IP communication and
displays corresponding jumper settings of the device i.e. hardware configuration.
If the communication link is in place, no more pushbutton programming is needed: the
computer takes over at this point. Follow the prompts and selections on that screen.
The Infinity configuration program allows the configuration the INF-B, INFP, INFS,
INFT and INFU devices.
The program does not read the device model (e.g. INF-B, INFU, etc). Before reading
or writing a configuration to a device, the correct device model has to be specified.
The program has a configuration file, named InfinityConfiguration.inb, which saves
all the program settings when the program is shut down. The next time that the
program is started, the program goes to the configuration file, InfinityConfiguration.inb,
reads all the settings and loads them to the program.
Help files are available. Select an item and click the F1 key to open the help files.
The program was designed to create a configuration as soon as the program is
opened or read or write a device configuration. There is no defined borderline. If
writing a configuration to a device, it is advisable to read first the device configuration
so the device settings are loaded into the configuration program. Then make required
modifications and write the configuration to the device.
Configuration is possible using either serial communication or ethernet. When ethernet
is used, the configuration program is compatible with the -EI option of your meter, and
our iServer products.
The latest Operation and Communication Manual as well as free
configuration software and ActiveX controls are available from the website
listed in this manual or on the CD-ROM enclosed with your shipment.
3-1
4. Definitions
This Guide uses some abbreviations and compact wording to signify devices and
concepts with detailed descriptions. Significant items are:
4.1 METER OR DCE
The term “METER” signifies one or more meters (or devices with compatible
communications) which respond to the commands (requests) of a controller device
such as a computer. Such meters are classified as “DCE” devices, from the older
“Data Communication Equipment” telephone specifications.
4.2 COMPUTER OR DTE
These descriptors signify the device controlling the communications, such as a
computer (“HOST” device) or programmable controller. Telephony specifications refer
to controllers as “Data Terminal Equipment” or DTEs.
4.3 POINT-TO-POINT
Direct connection between two (and only two) devices for data exchange, such as the
meter and your digital computer. No addresses are used unless the meter is
programmed for a “one-meter bus”.
4.4 MULTIPOINT (MULTI-DROP)
Shared wiring for a DTE and more than one DCE, designates a “BUS”. Several panel
meters and a personal computer can share a bus, with the computer serving as
controller. The controller can acquire data by transmitting the preassigned address for
a meter followed by a command for the meter to send selected information. When
used with the meter, up to 31 meters can share a bus (with addresses from 01 to
decimal 199); all meters receive the data when the address is “00”.
4.5 SIMPLEX
A channel (path, typically a twisted pair of wires) with unidirectional data flow.
4.6 HALF DUPLEX
A channel (e.g., twisted pair) with bi-directional data flow, but only in one direction at a
time.
4.7 FULL DUPLEX
Two channels (e.g., two twisted pairs) with bi-directional data flow at any time (one
simplex channel in each direction).
4-1
4. Definitions
4.8 RS-232 (CCITT V.24)
Bipolar ±5 to ±15 V point-to-point transmission for short distances and moderate data
rates. The meter operates with full-duplex RS-232, with two wires (RX and TX), plus a
common ground, to transmit baud in either direction. A third signal wire, Request To
Send, is referenced to the same ground wire and is used by the computer (DTE) to
control transmissions of the meter (DCE).
Receiver sensitivity is ±3 V and impedance of 3 to 7 kilohms. (Although RS-232 is
nominally for only one driver and one receiver on the line, custom high-impedance
versions exist for limited multipoint use.)
4.9 RTS
A designator for the “Request To Send” control signal from the computer, carried on a
wire separate from that of the data, and used by the meter to permit or inhibit
transmissions in Continuous Mode RS-232. The other control line of RS-232, CTS, is
not used in meter communications.
4.10 RS-422
Unipolar-voltage (3.6 to 6 V supplies) simplex drive of a bus with ±2 V-differential
signals (neither wire at ground) for long distances and/or high data rates. Receiver
sensitivity 200 mV, common-mode voltage range ±3 V, and impedance 4 kilohms or
more. A maximum of one driver and 10 receivers allowed, with no driver protection
against bus contention. Duplex operation requires another set of hardware.
4.11 RS-485
This is the extension of RS-422 to a half or full duplex bus of up to 32 devices, with
multiple drivers and driver-contention protection. Receiver impedance is now
12 kilohms or more.
4-2
4. Definitions
4.12 ASCII
Table 4.1 shows the ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)
symbols which can be encoded in a 7-bit binary code (DB0 through DB6). When
organized in table form, these 7 bits may be regarded as the symbol address, the
most significant 3 bits determining the column and the last four bits determining the
row.
These symbols include all the decimal numerals, letters, punctuation marks, common
abbreviations and control characters, including non-printed symbols such as Carriage
Return and Line Feed.
The 7-bit symbol code (or address) is called a “character”, and digital communication
with the meter is made with a string of these characters.
When transmitted, each character is preceded by a start bit (BAUD) and followed by
one or two stop bits plus an optional parity bit, making a train of 10 or 11 baud for
each transmitted character. If you are building a system from the UART up (Universal
Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter), that device must be informed of the number of
data bits, parity, stop bit length, etc., so that it properly decodes the incoming stream
into the bytes that your program can recognize (check the UART or plug-in board
literature for required control signals).
As dictated by FORMAT statements, a symbol may be sent by transmitting just its
table address (one character, plain ASCII) or by HEX-ASCII, which uses two
characters, one for each of the two hex address nibbles (0 through 7 for the column
nibble, 0 through F for the row nibble, shown on top and left-hand side of Table 4.1).
4-3
4. Definitions
4.13 HEX ASCII
Storage in most digital devices is in groups of 8 bits, called bytes. Each byte has a
most-significant nibble (the left most 4 bits) and a least-significant nibble.
To make the best use of the available storage, all possible bit sequences should be
used, so each nibble can have 16 different values (not just the ten of decimal notation).
These 16 values are symbolized by 0-9 and A-F, the hexadecimal code.
The meter transmits almost all data (shown in format statements as <data>) in this
HEX-ASCII form: each byte is broken into its two nibbles, each nibble is given its HEX
symbol, and the ASCII character (table address) for each of those two HEX symbols is
then transmitted (most significant nibble first).
The transmitter and receiver must know whether a number or a non-numerical symbol
is being sent by HEX-ASCII: this is the reason for standard FORMATs in the meter
commands and responses. To illustrate this requirement, if you decode two adjacent
characters as “0110100” (the code for the symbol “4”) and “1000001” (the code for the
symbol “A”), do you print “4A” or do you print the symbol whose hex table address is
4A, the letter “J”? The format statements tell you which is which.
The responses to “V” and “X” commands encode the numerical <data> in HEX-ASCII,
but use decimal (BCD) nibbles (4 bits per decimal digit), storing these two BCD digits
per byte (rather than 8 bits of straight binary). Decoding to decimal is then simplified
for receiving devices such as printers.
“V” and “X” commands also use a single plain ASCII character for each “-”, “.”, and
units-of-measure symbols, in contrast to the “G, P, R or W” commands and responses,
which encode everything in HEX-ASCII, 2 characters to the byte.
4-4
4. Definitions
Table 4.1. The ASCII Character Code
COL
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
DB6=
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
DB5=
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
DB4=
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
ROW
H
E
X
D
E
C
D
B
3
D
B
2
D
B
1
D
B
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NUL
DLE
SP
0
@
P
'
p
1
1
0
0
0
1
SOH
DC1
!
1
A
Q
a
q
2
2
0
0
1
0
STX
DC2
"
2
B
R
b
r
3
3
0
0
1
1
ETX
DC3
#
3
C
S
c
s
4
4
0
1
0
0
EOT
DC4
$
4
D
T
d
t
5
5
0
1
0
1
ENQ
NAK
%
5
E
U
e
u
6
6
0
1
1
0
ACK
SYN
&
6
F
V
f
v
7
7
0
1
1
1
BEL
ETB
‘
7
G
W
g
w
8
8
1
0
0
0
BS
CAN
(
8
H
X
h
x
9
9
1
0
0
1
HT
EM
)
I
Y
i
y
A
10
1
0
1
0
LF
SUB
*
:
J
Z
j
z
B
11
1
0
1
1
VT
ESC
+
;
K
[
k
{
C
12
1
1
0
0
FF
FS
,
<
L
\
l
|
D
13
1
1
0
1
CR
GS
-
=
M
]
m
}
E
14
1
1
1
0
SO
RS
.
>
N
^
n
~
F
15
1
1
1
1
SI
US
/
?
O
_
o
DEL
9
Non-numeric symbols (e.g., letters) or unprinted characters that are sent in hex
data strings are transmitted as the two characters of their hex address;
For example: “*” is “2A”
Carriage Return is “0D”
Line feed is “0A”
XON=DC1 is “11”
XOFF=DC3 is “13”.
4-5
4. Definitions
4.14 TRANSMISSION VOLTAGE LEVELS
The voltage levels accepted by the meter are those of the standards, and the meter
outputs are well regulated and well within the standards. The two wires carrying the
signal are designated “A” and “B”; for RS-232, “B” is taken as the 0 V ground.
Table 4.2. Meter Receiving Voltages
OPTION TYPE
“1” BIT/MARK
OR STOP BIT
“0” BIT/SPACE
OR START BIT
RS-232
RS-422 or 485
–3 > A > –15 V
A < (B–0.2 V)
+3 < A < +15 V
A > (B+0.2 V)
Table 4.3. Meter Transmitting Voltages
OPTION TYPE
“1” BIT/MARK
OR STOP BIT
“0” BIT/SPACE
OR START BIT
RS-232
RS-422 or 485
–6 > A > –7 V
A < (B–2 V)
+6 < A < +7 V
A > (B+2 V)
The RS-422/485 transmissions from the meter are 3-state, and both receive and
transmit are zener-protected.
4.15 RECOGNITION CHARACTER
A selectable symbol (e.g., the asterisk, *) transmitted as the first character of each
message from the computer, which is used for message security: the meter ignores
messages without this symbol.
4.16 RAM
The acronym for “Random Access Memory”. For the meter, the storage for the data
and instructions for the immediately-occurring operation. When given a “RESET1” or
“soft” reset, the meter restarts its operation from the data in RAM. “PUT” commands
insert information from the computer into RAM, and “GET” commands transmit RAM
information to the computer.
4.17 EEPROM
The acronym for “Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory”. For the
meter, the non-volatile memory for the setup and configuration data is retained
independent of power or resets. Upon a “RESET2” or “hard” reset (e.g., after any
BLOCK WRITE command), the data in the EEPROM is copied into RAM, discarding
whatever data had been running. “WRITE” commands insert information from the
computer into EEPROM, and “READ” commands transmit EEPROM data to the
computer.
4-6
5. Baud Rates
The meter can operate at any rate from 300 to 19,200 in 2:1 steps.
Following are the baud rates used by the meter:
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, and 19200.
6. Character Waveform
Ten or eleven bits are used for each character: a start bit, 7 bits for the ASCII
character, one parity bit, and either one or two stop bits. If the parity bit is
chosen as “none” (absent), the stop length is automatically set at two bits by
the meter (to keep the minimum character length to ten bits).
Figure 6-1 shows the mark/space sequence.
SPACE (0)
MARK (1)
START
BIT
LSB
STOP
BIT(S)
PARITY
(missing if
no parity)
MSB
7-BIT ASCII CHARACTER
Figure 6-1. Character Waveform
The rising edge of the start bit of the next character may occur at any time
after the end of the last stop bit.
5-1
7. Classes of Operation
There are two (2) classes of operation associated with meter serial communications:
Point-to-point and Multipoint. (Refer to Section 10.13)
7.1 POINT-TO-POINT
No device address is included in the command or response message when operating
in this class. There are two (2) modes associated with this class; CONTINUOUS and
COMMAND.
7.1.1 CONTINUOUS MODE
For RS-232, the computer can direct the meter to repeatedly transmit the data and
status information in the format specified by the communications setup (which includes
a selectable parameter to space out the transmissions for data logging purposes).
Continuous mode is not used on RS-422/485, because no RTS line is present to
prevent bus contention. However, you can use one meter using a RS-485 board by
configuring the meter for point-to-point continuous mode, and configure it so that it is
enabled at all times. This will result in allowing for transmission to be sent for longer
distances to such devices as large remote displays.
Control of the continuous mode is by RTS level. Either message or character control
can be specified. In the former case, RTS polarity is checked by the meter before a
message is begun, but, once started, the transmission continues to the end of the
specified message. In the latter case, RTS polarity is checked before each character
transmission, so that the meter message can be interrupted after any character.
The specified data and status are transmitted for each new measurement (if so
requested), provided that the selected baud rate and message length are adequate. If
the message transmission takes longer, complete messages are sent as fast as
possible, skipping any readings overlapped by a message transmission.
7-1
7. Classes of Operation
7.1.1.1 MESSAGE HANDSHAKE
The RTS line from the host controller is checked when the device is ready to send
measurement data. If the RTS is true, it sends the complete message data without
interruption even if RTS goes false in the middle of transmission. If RTS is false, it
skips sending the data completely and continues with the next measurement.
7.1.1.2 CHARACTER HANDSHAKE
The device checks the RTS input before sending each character and sends characters
only while RTS is true. It always completes sending the data before transferring the
latest reading to the output buffer.
7.1.2 COMMAND MODE
In this mode, no handshake line is used, but instead a simple command from the host
requests that the device transmit its latest measurement message.
7.2 MULTIPOINT
A device address from 0 to 199 is included in the COMMAND or RESPONSE
message. By using the addressing capabilities, collision on the bus can be avoided. If
“00” is used for the address on multiple units, they will all receive the COMMAND but
will not respond. This is used to avoid collisions on the bus. There are two (2) modes
available in the class; COMMAND MODE and ALARM MODE.
NO RTS handshaking is available with Multipoint.
7.2.1 COMMAND MODE
Each device, when it receives an addressed command, checks the received address.
If it matches its own pre-selected address, the device responds by fulfilling the
command. After a programmed turnaround delay time, it may transmit either an
acknowledgement and/or the requested data, or may have no response. If the
address does not match, the command is ignored. The programmed turnaround time
delay allows for line reflections to dissipate and for the transmitting host controller to
switch to the receive mode. The turnaround time delay choices are 0, 30, 100 and 300
milliseconds with a 3 ms uncertainty.
7-2
7. Classes of Operation
7.2.2 ALARM MODE
All devices can be put into the alarm mode simultaneously by a single address 00
command. In the alarm mode, the bus is quiet until one of the devices detects and
alarm condition. It then transmits its address onto the bus and goes out of the alarm
mode. When other devices detect a character on the bus, they too go out of the alarm
mode. The host program, which may have been performing an unrelated task, is then
interrupted by receipt of a character and after a short delay, starts polling all devices.
It begins with the received address device. All devices are polled in case two or more
have reached an alarm condition at or near the same time. If this happens, it can
cause bus contention, corrupted characters or framing errors. However, none of these
result in system failure because any bus activity causes all devices to exit the alarm
mode and the host program to perform the alarm poll. After identifying the alarm
device(s), the alarm can be reset and the host controller can put the devices back into
the alarm mode. It is suggested that the host controller polls all of the devices when
ready to send the common alarm mode and sends it only if all alarms are inactive.
This reduces the probability of two or more devices being ready to transmit on the bus
simultaneously when the alarm mode is entered due to existing alarm conditions.
7-3
7. Classes of Operation
7.3 THE METER AS A REMOTE DISPLAY
The meter has the capability to become a remote display. While in this mode, it can
accept any word with 1 to 6 letters (7 including one decimal point). Valid characters
are: numbers from 0-9, upper-case letters from A-Z, space, period, “/”, “–”, “+”, “,” and
“*”. Upon receiving the proper command from the host controller, the meter will switch
to the REMOTE DISPLAY mode and display whatever has been transmitted to it.
The meter will continue to operate normally during this mode.
As an example, try to write “Hello my name is Bob” to the meter number 25 decimal
(19 hex) on the RS-485 network. Assume “*” is the meter’s recognition character.
Transmit according to the following steps:
1) *19Y01HELLO<CR>
2) *19Y01MY<CR>
3) *19Y01NAME<CR>
4) *19Y01IS BOB<CR>
(You would want to generate a proper delay between each step.)
To go back to “RUN” mode, use the following command: *19D03<CR>
(See Section 8 for more information on commands).
7.4 THE METER AS A DOUBLE TASKING REMOTE METER
The Process, Strain Gauge, Temperature and Universal meters can be configured as a
double tasking remote indicator/controller. This is accomplished by transmitting any
value (In HEX format Only!) from “–99999 to 999999” (and any decimal point position
between 1 to 6) to the meter. The value transmitted will be the meter’s Reading Value
which allows you to display any value desired and assign a setpoint as well as set up
the value of this setpoint. The meter can also be configured to output this value via the
optional analog output boards. The double tasking is accomplished during this
operation, the meter will continue to operate normally and the Filtered Value is the
value used for normal operation.
For comparing the transmitted value with any setpoint, the decimal point of the
value should be equal to the meter’s decimal point position.
7-4
7. Classes of Operation
7.4.1 COMMAND STRUCTURE FOR DOUBLE TASKING
The general command structure for this mode is as follows:
*[nn]Y02<DATA><CR>
Where:
*
nn
Y02
DATA
= The recognition character
= Device address (Required for multipoint mode only)
= Command index
= 3 byte Hexadecimal based (24 bits) value as:
1) First 20 bits are the absolute value (Maximum is 999999 when positive and
99999 when negative)
2) Bits 21, 22, 23 are assigned to the decimal point as shown below:
23
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
BIT NO.
22
21
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
DECIMAL VALUE*
Not used
–0
–1
–2
–3
–4
–5
Not used
* 10 to the power
of the value
3) Bit 24 is the polarity sign
0 = Positive
1 = Negative
EXAMPLE: To send a value of “–23.468” to the meter, you must first send the meter
number which is 15 HEX with “*” as the recognition character. The following is the
itemized list of the required variables that must be sent via HEXADECIMAL:
Absolute value is 23468 and its HEX equivalent is “5BAC”
Decimal value will be “100 BINARY” and HEX equivalent is “4HEX”.
Sign is negative and must be sent as “1” and therefore bits 21, 22, 23, and 24 (or most
significant nibble) will be 1100 binary or “C” HEX. Combine this with value and you have
“DATA” with a Hexadecimal equivalent of “C05BAC”.
The complete command for this example is as follows:
“*15Y02C05BAC<CR>”
7-5
8. Command and Response Structure
8.1 MESSAGE STRING
8.1.1 “DATA” AND “NON DATA”
Each of the many types of messages between computer or printer and the meter is
transmitted or received as a string of ASCII characters. These characters are classified
as “DATA” and “NON DATA”.
“DATA” is the string of measurement or non-measurement values (see Section 8.2 and
Section 8.3) and can be classified as:
1. <data>: hexadecimal based values. Each nibble is converted to the ASCII
character and transmitted or received.
2. <data>: is alphanumeric plain ASCII characters and need not be converted. It is
used in Remote Display Mode.
3. <value> is data which is transmitted against “X” or “V01” commands. These are in
decimal base, and each digit is converted to the ASCII character and transmitted
along with decimal point and sign.
“NON DATA” items are: recognition character(*), device address (nn), command prefix
letter (c), command suffix (cc), space (S or SP), carriage return (CR), line feed (LF),
checksum (hh), and units of measure (uuu). Checksum, device address, and
command suffix (cc) items are hexadecimal base, and each nibble will be converted to
the ASCII character and transmitted. The rest of the “NON DATA” items are plain ASCII
characters and need not be converted (see examples in Section 8.8).
8.1.2 BRACKETS AND SPACES
In the following text the position reserved for each ASCII character is represented by a
lower-case letter. If there must always be an ASCII character put into the message at
that position, no brackets are used.
Angle brackets, “<“ and “>”, are used to enclose names (or acronyms). In the actual
message these names will be replaced by the ASCII value of that name (the number of
those ASCII characters is not usually the same as the number of letters of the name
inside the angle brackets).
The occurrence of non-printing ASCII characters is also indicated by angle brackets
(e.g., “<CR>”).
Square brackets, “[“ and “]” enclose items which are optional, i.e., the message is still
valid when those are omitted.
8-1
8. Command and Response Structure
8.2 COMMANDS AND STRUCTURE
The meter responds to over 150 different commands from the computer. This section
gives the format and lists all commands by COMMAND CLASS and COMMAND SUFFIX.
8.2.1 READ COMMUNICATIONS CONFIGURATION COMMAND
To have the meter report its current communication parameters, the special command
“^AE” is provided when transmitted to the meter with the correct baud rate, parity
information, stop bit(s), and address (if multipoint). The meter will return 4 bytes
(9 characters including carriage return) of information as follows:
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
#1
#2
#3
#4
=
=
=
=
Recognition character
Meter address
Bus Format
Communications configuration
This “READ ONLY” command is the only one without a leading recognition
character.
Command Format:
^AE<CR> for point-to-point,
or
^AE[nn]<CR> for multipoint
where nn = device address from 01 to C7 (hex) = 01 to 199 decimal.
Response detail is given in Sections 8.8 and 8.9.
8-2
8. Command and Response Structure
8.2.2 GENERAL COMMAND STRUCTURE
The meter can be commanded to “read”, i.e., to transmit (send) data from either the
nonvolatile memory (EEPROM) or from the volatile working memory (RAM). The meter
can also be commanded to “write”, i.e., store new values for data processing or meter
control.
There are different command types associated in communicating with your meter as
follows:
Type (1) Commands which return non-measurement data from the meter are “R” and “G”.
Type (2) Commands which return measurement data from the meter are “X” and “V”.
Type (3) Commands which return status character data from the meter is “U”.
Type (4) Commands which send non-measurement data to the meter are “P”, “W”, and “Y”.
Type (5) Commands for disable, enable, and reset are “D”, “E”, and “Z”.
Table 8.1. Command Prefix Letters (Command Classes)
COMMAND PREFIX
(COMMAND CLASS)
MEANING
^AE
P (Put)
W (Write)
G (Get)
R (Read)
U
V
X
D
E
Z
Y
Special read, communications parameters
Write HEX data into RAM
Write HEX data into EEPROM
Read HEX data from RAM
Read HEX data from EEPROM
Read status byte
Read measurement data string in decimal format
Read measurement data values in decimal format
Disable
Enable
Reset
Write characters or values to the meter
8-3
8. Command and Response Structure
8.2.3 COMMAND FORMATS
For “P” and “W” Command classes:
a) Point-to-point mode:
* ccc<data>[hh]<CR>
b)
Multipoint mode:
*nnccc[<data>][hh]<CR>
b)
Multipoint mode:
*nnccc[hh]<CR>
For “G” and “R” Command classes:
a) Point-to-point mode:
*ccc[hh]<CR>
For “X”, “V”, “U”, “D”, “E”, and “Z” Command classes:
a) Point-to-point mode:
*ccc[hh]<CR>
b)
Multipoint mode:
*nnccc[hh]<CR>
Remote Display
a) Point-to-point mode:
*Y01<data><CR>
b)
Multipoint mode:
*nnY01<data><CR>
Remote Indicator Controller
a) Point-to-point mode:
*Y02<data><CR>
b)
Multipoint mode:
*nnY02<data><CR>
For “Y” Command classes:
8-4
8. Command and Response Structure
Where “*” is the selected Recognition Character, you may select any ASCII table
symbol from “!” (hex address “21”) to the right-hand brace (hex “7D”) except for the
caret “^”, “A”, “E”, which are reserved for bus format request.
“[nn]” are the two ASCII characters for the device Bus Address. Use values from “00” to
hex “C7” (199 decimal).
“ccc” stands for the HEX-ASCII COMMAND CLASS letter (one of twelve given in
Table 8.1), followed by the two HEX-ASCII COMMAND SUFFIX characters identifying
the meter data, features or menu items to which the command is directed (given in
Table 8.2).
“<data>” is the string of characters containing the variable information the computer is
sending to the meter. These data (whether BCD or binary) are encoded into
HEX-ASCII characters, two characters to the byte, except for the “Y01”, “write to the
display” command: here, the desired display upper-case letters, numbers or (limited)
symbols are transmitted by plain ASCII characters. Square brackets (indicating optional
status) enclose this <data> string, since some commands contain no data.
“[hh]” is the optional CHECKSUM BYTE, two HEX-ASCII characters equal to the
modulo 256 sum of all the preceding bytes including the serial recognition character.
Each addition to this sum uses the ASCII 7 bits plus the parity bit as the mostsignificant bit. Any carry (overflow) bits are discarded. The checksum is transmitted
most-significant character first.
Message errors can be discovered by computing the checksum from the received
bytes and comparing that total with the transmitted checksum. However, most systems
have a good signal-to-noise ratio, so that checksum errors are rare and the procedure
is infrequently used.
8-5
8. Command and Response Structure
8.2.4 - COMMAND SUFFIX
The two HEX characters following the command class letter are used to specify the
data, features or menu items which the command affects. Table 8.2 gives the
command letter, suffix, feature affected, and the number of data characters included in
the command.
“00” is not used (reserved for the all-device bus address).
Table 8.2. Command Letters and Suffixes
COMMAND SUFFIX
D
E
R,W
U
V
X
Y
Z
D
E
R,W
U
X
X
Z
D
E
R,W
X
Z
D
E
X
Z
D
E
G,P,R,W
Z
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
G,P,R,W
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
02
02
02
02
02
Y02
02
03
03
03
03
03
04
04
04
04
05
05
05
05
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0E
ITEM AFFECTED
Disable Alarms (SP#3 and SP#4)
Enable Alarms (SP#3 and SP#4)
Menu Lockout
Setpoints and Alarm Status
Read Data String
Read Unfiltered Value
Write value to display
Reset latched alarms
Disable setpoints 1 and 2
Enable setpoints 1 and 2
Menu Lockout and Normal Color config
Peak/Valley (HI/LO) status
Read Peak (HI) value
Write value to meter
Reset averaging filter
Disable display of remote value
Set alarm mode
Setpoint (#1,#2) & Alarm Color (#1, #2)
Read Valley (LO) value
Soft Reset (RESET1, from RAM)
Hold displayed value
Display “RUN”
Read filtered value
Hard Reset (RESET2, from EEPROM)
Reset tare, valid only on strain meter
TARE, valid only on strain meter
INPUT, type and range (Rd.SC.OF)
Reset Peak/Valley (HI/LO)
RdG.CNF, display controls
RdG SC, display scale factor
RdG OF, display offset
INP.CNF, meter features
INP SC, input scale factor
dEC.Pt and CNt by (roundoff)
FILtER and FILt.tM, filter #s
# CHAR
SECTION
0
0
2
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
2
0
0
7
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
2
6
6
2
6
2
2
8.2.3
8.2.3
10.14, 1015
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
10.14,10.15
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
7.2.2
10.16
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
8.2.3
10.10
8.2.3
10.1
10.34
10.35
10.2
10.34
10.3
10.4
(continued next page)
8-6
8. Command and Response Structure
COMMAND SUFFIX
G,P,R,W
10
G,P,R,W
11
G,P,R,W
12
G,P,R,W
13
R,W
14
R,W
15
G,P,R,W
16
G,P,R,W
17
R,W
18
G,P,R,W
1A
G,P,R,W
1B
G,P,R,W
1C
R,W
1D
G,P,R,W
1E
G,P,R,W
1F
R,W
20
G,P,R,W
21
G,P,R,W
22
G,P,R,W
23
G,P,R,W
24
G,P,R,W
25
G,P,R,W
26
G,P,R,W
40
G,P,R,W
41
R,W
42
R,W
43
R,W
44
R,W
45
R,W
49
R,W
50
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
R,W
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
ITEM AFFECTED
# CHAR SECTION
SP.CNF, control setpoints 1 and 2
2
10.5
AL.CNF, control setpoints 3 and 4
2
10.6
AL MOdE, alarm function
2
10.7
NUM.dLy, alarm delay
2
10.8
SP db, setpoint hysteresis
4
10.36
AL db, alarm hysteresis
4
10.37
OUt.CNF, analog out and Ad.RAtE
2
10.9
OUt SC, analog out scale
6
10.34
COMM, communications config
2
10.11
AddRES, RS-485 device # address
2
10.29
dAt.FMt, communication data format
2
10.12
bUS.FMt, communications BUS format
2
10.13
SERCNt, # of readings between transmissions
4
10.30
SER.RCG, recognition character
2
10.31
SER.UOM, units of measure
6
10.32
SER.dLy, communication turnaround delay
2
10.33
SP 1, setpoint 1 value
6
10.28
SP 2, setpoint 2 value
6
10.28
SP 3, setpoint 3 value
6
10.28
SP 4, setpoint 4 value
6
10.28
INP OF, input offset
6
10.35
OUt OF, analog output offset
6
10.35
RAM or EEPROM BLOCK A
60
10.17
RAM or EEPROM BLOCK B
38
10.18
EEPROM BLOCK C
20
10.19
EEPROM BLOCK D
10.20
EEPROM BLOCK E
10.21
EEPROM BLOCK F
10.22
Analog Output Option Board (AN03) Calibration
16
-1st two bytes for “Set Color Config, 2nd two bytes
for “NUM.PNt” value of Multi-point Scale & Offset
2
10.26
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 0 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 1 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 2 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 3 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 4 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 5 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 6 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 7 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 8 values
6
10.27
Multi-point Scale & Offset Input / Read 9 values
6
10.27
8-7
8. Command and Response Structure
NOTES:
1. Each BLOCK is the string of HEX-ASCII data which is produced by the
concatenation of the data for single items listed below:
BLOCK A =
26+17+25+0B+09+08+24+23+22+21
BLOCK B =
1E+1F+20+1A+18+13+12+11+10+05+0C+16+07+1C+1B+0E+0A
BLOCK C =
1D+15+14+04+03+02+01
BLOCKS D, E AND F are meter factory calibration values. Adjustment of these
values should be made with care, preferably using a well-equipped calibration
laboratory.
2. Suffixes 06, 0D, 0F, and 19 are not used: the meter will respond to these with
an error message.
3. The meter, upon completion of a BLOCK PUT (into RAM) Command, goes to
soft reset, “RESEt1”, which does not copy EEPROM data into RAM.
4. Upon completion of a BLOCK WRITE (into EEPROM) Command, however, the
meter goes to hard reset, “RESEt2”, copying the data from EEPROM into the
working RAM. Single PUT (or WRITE) commands do not interrupt the
measurement process of the meter, even when the changes are to scale or
offset values.
5. <data> encoding for Write and Put Commands will be described in Section 10
with each Read and Get response.
8-8
8. Command and Response Structure
8.3 RESPONSE STRUCTURE
The meter transmits different response formats according to the type of command it
receives, e.g. if it is in echo or no-echo mode and if an error has occurred or not.
8.3.1 NO ERROR
8.3.2 ECHO MODE (SEE SECTIONS 10.13)
For type (1) Command:
[nn]ccc<data>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
For type (2) Command:
a) Response for “V01” Command
[nn][V01][Sa[b]]S<value>[S<value>][S<value>][S<value>][<SP>uuu][hh]<CR>[<LF>]
b) Response for “X” Command
[nn][ccc]<value>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
For type (3) Command:
[nn][ccc]<d>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
For type (4) Command:
a) For “P” and “W” Command:
[nn][ccc][hh]<CR>[<LF>]
b) For “Y” Command
[nn]Y01<CR>[<LF>]
For type (5) Command:
[nn]ccc[hh]<CR> [<LF>]
8.3.3 NO ECHO MODE
For Commands “P”, “W”, “D”, “E”, “Z”, and “Y” No response will be transmitted
For Type (1) Commands:
<data>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
For Type (2) Commands:
a) For “V01” Command:
[Sa[b]]S<value>[S<value>][S<value>][S<value>][<SP>uuu[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
b) For “X” Command:
<value>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
For Type (3) Commands:
<d>[hh]<CR>[<LF>]
8-9
8. Command and Response Structure
8.3.3 NO ECHO MODE continued
Where “nn” is the meter’s address in HEX format and is omitted from the response
format if the communication is in the point-to-point mode. “ccc” is the three (3)
character command prefix letter and it’s suffix number. “d” is one ASCII character.
“[hh]” is the optional checksum “CR” is carriage return “[<LF>]” is optional line feed.
“[Sa[b]]” is the optional alarm status character followed by the optional peak/valley
status character. Alarm status character is preceded by the chosen plain-ASCII
separator character, <S> or <CR>, depending on how you want this data displayed.
“S<value>” is the separator followed by the decimal-digit measurement value, with
plain-ASCII minus sign (if any) and decimal point.
“[S<value>]” is the optional inclusion of the separator followed by any one of the three
added decimal-digit values listed above.
“[<SP>uuu]” is the optional three units-of-measure characters (letters or other printable
plain-ASCII symbols) preceded by a space; “<CR>” is the terminating plain-ASCII
Carriage Return character.
[<LF>] optional line feed.
A positive overflow in any one of the <value>s results in the transmission of
“?+999999” for that value; negative overflow sends “?–999999”.
8.4 DATA LENGTH CORRESPONDING TO THE RESPONSE STRUCTURE
For “R” and “G” Commands:
Data is equivalent to the “W” and “P” Commands respectively
(see Table 8-2).
For “V01” and “X” Commands:
a) Value has 7 characters (like 724.352 or –233.45), unless overflow occurs
in which case it consists of 8 characters (see previous note)
b) Status characters “a” or “b” are each one character
For “U” Commands: Data is one character.
8-10
8. Command and Response Structure
8.5 ERROR RESPONSE
The meter is capable of detecting the different errors during the communication process
and will transmit an indicating message to the host controller.
8.5.1 ERROR RESPONSE FORMAT
1.
Echo Mode
[nn]?ee<CR>[<LF>]
2.
No echo mode
?ee<CR>[<LF>]
where “?ee” is the special code indicating an error has occurred as follows:
8.5.2 ERROR MESSAGE
Table 8.3 Error Messages
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
ERROR MESSAGE
CODE
Command Error
Format Error
Checksum Error
Parity Error
Calibration/Write Lockout Error
EEPROM Write Lockout Error
Serial Device Address Error
Decimal Point Error
Serial Recognition Error
Invalid Character(s) used in <data>
with Y01 Command
?43
?46
?48
?50
?4C
?45
?56
?56
?56
8-11
?56
8. Command and Response Structure
8.5.3 DESCRIPTION
1. COMMAND ERROR occurs when:
a. Command prefix letter is not valid
b. Command suffix is not valid
2. FORMAT ERROR occurs when:
a. Length of the message is either shorter or longer than it should be.
b. Any other character than “0-F” used for hexadecimal values
3. CALIBRATION LOCKOUT ERROR occurs if jumper “S3B” on the Main Board has
been removed to prohibit any changes in calibration.
4. EEPROM WRITE LOCKOUT ERROR occurs if any write (“W”) Command has been
issued to the meter and the jumper position “S3-A” on the Main Board of the meter
has been removed
or
External pin 10 on the rear connector “P2” of the meter has been grounded.
5. SERIAL RECOGNITION CHARACTER ERROR occurs if a new value is between
0 to 1F (hex) or larger than 7F (hex). “^”, “A”, “E”, are not valid since those are used
in the special communication command “^AE”.
6. SERIAL DEVICE ADDRESS ERROR occurs if the new value is larger than 199
decimal.
7. DECIMAL POINT ERRORS occur if:
a) New value is 0 or larger than 6 (3 when the meter is in the Thermocouple or
RTD modes).
b) New value causes the reading offset to overflow, i.e. if larger that 999999 or
smaller that -99999.
c) New value causes any ot the setpoints to overflow, i.e. if larger that 99999 or
smaller that -99999.
IMPORTANT NOTES:
1) The meter will not respond to a command if the command’s recognition character
does not match the meter’s recognition character.
2) When in multipoint mode, the meter will test the command’s address with the one
previously assigned after the recognition character has been matched. The meter will
not respond to the command if addresses do not match, even if an error has occurred.
3) If the meter is in the Menu or Setpoint mode and receives any transmitted data, it
quits that routine, displays “SERIAL” for up to two seconds, completes its
Communication job, and then resets the meter, i.e., hard reset (RESET 2) from
Menu, or soft reset (RESET 1) from Setpoint.
4) Any attempt to use push buttons when meter is in Transmit/Receive mode will be denied
and followed by the display of “SERIAL”, indicating that Communication is in process.
8-12
8. Command and Response Structure
8.6 STATUS CHARACTER FORMATS
The meter upon receiving U01 or U02 Command will transmit alarm or peak/valley
status characters respectively.
8.6.1 ALARM STATUS CHARACTERS
Table 8.4 shows the transmitted character for each of the sixteen possible
setpoint/alarm states. (Note the binary progression.)
Table 8.4. Alarm Status Characters
CHARACTER
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
SP#4
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
8-13
SP#3
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
SP#2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
SP#1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
8. Command and Response Structure
8.6.2 PEAK/VALLEY (HI/LO) STATUS CHARACTERS
Table 8.5 gives the characters transmitted to show changes in Peak/Valley readings.
The meter keeps track of Peak and Valley changes at the completion of each
measurement, so that the occurrence of new values can be signaled. However,
transmissions of PEAK/VALLEY status may be commanded less often: therefore, the
meter also monitors if Peak or Valley values have changed since the last status
transmission.
TABLE 8.5 PEAK/VALLEY STATUS CHARACTERS
CHARACTER
@
D
E
H
J
L
M
N
PEAK LARGER
THAN LATEST
TRANSMISSION
NO
NO
NO
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
VALLEY LESS
THAN LATEST
TRANSMISSION
NO
YES
YES
NO
NO
YES
YES
YES
8-14
PEAK LARGER
THAN LATEST
READING
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
YES
VALLEY LESS
THAN LATEST
READING
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
8. Command and Response Structure
8.7 "VO1" RESPONSE DATA FORMAT
As described in Section 8.3 response to the “V01” Command has the following format
if in echo mode:
[nn][V01][Sa[b]]S<value>[S<value>][S<value>][S<value>][<SP>uuu][hh]<CR>[<LF>]
“nnV01” is omitted from the response format if in no-echo mode; where:
TABLE 8.6 SPECIAL CHARACTERS
CHARACTERS
a
b
first<value>
second<value>
third<value>
fourth<value>
<SP>
S
<uuu>1
<uuu>2
hh
<CR>
LF
[]
Alarm status character
Peak/valley status character
Value of current reading
Value of filtered reading
Value of peak reading
Value of valley reading
Space
Space or <CR>
Three characters for the unit of measurement
N/A
Checksum
Carriage return
Line feed
Optional item
The length of the message transmitted by the meter in response to the “V01” command
is variable and controlled by the two menu items as “dAt FMt” (Data Format) and
“bUS.FMt” (Bus Format). (See Sections 10.12 and 10.13).
8-15
8. Command and Response Structure
8.8 “^AE” RESPONSE FORMAT
The meter’s response to “^AE[nn]<CR>” is 4 bytes of data, sent as 8 HEX-ASCII
characters, followed by a carriage return (no other characters even when programmed
to echo). These four bytes are:
1: Serial Recognition Character below; e.g., “*”, sent HEX-ASCII “2A”)
2: Device ID (INF-B)
3: Bus Format Byte (“bUS.FMt”; e.g., HEX-ASCII “5C” for multipoint mode with echo)
4: Serial Communications Configuration Byte (“COMM”: e.g., HEX-ASCII “56” for
2 stop bits, even parity, and 19200 baud)
8.9 EXAMPLES:
The following are examples of the different commands and their proper responses from
meters. For the following examples assume that:
a)
b)
c)
d)
echo mode
“*” as the recognition character of the meter
meter’s address is “15 HEX” if it is used in the multipoint mode
no line feed or checksum characters are included
1. Read serial recognition character from EEPROM in point-to-point mode:
Command format
*R1E<CR>
Response format
R1E2A<CR>
(Since “2A” is HEX-ASCII value of “*” in the table).
2. Read serial address from the RAM of the meter number “15 HEX” in the multipoint
mode:
Command format
Response format
*15G1A<CR>
15G1A15<CR>
3. Write “VLT” as units of measure into the EEPROM of the meter in the point-to-point
mode:
Command format
Response format
*W1F564C54<CR>
W1F<CR>
where 56, 4C, 54 are the three HEX ASCII values for V, L, and T respectively.
8-16
8. Command and Response Structure
4. Read alarm status character from the meter number 15 HEX:
Command format
Response format
*15U01<CR>
15U01@<CR>
where “@” is the alarm status character, decoded using Table 8.4.
5. Enable setpoints number 3 and 4 in point-to-point mode:
Command format
Response format
*E01<CR>
E01<CR>
6. Hold display value on meter number 15 HEX:
Command format
Response format
*15D04<CR>
15D04<CR>
7. Cold reset (reset 1) in point-to-point mode:
Command format
Response format
*Z04<CR>
Z04<CR>
8. Publish measurement string from the meter in point-to-point mode:
Command format
Response format
*V01<CR>
V01 567.891 567.880 712.345 110.765<CR>
9. Publish current reading value from the meter number 15 HEX in multipoint mode:
Command format
Response format
*15X01<CR>
X01 567.891<CR>
10.Read block of data from EEPROM in point-to-point mode:
Command format
Response format
*R42<CR>
R42271100010001EO3E003F<CR>
11.Display “HELLO” onto the meter number 15 HEX in multipoint mode:
Command format
Response format
*15Y01HELLO<CR>
15Y01<CR>
8-17
9. Meter Bus Response
As detailed before, the meter can receive and transmit at baud rates up to 19,200. No
data is ever lost by the meter even at the highest rate with the most complex meter
program, provided that the computer does not attempt to interrupt a transmission from
the meter by transmitting at the same time.
When not transmitting, the meter continually looks for a new character on the bus.
When any character is received, the meter drops out of ALARM mode; (if in that mode)
checks for the Recognition Character, the start of a new message.
9.1 POINT-TO-POINT OR MULTIPOINT COMMAND MODE
If the recognition character is correct, the meter now checks for the address in the
Multipoint mode.
When a match is obtained, the meter then decodes the Command Code and fulfills that
command. Otherwise, the meter ignores the command and continues to look for
another recognition character.
9-1
9. Meter Bus Response
9.1.1 METER’S RESPONSE TIME
RESPONSE TIME: this is the period from the time the meter detects the first command
character to the time that it starts transmitting proper response.
Response time = Transmit command time + program delay time + turn around delay time.
Where:
Transmit Command Time = the transmission period of full command from the host
computer to the meter.
[(# of bits in a character) * (# of characters)] – [baud rate] (in seconds)
where: * = Multiply
# of bits in a character = 10 or 11 (see Sections 4.12 and 6)
Turn around delay = Receive to transmit delay and can be programmable to 0, 30,
100, 300 ms. For the following data turn around delay assumed 0.
TABLE 9.1 READING RATE FOR COMMAND MODE
Sample Rate
0 (slow)
1
2
3
4
5 (fast)
Process (100mV) Rate (ms)
(Turn Around - Time ms)
7(135 ms)
14(68 ms)
27(36 ms)
52(19 ms)
60(14 ms)
60(14 ms)
TC(K type) Rate (ms)
(Turn Around - Time ms)
7(135 ms)
14(68 ms)
28(36 ms)
28(30 ms)
28(30 ms)
28(30 ms)
Test with Command Mode (Baud Rate at 19200 bps, Command Mode)
For the Command Mode, if the command-sending turn-around time is shorter than the
turn-around time in the above table (Refer to Process or TC), the response will have
some duplicate readings. For example, if the sample rate is 1 in process, the command
sending turn-around time should be larger than 68 ms.
Although single long transmission’s delay seems longer than chunk
transmission, in most cases total transmission time will be shorter, especially
using 19200 baud rate.
9-2
9. Meter Bus Response
9.2 POINT-TO-POINT CONTINUOUS MODE
As described before, the meter transmits its different measurement values in strings of
characters continuously on the bus. The length of the string is variable and is
controlled by two menu items: “DAt.FMt” and “bUS.FMt” (see Sections 10.12 and
10.13). The time between consecutive transmission is also controlled by another menu
item: “SERCNt”. This item is in units of “numbers of readings” (Section 10.20).
9.2.1 METER’S RESPONSE TIME
This is the difference in time from the moment when the Serial Count (“SERCNt”)
value is reached to the time of transmission of the first character of the data string.
TABLE 9.2 READING RATE FOR COMMUNICATION
Sample Rate
0 (slow)
1
2
3
4
5 (fast)
Process (100mV) Rate (ms)
7(135)
14(68)
27(36)
52(19)
71(14)
71(14)
TC (K type) Rate (ms)
7(135)
14(68)
27(36)
33(30)
33(30)
33(30)
Test with Communication (Baud Rate at 19200 bps, Continuous Mode)
Although transmission’s program delay seems longer than chunk
transmission, in most cases total transmission time will be shorter, especially
using 19200 baud rate.
9.2.2 COMMUNICATING WITH THE METER WHEN IN CONTINUOUS MODE
If the meter is in point-to-point continuous mode, it ignores any transmitting command.
On the other hand, transmitting “X-OFF” character (13 Hex) which is equivalent to the
“RTS line false” will halt continuous transmission. Transmitting “X-ON” character
(11 hex) or making “RTS line true” will resume continuous transmission. Specifically, if
command “^AE” is transmitted, it will cause the meter to switch to COMMAND mode.
To be able to communicate with the meter when in Continuous Mode, do the following:
1. Transmit “X-OFF” character or make “RTS” line false.
2. Transmit “^AE” command. Now your meter is in Command Mode.
3. Do the communication with the meter.
4. Use “P1C” command to change BUS FORMAT (see Section 10.13) i.e., change
bit #4 of “bUS FMt” from 1 to 0 to go back to Continuous Mode
9-3
9. Meter Bus Response
9.3 MULTIPOINT ALARM MODE RESPONSE
The meter is commanded into the ALARM mode by detecting the alarm code–E03 after
its own address or the common 00 address. It stays silent unless an alarm already
exists. If an alarm is detected, it immediately transmits its own address with its alarm
status characters. No turnaround time delay is used. All devices on the bus which are
in the ALARM mode drop out of that mode if any character is detected on the bus, so
that bus contention is minimized.
The program for the controlling device (computer) is usually written to poll the alarm
status of all devices once bus activity is detected after an alarm command, so that
nearly-simultaneous alarm conditions are properly detected. Such a meter poll by the
computer after an alarm response usually starts at the detected device address, or at
device 01 in case of a garbled address (if two or more devices alarm at once).
If there is adequate time allowance in the data acquisition program, the computer may
poll the alarm status of all meters before commanding the ALARM mode to reduce the
probability of bus contention and garbled transmissions.
a) Slow mode = 0 to 300 ms
b) fast mode = 0 to 100 ms
Although transmission’s program delay seems longer than chunk
transmission, in most cases total transmission time will be shorter, specially
using 19200 baud rate.
9.4 WATCHDOG TIMER FOR COMMUNICATION
There is an eight second watchdog timer available in the communication portion of the
meter. When the computer starts sending a command to the meter, meter enables its
receive mode and starts getting the incoming characters, until a carriage return
completes the command string. Then the meter disables its receive mode and enables
its transmission mode to transmit or act according to the command information.
Receive mode time is the period that the meter is in receive mode. Receive time
should always be less than eight seconds, otherwise meter will ignore the command
and will finish the receive mode (there will be no affect on the performance of the
meter). In this case command should be executed again.
Watchdog timer is disabled when meter is in continuous communication
mode.
9-4
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
This section introduces data formats in detail. The following conditions are assumed in
the text and in examples in this section
1. The recognition character is the asterisk(*).
2. The meter address number is 15 HEX (21 decimal)
3. When “W” command is given, a reset is necessary to initiate the command.
4. “X” in bit pattern information means the bit is not related to that parameter.
5. Each byte consists of 8 bits.
6. Each byte consists of 2 nibbles; Most Significant Nibble (MSN) and Least
Significant Nibble (LSN)
10-1
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.1 READING CONFIGURATION (“RdG.CNF”)
TABLE 10.1 READING CONFIGURATION
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
RdG.CNF
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
dIRECt Direct Format for Rd.SC.OF
2.CdINt 2-Coordinate Format for Rd.SC.OF
dP.ACtV yES Active Decimal Point
dP.ACtV NO Independent Decimal Point
SP1.FLS dISABL SP1 Flashing
SP1.FLS ENAbLE SP1 Flashing
SP2.FLS dISABL SP2 Flashing
SP2.FLS ENAbLE SP2 Flashing
AL1.FLS dISABL AL1 Flashing
AL1.FLS ENAbLE AL1 Flashing
AL2.FLS dISABL AL2 Flashing
AL2.FLS ENAbLE AL2 Flashing
H.bRt HIGH BRIGHTNESS
M.bRt MEDIUM BRIGHTNESS
L.bRt LOW BRIGHTNESS
(Not Used)
EXAMPLE: To set Rd.SC.OF direct format, Decimal Point active, Display flashing as
input value reaches SP1 or Alarm1 (SP3) and Display LED’s at high brightness level:
The command data is 00010100 BIN. = 14 HEX. Then send *W0714
10-2
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.2 INPUT CONFIGURATION (“INP.CNF” and “INPUt”)
TABLE 10.2 INPUT CONFIGURATION
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
INP.CNF and INPUt
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
60 Line Frequency 60Hz
50 Line Frequency 50Hz
SLOW (14/SEC) Reading Rate
FAST (100/SEC) Reading Rate
UNIPOL Voltage Unipolar; tC
BIPOL Voltage Bipolar
C Unit of Temperature Degree C
F Unit of Temperature Degree F
k Unit of Temperature Degree K
(Not Used)
tC.CO.JC ENAbLE TC Cold Junction;
3.LINR 3 wire linear RTD;
NORMAL Bridge Limit; Process (Not Used)
tC.CO.JC dISABL TC Cold Junction;
4.LINR 4 wire linear RTD ;
SP1.L2.H SP1 lower overload limit and SP2
upper overload limit; Process - (Not Used)
IN.SC.OF dISABL Input Scale & Offset
IN.SC.OF ENAbLE Input Scale & Offset
RAtIO dISABL Strain Non-Ratiometric;
TC & Process Default
RAtIO ENAbLE Strain Ratiometric
EXAMPLE: To set the meter with line frequency of 50 Hz, slow reading rate (in case of
MENU 2), degree K unit of measure, TC Cold-Junction enabled (in case of TC mode)
and input scale and offset enabled:
The command data is 01010001BIN. = 51 HEX. Then send *W0A51
10-3
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.3
SETTING COUNT BY (“CNtby”) AND DECIMAL POINT (“SEt dP”)
TABLE 10.3 COUNT BY and DECIMAL POINT
7
6
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
X
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
X
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
CNtby and SEt dP
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
001 Count
002 Count
005 Count
020 Count
020 Count
050 Count
100 Count
(Not Used)
(Not Used)
NONE
FFFFFF
FFFFF.F
FFFF.FF
FFF.FFF
FF.FFFF
F.FFFFF
(Not Used)
(Not Used)
By
By
By
By
By
By
By
1
2
5
10
20
50
100
EXAMPLE: To set the meter’s display decimal point at the 4th position (FFF.FFF) and
reading value counted by 2:
The command data is 01000001BIN. = 41 HEX. Then send *W0C41
10-4
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.4
FILTER CONFIGURATION “FILtER” AND “OUt.tyP”
TABLE 10.4 FILTER CONFIGURATION and OUTPUT TYPE
7
BIT POSITION
6
5
4
3
X
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
FILtER and OUt.tyP
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
001 Filter Time 1
002 Filter Time 2
004 Filter Time 4
008 Filter Time 8
016 Filter Time 16
032 Filter Time 32
064 Filter Time 64
128 Filter Time 128
(Not Used)
A.b.C.FIL ABC Filter Type
MOV.AVE Moving Average Filter Type
FILtRd Filtered Value on the Display
UNFILt Unfiltered Value to Analog Output
FILtRd Filtered Value to Analog Output
PEAk Value to Analog Output
VALLy Value to Analog Output
EXAMPLE: To set the meter’s display with a rapid changing input signal the filter time
constant should be higher (for example FILt.tM = 32), switch Filter Type to MOV.AVE,
and set Output Type to be filtered:
The command data is 01110101BIN. = 75 HEX. Then send *W0E75
10-5
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.5
SETPOINT 1 AND 2 CONFIGURATION (“SP.CNF”)
Table 10.5 Setpoint Configuration
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
SP.CNF
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
AbOVE SP1 Active Above
bELOW SP1 Active Below
N.OPEN SP1 Normal Open
N.CLOSE SP1 Normal Close
SP1 Use Un-filtered Value
SP1 Use Filtered Value
AbOVE SP2 Active Above
bELOW SP2 Active Below
N.OPEN SP2 Normal Open
N.CLOSE SP2 Normal Close
SP2 Use Un-filtered Value
SP2 Use Filtered Value
SP1 & SP2 Enable
SP1 & SP2 Disable
LED1 & 2 Enable
LED1 & 2 Disable
EXAMPLE: Set Setpoint 1 (SP1) active above, Relay 1 at normal close, Setpoint 2
(SP2) active below, Relay 2 at normal open, enable SP1 and SP2’s function, and
LED’s light up when input signal filtered value reaches the Setpoint 1 and 2:
The command data is 00101110BIN. = 2E HEX. Then send *W102E
10-6
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.6 ALARM (SETPOINTS 3 AND 4) CONFIGURATION (“AL.CNF”)
TABLE 10.6 ALARM CONFIGURATION
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
AL.CNF
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
AbOVE AL1 Active Above
bELOW AL1 Active Below
N.OPEN AL1 Normal Open
N.CLOSE AL1 Normal Close
AL1 Use Un-Filtered Value
AL1 Use Filtered Value
AbOVE AL2 ACTIVE Above
bELOW AL2 ACTIVE Below
N.OPEN AL2 Normal Open
N.CLOSE AL2 Normal Close
AL2 Use Un-Filtered Value
AL2 Use Filtered Value
AL1 & AL2 Enable
AL1 & AL2 Disable
ALARM RESET Enable AT P2-11
ALARM RESET Disable AT P2-11
EXAMPLE: To enable Alarm 1 & 2 and setup Alarm1 to activate above Alarm 1 value,
Relay at normal open and use of filtered input value. However, set Alarm 2 to activate
below Alarm 2 value, Relay at normal close, use of unfiltered input value and Alarm
reset disabled at pin#11 of rear terminal P2:
The command data is 10011100 BIN. = 9C HEX. Then send *W119C
10-7
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.7 ALARM FUNCTIONS (“AL.CNF and AL.MOdE”)
TABLE 10.7 ALARM CONFIGURATION AND MODE
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
AL.CNF and AL.MOdE
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
X
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
X
PROC AL1 Process
HI dEV AL1 HIGH Deviation
LO dEV AL1 LOW Deviation
bNd.dEV AL1 BAND Deviation
UNLtCH AL1 Un-Latched Alarm
LAtCH AL1 Latched Alarm
(Not Used)
PROC AL2 Process
HI dEV AL2 HIGH Deviation
LO dEV AL2 LOW Deviation
bNd.dEV AL2 BAND Deviation
UNLtCH AL2 Un-Latched Alarm
LAtCH AL2 Latched Alarm
(Not Used)
EXAMPLE: Set Alarm 1 function mode as Band Deviation, latched and Alarm 2
function mode as Process, latched.
The command data is 01000111 BIN. = 47 HEX. Then send *W1247
10.8 ALARM DELAY: (“NUM.dLy”)
TABLE 10.8 ALARM DELAY
7
X
BIT POSITION
6
5
4
3
X
X X X
NUM.dLy (ALARM DELAY)
2
X
1
X
0
X
0-15 for AL2
0-15 for AL1
EXAMPLE: These 2 bytes enable users to select the number of input readings
required to trigger Alarm 1 (SP3), and Alarm 2 (SP4) action that will delay the alarm
activation. Choose 7 for Alarm 2 and 9 for Alarm 1 as the number of input readings
before meter activates the alarm:
The command data is 10010111 BIN. = 97 HEX. Then send *W1397
10-8
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.9 OUTPUT CONFIGURATION (“OUt.CNF”) and A to D RATE (“Ad.RAtE”)
TABLE 10.9 OUTPUT CONFIGURATION
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
OUt.CNFand Ad.RAtE
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
dISABLE Analog Output
ENAbLE Analog Output
0-10 V Output
0-20 mA Output
Parallel BCD dISABL (not used)
Parallel BCD ENAbLE (not used)
BCD Output Display Value (not used)
BCD Output Peak Value (not used)
Standard Print (Desktop) (not used)
Special Printer (Panel Printer) (not used)
0 A to D Convert Rate 0
1 A to D Convert Rate 1
2 A to D Convert Rate 2
3 A to D Convert Rate 3
4 A to D Convert Rate 4
5 A to D Convert Rate 5
(Not Used)
(Not Used)
EXAMPLE: Enable Analog Output, which produces a 0-20 mA current source and set
the A to D conversion rate to 2:
The command data is 01000011 BIN. = 43 HEX. Then send *W1643
10-9
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.10 INPUT TYPE (“INPUt”) and READING SCALE & OFFSET (“Rd.SC.OF”)
TABLE 10.10 INPUT TYPE and READING SCALE & OFFSET
7
6
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
INPUt and Rd.SC.OF
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
TC: J; RTD: 2Pt392 2 wire 100ohm a=392;
Process:+/-50mV, 0-100mV; Current: 0-20mA
TC: K; RTD: 3Pt392 3 wire 100ohm a=392;
Process: +/-500mV, 0-1V; Current: 4-20mA
TC: T; RTD: 4Pt392 4 wire 100ohm a=392;
Process: +/-5V, 0-10V
TC: E; RTD: 2Pt385 2 wire 100ohm a=385;
Process: +/-50V, 0-100V
TC: N; RTD: 3Pt385 3 wire 100ohm a=385
TC: DINJ; RTD: 4Pt385 4 wire 100ohm a=385
TC: R; RTD: 3.LINR 3 wire Linear or Ohms
TC: S; RTD: 4.LINR 4 wire Linear
TC: B
TC
Rtd
VOLt
CURRNt
(Not Used)
bRIdGE
POt
(Not Used)
Rd.SC.OF dISAbL
Rd.SC.OF ENAbLE
EXAMPLE: To select 0-100 Volt range input type and enable Reading Scale and Offset :
The command data is 10100011 BIN. = A3 HEX. Then send *W05A3
10-10
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.11
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS CONFIGURATION (“COMM”)
TABLE 10.11 SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS CONFIGURATION
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
X
0
1
0
1
COM.PAR and MOdbUS
2
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Baud Rate 300
Baud Rate 600
Baud Rate 1200
Baud Rate 2400
Baud Rate 4800
Baud Rate 9600
Baud Rate 19200
(Not Used)
MODBUS Disable
MODBUS Enable
NONE PARITY
ODD PARITY
EVEN PARITY
(Not Used)
ONE STOP BIT
TWO STOP BIT
(Not Used)
EXAMPLE: To set the baud rate to 19200, enable Modbus, None Parity and one stop bit:
The command data is 00001110 BIN. = 0E HEX. Then send *W180E
10-11
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.12 DATA FORMAT (“dAt.FMt”)
TABLE 10.12 DATA FORMAT
7
BIT POSITION
6
5
4
3
DAt.FMt
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
Alarm Status - EXCLUDED
Alarm Status - INCLUDED
Peak / Valley Status - EXCLUDED
Peak / Valley Status - INCLUDED
Current Reading - EXCLUDED
Current Reading - INCLUDED
Filtered Value - EXCLUDED
Filtered Value - INCLUDED
Peak Value - EXCLUDED
Peak Value - INCLUDED
Valley Value - EXCLUDED
Valley Value - INCLUDED
Use Space as Separator
Use <CR. as Separator
Units of Measurement - EXCLUDED
Units of Measurement - INCLUDED
EXAMPLE: To format the data string, which includes Alarm status, Peak/Valley,
Current, Filtered input value status, units of measure and listed by underline instead of
space separated:
The command data is 11001111 BIN. = CF HEX. Then send *W1BCF
10-12
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.13 COMMUNICATIONS BUS FORMAT (“bUS.FMt”)
TABLE 10.13 BUS FORMAT
7
6
BIT POSITION
5
4
3
2
bUS.FMt
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
Checksum - EXCLUDED
Checksum - INCLUDED
NO Line Feed
Line Feed following with <CR.
NO ECHO
ECHO
Point to Point Mode (RS-232)
Multi-Point (RS-485)
CONTINUOUS (Point to Point Mode)
COMMAND
MESSAGE (Continuous MODE)
CHARACTER (Continuous MODE)
RS-232
RS-485
ALWAYS 0, (Not Used)
EXAMPLE: To configure communication protocol and bus format as following:
checksum excluded, no line feed, echo mode on, point to point, command mode and
RS-232 protocol:
The command data is 00010100 BIN. = 14 HEX. Then send *W1C14
10-13
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.14 LOCKOUT CONFIGURATION (“LCk.CNF”)
TABLE 10.14 LOCKOUT CONFIGURATION
BIT POSITION
7
6
5
4
3
LCk.CNF
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
SP1 LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
SP2 LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
AL1 LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
AL2 LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
INPUt LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
RdG.CFG LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
INP.CFG LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
MP.SC.OF LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
EXAMPLE: To prevent unauthorized modification of Setpoint 1 (SP1), Input type,
Reading Configuration menu and Multi-Point Scale and Offset menu:
The command data is 10110001 BIN. = 14 HEX. Then send *W01B1
10-14
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.15 LOCKOUT CONFIG. (“LCk.CNF”) and NORMAL COLOR (“N.COLOR”)
TABLE 10.15 LOCKOUT CONFIGURATION and NORMAL COLOR
BIT POSITION
7
6
5
4
3
LCk.CNF and N.COLOR
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0/1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
OUt.CNF LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
SP.CNF LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
AL.CNFG LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
COMM LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
COLOR LOCKOUT: UNLOCK
LOCK
(Not Used)
NORMAL COLOR: GREEN
NORMAL COLOR: RED
NORMAL COLOR: AMBER
(Not Used)
EXAMPLE: To prevent unauthorized access to Output Configuration menu,
Communication menu and select Normal color of the LED’s display as Green:
The command data is 00001001 BIN. = 09 HEX. Then send *W0209
10-15
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.16 COLOR CONFIGURATION (“COLOR”)
TABLE 10.16 COLOR CONFIGURATION
BIT POSITION
7
6
5
4
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
COLOR
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
SP1
SP1
SP1
SP1
COLOR: HOLD
COLOR: GREEN
COLOR: RED
COLOR: AMBER
SP2
SP2
SP2
SP2
COLOR: HOLD
COLOR: GREEN
COLOR: RED
COLOR: AMBER
AL1
AL1
AL1
AL1
COLOR: HOLD
COLOR: GREEN
COLOR: RED
COLOR: AMBER
AL2
AL2
AL2
AL2
COLOR: HOLD
COLOR: GREEN
COLOR: RED
COLOR: AMBER
EXAMPLE: To setup LED’s display change color to RED then AMBER when reading
reaches SP1 value then AL1 (SP3) value respectively, but hold the color for SP2 or
AL2:
The command data is 00110010 BIN. = 32 HEX. Then send *W0332
10-16
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.17 BLOCK A
BLOCK
A
COMMAND PREFIX
R,W
COMMAND SUFFIX (HEX)
40
NOTE: R,W means “R” or “W”
This block consists of ten (10) items and thirty bytes (60 ASCII characters):
TABLE 10.17
R/W40 (BLOCK A)
*W40200000100001200000100001200000100001200000200000200000200000
HEX
COMMAND
SUFFIX
DESCRIPTION
BYTE
NUMBER
& ORDER
NUMBER
OF
BYTE
DEFAULT
VALUE
26
Analog Out Offset
1, 2, 3
3
200000
17
Analog Out Scale
4, 5, 6
3
100001
25
Input Offset
7, 8, 9
3
200000
0B
Input Scale
10, 11, 12
3
100001
09
Reading Display Offset
13, 14, 15
3
200000
08
Reading Display Scale
16, 17, 18
3
100001
24
Setpoint 4 Value
19, 20, 21
3
200000
23
Setpoint 3 Value
22, 23, 24
3
200000
22
Setpoint 2 Value
25, 26, 27
3
200000
21
Setpoint 1 Value
28, 29, 30
3
200000
10-17
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.17 BLOCK A continued
EXAMPLE: To configure meter working with the following order and desired options:
FUNCTIONS
DESIRED OPTIONS
EQUIVALENT
HEX VALUE
Analog Out Offset
0
700000
Analog Out Scale
0.0001
A186A0
Input Offset
0
700000
Input Scale
1
6186A0
Display Offset
0
700000
Display Scale
1
6186A0
Setpoint 4 Value
+40000.
109C40
Setpoint 3 Value
+30000.
107530
Setpoint 2 Value
+20000.
104E20
Setpoint 1 Value
+10000.
102710
The command data is in order as following:
700000A186A07000006186A07000006186A0109C40107530104E20102710
Then send:
*W40700000A186A07000006186A07000006186A0109C40107530104E20102710
10-18
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.18 BLOCK B
BLOCK
B
COMMAND PREFIX
R,W
COMMAND SUFFIX (HEX)
41
NOTE: R,W means “R” or “W”
This block consists of 17 items and 19 bytes (38 ASCII characters):
TABLE 10.18
R/W41 (BLOCK B)
*W412A202020010115030000002000000894040000
HEX
COMMAND
SUFFIX
DESCRIPTION
BYTE
NUMBER
& ORDER
NUMBER
OF
BYTE
DEFAULT
VALUE
1
1
2A
2, 3, 4
3
202020
1E
Recognition Charater
1F
Units of Measure
20
Serial Delay
5
1
01
1A
RS-485 Device Address
6
1
01
18
COM.PAR and MOdbUS
7
1
15
13
NUM.dLy (Alarm Delay)
8
1
33
12
AL.CNF and AL.MOdE
9
1
00
11
AL.CNF
10
1
00
10
SP.CNF
11
1
00
05
INPUt and Rd.SC.OF
12
1
00
0C
CNt.by and dEC.Pt
13
1
00
16
OUt.CNF and Ad.RAtE
14
1
00
07
RDG.CNF
15
1
08
1C
BUS.FMt
16
1
94
1B
dAt.FMt
17
1
04
0E
FILtER
18
1
00
0A
INP.CNF
19
1
00
10-19
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.18 BLOCK B continued
R/W41 (BLOCK B)
EXAMPLE: To configure meter working with following order and desired options:
FUNCTIONS
DESIRED OPTIONS
Recognition Character
Units of Measure
Serial Delay
RS-485 Device address
COM.PAR & MOdbUS
!
mV
100msec.
15
Comm. Parameter: (19.2k, none, 1)
Modbus enabled
NUM.dLy (Alarm Delay)
7 for Alarm 2, 9 for Alarm1
AL.CNF & AL.MOdE
AL1: Band Dev., latched;
AL2: Process, latched
AL.CNF
AL1 & AL2 enabled, AL1:above,
normal open, filtered; AL2: below,
normal closed, unfiltered
AL. Reset disabled at P2-11 rear connector.
SP.CNF
SP1 & SP2 enabled and flashing;
SP1: above, normal close;
SP2: below, normal open,
INPUt & Rd.SC.OF
0-100 Volt, and enable Rd.SC.OF
CNt by & dEC.Pt
FFF.FFF
OUt.CNF & Ad.RAtE
Enabled Analog Output,
0-20mA and A2D conversion rate = 2
RdG.CNF
Rd.SC.OF direct format,
Decimal Point active,
Display Flashing at Alarm or Setpoint state
and LED’s display at high brightness level.
bUS.FMt
Checksum excluded, No line feed,
Echo mode on, P-to-P Command mode,
RS-485 protocol
DAt.FMt
Data String will include:
Alarm / Peak / Valley / current filtered
input value status and separated by line.
FILtER
32
INP.CNF
Line Frequency - 60HZ,
FAST (12/SEC) Reading Rate,
UNIPOLAR, IN.SC.OF- ENABLE
*The command data is in order as follows:
6D5600020F0E97479C2EA341431454CF
Then send: *W416D5600020F0E97479C2EA341431454CF
10-20
EQUIVALENT
HEX. VALUE
21
6D5600
02
0F
0E
97
47
9C
2E
A3
41
43
14
54
CF
75
1A
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.19 BLOCK C
BLOCK
C
COMMAND PREFIX
R,W
COMMAND SUFFIX (HEX)
42
NOTE: R,W means “R” or “W”
This block consists of 7 items and 10 bytes (20 ASCII characters):
TABLE 10.19
R/W42 (BLOCK C)
*W4200010014001400000000
HEX
COMMAND
SUFFIX
DESCRIPTION
BYTE
NUMBER
& ORDER
NUMBER
OF
BYTE
DEFAULT
VALUE
1D
SERCNt (Serial Count)
1, 2
2
0001
15
AL db (value)
3, 4
2
0014
14
SP db
5, 6
2
0014
04
(Reserved)
7
1
00
03
COLOR (Color Config)
8
1
00
02
LCk.CNF / N.COLOR
9
1
00
01
LCk.CNF
10
1
00
EXAMPLE: To configure meter working with following order and desired options:
FUNCTIONS DESIRED OPTIONS
EQUIVALENT
HEX. VALUE
SERCNt
Fast Rate (12readings/SEC)/hour or
(12x60x60=43200: # of reading between transmission)
A8C0
AL db
0030
001E
SP db
0030
001E
(Reserved)
00
00
COLOR
LED’s display changes color to RED then AMBER
when reading reaches SP1 value then AL1 (SP3) value
respectively, but hold the color for SP2 or AL2.
32
LCk.CNF /
N.COLOR
Lock menus and Green for Normal LED’s display color.
09
LCk.CNF
Prevent unauthorized modification of SP1, input type,
RdG.CNFand MP.SC.OF menus
47
The command data is in order as follows: A8C0001E001E00320947
Then send: *W42A8C0001E001E00320947
10-21
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.20 BLOCK D
R/W43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 are reserved by factory. It is not recommended that
that the customer perform these commands.
TABLE 10.20 R/W43 (BLOCK D)
*To write default value:
W43000000000000000000008000000000008000800000008000000080000640
BYTE NUMBER
& ORDER
DESCRIPTION
NUMBER OF
BYTE
DEFAULT
VALUE
1,2
Analog out mA Scale factor
2
0000
3,4
Analog out mA offset factor
2
0000
5,6
Analog out Volt Scale factor
2
0000
7,8
Analog out Volt offset factor
2
0000
9,10
QD-Online
2
0000
11,12
Cal. Current Scale
2
8000
13,14
Cal. Current Offset
2
0000
15,16
(Reserved)
2
0000
17,18
Cal. Bridge
2
8000
19,20
Cal. Ratio Scale
2
8000
21,22
Cal. Ratio Offset
2
0000
23,24
Cal. Quasi Scale
2
8000
25,26
Cal. Quasi Offset
2
0000
27,28
Cal. Howland Pump fine
2
8000
29,30
Cal. Howland Pump
2
0640
10-22
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.21 R/W44 (BLOCK E)
To write default value:
W44800000008000000080000000800000008000000080000000
TABLE 10.21 R/W44 (BLOCK E)
BYTE NUMBER
& ORDER
DESCRIPTION
NUMBER OF
BYTE
DEFAULT
VALUE
1,2
500mV Scale
2
8000
3,4
500mV Offset
2
0000
5,6
5 V Scale
2
8000
7,8
5 V Offset
2
0000
9,10
50V Scale
2
8000
11,12
50V Offset
2
0000
13,14
1 V Scale
2
8000
15,16
1 V Offset
2
0000
17,18
10 V Scale
2
8000
19,20
10 V Offset
2
0000
21,22
100 V Scale
2
8000
23,24
100 V Offset
2
0000
NUMBER OF
DEFAULT
VALUE
2
0000
10.22 R/W45 (BLOCK F)
To write default value:
W450000
TABLE 10.22 R/W45 (BLOCK F)
BYTE NUMBER
& ORDER
1,2
DESCRIPTION
Cal. Quasi Offset
10.23 R46
This command is for the channel one of A/D.
10.24 R47
This command is for the channel two of A/D
10.25 R48
This command is for the channel three of A/D
10-23
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.26 R/W50
Hex
Command
Suffix
TABLE 10.23 R/W50
DESCRIPTION
Number
of Byte
Default
Value
2
0400
1st Byte: MENU1 and MENU2
(SetColor.CNF) selector
2nd Byte: NUM.PNt value of MP.SC.OF
50
TABLE 10.24 R/W50 NUM.PNt and MENU selection
BIT POSITION
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7
0
0
0
1
1
FUNCTION
6
0
5
0
4
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0 0
0
0
0
1 1
1
1
1
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
2nd Byte:
NUM.PNt value of
MP.SC.OF
1st Byte:
MENU1 &
MENU2
(Set Color Config)
GREEN
REd
AMbER
(Not Used)
MENU1
MENU2
Normal default
Operation/Menu
selection disabled
NEW Menu default
UPDATE / Enabled
Menu Type selection
Initialization. (*)
(*) Menu Type Selection Initialization:
If the 1st byte of command data is set (remotely) 11111XXX, the selected menu (either
MENU1 or MENU2) will be written to the EEPROM and default configuration is
automatically loaded. This 1st byte also resumes the state (00000XXX) of normal
default operation or disables the Menu Type selection mode after the selected menu
embedded.
EXAMPLE: To select MENU1 from MENU2, send this following command:
*W50FC00
That will update the menu to new menu with default value items. The last two
characters represent the default value of NUM.PNt for MP.SC.OF (Multi-Point Scale &
Offset).
10-24
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.27 R/W51, R/W52, R/W53, R/W54, R/W55, R/W56, R/W57, R/W58, R/W59, R/W5A:
HEX
COMMAND
SUFFIX
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
TABLE 10.25 *R/W5XXXXX
DESCRIPTION
NUMBER
DEFAULT
1st 3 bytes = Read0 value
of BYTES
VALUE
2nd 3 bytes = Input0 value
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 0
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 1
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 2
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 3
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 4
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 5
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 6
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 7
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 8
6
200000200000
MP.SC.OF Read/Input 0 values = Pointer 9
6
200000200000
EXAMPLE: If Pointer 0 is read as with this command *R51 and the response is
R51200000200000, it means that:
2nd 3 bytes is Input0 value = 200000
1st 3 bytes is Read0 value = 200000
EXAMPLE: To setup Multi-Point Scale &
Offset with NUM.PNt = 3 as desired as
following and shown below:
Converting the decimal values to hex. values and send the Write Commands as listed
as following:
HEX.
COMMAND
SUFFIX
FOR
EQUIVALENT
HEX. VALUE
FOR
EQUIVALENT
HEX. VALUE
WRITE
COMMAND
51
Read 0
1007D0
Input 0
102710
W511007D0102710
52
Read 1
100FA0
Input 1
104E20
W52100FA0104E20
53
Read 2
101770
Input 2
107530
W53101770107530
54
Read 3
101F40
Input 3
10C350
W54101F4010C350
To enter the values of Pointer, the Sign and Decimal point must follow the manner
shown in Table 10.26.
10-25
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.28 SET SIGN AND DECIMAL POINT FORMAT
Command suffixes “21”, “22”, “23” and “24” set the value of Setpoints 1, 2, 3 and 4
respectively (the last two often used as Alarm 1 and 2). Each setpoint is described by
three bytes (six HEX-ASCII characters), with the sign and decimal point encoded in the
MSN:
(Here, “FFFFFF” represents the 6 displayed decimal digits, the magnitude of the 20
least-significant bits of these 3 bytes.)
1. Bits 0 to 19 belong to the absolute value (99999 for negative values and 999999 for
positive values)
2. Bits 20, 21, 22 belong to the decimalpoint as in Table 10.26
3. Bit 23 belongs to sign where 0 is positive and 1 is negative as in Table 10.26
TABLE 10.26 SETPOINT VALUES, BITS 23, 22, 21, AND 20
23
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
BIT PATTERN
22
21
20
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
SIGN AND
DECIMAL POINT
Not used
+FFFFF.
+FFFFF.F
+FFFF.FF
+FFF.FFF
+FF.FFFF
+F.FFFFF
Not used
Not used
–FFFFFF
–FFFFF.F
–FFFF.FF
–FFF.FFF
–FF.FFFF
–F.FFFFF
Not used
The following 5 nibbles (HEX-ASCII characters) give the binary magnitude.
Since Setpoint value decimal point is directly related to the system decimal
point (see Section 10.3), select the same decimal for setpoints as selected
for system decimal point.
EXAMPLE: The computer inquires of meter #15 hex what value for Setpoint #3 is
stored in EEPROM (usually the same value as in RAM):
“*15R23<CR>”, and if set for echo (“BUS.FMt”), the meter replies:
“15R23A12345<CR>”, where the magnitude is “12345” in hex, or “74565” in decimal,
and the MSN “A”, from the Table 10.28, sets the final decimal value of Setpoint #3 as
“–7456.5”.
10-26
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.29 RS-485 METER “AddRES”
This “1A” command suffix uses 2 HEX-ASCII characters for the device address, but
that number is limited to the 1 to 199 decimal range (many more numbers than the 32device hardware limit).
EXAMPLE: The computer wants to renumber meter #15 HEX (#21 decimal) to #25
HEX(#37 decimal); it then puts the new address into EEPROM with:
“*15W1A25<CR>”
Which, if “BUS.FMt”, would be echoed by the meter with “15W1A<CR>”.
This new address would then be put into action by giving the meter a hard reset,
“RESET2”, from the front-panel, by external contact closure (see Section 10.12), or by
sending the reset with:
“*15Z04<CR>”.
That meter will no longer answer to the “15” hex address; it now responds commands
preceded by “*25”.
10.30 NUMBER OF READINGS BETWEEN EACH TRANSMISSION (“SER CNt”)
The “1D” command suffix data is the number of readings between transmissions; this
is used only for point-to-point continuous transmission. Four nibbles (2 bytes or 4 HEXASCII characters) are used; overflow detection limits the number of readings between
transmissions to 59999 (decimal).
“1D” values reside only in EEPROM, so only “R/W” command letters apply.
EXAMPLE: If you were on SLOW (approximately 3 readings/second) and wanted a
transmission every hour, the number of readings between transmissions would be
approximately 3*60*60 = 10800, or hex 2A30: to tell the meter, send:
“*W1D2A30<CR>”, which places the 2A30 into the EEPROM memory of the meter
(add a Hard Reset, “*Z04<CR>” to move this into RAM). If you have set “BUS.FMt”,
the meter will echo “W1D<CR>”.
10-27
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.31 RECOGNITION CHARACTER (SER.RCG)
You can change the security code for commands with this “1E” command suffix; the
ASCII table address (two HEX-ASCII characters) of the selected character is
transmitted.
Valid character addresses are from 20 hex to 7F hex (32 to 127 decimal) with the
exception of “^”, “A”, “E” characters.
EXAMPLE: To change the recognition character from “*” to “!” for all meters on the bus,
send:
“*00W1E21<CR>”, which puts that new code into EEPROM (but not automatically into
RAM), followed by “*00Z04<CR>”, which gives a hard reset to all the meters, moving
the new code into RAM. All meters will now ignore commands preceded by “*”, and
recognize those preceded with “!”.
10.32 UNITS OF MEASURE (SER.UOM)
When instructed with this “1F” command suffix, the meter will label its transmitted
values with three letters representing the units of the measured quantity (these are for
screen or printer labels, not for the meter display; the right-hand digit F, C or K units for
temperature are selected by “RdG.CNF”, Section 10.1).
Each letter is represented by the two HEX-ASCII characters giving its ASCII table
address, from “41” to “79” (all upper and lower case letters) or the <SP> address, “20”,
for a total of six transmitted characters (do not select any control characters for unitsof-measure).
When the desired units-of-measure to be printed have fewer than 3 characters, send
the <SP> address (“20”) to put the blank(s) in the chosen spot(s).
Note that the units-of-measure letters transmitted in the “V01” response are in plain
ASCII (one character each) in contrast with this command, where the six characters of
the addresses are sent.
EXAMPLE: The computer requests the RAM setting for the measurements underway
at meter #15 hex with:
“*15G1F<CR>”, and that meter, if “BUS.FMt”, responds with:
“15G1F6B5061<CR>”; the <data> here are “6B5061”, which is HEX-ASCII for “kPa”
(kiloPascals).
“00” is equivalent to “nul” and meter will transmit nothing for units of measure
if the first character is “0”.
10-28
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.33 TX/RX TURNAROUND DELAY (SERIAL DELAY SER.dLy)
The four choices provided by the meter for this “20”
TABLE 10.27.
command suffix only need two bits of storage, but the
SERIAL DELAY (“SER.dLy”)
standard byte (two nibbles) is used, so that the MSN = 0.
Turn-around delay is normally used on half-duplex
systems (e.g., RS-485), not on full duplex (for the
meter, RS-232 or RS-422), but the chosen amount is
applied to any of these by the meter. The delay can
be useful in eliminating the effects of ringing,
reflections or line drop.
BIT #
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
Milliseconds of
Turnaround delay
0
30
100
300
EXAMPLE: The computer wants meter #15 hex to use a turn-around delay of 100
milliseconds:
“*15W2002<CR>”, and if set for echo with “BUS.FMt”, the meter replies:
“15W20<CR>”. If point-to-point (only one meter), the “15” address is not used. The
chosen delay is now stored in the EEPROM. To put it into use (move to RAM), send a
hard reset, “*15Z04<CR>”.
10.34 READING, INPUT, or OUTPUT SCALE FACTOR(“RdG SC”, “INP SC”, “OUt SC”)
These items are 3 bytes each (6 HEX- ASCII characters) and their corresponding
command suffixes are:
ITEM
RdG SC
IN SC
OUt SC
COMMAND SUFFIX (HEX)
08
0B
17
All three scale factors can be calculated by the meter from entry of two data points (via
pushbutton or diskette); only Reading Scale permits direct entry (to facilitate 1.00000
and other straight-forward values). Scale factor and Offset values, however, are stored
separately inside the meter. If your scale/offset information is in the form of two data
points (O2,I2 and O1,I1, where the O’s are the Outputs for the I’s, Inputs), then
SC = (O2-O1) / (I2-I1)
This value is entered/read with these “08”, “0B” and “17” command suffixes, and also
used in calculating the corresponding Offsets (see Section 10.5 ).
True value for output scale factor is stored in its location in EEPROM. When
the program is running, it combines this value with calibration scale of analog
out board and stores new value in output scale’s RAM location (CALLED
MODIFIED OUTPUT SCALE). Therefore, “P17” for this scale factor should be
used very carefully (avoid using if possible). But with “G17”, the value of
modified output scale factor can be read.
10-29
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.34 READING, INPUT, or OUTPUT SCALE FACTOR continued
The most significant nibble of the scale factor data sets the decimal point (power of 10
multiplier) for the least-significant nineteen bits, which give the magnitude using a righthand decimal point (decimal 499,999 full scale). The bit in between, #19, is the sign
bit, “0” for “+” and “1” for “-”, which is OR’d with the magnitude to get the HEX value of
the second nibble. The decimal-point code is given in Table 10.28. The figure “4”
indicates the maximum value in that position and “x” is any chosen decimal digit.
Bit pattern information is as follows:
1) Bits 0 to 18 belong to the absolute value.
2) Bits 20, 21, 22, 23, belong to decimal point as shown in Table 10.28.
3) Bit number 19 belongs to the sign and is “0” for positive and “1” for negative.
TABLE 10.28. READING SCALE (“RdG SC”), INPUT SCALE (“INP SC”), AND
OUTPUT SCALE (“OUt SC”) BITS 23, 22, 21 AND 20
23
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
BIT NUMBER
22
21
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
20
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
DECIMAL
NUMBER
4xxxxx0.
4xxxxx.0
4xxxx.x0
4xxx.xx0
4xx.xxx0
4x.xxxx0
4.xxxxx0
.4xxxxx0
.04xxxxx0
.004xxxxx0
.0004xxxxx0
.00004xxxxx0
.000004xxxxx0
.0000004xxxxx0
.00000004xxxxx0
.000000004xxxxx0
POWER OF10
MULTIPLIER
1
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
EXAMPLE: Desired reading scale factor is 123.45. The magnitude is 12345, which is
hex 03039. The polarity is negative, so the 19th bit is a “1”, giving hex “80000”; when
OR’2 with the magnitude, the least-significant 5 nibbles are hex “83039”.
The decimal-point is two places to the left of the right-hand position (e.g., of the 6-digit
display). The decimal point is thus -2, which is a MSB of 3 from the Table 10-28.
OR’d with the other 5 nibbles, hex “383039”, write this factor to the EEPROM of meter
hex #15 with: *15W08383039<CR>. The meter will echo 15W08<CR> if you have set
“BUS.FMt”.
10-30
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.35
READING OFFSET (“RdG OF”), INPUT OFFSET (“INP OF”), or
OUTPUT OFFSET (“OUt OF”)
These 3 (“09”, “25” and “26” command suffixes) all use the same 3-byte (6-nibble or 6
character) format. The most significant bit is the sign bit, “=0” for a positive value, “=1”
for a negative value. The other 3 bits of the MSN are used for decimal point
(referenced to the right-hand display dp position) as given in the Table 10.29. The
remaining 5 nibbles (20 bits) are the magnitude (resolution one ppm).
Your data might be in the form of two data points (O2,I2 and O1,I1); since the meter
stores this information as separate scale and offset values, it is necessary to calculate
the offset:
OF = O1 - SC*I1,
where the scale factor SC is that calculated by the equation in Section 10.34.
In Table 10.29, “9” represents the maximum leading digit, and “x” is any desired
decimal.
Bit pattern information is as follows:
1) Bits 0 to 19 belong to the absolute value (99999 when value is negative and
999999 when value is positive).
2) Bits 20, 21, 22, belong to decimal point as shown in Table 10.29.
3) Bit number 20 is assigned to sign and is equal to “0” for positive and “1” for
negative values.
TABLE 10.29. READING OFFSET (“RdG OF”), INPUT OFFSET (“INP OF”), AND
OUTPUT OFFSET (“OUt OF”), BITS 22, 21 AND 20
BIT NUMBER
22
21
20
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
DECIMAL
NUMBER
9xxxxx00.
9xxxxx0.
9xxxxx.0
9xxxx.x0
9xxx.xx0
9xx.xxx0
9x.xxxx0
9.xxxxx0
POWER OF 10
MULTIPLIER
2
1
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
EXAMPLE: The computer requests the current display (reading) offset value from the
meter hex #15 with: *15G09<CR>.
10-31
10. Data Format Commands (P, G, R, W)
10.35
READING OFFSET, INPUT OFFSET, or OUTPUT OFFSET continued
The meter (set to echo with “BUS.FMt”) responds: 15G09D17618<CR>. To translate
this, the 6 data nibbles are stripped out: “D17618”. The most significant bit (of the “D”
nibble) is a “1”, so the offset is negative. Decimal point is at position 4.
The magnitude, HEX “17618”, is decimal 95768, so the meter’s decimal reading offset
is -95.768.
True value for Output Offset is stored in its location in EEPROM. When
program is running, it combines this value with calibration offset of the Analog
Output Board and stores new value (called Modified Output Offset) in Output
Offset’s RAM location. Therefore, “P26” for this offset should be used very
carefully (avoid using if possible). But, with “G26”, value of modified output
offset can be read.
10.36 SETPOINT 1 AND 2 HYSTERESIS (“SP db”)
Command Suffix “14” uses two bytes (four nibbles, or four characters) for this binary
positive-only value. Both setpoints use this same hysteresis, applied 50% on either
side of the respective setpoint. This value is not kept in RAM (only in the EEPROM),
so that only “R” and “W” commands apply.
EXAMPLE: If the computer wants to know the hysteresis value stored by meter #15
hex, it sends:
“*15R14<CR>”, to which the meter replies:
“15R141A90<CR>” if it was programmed to echo with “BUS.FMt” and had decimal
hysteresis of 6,800 counts.
Maximum allowable value for hysteresis is 9999 counts.
10.37 ALARM (SP 3 AND SP 4) HYSTERESIS (“AL db”)
Identical with Section 10.36, suffix “15” commands use two bytes (four characters) for
this binary positive-only value. Both alarms use this same hysteresis, applied 100% on
the inactive side of the respective alarm point (setpoint), so that you get fast alarm
action and slower exit from that alarm. This value is not kept in RAM; “R” and “W”
interact with the EEPROM.
EXAMPLE: The computer sends “*15W1A90<CR>”, giving both alarms the hysteresis
value of hex 6800 Counts.
Maximum allowable value for hysteresis is 9999 counts.
10-32
ModBus Communication Option Supplement
Note: To Enable the MODBUS PROTOCOL via Front LED Display Panel Push Button
Menu, enter MOdbUS submenu and select option “yES” in the “COMM” Communication
Configuration Menu.
1. Introduction
Modbus protocol defines a message structure that this Universal Input Meter will
recognize and use, regardless of the type of networks over which they communicate. It
describes the process a meter uses to request access to another device, how it will
respond to requests from the other devices, and how errors will be detected and reported.
It establishes a common format for the layout and contents of message fields.
The Modbus protocol provides the internal standard that this Universal Input Meter uses
for parsing messages. During communications on a Modbus network, the protocol
determines how each meter will know its device address, recognize a message
addressed to it, determine the kind of action to be taken, and extract any data or other
information contained in the message. If a reply is required, the meter will construct the
reply message and send it using Modbus protocol.
Modbus defines a digital communication network to have only one MASTER and one or
more SLAVE devices. Either a single (point-to-point) or multi-drop network (multipoint) is
possible.
This Universal Input Meter communicates on standard Modbus networks using RTU
(Remote terminal unit) transmission mode.
2.
RTU mode
In RTU mode, each eight-bit byte in a message contains two four-bit hexadecimal
characters. The main advantage of this mode is that its greater character density allows
better data throughput than ASCII for the same baud rate. Each message must be
transmitted in a continuous stream.
The following format used for each byte sent and received by this Meter in RTU
mode:
2.1.
2.2.
2.3.
Eight-bit binary, Hexadecimal (0 ... 9, A ... F)
Two hexadecimal characters contained in each eight-bit field of the message
1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 Stop Bit (No Parity Bit)
™ The figure below shows the bit sequences when byte transmitted in RTU mode.
LSB
MSB
START
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
STOP
•
LSB – Least Significant Bit sent first
M -1
™ The Modbus Message frame is shown below
DEVICE ADDRESS
FUNCTION CODE
DATA
CRC CHECK
8 BITS
8 BITS
k x 8 BITS
16 BITS
hh
hh
hhh….
hhhh
where:
• h (hex. Number) – character,
• k – integers depend on the contents of the data format.
Device Address Code
• The address message frame contains eight bits. The slave device addresses are
in the range of 1 ... 199 decimal. A master addresses a slave by placing the slave
address in the address field of the message. When the slave sends its response,
it places its own address in this address field of the response to let the master
know which slave is responding.
• Address 0 is used for the write command broadcast that commands all controllers
on network, which all slave devices recognize
4. Function Code
• The function code field of a message frame contains eight bits (RTU). Valid
codes are in the range of 1 ... 255 decimal. Of these, some codes are applicable
for the Universal Input Meters.
• When a message is sent from a master to a slave device the function code field
tells the slave what kind of action to perform.
• The following functions are supported by the Universal Input Meters:
Function
Code
03
04
06
08
•
Function
Description
Read holding
register
Read input
register
Preset (Write to)
single register
Reads the binary contents of holding registers in the
slave
Reads the binary contents of input register in the
slave
Preset (Write) a value into single holding register
Diagnostic
Series of tests for checking communication between
master and slave
When the slave responds to the master, it uses the function code field to indicate
either a normal (error-free) response or that some kind of error occurred (called
an exception response). For a normal response, the slave simply echoes the
original function code. For an exception response, the slave returns a code that is
equivalent to the original function code with its most significant bit set to a logic 1.
M -2
5. Data Field
The data field is constructed using sets of two hexadecimal digits, in the range of 00 to FF
hexadecimal. The data field of messages sent from a master to slave devices contains
additional information, which the slave must use to take the action defined by the function
code. This can include items like discrete and register addresses, the quantity of items to
be handled, and the count of actual data bytes in the field.
6. CRC Checking
With RTU mode the error checking field contains a 16-bit value implemented as two eightbit bytes (HI-order byte and Low-order byte). The error check value is the result of a
Cyclical Redundancy Check (CRC) calculation performed on the message contents.
After building a message (address, function code, data) the transmitting device calculates
a CRC code and puts it to the end of the message. A receiving device will calculate a
CRC code from the message it has received and compare against transmitted CRC code.
If these CRC codes are different, there has been a communication error. The Universal
Input Meters will not reply if they detect a CRC error.
Sequences of CRC calculation:
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
Load a 16 bit CRC register with all 1’s.
Apply first 8 bit byte of the message to the least significant bit (LSB) of the
contents of the register.
Exclusive OR these 8 bit with the register contents.
Shift the result one bit to the right with zero entering into the most
significant bit (MSB) position and evaluate the LSB.
If over flow bit in LSB is 1, exclusive OR the latest register contents with
A001 Hex value.
If over flow bit in LSB is 0, no exclusive OR occurs (repeat step 4).
Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 until 8 shifts have been performed.
Apply next 8 bit byte of the message to the LSB contents of the register.
Exclusive OR these 8 bit with the register contents.
Repeat steps 4 to 9 until all bytes of the message have been processed.
The final content of the register is the CRC value.
™ Note: When CRC is placed into the end of the message, the low order byte of the
CRC will be transmitted first, followed by the high order byte.
M -3
7.
Modbus RTU Registers
• The table below shows the Modbus registers supported by the Universal
Input Meters:
FUNCTION
CODE
REGISTER
FUNCTION
NUMBER
OF BYTE
Refer to Section of
Comm. Manual:
(A): INF/DP41
(B): INF-B/DP41-B
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04
03/04
03/04
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
03/04, 06
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
SP1: SETPOINT 1 VALUE
SP2: SETPOINT 2 VALUE
SP3: SETPOINT 3 VALUE
SP4: SETPOINT 4 VALUE
RdG.SC : READING SCALE VALUE
RdG.OF : READING OFFSET VALUE
INPUT SCALE VALUE
INPUT OFFSET VALUE
OUTPUT SCALE VALUE
OUTPUT OFFSET VALUE
MAIN READING VALUE
HI RdG : PEAK READING VALUE
LO RdG : VALLEY READING VALUE
dAt.FMt : DATA FORMAT
bUS.FMt : BUS FORMAT
INP.CNF : INPUT CONFIG.
FILtER : FILTER SETUP
RdG.CNF : READING CONFIG.
Out.CNF : OUTPUT CONFIG.
dEC.Pt & CNt.by : dec.point & count by setup
INPUt : INPUT TYPE
SP.CNF : SETPOINT CONFIG.
AL.CNFG : ALARM CONFIG.
ALARM FUNCTIONS
NUM.dLy : ALARM DELAY
SERIAL COMM.CONFIGURATION
AddRES : SERIAL COMM. ADDRESS
CHAR.: SERIAL COMM.RECOGN.CHAR
MENU LOCKOUT
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(B)10.34
(*)
(B)10.34
(*)
(B)10.34
(*)
(*)
(*)
(*)
(B)10.12
(B)10.13
Table 10.2
(B)10.4
Example 4
(B)10.19
(B)10.3
(B)10.10
(B)10.5
(B)10.6
(B)10.7
(B)10.4
(B)10.8
(B)10.29
(B)10.31
(B)10.14 &15
(B)10.14 &15
(B)10.16
(A):10-3
(B): 10.36
(B): 10.37
MENU LOCKOUT & NORMAL COLOR CONFIG.
SP1,SP2 & ALARM COLOR 1&2
Only applied for MENU 2 : L4 CNF
SP.db : SetPoint Deadband
AL.db : Alarm Deadband
Table 7.1 Modbus Registers
(*) Note: Refer to Example 3 and 6 for description of How to configure and its format.
M -4
8.
Command Format
The following formats are used to SEND commands by computer and RETURNED by
device.
8.1. Read Multiple Register (03 or 04)
™ Send to device Command string format:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION CODE
1 BYTE
hh
1 BYTE
03
DATA
CRC
03 or 04
STARTING REGISTER
HB
00
NUMBER OF REGISTERS
LB
hh
HB
00
LB
hh
LB
hh
HB
hh
™ Returned by device Command string format:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
03 or 04
1 BYTE
hh
1 BYTE
03
DATA
CRC
NUMBER OF
First REGISTER
BYTES
1 BYTE
hh
HB
hh
Where: HB – High Order Byte
LB – Lower Order Byte
Unused bits are set to zero
hh : Hex. Numbers
M -5
LB
hh
……
…..
n REGISTERS
HB
hh
LB
hh
LB
hh
HB
hh
™ Note: the Universal Input Meters support only Read Single Register, so the
number of registers should always set to 1.
™ Screenshot for following examples 1- 3:
Figure 8.1: Read Command Samples via Infinity Configuration Software.
Example 1: For one byte data registers: 1st data string of Command sent section as
shown on the Figure 8.1:
™ 01 03 0010 0001 85CF : is to read INPUT CONFIGURATION ( INF.CNF and INPUt ).
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
01
03
03 or 04
DATA
STARTING REGISTER
00
10
CRC
NUMBER OF REGISTERS
00
01
85
CF
™ 01 03 02 0000 B844 : 1st Command Response on Figure 8.1 which device
responded to the 1st read command.
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
NUMBER OF
BYTES
01
03
02
VALUES OF
REGISTERS
(1 Byte)
00
20
(N/A)
CRC
B9
9C
For detail description of the VALUES OF THE REGISTER above, refer to Table 10.2 of
Communication Manual.
M -6
Example 2: For 2 bytes data registers: as shown on the Figure 8.1 as 2nd data string of
the Command sent section:
™ 01 03 0022 0001 2400: is to read the value of Alarm Deadband (AL.db).
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
01
03
03 or 04
DATA
STARTING REGISTER
00
22
CRC
NUMBER OF REGISTERS
00
01
24
00
™ 01 03 02 01F4 B853 : 2nd Command Response on Figure 8.1 which device
responded to the 2nd read command.
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
NUMBER OF
BYTES
01
03
02
VALUES OF
REGISTERS
(2 Bytes)
01
F4
CRC
B8
53
For detail description of the VALUES OF THE REGISTER above, refer to Section 10.37
of Communication Manual.
M -7
Example 3: For 3 bytes data registers: as shown on the Figure 8.1 as 3rd data string of
the Command sent section:
™ 01 03 0001 0001 D5CA: is to read Setpoint 1 value (SP1).
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
01
03
DATA
03 or 04
STARTING REGISTER
00
CRC
NUMBER OF REGISTERS
01
00
01
D5
CA
™ 01 03 04 0010 0064 FA1D: 3rd Command Response on Figure 8.1 which device
responded to the 3rd read command.
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
NUMBER
OF BYTES
01
03
04
VALUES OF REGISTERS
(3 Bytes)
00
(N/A)
10
00
64
CRC
FA
1D
™ NOTE: SetPoints, In/Output Offset and process values (Main, Peak and Valley
Reading Values) must be determined in following manner: (using above example)
Value
Format
Hex.
VALUES OF REGISTERS
(3 Hex. Bytes)
00
Binary bits
pattern
N/A
Binary
N/A
Setpoints,
In/Output
Offset,
Main/ Peak/
Valley
Readings
N/A
10
XXXX
(binary bits)
0001
X
XXX
0
001
SIGN
DECIMAL
POINT
+
FFFF.
00
64
XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX
(binary bits)
(binary bits)
0000
0000 0000
0110 0100
Absolute
Value
Absolute Value
Absolute Value
XXXX
(binary
bits)
100 (decimal)
Equivalent
Decimal
+100.
Table 8.1 Format of 3 bytes Data Value Description of SetPoints,
In/Output Offset and process values.
For detail description of How to determine Sign (+ or -) and Decimal Point Position,
refer to Section 10.28 and Table 10.16 of Communication Manual.
M -8
™ NOTE: Following bits patterns is the format for 3 bytes data registers of
READING SCALE (“RdG.SC”), INPUT SCALE (“INP.SC”), AND
OUTPUT SCALE (“Out.SC”) which are determined differently than the
above example.
Value
Format
VALUES OF REGISTERS
(3 Hex. Bytes)
Hex.
00
Pattern
hh
hh
hh
(2 hex.characters)
(2 hex.characters)
(2 hex.characters)
XXXX
XXXX XXXX
XXXX XXXX
(binary bits)
(binary bits)
(binary bits)
Absolute Value
Absolute Value
XXXX
Binary bits
pattern
N/A
(binary
bits)
Decimal
N/A
DECIMAL
POINT
X
XXX
SIGN
Absolute
Value
Table 8.2 : Format of 3 bytes Data Value Description of all type of Scale Function.
For detail description of How to determine Sign (+ or -), Decimal Point Position and
absolute value, refer to Section 10.34 and Table 10.28 of Communication Manual.
8.2. Write to Single Register (06)
The following command will write a parameter to the single register.
Send / Response Command string format:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
06
1 BYTE
hh
1BYTE
06
DATA
REGISTER
HB
00
LB
hh
M -9
CRC
DATA
VALUE
HB
00
LB
hh
LB
hh
HB
hh
Example 4: For Write Command of one byte data registers: using example on Section &
Table 10.1 of Serial Communication Option Operator’s manual to learn how to modify
Reading configuration (RdG.CNF), sent/responded data string as following:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
06
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
DATA
REGISTER
HB
00
LB
12
DATA VALUE
(1valid byte)
HB
LB
00
14
CRC
LB
29
Here is the screenshot of the Example 4:
Figure 8.2: Write (1 valid Data byte) Command Sample via
Infinity Configuration Software.
M -10
HB
C0
Example 5: For Write Command of two bytes data registers: There are only two registers
in this format: Setpoint Deadband (SP.db): Register #21 and Alarm Deadband (AL.db)
Register #22.
Using Example on Section 10.36 of Serial Communication Option Operator’s manual to
write new value of SetPoint Deadband as 6,800 count.
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
06
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
DATA
REGISTER
HB
00
LB
21
DATA VALUE
(2 valid bytes)
HB
LB
1A
90
CRC
LB
D2
Figure 8.3: Write (2 valid Data bytes) Command Sample via
Infinity Configuration Software.
M -11
HB
C2
Example 6: For Write Command of three bytes data registers: In order to modify or
configure, users must send two write commands to accomplish this task. First one only
change register’s 2 Low Order Bytes (LB)and is just similar to the previous example ,
However second command must write on converted register of original one to write or
modify value of High Order Byte (HB)(as example below illustrate How to set decimal
point and sign of value for detail description of Sign & Decimal Point configuration, refer to
Table 10.26 of Communication).
Following Table illustrates how to convert the register:
Format
Register
(Hex. Number)
Register
Method: change MSB of
character 0 of Register to 1
Reg. of SP1 value
Example:
Converted SP1 value:
Register
(Binary Number)
hh
MSB x x x
xxxx
01
81
0000
1000
0001
0001
Table 8.3: Conversion Method of 3 Bytes Register for Write Function.
Lets examine how to write SP1 with different values: +1000 and –100.0:
Send / Response Command string format:
™ Value +1000:
DATA
Desired
FUNCTION
DEVICE
CODE
Values:
DATA VALUE
ADDRESS
REGISTER
06
(2 bytes used)
+1000
st
1 command
(for absolute
value)
nd
2 command
(for Sign &
dec.point)
CRC
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
HB
00
LB
01
HB
03
LB
E8
LB
D8
HB
B4
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
HB
00
LB
81
HB
00
LB
10
LB
D8
HB
2E
Figure 8.4: Write (3 Data bytes) Commands Sample via
Infinity Configuration Software.
M -12
™ Value -100:
Desired
Values:
st
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
CODE
06
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
HB
00
LB
01
1 BYTE
01
1BYTE
06
HB
00
81
-100
1 command
(for absolute
value)
nd
2 command
(for Sign &
dec. point)
DATA
REGISTER
LB
CRC
DATA VALUE
(2 bytes used)
HB
LB
00
64
HB
00
LB
90
LB
D8
HB
B4
LB
D8
HB
2E
Figure 8.5: Write (3 Data bytes) Commands Sample via
Infinity Configuration Software.
8 Diagnostic command.
This command echoes the sent message to indicate that the communication link is
established correctly.
Send to/Return from device:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
1 BYTE
hh
FUNCTION
CODE
1 BYTE
08
DIAGNOSTIC
CODE
HB
LB
00
00
LOOPBACK
DATA
HB
LB
hh
hh
CRC
LB
hh
HB
hh
where:
o Diagnostic Code is two byte code to determine the type of test to be performed.
o Universal Input Meters supported only “00” code which requested slave to echo
sent command back to the master.
M -13
WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER
OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. warrants this unit to be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a period of one (1) year
from the date of purchase. In addition to OMEGA’s standard warranty period, OMEGA Engineering will extend the warranty period
for four (4) additional years if the warranty card enclosed with each instrument is returned to OMEGA.
If the unit malfunctions, it must be returned to the factory for evaluation. OMEGA’s Customer Service Department will issue an
Authorized Return (AR) number immediately upon phone or written request. Upon examination by OMEGA, if the unit is found
to be defective, it will be repaired or replaced at no charge. OMEGA’s WARRANTY does not apply to defects resulting from any
action of the purchaser, including but not limited to mishandling, improper interfacing, operation outside of design limits, improper
repair, or unauthorized modification. This WARRANTY is VOID if the unit shows evidence of having been tampered with or shows
evidence of having been damaged as a result of excessive corrosion; or current, heat, moisture or vibration; improper
specification; misapplication; misuse or other operating conditions outside of OMEGA’s control. Components which wear are not
warranted, including but not limited to contact points, fuses, and triacs.
OMEGA is pleased to offer suggestions on the use of its various products. However, OMEGA neither assumes
responsibility for any omissions or errors nor assumes liability for any damages that result from the use of its products
in accordance with information provided by OMEGA, either verbal or written. OMEGA warrants only that the parts
manufactured by it will be as specified and free of defects. OMEGA MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT THAT OF TITLE, AND ALL IMPLIED
WARRANTIES INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
HEREBY DISCLAIMED. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: The remedies of purchaser set forth herein are exclusive, and the
total liability of OMEGA with respect to this order, whether based on contract, warranty, negligence, indemnification,
strict liability or otherwise, shall not exceed the purchase price of the component upon which liability is based. In no
event shall OMEGA be liable for consequential, incidental or special damages.
CONDITIONS: Equipment sold by OMEGA is not intended to be used, nor shall it be used: (1) as a “Basic Component”
under 10 CFR 21 (NRC), used in or with any nuclear installation or activity; or (2) in medical applications or used on
humans. Should any Product(s) be used in or with any nuclear installation or activity, medical application, used on humans,
or misused in any way, OMEGA assumes no responsibility as set forth in our basic WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER language,
and, additionally, purchaser will indemnify OMEGA and hold OMEGA harmless from any liability or damage whatsoever
arising out of the use of the Product(s) in such a manner.
RETURN REQUESTS/INQUIRIES
Direct all warranty and repair requests/inquiries to the OMEGA Customer Service Department. BEFORE RETURNING
ANY PRODUCT(S) TO OMEGA, PURCHASER MUST OBTAIN AN AUTHORIZED RETURN (AR) NUMBER FROM
OMEGA’S CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT (IN ORDER TO AVOID PROCESSING DELAYS). The assigned AR
number should then be marked on the outside of the return package and on any correspondence.
The purchaser is responsible for shipping charges, freight, insurance and proper packaging to prevent breakage in
transit.
FOR WARRANTY RETURNS, please have the following
information available BEFORE contacting OMEGA:
1. Purchase Order number under which the product was
PURCHASED,
2. Model and serial number of the product under warranty,
and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems relative to
the product.
FOR NON-WARRANTY REPAIRS, consult OMEGA for current
repair charges. Have the following information available
BEFORE contacting OMEGA:
1. Purchase Order number to cover the COST of the repair,
2. Model and serial number of product, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems relative to the
product.
OMEGA’s policy is to make running changes, not model changes, whenever an improvement is possible. This affords our
customers the latest in technology and engineering.
© Copyright 2005 OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. All rights reserved. This document may not be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the prior written
consent of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
TRADEMARK NOTICE:
®
, omega.com ® and
®
are Trademarks of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
PATENT NOTICE: This product is covered by one or more of the following patents: U.S. Pat. No. Des. 336,895; 5,274,577;
6,243,021 / CANADA 2052599; 2052600 / ITALY 1249456; 1250938 / FRANCE BREVET No. 91 12756 / SPAIN 2039150;
2048066 / UK PATENT No. GB2 249 837; GB2 248 954 / GERMANY DE 41 34398 C2. The “Meter Bezel Design” is a Trademark
of NEWPORT Electronics, Inc. Used under License. Other US and International Patents pending or applied for.
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