Omega | iLD Series | Owner Manual | Omega iLD Series Owner Manual

Omega iLD Series Owner Manual
User’s Guide
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ILD BIG DISPLAY
Monitor / Controller
Communication Manual
omega.com info@omega.com
U.S.A.
Headquarters:
Servicing North America:
Omega Engineering, Inc.
Toll-Free: 1-800-826-6342 (USA & Canada only)
Customer Service: 1-800-622-2378 (USA & Canada only)
Engineering Service: 1-800-872-9436 (USA & Canada only)
Tel: (203) 359-1660
Fax: (203) 359-7700
e-mail: info@omega.com
For Other Locations Visit omega.com/worldwide
The information contained in this document is believed to be correct, but OMEGA accepts no liability for any errors it contains, and reserves
the right to alter specifications without notice.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part 1: Before You Begin ....................................................................................2
Part 2: Introduction to Digital Communication.................................................3
2.1
Overview.......................................................................................3
2.2
Definition of Terms ......................................................................3
Part 3: Hardware
...........................................................................................5
3.1
Communication Interfaces..........................................................5
3.2
Wiring RS-232 Interface .............................................................5
3.3
Wiring RS-485 Interface .............................................................6
Part 4: Communication Setup ............................................................................9
4.1
Flow Chart ....................................................................................9
4.2
Setup the i-Series Device Through the Front Panel ...............10
4.3
Abbreviations, Range, Default Setup.......................................10
Part 5: i-Series Protocol....................................................................................13
5.1
Command Structure ..................................................................13
5.2
Command Formats ....................................................................14
5.3
Response Format ......................................................................19
5.4
Error Message............................................................................20
5.5
Alarm Status Characters...........................................................20
5.6
Examples of Transmitted Data .................................................21
5.7
Command Formats ....................................................................22
5.7.1 Input Type (Command Index 07)...................................22
5.7.1.1 Input Type for Temperature/Process ...............22
5.7.1.2 Input Type for Process/Strain Gauge ..............23
5.7.2 Reading Configuration (Command Index 08)..............23
5.7.2.1 Reading Configuration for
Temperature/Process........................................23
5.7.2.2 Reading Configuration for
Process/Strain Gauge .......................................24
5.7.3 Linearization Points (Command Index 29) ..................24
5.7.4 Color Display (Command Index 11)..............................25
5.7.5 Alarm 1 Configuration (Command Index 09)...............25
5.7.6 Alarm 1 Low (Command Index 12) ...............................26
5.7.7 Alarm 2 Configuration (Command Index 0A) ..............26
5.7.8 Output 1 Configuration (Command Index 0C).............27
5.7.9 Output 2 Configuration (Command Index 0D).............27
5.7.10 Communication Parameters (Command Index 10).....28
5.7.11 Bus Format (Command Index 1F) ................................28
5.7.12 Data Format (Command Index 20)................................29
5.7.13 Miscellaneous (Command Index 24) ............................29
5.7.14 % Low and % Hi (Command Index 27 and 28).............30
5.7.15 Reading Scale and Offset
(Command Index 14 and 3A).........................................30
5.7.16 Grouping Commands with the Same Formats............33
i
Part 6: Modbus Protocol...................................................................................34
6.1
Introduction................................................................................34
6.2
RTU Mode ...................................................................................34
6.3
Device Address ..........................................................................35
6.4
Function Code............................................................................35
6.5
Data Field....................................................................................35
6.6
CRC Checking............................................................................36
6.7
Modbus RTU Registers .............................................................37
6.8
Command Format ......................................................................38
6.8.1 Read Multiple Register (03 or 04) .................................38
6.8.2 Write to Single Register (06) ........................................39
6.8.3 Diagnostic Command ....................................................41
6.8.4 Error Response ..............................................................41
Appendix A Reading Scale and Offset .........................................................43
Appendix B ASCII Chart.................................................................................48
ASCII Control Codes .................................................................49
Appendix C Examples of CRC Calculation ..................................................50
Example of CRC Calculation in “C” Language...............................................53
LIST OF FIGURES:
Figure 2.1
Figure 3.1
Figure 3.2
Figure 3.3
Figure 4.1
Transmission of “c” ....................................................................4
DB9 and RS-232 Wiring ..............................................................6
DB25 and RS-232 Wiring.............................................................6
Multipoint, Half-Duplex RS-485 Wiring .....................................7
Flow Chart for Communication Option......................................9
LIST OF TABLES:
Table 3.1
Table 3.2
Table 3.3
Table 4.1
Table 5.1
Table 5.2
Table 5.3
Table 5.4
Table 5.5
Table 5.6
Table 5.7
Table 5.8
Table 5.9
Table 5.10
Table 6.1
Table 6.2
Table A.1
Table A.2
Communication Interface ...........................................................5
Wiring RS-232 Interface ..............................................................6
RS-485 Half Duplex Hook-up ......................................................8
Abbreviations, Range, Default Setup ......................................10
Command Prefix Letters...........................................................13
Command Formats....................................................................14
Command Letters and Suffix ...................................................14
Command Letters and Suffix ...................................................16
Echo Mode .................................................................................19
No Echo Mode ...........................................................................19
Error Message ...........................................................................20
Alarm Status Characters ..........................................................20
Conversion Number ..................................................................30
Commands with Numeric Data Format ...................................33
Function Code ...........................................................................35
Modbus Registers .....................................................................37
Conversion Number ..................................................................43
Input Resolution Multiplier .......................................................43
ii
NOTES, WARNINGS and CAUTIONS
Information that is especially important to note is identified by following labels:
• NOTE
• WARNING or CAUTION
• IMPORTANT
• TIP
NOTE: Provides you with information that is important to successfully
setup and use the Programmable Digital Meter.
CAUTION or WARNING: Tells you about the risk of electrical shock.
CAUTION, WARNING or IMPORTANT: Tells you of circumstances or
practices that can effect the instrument’s functionality and must refer
to accompanying documents.
TIP: Provides you helpful hints.
1
PART 1
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
Customer Service
If you need assistance, please call the nearest Customer Service Department, listed in
this manual.
Manuals, Software
The latest Operation and Communication Manual as well as free configuration software
and ActiveX controls are available from the website listed in this manual or on the
CD-ROM enclosed with your shipment.
Communication Menu
The Communication menu only appears with devices purchased with the RS-232C /
RS-485 Serial Communications Option. Purchasing the controller with Serial
Communications permits a controller to be connected directly to the PC’s available COM
port. Device can be configured or monitored from an IBM PC compatible computer using
software available on our CD or on our website.
To Disable Outputs
Standby Mode is useful during setup of the controller or when maintenance of the
system is necessary. When the controller is in standby, it remains in the ready condition
but all outputs are disabled. This allows the system to remain powered and ready to go.
1. When the controller is in “RUN” Mode, push d twice to disable all outputs and
alarms. It is now in “STANDBY” Mode.
2. Push d once more to resume “RUN” Mode.
PUSH d TWICE to disable the system during an EMERGENCY.
To Reset the Meter
1. When the controller is in the “MENU” Mode, push c down button once to direct
controller one step backward of the top menu item.
2. Push c twice to reset controller, prior to resuming “Run” Mode except after
“Setpoints” and “Alarms” that will go to the “Run” Mode without resetting the
controller.
2
PART 2
INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
2.1 Overview
This manual describes how to use a digital communication link and i-SERIES or
MODBUS communication protocols to operate the iLD Big Display controllers. It has
been assumed that the user has some experience with communication protocols and
some familiarity with iLD Big Display controllers.
2.2 Definitions of terms
This guide is intended to help the user to become familiar with digital communication
between a computer (or other controlling instrument) and one or more devices.
User of this manual should be familiar with following definitions:
• Serial Communication is the exchange of the data one bit at a time on a single data
line. Serial compares with parallel communication, which sends several bits of
information simultaneously over multiple lines or channels.
• Interface are connections over which computers communicate. They may use one pair
of wires to send information in one direction and another pair to send in the opposite
direction (full duplex). They may also use one pair to send the information in both
directions (half duplex).
• Bit is a unit of digital data (binary digit) either a “1” or “0”.
• Byte is a string of seven or eight bits, which represents a single character.
• ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) – is a 7-bit code defines
128 characters, which include digits, upper and lowercase letters, punctuation symbols,
and control codes such as backspace, line feed, carriage return and so on. The ASCII
code can be written in a base – 16 number system, called hexadecimal (“hex”). The first
10 digits of this system are represented by the numbers 0 through 9, and the other six
digits are represented by the letters A through F. The 128 ASCII character code with the
decimal, hexadecimal and binary equivalents is listed in Appendix B.
• Synchronous and Asynchronous Communications
There are two basic types of serial communications, synchronous and asynchronous.
With synchronous communications, the two devices initially synchronize themselves to
each other, and then continually send characters to stay in sync. Asynchronous means
“no synchronization”, and thus does not require sending and receiving idle characters.
However, the beginning and end of each byte of data must be identified by start and stop
bits. The serial ports on IBM-style PCs are asynchronous devices and therefore only
support asynchronous serial communications.
• Start and Stop Bits
The start and stop bits identify the beginning and end of each character and permit a
receiver to resynchronize a local clock to each new character. The start bit indicates
when the data byte is about to begin and the stop bit signals when it ends. The start bit is
always a 0. The stop bit is always a 1.
3
• Parity Bit
Besides the synchronization provided by the use of start and stop bits, an additional bit
called a parity bit may optionally be transmitted along with the data. A parity bit affords a
small amount of error checking, to help detect data corruption that might occur during
transmission. You can choose either even parity, odd parity or no parity at all. When
even or odd parity is being used, the number of marks (logical 1 bits) in each data byte
are counted, and a single bit is transmitted following the data bits to indicate whether the
number of 1 bits just sent is even or odd.
For example, when even parity is chosen, the parity bit is transmitted with a value of 0 if
the number of preceding marks (1’s) is an even number. For the binary value of 0110 0011
the even parity bit would be 0. If even parity were in effect when the binary number
1101 0110 is sent, then the parity bit would be 1. Odd parity is just the opposite, and the
parity bit is 0 when the number of mark bits (1’s) in the preceding word is an odd number.
Parity error checking is very rudimentary. While it will tell you if there is a single bit error
in the character, it doesn't show which bit was received in error. Also, if an even number
of bits are in error then the parity bit would not reflect any error at all. No parity ignores
the parity bit. When transmitted, each character is preceded by a start bit and followed
by a stop bit plus an optional parity bit, making train of 10 or 11 bits for each transmitted
character. The Figure 2.1 below shows transmission of the 7 bits of the ASCII lower case
“c” with start, stop and even parity bits.
• Baud Rate
The baud rate refers to the data transmission. It specifies the communication rate over
the bus. When a change in signal represents one data bit, baud rate is equal to bits per
second (bps). Standard baud rates for computers are 300, 600, 1200,2400, 4800, 9600
and 19200 baud.
7 - BIT CHARACTER
1IIIIIIIII2IIIIIIIII3IIIIIIIII4IIIIIIIII5IIIIIIIII6IIIIIIIII7IIIIIIIII8
STOP BIT
1
0
START BIT
EVEN PARITY BIT
Figure 2.1 Transmission of “c” with start, stop, and even parity bits.
• Communication Protocol
A data communication protocol defines the rules and structure of messages used by all
devices on a network for data exchange. This protocol also defines the orderly exchange
of messages, and the detection of errors. iLD Big Display controllers use i-SERIES and
MODBUS communication protocols.
4
PART 3
HARDWARE
3.1 Communication Interfaces
Two communication interfaces are supported in the iLD Big Display devices: RS-232 and
RS-485. These standards define the electrical characteristics of a communication
network.
• The RS-232 standard (point-to-point) allows a single device to be connected to a PC.
The iLD Big Display devices operate with full-duplex RS-232 using three wires: a Rx receive wire, a Tx - transmit wire and a common ground wire. RS-232 cable length is
limited to 50 feet.
• The RS-485 standard (multipoint) allows one or more devices to be connected
(multi-dropped) using a two wire connection (half-duplex) +Rx / +Tx and -Rx / -Tx.
Use of RS-485 communications allows up to 32 “remote” devices to connect to the
“master” computer with cable length up to 4000 feet long.
• Both interfaces use standard RS-232/RS-485 voltage levels.
Although the RS-485 is commonly referred to as a “two wire” connection, the iLD
Big Display also provides a ground / return shield connection to use as a
common connection for EMI noise protection.
The Table 3.1 shows the differences between RS-232 and RS-485 communication
interfaces.
Table 3.1 Communication Interfaces
Data Transmission Characteristics RS232
Transmission Mode
Single ended
Electrical connections
3 wire
Drivers per line
1 driver
Receivers per line
1 receiver
Maximum data rate
20k bits/s
Maximum cable length
50 ft (15 meters)
RS485
Differential
2 wire
32 drivers
32 receiver
10M bits/s
4000 ft (1200 meters)
Changing between RS-232 and RS-485 is possible through the front panel
buttons (see Part 4 for details).
3.2 Wiring RS-232 Interface
Most PC’s provide an RS-232 port for digital communication. The RS-232 communication
uses three wire full-duplex system: a line for receiving data, a line for transmitting data
and a common line between the computer and device. Usually PCs use a 25 or 9 pin
connector.
Caution: Do not connect power to your instrument until you have completed all
serial interface connections. Failure to do so may result in injury.
5
Figures 3.1 and 3.2 show the three-wire RS-232 connections between the host computer
using a 9-pin or 25-pin “D” connector and the iLD Big Display device.
7
6
2
1
8
3
9
4
5
Figure 3.1 Wiring between DB9 computer connector and RS-232 controller interface
14 15 16 17 18 17 20 21 21 23 24 25
1
2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Figure 3.2 Wiring between DB25 computer connector
and RS-232 controller interface
Table 3.2 shows the pin connection assignments between the RS-232 connector on the
meter and the 9-pin or 25-pin “D” connectors of your computer.
Table 3.2 Wiring RS-232 Interface
COMPUTER
PIN FUNCTION
Receive (Rx)
Transmit (Tx)
Common ground
DB9
2
3
5
DB25
3
2
7
iLD Big Display
FUNCTION/LABEL
TB4
Transmit (Tx) 3
Receive (Rx) 2
RTN
1
3.3 Wiring RS-485 Interface
RS-485 interface uses a two wire communication system (one for transmitting and one
for receiving) plus a common wire to connect to the shield of a cable. It is recommended
to use a shielded cable with one twisted pair.
Use of twisted pair and shield will significantly improve noise immunity.
6
Figure 3.3 shows multipoint, half-duplex RS-485 interface connections for the iLD Big
Display.
Figure 3.3 Multipoint, Half-Duplex RS-485 wiring
Value of the termination resistor is not critical and depends on the cable
impedance.
7
Table 3.3 shows RS-485 half-duplex hookup using a computer’s RS-232 interface, an
RS-485 interface converter, and an iLD Big Display controller.
Table 3.3 RS-485 Half-Duplex Hook-up
COMPUTER
CONVERTER BOX
PIN FUNCTION
Rx/Tx
Rx/Tx
Common ground
DB9 DB25
2
3
5
3
2
7
COMPUTER
iLD
SIDE
SIDE
SEE CONVERTER’S -Rx/-Tx
MANUFACTURING +Rx/+Tx
SPECIFICATION
COM
iLD Big Display
FUNCTION/LABEL
TB4
Tx
Rx
RTN
3
2
1
Communication Interfaces shown above are those which are used on iLD Big
Display devices. Other types of Communication Interfaces are not covered in this
chapter.
8
PART 4
COMMUNICATION SETUP
4.1 Flow Chart
Figure 4.1 Flow Chart for Communication Option
9
4.2 Setup the iLD Big Display Device Through the Front Panel
You can setup your device by pressing the push buttons on the front panel.
ENTER COMMUNICATION OPTION MENU:
Press a
1) Press a until CNFG prompt appears.
Press d
2) Display advances to INPT Input Menu.
Press a
3) Press a, until display advances to COMM Communication Options Menu.
Press d
4) Display advances to C.PAR Communication Parameters Submenu.
a - Use a to advance/navigate through all Communication Menu items.
b - Press d to access the submenus from a top level of Communication Menu item.
Press d to store a submenu selection.
c - Press b to scroll through “flashing” selection. When a numerical value is displayed,
press b to change a value of this parameter.
d - Press c to go back to a top level of Communication Menu item. Press c twice to
reset the device to Run mode.
4.3 Abbreviations, Range, Default Setup
The Communication Menu Displays items using some abbreviations and compact
wording shown on Table 4.1.
Table 4.1 Abbreviations, Range, Default Setup
Display
Function
Range/ Definition
(abbreviations)
C.PAR
Communication
Parameter:
bAUd
Baud rate
300, 600,1200, 2400
4800, 9600, 19200
PRtY (odd_, EVEN, Parity
Odd, Even, No
_No_)
dAtA (7.bit, 8.bit)
Data bit
7 bit, 8 bit
StOP (1.bit, 2.bit)
Stop bit
1 bit, 2 bit
bus.F
Bus format:
M.bUS
Modbus protocol Yes – Modbus protocol enabled
No – i-Series protocol enabled
_LF_
Line feed
Yes – print on every other line
No – print on every line
ECHO
Echo
Yes – echo the command
parameter
No – no echo
StNd (232C, 485_)
Communication
RS-232, RS-485
Standard
ModE (CMd_, CoNt) Data Flow Mode Command – operate in Command
Mode (respond to valid command).
Continuous – operate in
Continuous mode (transmit
different measurement values
continuously on the bus).
10
Factory
Default
9600
odd
7.bit
1.bit
_No_
_No_
_YES
232C
CMd_
Abbreviations, Range, Default Setup Continued
SEPR (SPCE, _cR_) Data Separation Space – space inserted after each
Character
piece of data.
Carriage Return – carriage return
inserted after each piece of data
dAt.F
Data Format:
stAt
Alarm Status
Yes – enables the transmission of
Alarms Value
No – disable
RdNG
Reading
Yes – enables the transmission
of Reading Value
No – disable
PEAk
Peak
Yes – enables the transmission
of Peak Value
No – disable
VALY *
Valley
Yes – enables the transmission
of Valley Value
No – disable
GROS **
Gross
Yes – enables the transmission
of Gross Value
No – disable
UNit
Units
Yes – enables the transmission
of Units of Measurement
No – disable
AddR
Multipoint Address 0000 to 0199 – Addressed Meter
tR.tM
Transmit Time
0000 to 5999 sec – transmission
Interval
Time Interval between consecutive
transmissions in Continuous Mode.
Recognition
20 Hex to 7F Hex (32 to 127 Dec)
Character
–see Table 2.1, except “^”, “A”,
“E”
* - For Temperature/Process instrument only
** - For Process/Strain Gauge instrument only
SPCE
_No_
_Yes
_No_
_No_
_No_
_No_
0001
0016
*
1. There is no Continuous Mode, when the device is configured to use the
RS-485 interface standard.
2. The Multipoint Address will be included in the transmission data if RS-485
standard has been selected in the menu items.
3. Transmit time is available only when the device has been configured for
Continuous Mode and RS-232 Standard.
4. If the meter is in point-to-point Continuous Mode, it ignores any transmitted
commands except Crtl S, which will stop transmission.
11
Communications Parameters Submenu
Allows the user to adjust Serial Communications settings of the device. When
connecting an instrument to a computer or other device, the Communication Parameters
must match. Generally the default settings shown in Table 4.1 should be utilized.
Bus Format Submenu
Determines communications standards and command/data formats for transferring
information into and out of the device via the Serial Communications Bus.
Bus Format submenus essentially determine how and when data can be accessed via
the Serial Communications Port of the device.
Data Format Submenu
Preformatted data can be sent automatically or upon request from the device. Use the
Data Format Submenus to determine what data will be sent in this preformatted data
string. At least one of the Data Format suboptions must be enabled to send output data
to the Serial Bus.
Recognition Character
A selectable symbol transmitted as the first character of each message from the
computer, which is used for message security: the meter ignores messages without this
symbol.
12
PART 5
i-SERIES PROTOCOL
To Enable the i-Series Protocol, set the Modbus menu item to “No” in the Bus
Format Submenu of the Communication Menu. Refer to Section 5.7.11.
A Data Communication Protocol defines the rules and structure of messages used by all
devices on a network for data exchange. A typical transaction will consist of a request to
send from the “master” followed by the response from the “slave”.
5.1 Command Structure
The device can be commanded to “Read”, i.e., to transmit (send) data from either the
nonvolatile memory (EEPROM) or from the volatile working memory (RAM).
The device can also be commanded to “Write”, i.e., store new values for data processing
or control.
There are different command types associated in communicating with your meter shown
in Table 5.1, which shows the Command Prefix Letters (Command Classes).
Table 5.1 Command Prefix Letters
COMMAND PREFIX
(COMMAND CLASS) MEANING
^AE
Special read, Communication parameters
P (Put)
Write HEX data into RAM
W (Write)
Write HEX data into EEPROM. 1,000,000 writes to EEPROM
is guaranteed!
G (Get)
Read HEX data from RAM
R (Read)
Read HEX data from EEPROM
U
Read status byte
V
Read measurement data string in Decimal format
X
Read measurement data values in Decimal format
D
Disable
E
Enable
Z
Reset
13
5.2 Command Formats
Table 5.2 shows the command formats for iLD Big Display devices.
Table 5.2 Command Formats
For “P” and “W” Command For “G” and “R” Command For “X”, “V”, “U”, “D”,
classes:
classes:
“E”, and”Z” Command
classes:
Point-to-point mode
Point-to-point mode
Point-to-point mode
* ccc<data><cr>
* ccc <cr>
* ccc <cr>
Multipoint mode
Multipoint mode
Multipoint mode
* nnccc [<data>]<cr>
* nnccc <cr>
* nnccc <cr>
Where:
“*” is the selected Recognition Character. You may select any ASCII table symbol from
“!” (HEX address “21”) to the right-hand brace (HEX “7D”) except for the caret “^”, “A”,
“E”, which are reserved for bus format request.
“ccc” stands for the hex-ASCII Command Class letter (one of eleven given in Table 5.1),
followed by the two hex-ASCII Command Suffix characters identifying the meter data,
features or menu items to which the command is directed (given in Table 5.3).
“<data>” is the string of characters containing the variable information the computer is
sending to the meter. These data (whether BCD or binary) are encoded into hex-ASCII
characters, two characters to the byte. Square brackets (indicating optional status)
enclose this string, since some commands contain no data.
“<nn>” are the two ASCII characters for the device Bus Address of RS-485
communication . Use values from “00” to hex “C7” (199 decimal).
Table 5.3 and 5.4 shows the command letters and suffix for iLD Big Display devices.
Table 5.3 Command Letters and Suffix for Temperature/Process and Process/Strain Gauge
Instruments
Command Command
Function
Command
# Of
Default
Index
Bytes
Characters
Value
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
SP1
SP2
RDGOFF
ANLOFF
ID
N/A
INPUT
RDGCNF
AL1CNFG
AL2CNFG
LOOP BREAK TIME
OUT1CNF
OUT2CNF
RAMPTIME
14
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
6
6
6
6
4
2
2
2
2
4
2
2
4
200000
200000
200000
400000
0003
04
4A
00
00
003B
00
60
0000
Command Letters and Suffixes Continued
Command Command
Function
Index
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
D
D
D
D
E
E
E
E
X
X
X
U
U
V
Z
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
01
02
03
04
01
02
03
04
01
02
03
01
03
01
02
ANLSCL
COMM.PARAMETERS
COLOR
AL1LO
AL1HI
RDGSCL
AL2LO
AL2HI
PB1/DEAD BAND
RESET 1
RATE 1
CYCLE 1
N/A
PB2/DEAD BAND
CYCLE 2
SOAK TIME
BUS FORMAT
DATA FORMAT
ADDRESS
Transit Time Interval
N/A
Miscellaneous
C.J. OFFSET ADJ.
Recognition Character
%LOW
%HI
DISABLE ALARM 1
DISABLE ALARM 2
STANDBY
DISABLE SELF
ENABLE ALARM 1
ENABLE ALARM 1
DISABLE STANDBY
ENABLE SELF
SEND READING
SEND PEAK READING
SEND VALLEY READING
SEND ALARM STATUS
SEND SW VERSION
SEND DATA STRING
HARD RESET
15
Command
Bytes
# Of
Characters
Default
Value
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
2
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
4
4
2
4
2
4
2
2
2
4
2
6
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9186A0
0D
09
A003E8
200FA0
100001
A003E8
200FA0
00C8
00B4
0000
07
00C8
07
0000
14
02
01
0010
00
200000
2A
00
63
-
Table 5.4 Command Letters and Suffix for Process/Strain Gauge Instrument with
10 Linearization Points
Command Command
Function
Command
# Of
Index
Bytes
Characters
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
GPRW
RW
RW
GPRW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
SP1
SP2
RDGOFF
ANLOFF
ID
N/A
INPUT
RDGCNF
AL1CNFG
AL2CNFG
LOOP BREAK TIME
OUT1CNF
OUT2CNF
RAMPTIME
ANLSCL
COMM.PARAMETERS
COLOR
AL1LO
AL1HI
RDGSCL
AL2LO
AL2HI
PB1/DEAD BAND
RESET 1
RATE 1
CYCLE 1
N/A
PB2/DEAD BAND
CYCLE 2
SOAK TIME
BUS FORMAT
DATA FORMAT
ADDRESS
Transit Time Interval
N/A
Miscellaneous
C.J. OFFSET ADJ.
Recognition Character
%LOW
%HI
16
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
6
6
6
6
4
2
2
2
2
4
2
2
4
6
2
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
4
4
2
4
2
4
2
2
2
4
2
6
2
2
2
Default
Value
200000
200000
200000
400000
0003
04
4A
00
00
003B
00
60
0000
9186A0
0D
09
A003E8
200FA0
100001
A003E8
200FA0
00C8
00B4
0000
07
00C8
07
0000
14
02
01
0010
00
200000
2A
00
63
Command Letters and Suffixes Continued
Command Command
Function
Index
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
D
D
D
D
E
E
E
E
X
X
X
U
U
V
Z
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
40
41
42
43
44
45
01
02
03
04
01
02
03
04
01
02
03
01
03
01
02
INPUT FOR SCALE 1
INPUT FOR SCALE 2
INPUT FOR SCALE 3
INPUT FOR SCALE 4
INPUT FOR SCALE 5
Linearization Points
INPUT FOR SCALE 6
INPUT FOR SCALE 7
INPUT FOR SCALE 8
INPUT FOR SCALE 9
RDGSCL1/SCALE 1
RDGSCL2/SCALE 2
RDGSCL3/SCALE 3
RDGSCL4/SCALE 4
RDGSCL5/SCALE 5
RDGSCL6/SCALE 6
RDGSCL7/SCALE 7
RDGSCL8/SCALE 8
RDGSCL9/SCALE 9
RDGOFF1/OFFSET 1
RDGOFF2/OFFSET 2
RDGOFF3/OFFSET 3
RDGOFF4/OFFSET 4
RDGOFF5/OFFSET 5
RDGOFF6/OFFSET 6
RDGOFF7/OFFSET 7
RDGOFF8/OFFSET 8
RDGOFF9/OFFSET 9
DISABLE ALARM 1
DISABLE ALARM 2
STANDBY
DISABLE SELF
ENABLE ALARM 1
ENABLE ALARM 1
DISABLE STANDBY
ENABLE SELF
SEND READING
SEND PEAK READING
SEND VALLEY READING
SEND ALARM STATUS
SEND SW VERSION
SEND DATA STRING
HARD RESET
17
Command
Bytes
# Of
Characters
Default
Value
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
6
6
6
6
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
00
-
After modifying any settings with the use of the W prefix commands, a Hard Reset
command should be sent in order to load the changes into Volatile memory.
Examples:
1. To reset the controller, send *Z02 (Table 5.3 & 5.4)
2. To read Setpoint 1, send *R01 (Table 5.3 & 5.4)
3. To change Setpoint 1 to 100.0, send *W012003E8 (see explanation below)
Description: SETPOINT.23~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions
(2 hex. character in each byte)
Where 23~0 are 3 x 8 = 24 Binary bit positions
SETPOINT.23 =
0 = positive sign
1 = negative sign
SETPOINT.22~20 =
000 – Not Allowed
001 – Decimal Point 1 (FFFF.)
010 – Decimal Point 2 (FFF.F)
011 – Decimal Point 3*(FF.FF)
101 – Decimal Point 4*(F.FFF)
*Process only
SETPOINT.19~0 =
Setpoint data
For 100.0: Positive sign = 0, Decimal Point 2 = 010 Bin, Setpoint data 1000 = 3E8 Hex =
=001111101000 Bin
The command data = 0010 0000 0000 0011 1110 1000 Bin = 2003E8 Hex.
2
0
0
3
E
8 Hex
Send *W01 20 03E8
where:
*W01 - *<ccc> - write to Setpoint 1 (Table 5.2)
2003E8 - <data> - Setpoint data in hexadecimal format including sign and decimal
point (Table 5.2)
No spaces are allowed in the data string. The spaces shown on the above
example for illustration purposes only.
Decimal Point position for TC/RTD = 1 or 2, for PROCESS = 1, 2, 3, or 4
Decimal Point position for Set Point should be the same as Decimal Point
position set for process value and can not be overwritten by SETPOINT
command (see RDGCNG command, described in 5.7.2).
4. To change Setpoint 1 to –100.0, send *W01A003E8 (see explanation below)
For (–100.0): Negative sign = 1, Decimal Point 2 = 010 Bin, Setpoint data
1000=3E8 Hex = 001111101000 Bin
The command data = 1010 0000 0000 0011 1110 1000 Bin = A003E8 Hex
A
0
0
3
E
8 Hex
Send *W01A003E8
5. To send the same as above for RS-485 with transmit address 01, the command is
Send *01W01A003E8.
18
5.3 Response Format
Table 5.5 and 5.6 show response format with ECHO and without ECHO Mode selection.
Table 5.5 Echo Mode
For “P” and “W”
For “G” and “R”
Command
Command
classes:
classes:
Point-to-point
Point-to-point
mode
mode
ccc<cr>
ccc<data> <cr>
Multipoint mode
Multipoint mode
nnccc <cr>
nnccc<data> <cr>
For “X”,”V” and “U”
Command
classes:
Point-to-point
mode
ccc<value><cr>
Multipoint mode
nnccc<value><cr>
For “D”, “E” and “Z”
Command
classes:
Point-to-point
mode
ccc<cr>
Multipoint mode
nnccc<cr>
Examples:
1. Sent: *W012003E8 (Change Setpoint 1 to 100.0- see example above)
Response: W01
2. Sent *R01 (Read Setpoint 1, which set to 100.0)
Response: R012003E8
3. Sent: *X01 (Controller reads 75.4 F and Units set to “No”)
Response: X01075.4
4. Sent: *E02 (Enable Alarm 2)
Response: E02
Table 5.6 No ECHO Mode
For “P” and “W”
For “G” and “R”
Command
Command
classes:
classes:
Point-to-point
Point-to-point
mode
mode
No Response
<data> <cr>
Multipoint mode
Multipoint mode
No Response
<data> <cr>
For “X”,”V” and “U”
Command
classes:
Point-to-point
mode
<value><cr>
Multipoint mode
<value><cr>
For “D”, “E” and “Z”
Command
classes:
Point-to-point
mode
No Response
Multipoint mode
No Response
Examples:
1. Sent: *W012003E8 (Change Setpoint 1 to 100.0 - see example above)
Response: No Response
2. Sent *R01 (Read Setpoint 1, which set to 100.0)
Response 2003E8
3. Sent: *X01 (Controller reads 75.4 F and Units set to “No”)
Response: 075.4
4. Sent: *E02 (Enable Alarm 2)
Response: No Response
<data> in Hexadecimal format, except “U” command class, <value> reading in
Decimal format
19
5.4 Error Message
The instrument is capable of detecting different errors during the Communication process
and will transmit an indicating message as shown in Table 5.7 to the host computer.
Table 5.7 Error Message
ERROR MESSAGE
1 Command Error
2 Format Error
3 Parity Error
4 Serial Device Address Error
CODE
?43
?46
?50
?56
Where:
1. COMMAND ERROR occurs when:
a. Command prefix letter is not valid.
b. Command suffix is not valid.
2. FORMAT ERROR occurs when:
a. Length of message is either shorter or longer than it should be.
b. Any characters other than “0 – F” used for hexadecimal values.
3. PARITY ERROR occurs when transmitted parity does not match with parity set on
the receiver.
4. Serial Device Address Error occurs if the new value is larger than 199 decimal.
1. The iLD Big Display device will not respond to a command if the command‘s
recognition character does not match the meter’s recognition character.
2. When in Multipoint mode, the device will not respond to the command if the
addresses do not match.
3. If the device is in the Menu or Setpoint Mode and receives any transmitted
data, it quits that routine, displays COMM for up to 2 seconds, completes its
Communication job, and then resets the device, i.e., hard reset.
5.5 Alarm Status Characters
The meter, upon receiving the U01 Command, will transmit the alarm status characters.
Table 5.8 shows the transmitted character for each of the possible setpoint/alarm states.
Table 5.8 Alarm Status Characters
CHARACTER
Alarm1
@
OFF
A
ON
B
OFF
C
ON
Alarm2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
20
5.6 Examples of Transmitted Data
1. The following menu items have been selected:
Standard – RS-232, Mode – Continuous, Linefeed – No, Separation – Space, Status - No
Echo – No, Reading – Yes, Valley – Yes, Peak – Yes, Unit of measurement – Yes
Assume that instrument has the following data:
Reading value = 74.2°F, Peak value = 75.1°F, Valley value = 73.2°F
Alarm 1 – OFF, Alarm 2 - OFF
Instrument will transmit: 74.2 75.1 73.2 F
2. The following menu items have been changed: Separation – Carriage Return
Instrument will transmit: 74.2
75.1
73.2 F
3. The following menu items have been changed: Alarm Status – Yes
Instrument will transmit: @
74.1
75.1
73.2 F
4. The following menu items have been changed: ECHO – Yes, Alarm 1 - ON
Instrument will transmit: V01
A
74.2
75.1
73.2 F
21
5.7 Command Formats
The following conditions are assumed in the examples in this section.
1. The recognition character is the asterisk (*).
2. The meter uses the RS-232 interface standard (point-to-point communication).
3. When the “W” command is given, a reset is necessary to initiate the command.
4. Each byte consist of 8 bits.
5. “ “ (blank) in bit pattern information means the bit is not applicable to that parameter.
Note that all ranges have been given decimal numbers. To make a data
command, the decimal numbers are converted into a hex numbers and then the
digits of that hex number are encoded into their equivalent ASCII values.
5.7.1 Input Type (Command Index 07)
Description: INPUT.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
5.7.1.1 Input Type Format for Temperature/Process Instrument
7
BIT POSITION
6 5 4 3
2 1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
INPUT CLASS, RANGE
OR TYPE
TC (Thermocouple)
RTD
PROCESS
TC/
RTD/ PROCESS
J/
392.2/ 0-100 mV
K/
392.3/ 0-1 V
T/
392.4/ 0-10 V
E/
385.2/ 0-20 mA
N
DIN-J/ 385.4
R
S
B/
xx/
xx
C/
xx/
xx
xx/
385.3/ xx
100 ohm RTD
500 ohm RTD
1000 ohm RTD
Example: Set RTD, 4 wire, .0392 Curve, 100 ohms.
The command data is 00001001 Bin = 09HEX. Send: *W0709
Send a Read command first to determine the bits, which are not specified for
some positions (TC and Process for positions 7,6 above).
22
5.7.1.2 Input Type Format for Process/Strain Gauge Instrument
7
6
BIT POSITION
5 4 3 2 1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
INPUT CLASS, RANGE
OR TYPE
Voltage 0 ~ 100 mV
Voltage 0 ~ 1 V
Voltage 0 ~ 10 V
Voltage 0 ~ 20 mA
Ratio Disable
Ratio Enable
Low Resolution
High Resolution
Peak Value
Gross Value
Example: Set Voltage 0 ~ 100 mV, Ratio Enabled, Low Resolution, Gross Value
The command data is 00010100 Bin = 14HEX. Send: *W0714
Send a Read command first to determine the bits, which are not specified for
some positions (positions 7,6 and 5 above).
5.7.2 Reading Configuration: (Command Index 08)
Description: RDGCNG.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
5.7.2.1 Reading Configuration Format for Temperature/Process Instrument
7
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
6
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
Not Allowed
Decimal Point 1 (FFFF)
Decimal Point 2 (FFF.F)
Decimal Point 3 (FF.FF)
Decimal Point 4 (F.FFF)
°C
°F
Filter Constant 1
Filter Constant 2
Filter Constant 4
Filter Constant 8
Filter Constant 16
Filter Constant 32
Filter Constant 64
Filter Constant 128
Example: Set Decimal point 1, ºC, Filter constant 16.
The command data is 10000001Bin = 81Hex. Send: *W0881
23
5.7.2.2 Reading Configuration Format for Process/Strain Gauge Instrument
7
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
6
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
Not Allowed
Decimal Point 1 (FFFF)
Decimal Point 2 (FFF.F)
Decimal Point 3 (FF.FF)
Decimal Point 4 (F.FFF)
Load (On line Cal) Disable
Load Enable
Filter Constant 1
Filter Constant 2
Filter Constant 4
Filter Constant 8
Filter Constant 16
Filter Constant 32
Filter Constant 64
Filter Constant 128
Example: Set Decimal point 2, Load Enable, Filter constant 4.
The command data is 01010010 Bin = 81Hex. Send: *W084A
5.7.3 Linearization Point (Command Index 29)
The data for number of Linearization Points (number of Scales and Offsets) has offset of -2.
Example: Linearization Points 2 (Scale/Offset number 1 is active for the entire range)
Send: *W2900
Example: Linearization Points 10 (All 9 Scale/Offset are active)
Send: *W2908
24
5.7.4 Color Display (Command Index 11)
Description: CLR.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0 0
0 1
1 0
0 0
0 1
1 0
FUNCTION
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
Alarm 2 Color AMBER
Alarm 2 Color GREEN
Alarm 2 Color RED
Alarm 1 Color AMBER
Alarm 1 Color GREEN
Alarm 1 Color RED
Normal Color AMBER
Normal Color GREEN
Normal Color RED
Example: Set Normal color green, Alarm 1 color red, Alarm 2 color amber
The command data is 00001001Bin = 09Hex. Send *W1109
5.7.5 Alarm 1 Configuration (Command Index 09)
Description: ALR1CNG.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
0
1
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2 1
FUNCTION
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Alarm 1 at Power On Disable
Alarm 1 at Power On Enable
Loop Break Time Disable
Loop Break Time Enable
Active Above
Active Below
Active Hi/Lo
Active Band (Deviation only)
Normally Open
Normally Closed
Unlatch
Latch
Absolute
Deviation
Disable Alarm 1 /
Retransmission
Enable Alarm 1 /
Retransmission
Example:Set Alarm 1 Enable, Deviation, Unlatch, N.C., Band, Loop Disable, Alarm at
Power On Enable. The command data is 10111011Bin = BBHex.
Send: *W09BB
25
5.7.6 Alarm 1 Low (Command Index 12)
Description: AL1LO.23~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions of the Alarm Low Data
AL1LO.23 =
0 = positive sign
1 = negative sign
AL1LO.22~20 =
000 – Not Allowed
001 – Decimal Point 1 (FFFF.)
010 – Decimal Point 2 (FFF.F)
011 – Decimal Point 3*(FF.FF)
101 – Decimal Point 4*(F.FFF)
*Process only
AL1LO.19~0 =
Setpoint data
Example:Set Alarm 1 Low value to -50.0
The command data is 101000000000000111110100Bin = A001F4Hex.
Send: *W12A001F4
To set the Decimal Point for proper position see command format for RDGCNF
(command index 08).
5.7.7 Alarm 2 Configuration (Command Index 0A)
Description: ALR2CNG.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
0
1
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2 1
0
0
1
1
FUNCTION
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Voltage Retransmission
Current Retransmission
Active Above
Active Below
Active Hi/Lo
Active Band (Deviation only)
Normally Open
Normally Closed
Unlatch
Latch
Absolute
Deviation
Disable
Enable
Example: Set Alarm 2 Enable, Absolute, Latch, N.O.,Above, Current Retransmission.
The command data is 10000101 Bin = 85Hex. Send: *W0A85
Warning: If you change the “0A” to “00” on units with Isolated Analog Output it
will disable the Alarm 2 menu.
26
5.7.8 Output 1 Configuration (Command Index 0C)
Description: OUT1CNG.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2 1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
0
0
1
0
1
Auto Tune PID Stop
Auto Tune PID Start
Anti Wind Up Disable
Anti Wind Up Enable
Auto PID Disable
Auto PID Enable
Reverse
Direct
Analog Proportional 0 – 20 mA
Analog proportional 4 – 20 mA
Time Proportional On/Off
Time Proportional PID
Example: Set PID, Direct, Auto PID Enable, Anti Integral Enable, Auto PID Stop.
The command data is 00010111Bin = 2Fhex. Send: *W0C17
5.7.9 Output 2 Configuration (Command Index 0D)
Description: OUT2CNG.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
6
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
1
0
Damping 0
Damping 1
Damping 2
Damping 3
Damping 4
Damping 5
Damping 6
Damping 7
Soak Disable
Soak Enable
Ramp Disable
Ramp Enable
Auto PID Disable
Auto PID Enable
0
Reverse
1wReverseADirect
0
Time Proportional On/Off
1
Time Proportional PID
Example: Set On/Off, Reverse, Auto PID Disable, Ramp Disable, Soak Disable,
Damping 4. The command data is 10000101Bin = 80Hex. Send: *W0D85
27
5.7.10 Communication Parameters (Command Index 10)
Description: COMM.PAR.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
6
0
1
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
FUNCTION
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1 Stop Bit
2 Stop Bit
7 Bit
8 Bit
No Parity
Odd
Even
300 Baud
600
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
Example: Set Baud Rate 9600, Odd Parity, 7 Bit, 1 Stop.
The command data is 00001101Bin = 0Dhex. Send: *W100D
5.7.11 Bus Format (Command Index 1F)
Description: BUSFORMAT.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
1
0
0
1
0
1
Space
Carriage Return
Continuous
Command
RS-232
RS-485
N0 ECHO
ECHO
No Line Feed
Line Feed
No Modbus
Modbus
Example: Set Space, Continuous, RS-232, Echo, Line Feed, N/A
The command data is 00000110Bin = 06Hex. Send *W1F06
28
5.7.12 Data Format (Command Index 20)
DATAFORMAT is used for V01 command or continuous mode (RS-232)
Description: DATAFORMAT.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
6
0
1
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2 1
FUNCTION
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
No Unit
Unit
No Valley or Gross
Valley or Gross
No Peak
Peak
No Reading
Reading
No Alarm Status
Alarm Status
Example: Set ID, Unit, No Valley, No Peak, Reading, No Status.
The command data is 11000010Bin = C2Hex. Send: *W20C2
ADDRESS is applicable for RS-485 standard only and can be 01 to 199
TRANSMIT TIME INTERVAL is applicable for RS-232 standard and Continuous Mode,
which specifies the time between transmission and the minimum time is 500 msec.
5.7.13 Miscellaneous (Command Index 24)
Description: MISCELLANEOUS.76543210 means 8 bit positions of the Command Data.
7
0
1
6
BIT NUMBER
5 4 3 2
0
1
0
1
0
1
FUNCTION
1
0
SP Deviation Disable
SP Deviation Enable
Self Disable
Self Enable
Full ID Disable
Full ID Enable
Set Point ID Disable
Set Point ID Enable
Example: Set SP Enable, Self Disable, Full ID Enable, Set Point ID Disable.
The command data is 10001000Bin = 88Hex. Send: *W2088
29
5.7.14 % Low and % Hi (Command Indexes 27 and 28)
Make sure the values of % Low and % Hi submenus are entered correctly
(% Hi can’t be more than 99% or % Hi should be always more than % Low). If
values entered incorrectly, instrument will reset these values to factory defaults
(% Low = 0, % Hi = 99 (63 Hex)
5.7.15 Reading Scale and Offset (Command Indexes 14 and 3A)
Description: RDGOFF.23~16, 15~8, 7~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions of the
Reading Offset
RDGSC.23~16, 15~8, 7~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions of the
Reading Scale
RDGOFF.23 =
0 positive offset
1 negative offset
RDGOFF.22~20 =
DP+2
RDGOFF.19~0 =
offset data
RDGSC.23~20 =
DP+1
RDGSC.19 =
0 direct scale
1 reverse scale
RDGSC.18~0 =
scale data
Example: To have an input of 4 to 20 mA displayed as 0 to 100
First make sure that the Decimal Point on your device is set to the proper position.
Then, disregard the decimal point position through Scale and Offset calculation.
For instance: to display 0 to 100 set decimal point into position 1 (FFFF);
to display 0 to 100.0 set decimal point into position 2 (FFF.F)
then, perform Scale and Offset calculation to display 0 to 1000.
The Low input value = min. input value * conversion number = 4(mA) x 500 = 2000
The High input value = max. input value * conversion number = 20(mA) x 500 = 10000 (9999)
where: conversion number is a coefficient of conversion between input values and real
display range.
The full range of the display = 10000, conversion number = 10000/20 = 500
See Table 5.9 below for proper conversion number
Table 5.9 Conversion Number
INPUT RANGE CONVERSION NUMBER
0 ~ 100 mV
10000 / (100 x 1) = 100 cts/mV
0~1V
10000 / (1000 x 1) = 10 cts/mV
0 ~ 10 V
10000 / (1000 x 10) = 1 cts/mV
0 ~ 20 mA
10000 / (20 x 1) = 500 cts/mA
30
Scaling:
Y = mX + b
Y2
WHERE:R
RR
Y1
m - SLOPE (SCALE)
b - OFFSET
R
(Y2 - Y1)
R m = (X2 - X1)
b
X1
X2
To remap 4 – 20 mA to a displayed reading from 0 to 100 then use slope:
Rd2 – Rd1
Slope (Scale) = ------------------In2 – In1I
where: Rd2 – Hi Display reading (100), Rd1 – Low Display reading (0)
In2 – Hi Input (20 x 500),
In1 – Low Input (4 x 500)
1. Obtain a Scale Factor
Scale = (100-0) / (9999-2000) = 0.0125016
2. Rewrite the Scale Factor as an integer times an exponent
0.0125016 = 125016 E -7
3. Then Encode these values
125016 Dec = 1E858 Hex - Reading Scale Data
(RDGSC.18 ~ 0 value stored into bits 0 - 18);
E –7 is represented as RDGSC.23 ~ 20 = 8 (DP = 7);
Direct Scale is represented as RDGSC.19 = 0 (direct scale);
31
Binary Code:
Send command: *W1481E858 (scale = 81E858)
Offset:
Offset is found in the following equation: Reading = Scale x Input value + Offset (Y=mX+b)
or the equation can be rewritten as: Offset = Reading – Scale x Input Value (b=Y-mX)
1. Obtain the Offset Factor
Offset = 100 – (0.0125 x 10000) = (-25)
2. Rewrite the Offset Factor as an integer times an exponent
–25 x E0
3. Then encode these values
25 Dec = 00019 Hex Offset Data (RDGOFF.19 ~ 0 value stored into bits 0 – 19)
E0 is represented as RGDOFF.22 ~ 20 = 2 (DP+2=0+2)
Offset is negative represented RDGOFF.23 = 1
Binary Code:
Send command: *W03A00019 (offset=A00019)
See Appendix A for Reading Scale and Offset of Process/Strain Gage Instrument
with 10 Linearization Points
32
5.7.16 Grouping Commands with the Same Formats
1. The following are of the same format as the Alarm 1 Low data format:
Set Point 1 (command index 01), Set Point 2 (command index 02)
Alarm 1 High (command index 13), Alarm 2 Low (command index 15),
Alarm 2 High (command index 16), C.J. Offest Adjustment
(command index 25).
2. There are two commands using the same Scale-Type format:
Reading Scale (command index 14) and Analog Output Scale
(command index 0F)
3. There are two commands using the same Offset-Type format:
Reading Offset (command index 03) and Analog Output Offset
(command index 04)
4. Table 5.10 below shows the simple natural numbers, which have a simple
data format.
Table 5.10 Commands with Numeric Data Format
Command
Function
# of
index
characters
05
ID Code
2
22
Transmit Time Interval
4
1A
Cycle 1
2
1D
Cycle 2
2
21
Address
2
17
PB1/Dead Band 1
4
1C
PB1/Dead Band 2
4
18
Reset 1
4
19
Rate 1
4
27
%Low
2
28
%High
2
Range
0 ~ 9999
0 ~ 1999 (0 = 500 ms)
1 ~ 199 Sec
1 ~ 199 Sec
1 ~ 199
0 ~ 9999 Counts
0 ~ 9999 Counts
0 ~ 3999 Sec
0 ~ 3999 Sec
0 ~ 98%
0 ~ 99%
Example: Set Proportional Band 1 (PB 1) to 150
The command data = 0096Hex. Send: *W170096
5. Time Formats:
Loop Break Time Value MM * 100 + SS (encoded as a 4 digit hex number)
Ramp Time
HH * 100 + MM (encoded as a 4 digit hex number)
Soak Time
HH * 100 + MM (encoded as a 4 digit hex number)
Example: Set Loop Break Time to 10 minutes 25 seconds (10:25)
The command data = 0401Hex. Send: *W0B0401
To communicate when the Continuous Mode is enabled, the Continuous Mode
must be stopped by sending Crtl S (Xoff) and then send ^AE
33
PART 6
MODBUS PROTOCOL
To Enable the Modbus Protocol, set Modbus menu item to “Yes” in the Bus
Format Submenu of the Communication Menu.
6.1 Introduction
Modbus Protocol defines a message structure that iLD Big Display devices will recognize
and use, regardless of the type of networks over which they communicate. It describes
the process a device uses to request access to another device, how it will respond to
requests from the other devices, and how errors will be detected and reported. It
establishes a common format for the layout and contents of message fields.
The Modbus Protocol provides the internal standard that the iLD Big Display devices use
for parsing messages. During communications on a Modbus network, the protocol
determines how each instrument will know its device address, recognize a message
addressed to it, determine the kind of action to be taken, and extract any data or other
information contained in the message. If a reply is required, the iLD Big Display will
construct the reply message and send it using Modbus protocol.
Modbus defines a digital communication network to have only one MASTER and one or
more SLAVE devices. Either a single (point-to-point) or multi-drop network (multipoint) is
possible.
iLD Big Display devices communicate on standard Modbus networks using RTU
(Remote Terminal Unit) transmission mode.
6.2 RTU Mode
In RTU Mode, each eight-bit byte in a message contains two four-bit hexadecimal
characters. The main advantage of this mode is that its greater character density allows
better data throughput than ASCII for the same baud rate. Each message must be
transmitted in a continuous stream.
The following format used for each byte sent and received by i-Series instrument
in RTU Mode:
1. Eight-bit binary, Hexadecimal (0 ... 9, A ... F)
2. Two hexadecimal characters contained in each eight-bit field of the message
3. 1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 Stop Bit (No Parity Bit)
The figure below shows the bit sequences when byte transmitted in RTU Mode.
LSB – Least Significant bit sent first
34
The Modbus Message frame is shown below
DEVICE
ADDRESS
8 BITS
nn
FUNCTION
CODE
8 BITS
nn
DATA
CRC
CHECK
16 BITS
nnnn
k x 8 BITS
nnn...
where: n – character, k – integers depend on the contents of the data format.
6.3 Device Address
The address message frame contains eight bits. The slave device addresses are in the
range of 1 ... 199 decimal. A master addresses a slave by placing the slave address in
the address field of the message. When the slave sends its response, it places its own
address in this address field of the response to let the master know which slave is
responding. Address 0 is used for the write command broadcast that commands all
devices on network, which all slave devices recognize.
6.4 Function Code
The function code field of a message frame contains eight bits (RTU). Valid codes are in
the range of 1 ... 255 decimal. Of these, some codes are applicable for i-Series
controllers. When a message is sent from a master to a slave device the function code
field tells the slave what kind of action to perform.
The following functions are supported by iLD Big Display devices:
Table 6.1 Function Code
Function Code
Function
03
Read holding register
04
Read input register
06
Preset (Write to)
single register
Diagnostic
08
Description
Reads the binary contents of holding
registers in the slave
Reads the binary contents of input register
in the slave.
Preset (Write) a value into single holding
register
Series of tests for checking communication
between master and slave
When the slave responds to the master, it uses the function code field to indicate either a
normal (error-free) response or that some kind of error occurred (called an exception
response). For a normal response, the slave simply echoes the original function code.
For an exception response, the slave returns a code that is equivalent to the original
function code with its most significant bit set to a logic 1.
6.5 Data Field
The data field is constructed using sets of two hexadecimal digits, in the range of 00 to
FF hexadecimal. The data field of messages sent from a master to slave devices
contains additional information, which the slave must use to take the action defined by
the function code. This can include items like discrete and register addresses, the
quantity of items to be handled, and the count of actual data bytes in the field.
35
6.6 CRC Checking
With RTU Mode the error checking field contains a 16-bit value implemented as two
eight-bit bytes (High order byte and Low order byte). The error check value is the result
of a Cyclical Redundancy Check (CRC) Calculation performed on the message contents.
After building a message (address, function code, data) the transmitting device
calculates a CRC Code and puts it to the end of the message. A receiving device will
calculate a CRC Code from the message it has received and compare against
transmitted CRC Code. If these CRC Codes are different, there has been a
communication error. iLD Big Display devices will not reply if they detect a CRC Error.
Sequences of CRC calculation:
1. Load a 16 bit CRC register with all 1’s.
2. Apply first 8 bit byte of the message to the low order byte (LB) of the contents of the
register.
3. Exclusive OR these 8 bit with the register contents.
4. Shift the result one bit to the right with zero entering into the high order byte (HB)
position and evaluate the LB.
5. If over flow bit in LB is 1, exclusive OR the latest register contents with A001 Hex
value.
6. If over flow bit in LB is 0, no exclusive OR occurs (repeat step 4).
7. Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 until 8 shifts have been performed.
8. Apply next 8 bit byte of the message to the LB contents of the register.
9. Exclusive OR these 8 bit with the register contents.
10. Repeat steps 4 to 9 until all bytes of the message have been processed.
11. The final content of the register is the CRC value.
Examples of CRC calculation sees in Appendix B
When CRC is placed into the end of the message, the low order byte of the CRC
will be transmitted first, followed by the High order byte.
36
6.7 Modbus RTU Registers
The table below shows the Modbus registers supported by iLD Big Display devices.
Table 6.2 Modbus Registers
FUNCTION
REGISTER
CODE
NO
0
03/04, 06
1
03/04, 06
2
NO
3
NO
4
03/04, 06
5
NO
6
03/04, 06
7
03/04, 06
8
03/04, 06
9
03/04, 06
10
03/04, 06
11
03/04, 06
12
03/04, 06
13
03/04, 06
14
NO
15
03/04, 06
16
NO
17
03/04, 06
18
03/04, 06
19
NO
20
03/04, 06
21
03/04, 06
22
03/04, 06
23
03/04, 06
24
03/04, 06
25
03/04, 06
26
NO
27
03/04, 06
28
03/04, 06
29
03/04, 06
30
03/04, 06
31
03/04, 06
32
03/04, 06
33
03/04, 06
34
NO
35
NO
36
NO
37
03/04, 06
38
03/04
39
03/04
40
03/04
41
03/04
42
06
43
FUNCTION
N/A
SETPOINT 1
SETPOINT 2
N/A
N/A
ID
N/A
INPUT
RDGCNF
ALR1CNF
ALR2CNF
LOOP BREAK TIME
OUT1CNF
OUT2CNF
RAMP TIME
N/A
COMM. PARAMETERS
N/A
ALR1 LOW
ALR1 HI
N/A
ALR2 LOW
ALR2 HI
PB1/DEAD BAND 1
RESET 1
RATE 1
CYCLE 1
N/A
PB2/DEAD BAND 2
CYCLE 2
SOAK TIME
BUS FORMAT
DATA FORMAT
ADDRESS
TRANSIT TIME
N/A
N/A
N/A
RECOGNITION CHAR.
PROCESS VALUE
PEAK VALUE
VALLEY VALUE
SOFTWARE VERSION
RESET
37
VALUE, RANGE
(Decimal)
-1999 to 1999
-1999 to 1999
0 to 9999
0 to 255
0 to 255
0 to 255
0 to 255
00:00 to 99:59
0 to 255
0 to 255
00:00 to 99:59
0 to 255
-1999 to 9999
-1999 to 9999
-1999 to 9999
-1999 to 9999
0 to 9999
0 to 3999
0 to 399.9
1 to 199
0 to 9999
1 to 199
00:00 to 99:59
0 to 255
0 to 255
0 to 199
0 to 9999
32 to 126
6.8 Command Format
The following formats are used to SEND commands by computer and RETURNED by
the device.
6.8.1 Read Multiple Register (03 or 04)
SENT TO DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
FUNCTION CODE
03 or 04
1 BYTE
nn
1 BYTE
03
DATA
STARTING
NUMBER OF
REGISTERS REGISTERS
HB
LB
HB
LB
00
nn
00
nn
CRC
LB
nn
HB
nn
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE FUNCTION CODE
DATA
ADDRESS
03 or 04
NUMBER OF
FIRST
BYTES
REGISTER
1 BYTE
1 BYTE
1 BYTE
HB
LB
nn
03
nn
nn
nn
....
n
CRC
REGISTER
HB LB LB HB
nn
nn nn nn
....
Where: HB – High Order Byte
LB – Lower Order Byte
Unused bits are set to zero
iLD Big Display devices support only Read Single Register, so the number of
registers should always set to 1.
Example:
SENT TO DEVICE: Address 1, Read (03) register 1 (Setpoint 1)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
03
STARTING
REGISTER
00
01
NUMBER OF
REGISTERS
00
01
CRC
D5
CA
To determine the appropriate registers see Table 6.2
RETURNED FROM DEVICE: Setpoint 1 set to 100.0
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
03
NUMBER OF
BYTES
02
VALUE OF
REGISTERS
03
E8
CRC
B8
FA
03E8 Hex = 1000 Dec
These returned data do not specify the Decimal Point position. The following command
will determine the Decimal Point position.
38
Example:
SENT TO DEVICE: Address 09, Read (03) register 08 (Reading Configuration)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
09
FUNCTION
CODE
03
STARTING
REGISTER
00
08
NUMBER OF
REGISTERS
00
01
NUMBER OF
BYTES
02
VALUE OF
REGISTERS
00
4A
CRC
04
80
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
09
FUNCTION
CODE
03
CRC
D8
72
004A Hex = 01001010 Bin. This value calls for Decimal Point position number 2 (FFF.F)
– see example in 5.7.2 for Reading Configuration.
6.8.2 Write to Single Register (06)
The following command will write a parameter to the single register.
Sent to/Return from device :
DEVICE
ADDRESS
1 BYTE
nn
FUNCTION CODE
06
1 BYTE
06
DATA
REGISTER
HB
00
LB
nn
DATA/
VALUE
HB
LB
00
nn
CRC
LB
nn
HB
nn
Example: Set Alarm1 Low (register 18) to 300 Dec (12C Hex)
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 20 (14 Hex), write (06) to register 18 (12 Hex) value 300
(12C Hex)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
01
2C
12
CRC
2B
47
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
01
2C
12
CRC
2B
47
iLD Big Display devices support only Write to Single Register command
39
Example: Set Alarm2 Low to –100.0 on Device address 20
We have to send two commands to accomplish this task.
First, we have to set decimal point into the position 2 (FFF.F) and then, set value of
Alarm 2 Low to –1000 counts (disregard decimal point).
1. Set Decimal Point
Set the Decimal point to the position 2 (FFF.F), Temperature unit ºF, Filter constant 4
- see example in 5.7.2
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 20 (Hex 14), write (06) to register 8, data 4A
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
00
4A
08
CRC
8B
3A
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
00
4A
08
CRC
8B
3A
2. Conversion the Decimal value of (–1000) to Hexadecimal Value:
N = +1000 Dec = 0000 0011 1110 1000 Bin = 2 bytes or 16 bits
1’s complement of N = 1111 1100 0001 0111 Bin = Not N
2’s complement of N = 1111 1100 0001 1000 Bin = 1’s complement of N + 1LSB
F
C
1
8 Hex
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 20 (14 Hex), write (06) to register 21 (15 Hex) value
(–1000) (FC18 Hex)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
FC
18
15
CRC
DB
C1
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
14
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
FC
18
15
CRC
DB
C1
For examples of how to Read/Write data code for INPUT, RDGCNF, ALR1CNF,
ALR2CNFG, OUT1CNF, OUT2CNF, COLOR, COMM.PARAMETERS,
BUSFORMAT, DATAFORMAT see section 5.7 of this manual.
40
6.8.3 Diagnostic Command
This command echoes the sent message to indicate that the communication link is
established correctly.
SEND TO/RETURN FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
1 BYTE
nn
FUNCTION
CODE
1 BYTE
08
DIAGNOSTIC LOOPBACK
CODE
DATA
HB
LB
HB
LB
00
00
nn
nn
CRC
LB
nn
HB
nn
Where: Diagnostic Code is two byte code to determine the type of test to be performed.
iLD Big Display devices supported only “00” code which requested slave to echo sent
command back to the master.
Example:
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 01, Diagnostic command (08), data value 8755 Dec
(2233 Hex)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
08
DIAGNOSTIC
CODE
22
33
LOOPBACK
DATA
00
00
DIAGNOSTIC
CODE
22
33
LOOPBACK/
DATA
00
00
CRC
BE
B8
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
08
CRC
BE
B8
6.8.4 Error Response
When a device can not properly respond to the command due to incorrect or corrupted
command, it will respond with an error message. The error massage has the following
format:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
1 BYTE
nn
FUNCTION
CODE
1 BYTE
nn
ERROR
RESPONSE
1 BYTE
nn
CRC
LB
nn
HB
nn
iLD Big Display devices support the following error code messages:
02 – read from/write to the illegal register – read from/write to the register, which is
inactive, or not supported by iLD Big Display devices
03 – write an illegal value – write out of range value
41
Example:
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 05, read (03) register 04 - inactive (see Table 6.2)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
05
FUNCTION
CODE
03
STARTING
REGISTER
00
04
NUMBER OF
REGISTERS
00
01
ERROR
RESPONSE
02
CRC
CRC
C4
4F
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
05
FUNCTION
CODE
83
81
30
Example:
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 120 (Hex 78), write (06) to register 35 (Hex 23) - inactive
(see Table 6.2)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
78
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
00
00
23
CRC
73
A9
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
78
FUNCTION
CODE
86
ERROR
RESPONSE
02
CRC
12
78
Example:
SEND TO DEVICE: Address 01, write (06) to register 12 (Hex C) value 300 (Hex 12C)
–out of range (see Table 6.2)
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
06
REGISTER
00
DATA/
VALUE
01
2C
0C
CRC
49
84
RETURNED FROM DEVICE:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
01
FUNCTION
CODE
86
ERROR
RESPONSE
03
CRC
02
61
When a device returns an error message, it adds 80 Hex to the Function Code
(03 + 80 = 83 or 06 + 80 = 86)
42
APPENDIX A
Reading Scale and Offset for Process/Strain Gage Instrument with 10 Linearization
Points (Command Indexes 2B to 33, 34 to 3C, 3D to 45)
Description: RDGOFF.23~16, 15~8, 7~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions of the
Reading Offset
RDGSC.23~16, 15~8, 7~0 means 3 bytes x 8 bit positions of the
Reading Scale
RDGOFF.23 =
0 positive offset
1 negative offset
RDGOFF.22~20 =
DP+2
RDGOFF.19~0 =
offset data
RDGSC.23~20 =
DP+1
RDGSC.19 =
0 direct scale
1 reverse scale
RDGSC.18~0 =
scale data
Example:
The following example assumes load cells with this specification:
Maximum Load:
Output:
Sensor Excitation:
100 lbs
3.0 mV/V
10 Vdc
Maximum Sensor Output = (Output) x (Sensor Excitation) = 3.0 (mV/V) x 10 (V) = 30 mV
Input Value (In) = (Sensor Output) x (Conversion Number) x (Multiplier)
See Tables A.1 and A.2 below for proper Conversion and Multiplier Numbers.
Table A.1 Conversion Number
INPUT RANGE CONVERSION NUMBER
0 ~ 100 mV
10000 / (100 x 1) = 100 cts/mV
0~1V
10000 / (1000 x 1) = 10 cts/mV
0 ~ 10 V
10000 / (1000 x 10) = 1 cts/mV
0 ~ 20 mA
10000 / (20 x 1) = 500 cts/mA
Table A.2 Input Resolution Multiplier
INPUT RANGE
RESOLUTION
LOW
HIGH
0 ~ 100 mV
1.0
10.0
0~1V
1.0
10.0
0 ~ 10 V
1.0
10.0
0 ~ 20 mA
1.0
10.0
Determine IN min and IN max Input Range and Resolution. For our transducer select
0 - 100 mV range and Low resolution.
IN min = 0 (mV) x 100 (cts/mV) x 1.0 = 0
IN max = 30 (mV) x 100 (cts/mV) x 1.0 = 3000
43
Determine correct values for Display reading (Rd min and Rd max). In most cases, Rd min
and Rd max are equal to the minimum and maximum of the transducer output range.
Rd min = 0
Rd max = 100.0
We have to scale our meter to have an input 0 to 3000 (30 mV) displayed as 0 to 100.0 (lbs)
Assume that the shape of the transducer response characteristic is equal to the shape of the
parabola (Y=KX^2)
Output = K x Input^2, there K = Output / Input^2 = 100.0 / (3000^2) = 1 / (9 x 10^4)
Output = Input^2/(9 x 10^4)
Let’s build the response characteristic of our transducer based on the seven inputs within the
range of the transducer (7 linearization points)
Input (X): In 1=0 In 2=500 In 3=1000 In 4=1500 In 5=2000 In 6=2500 In 7=3000
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Output (Y): Rd 1=0 Rd 2=2.8 Rd 3=11.0 Rd 4=25.0 Rd 5=44.4 Rd 6=69.4 Rd 7=100.0
Reading
Output
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Output
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
Input
The following commands need to be sent to the meter to create this response characteristic.
First make sure that the Decimal Point on your device is set to the proper position.
Then, disregard the decimal point position through Scale and Offset calculation.
For instance: to display 0 to 100 set decimal point into position 1 (FFFF);
to display 0 to 100.0 set decimal point into position 2 (FFF.F)
then, perform Scale and Offset calculation to display 0 to 1000.
44
1. The command for the number of linearization points is 29 (Table 5.4) and the data has
an offset of -2. Send command: *W2905 means 7 points of linearization are active.
2. Out of ten points the very first one is not available through the communication
commands. The nine points from 1st to 9th must represent min and max of each interval
respectively, and the points in between them must be progressively incrementing. The
commands for these points are 2B to 33 (Table 5.4)
2.1 Send command: *W2B2001F4 means 5 mV input for Scale 1/Offset 1 is active, DP=2
2.2 Send command: *W2C2003E8 means 10 mV input for Scale 2/Offset 2 is active, DP=2
2.3 Send command: *W2D2005DC means 15 mV input for Scale 3/Offset 3 is active, DP=2
2.4 Send command: *W2E2007D0 means 20 mV input for Scale 4/Offset 4 is active, DP=2
2.5 Send command: *W2F2009C4 means 25 mV input for Scale 5/Offset 5 is active, DP=2
2.6 Send command: *W30200BB8 means 30 mV input for Scale 6/Offset 6 is active, DP=2
3. Calculate Scale.
Rd(n) - Rd(n-1)
Scale = -------------------- , where n is an interger
IN(n) - IN(n-1)
The commands for these points are 34 to 3C (Table 5.4)
3.1 Scale 1 = (28 - 0) / (500 - 0) = 56000 x E-6
56000 Dec = DAC0 Hex is a Reading Scale Data (RDGSC1.18~0 = DAC0)
E-6 represented as RDGSC1.23~20 = 7 (DP+1=7)
RDGSC1.19 = 0 (direct scale)
Send command: *W3470DAC0
3.2 Scale 2 = (110 - 28) / (1000 - 500) = 164000 x E-6
RDGSC2.18~0 = 164000 Dec = 280A0 Hex
RDGSC2.23~20 = 7
RDGSC2.19~0 = 0
Send command: *W357280A0
3.3 Scale 3 = (250 - 110) / (1500 - 1000) = 280000 x E-6
RDGSC3.18~0 = 280000 Dec = 445C0 Hex
RDGSC3.23~20 = 7
RDGSC3.19~0 = 0
Send command: *W367445C0
45
3.4 Scale 4 = (444 - 250) / (2000 - 1500) = 388000 x E-6
RDGSC4.18~0 = 388000 Dec = 5EBA0 Hex
RDGSC4.23~20 = 7
RDGSC4.19~0 = 0
Send command: *W3775EBA0
3.5 Scale 5 = (694 - 444) / (2500 - 2000) = 500000 x E-6
RDGSC5.18~0 = 500000 Dec = 7A120 Hex
RDGSC5.23~20 = 7
RDGSC5.19~0 = 0
Send command: *W3877A120
3.6 Scale 6 = (1000 - 694) / (3000 - 2500) = 612000 x E-6
RDGSC6.18~0 = 612000 Dec = 956A0 Hex
RDGSC6.23~20 = 7
RDGSC6.19~0 = 0
Send command: *W397956A0
4. Calculate Offset.
Reading = Scale x Input + Offset
Offset (n) = Reading (n) - Scale (n) x Input (n), where n is an integer
The commands for these points are 3D to 45 (Table 5.4)
4.1 Offset 1 = 28 - (28 - 0) / (500 - 0) x 500 = 0
RDGOFF1.19~0 = 0 Dec = 0 Hex
RDGOFF1.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF1.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W3DA00000
4.2 Offset 2 = 110 - (110 - 28) / (1000 - 500) x 1000 = -54 x E0
RDGOFF2.19~0 = 54 Dec = 36 Hex
RDGOFF2.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF2.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W3EA00036
4.3 Offset 3 = 250 - (250 - 110) / (1500 - 1000) x 1500 = -170 x E0
RDGOFF3.19~0 = 170 Dec = AA Hex
RDGOFF3.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF3.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W3FA000AA
4.4 Offset 4 = 444 - (444 - 250) / (2000 - 1500) x 2000 = -332
RDGOFF4.19~0 = 332 Dec = 14C Hex
RDGOFF4.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF4.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W40A0014C
46
4.5 Offset 5 = 694 - (694 - 444) / (2500 - 2000) x 2500 = -556
RDGOFF5.19~0 = 556 Dec = 22C Hex
RDGOFF5.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF5.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W41A0022C
4.6 Offset 6 = 1000 - (1000 - 694) / (3000 - 2500) x 3000 = -836
RDGOFF6.19~0 = 836 Dec = 344 Hex
RDGOFF6.22~20 = 2 (DP+2)
RDGOFF6.23 = 1 (Offset is negative)
Send command: *W42A00344
A Hard reset command (*Z02) should be sent at the end in order to load the
changes into Volatile memory.
47
APPENDIX B
ASCII Dec
Char
NUL
00
SOH
01
STX
02
ETX
03
EOT
04
ENQ
05
ACK
06
BEL
07
BS
08
HT
09
LF
10
VT
11
FF
12
CR
13
SO
14
SI
15
DLE
16
DC1
17
DC2
18
DC3
19
DC4
20
NAK
21
SYN
22
ETB
23
CAN
24
EM
25
SUB
26
ESC
27
FS
28
GS
29
RS
30
US
31
SP
32
!
33
"
34
#
35
$
36
%
37
&
38
39
(
40
)
41
*
42
+
43
44
45
46
Hex
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
ASCII Chart
Binary
ASCII
No parity Char
00000000
@
00000001
A
00000010
B
00000011
C
00000100
D
00000101
E
00000110
F
00000111
G
00001000
H
00001001
I
00001010
J
00001011
K
00001100
L
00001101
M
00001110
N
00001111
O
00010000
P
00010001
Q
00010010
R
00010011
S
00010100
T
00010101
U
00010110
V
00010111
W
00011000
X
00011001
Y
00011010
Z
00011011
[
00011100
\
00011101
]
00011110
^
_
00011111
00100000
`
00100001
a
00100010
b
00100011
c
00100100
d
00100101
e
00100110
f
00100111
g
00101000
h
00101001
I
00101010
j
00101011
k
00101100
l
00101101
m
00101110
n
48
Dec
Hex
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
Binary
No Parity
01000000
01000000
01000010
01000011
01000100
01000101
01000110
01000111
01001000
01001001
01001010
01001011
01001100
01001101
01001110
01001111
01010000
01010001
01010010
01010011
01010100
01010101
01010110
01010111
01011000
01011001
01011010
01011011
01011100
01011101
01011110
01011111
01100000
01100001
01100010
01100011
01100100
01100101
01100110
01100111
01101000
01101001
01101010
01101011
01101100
01101101
01101110
ASCII Chart Continued
ASCII Dec
Hex
Char
/
47
2F
0
48
30
1
49
31
2
50
32
3
51
33
4
52
34
5
53
35
6
54
36
7
55
37
8
56
38
9
57
39
:
58
3A
;
59
3B
<
60
3C
=
61
3D
>
62
3E
?
63
3F
Binary
No parity
00101111
00110000
00110001
00110010
00110011
00110100
00110101
00110110
00110111
00111000
00111001
00111010
00111011
00111100
00111101
00111110
00111111
ASCII Control Codes
ASCII Dec Hex Ctrl Key
Char
Equiv.
NUL 00 00 Crtl @
SOH
STX
01
02
01
02
Crtl A
Crtl B
ETX
EOT
03
04
03
04
Crtl C
Crtl D
ENQ
05
05
Crtl E
ACK
06
06
Crtl F
BEL
BS
07
08
07
08
Crtl G
Crtl H
HT
09
09
Crtl I
LF
VT
10
11
0A
0B
Crtl J
Crtl K
FF
12
0C
Crtl L
CR
13
0D
Crtl M
SO
SI
DLE
14
15
16
0E
0F
10
Crtl N
Crtl O
Crtl P
ASCII
Char
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
Definition
Dec
Hex
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
Binary
No Parity
01101111
01110000
01110001
01110010
01110011
01110100
01110101
01110110
01110111
01111000
01111001
01111010
01111011
01111100
01111101
01111110
01111111
ASCII Dec Hex Ctrl Key Definition
Char
Equiv.
Null Character DC1 17 11 Crtl Q Data Control 1
- XON
Start of Header DC2 18 12 Crtl R Data Control 2
Start of Text
DC3 19 13 Crtl S Data Control 3
- XOFF
End of Text
DC4 20 14 Crtl T Data Control 4
End of
NAK 21 15 Crtl U
Negative
Transmission
Acknowledge
Inquiry
SYN 22 16 Crtl V Synchronous
Idle
Acknowledge
ETB 23 17 Crtl W End of Trans
Block
Bell
CAN 24 18 Crtl X
Cancel
Back Space
EM
25 19 Crtl Y
End of
Medium
Horizontal
SUB 26 1A Crtl Z
Substitute
Tabulation
Line Feed
ESC 27 1B
Crtl [
Escape
Vertical
FS
28 1C
Crtl \
File
Tabulation
Separator
Form Feed
GS
29 1D
Crtl ]
Group
Separator
Carriage
RS
30 1E
Crtl |
Record
Return
Separator
Shift Out
US
31 1F Crtl _ Unit Separator
Shift In
SP
32 20
Space
Data Link Escape
49
APPENDIX C
Example of CRC Calculation
Device address 06, read (03), starting register 0008, number of registers 0001
CRC Calculation
Function code
Load 16 bit register to all 1’s
First byte is address 06
Exclusive OR
1st shift
A001
Exclusive OR
2nd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
5th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
6th shift
7th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
8th shift
Second byte Read 03
Exclusive OR
1st shift
2nd shift
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
5th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
6th shift
7th shift
8th shift
Third byte Starting reg. 00
Exclusive OR
1st shift
2nd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
1111
1111
0111
1010
1101
0110
1010
1100
0110
1010
1100
0110
0011
1010
1001
0100
0010
1010
1000
0100
0100
0010
0001
0000
1010
1010
0101
0010
1010
1000
0100
0010
0001
0001
0000
0000
1010
1010
0101
1010
1111
0111
Two byte (16 bit) Register
HB
LB
1111
1111
0000
1111
1111
1111
1111
0000
0000
1111
1111
1111
1111
0000
0000
1111
1111
0111
1111
0000
0000
0111
1111
0011
1111
0001
1111
0000
0000
0001
1111
1000
1111
0100
0111
0000
0000
0100
0111
0010
0011
0000
0010
0011
0001
0001
0000
1000
1000
0100
0000
0000
1000
0100
0100
0010
1010
0001
0000
0000
1010
0001
0101
0000
0010
1000
0001
0100
0000
0001
0100
1000
1010
0100
0101
0000
0000
0100
0101
0010
0010
0000
0000
0010
0010
1001
0001
50
1111
0110
1001
1100
0001
1101
1110
0001
1111
1111
0001
1110
1111
1111
0001
1110
1111
1111
0001
1110
1111
0011
1100
1110
1111
0111
0001
0110
0011
0001
0001
0000
1000
0100
0010
0000
0010
0001
0000
0001
0001
1000
0001
1001
0100
Overflow
Bit
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
CRC Calculation Continued
Function code
A001
Exclusive OR
5th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
6th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
7th shift
8th shift
Fourth Byte 08
Exclusive OR
1st shift
A001
Exclusive OR
2nd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
5th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
6th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
7th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
8th shift
Fifth Byte 00
Exclusive OR
1st shift
A001
Exclusive OR
2nd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
5th shift
6th shift
1010
1101
0110
1010
1100
0110
1010
1100
0110
0011
0011
0001
1010
1011
0101
1010
1111
0111
1010
1101
0110
0011
1010
1001
0100
1010
1110
0111
1010
1101
0110
0110
0011
1010
1001
0100
1010
1110
0111
1010
1101
0110
1010
1100
0110
0011
Two byte (16 bit) Register
HB
LB
0000
0000
1001
0001
1100
1000
0000
0000
1100
1000
0110
0100
0000
0000
0110
0100
0011
0010
0001
1001
0000
0001
1001
1000
1100
0000
0000
1000
1100
1100
0110
0000
0000
1100
0110
1110
0011
0000
0000
1110
0011
1111
0001
0111
1000
0000
0000
0111
1000
1011
1100
0000
0000
1011
1100
0101
1110
0000
0000
0101
1110
1010
1111
0000
1010
1111
0101
0111
0000
0000
0101
0111
1010
1011
0000
0000
1010
1011
0101
0101
0000
0000
0101
0101
1010
1010
0000
0000
1010
1010
0101
0101
0010
1010
51
Overflow
Bit
0001
0101
1010
0001
1011
0101
0001
0100
0010
0001
1000
1001
1100
0001
1101
0110
0001
0111
0011
0001
0010
1001
1100
0001
1101
0110
0001
0111
0011
0001
0010
0001
0000
0001
1000
0001
1001
1100
0001
1101
1110
0001
1111
1111
0001
1110
0111
1011
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
CRC Calculation Continued
Function code
A001
Exclusive OR
7th shift
8th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
Sixth Byte 01
Exclusive OR
1st shift
2nd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
3rd shift
A001
Exclusive OR
4th shift
5th shift
6th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
7th shift
A001
Exclusive OR
8th shift
CRC code
1010
1001
0100
0010
1010
1000
1000
0100
0010
1010
1000
0100
1010
1110
0111
0011
0001
1010
1011
0101
1010
1111
0111
7
Two byte (16 bit) Register
HB
LB
0000
0000
0010
1010
1001
0101
0100
1010
0000
0000
0100
1010
0000
0100
1010
0010
0101
0001
0010
0000
0000
0001
0010
0000
1001
0000
0000
0000
1001
0000
0100
1000
0010
1100
0001
0000
0000
1100
0001
1110
0000
0000
0000
1110
0000
1111
0000
F
0
Overflow
Bit
0001
1010
0101
1010
0001
1011
0001
1010
0101
1010
0001
1011
0101
0001
0100
1010
0101
0010
0001
0011
1001
0001
1000
0100
4
Transmitted Message:
DEVICE
ADDRESS
06
FUNCTION
CODE
03
STARTING
REGISTER
00
08
NUMBER OF
REGISTERS
00
01
52
CRC
04
7F
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
Example of CRC calculation in “C” language
This subroutine used to do CRC calculation
#define POLY 0xA001;
unsigned int crc_calculation (unsigned char *start_string, unsigned char number_byte)
{
unsigned int crc;
unsigned char bit_counter;
unsigned char *data_pointer;
data_pointer= start_string;
crc = 0xffff;
// Initialize crc
while (number_byte>0)
{
crc ^= data_pointer
bit_counter=0;
// crc XOR with data
// reset counter
while (bit_counter < 8)
{
if (crc & 0x0001)
{
crc >>= 1;
crc ^= POLY;
}
// shift to the right 1 position
// crc XOR with POLY
else
{
crc >>=1;
}
// shift to the right 1 position
bit_counter++;
}
// increase counter
number_byte--;
}
return (crc);
// adjust byte counter
// final result of crc
}
53
APPROVAL INFORMATION
1. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
This device comforms with requirements of EMC Directive 89/336/EEC,
amended by 93/68/EEC. This instrument complies with the following EMC
Immunity Standards as tested per EN 50082-2, 1995 (Industrial environment)
Phenomena
Test Specification
Basic Standard
Electrostatic
Discharge
+/- 4 kV contact discharge
+/- 8 kV air discharge
IEC 1000-4-2
Performance
Criteria B
Radio Frequency
electromagnetic
field.
27 - 1000 MHz
10 V/m
80% AM (1 KHz)
IEC 1000-4-3
Performance
Criteria A
Radio Frequency
electromagnetic field.
Pulse modulated.
900 MHz
10 V/m
50% Duty cycle @ 200 Hz
IEC 1000-4-3
Performance
Criteria A
Fast Transients
+/- 2 kV (ac mains)
+/- 1 kV (dc, signal I/O)
5/50 ns Tr/Th, 5 KHz rep. freq.
IEC 1000-4-4
Performance
Criteria B
Radio Frequency
conducted
0.15 - 80 MHz
10 V/m
80% AM (1 KHz)
IEC 1000-4-6
Performance
Criteria A
This instrument complies with the following EMC Emission Standards as
tested per EN 50081-1, 1992 (Residential, Commercial and Light Industrial)
Phenomena
Frequency
Range
Limits
Basic
Standard
Radiated
Emission
30-230 MHz
230-1000 MHz
30 dB_V/m at 10 m
37 dB_V/m at 10 m
quasi peak
CISPR 22
Class B
Conducted
Emission
0.15-0.5 MHz
0.5-5 MHz
5-30 MHz
66-56 dB_V quasi peak
56 dB_V quasi peak
60 dB_V quasi peak
CISPR 22
Class B
2.Safety
This device conforms with Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC, amended by 93/68/EEC.
The following LVD requirements have been met to comply with EN 61010-1, 1993
(Electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory use)
1. Pollution Degree 2
2. Installation Category II
3. Double Insulation
4. Class I Equipment (Units with 100-240 Vac Power)
54
WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER
OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. warrants this unit to be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of 61 months from date of purchase. OMEGA’s WARRANTY adds an additional one (1) month grace
period to the normal five (5) year product warranty to cover handling and shipping time. This ensures
that OMEGA’s customers receive maximum coverage on each product.
If the unit malfunctions, it must be returned to the factory for evaluation. OMEGA’s Customer Service
Department will issue an Authorized Return (AR) number immediately upon phone or written request.
Upon examination by OMEGA, if the unit is found to be defective, it will be repaired or replaced at no
charge. OMEGA’s WARRANTY does not apply to defects resulting from any action of the purchaser,
including but not limited to mishandling, improper interfacing, operation outside of design limits,
improper repair, or unauthorized modification. This WARRANTY is VOID if the unit shows evidence of
having been tampered with or shows evidence of having been damaged as a result of excessive corrosion;
or current, heat, moisture or vibration; improper specification; misapplication; misuse or other operating
conditions outside of OMEGA’s control. Components in which wear is not warranted, include but are not
limited to contact points, fuses, and triacs.
OMEGA is pleased to offer suggestions on the use of its various products. However,
OMEGA neither assumes responsibility for any omissions or errors nor assumes liability for
any damages that result from the use of its products in accordance with information provided
by OMEGA, either verbal or written. OMEGA warrants only that the parts manufactured by the
company will be as specified and free of defects. OMEGA MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT THAT OF
TITLE, AND ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY DISCLAIMED. LIMITATION OF
LIABILITY: The remedies of purchaser set forth herein are exclusive, and the total liability of
OMEGA with respect to this order, whether based on contract, warranty, negligence,
indemnification, strict liability or otherwise, shall not exceed the purchase price of the
component upon which liability is based. In no event shall OMEGA be liable for
consequential, incidental or special damages.
CONDITIONS: Equipment sold by OMEGA is not intended to be used, nor shall it be used: (1) as a “Basic
Component” under 10 CFR 21 (NRC), used in or with any nuclear installation or activity; or (2) in medical
applications or used on humans. Should any Product(s) be used in or with any nuclear installation or
activity, medical application, used on humans, or misused in any way, OMEGA assumes no responsibility
as set forth in our basic WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER language, and, additionally, purchaser will indemnify
OMEGA and hold OMEGA harmless from any liability or damage whatsoever arising out of the use of the
Product(s) in such a manner.
RETURN REQUESTS/INQUIRIES
Direct all warranty and repair requests/inquiries to the OMEGA Customer Service Department. BEFORE
RETURNING ANY PRODUCT(S) TO OMEGA, PURCHASER MUST OBTAIN AN AUTHORIZED RETURN (AR)
NUMBER FROM OMEGA’S CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT (IN ORDER TO AVOID PROCESSING
DELAYS). The assigned AR number should then be marked on the outside of the return package and on any
correspondence.
The purchaser is responsible for shipping charges, freight, insurance and proper packaging to prevent
breakage in transit.
FOR NON-WARRANTY REPAIRS, consult
FOR WARRANTY RETURNS, please have the
OMEGA for current repair charges. Have
following information available BEFORE contacting
the following information available BEFORE
OMEGA:
contacting OMEGA:
1. Purchase Order number under which the product
1. Purchase Order number to cover the COST
was PURCHASED,
of the repair,
2. Model and serial number of the product under
2. Model and serial number of the product, and
warranty, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
relative to the product.
relative to the product.
OMEGA’s policy is to make running changes, not model changes, whenever an improvement is possible. This affords our
customers the latest in technology and engineering.
OMEGA is a trademark of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
© Copyright 2018 OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. All rights reserved. This document may not be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the prior
written consent of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
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Process Measurement and Control?
OMEGA…Of Course!
Shop online at omega.com
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U Rotameters, Gas Mass Flowmeters & Flow Computers
M
U Air Velocity Indicators
M
U Turbine/Paddlewheel Systems
M
U Totalizers & Batch Controllers
pH/CONDUCTIVITY
M
U pH Electrodes, Testers & Accessories
M
U Benchtop/Laboratory Meters
M
U Controllers, Calibrators, Simulators & Pumps
M
U Industrial pH & Conductivity Equipment
DATA ACQUISITION
M
U Communications-Based Acquisition Systems
M
U Data Logging Systems
M
U Wireless Sensors, Transmitters, & Receivers
M
U Signal Conditioners
M
U Data Acquisition Software
HEATERS
M
U Heating Cable
M
U Cartridge & Strip Heaters
M
U Immersion & Band Heaters
M
U Flexible Heaters
M
U Laboratory Heaters
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING AND CONTROL
M
U Metering & Control Instrumentation
M
U Refractometers
M
U Pumps & Tubing
M
U Air, Soil & Water Monitors
M
U Industrial Water & Wastewater Treatment
M
U pH, Conductivity & Dissolved Oxygen Instruments
M3730/0818
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