Omega | iTHX-SD | Owner Manual | Omega iTHX-SD Owner Manual

Omega iTHX-SD Owner Manual
TM
User’s Guide
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Temperature + Humidity
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Servicing North America:
Omega Engineering, Inc.
Toll-Free: 1-800-826-6342 (USA & Canada only)
Customer Service: 1-800-622-2378 (USA & Canada only)
Engineering Service: 1-800-872-9436 (USA & Canada only)
Tel: (203) 359-1660
Fax: (203) 359-7700
e-mail: info@omega.com
For Other Locations Visit omega.com/worldwide
The information contained in this document is believed to be correct, but OMEGA accepts no liability for any errors it contains, and
reserves the right to alter specifications without notice.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part 1: INTRODUCTION
1.1 Safety and EMC Considerations .....................................................................2
1.2 Before You Begin .............................................................................................2
1.3 Description .......................................................................................................2
Part 2: HARDWARE
2.1 Dimensions ......................................................................................................5
2.2 Wall Mounting ..................................................................................................6
2.3 Parts of the iServer Unit.............................................................................. 7
2.4 Disassembly Instruction ............................................................................. 8
2.5 Network Communication Interfaces .......................................................... 9
2.5.1 10/100 BASE-T RJ-45 Pinout .......................................................... 9
2.5.2 Connecting iServer to PC/Hub/Switch/Router.............................. 9
2.6 Relay Wiring Connections .......................................................................... 9
PART 3 NETWORK CONFIGURATION
3.1 Network Protocols ..................................................................................... 10
3.2 Ethernet (MAC) Address ........................................................................... 10
3.3 DHCP .......................................................................................................... 11
3.4 DNS .......................................................................................................... 11
3.5 IP Address .................................................................................................. 11
3.6 Port Number ............................................................................................... 12
PART 4 OPERATIONS ......................................................................................................
4.1 IP Address Assignment ............................................................................ 12
4.1.1 DHCP (Method 1) ........................................................................... 12
4.1.2 ARP HTTPget Commands (Method 2) ......................................... 13
4.1.3 Direct Connection (Method 3) ...................................................... 13
4.1.4 iConnect Software (Method 4) ..................................................... 17
4.2 Access and Configuration Using a Web Browser .................................. 19
4.3 LOGIN and ADMINISTRATOR Passwords............................................... 19
4.4 Setup .......................................................................................................... 20
4.4.1 Overview ........................................................................................ 20
4.4.2 Network .......................................................................................... 21
4.4.2.1 IP Configuration ...................................................................... 21
4.4.2.2 Ethernet Port ........................................................................... 23
4.4.3 Configuration................................................................................. 23
4.4.3.1 Data and Time ......................................................................... 23
4.4.3.2 Server ...................................................................................... 25
4.4.3.3 Sensors ................................................................................... 25
4.4.3.4 Alarm Relays ........................................................................... 27
4.4.4 Management .................................................................................. 29
4.4.4.1 Setup ....................................................................................... 29
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol ................................ 29
SMTP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol ............................................... 30
4.4.4.1.1 Sending Text Messages to a Cell Phone ....................... 30
4.4.4.2 Alarms ..................................................................................... 30
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
4.4.5 Security .......................................................................................... 32
4.4.6 Recording ...................................................................................... 34
4.4.6.1 Start Recording ....................................................................... 34
4.4.6.2 Status ....................................................................................... 36
4.4.6.3 Data Retrieval .......................................................................... 37
4.4.6.4 Format SD Card ...................................................................... 38
4.4.7 System ........................................................................................... 38
4.4.7.1 Reboot ..................................................................................... 38
4.4.7.2 Defaults ................................................................................... 39
4.4.7.3 Upgrade ................................................................................... 39
4.4.7.4 Download Configuration ........................................................ 40
4.4.7.5 Upload Configuration ............................................................. 41
4.4.8 Diagnostics .................................................................................... 41
4.4.9 Log Out .......................................................................................... 41
4.5 Readings .................................................................................................... 42
4.5.1 HTML .............................................................................................. 42
4.5.2 Java ................................................................................................ 43
4.6 Chart .......................................................................................................... 44
4.7 Web Link..................................................................................................... 45
4.8 Telnet Setup ............................................................................................... 46
4.8.1 Telnet Connection ......................................................................... 46
4.9 HTTPget Program ...................................................................................... 47
4.9.1 HTTPget using Port 2000.............................................................. 48
4.10 Flash Card Reader ................................................................................... 50
4.11 iLog Software ........................................................................................... 52
PART 5 SPECIFICATIONS........................................................................................... 54
APPENDIX A GLOSSARY ........................................................................................... 56
APPENDIX B IP Address ............................................................................................. 57
APPENDIX C ARP Commands ................................................................................... 58
APPENDIX D IP Netmask ............................................................................................ 59
APPENDIX E ASCII Chart ............................................................................................ 60
APPENDIX E ASCII Control Codes ............................................................................ 61
APPENDIX F iLog Error Messages ............................................................................ 62
APPENDIX G Java Runtime Environment Setup ....................................................... 63
APPENDIX H Sensor Information............................................................................... 65
APPENDIX J SNMP ...................................................................................................... 67
Part 6: APPROVALS INFORMATION
6.1 CE APPROVALS ............................................................................................68
ii
LIST OF FIGURES:
Figure 1.1 iServer and iLD Big Display on the Ethernet Network .............................. 4
Figure 2.1 Dimensions ................................................................................................... 5
Figure 2.2 Wall Mounting ............................................................................................... 6
Figure 2.3 Parts of the iServer Unit............................................................................... 7
Figure 2.4 Opening the Unit........................................................................................... 8
Figure 2.5 RJ45 Pinout ................................................................................................... 9
Figure 2.6 Relay Connections ....................................................................................... 9
Figure 3.1 Labeling .................................................................................................. 10
Figure 4.1 ARP and HTTPget Commands on a DOS Window .................................. 13
Figure 4.2 Connecting Computer Directly to iServer ................................................ 14
Figure 4.3 Network Connections................................................................................. 14
Figure 4.4 Local Area Connection .............................................................................. 14
Figure 4.5 Changing TCP/IP Properties on Your Computer ..................................... 15
Figure 4.6 iServer Welcome Page ............................................................................... 16
Figure 4.7 Pinging the iServer from MS-DOS Prompt ............................................... 16
Figure 4.8 Assigning an IP Address using iConnect ................................................. 17
Figure 4.9 Accessing the iServer’s using iConnect .................................................. 18
Figure 4.10 iServer Welcome Page ............................................................................. 19
Figure 4.11 LOGIN and ADMINISTRATOR Passwords.............................................. 19
Figure 4.12 Overview .................................................................................................. 20
Figure 4.13 Network: IP Configuration ...................................................................... 21
Figure 4.14 Network: Ethernet Configuration ............................................................ 23
Figure 4.15 Network: Ethernet Configuration ............................................................ 24
Figure 4.16 Configuration Menu: Server .................................................................... 25
Figure 4.17 Configuration Menu: Sensors ................................................................. 26
Figure 4.18 Configuration Menu: Alarm Relays......................................................... 28
Figure 4.19 Management Menu: Setup ....................................................................... 29
Figure 4.20 Management Menu: Alarms ..................................................................... 30
Figure 4.21 Security Menu ........................................................................................... 32
Figure 4.22 Recording Menu: Start Recording .......................................................... 34
Figure 4.23 Recording Menu: Status .......................................................................... 36
Figure 4.24 Recording Menu: Data Retrieval ............................................................. 37
Figure 4.25 Recording Menu: Format SD Card .......................................................... 38
Figure 4.26 System: Reboot ........................................................................................ 38
Figure 4.27 System: Defaults ...................................................................................... 39
Figure 4.28 System: Upgrade ...................................................................................... 39
Figure 4.29 System: Download Configuration ........................................................... 40
Figure 4.30 System: Upload Configuration ................................................................ 40
Figure 4.31 Diagnostics ............................................................................................... 41
Figure 4.32 Readings: HTML ....................................................................................... 42
Figure 4.33 Readings: Java ......................................................................................... 43
Figure 4.34 Adjustable Chart ....................................................................................... 44
Figure 4.35 Web Link .................................................................................................. 45
Figure 4.36 Tera Term Telnet Connection Screen ..................................................... 46
Figure 4.37 Telnet to port 2002 – p command ........................................................... 47
Figure 4.38 Telnet to port 2002 – ? command ........................................................... 47
Figure 4.39 Recorded Data File Directory .................................................................. 53
Figure 4.40 Example of data recorded on the SD card, standard text (.txt) file format 53
iii
LIST OF FIGURES (continued)
Figure 4.41 iLog Software Logging Data .................................................................... 54
Figure C.1 ARP Commands and Responses ............................................................. 58
Figure G.1 Java 1.7 Screen Shot ................................................................................. 63
Figure H.1 RH Accuracy Chart .................................................................................... 65
Figure H.2 Temperature Accuracy Chart.................................................................... 65
Figure H.3 Normal Range............................................................................................. 65
LIST OF TABLES
Table 2.1
Table 4.1
Table F-1
Table J-1
Table J-2
Parts of iServer Unit....................................................................................... 7
iLog Excel Applications............................................................................... 53
iLog Error Messages ................................................................................... 62
SNMP MIB-2 .................................................................................................. 67
SNMP Trap .................................................................................................. 67
iv
NOTES, WARNINGS and CAUTIONS
Information that is especially important to note is identified by the following labels:
W*+0!
W3ARNING or CAUTION
W%),+.0ANT
W0%,
NOTE: Provides you with information that is important to successfully
setup and use the iServer.
CAUTION: Tells you about the risk of electrical shock.
CAUTION: Risk of danger. Tells you of circumstances or practices
that can affect the instrument’s functionality and must refer to
accompanying documents.
TIP: Provides you helpful hints.
FEATURES
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Temperature
Relative Humidity
Web Server
Dual Probe Capability
Virtual Chart Recorder
Two Relay Alarms
2GB SD Flash Memory Card
Password Protection
Email Alarms
Data Logging
Real Time Clock
Accurate Readings
SNMP Trap
LCD Display
Back-up Battery 9Vdc
1
PART 1
INTRODUCTION
1.1 Safety and EMC Considerations
Refer to the CE Approvals Section.
EMC Considerations
W Whenever EMC is an issue, always use shielded cables.
W Never run signal and power wires in the same conduit.
W Use twisted-pair wires for signal connections.
W Install Ferrite Bead(s) on signal wires close to the instrument if EMC problems persist.
Failure to follow all instructions and warnings may result in injury!
1.2 Before You Begin
Inspecting Your Shipment: Remove the packing slip and verify that you have received
everything listed. Inspect the container and equipment for signs of damage as soon as
you receive the shipment. Note any evidence of rough handling in transit. Immediately
report any damage to the shipping agent. The carrier will not honor damage claims
unless all shipping material is saved for inspection. After examining and removing the
contents, save the packing material and carton in the event reshipment is necessary.
Customer Service: If you need assistance, please contact the Customer Service
Department nearest you.
Manuals, Software: The latest Operation Manual as well as free configuration software
(iConnect) and datalogging software (iLog) are available at the website listed on the
cover page of this manual or on the CD-ROM enclosed with your shipment.
1.3 Description
View Temperature + Humidity with a Web Browser. The iServer let’s you monitor and
record Temperature, Relative Humidity and Dew Point over an Ethernet network or the
Internet with no special software -- just a Web browser. The iServer serves Active Web
Pages to display real time readings and display charts of temperature, humidity and dew
point, or log data in standard data formats for use in a spreadsheet or data acquisition
program such as Excel or Visual Basic.
Adjustable Charts. The Java™ Applet chart scales are fully adjustable on the fly. For
example, the chart can display one day, one week, one month or one year. Temperature
and humidity can be charted across the full span (-40 to 124ºC, and 0 to 100% RH) or
within any narrow range (such as 20 to 30ºC).
When a second sensor is added, users can select a chart that records channel 1,
channel 2 or the difference of the two channels.
SD Flash Memory Card. The iServer comes complete with a removable 2 GB SD Flash
Memory card that can store up to seven years of readings taken at ten second intervals.
The data is recorded on widely available SD (Secure Digital) flash cards. The format is a
simple text file that is easily imported to spreadsheets and other programs. It can be read
on a PC or MAC with a USB card reader. You can also download the data remotely over
an Ethernet network or the Internet.
Installation and operation of the iServer requires no special training, tools, or software.
The device connects to any Ethernet network with standard cable and is powered by a
universal 100 to 240 Vac adapter which is supplied with the product.
2
1.3 Description (continued)
Back-up Battery. The iServer comes with a universal 100 to 240 Vac power adapter.
A standard 9 Volt Alkaline battery (also included) allows the device to continue recording
data for 60 hours (at one minute interval setting) without external ac power (such as a
power outage).
Display and Chart Two Channels. The transmitter comes complete with a temperature
and humidity probe for measurement of a single location.
With the addition of a second probe, the transmitter can measure and display
temperature, humidity and dew point in a second location up to ten feet away.
The transmitter can display and chart absolute measurements in both locations, or a
differential measurement between the two locations. The second probe requires no
change to the basic transmitter hardware, it can be added at the time of purchase or in
the future. A choice of industrial probes in 2” and 5” lengths, and a wand style for ambient
indoor applications are available. A simple DB-9 “Y” connector is required for adding a
second probe.
Sensor and Calibration. It is not necessary to take the iTHX-SD out of service for
routine calibration. The temperature/humidity sensors are interchangeable and can be
replaced for about the same cost as a typical calibration. Replacement sensors with
optional 3-point NIST traceable calibration certificates are available.
Email Alarms. The device can trigger an alarm if temperature or humidity goes above or
below a set point that you determine. Your alarm can be sent by email to a single user or
to a group distribution list, including text messages to cell phones and PDA’s.
Alarm Relays. The iServer features two 1.5 Amp relays. With the easy Web-based setup
page, the two relays can be programmed for any combination of temperature or humidity,
and high or low set points. The relays can also be programmed to remain latched and
require a manual reset if a limit is exceeded.
Link to Web CAM or IP Camera. The Web page includes a link to a “Web Cam” or “IP
camera” (not included). If you get a message about an alarm condition, you can quickly
click on the link to view the actual scene over the Internet.
3
1.3 Description (continued)
Award-winning Technology. The iServer is simple to install and use. It features
award winning technology that requires no special software except a Web browser. The
iServer connects to an Ethernet Network with a standard RJ45 connector and sends
data in standard TCP/IP packets. It is easily configured with a simple menu using a
Web browser and can be password protected. From within an Ethernet LAN or over the
Internet, the user simply types its IP address or an easy to remember name such as
“Cleanroom5” or “ServerRoom” in any Web Browser, and the iServer serves a Web Page
with the current readings. The iServer comes complete with one temperature/humidity
wand probe, universal ac power adapter, 9V battery, SD card, and full documentation.
Example:
A standard web browser can be used to monitor and chart temperature and humidity.
The browser can also be used to configure the device’s IP address, passwords for
access and all configuration parameters. An iLD Big Display can display temperature
and humidity received from an iServer over the Ethernet or the Internet.
The following example illustrates how you can hookup an iServer and iLD to your
network:
SMTP SNMP Server
COMPUTER with
Standard Web Browser
COL
ON
TX
RX
and
Figure 1.1 iServer and iLD Big Display on the Ethernet Network
4
PART 2 HARDWARE
2.1 Dimensions
82.6 [3.25]
19.1 [0.75]
88.9 [3.50]
54.1 [2.13]
270.4 [10.65]
12.7 [0.50 ]
If unit is to be
mounted on a flat
surface, you may
take the bottom
rubber feet off the
unit.
90.3 [3.56]
61.6 [2.42]
Dimensions are in mm
with inches in [ ].
3.0 [0.12]
36.6 [1.44]
2.54 [0.10]
Figure 2.1 Dimensions
5
2.2 Wall Mounting
Position unit where required. Mark and drill the two #4 screw holes.
After bracket is mounted on the wall, align back of unit over the three bracket clips, once
engaged, slide downward, the unit will snap in place.
61.6 [2.42]
11.7 [0.46 ]
38.1 [1.50]
REAR WIRE
ENTRY AREA
33.3 [1.31]
DRILL 3.17 [0.125]
USE TWO, #4
FLAT HEAD SCREWS
TO MOUNT BRACKET
SNAP
BRACKET CLIPS (3)
Dimensions are in mm
with inches in [ ].
Figure 2.2 Wall Mounting
It is recommended that you ground your unit by connecting a wire to the Return/
Ground position of the relay connector, see Figure 2.6.
6
2.3 Parts of the iServer Unit
8
1
1
The 9V battery is the
back-up power for the
recording function only.
Figure 2.3 Parts of the iServer Unit
Table 2.1 Parts of iServer Unit
ETHERNET
RJ45 interface for 10/100BASE-T connection.
RESET
Button: Momentary (Push and Release) resets power on unit; Push and Hold for
10 seconds to reset unit to factory defaults and reset power.
100 BASE-T
LINK/ACT
DHCP
LED (Green) On: Indicates 100 Mbps; LED Off: Indicates 10 Mbps.
LED (Green) On/Blinking: Indicates good network link and network activities
(receiving or sending packets).
LED (Yellow): When DHCP is enabled, once the iServer receives the IP
parameters from the DHCP server this LED will turn Solid yellow.
RECORDING
LED (Green) Blinking Fast: Indicates that the unit is recording. LED Blinking:
during back-up battery operation according to sampling rate, or recording interval
if recording is ON.
°C/°F
Button: Press to change LCD display units of measurement between °C and °F.
Press and Hold along with TIME/IP button during power-on, this will enable
DHCP mode.
TIME/IP
Button: Press repeatedly to change LCD display from: 1) Date and Time;
2) Temperature and Humidity; 3) iServer’s IP address. Press and Hold
along with °C/°F button during power up, this will enable DHCP mode.
7
2.3 Parts of the iServer Unit (continued)
STBY
Button: 1) Stops the recording 2) Press before ejecting Flash Card.
NOTE: display will show “Safe to Eject SD” after button has been pressed.
BKLT
Button: Push and Hold to display Backlight on LCD when it is running on the
back-up battery (backlight is always on while running on the ac adapter).
2.4 Disassembly Instruction
You may need to open the unit for one of the following reasons:
W To wire relay connector. (Refer to Figure 2.6)
W To connect or replace the battery.
Disconnect the power supply before proceeding.
W Make sure the flash memory card is fully inserted (or removed), before removing the
cover.
W Remove probe from handle clip (if needed).
Remove cover, by removing 2 mounting screws on each side.
Press STBY before
ejecting Flash Card.
Display will show “Safe
to Eject SD” after button
has been pressed.
COVER
FLASH
CARD
MOUNTING
SCREWS (2)
RELAY
CONNECTOR
TRAY
REMOVE BATTERY CLIP
INSULATOR COVER AND
STORE WHERE SHOWN
WHEN 9V BATTERY IS
BEING USED.
POWER ADAPTOR
KEEP INSULATOR
COVER ON BATTERY
CLIP WHEN BATTERY
IS NOT BEING USED
Figure 2.4 Opening the Unit
8
2.5 Network Communication Interfaces
2.5.1 10/100 BASE-T RJ-45 Pinout
The 10/100BASE-T Ethernet network
system is used in the iServer for
network connectivity. The 10 Mbps
or 100 Mbps twisted-pair Ethernet
system operates over two pairs of
wires. One pair is used for receiving
data signals and the other pair is used
for transmitting data signals. This
means that four pins of the eight-pin
connector are used.
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
For CE compliance at 100
Mbps: use shielded cable,
opposite end of cable must be grounded.
Name
+Tx
- Tx
+RX
N/C
N/C
-Rx
N/C
N/C
Description
+Transmit Data
-Transmit Data
+Receive Data
Not Connected
Not Connected
-Receive Data
Not Connected
Not Connected
Figure 2.5 RJ45 Pinout
2.5.2 Connecting iServer to PC/Hub/Switch/Router
The iServer’s Ethernet interface can automatically detect the Rx and Tx lines on a
twisted pair Ethernet cable (MDI/MDIX Auto Cross). Therefore, to connect an iServer to a
PC/Hub/Switch/Router, either a straight-through or a cross-over cable can be used.
On certain devices (like iServer), it is possible for the hardware to automatically
correct errors in cable selection, making the distinction between a “straightthrough” cable and a “cross-over” cable unimportant. This capability is known as
“Auto MDI/MDIX”.
2.6 Relay Wiring Connections
To access the Relay Connector you must remove the cover, refer to Section 2.4.
It is recommended that you ground your unit by connecting a wire to the
Ground/Return position of the relay connector.
Removable Plug
Connector for Relays
under the Cover
1
4
Figure 2.6 Relay Connections
9
3
COM2
5
NO2
RTN
6
9 Vdc
Side or Bottom
Wire Entry for
Relay Connector
RELAY 1
2
1
COM1
RELAY 2
NO1
6
PART 3
NETWORK CONFIGURATION
3.1 Network Protocols
The iServer can be connected to an Ethernet network communicating through standard
IP protocols including TCP, UDP, SNMP, SMTP, ARP, HTTP (WEB access), DNS,
DHCP, ICMP, SNTP, and Telnet.
3.2 Ethernet (MAC) Address
MAC (Media Access Control) address is a unique hardware number for Ethernet devices
like computers, network switches, print servers, etc. When you’re connected to an
Ethernet LAN using a computer you can see a table of IP addresses called “ARP table”
stored on that computer. The ARP table relates IP addresses of devices on a network
to their corresponding MAC addresses. The MAC address can be found on a label
attached to your Ethernet device and it contains 6 bytes (12 characters) of hexadecimal
numbers XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX hex
For example: 0A:0C:3D:0B:0A:0B
Remove the small label with the default IP address of 192.168.1.200 and there
will be room to put your IP address. See Figure 3.1
REMOVE FACTORY DEFAULT
IP ADDRESS LABEL.
PUT THE NEWLY ASSIGNED
IP ADDRESS IN THIS LOCATION.
FIRMWARE VERSION #
Figure 3.1 Labeling
10
3.3 DHCP
DHCP, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, enables computers and network devices to
receive their IP configurations from a DHCP server.
If DHCP is enabled on your iServer, as soon as the iServer that is connected to the
network is powered on, there will be an exchange of information between the iServer and
the DHCP server. As a result, the DHCP server will assign an IP address, a Gateway
address, a Subnet Mask, and a DNS address to the iServer. Note that the DHCP server
must be correctly configured to make such assignments.
If fixed or static IP address is desired, the DHCP function must be disabled.
The iServer is shipped with DHCP disabled (factory default).
The DHCP can be enabled by accessing the iServer’s web server and selecting Network
menu (refer to Section 4.4.2) or by pressing and holding the two front buttons °C/°F and
TIME/IP during power-on (refer to Section 2.3).
It’s very important to communicate with the network administrator in order to
understand DHCP and its existing configurations on the host server before
enabling DHCP on the iServer.
The iServer is shipped with a default static IP address of 192.168.1.200 and
Subnet Mask of 255.255.255.0.
3.4 DNS
DNS, Domain Name System, enables computers and devices to be recognized over a
network based on a specific name instead of IP addresses.
For example, instead of having to use http://192.168.1.200 (IP address), you would use
http://ithx03ec or any name up to sixteen alphanumeric characters defined as a Host
Name in the iServer’s web server.
The default Host Name for an iServer is “ithx” followed by the last four digits of the
MAC address of that iServer unit.
On Windows servers where DHCP and DNS are separate functions it is very
important to configure the DHCP server to communicate with DNS in order for
the iServer’s Host Name to correctly respond. If you cannot access the iServer
using its Host Name, please contact your network administrator to make sure
DHCP and DNS servers are linked together.
If DNS server address is setup, all Host Names reported during weblink configuration
(i.e. SMTP server IP, SNTP server IP, SNMP trap server IP, etc.) will be translated into
IP addresses.
3.5 IP Address
Every active device connected to the TCP/IP network must have a unique IP address.
This IP address is used to build a connection to the iServer.
All network devices like computers that use TCP/IP protocol to communicate with each
other should have a unique 32-bit address called IP address. The IP address is divided
into two portions, the network ID and the host ID. For instance, every computer on the
same network uses the same network ID. At the same time, all of them have different
host IDs. For more details about the IP address see Appendix B.
11
3.6 Port Number
All TCP connections are defined by the IP address and a port number. A port number is
an internal address that provides a TCP/IP interface between an application software on
a computer and a device on the network or between two devices on the network.
There are two default TCP port (socket) numbers assigned to the iServer:
1) Port 2000: Once a TCP connection is made to the iServer using port 2000 or any
port number that is configured on the iServer for Local Port (see Network menu,
Section 4.4.2), the iServer can then be polled for variables like temperature,
humidity, etc. using commands. For the list of commands see Section 4.9.1.
2) Port 2002: This port is the iServer’s network console port for reading or changing
the settings within the iServer. For the list of settings refer to Section 4.8.1. For both
of the above cases, for example, a Telnet application can be used.
PART 4
OPERATIONS
Depending on user’s preference and network setup, the iServer can be configured in
several ways:
Using the latest versions of Web browsers like Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, or
Safari (iPhone) the iServer’s Web server can be accessed, see Section 4.2.
It can also be configured using a TCP connection to port 2002 using a command line
interface, see Section 4.8.1.
The iCONNECT Configuration Software can also be used to find and configure the
iServer over the Ethernet, see Section 4.1.2.
Before you configure the iServer, you will need to assign an IP address to the
unit. Refer to Section 4.1.1, 4.1.2 or 4.1.3.
4.1 IP Address Assignment
4.1.1 DHCP (Method 1)
The DHCP server will assign an IP address, see Section 3.3.
4.1.2 ARP HTTPget Commands (Method 2)
You can download the HTTPget program from our web site to use it for this section.
1. From the Command line (DOS prompt) where you keep the HTTPget.exe file, type the
following:
arp -s 128.100.101.76 00-03-34-00-9c-5c
press the <Enter> key
128.100.101.76, for example, is the IP address that you want to assign to your iServer
and 00-03-34-00-9c-5c is the MAC address of your iServer labeled on the bottom of the
unit.
2. From the same prompt, type the following HTTPget command:
httpget -r -S “00000000” 128.100.101.76:1
press the <Enter> key
00000000 is the default ADMINISTRATOR password in your iServer unit and
128.100.101.76:1 is the IP address that your iServer will accept on TCP port 1. At this
point, you have successfully assigned 128.100.101.76 IP address to your iServer.
Continued on the following page.
12
4.1.2 ARP HTTPget Commands (Method 2) (continued)
The above IP address of 128.100.101.76 is an example to show how these
commands work. To get a valid IP address on your network you need to consult
with your IT department.
Figure 4.1 shows the screen shot of an actual DOS window with the above commands
executed.
C:\>arp -s 128.100.101.76 00-03-34-00-9c-5c
C:\>httpget -r -S “00000000” 128.100.101.76:1
New IP is assigned. The unit will reset in 10 seconds.
C:\>
Figure 4.1 ARP and HTTPget Commands on a DOS Window
4.1.3 Direct Connection (Method 3)
The iServer is shipped with a default IP address of 192.168.1.200 and Subnet Mask of
255.255.255.0.
To start, connect your iServer directly to your PC using a straight or cross-over Ethernet
cable and power it on.
Make sure that the Network LINK/ACT LED on the iServer and your Ethernet switch is
solid ON. Refer to Figure 4.2.
If you are going to use a Web browser or Telnet program to access the iServer using
its default IP address of 192.168.1.200, you need to make sure that the PC from which
you’re establishing the connection has an IP address that is in the same range as the
iServer’s IP address.
For example, you can assign your PC an IP address of 192.168.1.x, where x is any
number from 1 to 254.
Your PC’s IP address cannot be the same as the iServer’s IP address.
You also need to make sure that your PC’s subnet mask is 255.255.255.0.
This is a good way to access the iServer over the network and make any configuration
changes needed.
Changing your PC’s IP address is temporary and it’s only for the purpose of accessing
the iServer for initial configurations like assigning a new IP address, subnet mask, etc.
Once the iServer is configured you can put your PC back to its original IP settings.
If 192.168.1.200 is already in use on your network, connect the iServer directly to
your computer using a CAT5 Ethernet cable (either straight or cross-over cable will be
detected by the iServer) and proceed as described below.
13
4.1.3 Direct Connection (Method 3) (continued)
Ethernet Cable
Computer’s
Ethernet Port
(RJ45
connection)
After connecting the
iServer to computer, power it on.
LINK/ACT LED should be
SOLID green
8
iServer with
default IP address
of 192.168.1.200
1
100 BASE-T
LINK / ACT
DHCP
RECORDING
Plug in the
Power Adapter
Figure 4.2 Connecting Computer Directly to iServer
1) Click on your Windows “Start” menu and select
“Control Panel” from the list options.
Double click on the “Network Connections” icon
Figure 4.3 Network Connections
2) You now have “Network Connections”
window opened.
The “Local Area Connection” icon
has all the settings for your ethernet
connection.
Double click on this icon.
Figure 4.4 Local Area Connection
14
4.1.3 Direct Connection (Method 3) (continued)
Select “Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP)” and click on
“Properties” button
3) Click on “Properties”
button
Fill out the feilds for the IP
address 192.168.1.100 and
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
as indicated below. Press
OK and also on all other
remaining windows.
Figure 4.5 Changing TCP/IP Properties on Your Computer
4) Now you may need to reboot your computer.
5) Once your PC is back up, open your browser and type the iServer’s default IP
address of 192.168.1.200 in the “Address” window of your browser and press the
Enter key.
You will soon be inside the Welcome page (see Figure 4.6) of the iServers WEB
server and from there you can access all the menus.
iTHX-SD Welcome Page
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Setup
Web Link
Figure 4.6 iServer Welcome Page
15
4.1.3 Direct Connection (Method 3) (continued)
To verify a good connection to the iServer, from a DOS prompt on your computer
type “ping 192.168.1.200” and press Enter.
You should get a reply as shown in Figure 4.7.
If you don’t receive a reply it means that you do not have a network connection
between your PC and the iServer.
Check your IP address, subnet mask, and gateway address.
C:\>ping 192.168.1.200
Pinging 192.168.1.200 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply
Reply
Reply
Reply
from
from
from
from
192.168.1.200:
192.168.1.200:
192.168.1.200:
192.168.1.200:
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
time=15ms TTL=64
time=8ms TTL=64
time=8ms TTL=64
time=8ms TTL=64
Pinging statistics for 192.168.1.200:
Packets: Sent=4, Received=4, Lost=0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum=8ms, Maximum=15ms, Average=9ms
Figure 4.7 Pinging the iServer from MS-DOS Prompt
16
4.1.4 iConnect Software (Method 4)
The iServer can be assigned an IP Address by using the iConnect software.
a) Download the iConnect software from the website listed on the cover of this manual
(software section).
b) Install iConnect software on a networked PC. This software is compatible with
Windows 95, 98, NT, 2000, and XP.
c) Use iConnect to assign an IP address to the iServer and access its web pages for
configuration.
You can also use any standard web browser to access the iServer’s web pages.
Consult with your IT department for obtaining an IP address.
Figure 4.8 Assigning an IP Address using iConnect
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Place the IP address in this box.
Take the MAC address from the label attached to the bottom of the iServer and
place it in this box.
Click here to send the above IP address to the iServer.
After the IP address is assigned to the iServer, click here to access it’s web pages.
Click here to Ping the iServer whose IP address is shown in the IP address box.
Click here to find all the iServer’s on your network .
The IP addresses for the iServer’s found by the iConnect will be listed here.
These fields indicate the IP address and the subnet mask of the PC on which the
iConnect is running.
17
4.1.4 iConnect Software (Method 4) (continued)
d)
To access the iServer for Configuration:
Click on the “View Webpage” button, you will access the iServer’s welcome page.
To take advantage of the iServer’s full capability use any standard web browser to
access the iServer’s web pages as described in Section 4.2.
Readings
Chart
Setup
Web Link
Figure 4.9 Accessing the iServer’s using iConnect
18
4.2 Access and Configuration Using a Web Browser
WStart your web browser.
WIn the URL field, type http://192.168.1.200 (iServer’s default IP address).
WThe Welcome Page, will be displayed.
iTHX-SD Welcome Page
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Setup
Web Link
Figure 4.10 iServer Welcome Page
In order to access the iServer’s web pages, users may be prompted for a
password, as shown below.
4.3 LOGIN and ADMINISTRATOR Passwords
Login
Administrator Login
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Address http://192.168.1.200
Web Link
Setup
Readings
LOGIN
Password:
Chart
Web Link
Setup
ADMINISTRATOR
Password:
OK
OK
Figure 4.11 LOGIN and ADMINISTRATOR Passwords
There are 2 different access levels:
1. LOGIN Password is required to access the iServer’s Readings, Chart, and Web Link
pages unless it’s disabled. The default password is 12345678.
2. ADMINISTRATOR Password is required to access the iServer’s Setup menu unless
it’s disabled. The default password is 00000000.
Refer to Section 4.4.5 for Password setup.
19
4.4 Setup
Clicking the Setup button on the Welcome page (see Figure 4.10) will provide access to
the Menu Panel (see Figure 4.12).
Using this Panel you can configure the iServer entirely.
4.4.1 Overview
Once the Administrator password is entered, the Overview page will appear which
provides a summary of important parameters within the iServer.
All the fields are read-only.
Menu Panel
Menu Bar
Overview
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Model
Firmware Version
DHCP
MAC Address
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Gateway Address
Hostname
Ethernet Port
Web Server Port
Recording
Uptime
x.x
Disabled
00:03:34:00:b8:70
192.168.1.200
255.255.255.0
0.0.0.0
ithxb870
Auto
80
OFF
1 day, 00:00:00 hh:mm:ss
Figure 4.12 Overview
20
4.4.2 Network
This menu provides network configurations including IP parameters and Ethernet
interface options. Fields are described below.
4.4.2.1 IP Configuration
Network
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
IP Configuration Ethernet Port
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
DHCP
00:03:34:00:b8:70
MAC Address
IP Address
192.168.1.200
Subnet Mask
255.255.255.0
Gateway Address
0.0.0.0
DNS Address
0.0.0.0
Host Name
ithxb870
Protocol
TCP
Local Port
2000
Web Server Port
80
Web Link Title
WebLink
Web Link Address
www.abc.com
Save Changes
Reset
Figure 4.13 Network: IP Configuration
DHCP – If the box is checked the iServer will dynamically request an IP address, a
subnet mask, a gateway address, and a DNS address from the DHCP server. By default
the DHCP option is disabled. For more information about DHCP, see Section 3.3.
DHCP can be enabled by pressing and holding the two front buttons ºC/ºF and
TIME/IP during power-on (refer to Section 2.3).
MAC Address – This Indicates the hardware address of the iServer and it is nonconfigurable. For more information about MAC Address, see Section 3.2.
IP Address – This indicates the IP address of the iServer. The iServer’s default IP
address is 192.168.1.200. When DHCP is enabled this field will be dimmed. Consult with
your IT department for obtaining an IP address.
Subnet Mask – It’s a 32-bit number that is used to determine which part of the IP
address is the network portion and which part is the host portion. When DHCP is enabled
this field will be dimmed. The iServer’s default Subnet Mask is 255.255.255.0. Consult
with your IT department for obtaining a subnet mask.
21
4.4.2.1 IP Configuration (continued)
Gateway Address – This points to the router that forwards traffic to a destination
address outside of the subnet on which the iServer resides. This is the IP address of the
router which functions as a gateway. When DHCP is enabled this field will be dimmed.
The iServer’s default Gateway address is 0.0.0.0. Consult with your IT department for
obtaining a gateway address.
DNS Address – In order to use the hostname to access the iServer, the DNS server on
your network must be configured, refer to Section 3.4. iServer plays the role of a DNS
client, in the sense that the iServer will actively query the DNS server for the IP address
associated with a particular domain name. When DHCP is enabled this field will be
dimmed. The iServer’s default DNS address is 0.0.0.0. Consult with your IT department
for obtaining a DNS address.
Host Name – If DHCP is enabled, the iServer will send this name to the DHCP server.
This name is used so that the iServer can be accessed based on a specific name instead
of an IP address. For example, instead of using http://192.168.1.200
(IP
address), you would use http://ithxA838 or any name up to sixteen (16) alphanumeric
characters. The default Host Name for an iServer is “ithx” followed by the last four digits
of the MAC address of that particular iServer.
On Windows servers where DHCP and DNS are separate functions it’s very
important to configure the DHCP server to communicate with DNS in order for
the iServer’s Host Name to correctly respond. If you cannot access the iServer
using its Host Name, please contact your network administrator to make sure
DHCP and DNS servers are linked together.
Protocol – It’s the network protocol the iServer communicates with the Ethernet
Network. Options are TCP and UDP. The default is TCP.
Local Port – The default port is 2000. Refer to Section 3.6.
Web Server Port – The default port is 80. This is the primary port number for the HTTP
protocol used for communication between internet browsers and web sites/web servers.
Web servers open this port then listen for incoming connections from web browsers.
Similarly, when a web browser is given an IP address (like the iServer’s IP address),
it assumes that the iServer’s web server is listening for connections on port 80. If this
port is changed to anything but 80 then on the browser the new port number must be
indicated with a colon (:) after the IP address. For example, if the Web Server Port is
changed to 500, you will then need to type http://192.168.1.200:500 on the browser to
access the iServer’s web server.
One of the applications where the Web Server Port number may need to change
is when users want to access the iServer’s web server from outside the local
area network (i.e. Internet). By setting up “Port Forwarding” inside a router that
is the gateway to that local area network this task can be accomplished. “Port
Forwarding” technique uses the Web Server Port number to forward the Internet
connection to the iServer on the LAN.
Web Link Title – This is a text field that appears on the button on the iServer’s Web Link
Page, refer to Section 4.7. This can describe the Web Link Address assigned below.
Web Link Address – This provides a link to any TCP/IP node on the network or any
Web link on the Internet. Examples would be www.123abc.com or if you have a device
with an embedded Web server (just like the iServer) once you enter its IP address in this
field and click on the Web Link button on the iServer’s Welcome page you’ll be able to
access your device using the same browser interface.
22
4.4.2.2 Ethernet Port
Ethernet Port
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
IP Configuration Ethernet Port
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Auto-Negotiation
Speed
100 Mbps
10 Mbps
Duplex
Full
Half
Save Changes
Reset
Figure 4.14 Network: Ethernet Configuration
Auto-Negotiation – It is the link, in terms of speed and duplex, between the iServer and
another Ethernet device like an Ethernet switch.
If Auto-Negotiation box is checked, the iServer will auto-negotiate the speed and duplex
with the attached Ethernet device. If any of the other options are selected, the speed
and duplex will be fixed.
It’s important to have the same Ethernet port configuration on the iServer and the
attached Ethernet device. If iServer cannot auto-negotiate with the attached Ethernet
node it will default to 10 Mbps and Half-Duplex. Once Auto-Negotiation is checked, other
fields under this category will be dimmed. By default the Auto-Negotiation is checked.
If the iServer detects the link to be 100 Mbps the 100 BASE-T LED will be solid
green.
4.4.3 Configuration
This menu provides configurations for the real-time clock, server parameters, sensors,
and alarm relays settings. Fields are described below.
4.4.3.1 Date and Time
Current Date – This field indicates the iServer’s real time clock date. The format is yyyy/
mm/dd. When there is no date defined, the iServer will be defaulted to 2099/01/01 and
be shown in red to alert you that it has not yet been set.
Current Time – This field indicates the iServer’s real time clock time. The format is
military time (24-hour) and it is entered as hh:mm:ss.
Change Date and Time – By clicking on this option the real data and time can be entered.
23
4.4.3.1 Data and Time (continued)
Date and Time
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Web Link
Chart
Setup
Date and Time Server Sensors Alarm Relays
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Date and Time
Current Date
2099/01/01 (yyyy/mm/dd)
Current Time
00:00:00
Change Date and Time
Time Server
Network Time Server
NTS Address
Time Zone
(GMT-08:00)PacificTime(US&Canada)
Save Changes
Cancel
Figure 4.15 Network: Ethernet Configuration
Once the AC adaptor is disconnected from the iServer and there is no battery
back-up, the iServer will lose its date and time settings.
Once the iServer is rebooted from any web page, the iServer will lose its date
and time settings whether or not the back-up battery is installed.
If the iServer is setup to get it’s time from a Network Time Server, then the time
will be re-assigned after the reboot.
Network Time Server – If there is a time server on the network or the Internet, the
iServer will get the real date and time once the Network Time Server’s IP address is
provided. Default is unchecked.
NTS Address – The field to enter the Network Time Server’s IP address.
The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) publishes a list of time
servers on the Internet used by the NIST Internet Time Service (ITS). The list includes
each server’s name, IP address, and location in the United States. As of the publication
date of this manual, links to the list can be found at http://tf.nist.gov.
Time Zone – If Network Time Server option is checked, the correct time zone must be
selected for the correct time display.
24
4.4.3.2 Server
Server
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Date and Time Server Sensors Alarm Relays
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Server
Server Type
Command
Interval
5
secs
Time Stamp
Disconnect After Data Sent
Save Changes
Reset
Figure 4.16 Configuration Menu: Server
Server Type – Options are Command and Continuous.
If Command is selected the iServer will respond to commands sent from a network host
(for the list of commands refer to Section 4.9.1).
If Continuous is selected the iServer will send temperature, humidity, dewpoint values
and alarm relay status once every time amount selected in the Interval box.
The Command and Continuous modes operate when a network host opens a TCP
connection to the iServer’s IP address with port 2000.
In UDP Command mode, iServer will respond back with a UDP packet (to the _ address
and port) if a host application sends a UDP command to iServer’s IP address with port
2000.
In UDP Continuous mode, iServer starts sending continuous data if a host application
sends a trigger or UDP packet to iServer’s IP address with port 2000.
Interval – This is the time interval (in seconds) between each data transmission when
the iServer is in Continuous mode. The default value is set to 5 seconds and the
minimum is 2 seconds.
Time Stamp – If checked, the iServer will stamp the data with date and time before
sending it out to a network host. This will apply to Command and Continuous modes.
Default is unchecked.
Disconnect After Data Sent – If checked, once the iServer responds back with data, the
iServer will close the TCP connection that had been made from the network host.
This feature should be used if data acquisition software expects data to be ended by
closing TCP connection from the client.
4.4.3.3 Sensors
This is the page where the Sensor Parameters are defined. Reading 1 is for
Temperature, Reading 2 is for Humidity, and Reading 3 is for Dewpoint.
Enabled Probes – Choose Both Probes if you have two probes (sensors). Choose Only
Probe 1 if you just have one probe, or if you have two probes but only want to show
Probe 1. Default is Both Probes.
Degree Unit – This would be the units of measurement for the probe sensor. Examples
are F and C for temperature and dewpoint. Once the unit of temperature is selected,
either C or F, it will be a global change throughout the web server, as well as on the LCD
display. If you use the front C/F buttons to change the unit of temperature it will have no
effect on the web pages.
25
4.4.3.3 Sensors (continued)
End Character – This means that the iServer will send a character (in Hex) after the
value for each variable. This will apply to either Continuous or Command mode. Once the
value is selected, it will be a global change for all readings. The default is set for 0D (Hex
representation of <CR>).
Description – This can be a name for the sensor or where the sensor is located. This
field is text only and can have up to 16 alphanumeric characters. This description will
appear wherever Reading 1, 2 or 3 is displayed on the web server.
Unit – This would be the units of measurement for that particular sensor. Examples are
% for humidity, F and C for temperature and dewpoint. Once the unit of temperature is
selected, either C or F, it will be a global change through out the web server, as well as
on the LCD display. If you use the front C/F buttons to change the unit of temperature it
will have no affect on the web pages.
Sensors
Address http://128.100.101.232
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Date and Time Server Sensors Alarm Relays
The adjusting values
must be assigned
after the unit of
temperature (C or F)
is selected. If the unit
of temperature is
changed, you must
readjust the values
for a correct result.
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Enabled Probes Both Probes
Degree Unit C
End Characters 0x 0A
Probe 1
Reading 1
Description Temperature 1 Unit C
End Character 0x0A
Data Format 000.0C
Adjust by Offset
Offset 0.0
Reading Low 0.0
Reading 2
Description Humidity 1
End Character 0x0A
Adjust by Offset
Display
Reading High 100.0
Ref. Low 0.0
Ref. High 100.0
Unit %
Display
Data Format H00.0%
Offset 0.0
Reading Low 0.0
Reading High 100.0
Ref. Low 0.0
Ref. High 100.0
Reading 3
Description Dewpoint 1
Unit C
Display
End Character 0x0A
Data Format D000.0C
Figure 4.17a Configuration Menu: Sensors
Display – If checked the variable (i.e. temperature) will be displayed on the Readings
and Chart applets as well as data transmission in Continuous mode (see Server Section
4.4.3.2). The default is checked.
Data Format – This indicates the format of the variable being displayed on a network
host when Continuous or Command transmission is used. Reading 1: T000.0C, 000.0C,
000.0; Reading 2: H00.0%, 00.0%, 00.0 (the C or F will change to the appropriate unit
once you press Save Changes button).
Adjust by – If it’s determined that the reading is slightly off this field can be used to
adjust the reading. The options are Offset and Scale & Offset. Using the Offset method
you can manually assign a numerical value to adjust
the reading. For example if the actual reading is 55
Ref. Low 12.0
Reading Low 10.0
where it should be 54 you can enter -1 in the Offset
Reading High 200.0
Ref. High 195.0
field. The Scale & Offset method uses two points
to adjust the reading within the entire temperature
range. For example, if at the lower point the actual reading is 10 where it should be
12 and at the higher point the actual reading is 200 where it should 195, here is how
the numbers are entered. The adjusting numbers can be positive or negative with one
decimal point.
26
4.4.3.3 Sensors (continued)
Offset – If it’s determined that the reading is slightly off, this field can be used to
manually assign a numerical value to adjust the reading. The offset can be a positive or
a negative number with one decimal point.
The temperature offset value must be assigned after the Unit (C or F) is selected.
If the unit of temperature is changed, you must reassign the offset value for the
correct result.
Sampling Rate – This determines the rate in which the iServer polls the probe for
temperature and humidity values. The options are 1, 10, and 60 seconds.
The default is set for 10 seconds.
The higher the sampling rate, the more accurate data is transmitted by the probe.
LCD Display – Probe to Display - This dropdown box is only available when Both
Probes are enabled (on Enabled Probes drop down box). If you only have 1 probe then
probe 2 will be shown as OPEN on the readings page, chart and recorded data.
Sensors
Address http://192.168.1.200
Probe 2
Reading 1
Description Temperature 2 Unit C
Display
End Character 0x0A
Data Format 000.0C
Adjust by Offset
Offset 0.0
Reading Low 0.0
Ref. Low 0.0
Reading High 100.0
Ref. High 100.0
Unit %
Display
Reading 2
Description Humidity 2
End Character 0x0A
Adjust by Offset
Data Format H00.0%
Offset 0.0
Reading Low 0.0
Ref. Low 0.0
Reading High 100.0
Ref. High 100.0
Reading 3
Description Dewpoint 2
Unit C
Display
End Character 0x0A
Data Format D000.0C
Sampling Rate
One Sample per 1 second
LCD Display
Probe To Display Both Probes
Save Changes
Reset
Figure 4.17b Configuration Menu: Sensors
4.4.3.4 Alarm Relays
This section would allow the two relays on the iServer to be configured as
needed. For physical connections and pin-outs refer to Section 2.6.
Relay 1 and Relay 2 – This configures the first and second relays on the iServer. The
options for each are temperature, humidity, and dew point. This means that both Relays
can be set for temperature or both Relays can be set for humidity, or one can be set for
humidity and one for temperature.
Description – This is a text field for naming the device connected to the relay or it could
be the location where the device is installed. This field can take up to 16 alphanumeric
characters. This name will be displayed anywhere on the web pages associated with
alarm relays; for example the Readings applet. Defaults are Alarm Relay1 and Alarm Relay2.
27
4.4.3.4 Alarm Relays (continued)
Alarm Relays
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Date and Time Server Sensors Alarm Relays
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Probe
1
Probe
2
Relay 1
Temperature
Relay 2
Dew Point
Description
R1alarm1
Description
R2alarm2
Status
Low or High
Status
Low or High
Type
Latch
Type
Latch
Clear Latch
Clear Latch
Set Point High 101.0
Set Point High 60.0
Set Point Low 30.0
Set Point Low 0.2
End Character 0x 0A
End Character 0x 0F
Display
Display
Record all alarm events on the flash memory
Save Changes
Alarm status with
the associated set
point will be shown on
the chart applet as well.
Retrieve
Reset
Figure 4.18 Configuration Menu: Alarm Relays
Status – The options are Disable, Low, High, and Low or High. The default is Disable.
If Low is selected Set Point Low must be given a value and once the sensor reading falls
below that value the relay will change status. If High is selected Set Point High must be
given a value and once the sensor reading rises above that value the relay will change
status. If Low or High is selected Set Point Low and High must be given values and relay
status will change once the sensor reading is outside that range. If Disable is selected
relays will be deactivated.
Type – The options are Unlatch and Latch. The default is Unlatch.
If Unlatch is selected and the relay is activated, once the sensor reading goes back
within the Set Point range, the alarm will be deactivated automatically.
If Latch is selected, once the sensor reading goes back within the Set Point range, the
relay will remain active until the user clears it by clicking on the Clear Latch button.
Set Point High – This is the field for the upper Set Point.
Set Point Low – This is the field for the lower Set Point.
End Character – This is the character (in Hex) that the iServer will send along with the
alarm status.
This applies to either Command and Continuous mode described on the Server page,
under the Configuration menu (Section 4.4.3.2).
The default is 0D meaning a Carriage Return character will be sent after the value.
Display – This would indicate whether to display the status of the alarm relays on the
Readings applet as well as the TCP Command and Continuous modes, and any other
related fields. The default is unchecked.
Record all alarm events on the flash memory – If checked, all the alarm events with
stamped date and time will be recorded on the flash memory card.
By pressing the Retrieve button the ASCII log file will be opened.
The default is unchecked.
Using the web server, the log file can be retrieved if the file size is 32 KB or
smaller. For a larger file size you must use a flash card reader to open the log
file. Refer to Section 4.10.
28
4.4.4 Management
This page provides the iServer’s email, SNMP and alarm settings. SNMP (Simple
Network Management Protocol) is the protocol used by network management systems to
communicate with network devices that respond to SNMP connections for the purpose of
problem detections and corrections.
If SNMP and/or SMTP features are desired, please make sure iServer’s network setting
as well as SNMP trap server and SMTP mail server are setup properly. Failure to do so
may cause iServer to be unresponsive while waiting for these servers to reply back.
Fields are described below.
4.4.4.1 Setup Setup
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Setup Alarms
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Response Enabled
SNMP Community
Contact
Location
SNMP Trap Server
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
SMTP Server
SMTP Server Port
From:
To:
Subject:
Reminder Interval
Transmission Delay
public
None
None
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
25
Save Changes
60
mins
1
mins
Reset
Figure 4.19 Management Menu: Setup
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNMP Response Enabled – If this option is checked the iServer will respond to network
nodes broadcasting SNMP requests. The default is unchecked.
Make sure your network is setup properly (gateway, etc) before using SNMP feature
SNMP Community – Every SNMP communication takes place using a community
string. The default is Public.
Contact – This text field specifies the contact person for this node, together with information
on how to contact this person. This field takes up to 16 alphanumeric characters.
Location – This text field specifies the location of the iServer. For example it can be
“control station”, which is the place where the iServer is located. This field takes up to 16
alphanumeric characters.
29
4.4.4.1 Setup (continued)
SNMP Trap Server – This field contains the IP address of the SNMP trap server located
somewhere on the network. The trap server listens for SNMP traps coming from the
iServer when there is an alarm condition (refer to Alarms Section 4.4.4.2 under the
Management page).
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
SMTP Server – This field specifies the IP Address of the SMTP server.
1) You must have an email server (SMTP server) on your network in order to
receive emails generated by the iServer.
2) iServer does not support SMTP server authentication.
SMTP Server Port – This specifies the TCP port used by the SMTP Server. The default is 25.
From – This field specifies the name of the person who sends the email. It can also be
an email address.
To – This field specifies the email address of the recipient. This field can take up to 200
alphanumeric characters; limited to 4 addresses of 50 characters each. Each address
should be separated by a comma, without spaces. Ex: aaa@bbb.com,ccc@ddd.com
You can create a “distribution group address” if you need to have more email
addresses.
Subject – This field specifies the subject of the email. Emails for all the alarms will have
this common subject line. Example of a subject can be “Alarm from iServer”.
Reminder Interval – This field sets a reminder interval for email and/or trap to be sent
again. The allowed minimum value is 1 minute. If it’s set to 0 the iServer will not send a
reminder email. The default is 60 minutes.
Power Reset alarm is only sent once, regardless of reminder interval.
Transmission Delay – Once the iServer alarm condition is met, this is the amount of
time the alarm condition is met before iServer sends any email or trap. If it’s set to 0,
email and/or trap will be sent immediately. The default is 1 minute.
4.4.4.1.1 Sending Text Messages to a Cell Phone
In the SMTP To field, you can use the following format to have the iTHX-SD send a text
message to your cell phone. Since most cell phones are capable of receiving text messages
you just need to find the correct email format for your cell phone provider.
T-Mobile
phone_number@tmomail.net
Virgin Mobile phone_number@vmobl.com
AT&T
phone_number@txt.att.net
Sprint
phone_number@messaging.sprintpcs.com
Verizon
phone_number@vtext.com
Nextel
phone_number@messaging.nextel.com
“phone_number” is your 10 digit cell phone number.
4.4.4.2 Alarms
This includes events or conditions. Once a condition is met the iServer will send an email
or/and an SNMP trap if either one or both are checked. Fields are described below.
Multiple alarm events can be checked and for each event an email and/or a trap
will be sent.
30
4.4.4.2 Alarms (continued)
Alarms
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Setup Alarms
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Events
Email SNMP Trap
Probe 1
Temperature Low
Low 0.0
High 0.0
Low
Low 0.0
High 0.0
Dewpoint Low
Low 0.0
High 0.0
Humidity
Probe 2
Temp Low or High
Humi Low or High
Dew Low or High
Low 0.0
Low 0.0
Low 0.0
High 0.0
High 0.0
High 0.0
Device
Power Reset
Probe 1 Disconnected
Probe 2 Disconnected
Recording Stopped
SD Card 10% Memory Left
Low Battery
Relay 1 Activated
Relay 2 Activated
Save Changes
Reset
There is a text box next
to each event. The text
content will be the body of
the email.
Figure 4.20 Management Menu: Alarms
Temperature – The options are Low, High, and Low or High.
If Low is selected the Low field must be given a value (lower than that value is an alarm
condition).
If High is selected the High field must be given a value (higher than that value is an alarm
condition).
If Low or High is selected the Low and High fields must be given values (outside the
band is an alarm condition).
Humidity – The same as Temperature defined above.
Dew Point – The same as Temperature defined above.
Power Reset – This refers to the iServer being powered off and back on (power reset).If
the option is checked the iServer will automatically send one email or/and an SNMP trap
after rebooting, regardless of reminder interval.
Probe Disconnected – If the probe attached to the iServer is disconnected that is
considered as an alarm condition.
Recording Stopped – If the iServer is recording, once the recording is stopped (no
matter what the cause was) an email or/and a trap will be sent.
SD Card 10% Memory Left – An alarm will be triggered if 10% or less memory left on
the flash card.
31
Low Battery – If the 9V battery lowers to about 7V, the iServer will prompt an alarm.
Relay 1 Activated – If relay 1 is activated the iServer will prompt an alarm.
See Alarm Relays section under the Configuration page (Section 4.4.3.4).
Relay 2 Activated – If relay 2 is activated the iServer will prompt an alarm.
See Alarm Relays section under the Configuration page (Section 4.4.3.4).
4.4.5 Security
This page provides security and access settings for the iServer. Fields are described
below.
Security
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Login Password
12345678
Change
Admin Password
00000000
Change
Local Port Password
Change
Telnet Console Access
Web Server Access
Secured Readings and Charts
IP Exclusivity
Enable
No IP Address
1 0.0.0.0
2
0.0.0.0
3
0.0.0.0
4
0.0.0.0
Save Changes
Figure 4.21 Security Menu
32
Reset
Login Password – To access Readings, Chart, and Web Link menus this password is
required. The password length can be up to 16 alphanumeric case-sensitive characters.
To change the password click on Change.
Empty box means no password is required. The default Login Password is 12345678.
Administrator Password – To access Setup menu this password is required. The
password length can be up to 16 alphanumeric case-sensitive characters. To change
the password click on Change.
Empty box means no password is required. The default Administrator Password is
00000000.
This password will also be prompted when Telnet connection to port 2002 is
made. Port 2002 is the Telnet console port that allows users to configure some
of the parameters that can be configured through the web server.
Local Port Password – To access the iServer via TCP or UDP socket connection
to port 2000, this password is required. The maximum length can be up to 16
alphanumeric case-sensitive characters.
Empty box means no password is required. The default is none.
Telnet Console Access – If it is unchecked, Telnet console connection to port 2002 will
be blocked. The iServer must be rebooted for the change to take place.
The default is checked.
Web Server Access – If it is unchecked, the iServer’s Web server will not be accessible.
The iServer must be rebooted for the change to take place.
The default is checked.
When the Web Server Access is not enabled, the iServer needs to be
configured using Telnet console.
If someone needs to access the Web Server again, use the Telnet console to
enable it.
Secured Readings and Charts – If it is checked the Login password will be required to
display Readings and Chart applets.
The default is checked.
IP Exclusivity – This table contains the IP addresses that are allowed to communicate
with the iServer over TCP or UDP connection. This means if the table is empty
connections from all IP nodes are allowed to the iServer.
If enabled, all packets from IP addresses not on this list are ignored and thrown away.
33
4.4.6 Recording
This section includes all the parameters and settings for data recording, SD flash card
and recording status, data retrieval, and formatting the SD card.
Fields are described below.
4.4.6.1 Start Recording
Start Recording
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Start Recording Status Data Retrieval Format SD Card
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Current Date: 2099/01/01 (yyyy/mm/dd)
Interval 10
Current Time: 00:00:00
(1-3600)seconds
Title
Quick Start Recording
Type Wrap
Category Continuous
Set Date and Time
Start Date
yyyy/mm/dd
Start Time
hh:mm:ss(24 hours)
Stop Date
Stop Time
hh:mm:ss(24 hours)
yyyy/mm/dd
Set Weekdays (only for scheduled recording)
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thur
Fri
Sat
Sun
Start Recording
Figure 4.22 Recording Menu: Start Recording
Interval – This is the time interval between each data. It can be between 1 to 3600
seconds.
Title – This is the header for each recorded data file on the SD flash card.
Quick Start Recording – If this button is clicked recording will start immediately.
Make sure your Current Date and Time are correct.
Type – The options are Wrap and Non-Wrap.
If Wrap is selected once the SD flash card is full the iServer will delete the old data
stored on the card in order to record the new data. Each time a new recording takes
place an old record will be deleted.
If Non-Wrap is selected the iServer will stop recording once the SD flash card is full.
34
4.4.6.1 Start Recording (continued)
Category – The options are Continuous and Scheduled.
In Continuous recording Start Date and Start Time fields are required. If there is not an
End Date and End Time, the recording will continue non-stop.
In Scheduled recording, any of the days can be selected and the recording will take
place only on those days. Here are some important notes about the Scheduled
recording:
W The Start Date, Start Time, and Stop Time must be defined. The Stop Date does not
apply to Scheduled recording. This means that the Scheduled recording will never
stop until the user decides to stop it.
W If the Start Date is one of the selected days recording will start on that day.
W If the Start Date is not one of the selected days recording will start on the next 1st
selected day.
W The Start Time and the Stop Time apply to every single day that is selected.
W The Start Time is the time that recording will start on those selected days.
W The Stop Time is the time that recording will stop on those selected days.
W The Start Time must be earlier (at least 20 seconds) than the stop time.
W Let’s say today we’re configuring the unit for Scheduled recording. If the Start Time
is earlier than the Current Time (real time clock) and today is one of the selected
days, the recording will start immediately.
W Scheduled recording is suitable for users who want to start and stop recording at
certain times on certain days. Users who want to have continuous recording three
days a week, for instance, this feature can also be used. Just make sure to select
start and stop times that would link the three days together.
For example, we need to have 3 days (72 hrs) a week continuous recording
(Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday) with recording Interval of 1 minute. The Start
Time should be 00:00:00 and the Stop Time should be 23:59:00. This will connect
all 3 days together and it will run on weekly bases.
Start Date – This is the date on which the data recording must start.
Start Time – This is the time that the recording will start. It’s based on a 24-hour format.
The Start Time must be at least twenty seconds after the Current Time (real time).
Stop Date – This is the date on which the data recording will stop. Stop Date does not
apply to Scheduled recording.
Stop Time – This is the time that the recording will stop. It’s based on a 24-hour format.
A failure on the Ethernet network will not interrupt data recording.
35
4.4.6.2 Status
This page describes the Recording and SD flash card status.
All the fields on this page are read-only.
Status
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Start Recording Status Data Retrieval Format SD Card
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Current Date: 2099/01/01
Recording Status
Recording OFF
StartDate (yyyy/mm/dd)
(yyyy/mm/dd)
StopDate
Category
Interval
Current Time: 00:00:00
StartTime
StopTime
Type
Title
SD Card Status
SD Card Detected
SD Card Write Protected
Total Flash Size
Available Flash Size
YES
NO
1925456(KB)
1925452(KB)
(hh:mm:ss)(24 hours)
(hh:mm:ss)(24 hours)
Battery Status
Check Battery
Uptime
0 days,00:00:00 hh:mm:ss
Figure 4.23 Recording Menu: Status
36
4.4.6.3 Data Retrieval
This page can be used to retrieve the recorded data from the SD flash card and save it
into an ASCII file.
Using the Retrieve EndDate field select the date (year, month, and day) that is the end
date for the retrieved data.
Then use Retrieve Period field to identify the duration of the retrieved data; selections
are: 1 Day, 1 Week, 1 Month and 1 Year.
The year, month and day dates are taken from your computer.
Now, you can press on the Start Data Retrieval button to log the data into a file.
The file is a text document with extension .csv. It can be opened in MS Excel, MS
Wordpad, Notepad or any software package that can read text files.
The fields are separated by a comma ( , ) see Figure Figure 4.40 for a sample text file.
Data Retrieval
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Start Recording Status Data Retrieval Format SD Card
Overview
Retrieve End Date 2010
Month January
Network
Configuration Retrieve Period
1 Day
Management
Security
Recording
Start Data Retrieval
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Day 1
Figure 4.24 Recording Menu: Data Retrieval
Refer to Section 4.10.1 for steps that may help you to open the data file
in an ASCII or Excel application.
The data recorded on the SD card can be read on a PC or MAC using a USB or
any standard card reader. The file format is text and is easily imported to spread
sheets and other programs. For details see Section 4.10.
37
4.4.6.4 Format SD Card
Clicking on Format SD Card button will start formatting the flash card inside the iServer.
Formatting the SD card will erase all data on the card. Allow up to 2 minutes for format
to be completed which then it will display “SD Card Formatted”.
Format SD Card
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Start Recording Status Data Retrieval Format SD Card
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Format SD Card
Formatting SD Card will erase all data.
Allow up to 2 minutes to format.
While card is being formatted, please wait for message:
“SD Card Formatted” before continuing.
Figure 4.25 Recording Menu: Format SD Card
4.4.7 System
This menu provides various options to reboot, restore defaults, upgrade firmware and
download/upload configuration for the iServer. Fields are described below.
4.4.7.1 Reboot
Reboot
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Reboot Defaults Upgrade Download Configuration Upload Configuration
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Reboot
Figure 4.26 System: Reboot
Reboot – This option resets the power on the iServer.
If the iServer is recording data the reboot option will stop the recording.
It will also set the real date/time back to default unless the Network Time Server option
from Configuration page, is enabled.
38
4.4.7.2 Defaults
Clicking on this button will put the iServer back to its default settings.
Defaults
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Reboot Defaults Upgrade Download Configuration Upload Configuration
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
4.4.7.3 Upgrade
Restore Factory Defaults
Figure 4.27 System: Defaults
Upgrade Firmware
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Reboot Defaults Upgrade Download Configuration Upload Configuration
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Filename: iTHX-SD*.bin
Browse...
Upgrade
Please make sure no other clients are connected to the device.
Consult manual for complete instructions.
Figure 4.28 System: Upgrade
Upgrade – This option loads a new firmware into the iServer over the network. The
firmware is a binary file with .bin extension. This file must be kept on the same PC from
which the iServer is accessed.
If you have an iServer with a firmware version previous to 1.09.0, it is mandatory to set
the iServer to default settings after a firmware upgrade to any version, after 1.09.0.
Once the firmware upload is completed the iServer will power reset itself. This typically
takes about 30 seconds.
When doing firmware upgrade on the iServer, there should be NO other
on-going or new Web server (HTTP) connections made to the device; otherwise,
the iServer will not upgrade the firmware. You can do either of the following to
prevent this from happening:
1. Connect the iServer directly to the PC using a straight or crossed Ethernet cable. This
will also help to have a faster firmware upload.
2. From the “Network” menu, change the Web Server Port, for example, to 500 (default
is 80), save the change, and reset the power on your iServer. The next time you will
access the iServer’s Web server, you must type http://192.168.1.200:500 where
192.168.1.200 is the IP address of the iServer and 500 is the new Web server port
(HTTP port).
39
4.4.7.3 Upgrade (continued)
Either one of the above options will make you the only user on that iServer.
Set the iServer to default settings after the firmware is upgraded.
See Section 4.4.7.2 on how to set the iServer to default settings.
Applying default settings will change the iServer’s settings to factory defaults.
If those settings are important to you and you do not want to reconfigure the iServer, you
will need to do the following steps.
From the “System” menu:
1) “Download” the iServer’s configuration settings, Section 4.4.7.4.
2) “Upgrade” the iServer with the new firmware, Section 4.4.7.3.
3) Set the iServer to “Default” settings. The iServer’s IP address is now
192.168.1.200.
4) “Upload” the same configuration you obtained from step 1 onto the iServer,
Section 4.4.7.5.
After you have successfully upgraded your device, you can verify the firmware
version number on the “Overview” page (see Section 4.4.1).
4.4.7.4 Download Configuration
Clicking on this button will download the configuration file that contains all the settings
stored in the iServer and use it as a reference.
Download
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Reboot Defaults Upgrade Download Configuration Upload Configuration
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Download Configuration File
Figure 4.29 System: Download Configuration
40
4.4.7.5 Upload Configuration
Upload Configuration
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Reboot Defaults Upgrade Download Configuration Upload Configuration
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Browse...
Upload Configuration File *.cfg
Please make sure no other clients are connected to the device.
Consult manual for complete instructions.
Figure 4.30 System: Upload Configuration
Upload Configuration – Using this option to upload the configuration file into the
iServer. It is recommended to download and store a working copy of this configuration
file in case the device is configured improperly.
You can set the iServer to its default settings and upload the configuration file
back into the iServer.
4.4.8 Diagnostics
This page provides the number of Ethernet packets received or transmitted. Pressing the
Reset Counter button will set the counts to zero.
Diagnostics
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Overview
Network
Configuration
Management
Security
Recording
System
Diagnostics
Log Out
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Ethernet
Received
Transmitted
Packets
4437
6073
Reset Counter
Figure 4.31 Diagnostics
4.4.9 Log Out
Once you click on Log Out, you will be logged out, and taken back to the Welcome page.
41
4.5 Readings
This page displays temperature, humidity, dew point, and the status of the alarm relays
and recording.
It can be displayed either as an HTML page or a Java applet.
4.5.1 HTML
Figure 4.32 Readings: HTML - Shown with Probe 1 and 2 Enabled
Refresh – Adding a time value in seconds will automatically update the HTML page with
fresh readings.
42
4.5.2 Java
If Java option is chosen installation of Java Runtime is required (refer to Appendix G).
Help[?]
Refresh 2
Seconds
Data Logging: INACTIVE
Figure 4.33 Readings: Java - shown with Probe 1 enabled
Data Logging – This option will require the Java Policy file to be setup.
Press on Help[?] for details.
An alternate way to set up the Java Policy can be found in Appendix G.
Once the Java Policy file is completed, click on Data Logging button to log the data
displayed on this page into a file. The file is in comma separated values (.csv) format,
which can be opened in Excel or as ASCII. The fields are separated by a comma ( , ).
When the button is ACTIVE it means that the data is currently being logged into a file.
The value in seconds in the Refresh box determines how often the data is being logged.
The default is 2 seconds.
If you want to access the “Chart” and/or the “Readings” applet from outside your
local network on which the iServer is connected, you must allow ports 1001
(Readings) and 2003 (Chart) on your Router.
If a blank screen appears without any “java application running” or image of a
“Java logo”, please verify you have the latest Java Runtime Environment installed
and configured according to the instructions (refer to Appendix G). If you do not
have Java Runtime Environment installed, you may download it from our website
(in the software section) or contact the Customer Service Department nearest you.
“Java and the Java Coffee Cup Logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries.”
43
4.6 Chart
This page charts the temperature, humidity, and dew point in real-time across the full span
(-40 to 124ºC, and 0 to 100% RH) or within any narrow range (such as 20 to 30ºC). The
time-base can display one minute, one hour, one day, one week, one month or one year.
Figure 4.34 Adjustable Chart
If a blank screen appears without any “java application running” or image of a
“Java logo”, please verify you have the latest Java Runtime Environment
installed and configured according to the instructions (refer to Appendix G).
If you do not have Java Runtime Environment, you may download it from our
website (in the software section) or contact the Customer Service Department
nearest you.
High / Low – If Alarm Relays are enabled (in the Configuration menu), the set point
values for High and Low alarms will be listed and graphed on the chart.
Max. / Min. – This shows the maximum and minimum values for Temperature and
Humidity (or Dewpoint) indicated on the Y-axis.
44
4.6 Chart (continued)
Display Selection – The options are Both Probes, Probe 1, and Probe 2
X-axis – This indicates the time, options includes one minute, one hour, one day, one
week, one month or one year.
Y-axis – The left Y-axis is dedicated to temperature. Either humidity or dewpoint can be
selected for the right Y-axis.
Data Source – The options are Live and Recorded.
If Live is selected the real-time data will be charted for the time indicated on the X-axis.
If Recorded is selected the stored data on the SD card will be charted for the time
indicated on the X-axis.
Alarm Relay Set Points – This option will hide or chart (normal) the set point values.
The bold option will thicken the displayed set point lines.
If Alarm Relays are disabled (in the Configuration menu) the set points for High
and Low alarms will not be graphed or displayed on the chart.
Sensor Type – Choose Humidity or Dewpoint.
Show – To select which probes are charted.
Graph Line Style – Choose between Normal and Bold.
Save Chart – Save the current graph in PNG (Portable Network Graphics) format. The
filename has extension .png. This option will require the Java Policy file to be setup.
Press on Help[?] for details. An alternate way to set up the Java Policy can be found in
Appendix G.
Print Chart – The displayed chart will be printed once the button is clicked.
If you want to access the “Chart” and/or the “Readings” applet from outside your
local network on which the iServer is connected, you must allow ports 1001
(Readings) and 2003 (Chart) on your Router.
4.7 Web Link
This page is configured from the Network menu under IP configuration.
Refer to Section 4.4.2.1.
Web Link
Address http://192.168.1.200
Readings
Chart
Web Link
Setup
Web Link
Figure 4.35 Web Link
45
4.8 Telnet Setup
With a telnet program, you can connect to the iServer using its IP address and TCP Port
2000. In Continuous mode (refer to Configuration:Sensors page Section 4.4.3.2), the
telnet session will receive continuous data (temperature and humidity) from the iServer.
In Command mode, a command can be sent to query the iServer.
Refer to Section 4.9.1 for list of commands.
4.8.1 Telnet Connection
Telnet stands for Telecommunications Network, it is a protocol that provides a way for
users to connect to a node with a valid IP address anywhere on an Ethernet network or
the Internet . You can open a Telnet session using a terminal emulation programs like
Tera Term (downloadable from the internet), which is a free software for Windows.
You can initiate a telnet connection by typing the IP address of the iServer, and Port
2002 for logging into the iServer’s telnet consol port (see Figure 4.36). By telneting to
Port 2000, you will be able to access temperature, humidity, and dew point readings.
The default password for Telnet Login is 00000000 and can be changed if
desired.
Tera Term: New Connection
TCP/IP:
Host: 192.168.1.200
Protocol: UNSPEC
TCP port#: 2002
Telnet
Serial:
COM1: Communications Port {COM1
OK
Cancel
Help
Figure 4.36 Tera Term Telnet Connection Screen
Once the connection is established you will be prompted for an Administrator Password
(default is 00000000). Telnet console port (2002) allows users to configure some
parameters within the iServer. Figure 4.38 shows the parameters that can be changed.
After connecting to the iServer, you can use the following commands to read, modify,
and get help.
p
displays the current settings (Figure 4.37)
?
displays all the available options as well as an example on how to enter a
command (Figure 4.38)
s
set a new configuration (see the example in Figure 4.38), sending the
command c is required to permanently store the new settings
RESET
restart the iServer
FACTORY set the iServer to it’s factory default, the RESET command is required after
the FACTORY command
c
permanently store the new settings
q
quit the telnet session
46
4.8.1 Telnet Connection (continued)
Figure 4.37Figure 4.38
Telnet to port 2002 – p command
Telnet to port 2002 – ? command
4.9 HTTPget Program
The HTTPget software is used to send a single HTTP or TCP request to an iServer
product. In contrast, the telnet or Hyperterminal programs allow a continuous
connection with multiple requests to be sent to the iServer product.
Generally HTTPget is used for simply programming an IP address to the iServer or for
quickly obtaining a reading of from a device.
The iServer product must be configured from the configuration web page so that the
“Server Type” value is set to “Command”, refer to Section 4.4.3.2.
47
4.9.1 HTTPget using Port 2000
You can setup and read the information from the iServer by using the HTTPget program.
The following program can be used to read data from the iServer by using TCP port
2000. The command string is sent to this TCP port, then the response can be read back
from the same socket.
The HTTPget.exe file is used to setup and read information from the iServer. This
file can be downloaded from the website listed on the cover of this manual (software
section).
Notes on using HTTPget :
The HTTPget.exe program should be installed to the windows directory (usually c:\winnt
or c:\windows)
1. Open up a command window (or have a DOS window)
a) Click on start menu
b) Click on “Run”
c) In the dialog box that appears, type “cmd” or “command” and click on “OK” button.
d) A command window should now appear.
2. If you now type “httpget” and press the “enter” key, the program options should be
displayed.
3. Next run HTTPget with the options displayed below
httpget -r -S “*SRTC\r” 192.168.1.200:2000
where:
-r –S are parameters needed for the command string
*SRTC is the command:
\r is the carriage return termination character
192.168.1.200 is an IP address
2000 is a socket port number
Response:
076.6 (in Deg.F format)
*SRT/*SRTC
*SRT2/*SRTC2
*SRT3/*SRTC3
*SRTF
*SRTF2
*SRTF3
*SRH
*SRH2
*SRH3
*SRD/*SRDC
*SRD2/*SRDC2
*SRD3/*SRDC3
Get Temperature Reading in Celsius from Probe 1
Get Temperature Reading in Celsius from Probe 2
Get Temperature Reading in Celsius from Probe 1 and 2;
separated by a semi-colon
Get Temperature Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 1
Get Temperature Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 2
Get Temperature Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 1 and 2;
separated by a semi-colon
Get Humidity (%) Reading from Probe 1
Get Humidity (%) Reading from Probe 2
Get Humidity (%) Reading from Probe 1 and 2; separated by a
semi-colon
Get Dewpoint Reading in Celsius from Probe 1
Get Dewpoint Reading in Celsius from Probe 2
Get Dewpoint Reading in Celsius from Probe 1 and 2; separated
by a semi-colon
48
4.9.1 HTTPget using Port 2000 (continued)
*SRDF
Get Dewpoint Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 1
*SRTD2
Get Dewpoint Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 1
*SRDF3
Get Dewpoint Reading in Fahrenheit from Probe 1 and 2;
separated by a semi-colon
*SRB/*SRBC
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Celsius from Probe 1;
separated by a semi-colon
*SRB2/*SRBC2
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Celsius from Probe 2;
separated by a semi-colon
*SRB3/*SRBC3
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Celsius from Probe 1
and 2; separated by a semi-colon
*SRBF
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Fahrenheit from
Probe 1; separated by a semi-colon
*SRBF2
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Fahrenheit from
Probe 2; separated by a semi-colon
*SRBF3
Get Temperature and Humidity Reading in Fahrenheit from
Probe 1 and 2; separated by a semi-colon
*SRYS
Indicate AC or DC power and battery status
*SRYRST
Reset Power on
*SR_XD1
Disable alarm condition check for relay 1
*SR_XD2
Disable alarm condition check for relay 2
*SR_XC2
Reset relay 2 latch condition
*SR_XC1
Reset relay 1 latch condition
*SR_XC2
Reset relay 2 latch condition
*SR_XE1
Re-enable alarm condition check for relay 1 (must be
executed after *SR_XD1)
*SR_XE2
Re-enable alarm condition check for relay 2 (must be
executed after *SR_XD2)
*SR_XP1
Close relay 1 for < 200 mSec
*SR_XP2
Close relay 2 for < 200 mSec
*SR_XH1
Close relay 1
*SR_XH2
Close relay 2
*SR_XL1
Open relay 1
*SR_XL2
Open relay 2
*SR_XR1
Read current state of relay 1
*SR_XR2
Read current state of relay 2
Commands developed specifically for DASYLab/LabView
*SRAC
Get All Readings in below format in Celsius
*SRAF
Get All Readings in below format in Fahrenheit
Format:
T1[+/-]###.#H1[+/-]###.#D1[+/-]###.#T2[+/-]###.#H2[+/-]###.#D2[+/]###.#;[EndCharacter]
*SRACS
Get All Readings in below format in Celsius
*SRAFS
Get All Readings in below format in Fahrenheit
Format:
[+/-]###.# [+/-]###.# [+/-]###.# [+/-]###.# [+/-]###.# [+/-]###.#;[EndCharacter]
49
4.10 Flash Card Reader
The data recorded on the SD card can be read on a PC or MAC with a USB or any
standard card reader.
The format is a simple “.csv” text file that is easily imported in MS Excel or MS WordPad
or any software package that can read text files (see Figure 4.40).
The entire recording session is saved into a file kept in the root directory.
The name of this file is S followed by the date the recording was started, so for example:
S20100401.txt is April 1st, 2010.
The same recording data is also saved as daily files located in a series of month and
year directories in which the recording took place (see Figure 4.39).
E:\
File
Edit
View
Favorites
Tools
Help
Size Type
File Folder
File Folder
15,598KB Text Document
Name
2010
Events
S20100401.txt
Date Modified
4/01/2010 8:08AM
4/01/2010 8:08AM
5/02/2010 1:08PM
E:\2010
File
Edit
View
Favorites
Tools
Help
Size Type
File Folder
File Folder
Name
04
05
Date Modified
4/01/2010 8:08AM
5/02/2010 1:08PM
E:\2010\04
File
Edit
View
Favorites
Tools
Name
20100401.txt
20100402.txt
20100403.txt
20100404.txt
20100405.txt
20100406.txt
20100407.txt
Help
Size
598 KB
598 KB
598 KB
598 KB
598 KB
598 KB
598 KB
Type
Text Document
Text Document
Text Document
Text Document
Text Document
Text Document
Text Document
Date Modified
4/02/2010 12:00AM
4/03/2010 12:00AM
4/04/2010 12:00AM
4/05/2010 12:00AM
4/06/2010 12:00AM
4/07/2010 12:00AM
4/08/2010 12:00AM
Figure 4.39 Recorded Data File Directory
Figure 4.40
Example of data recorded
on the SD card
#2010/04/02;09:00:00;23.3C;35.6%;D6.7C;
#2010/04/02;09:00:10;23.3C;35.6%;D6.7C;
#2010/04/02;09:00:20;23.3C;35.6%;D6.7C;
#2010/04/02;09:00:30;23.3C;35.7%;D6.7C;
#2010/04/02;09:00:40;23.3C;35.7%;D6.7C;
50
4.10.1 Opening Older iTHX-SD .txt Data Files
1. Right-click on the data file and select Open with Wordpad. This will display the
ASCII data in WordPad.
2. From the Edit menu select the Replace option to replace all the ; (semicolons)
with , (commas).
3. From the File menu select Save As and save the file with an extension .csv (Comma
Separated Value).
4. This .csv file can now be opened in Excel with the correct format.
Alternatively, you can do the following-1 Open Excel. Go to File, Open, select Files of Type: Choose Text files (*.prn, *.txt,
*.csv), and then select the data file you wish to open.
2. A Text Import Wizard should pop-up.
Select Delimited type of file, then Next.
Click on semicolon as the Delimiter type, then Next.
The screen should show how the file is being divided into columns, click on Finish.
3 From the File menu select Save As and save the file with an extension .csv.
The next time you open this file it will open in Excel automatically.
You may remove the letters C or F and D from the recorded values (using the
Replace option of Excel or Wordpad). This will enable you to create charts of the
data.
51
4.11 iLog Software
This is an Excel application software that can log temperature, humidity and dewpoint
from the iServer over the local network (Ethernet) or the internet.
a) Download the iLog software from the website listed in this manual.
b) Install iLog software on a networked PC. This software is compatible with Windows
95, 98, NT, 2000, XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 (32 and 64-bit).
c) If you have Excel 2007 or higher, when installing iLog choose “Custom” installation
option and on the next window check the box for “Excel 2007 Apps” and continue
the installation to the end.
d) For complete information of how to use the iLog software, click on the HELP button.
e) There is a list of Error Messages in Appendix F.
f) For single probe units use iLog -- 1.9.4;
for dual probe units use iLog - iTHX-W Dual Probe
Figure 4.41 iLog Software Logging Data
The Options button will let you select the product model.
Choose iTHX-SD from the Model Selection pull-down menu (from General tab).
52
iLog Software (continued)
Table 4.1 iLog Excel Applications
The iLog application actually consists of several Excel files, though most supported
devices can be accessed by the main iLog program. The main program is listed as
“iLog”, plus a version number, under the Start Menu program links (those links available
by clicking the Start button on the Windows taskbar).
In the following table, the iLog File column shows how many sensors are logged by the
main iLog file. If more than 3 sensors are available, then the Alternate column shows
how many sensors the device can support. Devices with more than 3 sensors will have
their own Excel file. For these files, click on the model device found in the Start Menu.
Networked Product
iTHX-W, iTHX-2
iTHX-M, iTHX-SD
iTHX-W Dual Probe
iSE-TC, iSD-TC
iSE-TH, iSD-TH
iBTHX-W, iBTHX-D
iBTX-W/-D, iBTX-M, iBTX-SD
iPTX-W
iTCX
iTH Controller
iVI
iSeries
iDRX/iDRN
INF-B
iLog File
3 column
3 column
1st probe / 3 column
3 column
3 column
3 column
2 column
2 column
3 column
3 column
3 column
1 column
1 column
1 column
Alternate
6 column
5 column
5 column
4 column
4 column
Wireless Devices
The “Auto” column shows number of columns per remote device that are possibly
displayed.
The Full column shows number of columns allocated per device for the “Full”
spreadsheet, which will be able to display all data for all active devices.
Networked Product
zSeries Receiver and Remotes
wiSeries with zED Remotes
UWTC REC-3 and Remotes
wiSeries with UWTC Remotes
Auto
1 to 4 column / device
1 to 2 column / device
1 or 2 column / device
1 to 2 column / device
Full
4 column / 32 device
2 column / 32 device
2 column / 32 device
2 column / 32 device
The active wireless devices, when shown in the Excel application, will be shown with
the device number and the units returned.
53
PART 5
SPECIFICATIONS
SENSOR SPECIFICATIONS
Relative Humidity (RH)
Accuracy/Range at 25ºC
- Non-Condensing:
Hysteresis:
Non-linearity:
Response Time:
Repeatability:
Resolution:
Temperature (T)
Accuracy/Range*:
Wand Probe:
Industrial Probe:
Response Time:
Repeatability:
Resolution:
PROBE SPECIFICATIONS
Wand Probe:
Industrial Probe:
±2.75% for 10 to 90%;
±3% for 5 to 10% and 90 to 95%
±4% for 0 to 5% and 95 to 100%
Refer to chart in Appendix H
±1% RH
±3%
8 seconds, tau 63% (time for reaching 63% of a step
function, valid at 25C and 1m/s airflow)
±0.1%
0.1%, 12bit
NOTE: Reconditioning of the probe may be necessary if
the probe is stored for a period of time in a harsh
environment (temperatures below 0°C or above 70°C or
exposure to chemical vapors, condensation, etc).
To recondition the probe refer to Appendix H.4
±0.5°C for 5° to 45°C (±1°F for 41° to 113°F);
Up to ±1°C for 0° to 5°C and 45° to 70°C
Up to ±2°F for 32° to 41°F and 113° to 158°F)
Refer to chart in Appendix H
±0.5°C for 5° to 45°C ( ±1°F for 41 to 113°F);
Up to ±1.5°C for -40° to 5°C and 45° to 12 4°C
Up to ±2.7°F for -40° to 41°F and 113° to 255°F)
Refer to chart in Appendix H
*Note: extended temperature range is for Industrial Probe
only, the iServer’s operating temperature is 0 to 60°C
5 to 30 seconds, tau 63% (response time depends on heat
capacity of and thermal resistance to sensor substrate)
±0.1°C
0.1°C, 14 bit
198 mm long x 19 mm diameter (7.8” x 0.75”)
Cable with DB9 connector: 152 mm long (6”)
Cable operating temperature: 0 to 80°C (32 to 176°F)
137mm or 51mm long x 16mm diameter (5” or 2” x 0.63”)
Cable with DB9 connector: 3m or 0.9m long (10’ or 3’)
Cable operating temperature: -40 to 125°C (-40 to 257°F)
54
iSERVER SPECIFICATIONS
Interfaces
Ethernet (RJ45):
Fixed or auto-negotiating 10/100Base-T; Auto MDI/MDIX
Sensor:
Digital 4-wire (DB-9)
Supported Protocols:
TCP, UDP, SNMP, SMTP, SNTP, ARP, ICMP, DNS,
DHCP, HTTP, and Telnet
LED Indicators:
100 BASE-T, Network Link and Activity, DHCP, Recording
LCD Display:
16 digits, 6mm (0.23”)
Memory Data Flash Card:
2 GB SD Flash Card for 8 months of data storage at
1 second recording intervals, or 7 years at 10 seconds
Relay Outputs:
Two relays 1.5A @ 30Vdc
Management:
Device configuration and monitoring through embedded
WEB server
Embedded WEB Server:
Serves WEB pages containing real-time data and live
updated charts within definable time intervals.
POWER
Power Input:
9 to 12 Vdc
Consumption:
3.5 W.
Safety Qualified
ac Power Adapter (included)
Nominal Output: 9 Vdc @ 0.5 A
Input: 100 to 240 Vac, 50/60Hz
Back-up Battery:
9 Vdc, alkaline. 30 hours at 10 second recording intervals,
or 60 hours at 1 minute intervals
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperatures
iServer Unit:
0 to 60°C (32 to 140°F)
Battery:
-18 to 55°C (-0.4 to 131°F)
ac Power Adapter:
0 to 40°C (32 to 104°F)
Wand Cable:
0 to 80°C (32 to 176°F)
Industrial Cable:
-40 to 125°C (-40 to 257°F)
Storage Temperature:
-40 to 85°C (-40 to 185°F)
Material:
Steel metal case with wall mount bracket
iServer Housing Dimensions: 36.6H x 62W x 90D mm (1.44 x 2.93 x 3.56 in)
Weight:
389 g (0.86 lbs.), including battery
GENERAL
Agency Approvals:
Software:
FCC-B, CE
Compatible with Windows operating systems
Firmware upgrade from Ethernet
OPC Server
iConnect: Configuration software for the Ethernet interface
iLog: Macro for automatic data logging in MS Excel
55
Appendix A
GLOSSARY
User of this manual should be familiar with following definitions:
ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is a protocol for mapping an Internet Protocol address
(IP address) to a physical machine address that is recognized in the local network. For
example, the IP address in use today is an address that is 32-bits long.
In an Ethernet
local area network, however, addresses for attached devices are 48-bits long. (The physical
machine address is also known as a Media Access Control or MAC address.) A table, usually
called the ARP cache, is used to maintain a correlation between each MAC address and its
corresponding IP address. ARP provides the protocol rules for making this correlation and
providing address conversion in both directions.
Ethernet is a network protocol defined by the IEEE 802.3 standard. Ethernet-based
networks use MAC Address rather then IP Address to exchange data between computers.
By using ARP and adding TCP/IP support, Ethernet devices may be connected as part of the
Internet. An Ethernet LAN typically uses coaxial cable or special grades of twisted pair wires.
The most commonly installed Ethernet systems are called 10BASE-T and provide transmission
speeds up to 10 Mbps. Devices are connected to the cable and compete for access using a
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol.
IP (Internet Protocol) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to
another on the Internet.
IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a 32-bit number that identifies each sender or
receiver of information that is sent in packets across the Internet.
IP Netmask is a 32-bit pattern of bits used to determine which part of the IP address is the
network portion and which part is the host portion.
MAC (Media Access Control) Address is your computer’s unique hardware number. When
you’re connected to the Internet from your computer, a correspondence table relates your IP
address to your computer’s physical (MAC) address on the LAN.
Ping is a utility that tests the network connectivity. It is used to determine if the host is capable
of exchanging information with another host.
Port number/Socket number is a way to identify a specific process to which an Internet or
other network message is to be forwarded when it arrives at a server. It is a predefined address
that serves as a route from the application to the Transport layer or from the Transport layer to
the application of the TCP/IP system.
Sockets are a method for communication between a client program and a server program in
a network and defined as “the endpoint in a connection.” Information transferred across the
Internet primarily occurs between sockets.
SMTP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol is an Internet standard for electronic mail (email) transfer
across the Internet. SMTP clients usually use SMTP to send email messages by specifying the
SMTP server. The email server uses SMTP to both send and receive email messages.
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol is a network monitoring protocol to monitor
devices connected to an Ethernet Network.
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is the basic communication
language or protocol of the Internet. When you are set up with direct access to the Internet,
your computer is provided with a copy of the TCP/IP program just as every other computer that
you may send messages to or get information from also has a copy of TCP/IP. TCP/IP often is
used as a general term to indicate generic access to the Internet.
UDP/IP (User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol) is the TCP/IP standard protocol that
allows an application program on one machine to send a datagram to an application program
on another. The UDP can be either in Broadcast or Directed form. The Broadcast UDP transmits
data to every node on the same network. The Directed UDP transmits data to one node only.
56
Appendix B
IP Address
An IP address is a unique 32-bit address assigned to a computer and includes:
a A network ID number identifying a network.
a A host ID number identifying a computer on the network.
All IP addresses have been divided into three smaller groups (classes) A, B and C
a Class A addresses have 8-bits of network ID and 24-bits of host ID. They can support
a large number of hosts, approximately 2 = 16,777,216 computers per network.
The IP addresses range in binary from 00000001.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx
to 01111111.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx
The IP addresses range in decimal from 1.x.x.x to 127.x.x.x
Class A network ID’s support a very large number of hosts.
a Class B addresses have 16-bits of network ID and 16-bits of host ID. They can
support approximately 216 = 65,536 computers per network.
The IP addresses range in binary from 10000000 00000000.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx
to 10111111 11111111.xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxx
The IP addresses range in decimal from 128.0.x.x TO 191.255.xxx.xxx
Class B network ID’s support a medium number of hosts.
a Class C addresses have 24-bits of network ID and 8-bits of host ID. They can support
approximately 28 = 256 computers per network.
The IP addresses range in binary from 11000000.00000000.00000000.xxxxxxxx
to 11011111.11111111.11111111.xxxxxxxx
The IP addresses range in decimal from 192.0.0.xxx to 223.255.255.xxx
Class C network ID’s support a small number of hosts.
The rest of the addresses are divided into two classes, D and E.
Class D networks are not assigned to the host. They are used for multicasting.
The address range from 224.x.x.x to 239.x.x.x
Class E networks are experimental or reserved addresses.
The address range from 240.x.x.x to 247.x.x.x
57
Appendix C
ARP Commands
ARP is the Internet layer protocol responsible for matching or obtaining the MAC
(hardware) address that corresponds to a particular IP address. The ARP command
allows the user to view the current contents of the ARP cache of the local computer
(residing on the same network). Microsoft includes the ARP.EXE utility for viewing and
modifying the ARP cache with its Windows products. The following ARP commands can
be used to view cache entries:
a arp –a Use this command to view all ARP cache entries.
a arp –a plus IP address Use this command to view ARP cache entries associated
with one particular interface on a network with multiple adapters.
a arp –g Same as arp –a.
a arp –N Use this command to display ARP entries for specific network interface.
a arp – s plus IP address plus Physical address Use this command to manually
add a permanent static entry to the ARP cache.
a arp –d Use this command to manually delete a static entry.
Ping the destination computer using IP address first before using the arp -a
command.
The following window shows examples of arp commands and responses.
a Your computer has an IP address of 192.168.1.118
a The destination computer has an IP address of 192.168.1.96
Figure C.1 ARP Commands and Responses
58
Appendix D
IP Netmask
IP Netmask or Subnet Mask is a 32-bit pattern of ones and zeros used to determine
network portion of an IP address from the host portion of the IP address. Subnet mask is
a network ID that is created by borrowing bits from host portion of IP address and using
them as part of a network ID. The table below shows a default subnet mask for address
Classes A, B, and C. Each bit that is set to “1” in the subnet mask corresponds to the bit
in the IP address that is to be used as the network ID. Each bit that is set to “0” in the
subnet mask corresponds to a bit in the IP address that is to be used as the host ID.
Address Class
Mask Binary Value
Class A
11111111 00000000 00000000 00000000
Class B
11111111 11111111 00000000 00000000
Class C
11111111 11111111 11111111 00000000
Mask Decimal Value
or Dotted Notation
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
If your network requires more network ID’s, you can extend the default subnet mask to
include additional bits from the host ID. This allows for additional network ID’s within the
network. The table below shows some examples of subnet masks and bits moved from
the hosts ID to create a new subnet.
Mask Dotted Notation
255.0.0.0 (Default)
255.192.0.0
255.224.0.0
255.240.0.0
255.248.0.0
255.252.0.0
255.254.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.128.0
255.255.192.0.0
…………….........
255.255.255.252
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
........
11111111
255.255.0.0 (Default)
255.255.192.0
…………….........
255.255.255.252
11111111
11111111
........
11111111
255.255.255.0 (Default)
255.255.255.192
………………….
255.255.255.254
11111111
11111111
........
11111111
Mask Binary
Class A
00000000 00000000
11000000 00000000
11100000 00000000
11110000 00000000
11111000 00000000
11111100 00000000
11111110 00000000
11111111 00000000
11111111 10000000
11111111 11000000
........ ........
11111111 11111111
Class B
11111111 00000000
11111111 11000000
........ ........
11111111 11111111
Class C
11111111 11111111
11111111 11111111
........ ........
11111111 11111111
Mask Bits
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
........
11111100
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
.
22
00000000
00000000
........
11111100
0
2
.
14
00000000
11000000
........
11111100
0
2
.
6
To determine the number of valid hosts ID’s remaining after subnetting, use the following
equation: 2n – 2, where n is the number of octet digits left after the subnet mask.
59
Appendix E
ASCII
Char
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
HT
LF
VT
FF
CR
SO
SI
DLE
DC1
DC2
DC3
DC4
NAK
SYN
ETB
CAN
EM
SUB
ESC
FS
GS
RS
US
SP
!
“
#
$
%
&
‘
(
)
*
+
,
.
ASCII Chart
Dec
Hex
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
Binary
No Parity
00000000
00000001
00000010
00000011
00000100
00000101
00000110
00000111
00001000
00001001
00001010
00001011
00001100
00001101
00001110
00001111
00010000
00010001
00010010
00010011
00010100
00010101
00010110
00010111
00011000
00011001
00011010
00011011
00011100
00011101
00011110
00011111
00100000
00100001
00100010
00100011
00100100
00100101
00100110
00100111
00101000
00101001
00101010
00101011
00101100
00101101
00101110
ASCII
Char
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I
j
k
l
m
n
60
Dec
Hex
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
Binary
No parity
01000000
01000000
01000010
01000011
01000100
01000101
01000110
01000111
01001000
01001001
01001010
01001011
01001100
01001101
01001110
01001111
01010000
01010001
01010010
01010011
01010100
01010101
01010110
01010111
01011000
01011001
01011010
01011011
01011100
01011101
01011110
01011111
01100000
01100001
01100010
01100011
01100100
01100101
01100110
01100111
01101000
01101001
01101010
01101011
01101100
01101101
01101110
Appendix E
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
ASCII
Char
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
HT
LF
VT
FF
CR
SO
SI
DLE
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
ASCII Chart Continuation
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
00101111
00110000
00110001
00110010
00110011
00110100
00110101
00110110
00110111
00111000
00111001
00111010
00111011
00111100
00111101
00111110
00111111
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
01101111
01110000
01110001
01110010
01110011
01110100
01110101
01110110
01110111
01111000
01111001
01111010
01111011
01111100
01111101
01111110
01111111
ASCII Control Codes
Dec Hex Ctrl Key Definition
ASCII Dec Hex Ctrl Key Definition
Equiv.
Char
Equiv.
00 00 Crtl @ Null Character DC1
17
11
Crtl Q Data Control 1
- XON
01 01 Crtl A
Start of
DC2
18
12
Crtl R Data Control 2
Header
02 02 Crtl B
Start of Text
DC3
19
13
Crtl S Data Control 3
- XOFF
03 03 Crtl C
End of Text
DC4
20
14
Crtl T Data Control 4
04 04 Crtl D
End of
NAK
21
15
Crtl U
Negative
Transmission
Acknowledge
05 05 Crtl E
Inquiry
SYN
22
16
Crtl V Synchronous
Idle
06 06 Crtl F Acknowledge ETB
23
17
Crtl W End of Trans
Block
07 07 Crtl G
Bell
CAN
24
18
Crtl X
Cancel
08 08 Crtl H
Back Space
EM
25
19
Crtl Y End of Medium
09 09
Crtl I
Horizontal
SUB
26 1A
Crtl Z
Substitute
Tabulation
10 0A Crtl J
Line Feed
ESC
27 1B
Crtl [
Escape
11 0B Crtl K
Vertical
FS
28 1C
Crtl \ File Separator
Tabulation
12 0C Crtl L
Form Feed
GS
29 1D
Crtl ]
Group
Separator
13 0D Crtl M
Carriage
RS
30 1E
Crtl |
Record
Return
Separator
14 0E Crtl N
Shift Out
US
31 1F
Crtl _ Unit Separator
15 0F Crtl O
Shift In
SP
32
20
Space
16 10 Crtl P
Data Link
Escape
61
Appendix FiLog Error Messages
Table F-1 iLog Error Messages
Error # Description
-8003
Note
User stopped logging readings.
-10005 Failed to find the iServer.
Ethernet cable is disconnected,
iServer is powered off, connections
across the firewall require longer
“connection to socket time out”
setting.
-10006 Windows socket was closed.
-10007 Windows socket error.
Wrong IP or wrong Port number
was used.
-10008 The iServer failed to respond to a request.
Wrong IP or wrong Port number
was used.
-10011 Response came empty.
No data was sent.
-10012 Device responded with
“Serial Time Out” string.
Possibly the iLog is configured for
wrong product model.
-10014 Terminal Server Mode when the Port is 1000. Try Port 2000 in iLog configuration.
-15100 Error on obtaining the temperature reading.
Possibly the iLog is configured for
wrong product model.
-15105 Error on obtaining the humidity reading.
Possibly the iLog is configured for
wrong product model.
-15110 Error on obtaining the dew point reading.
Possibly the iLog is configured for
wrong product model.
62
Appendix G
Java Runtime Environment Setup
If your computer does not have Java installed, please download from http://java.sun.com.
You can change the Java setting by clicking its icon in Control Panel. To load the applet,
you have to enable the web browser and disable cache.
G.1 Java Runtime Environment 1.7 Setup instructions
1. Go to your computer’s Control Panel. Open the Java Plug-in
Verify that
the path is
correct.
Figure G.1 Java 1.7 Screen Shot
63
G.2 Browser Proxy Selection
Accessing iServer within your internal network
W Usually when the computer and iServers are on an internal network, you will not use
Proxy server access.
W You should un-check the “Use Browser Settings” option on the “Proxy” tab.
Accessing iServers units using the internet
W Often the web browser will use Proxy server access to the internet. In such cases,
the default Java runtime settings on the “Proxy” tab should suffice. The default
setting is the “Use Browser Settings” option.
W If the default proxy setting doesn’t work, then you may have a situation where the
proxy settings of the web browser are incorrect.
Diagnostics:
If the web page of the iServer appears, then the HTTP Proxy is working fine.
If the data isn’t updated on the iServer upon selecting the “Readings” or “Chart” web
page, there may be a problem with access through a winsock proxy server. In such
cases your network administrator will need to provide the winsock proxy server and port
#s. .
These values should be entered into the Socks line on the “Proxy” tab (of the Java Plugin
control panel) or into the “connections” tab on the View,Internet Options dialog and make
sure that the Proxy tab shows that the “Use Browser Settings” option is not selected (i.e.
when you specify proxy connections in the Java Plugin control panel).
Accessing iServer units over Peer-to-Peer network
A simple peer-to-peer network is setup by disconnecting from the main network (as users
will often do when trying to do initial setup of the iServer) and then connecting the iServer
to another computer using an ethernet hub, an ethernet switch, or a Cross-over cable
connection.
Often when using a peer-to-peer network, the Java plugin and the web browser (such
as Internet Explorer) have internet connections configured to connect through proxy
servers. In such case, you will need to simply assign the final IP address on this peer
to peer network and then view the iServer charts after connecting the iServer into the
regular network. Otherwise you can disable the Java plug-in’s “Use Browser Settings”
temporarily and then reconfigure the Java plug-in settings for regular network access
after testing the iServer chart access on your peer-to-peer network.
The “Use Browser Settings” should not be selected. And the HTTP and Socks proxy
entries should be blank. Also, setup the internet browser so that proxy servers are disabled.
64
Appendix H
Sensor Information
H.1 Accuracy
Figure H.1
Figure H.2
RH Accuracy Chart
Temperature Accuracy Chart
Accuracies are tested at Manufacturer’s Outgoing Quality Control at 25°C (77°F) and
3.3V. Values exclude hysteresis and non-linearity, and is only applicable to noncondensing
environments.
H.2 Operating Conditions
Sensor works stable within recommended normal range – see Figure. Long term exposures
to conditions outside normal range, especially at humidity >80%RH, may temporarily offset
the RH signal (+3 %RH after 60h). After return to normal range it will slowly return towards
calibration state by itself. See Section H.4 “Reconditioning Procedure” to accelerate
eliminating the offset. Prolonged exposure to extreme conditions may accelerate aging.
Figure H.3 Normal Range
H.3 Storage Conditions and Handling Instructions
It is of great importance to understand that a humidity sensor is not a normal electronic
component and needs to be handled with care.
Chemical vapors at high concentration in combination with long exposure times may offset
the sensor reading. For these reasons it is recommended to store the sensors in original
packaging including the sealed ESD bag at following conditions: Temperature shall be in
the range of 10°C – 50°C (0 – 80°C for limited time) and humidity at 20 – 60%RH (sensors
that are not stored in ESD bags). For sensors that have been removed from the original
packaging we recommend to store them in ESD bags made of PE-HD8.
In manufacturing and transport the sensors shall be prevented of high concentration of
chemical solvents and long exposure times. Out-gassing of glues, adhesive tapes and
stickers or out-gassing packaging material such as bubble foils, foams, etc. shall be avoided.
Manufacturing area shall be well ventilated.
65
Appendix H
Sensor Information (continued)
H.4 Reconditioning Procedure
As stated above extreme conditions or exposure to solvent vapors may offset the sensor. The
following reconditioning procedure may bring the sensor back to calibration state:
Baking: 100 – 105°C at < 5%RH for 10h
Re-Hydration: 20 – 30°C at ~ 75%RH for 12h.
(75%RH can conveniently be generated with saturated NaCl solution. 100 – 105°C
correspond to 212 – 221°F, 20 – 30°C correspond to 68 – 86°F)
H.5 Temperature Effects
Relative humidity reading strongly depends on temperature. Therefore, it is essential to keep
humidity sensors at the same temperature as the air of which the relative humidity is to be
measured. In case of testing or qualification the reference sensor and test sensor must show
equal temperature to allow for comparing humidity readings.
The packaging of sensor is designed for minimal heat transfer from the pins to the sensor.
Still, if the sensor shares a PCB with electronic components that produce heat it should be
mounted in a way that prevents heat transfer or keeps it as low as possible. Furthermore,
there are self-heating effects in case the measurement frequency is too high.
H.6 Light
The sensor is not light sensitive. Prolonged direct exposure to sunshine or strong UV
radiation may age the housing.
H.7 Materials Used for Sealing / Mounting
Many materials absorb humidity and will act as a buffer increasing response times and
hysteresis. Materials in the vicinity of the sensor must therefore be carefully chosen.
Recommended materials are: Any metals, LCP, POM (Delrin), PTFE (Teflon), PE, PEEK, PP,
PB, PPS, PSU, PVDF, PVF. For sealing and gluing (use sparingly): Use high filled epoxy for
electronic packaging (e.g. glob top, underfill), and Silicone.
Out-gassing of these materials may also contaminate the sensor (see Section H.3).
Therefore try to add the sensor as a last manufacturing step to the assembly, store the
assembly well ventilated after manufacturing or bake at 50°C for 24h to outgas contaminants
before packing.
66
Appendix J
SNMP
Table J-1 SNMP MIB-2
Version: SNMPv1 Private Enterprise Number: .1.3.6.1.4.1.34089
MIB-2 (RFC 1213) supported: System Group
Object Identifier Object
(OID)
Description
Access
Default
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1
sysDescr
The name and version
identification of the product
Read-only
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.2
sysObjectID The authoritative identification
of the network management
subsystem contained in the
product. This value is allocated
within the SMI enterprises
subtree (1.3.6.1.4.1).
sysUpTime The time since the system
was last re-initialized.
sysContact The contact person for this
node, together with
information on how to
contact this person.
sysName
The hostname of this node.
iTHX-SD/ X.XX
X.XX is the
firmware version
.1.3.6.1.4.1.34089.X.X
X.X is the product
system object ID
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.3
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.4
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.5
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.6
.1.3.6.1.2.1.1.7
sysLocation The physical location of
this node.
sysServices The set of services that this
product primarily offers.
The value is a sum of network
layer services implemented.
Read-only
Read-only
Read-write
None
Read-write
ithxXXXX
XXXX are the last
4 characters of the
MAC address
None
Read-write
Read-only
76
Services include
application, end-to-end
and internet
Table J-2 SNMP Trap
SNMP Trap (RFC 1157) version: SNMPv1
Generic trap type: enterpriseSpecific(6)
Specific Trap
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Alarm Description
Reading 1
Reading 2
Reading 3
Reserved
Power reset
Sensor disconnected
Recording stopped
Specific Trap
7
8
9
10
11
12
67
Alarm Description
SD card 10% memory left
Low battery
Relay 1 activated
Relay 2 activated
Reserved
Reserved
PART 6
APPROVALS INFORMATION
6.1 CE APPROVAL
This product conforms to the EMC directive 89/336/EEC amended by 93/68/EEC,
and with the European Low Voltage Directive 72/23/EEC.
Electrical Safety EN61010-1:2001
Safety requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control and laboratory.
Basic Insulation
Pollution Degree 2
Dielectric withstand Test per 1 min
W Input Power to Sensor Metal Body:
none
W Input Power to Ethernet Output:
1500Vac
W Input Power to Relays:
1500Vac
W Ethernet Output to Relays:
1500Vac
Measurement Category I
Category I are measurements performed on circuits not directly connected to the Mains
Supply (power). Unit measures Air Temperature and Humidity.
Transients Overvoltage Surge (1.2/50uS Pulse)
W Input Power:
500V Transients Overvoltage
W Ethernet:
1500V Transients Overvoltage
Note: The ac/dc power adapter must have Safety Qualified Agency Approvals
for CE with Double Insulation rating.
The ac/dc power adapter is 9Vdc.
The minimum output current rating is 500mA.
EMC EN61000-6-1:2001 (Immunity) and EN61000-6-3:2001 (Emissions)
Immunity requirements for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments
W EMC Emissions
Table 1, Class B
W EMC Immunity
Table 1: Enclosure
Table 2: Signal Lines Ports
Table 3: Dc input/Dc output Ports
EMC EN61326:1997 + and A1:1998 + A2:2001
Immunity and Emissions requirements for electrical equipment for measurement, control
and laboratory.
W EMC Emissions
Table 4, Class B of EN61326
W EMC Immunity
Table 1 of EN61326
Note:
I/O lines / sensor cables require shielded cables and these cables must be located
on conductive cable trays or in conduits.
Refer to the EMC and Safety installation considerations (Guidelines) of this manual for
additional information.
6.2
FCC
This device complies with Part 15, Subpart B, Class B of the FCC rules.
68
NOTES
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WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER
OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. warrants this unit to be free of defects in materials and workmanship
for a period of 13 months from date of purchase. OMEGA’s WARRANTY adds an additional one (1)
month grace period to the normal one (1) year product warranty to cover handling and shipping
time. This ensures that OMEGA’s customers receive maximum coverage on each product.
If the unit malfunctions, it must be returned to the factory for evaluation. OMEGA’s Customer Service
Department will issue an Authorized Return (AR) number immediately upon phone or written request.
Upon examination by OMEGA, if the unit is found to be defective, it will be repaired or replaced at no
charge. OMEGA’s WARRANTY does not apply to defects resulting from any action of the purchaser,
including but not limited to mishandling, improper interfacing, operation outside of design limits,
improper repair, or unauthorized modification. This WARRANTY is VOID if the unit shows evidence of
having been tampered with or shows evidence of having been damaged as a
result of excessive corrosion; or current, heat, moisture or vibration; improper
specification; misapplication; misuse or other operating conditions outside of
OMEGA’s control. Components in which wear is not warranted, include but are not
limited to contact points, fuses, and triacs.
OMEGA is pleased to offer suggestions on the use of its various products. However,
OMEGA neither assumes responsibility for any omissions or errors nor
assumes liability for any damages that result from the use of its products
in accordance with information provided by OMEGA, either verbal or
written. OMEGA warrants only that the parts manufactured by it will be as
specified and free of defects. OMEGA MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT
THAT OF TITLE, AND ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY
DISCLAIMED. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: The remedies of purchaser set forth herein are
exclusive, and the total liability of OMEGA with respect to this order, whether
based on contract, warranty, negligence, indemnification, strict liability or otherwise,
shall not exceed the purchase price of the component upon which liability
is based. In no event shall OMEGA be liable for consequential, incidental or special damages.
CONDITIONS: Equipment sold by OMEGA is not intended to be used, nor shall it be used: (1) as a
“Basic Component” under 10 CFR 21 (NRC), used in or with any nuclear installation or activity; or (2)
in medical applications or used on humans. Should any Product(s) be used in or with any nuclear
installation or activity, medical application, used on humans, or misused in any way, OMEGA assumes
no responsibility as set forth in our basic WARRANTY / DISCLAIMER language, and, additionally,
purchaser will indemnify OMEGA and hold OMEGA harmless from any liability or damage whatsoever
arising out of the use of the Product(s) in such a manner.
RETURN REQUESTS/INQUIRIES
Direct all warranty and repair requests/inquiries to the OMEGA Customer Service Department.
BEFORE RETURNING ANY PRODUCT(S) TO OMEGA, PURCHASER MUST OBTAIN AN AUTHORIZED
RETURN (AR) NUMBER FROM OMEGA’S CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT (IN ORDER TO AVOID
PROCESSING DELAYS). The assigned AR number should then be marked on the outside of the return
package and on any correspondence.
The purchaser is responsible for shipping charges, freight, insurance and proper packaging to prevent
breakage in transit.
FOR WARRANTY RETURNS, please have the
following information available BEFORE
contacting OMEGA:
1. Purchase Order number under which the
product was PURCHASED,
2. Model and serial number of the product under
warranty, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
relative to the product.
FOR NON-WARRANTY REPAIRS, consult OMEGA
for current repair charges. Have the following
information available BEFORE contacting OMEGA:
1. Purchase Order number to cover the COST
of the repair,
2. Model and serial number of the product, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
relative to the product.
OMEGA’s policy is to make running changes, not model changes, whenever an improvement is possible. This affords
our customers the latest in technology and engineering.
OMEGA is a trademark of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
© Copyright 201n OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. All rights reserved. This document may not be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the
prior written consent of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
Where Do I Find Everything I Need for
Process Measurement and Control?
OMEGA…Of Course!
Shop online at omega.com
TEMPERATURE
!
" Thermocouple, RTD & Thermistor Probes, Connectors, Panels & Assemblies
!
" Wire: Thermocouple, RTD & Thermistor
!
" Calibrators & Ice Point References
!
" Recorders, Controllers & Process Monitors
!
" Infrared Pyrometers
PRESSURE, STRAIN AND FORCE
!
" Transducers & Strain Gages
!
" Load Cells & Pressure Gages
!
" Displacement Transducers
!
" Instrumentation & Accessories
FLOW/LEVEL
!
" Rotameters, Gas Mass Flowmeters & Flow Computers
!
" Air Velocity Indicators
!
" Turbine/Paddlewheel Systems
!
" Totalizers & Batch Controllers
pH/CONDUCTIVITY
!
" pH Electrodes, Testers & Accessories
!
" Benchtop/Laboratory Meters
!
" Controllers, Calibrators, Simulators & Pumps
!
" Industrial pH & Conductivity Equipment
DATA ACQUISITION
!
" Communications-Based Acquisition Systems
!
" Data Logging Systems
!
" Wireless Sensors, Transmitters, & Receivers
!
" Signal Conditioners
!
" Data Acquisition Software
HEATERS
!
" Heating Cable
!
" Cartridge & Strip Heaters
!
" Immersion & Band Heaters
!
" Flexible Heaters
!
" Laboratory Heaters
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING AND CONTROL
!
" Metering & Control Instrumentation
!
" Refractometers
!
" Pumps & Tubing
!
" Air, Soil & Water Monitors
!
" Industrial Water & Wastewater Treatment
!
" pH, Conductivity & Dissolved Oxygen Instruments
M/01
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