Omega | LVU30 Series | Owner Manual | Omega LVU30 Series Owner Manual

Omega LVU30 Series Owner Manual
User’s Guide
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LVU30 SERIES
Ultrasonic Sensors
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the right to alter specifications without notice.
Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 3
2.0 Sensor Wiring ........................................................................................................................................ 3
3.0 Communications Protocol ................................................................................................................... 3
4.0 Sensor Commands.............................................................................................................................4-8
4.1 Request for STATUS from the LVU30 Series ...................................................................................4
4.2 Response from LVU30 Series when STATUS information is requested ...................................4
4.3 Request to WRITE to the LVU30 Series Data Memory .................................................................5
4.4 Request to READ from the LVU30 Series Data Memory ..............................................................6
4.5 Response from the LVU30 Series to a READ request of Data Memory.....................................6
4.6 Request to SOFTWARE TRIGGER the LVU30 Series ......................................................................7
4.7 Request for LVU30 Series MODEL TYPE and FIRMWARE REVISION LEVEL.............................7
4.8 Response from the LVU30 Series when requesting MODEL TYPE and FIRMWARE REV. 7
4.9 Response from the LVU30 Series on a SENSOR ERROR ..............................................................8
4.10 Resetting an LVU30 Series ERROR .................................................................................................8
4.11 Request to REBOOT the LVU30 Series ...........................................................................................8
5.0 LVU30 Series Data Memory ............................................................................................................9-13
5.1 LVU30 Series Data Memory (General) ...................................................................................... 9-10
5.2 LVU30 Series Data Memory (Linear Mode Parameters).............................................................11
5.3 LVU30 Series Data Memory (Switch Mode Parameters)............................................................12
5.4 LVU30 Series Data Memory (Sensitivity Adjustment Parameters)...........................................13
6.0 Flowcharts ........................................................................................................................................14-17
LVU30 Series Flowchart for Status Information on Multiple Sensors............................................14
LVU30 Series Flowchart for Writing to Data Memory .......................................................................15
LVU30 Series Flowchart for Reading Data Memory...........................................................................16
LVU30 Series Flowchart for Error Processing......................................................................................17
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No
part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated without the prior written consent of
Omega Engineering, Inc.
All specifications are subject to change without notice.
i
1 Introduction
This document was developed for users who want to communicate and control the LVU30 Series
Ultrasonic Sensors with their own host device. The following pages describe how to obtain Sensor
Status information and how to access Data Memory, which controls the sensors operation.
Flowcharts in the back of the guide include how to develop routines to implement 32 sensors on
line and error handling. Throughout this guide, the term LVU30 Series will mean the line of LVU30
Series Smart Sensors.
2 Sensor Wiring
A wiring diagram using an RS232 (DB9) to RS485 Converter is shown below. You can also use a
USB to RS485 Converter if your PC does not have a RS232 communications port.
3 Communications Protocol
The data rate is set at 19.2 kbaud. Each byte contains 10 bits that include a start bit, 8 bit data, and
1 stop bit and no parity bit. There are a total of 6 bytes required to access the LVU30 Series. The
LVU30 Series will respond back with 6 bytes that include status (range to target, temperature, target
strength, etc), Data Memory read requests, and sensor error messages on the RS485 bus.
Transmitted values are in binary.
Request from PC or other host
Response from LVU30 SERIES
19.2k
baud
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
byte 1 = 170
2
3
byte 1 = ID Tag number
1
4
5
6
4 Sensor Commands
4.1 Request for STATUS from the LVU30 Series
There are a total of 6 bytes required to obtain the status information from the LVU30 Series that will
include target range, temperature, target strength, error condition and other information. The data
format of the Status Request from host to sensor is as follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Placeholder byte
Placeholder byte
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
3 (status)
0
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
4.2 Response from LVU30 Series when STATUS information is requested
Upon receiving the Status request, the LVU30 Series will respond back with 6 bytes of Status data
with the format defined as:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor ID Tag No.
Response Code
Range data byte (LSB)
Range data byte (MSB)
Temperature data
Checksum byte
Value
1 to 32
8 bits parsed, see below
see Notes 1 and 2
see Notes 1 and 2
5 to 254, see Note 3 below
Sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
Response Code data byte 2 parsed:
bit
7 6 5 4 Description
0 0 0 0 0% target strength
0 0 0 1 25% target strength
0 0 1 0 50% target strength
0 0 1 1 75% target strength
0 1 0 0 100% target strength
bit
3
2
1
0
Description
Target Detected: 0=NO 1=YES
Vout operating mode: 0=Linear 1=Switch
If Switch Mode operation Vout: 0=0Vout 1=10Vout
else Linear Mode = 0
Set if sensor error, see Data Memory address 104,
on page 8 for the error description
Notes:
1. Range to target (average): Byte 3 (LSB) combined with byte 4 (MSB) to form 2 bytes, then divided by 128 (inches).
2. No target detected will be indicated as 0000 range and 0% target strength.
3. Temperature data is defined as deg C = (byte 5 * 0.48876) – 50.
4. See page 8 for the response if there is a sensor error.
2
4.3 Request to WRITE to the LVU30 Series Data Memory
There are a total of 6 bytes required to write to the LVU30 Series Data Memory. These locations
affect operation of the sensor including sample rate, averaging, loss of echo timeout, Voltage
Output operating mode, Sensor ID tag, etc. The description to each Data Memory location is on
pages 9-13. The data format is as follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Address of Data Memory
Data to be stored in memory
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
103 (write to Data Memory)
21 to 104
0 – 255 (limits indicated in Data Memory section of this guide)
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
There is no response from the LVU30 Series after a write request. Good design practice is to read
back the Data Memory for verification (see next page). The LVU30 Series will verify that the Data
Memory is within specified values as described in the Data Memory description section. Any invalid
data will be replaced with the factory default value and will indicate a Data Memory replacement
error (see page 8).
When a write command is initiated, the sensor will stop its normal operation and remain idle
waiting for additional writing to the Data Memory. The sensor will only return to normal operation
(with the new parameters in Data Memory) when a re-boot command is initiated (see page 8) or if it
is re-powered.
SPECIAL CASE: The ID Tag memory address 40 must be unlocked by the command shown here
prior to requesting the change. Note that any other command request other than the ID Tag change
request will re-lock the ID Tag memory location.
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Unlock value
Unlock value
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
105 (unlock ID Tag location 40)
12
234
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
This command must immediately follow with the standard write to Data Memory:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Address of data memory
New ID Tag
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32 (Sensor ID Tag you are requesting to change)
103 (write to Data Memory)
40
1 to 32
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
The new ID Tag will take affect after a re-boot command (or power cycle).
3
4.4 Request to READ from the LVU30 Series Data Memory
There are a total of 6 bytes required to access and read the Data Memory from the LVU30 Series.
The data format is as follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Address of data memory
Placeholder byte
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
104 (read)
21 to 104
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
4.5 Response from the LVU30 Series to a READ request of Data Memory
Upon the LVU30 Series receiving the read request for the specific Data Memory location, the LVU30
Series will respond back with 6 bytes of data with the format defined below:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor ID Tag No.
Response Code
Address
Data Memory
Data Memory
Checksum
Value
1 to 32
128 (read)
address of Data Memory
data from address in byte 3
data from next higher address
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
See pages 9-13 for details on all the Data Memory locations.
4.6 Request to SOFTWARE TRIGGER the LVU30 Series
If the LVU30 Series trigger mode is programmed for Software Trigger (memory address 94 = 1), the
LVU30 Series will then remain idle until a Software Trigger request occurs. This trigger request will
cause the sensor to transmit an ultrasonic pulse and acquire the range to target. Page 9 describes
the trigger mode options. See Note 1 below on how long to wait before you request the status
information from the sensor. You may also trigger all the sensors wired to the communication bus
simultaneously by setting the sensor ID to 0 (zero). This is recommended when sensors are placed
in close proximity to each other thus avoiding acoustic cross-talk and erroneous operation. The
data format to trigger the LVU30 Series is as follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Placeholder byte
Placeholder byte
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32 (including 0, see Note 2)
1 (trigger sensor to transmit)
0
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
Note 1: After you request a software trigger, you must wait a finite amount of time before you request for
status information from the sensor so that it has time to capture the furthest target (model dependant). For
the 210 kHz model, wait at least 10mS. For the 150 kHz models, wait at least 15mS. For the 95 kHz model, wait
at least 40mS.
Note 2: If the Sensor ID Tag (byte 2) is zero, then all sensors on the communications bus will transmit at
approximately the same time.
4
4.7 Request for LVU30 Series MODEL TYPE and FIRMWARE REVISION LEVEL
There are a total of 6 bytes required to access the sensor's model type and firmware revision level.
Shown below is the data format required to receive this information:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Placeholder byte
Placeholder byte
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
123 (model type /firmware revision request code)
0
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
4.8 Response from the LVU30 Series when requesting MODEL TYPE and
FIRMWARE REVISION LEVEL
Upon the LVU30 Series receiving the request for Model Type and Firmware Revision Level request,
the LVU30 Series will respond back with 6 bytes of data with the format defined below:
Byte
1
2
3
Description
Sensor ID Tag No.
Response Code
Sensor Model Code
Value
1 to 32
131 (model type /firmware revision response code)
100 = LVU31, 101 = LVU33, 102 = LVU32
(guide will be updated to any future sensors)
4
5
6
Firmware Revision
Placeholder byte
Checksum
data
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
4.9 Response from the LVU30 Series on a SENSOR ERROR
An error is indicated in the Sensor Status response if byte 2 bit 0 = 1. The Data Memory address 104
will have at least a bit set indicating the source of the error (see Error Flags in the Data Memory
Section, page 10). The LVU30 Series will respond back to the normal Status request with 6 bytes as
defined below:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor ID Tag No.
Response Code
Range data byte (LSB)
Range data byte (MSB)
Temperature data
Checksum
Value
1 to 32
bit 0 is set on error, other bits undetermined
see note below
see note below
5 to 255 (probe fault if less than 5)
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
Note: Range data bytes will be zero if Data Memory was replaced. Other errors may or may not
have valid range. For example, a temperature probe fault error will still try to attempt to obtain a
range and report it. An Internal Signal Detect error will report the range as zero and attempts to self
correct. A Brown Out error may operate properly, but users should verify their power supply for
minimum requirements.
Data Memory address 104 error flags (see page 10):
If bit 0 set: A Data Memory location was replaced with a factory default value. Sensor
sampling operation stops until user clears bit and re-boots the sensor.
If bit 1 set: Internal Signal Detect error. Sensor will attempt to self correct.
If bit 2 set: Temperature Probe error. Sensor will attempt to self correct.
If bit 3 set: Brown out error. Sensor will attempt to self correct. Verify supply voltage.
5
4.10 Resetting an LVU30 Series ERROR
The only two errors that can be reset are the Data Memory replacement and Brown Out errors. This
can be done by writing a zero to the memory address 104. After clearing the error, the sensor must
be re-booted (see below). The sensor will attempt to self clear both the Internal Signal detect and
Temperature Probe faults. The user cannot clear these errors.
4.11 Request to REBOOT the LVU30 Series
There are a total of 6 bytes required to reboot the LVU30 Series. This command must be sent after
you have completed writing to any or all LVU30 Series Data Memory locations to activate the
changes (however re-powering the sensor will also activate the changes). The data structure is as
follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
Description
Sensor Request
Sensor ID Tag No.
Request Code
Placeholder byte
Placeholder byte
Checksum
Value
170
1 to 32
119 (reboot)
0
0
sum of bytes 1 to 5, modulo 256
The latter pages contain flowcharts to be used as guides in developing your code.
6
5 LVU30 Series Data Memory
The LVU30 Series Data Memory locations described below may be changed to tailor the sensor’s
operation to your particular application. The LVU30 Series will verify that you stay within product
limits for proper operation. If you write invalid data to any location, the LVU30 Series sensor will
replace the invalid data with the product default values after a re-boot command or next power up.
Common practice is to verify the location you written to with the Read command (see page 6).
5.1 LVU30 Series Data Memory (General)
5.1.1 ID Tag is in Data Memory address 40. Values in this location must be between 1 and 32. This
location requires a special unlock command to enable writing to this location. See page 5 for
details. The default value is 1.
5.1.2 User Description Field is in Data Memory address 41 thru 72. These values must be ASCII
codes from 32 through 126. The default values are 32 (ASCII spaces).
5.1.3 Voltage Output Operating Mode is in Data Memory address 85. This location defines the
operating mode of the Sensor’s Voltage Output. A “0” in this location operates the Voltage Output
in a linear mode. The parameters that control the slope and min/max voltage values of the voltage
output are located in data memory locations Zero Setpoint Distance, Zero Setpoint Voltage Value,
Span Setpoint Distance, and Span Setpoint Voltage Value (see page 11). A “1” in this location
operates the Voltage Output as switch. The parameters that control the switch points are located in
data memory Close Setpoint Distance, Far Setpoint Distance, and Switch Mode Output Operation
and Setpoint Output Hysteresis (see page 12).
5.1.4 Average is in Data Memory address 91. This location is defined as follows: 0=ave. of
1, 1=ave. of 2, 2 = a v e . o f 4 , 3 = a v e . o f 8 , 4 = a v e . o f 1 6 , 5 = a v e . o f 3 2 , 6 = a v e . o f 6 4 , 7=ave.
of 128, 8=ave. of 256, 9=ave. of 512, and 10=ave. of 1024. The maximum average for the “Rolling”
average type is 32 (or index value of 5). The default value is 0.
5.1.5 Average Type is in Data Memory address 92. This location is defined as follows: “0” = Rolling
and “1” = Boxcar. By definition, a Rolling average uses the latest samples where each new sample
replaces the oldest sample. A Boxcar average takes the selected number of samples before
outputting the average reading, then starts a new average. The default value is 0 (Rolling).
5.1.6. No Echo Time Out is in Data Memory address 93. This location is programmable from 1 to
254 representing the amount of consecutive missed echoes before the sensor reaches a loss of echo
condition. This parameter is independent of the Average parameter. The default value is 1.
5.1.7 Trigger Mode is in Data Memory address 94. This location is defined as follows: “0”
establishes normal operation or internal self triggering at a rate programmed by the Sample Rate
(data memory location 100-103). A “1” in this location places the sensor in a software trigger mode
where a computer or other host is required to initiate the sensor to transmit (see Software Trigger
command on page 7). The default value is 0 (internal).
5.1.8 Sample Rate is in Data Memory address 100 thru 103. This 4 byte location represents the
sampling time for which the sensor transmits its ultrasonic pulse. Address 100 is the LSB thru 103
being the MSB. Resolution for all sensor model LVU31 Series is 200nS/bit, model LVU32 Series is
400nS/bit, and model LVU33 Series is 800nS/bit. The default value for all models is 10Hz.
7
5.1.9 Temperature Compensation is in Data Memory address 95. This location is defined as follows:
“0” = internal probe or “1” = manual temperature (see location 96). The default value is 0 (internal
probe). The formula for the speed of sound compensation is:
c = 789.9147 * SQRT (temperature in °C + 273) inches/sec
For round trip to get range, divide the above formula by 2.
5.1.10 Manual Temperature Override is in Data Memory address 96. When address 95 is set to 1,
Manual Temperature operation is in effect and the value in this location (96) is used in calculating
the target distance. The temperature is defined as:
Temp ºC = (data memory 96 * 0.48876) – 50
5.1.11 Self Heating Correction is in Data Memory address 24. This location is defined as follows: “0”
corrects for a self-heating error immediately at power up and is based on the input power supply
voltage. The sensor’s self heating time is approximately 30 minutes where the sensor’s temperature
probe will measure slightly low and will correct in time (30 min). This will give a slight error in
reporting the range during this initial power up period (worst case error at power up). In most
processes, the sensor is powered continuously, so it only affects the initial power up cycle.
Subsequent power cycles (low off duty cycle) will report the temperature accurately.
When applications requires a sensor to be occasionally powered (very low ON duty cycles), setting
this location to “1” disables self heating correction and will properly measure the ambient
temperature. Note that if self heating is disabled and the sensor it powered continuously, then an
error in reading the temperature will occur. The default value is 0 (self heating correction enabled).
5.1.12 Error Flags is in Data Memory address 104. These are set when the sensor is in a fault
condition. If bit 0 is set, then at least one Data Memory location was programmed beyond the
sensor limits and a factory default value replaced the data in error. The user should validate all Data
Memory locations since more than one location could have been replaced. This particular error
requires user intervention to clear by writing a “0” to this location.
Other errors indicators are bit1 for an internal Signal Detect Error. Bit 2 for an internal Temperature
Probe Fault. And bit 3 for a Brown Out error due to a low power supply. Errors indicated by bits 1
and 2 are self clearing and the sensor will try to recover on its own. The Brown Out error flag can be
cleared by writing a zero to its location. It is possible for the LVU30 Series to continue to operate,
even with this Brown Out flag set. However, users should check the power supply if this continues
to be set.
5.2 LVU30 Series Data Memory (Linear Mode Parameters)
5.2.1 Zero Setpoint Distance is in Data Memory address 73-74. This 2 byte memory location
represents the distance for the Zero Setpoint Voltage Value for the voltage output operating in the
Linear Mode. The Voltage Output will operate linearly when a target is detected between this Zero
Setpoint Distance and the Span Setpoint Distance. These 2 bytes are defined as 74 being the MSB
and 73 being the LSB having a value of 128 times the range in inches1. The default value is the
Sensor’s minimum specified distance and the limits are the sensors minimum and maximum
specified ranges and must not equal the Span Setpoint Distance.
5.2.2 Zero Setpoint Voltage Value is in Data Memory address 77-78. This 2 byte memory location is
the voltage value for the Zero Setpoint Distance and is used when operating in the Linear Mode.
The resolution for this 2 byte value is 1mV/bit with address 78 being MSB and 77 being LSB. The
default value is 0 (0V).
8
5.2.3 Span Setpoint Distance is in Data Memory address 75-76. This 2 byte memory location
represents the distance for the Span Setpoint Voltage Value for the voltage output operating in the
Linear Mode. The Voltage Output will operate linearly when a target is detected between the Zero
Setpoint Distance and this Span Setpoint Distance. These 2 bytes are defined as 76 being the MSB
1
and 75 being the LSB having a value of 128 times the range in inches . The default value is the
Sensor’s maximum specified distance and the limits are the sensors minimum and maximum
specified ranges and must not equal the Zero Setpoint Distance.
5.2.4 Span Setpoint Voltage Value is in Data Memory address 79-80. This 2 byte memory location is
the voltage value for the Span Setpoint Distance and is used when operating in the Linear Mode.
The resolution for this 2 byte value is 1mV/bit with address 80 being MSB and 79 being LSB. The
default value is 10,000 (10.00V).
5.2.5 Loss of Echo Voltage Value is in Data Memory address 86-87. This value represents the voltage
output when the sensor is in the No Echo Condition (see No Echo Timeout address 93 on page 9).
The resolution for this 2 byte value is 1mV/bit with address 87 being MSB and 86 being LSB. The
default value is 10250 (10.25V).
5.2.6 Voltage Output Calibration is in Data Memory address 22-23. This 2 byte location represents
the 10.00V calibration value. The factory calibrates this parameter, but it may be adjusted to your
instrument. The limits are from 900 to 1023.
Note 1: Example for a range value of 37.75” saved in data memory would be 37.75x128=483210 or
12E016. Thus in data memory store MSB=1216 and LSB=E016 (MSB=1810 and LSB=22410)
5.3 LVU30 Series DATA MEMORY (Switch Mode Parameters)
5.3.1 Close Setpoint Distance is in Data Memory address 81-82. This 2 byte memory location is the
distance used to establish a zone for the Voltage Output when operating in the Switch Mode. The
nd
2 setpoint used to create these zones is the Far Setpoint Distance. See Switch Mode Output
Operation below for details on how the voltage output will operate. These 2 bytes are defined as 82
being the MSB and 81 being the LSB having a value of 128 times the range in inches (see note 1
previous page). This value must be less than the Far Setpoint Distance. The default value is the
Sensor’s minimum specified distance.
5.3.2 Far Setpoint Distance is in Data Memory address 83-84. This 2 byte memory location is the
distance used to establish a zone for the Voltage Output when operating in the Switch Mode. The
st
1 setpoint used to create these zones is the Close Setpoint Distance. See Switch Mode Output
Operation below for details on how the voltage output will operate. These 2 bytes are defined as 84
being the MSB and 83 being the LSB having a value of 128 times the range in inches (see note 1
previous page). This value must be greater than the Close Setpoint Distance. The default value is
the Sensor’s maximum specified distance.
5.3.3 Switch Mode Output Operation is in Data Memory address 88. This data location is used to
establish what state the voltage output will be in when a target is detected within a particular zone
created by the Close and Far Setpoint Distances (subject to Hysteresis, see below) when operating
in the Switch Mode. The default value is 0. The data byte is parsed as follows:
9
bit 0: No Echo
0 = No Echo Vout=0V , Echo present Vout=10V
1 = No Echo Vout=10V, Echo present Vout=0V
bit 1: Target > Far Setpoint Distance
0 = If Target > Far Setpoint Distance, then Vout = 0V
1 = If Target > Far Setpoint Distance, then Vout = 10V
bit 2*: Target between Close and Far Setpoint Distances (* bit 3 = 0 for this function, else see bit 3)
0 = Target Present between Close and Far Setpoint Distances, Vout=0V
1 = Target Present between Close and Far Setpoint Distances, Vout=10V
bit 3: No Change for Target between Close and Far Setpoint Distances
0 = See bit 2 for operation of targets between Close and Far Setpoint Distances
1 = No change in voltage output when targets enter between Close & Far Setpoint Distances
(setting this to 1 will disable function of bit 2)
bit 4: Target < Close Setpoint Distance
0 = If Target < Close Setpoint Distance, then Vout = 0V
1 = If Target < Close Setpoint Distance, then Vout = 10V
5.3.4 Setpoint Output Hysteresis is in Data Memory address 90. This location specifies the amount
of hysteresis in %. The Close Setpoint Distance, Far Setpoint Distance, and Hysteresis must be
chosen so that the Far Setpoint Distance with hysteresis applied is greater than the Close Setpoint
Distance. This parameter is used when operating in the Switch Mode. The limits are 0 to 75%.
Hysteresis is defined as the distance between the operating point when a target approaches a
setpoint and the release point when the target moves away from the setpoint towards its original
position. The default value is 5 (percent).
5.3.5 Maximum Sensing Range is in Data Memory address 98-99. This programmed value limits how
far the sensor detects objects. These 2 bytes are defined as 99 being the MSB and 98 being the LSB
having a value of 128 times the range in inches (see note 1 previous page). This parameter can be
useful if you would like to eliminate a fixed background target and have the sensor indicate it as
“No Echo”. The default value is the Sensor model maximum specified sensing range.
10
5.4 LVU30 Series Data Memory (Sensitivity Adjustment Parameters)
The LVU30 Series Sensor has a sensitivity adjustment that can set both in amplitude and in time
where it occurs. Omega has developed a of adjustments as seen the in LVU30 Series Software
drop down menu. This includes Normal, Normal High-Temperature, Low, Very Low, High and Very
High. These thresholds have been developed for typical or not so typical applications. Most
applications should use the Normal setting. However applications such as the sensor being in a
very hot environment (over 130ºF) may want to select Normal High-Temperature. High settings
improve acquiring a weak target, but may have other issues like detecting unwanted targets, so use
these High settings with care. In applications such as a sensor aiming down a narrow pipe, the Low
setting may be selected to avoid side reflections. Described below are the Data Memory locations
that affect the sensitivity adjustment of the sensor. However it is highly recommended that if you
change from the Normal setting that you fully evaluate operation of the sensor in your application.
The LVU30 Series Software has a menu item that displays the ultrasonic signals and will show the
threshold levels as programmed.
5.4.1 Threshold Voltage #1 is in Data Memory address 30. This is the initial voltage level set. The
value is indexed from 1 to 18 and is defined as:
1=1.25V, 2=1.41V, 3=1.46V, 4=1.56V, 5=1.67V, 6=1.72V, 7=1.88V, 8=2.03V, 9=2.08V, 10=2.19V, 11=2.29V,
12=2.34V, 13=2.50V, 14=2.66V, 15=2.71V, 16=2.81V, 17=2.92V, 18=2.97V.
5.4.2 Threshold Voltage #2 is in Data Memory address 31. This is the next level change that can be
set and will occur at the timing parameter Switch time for Threshold #2. The value is indexed from 1
to 18 and as described in Threshold Voltage #1. However, programming this location to a 0 will turn
off this voltage level change.
5.4.3 Threshold Voltage #3 is in Data Memory address 32. This is the next level change that can be
set and will occur at the timing parameter Switch time for Threshold #2. The value is indexed from 1
to 18 and as described in Threshold Voltage #1. However, programming this location to a 0 will turn
off this voltage level change.
5.4.4 Threshold Voltage #4 is in Data Memory address 33. This is the next level change that can be
set and will occur at the timing parameter Switch time for Threshold #2. The value is indexed from 1
to 18 and as described in Threshold Voltage #1. However, programming this location to a 0 will turn
off this voltage level change.
5.4.5 Switch Time for Threshold Voltage #2 is in Data Memory address 33-34. This 2 byte value
represents the time from transmission of the ultrasonic pulse to the voltage level changing to
Threshold Voltage #2. The MSB is stored in 34 and the LSB is in 33. See note below for the defined
unit value.
5.4.6 Switch Time for Threshold Voltage #3 is in Data Memory address 35-36. This 2 byte value
represents the time from transmission of the ultrasonic pulse to the voltage level changing to
Threshold Voltage #3. The MSB is stored in 36 and the LSB is in 35. See note below for the defined
unit value.
5.4.7 Switch Time for Threshold Voltage #4 is in Data Memory address 37-38. This 2 byte value
represents the time from transmission of the ultrasonic pulse to the voltage level changing to
Threshold Voltage #4. The MSB is stored in 34 and the LSB is in 33. See note below for the defined
unit value.
Note: The Switch Time for Threshold Voltage is model dependant. The LVU31 Series is 200nS per bit, LVU32
Series is 400nS per bit, and the LVU33 Series is 800nS per bit.
11
6 Flow Charts
LVU30 SERIES Flow Chart
for Status Information
on Multiple Sensors
Initialize
Check Sensors On-Line
Sensor ID number
x=1
Request Status
from Sensor x
Response
within 10mS?
No
Yes
Store Sensor
Tag as available
No
Increment
x > 32 ?
Yes
Request Status
available sensor on line
Correct
sensor respond
back?
Wait at least 50mS before
next sensor is read
No
Retry request
status of same
Sensor
Correct
sensor respond
back?
No
Remove sensor from list.
Indicate this sensor lost
Yes
Yes
Byte 2
bit 0 set?
Yes
No
Valid Sensor Data:
byte 2 = status
bytes 3 & 4 = target range
byte 5 = temperature
12
Sensor Error
See Error Processing
Flowchart
LVU30 SERIES
Write to Data Memory
LVU30 SERIES Flowchart
for
Writing to Data Memory
Get ID Tag, address
and data
Send write request on
communications port
Verify sensor received data
Call Read Subroutine
using same address
data read
back as same?
No
is
the 2nd request
to
No
Yes
Request Status
on this sensor
Yes
all data
sent to
sensor?
No
Get next address and data
Is
this sensor
still available
?
No
Sensor is not online
Check connection and
restart program
Yes
Call Error Subroutine
Yes
does
sensor
indicate an
error?
Yes
No
Unknown data
retry
Send reboot command
Return
13
LVU30 SERIES Flowchart
for
LVU30 SERIES
Read Data Memory
Request READ from a
LVU30 SERIES data
memory location
received
6 bytes of
data?
No
Yes
valid ID
did the
proper sensor
respond?
No
Yes
Confirm Data
Memory Request
sensor
error?
byte 2 = 128?
No
Byte 2
bit 0 set?
Yes
Sensor Error Subroutine
See Error Processing
Flowchart
Yes
No
vali
checksu
(byte
No
Yes
communications buffer
byte 3 = data memory address
byte 4 = data memory data
byte 5 = next data memory data
14
LVU30 SERIES
Sensor Error
LVU30 SERIES Flowchart
for
Error Processing
Read Loc
104
Signal
Detect
Fault?
Yes
LVU30 SERIES
attempting self clear
Time out if continues.
Yes
LVU30 SERIES
attempting self clear
Time out if continues.
Sensor
Yes
Check input from Power
supply
No
Temperature
probe Fault?
No
Brown
Out
Clear Error Code
No
LVU30 SERIES
setting replaced
with default?
No
Yes
Validate data
memory
for users
application and
replace if
necessary
Clear Error
Code
Reboot
Return
15
WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER
OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. warrants this unit to be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of 13 months from date of purchase. OMEGA’s WARRANTY adds an additional one (1) month grace
period to the normal one (1) year product warranty to cover handling and shipping time. This ensures
that OMEGA’s customers receive maximum coverage on each product.
If the unit malfunctions, it must be returned to the factory for evaluation. OMEGA’s Customer Service
Department will issue an Authorized Return (AR) number immediately upon phone or written request.
Upon examination by OMEGA, if the unit is found to be defective, it will be repaired or replaced at no
charge. OMEGA’s WARRANTY does not apply to defects resulting from any action of the purchaser,
including but not limited to mishandling, improper interfacing, operation outside of design limits,
improper repair, or unauthorized modification. This WARRANTY is VOID if the unit shows evidence of
having been tampered with or shows evidence of having been damaged as a result of excessive corrosion;
or current, heat, moisture or vibration; improper specification; misapplication; misuse or other operating
conditions outside of OMEGA’s control. Components in which wear is not warranted, include but are not
limited to contact points, fuses, and triacs.
OMEGA is pleased to offer suggestions on the use of its various products. However,
OMEGA neither assumes responsibility for any omissions or errors nor assumes liability for
any damages that result from the use of its products in accordance with information provided
by OMEGA, either verbal or written. OMEGA warrants only that the parts manufactured by the
company will be as specified and free of defects. OMEGA MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT THAT OF
TITLE, AND ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY DISCLAIMED. LIMITATION OF
LIABILITY: The remedies of purchaser set forth herein are exclusive, and the total liability of
OMEGA with respect to this order, whether based on contract, warranty, negligence,
indemnification, strict liability or otherwise, shall not exceed the purchase price of the
component upon which liability is based. In no event shall OMEGA be liable for
consequential, incidental or special damages.
CONDITIONS: Equipment sold by OMEGA is not intended to be used, nor shall it be used: (1) as a “Basic
Component” under 10 CFR 21 (NRC), used in or with any nuclear installation or activity; or (2) in medical
applications or used on humans. Should any Product(s) be used in or with any nuclear installation or
activity, medical application, used on humans, or misused in any way, OMEGA assumes no responsibility
as set forth in our basic WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER language, and, additionally, purchaser will indemnify
OMEGA and hold OMEGA harmless from any liability or damage whatsoever arising out of the use of the
Product(s) in such a manner.
RETURN REQUESTS/INQUIRIES
Direct all warranty and repair requests/inquiries to the OMEGA Customer Service Department. BEFORE
RETURNING ANY PRODUCT(S) TO OMEGA, PURCHASER MUST OBTAIN AN AUTHORIZED RETURN (AR)
NUMBER FROM OMEGA’S CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT (IN ORDER TO AVOID PROCESSING
DELAYS). The assigned AR number should then be marked on the outside of the return package and on any
correspondence.
The purchaser is responsible for shipping charges, freight, insurance and proper packaging to prevent
breakage in transit.
FOR NON-WARRANTY REPAIRS, consult
FOR WARRANTY RETURNS, please have the
OMEGA for current repair charges. Have
following information available BEFORE contacting
the following information available BEFORE
OMEGA:
contacting OMEGA:
1.Purchase Order number under which the product
1. Purchase Order number to cover the COST
was PURCHASED,
of the repair,
2.Model and serial number of the product under
2. Model and serial number of the product, and
warranty, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
relative to the product.
relative to the product.
OMEGA’s policy is to make running changes, not model changes, whenever an improvement is possible. This affords our
customers the latest in technology and engineering.
OMEGA is a trademark of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
© Copyright 2018 OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. All rights reserved. This document may not be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the prior
written consent of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
Where Do I Find Everything I Need for
Process Measurement and Control?
OMEGA…Of Course!
Shop online at omega.com
TEMPERATURE
M
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Panels & Assemblies
M
U Wire: Thermocouple, RTD & Thermistor
M
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M
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M
U Infrared Pyrometers
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M
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M4583/0418
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