Omega | LVU30A Series | Owner Manual | Omega LVU30A Series Owner Manual

Omega LVU30A Series Owner Manual
User’s Guide
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LVU30A SERIES
Ultrasonic Sensors
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U.S.A.
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Servicing North America:
Omega Engineering, Inc.
Toll-Free: 1-800-826-6342 (USA & Canada only)
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Tel: (203) 359-1660
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For Other Locations Visit omega.com/worldwide
The information contained in this document is believed to be correct, but OMEGA accepts no liability for any errors it contains, and reserves
the right to alter specifications without notice.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
Page
1 Introduction ........................................................................................................ 1
2 Quick Guide on Getting Started ..................................................................... 2
Mounting the LVU30A Series Sensor ..............................................................................................
Operating an LVU30A Series Sensor without a Computer ..........................................................
Operating an LVU30A Series Sensor Connected to a Computer ...............................................
Operating Up to 32 LVU30A Series Sensors Simultaneously Using a Multi-Drop Configuration .
2
2
3
5
3 Product Description ......................................................................................... 6
DC Power Requirements ...................................................................................................................
Sensor’s Voltage Output (Vout) .......................................................................................................
RS485 Port .............................................................................................................................................
6
6
8
4 Installing Omega Software ............................................................................... 9
5 Status and Setup Screen .................................................................................. 10
Establishing Communication between a PC and an LVU30A Series Sensor .............................
Status Box of the Status and Setup Screen ......................................................................................
Editing the Sensor Parameters ...........................................................................................................
Sensor Selection Box of the Status and Setup Screen ..................................................................
Mode Selection for Output Voltage Box of the Status and Setup Screen .................................
Sampling Settings Box of the Status and Setup Screen ................................................................
Miscellaneous Box of the Status and Setup Screen .......................................................................
Messages Box of the Status and Setup Screen ...............................................................................
Self-Heating Correction ......................................................................................................................
File Tab (Saving & Recalling Sensor Settings) ..................................................................................
Tools Tab (Calibration of the Voltage) .............................................................................................
Tools Tab (Firmware Update) .............................................................................................................
Tools Tab (Ultrasonic Waveforms) ....................................................................................................
Setting Tab .............................................................................................................................................
Getting Started Tab ..............................................................................................................................
10
11
12
13
14
16
17
18
18
19
20
21
21
23
24
6 Factory Default Programmed Settings ........................................................... 25
7 Troubleshooting ................................................................................................. 26
8 Terminology ........................................................................................................ 26
9 Wire Color Code ................................................................................................ 28
Warranty Information ...................................................................... 29
The LVU30A Series Sensor product line listed in the introduction of this manual complies
with the European Council EMC Directive 2004/108/EC (EMC) and Low Voltage Directive
2006/95/EC (LVD).
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Introduction
In operation, an LVU30A Series Sensor generates a high frequency ultrasonic pulse, measures the time
it takes for the reflected echo to return from a target, and then calculates the target distance using the
speed of sound. The value of the speed of sound, which is a function of temperature, is determined by
the sensor using its internal temperature probe. The distance to a target can be obtained from an
LVU30A Series Sensor in a variety of ways. For example, the sensor output can be a DC voltage, the
value of which is proportional to the target distance, or the sensor can be programmed to produce a
switched voltage output at a user-determined target distance. Information regarding the target can be
sent by an RS485 communication link to a computer and displayed using the Omega Software, or
another host device can be used. See the Omega Sensor Serial Communications Guide for developing
a custom host device.
Key Features of LVU30A Sensors include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Analog or Setpoint Switched Output
Plug & Play Setup - No Targets Needed
Software Set Span and Zero - No Pots or Pushbuttons
Easy to use Setup Software using Windows® 10, 8, 7, and XP Systems
Built-in Temperature/Sound Speed Compensation
Up to 32 Sensors on RS485 Multi-drop Loop
Ultrasonic waveforms allowing diagnosis of measurement issues
Fault detection and reporting
Family of LVU30A Series Ultrasonic Sensors
Model
Nominal
Ultrasonic
Frequency
System
Beam
Angle
Output Type
Sensing
Range
LVU32A
150 kHz
8º
0-10V
4” to 7’
LVU32A-E
150 kHz
8º
0-10V
4” to 9’
LVU33A
95 kHz
8º
0-10V
8” to 13’
LVU33A-E
95 kHz
8º
0-10V
8” to 18’
LVU32A-E-I
150 kHz
8º
0-20mA
4” to 9’
LVU33A-E-I
95 kHz
8º
0-20mA
8” to 18’
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Quick Guide on Getting Started
Mounting the LVU30A Series Sensor
TheLVU30ASensor Family is designed to be easily mounted by using the 1 NPT threaded shaft that is
part of the housing of each sensor. It can either be screwed into a 1 NPT tapped hole or it can be
mounted onto a flat plate and secured with a supplied locknut. An optional Mounting Bracket can also
be purchased, as shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1
Photograph of an Omega LVU30A Series Sensor Attached to an optional mounting bracket
Operating an LVU30A Series Sensor Without a Computer
•
Provide a 12 to 24 V DC Power Supply and keep it turned off at this time.
•
Connect the sensor’s leads as shown in Figure 2. Sensors are programmed for factory default
setting. Applications may need setting adjustments which will require connection to the
RS485 port (green and brown wires) and the Omega Software (see Figure 3). Once
configured, the RS485 wires can be removed.
•
Turn the Power Supply ON
•
The DC voltage on the white lead will be proportional to the distance to the target (sensor
configured zero and span settings).
Figure 2
Wiring Diagram for an LVU30A Series Sensor Used Without a Computer
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Quick Guide on Getting Started (continued)
Operating an LVU30A Series Sensor Connected to a Computer
•
Download the Omega Software from Omega’s website and install it into your laptop. See
Section 4 in this guide for details.
•
Provide a 12 to 24 V DC Power Supply and keep it turned off at this time.
•
Connect the sensor’s power leads as shown in Figure 3. If wiring the sensor’s Vout or Iout
lead, connect it as well.
•
Obtain a USB/RS485 converter (see Omega’s website for purchase) and follow instructions to
properly configure it to a laptop. Only plug it into your laptop’s USB port when indicated.
•
Wire the sensor’s RS485 green and brown wires as shown in Figure 3.
•
Turn the Power Supply ON.
•
Execute the Omega Software program. See instructions in Section 5 to find the USB port if
not found.
•
The main page will appear as shown in Figures 4 (standard) & Figure 5 (Plus) when the sensor
is found. If the sensor was not found, you may have to select another communications port.
Use the drop-down menu ‘Settings’ then ‘Communications Port’ to select another port. Use
the ‘Tools’ drop-down menu and then ‘Search for Sensors’ to establish communications on
the new port.
•
Point the sensor towards a target, such as a wall, to obtain a distance measurement.
•
To change any of the sensor’s settings, move the mouse pointer and click on the field to be
modified. After all changes have been made, click on the ‘Program’ button. There is no limit
to the number of times the sensor can be reprogrammed. The sensor’s settings are nonvolatile and the programmed values will be retained even if power is lost.
•
The LVU30A Series Sensor can be adjusted for optimum performance in each application by
adjusting its settings. (See Section 5 for detailed information regarding utilization of these
adjustment features.)
NOTE: A termination resistor on the RS485 network is not required.
Figure 3
Wiring Diagram for an LVU30A Series Sensor Used With a Computer
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Quick Guide on Getting Started (continued)
`
Figure 4
Example of the Status and
Setup Screen for a standard
LVU30A Series Sensor
Figure 5
Example of the Status and Setup Screen for an LVU30-A-E Sensor
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Quick Guide on Getting Started (continued)
Operating Up to 32 LVU30A Series Sensors Simultaneously in a Multi-Drop
Configuration
Sensors that will be wired together on the same RS485 bus will first require that each sensor be
programmed with its own unique ID Tag. This must be done one at a time before all sensors can be
wired together. Follow the steps below:
•
Connect each LVU30A Series Sensor one at a time to a computer using the steps shown in the
previous section entitled “Operating an LVU30A Series Sensor Connected to a Computer”.
Use the Change ID Tag button to program a unique ID Tag from 1 to 32 into each sensor.
•
Once all sensors have been programmed, wire all sensors to the power and RS485 bus as
shown in Figure 6.
•
Restart the Omega Software program to find all the sensors. Each sensor can be viewed one
at a time by selecting it the ID Tag drop down list. Status will be displayed along with its
settings that may be reprogrammed. Diagnostic waveforms can be obtained using the drop
down menu.
Figure 6
Wiring Diagram for LVU30A Series Sensors Using a Multi-Drop Configuration
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Product Description
This section contains a general overview of the LVU30A Series of Ultrasonic Sensors. For detailed
information on any specific sensor model, refer to the datasheet located on the Omega website.
DC Power Requirements
LVU30A Series Sensors are powered from 12 to 24 V DC sources, either batteries or power supplies, that
are capable of supplying currents of approximately 30 ma (Vout models) and up to 50mA (Iout models).
The red and black wires of a sensor must be connected to the DC power, as shown in Figures 2, 3, and
6 in Section 2.
Voltage Output (Vout)
The sensor’s white lead produces a DC analog Output Voltage. The value of Vout provides information
regarding the Target Distance, which is the distance from the sensor to a target. Sensors have two
modes of operation for this output. In the Proportional Voltage Output Mode, Vout is an analog DC
voltage that is directly proportional to the Target Distance. In the Switched Setpoint Output Mode,
Vout (or Iout) switches between 0 & 10V (or 0 & 20mA) based on the Target Distance falling within
specific distance zones that are programmed into the sensor as Setpoints. More detailed information
regarding the use of these operational modes is contained in Section 5.
Proportional Voltage Output Mode (‘Linear Mode’)
Figure 7 is a schematic illustration of the Proportional Voltage Output Mode when sensor is operating
in the Linear Mode. A Zero distance and a Span distance that are anywhere within the Minimum Sensing
Range and Maximum Sensing Range of the sensor can be programmed into the sensor. The values of
Vout will then be proportional to the Target Distance in the zone between the distances set for Zero
and Span. If a target is any closer than the Zero distance, Vout (or Iout) will be the voltage value that
was programmed into sensor for the Zero distance. If the target is further away than the Span distance,
Vout (Iout) will be the voltage value that was programmed into the sensor for the Span distance. If
target is not detected, than Vout will be a third voltage setting named “Loss of Echo Voltage”.
Figure 7
Schematic Illustration of the Proportional Voltage Output Mode of Vout or Iout
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Product Description (continued)
In the ‘Linear Mode’, the user can set the values for the following programming options using the Status
and Setup Screen shown in Figure 4.
1) Set any Output Voltage value from 0 V DC to 10.25 V DC for the Zero Distance
2) Set any Output Voltage value from 0 V DC to 10.25 V DC for the Span Distance
3) Set any Output Voltage value from 0 V DC to 10.25 V DC for the No Echo Time Out to indicate that
the target is “lost”, which occurs after the preset number of samples that were programmed into
the ‘No Echo Time Out’ in the ‘Sampling Settings’.
With this flexibility, positive or negative slopes can be established, along with any start and end voltage
value. Targets within the detection zone, established by the Zero and Span distances, will produce an
output voltage that is proportional to the Target Distance between the Zero Output Voltage and the
Span Output Voltage. Targets detected beyond the endpoints of the selected distance zone will
produce output voltage equal to the nearer endpoint. Targets detected closer than the minimum
specified Sensing Range will produce a voltage equal to the Outpoint Voltage programmed for the Zero
distance. Targets detected at distances greater than the programmed Span distance will produce a
voltage equal to the Output Voltage programmed for the Span distance. If no target is detected, a
voltage will be the Output Voltage programmed for ‘No Echo Time Out’.
Switched Setpoint Output Mode (‘Switch Mode’)
Figure 8 is a schematic illustration of the Switched Setpoint Output Mode (‘Switch Mode’) for the
sensor’s Voltage Output. In this Switch Mode, a Close Setpoint Distance and a Far Setpoint Distance,
that are anywhere within the Minimum and Maximum Sensing Range, can be programmed into a
sensor. These two setpoint distances will then establish three distance zones, which are the CIose Zone
for Target Distances less than the Close Setpoint Distance, the Mid Zone for target distances between
the Close Setpoint Distance and the Far Setpoint Distance, and the Far Zone for Target Distances greater
than the Far Setpoint Distance. Voltage value of 0V or 10V (or 0mA or 20mA) can be selected to be
outputted when the target is located in each of the three zones.
Figure 8
Schematic Illustration of the Switched Setpoint Output Mode
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Product Description (continued)
In the SWITCH MODE SETTINGS section, program values to set up distance zones and output values
sensor will produce when target is in any specific zone. Follow these steps.
1) Enter a value for a Close Setpoint Distance.
2) Enter a value for a Far Setpoint Distance.
3) Select a value of voltage output 0V or 10.25V when the target is in the Close Zone (<Close Setpoint
Distance).
4) Select a value of voltage output 0V or 10.25V when the target is in the Mid Zone (>Close Setpoint
Distance and <Far Setpoint Distance).
5) Select a value of voltage output 0V or 10.25V when the target is in the Far Zone (>Far Setpoint
Distance).
6) Select a value of voltage output 0V or 10.25V if no target is detected after set timeout (see setting
“No Echo Timeout”).
7) The Mid Zone also has a ‘No Change’ programmable option where the value of Vout (or Iout) will
not charge when a target enters this zone from another zone.
8) Hysteresis around the setpoints can be programmed from 0% to 75%.
9) Output for target detected closer than the minimum specified Sensing Range will be the same as
the Close Zone.
RS485 Port
Communicating with LVU30A Series Sensors is done through the RS485 serial communications port.
The advantages of an RS485 based system include the ability to have long cable lengths and up to 32
sensors on one pair of wires (multi-drop). This method allows for access to all sensors from any
convenient location. When communicating with a PC, a communications converter will be required to
convert the signals from the PC’s USB or RS232 port to the sensor’s RS485 port. Wire the LVU30A Series
Sensor to the RS485 Communication Converter as shown in Figure 3.
To learn more about the specific operational details of this communication port, see the “LVU30A &
LVTX-10 Series Sensors Serial Communications Guide” located on the Omega website.
Multi-drop Operation
If planning to connect more than one LVU30A Series Sensor on the same communications bus, each
must be programmed with its own unique ‘ID Tag’ from 1 to 32. To do this, power and program each
sensor with its own unique ID Tag before wiring them together. The available ‘ID Tag’ numbers are 1
to 32.
The software will now allow the monitoring and editing of any sensor on-line. To monitor any sensor,
simply go to the ‘ID Tag’ field in the ‘Sensor Selection’ box and select a sensor by using the ‘ID Tag’
drop down menu and highlighting the numbering of the sensor that is to be monitored (Figure 16).
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Installing Omega Software
_
The minimum requirements to run Omega Sensor Software program is a PC operating under Windows®
10, 8, 7, or XP operating systems. This software can be downloaded from the Omega website.
Start by running ‘setup.exe’, and the screen shown in Figure 9 will be displayed.
Figure 9
First Screen that is displayed to load Omega Sensor Software
Click on ‘OK’ and the screen shown in Figure 10 will be displayed. Continue with the installation by
clicking the ‘Install Omega Software’ button and proceed with the rest of the installation.
Figure 10
Screen That Is Displayed After the ‘OK’ Button in Figure 9 is clicked
Once the software has been installed, connect the sensor to the computer, as shown in Figure 4 or 5.
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Status and Setup Screen
Establishing Communication between a PC and the LVU30A Series Sensor
Once the Omega Software has
been installed and program
executed, the PC’s comm port
assigned for the USB to RS485
Converter must be determined.
Use the drop down menu item
Getting_Started
and
follow
instructions on this page. The
USB/RS485 Converter must be first
unplugged from your PC’s USB
port followed by plugging it back
in when requested to determine
port assignment. See Figures 11
and 12 below.
Figure 11
Getting Started Instructions to
find the assigned comm port
Figure 12
Main page of the LVU30A Series Sensor version after the Getting
Started page is closed. This includes the Sensor Status and register
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Status Box of the Status and Setup Screen
The ‘Status’ box displays the various parameters for the particular LVU30A Series Sensor whose ‘ID Tag’
is displayed in the ‘Sensor Selection’ box of the Status and Setup Screen. This field is updated
approximately every ¼ of a second. An example is shown in Figure 13.
Figure 13
Example of the Status Box of the Status and Setup Screen
‘Average Distance’: Measured average Target Distance to target. Number of samples in the average
and the average type is programmable by using the ‘Sampling Settings’ box.
‘Target Detected’: Indicates that a target is detected. If the sensor is in the ‘Switch Mode’ and if the
target is beyond the programmed ‘Maximum Sensing Range’ for ‘Switch Mode’, the ‘Target Detected’
indication will be ‘NO’.
‘Linear Output’ or ‘Switch Output’: Indicates the value of Vout, which is proportional to the Target
Distance if the sensor’s voltage output is programmed in the ‘Linear Mode. If the sensor’s voltage
output is programmed for ‘Switch Mode’ operation, it will indicate either 0V or 10V (0mA or 20mA for
Iout model sensors).
‘Target Strength’: Measure of the relative strength of the received ultrasonic echo signal and can be
used to align either the target or the sensor to produce the optimum echo.
‘Temperature’: Temperature reading of the internal probe in the sensor when ‘Automatic’ is selected
in the ‘Temperature Compensation’ box. If ‘Preset’ is selected in the ‘Temperature Compensation’ box,
then the preset temperature that was entered will be displayed.
‘Serial Number’: The serial number of the sensor assigned at the factory.
The last line in the ‘Status’ box is the sensor description including its firmware version number.
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Editing the LVU30A Series Sensor Parameters
The Status and Setup Screen provides status information and all the operating parameters for the sensor
as shown in Figure 12. Editing is performed using standard Windows® text editing or by drop down
menus. When a field is changed, the ‘Editing’ box shown in Figure 14 will replace the ‘Status’ box in the
Status and Setup Screen.
Figure 14
‘Editing’ Box
Make the desired changes to the various sensor settings and then click the ‘Program Sensor’ button. It
is possible to recall previously saved settings by using the drop down menu item ‘File’ then ‘Recall
Settings…’. If it is preferred to defer to the sensors default settings, use the drop down menu item
‘Settings’ followed by ‘Display Default Settings’ and then click ‘Program Sensor’ to apply the defaults to
the sensor.
If an invalid setting is entered and tried to programmed, the Omega Software will highlight the invalid
value in red and will display a red error message in the ‘Messages’ box, as illustrated in Figure 15. Enter
a valid setting and program the sensor.
Figure 15
Omega Software Status and Setup Screen When an Invalid Parameter Has Been Entered
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Sensor Selection Box of the Status and Setup Screen
‘ID TAG’’
The ID Tag is a programmable sensor address that allows multiple sensors to be connected to the same
pair of wires of a communications bus. Figure 16 shows the ‘Sensor Selection’ box of the Status and
Setup Screen. The sensor being monitored is identified by the number displayed in the ‘ID Tag’. There
are two methods of programming multiple sensors placed on the same network. The first method is to
program each sensor by itself on the bus with its own unique ‘ID Tag’. Once this has been completed,
place all the sensors on the bus in parallel. To change the ‘ID Tag’ of a sensor, click the ‘Change ID Tag’
button and the ‘Change ID Tag’ box shown in Figure 17 will appear. Select a new ‘ID Tag’ from the drop
down menu and then click the ‘OK’ button.
Figure 16
Sensor Selection Box of the Status and Setup Screen
Figure 17
Change ID Tag Box
The second method of placing multiple sensors on the same network is to place only the 1st sensor on
the network and assign 2 or greater for its ‘ID Tag’. Disconnect power and connect another sensor on
the network. Reconnect power to the sensors and restart the Omega Software Program or re-establish
communications. The new sensor will have 1 for its ‘ID Tag 1’. Using the ‘Change ID Tag’ button, select
the next available ‘ID Tag’ from the drop down list. Repeat this procedure until all the sensors are placed
on the network. This method should only be used with new sensors that have been assigned 1 for their
‘ID Tag‘ at the factory.
User Description
Each sensor can be identified with up to 32 ACSII characters of descriptive information, such as “Process
Tank #3”, that can be entered into the ‘User Description’ box. Once editing of the User Description
box has begun, then the ‘Editing’ box shown in Figure 14 will replace the “Status” box. To save the
information, click the ‘Program Sensor’ button in the ‘Editing’ box.
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Mode Selection for Output Voltage Box of the Status and Setup Screen
The ‘MODE SELECTION for OUTPUT VOLTAGE’ box of the Status and Setup Screen allows
programming the sensor to operate in either the ’Linear Mode’ or the ‘Switch Mode’.
‘Linear Mode Settings’ Box of the Status and Setup Screen
When a sensor is programmed to operate in the Proportional Voltage Output Mode (‘Linear Mode’),
Vout is an analog voltage that is proportional to the Target Distance. To enable this mode of operation,
click on the ‘Linear Mode’ button in the ‘Mode Selection for Output Voltage’ box of the Status and
Setup Screen, as shown in Figure 18. ‘Switch Mode Settings’ parameters are disabled when the sensor
is in the Linear Output Mode.
Figure 18
Sensor Mode Selection for Output Voltage Box of the Status and Setup Screen
Programming options in the ‘Linear Mode’ allow any voltage to be entered into the ‘Output’ box from
0 to 10.25 V DC for the 1st programmed distance (Zero), and any voltage from 0 V DC to 10.25 V DC for
the 2nd programmed distance (Span). With this flexibility, positive or negative slopes can be realized
along with any start and end voltage (see Figure 7 for an explanation of Zero and Span Distance.) In the
example shown in Figure 18, the ‘Output’ is programmed for 1.00 V DC for a ‘Zero Distance’ of 10.00
inches. The Span is programmed for an ‘Output’ of 10.00 V DC at a ‘Distance of’ 30.00 inches. Targets
detected between the Zero and Span distances will produce a linear value of Vout between the
programmed Zero and Span Voltage values. Targets detected closer than the Zero distance will
produce a value for Vout equal to the Zero distance voltage (1.00 V DC in this example). Targets
detected greater than the Span distance will produce a value for Vout equal to the Span distance voltage
(10.00 V DC in this example).
If targets are not detected, Vout will be equal to the
‘ “No Echo” Time Out ’ voltage (10.25 V DC in this example).
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
‘Switch Mode Settings’ Box of the Status and Setup Screen
The Switched Setpoint Output Mode (‘Switch Mode’) allows the state of Vout to switch between
0 and 10.25 V DC based on the relationship of the measured Target Distance to the ‘Close Setpoint
Distance’ and the ‘Far Setpoint Distance’. Figure 8 shows how three zones are created; the Close Zone
where the Target Distance is < the ‘Close Setpoint Distance’, the Mid Zone where the Target Distance
is between the ‘Close and the Far Setpoint Distances’, and the Far Zone where the Target Distance is
greater than the ‘Far Setpoint Distance’.
To enable this mode, click on the ‘Switch Mode’ radio button in the ‘Mode Selection for Output Voltage’
box of the Status and Setup Screen, as shown in Figure 19. Enter values for the ‘Close Setpoint Distance’
and the ‘Far Setpoint Distance’ within the allowable distances specified in the datasheet for sensor
model. Use the drop down menu to set the values of Vout for when the Target Distance is within each
of the three zones. These values can be 0 V DC or 10 V DC. (In the 10 V DC settings, the actual value of
Vout is 10.25 V DC). A value for Vout of 0 V DC or 10 V DC can also be set for a ‘No Echo’ condition.
Figure 19
Switch Mode Setting Box
A ‘No Change’ condition can also be chosen for the voltage setting for the Mid Zone. In this state, Vout
would not change as a target transitioned into the Mid Zone. For example, if the ‘<Close Setpoint’
voltage was set at 0 V and the ‘>Far Setpoint’ voltage was set at 10 V, Vout would stay at 0 V when the
target moved from the Close Zone into the Mid Zone, and would change to 10 V when it moved into
the Far Zone. If the target started moving closer, Vout would stay at 10 V as it moved from the Far Zone
into the Mid Zone, and would change to 0 V as it moved into the Close Zone.
A percentage between 0 and 75% can also be entered in the ‘Hysteresis’ section of the ‘Switch Mode
Settings’ box. This creates a guard zone around each Setpoint Distance to keep Vout from switching
back and forth between two states when the Target Distance equals the Setpoint distance. This is
explained in more detail in the terminology section.
A Maximum Sensing Range for ‘Switch Mode’ can also be entered into the ‘Switch Mode Settings’ box.
If the Target Distance is greater than the maximum range entered, the sensor will consider it to be a ‘No
Echo’ condition and Vout will be the programmed ‘No Echo’ voltage.
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Sampling Settings Box of the Status and Setup Screen
The ‘Sampling Setting’ box shown, in Figure 20, allows adjustment of the sensor’s filter parameters to
optimize operation.
Figure 20
Sampling Settings Box of the Status and Setup Screen
‘Trigger Mode’: Use the pull down menu to select the ‘Trigger Mode’. Options are ‘Internal’ (self
trigger) or ‘Manual’. If ‘Internal’ is selected, the sensor will measure the Target Distance as many times
per second as is entered for the ‘Sample Rate’. If ‘Manual’ is selected, the sensor will wait for serial
communications to send a software trigger signal before the sensor transmits an acoustic pulse. The
screen will display a ‘Manual Trigger’ button that causes the sensor to transmit an acoustic pulse each
time it is clicked.
‘Average Type’: The Target Distance displayed, and the value of Vout, are determined by averaging a
number of measured Target Distances. The pull down menu allows the selection of either ‘Rolling’ or
‘Boxcar’ for the type of averaging to be used by the sensor. If ‘Rolling’ is selected, the sensor stores the
number of sequential Target Distance measurement entered for ‘Average’, and then computes the
average. Each new sample then replaces the oldest sample in memory, and the average is recomputed
and displayed. If ‘Boxcar’ is selected, the number of measurements entered for ‘average’ are stored
with the average computed and displayed. These samples are then discarded and the process starts
over again.
‘Average’: This drop down menu selects the number of samples to be used to obtain the average Target
Distance. If ‘Rolling’ is selected for the ‘Average Type’, ‘Average’ is limited to 32 samples. For ‘Boxcar’,
the maximum number of samples is 1024.
‘Sample Rate’: When ‘Internal’ is selected for the ‘Trigger Mode’, the number of times per second the
sensor will measure the Target Distance can be entered for the ‘Sample Rate’. This rate can be between
0.1 samples/sec up to the sensor’s maximum specified sampling rate. (This is model dependent. Refer
to the datasheet located on the Omega website for the particular sensor being used.) In general, the
faster the target is moving, the higher the sample rate required.
‘No Echo Time Out’: The number entered is the number of consecutive samples for which an echo is
not detected that must occur before the sensor enters the ‘No Echo’ state. The displayed ‘Target
Distance’ and Vout will hold these last values until the ‘Time Out’ occurs.
‘Sensitivity’: This parameter, which is set by a drop down menu, allows the sensor’s target detection
ability to be adjusted. Most applications should be set to ‘Normal’. Applications with poor reflecting
targets may require a ‘High’ setting. If unwanted reflections are detected by the sensor a ‘Low’ setting
may be required.
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Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Miscellaneous Box of the Status and Setup Screen
The ‘Miscellaneous’ box, shown in Figures 21 and 22, is used to select different methods of
‘Temperature Compensation’ to be used by the sensor to calculate the speed of sound in order to
obtain an accurate Target Distance measurement. This box is also used to display error messages.
The radio buttons under ‘Temperature Compensation’ can be used to select either ‘Automatic’ or
‘Preset’. If ‘Automatic’ is selected, the sensor uses its internal temperature probe to calculate the speed
of sound. This calculation assumes that the Target Distance measurement is being conducted in air.
The factory default setting is ‘Automatic’, and it is recommended that this setting is used for most
applications. If a specific speed of sound is desired to be used for the Target Distance measurement,
‘Preset’ can be selected, which overrides the internal temperature probe. The desired speed of sound
to be used by the sensor is set by entering the temperature that produce this sound speed based on
the following:
=
c(T ) 13,044 1 +
Where:
T
273
c(T) is the Speed of Sound in Inches per Second
T is the Temperature in ºC
Certain error conditions will be displayed in the lower portion of the ‘Miscellaneous’ box as shown in
Figure 22. They include invalid operating parameters that may have been programmed outside the
acceptable range of the Omega Setup Software, internal temperature sensor faults, low supply voltage,
and the echo detector fault.
The ‘Invalid Operating Parameter’ error is considered a fatal error since it could affect the operational
settings of the sensor. After entering new settings, the values should be validated by clicking ‘Reset
Error(s)’. The sensor will not operate (transmit ultrasonic pulses) while in this error mode.
The ‘Low Supply Voltage Occurred’ error is non-fatal and simply indicates that the sensor went into
reset at some point due to a low power supply or glitch. The sensor will continue to transmit ultrasonic
pulses.
The ’Temperature Sensor’ and ‘Echo Detector’ error messages cannot be cleared. If these errors occur,
the sensor will attempt to fix the problem and will self-clear once they have been corrected. If the
errors do not clear after a period of time, the sensor may have a serious fault. While in these error
modes, the sensor will not transmit ultrasonic pulses and the output voltage will default to the
programmed ‘No Echo’ voltage.
Figure 21
Figure 22
Miscellaneous Box of the
Status and Setup Screen
Miscellaneous Box
Showing Error Message
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Messages Box of the Status and Setup Screen
Messages will be displayed in this box, such as “Searching for Sensors on Port 1…” as shown in
Figure 23, errors, such as user inputs that are out of parameter limits, are also displayed, as shown in
Figure 15.
Figure 23
Example of Messages in the Messages Box of the Status Setup Screen
Self Heating Correction
When in operation, the temperature of the LVU30A Series Sensor becomes slightly higher than the
ambient temperature of the air. The sensor firmware corrects the reading of the temperature probe to
obtain the actual temperature of the air outside of the sensor. The adjustment if found in the
MISCELLANEOUS box. It is recommended that if sensor is continuously powered, then check the Self
Heating Correction box. If the sensor is briefly being turned on then off for long periods, then uncheck
the Self Heating Correction box as sensor self-heating does not occur. See Figure 24.
Figure 24
Example Showing ‘Self Heating Correction’ in the ‘MISCELLANEOUS’ box
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
File Tab
Sensor register settings can be saved and recalled using the File drop down menu tab. This function
allows the convenience of programming numerous sensors with the same settings. See Figure 25.
Figure 25
Example Showing ‘Save Data’ and ‘Recall Data’ in the ‘File’
Drop Down Menu of the Status and Setup Screen
‘Save Settings...’: Allows all the sensor settings displayed to be saved to a PC. This facilitates the
transfer of settings to other sensors.
‘Recall Settings...’: Allows restoration of previously saved values. Only data sets that were saved for
the same specific sensor model as the selected sensor are allowed to be recalled. Click ‘Program
Sensor’ to apply the settings to the selected on-line sensor.
‘Exit’: Exits the Omega Setup Software while the sensor continues to operate normally.
Units Tab
The Units dropdown menu allows the selection of units for distance and temperature, see Figure 26
below.
Figure 26
The ‘Units’ Drop Down Menu Selections of the Status and Setup Screen
‘Distance’: Allows the user to select the distance units to be displayed. The available selections include
inches, centimeters, feet, and meters.
‘Temperature’: Allows the user to select the temperature units to be displayed. Select either
Celsius or Fahrenheit.
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Tools Tab
The Tools dropdown menu contains the menu item to calibrate the Voltage Output. Each sensor is
calibrated at the factory for 10.00V or 20.00mA so in most instances, the sensor does not need to be
calibrated. The second menu item allows the program to search for sensors if communications was
lost. See Figure 27 below.
Figure 27
The ‘Tools’ Drop Down Menu Selections of Sensor Calibration and Setup Screen
‘Calibrate Voltage…’: Allows the user to calibrate the Vout to 10.00 V DC for the voltage output models
Sensor. A warning page will appear (Figure 28) acknowledging you want to continue as this will change
the output for calibration which could disrupt a process when the sensor is connected to an application.
See Figure 29.
Figure 29
The ‘Calibrate Voltage Warning’
Figure 28
The ‘Calibrate Voltage Warning’
Attach a volt meter to the white lead of the voltage output models and adjust the voltage by using the
‘Increase Voltage’ or ‘Decrease Voltage’ buttons to 10. See Figure 30. Click ‘Exit and resume normal
sensor operation’ button when done.
‘Search for Sensors’: Allows the user to re-establish communications with the sensor(s) if lost or not
initially obtained and the ’Status’ box area will be replaced with a ‘No Sensors On Line’ box as shown
in Figure 30. Clicking on the ‘Establish Communication’ button in this box will produce the same results
as clicking on ‘Search for Sensors’ as seen in Figure 28.
Figure 30
‘Establish Communications’ Box
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
‘Program Firmware’: Allows the user to update the sensor’s firmware if new versions are available (see
Omega’s website). Download any new firmware to your PC and select the file using the Browse button.
Click the ‘Program Sensor’ button and wait for the sensor firmware to be completely uploaded. See
Figure 31 below
NOTE: Only program firmware with one sensor on-line.
Figure 31
‘Program Firmware’ Box
UltrasonicWaveform Tab
The LVU30A Series Sensor has a unique feature that will allow the Omega Software to obtain and display
an ultrasonic waveform, similar to an oscilloscope. This can be used as a valuable aid in diagnosing
difficult applications. Waveforms can be saved and recalled for future review. To access this feature,
click on the UltrasonicWaveform tab shown in Figure 32.
Figure 32
Ultrasonic Waveform Drop Down Menu Item
A warning display will appear as shown here in Figure 33. If the sensor is actively controlling a process,
then the operation of the process may be affected since the sensors output voltage will be operating in
the No Echo programmed value. Click Continue to obtain an ultrasonic waveform.
Figure 33
Warning Page the Sensor Output Will Change
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
After clicking Continue in the Warning Display page, the sensor will obtain ultrasonic waveforms and
display them one at a time as shown if Figure 34. The “Signal” trace, in black, represents the peak
detected waveform from the received ultrasonic signals. The first peak is the sensor’s transmit pulse,
followed by a second peak at 21” that is the target. Subsequent reflections may follow the target signal,
but they are ignored by the sensor. The 2nd trace in red is the ‘Threshold’ trace. This represents the
signal detection level as determined by the “Sensitivity” setting. A reflected signal that crosses over
this ‘Threshold’ level is captured and used to calculate the Target Distance. Most applications will have
the “Sensitivity” adjustment set to “Normal”. However, if the target’s reflection is marginal, setting the
“Sensitivity” setting to “High” (which lowers the threshold level) will improve target detection. On the
other hand, if there are unwanted reflections in the application arriving before the target echo, setting
the “Sensitivity” setting to “Low” (which raises the “Threshold” level) may be required. This valuable
display tool will help to analyze and validate the sensor’s operation in the particular application. Certain
applications may require custom sensitivity adjustments that can be done with the PLUS models.
Consult Omega Engineering Inc. for additional information.
Figure 34
Ultrasonic Waveform
(1 of 2 waveforms available)
Diagnostic waveforms can be saved and recalled using the ‘Save Data’ and ‘Recall Data’ from the File
drop down menu. See Figure 35.
Figure 35
Saving and Recalling of Waveforms
Drop down menu items
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Settings Tab
Figure 36 shows the selection options for the ‘Setting’ drop down menu
Figure 36
The ‘Settings’ Drop Down Menu Selections of the Status and Setup Screen
‘Display Default Settings’: Displays the Factory Default values. Either cancel or program these values
into your sensor. You may change settings before programming the sensor.
‘Communications Port…’: Allows for selection of the PC port the USB Converter is assigned to. If it
has not yet been determined, then use the Getting Started menu to have it automatically found.
‘Search Options…’: If ‘Search Options…’ is selected, the screen shown in Figure 37 is displayed. The
Omega Software will only search for sensors with ID Tag numbers between those listed in ‘Start Search
ID Tag’ and ‘End Search ID Tag’. To change the search limits, click on the ‘Start Search ID Tag’ and ‘End
Search ID Tag’ boxes and enter ID Tag values from 1 to 32 and click ‘OK’. To search for the new ID Tag
search limits just entered, go to the ‘Tools’ drop down menu and then select ‘Search for Sensors Options’. If all the sensors on line are not found, then revert back to searching from 1 to 32.
Figure 37
Example Showing the ‘Search for Sensors - Options’ Screen
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5
Status and Setup Screen (continued)
Getting Started Tab
The Getting Started tab allows the USB port being used to be found easily. See Page 10 for details on
finding the comm port using this tool.
Figure 38
‘Getting Started’ Drop Down Menu Selections
Help Tab
Figure 39 shows the selection options for the ‘Help’ drop down menu.
Figure 39
‘Help’ Drop Down Menu Selections
‘Help’: Will indicate the software version.
For additional help, the Omega Product Manual is available from omega.com.
Figure 40
Omega Software version
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6
Factory Default Programmed Settings
The LVU30A Series Sensor is factory programmed with the default values listed below. All of the values
can be reprogrammed if required by the application. The factory defaults are as follows:
ID Tag = 1
User Description Field = 32 ASCII spaces
Mode Selection for Voltage Output = Linear
Voltage Output Linear Mode Settings:
1st Output Setpoint: Vout = 0.0 V (Iout models = 4 mA); Distance = *min specified sensing range
2nd Output Setpoint: Vout = 10.0 V (Iout models = 20 mA); Distance = *max specified sensing range
No Echo Voltage = 10.25 V (Iout models = 20.5 mA)
Voltage Output Switch Mode Settings:
Close Setpoint Distance = *minimum sensing range
Far Setpoint Distance = *maximum sensing range
Volts Out Switch State = 0 V DC for all zones
Maximum Sensing Range for Switch Mode = *maximum sensing range
Hysteresis = 5%
Sampling Settings:
Trigger Mode = Internal
Average Type = Boxcar
Average = 1 sample
Sample Rate = 10 samples/sec. (Hz)
No Echo Time Out = 1 sample (0.10 Sec.)
Sensitivity = Normal
Miscellaneous:
Temperature Compensation = Automatic (internal probe)
Other parameters:
Self-heating Correction = Enabled (checked)
*
Minimum and Maximum sensing ranges are different for each model in the LVU30A Sensor Series.
Consult the Datasheet located on the Omega website for the specific sensor model to obtain its
minimum and maximum sensing ranges.
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8
Troubleshooting
The Setpoint Output is erratic when the target is at the programmed setpoint:
Set the ‘Hysteresis’ to a nominal value of 5%.
Cannot find all sensors that are connected in a multi-drop network:
Verify the communications adapter is wired properly. Verify that unique ID tags were assigned for
each sensor on line. Verify that range of ‘ID Tags’ entered in the ‘Search for Sensors’ screen is 1
to 32 (see Figure 37).
The Voltage Output does not respond:
Verify that power is connected to the sensor. Verify that the sensor in not in the Manual trigger
mode.
Sensor reports ‘zero’ range and ‘No Target’ when the target should be detected:
If the sensor is programmed for ‘Switch Mode’ operation the target could be beyond the Far Zone.
Under these circumstances, the sensor will report ‘Zero’ range and ‘No Target’. Adjust the
parameter ‘Maximum Sensing Range for Switch Mode’.
The sensor seems to respond slowly or erratically:
The ‘Average’ may be set to a high value and/or the ’Sample Rate’ may be set to a slow rate. There
is a balance required for adjusting these parameters. Each sensor must be adjusted to each
application based on process speed (‘Sample Rate’), the smoothness required of the outputs
(‘Average’) and occasional loss of echo filtering (‘No Echo Time Out’).
9
Terminology
Beam:
The projection, usually conical, of useable ultrasonic energy radiating from the
sensor that extends axially from the face of the transducer in the sensor.
Beam Diameter:
The diameter, dia (D), as a function of distance, D, of the cross-sectional area
insonified by a sensor with an acoustic system beam angle of θ, computed as
follows (for value of θ, see Table in Section 1 or the datasheet for the specific
model of sensor on the Omega website:
θ 
dia ( D ) = 2 D tan  
2
Close Setpoint
Distance
A position in space within the sonar’s beam that is closer than the Far Setpoint
Distance, and between the Minimum Sensing Range and the Maximum
Sensing Range (see Figure 8).
Far Setpoint
Distance:
A position in space beyond the Close Setpoint Distance, and between the
Maximum Sensing Range and the Minimum Sensing Range (see Figure 8).
Half Duplex:
Operation of a communication network in which access on the line only occurs
one at a time (due to a 2 wire system). This requires full software control on the
line, typically the PC or host controls the data flow. This is the operation of the
Omega Software with the sensors.
26
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Terminology (continued)
Hysteresis:
The distance between the operating point when a target approaches a setpoint
and the release point when the target moves away from a setpoint towards its
original position.
ID Tag:
A unique sensor programmed value (address) from 1 to 32 which identifies the
sensor in a multi-drop communications loop.
Multi-drop:
A communication network based on a pair of twisted wires which operates at
half-duplex. This system simplifies wiring at the expense of a rigid software
protocol. Up to 32 sensors (with their own unique ID) can be wired on the same
pair of wires.
Multiple Bounce:
Ultrasonic signals that are detected after the initial reflected target may be
multiple bounce echoes. This is the result of having a good reflective target and
may require you to limit the sample rate of your system. All ultrasonic signals
must subside before the next transmit burst is to occur, otherwise spurious
output values may result.
Sample Rate:
The rate at which a sensor transmits an ultrasonic pulse of energy.
=
c(T ) 13, 044 1 +
Speed of Sound in Air:
Where:
T
273
c(T) is the Speed of Sound in Inches per Second
T is the Temperature in ºC
Temperature
Compensation:
The technique for determining the speed of sound, which is a formation of
temperature, used to calculate the Target Distance.
Transducer:
A device capable of efficiently converting one form of energy (in this case
ultrasonic sound) back and forth into another form of energy (in this case
electricity).
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10
Wire Color Code
Wire Color Code for Standard LVU30A Series Sensors:
RED:
BLACK:
WHITE:
GREEN:
BROWN:
SHIELD:
12 - 24 V DC
Ground
Vout
RS485 communications port, A (-) or TDA (-) terminal
RS485 communications port, B (+) or TDB (+) terminal
Ground
28
M-4582/0516
WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER
OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. warrants this unit to be free of defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of 13 months from date of purchase. OMEGA’s WARRANTY adds an additional one (1) month grace
period to the normal one (1) year product warranty to cover handling and shipping time. This ensures
that OMEGA’s customers receive maximum coverage on each product.
If the unit malfunctions, it must be returned to the factory for evaluation. OMEGA’s Customer Service
Department will issue an Authorized Return (AR) number immediately upon phone or written request.
Upon examination by OMEGA, if the unit is found to be defective, it will be repaired or replaced at no
charge. OMEGA’s WARRANTY does not apply to defects resulting from any action of the purchaser,
including but not limited to mishandling, improper interfacing, operation outside of design limits,
improper repair, or unauthorized modification. This WARRANTY is VOID if the unit shows evidence of
having been tampered with or shows evidence of having been damaged as a result of excessive corrosion;
or current, heat, moisture or vibration; improper specification; misapplication; misuse or other operating
conditions outside of OMEGA’s control. Components in which wear is not warranted, include but are not
limited to contact points, fuses, and triacs.
OMEGA is pleased to offer suggestions on the use of its various products. However,
OMEGA neither assumes responsibility for any omissions or errors nor assumes liability for
any damages that result from the use of its products in accordance with information provided
by OMEGA, either verbal or written. OMEGA warrants only that the parts manufactured by the
company will be as specified and free of defects. OMEGA MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES OR
REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT THAT OF
TITLE, AND ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY DISCLAIMED. LIMITATION OF
LIABILITY: The remedies of purchaser set forth herein are exclusive, and the total liability of
OMEGA with respect to this order, whether based on contract, warranty, negligence,
indemnification, strict liability or otherwise, shall not exceed the purchase price of the
component upon which liability is based. In no event shall OMEGA be liable for
consequential, incidental or special damages.
CONDITIONS: Equipment sold by OMEGA is not intended to be used, nor shall it be used: (1) as a “Basic
Component” under 10 CFR 21 (NRC), used in or with any nuclear installation or activity; or (2) in medical
applications or used on humans. Should any Product(s) be used in or with any nuclear installation or
activity, medical application, used on humans, or misused in any way, OMEGA assumes no responsibility
as set forth in our basic WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER language, and, additionally, purchaser will indemnify
OMEGA and hold OMEGA harmless from any liability or damage whatsoever arising out of the use of the
Product(s) in such a manner.
RETURN REQUESTS/INQUIRIES
Direct all warranty and repair requests/inquiries to the OMEGA Customer Service Department. BEFORE
RETURNING ANY PRODUCT(S) TO OMEGA, PURCHASER MUST OBTAIN AN AUTHORIZED RETURN (AR)
NUMBER FROM OMEGA’S CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT (IN ORDER TO AVOID PROCESSING
DELAYS). The assigned AR number should then be marked on the outside of the return package and on any
correspondence.
The purchaser is responsible for shipping charges, freight, insurance and proper packaging to prevent
breakage in transit.
FOR NON-WARRANTY REPAIRS, consult
FOR WARRANTY RETURNS, please have the
OMEGA for current repair charges. Have
following information available BEFORE contacting
the following information available BEFORE
OMEGA:
contacting OMEGA:
1.Purchase Order number under which the product
1. Purchase Order number to cover the COST
was PURCHASED,
of the repair,
2.Model and serial number of the product under
2. Model and serial number of the product, and
warranty, and
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
3. Repair instructions and/or specific problems
relative to the product.
relative to the product.
OMEGA’s policy is to make running changes, not model changes, whenever an improvement is possible. This affords our
customers the latest in technology and engineering.
OMEGA is a trademark of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
© Copyright 2018 OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC. All rights reserved. This document may not be copied, photocopied,
reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part, without the prior
written consent of OMEGA ENGINEERING, INC.
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