Omega | OM-3004 | Owner Manual | Omega OM-3004 Owner Manual

Omega OM-3004 Owner Manual
OM3003-GP4
&
OM3004-GP8
Owner’s Manual
R
Reevviissiioonn 002200330011
Trademark Notice
Trademarks and registered trademarks belong to their respective
owners.
COPYRIGHT – 2001 Omega Engineering Limited
All Rights Reserved
2
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION _____________________________ 7
1.1 STANDARD FEATURES _______________________ 8
1.2 STANDARD KIT ITEMS ________________________ 9
1.3 SUMMARY OF PARTS ________________________ 10
1.4 PRECAUTIONS______________________________ 12
1.5 USING THIS MANUAL ________________________ 14
1.5.1 Warnings ____________________________________
1.5.2 Names ______________________________________
1.5.3 Instruction Sequences __________________________
1.5.4 Instruction Types ______________________________
14
14
15
15
1.6 QUICK START GUIDE ________________________ 16
1.6.1 Taking a Recording ____________________________
1.6.2 Taking another Recording _______________________
1.6.3 Recording Playback ____________________________
1.6.4 Changing the Default Setup ______________________
1.6.5 Recording Data at Time Intervals__________________
1.6.6 Recording after an Alarm Condition has occured _____
1.6.7 Recording Data before an Alarm Condition __________
16
16
17
17
18
18
19
BASIC OPERATION _________________________ 21
2.1 GENERAL __________________________________ 22
2.1.1 Powering Up __________________________________
2.1.2 Accessing Main Menu __________________________
2.1.3 Selecting a Main Menu Item______________________
2.1.4 Selecting an Option ____________________________
2.1.5 Editing Names ________________________________
2.1.6 Editing Numerical Values ________________________
22
22
23
23
25
28
2.2 SETTING UP INPUTS _________________________ 29
2.2.1 Channel Selection & Setup ______________________
2.2.2 Wiring Sensors ________________________________
2.2.3 Internal Power to Sensor ________________________
2.2.4 Matching Inputs to Sensors ______________________
2.2.5 Modifying the Input boxes _______________________
2.2.6 Modifying the Output boxes ______________________
29
30
30
31
32
34
3
2.2.7 Modifying the Units _____________________________ 34
2.3 SETTING UP CHANNELS _____________________ 35
2.3.1 Setting Up Your Recording (The Trigger Menu) ______ 35
2.3.2 Setting Display Options _________________________ 41
2.3.3 Graph Controls ________________________________ 42
2.4 RECORDING DATA __________________________ 44
2.4.1 Setting Up the Filename_________________________
2.4.2 Choosing a Folder _____________________________
2.4.3 Starting a Recording____________________________
2.4.4 Auto-Repeating Recordings ______________________
2.4.5 Chained Recordings ____________________________
44
44
45
45
46
2.5 PLAYING BACK _____________________________ 47
2.6 FILE UTILITIES ______________________________ 48
2.7 OUTPUTTING SAMPLES FROM RS232 __________ 49
UTILITIES__________________________________ 51
3.1 RESETTING THE INSTRUMENT ________________ 52
3.2 ADJUSTING LCD ____________________________ 53
3.2.1 Adjusting Contrast _____________________________ 53
3.2.2 Turning Backlight On ___________________________ 53
3.3 SETTING CLOCK ____________________________ 54
3.3.1 Checking Date and Time ________________________ 54
3.3.2 Setting Date and Time __________________________ 54
3.4 MANAGING BATTERY________________________ 55
3.4.1 Instrument Battery _____________________________
3.4.2 Checking Battery Capacity _______________________
3.4.3 Charging Powered-up instrument__________________
3.4.4 Charging Powered-down instrument _______________
3.4.5 Reconditioning Battery Pack _____________________
3.4.6 Power Saver __________________________________
3.4.7 Replacing Battery Pack _________________________
55
56
56
56
57
57
58
3.5 ERASING MEMORY __________________________ 59
3.6 TROUBLESHOOTING ________________________ 60
3.6.1 Power Problems _______________________________ 60
3.6.2 Data Problems ________________________________ 60
3.6.3 Data-Transfer Problems _________________________ 61
4
3.6.4 Other Problems _______________________________ 61
ANALYSIS SOFTWARE ______________________ 63
4.1 INSTALLING OM-3000 MAS ____________________ 64
4.1.1 License Agreement ____________________________ 64
4.1.2 PC System Requirements _______________________ 64
4.1.3 Installing OM-3000 MAS on PC ___________________ 65
4.2 STARTING UP MAS___________________________ 66
4.2.1 Starting up ___________________________________ 66
4.2.2 Configuring PC COM port _______________________ 66
4.3 TRANSFERRING DATA TO THE PC _____________ 67
4.4 MANAGING DATA ___________________________ 68
4.4.1 Opening a File ________________________________
4.4.2 Merging Two Files _____________________________
4.4.3 Using the Navigator ____________________________
4.4.4 Deleting Data from a Folder ______________________
4.4.5 Editing Recording Details ________________________
4.4.6 Viewing and Printing Data Values _________________
4.4.7 Exporting data ________________________________
68
68
68
68
69
69
70
4.5 CALCULATING DATA ________________________ 71
4.6 PLOTTING DATA ____________________________ 72
4.6.1 Plotting Single and Individual Charts _______________
4.6.2 Zooming & Panning ____________________________
4.6.3 Printing Charts ________________________________
4.6.4 Reading and Comparing Values __________________
4.6.5 Plotting Waterfall Charts_________________________
72
73
73
74
76
4.7 UPGRADING FIRMWARE _____________________ 77
Appendix SPECIFICATIONS __________________ 79
Appendix SENSOR WIRING __________________ 81
6.1 TWO-WIRE 4-20mA SENSORS _________________ 82
6.1.1 Two-Wire 4-20mA Sensors ______________________ 82
6.1.2 Connecting Sensors using External Power Supply ____ 83
6.2 FOUR-WIRE 4-20mA SENSORS ________________ 84
6.2.1 Connecting Sensors using Internal Power Supply _____ 84
6.2.2 Connecting Sensors using External Power Supply ____ 85
5
Appendix OM-3000 MAS MATH ________________ 87
7.1 FUNCTIONS ________________________________ 88
7.1.1 Mathematical Functions _________________________
7.1.2 Iterative Functions _____________________________
7.1.3 Logical Functions ______________________________
7.1.4 Conditional Functions ___________________________
7.1.5 Date and Time Functions ________________________
88
90
90
91
91
7.2 OPERATORS _______________________________ 92
7.2.1 Logical Operators ______________________________ 92
7.2.2 Arithmetic Operators ___________________________ 92
6
INTRODUCTION
Thank you for purchasing the OM3003-GP4 or OM3004-GP8.
The GP4 module allows up to four channels of measurements using
sensors that output 4-20mA signals.
The GP8 module allows up to eight channels of measurements using
sensors that output 4-20mA signals.
Collected data can be transferred to a PC where it can be analyzed
in detail using the OM-3000 MAS Windows based software supplied
in the kit.
This manual has been formatted to allow you to quickly learn how to
use your instrument. Please keep this manual for future reference
and read it before operating your instrument.
7
1.1 STANDARD F EATURES
•
GP4 module allows up to four channels of measurements using
sensors that output 4-20mA signals
•
GP8 module allows up to eight channels of measurements using
sensors that output 4-20mA signals
•
24-bit A/D converter providing high-precision measurements
•
512 kB non-volatile memory capable of storing up to 100,000
sample points
•
Time and date stamped recordings
•
Temperature-compensated graphical LCD (liquid-crystal display)
with 240x128 pixels
•
Electro-luminescent LCD backlight
•
Built-in battery charger and conditioner
•
1500mAh Ni-Cad (Nickel-Cadmium) battery pack
•
Upgradeable instrument firmware
•
RS232 interface to communicate with a PC (personal computer)
•
Windows based Measurment Analysis Software (MAS)
8
1.2 STANDARD K IT ITEMS
9
1.3 SUMMARY O F PARTS
OM3003-GP4
10
OM3004-GP8
11
1.4 PRECAUTION S
WARNING: Please read and understand this section fully before
operating your instrument. Not heeding the warnings or
recommendations could result in data loss, data inaccuracy, damage
to the instrument, or injury to yourself.
WARNING: To avoid electrical shock, do not
connect any sensor to a high voltage i.e. a voltage
that exceeds 50VDC or 32VAC or the “safety extra
low voltage” (SELV) defined by your local power
authority.
WARNING: Ensure the datatransfer cable and bootstrap
cannot be entangled with any
moving or rotating machinery.
WARNING: Do not operate the instrument in
an explosive environment.
WARNING: Do not detach the battery pack from
the instrument for more than 2 hours as data and
settings may be lost.
<
2 hours
WARNING: Transfer data stored in the instrument to
a PC before reprogramming the instrument with new
firmware – reprogramming the instrument erases all
data stored in the instrument (see section 4.7).
12
WARNING: Charge the battery pack up to at least 30%
capacity before taking a recording. If using the
instrument for 4 hours or more, first ensure that the
battery pack is fully charged.
>
30%
WARNING: Constantly charging the battery when it is not fully
drained will create a "Memory" effect and eventually shorten the
amount of charge that the battery can hold. Please read 3.4
Managing Battery to learn how to prevent this.
WARNING: Do not expose the instrument to large
impacts or pressure.
WARNING: Do not use alcohol or any organic
solvent to clean the instrument.
Kero
WARNING: Do not expose the instrument to wet
conditions or store it in a damp place where the relative
humidity exceeds 80% RH.
WARNING: Do not place the instrument in a hot
place where the temperature exceeds 140°F (60°C).
Otherwise, the battery pack will degrade.
WARNING: If the instrument malfunctions, return it
to an authorized dealer. Do not try to repair it
yourself, as this will invalidate the warranty.
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
WARNING: Ensure that the battery pack is securely
fastened – but not over-tightened – to the instrument
before operating the instrument.
WARNING: Use only an approved power transformer
and ensure its voltage and frequency rating matches
that of your mains AC power.
13
1.5 USING THIS M ANUAL
1.5.1 Warnings
In this manual, the word WARNING is displayed where certain
actions may lead to damaging consequences. Please heed all such
warnings.
1.5.2 Names
In this manual, window and screen names are italicized. These
names refer to the names appearing at the top of windows/screens.
MAS Window
The PC key names are shown as normal text, e.g. Shift refers to the
Shift key on the PC keyboard.
Keys on the instrument are shown as they appear on the instrument
keypad, e.g.
refers to the Shift key on the instrument.
Some instrument keys have more than one function, e.g. the
key which is used as either the ON key or the OFF key depending on
the state the instrument is operating in.
14
1.5.3 Instruction Sequen ces
The ! symbol is used to indicate the sequence of menu selections.
Instruction
Meaning
Click File ! Save.
Select the File menu and then
select Save.
1.5.4 Instruction Types
The word “press” refers to key presses or menu selections on the
instrument.
The word “click” refers to menu selections on the PC, and “push”
refers to key presses on the PC keyboard.
Instruction
Meaning
Click File ! Export.
Select File and then Export in
OM-3000 MAS software.
Push the Esc key.
Push the Esc key on the PC
keyboard.
Some operating instructions are illustrated with examples. Such
instructions are marked with the word EXAMPLE.
15
1.6 QUICK STAR T GUIDE
This section of the manual is provided so you can get up and running
with your instrument without having to read the whole manual.
Please read section 1.4 Precautions before continuing.
1.6.1 Taking a Recording
To perform a simple recording;
•
Press
•
Press
•
You have now setup a Manual trigger recording.
•
Press
to begin the recording.
•
Press
to end the recording.
Trig.
Manual.
1.6.2 Taking another Rec ording
To perform a yet another recording after the first;
•
Press
Note:
•
16
to begin the next recording.
Recordings are sequentially numbered unless manually
renamed.
Press
to end the recording.
1.6.3 Recording Playbac k
To review any of the recordings made using the instrument;
•
Press
•
Press
•
Select the recording to be reviewed using
•
Press
•
To end the Playback, press
Note:
File.
Examine Files…
and
.
to confirm the selection and commence Playback.
Display,
Exit Playback.
Refer to section 2.5 Playing Back for more details.
1.6.4 Changing the Defa ult Setup
1. To change the Sample Period or the Recording period;
•
Press
•
Press
Record for… to edit the Recording period.
Press
Sample Period… to edit the Sample period.
Trig.
OR
•
Note:
Refer to section 2.3 Setting up Channels for more details.
2. To match your 4-20mA sensors to the instrument so it displays in
the units of the sensor instead of mA;
•
Press
Sys and select
Setup Inputs… .
Note: Refer to section 2.2 Setting up Inputs for more details.
17
1.6.5 Recording Data at Time Intervals
An example of this type of recording may be recording the Relative
Humidity in an art gallery every hour. You would then log one sample
of data every hour and have channels with sensors recording the
%RH, Temperature and light levels.
To make the instrument record data every specified time interval and
then power down and wait for the next recording time;
•
Press
•
Change the Recording and Sampling periods to suit.
•
Change the After Recording: option to Power Down.
•
Press
to accept the changes and then press
the recording.
Note:
Trig and select
Timer Based… .
to begin
Refer to section 2.3.1 Setting Up Your Recording (The
Trigger Menu) for more details.
1.6.6 Recording after an Alarm Condition has
occured
An example of this type of recording would be to record the level of a
lake after it begins to flood.
To make the instrument start to record data after an alarm event;
•
Press
•
Select the channel on which to place the alarm level.
•
Select the Trigger type to be used.
•
Enter the range(s) of the Trigger that would cause it to generate
the alarm.
18
Trig and select
Level Based… .
•
to accept the changes and then press
Press
the instrument into Waiting for Trigger mode.
to place
Note:
Ensure that the channel that you have set the alarm level on
is actually enabled.
Note:
Refer to section 2.3.1 Setting Up Your Recording (The
Trigger Menu) for more details.
1.6.7 Recording Data be fore an Alarm
Condition
An example of this type of recording would be to record data 60
minutes before an earth quake occurs.
To make the instrument record data before an alarm is triggered;
•
Setup the channel(s) required with the alarm condition as above.
•
Press
•
Enter the time period required to log data before the alarm event
Trig and select
Pre-Trig… .
to accept this value. In the example 60 minutes
and press
would be entered.
•
Press
and the instrument will begin logging data. This allows
it to store data for the specified time before an alarm event
occurs.
Note:
If an alarm event triggers the instrument before it has stored
the specified Pre-Trig data then the recording will begin at
the current point in time. This means it is possible to have a
recording that does not contain the total amount of Pre-Trig
data.
19
20
BASIC
OPERATION
This section outlines the procedure for performing basic operations
on your instrument. You will learn to:
•
•
•
use the instrument menu system;
record data; and
playback recorded data.
WARNING: Read section 1.4 before operating your instrument.
21
2.1 GENERAL
2.1.1 Powering Up*
•
Press
•
Press
. Measurement begins and the screen displays data
that is being measured (using previous settings).
•
To power down, press
and follow on-screen instructions. If
the instrument does not respond to any key press, reset it (see
section 3.1).
. The Initialization screen is displayed.
2.1.2 Accessing Main Me nu
To perform instrument operations, you need to access the main
menu. To access the main menu:
•
Press
.
. The main menu is displayed at the
You can alternatively press
top of the screen and consists of four items: File, Display, Trig(ger),
and Sys(tem). To cancel the main menu, press
again.
* Every time the instrument is powered up, the power saver (a power-saving feature)
is automatically turned on. See section 3.4.6 for more details.
22
2.1.3 Selecting a Main M enu Item
•
Press the number preceding the menu item.
Alternatively, press
or
and
to cycle to the menu item then press
.
EXAMPLE: to select the main menu item Trig, press
.
The drop down menu above shows the available options for the
.
Trigger menu. To cancel a dropdown menu, press
2.1.4 Selecting an Optio n
The procedure for selecting an option in a dropdown menu is similar
to selecting a main menu item i.e.
•
Press the number preceding the option, or press
cycle to the option and then press
or
and
to
.
Selected options, where appropriate, are checked (!). Selecting
options with names ending with “…” brings up windows that provide
more options. These options, and any further options they provide,
can be selected in the same manner. Most windows have selfexplanatory instructions. If more than one window is displayed, the
topmost is the one active. To cancel a window, press
.
23
EXAMPLE: to select Level Based… in the example below, press
24
2.1.5 Editing Names
To enter characters in the text editing window:
•
Select Display from the main menu and then select Edit Channel
Units or Edit Channel Names.
•
Press the key with the character you want until it appears above
the flashing cursor.
e.g. to enter the letter B, press
•
until the B is displayed.
The cursor advances automatically when you press the next key.
e.g. if the next letter you want to enter is E, press
displayed.
•
until E is
If the next letter of the word is on the same key just pressed,
press
to advance the cursor position.
then press key
e.g. press
until the letter D appears.
(The cursor can be moved backwards by pressing
•
).
More editing options (and their shortcut keys) are available by
pressing
Note:
.
and
can be used to enter the space character.
25
Libraries are available to make entering text easier.
•
Press
•
Pressing
26
to access the library categories.
will show the last text library selected.
Table of Short Cut Keys
Short Cut Key
Meaning
Clear all text
!
or
Move cursor forward
!
or
Move cursor back
Insert a space
Delete character
or
(press twice)
Can be used to enter a space
Text Library
Last Text Library
To toggle from upper to lower case press
desired case from the pop-up menu.
and choose the
Folder, Recording and Channel names can have a maximum of 16
characters. Unit Names can have a maximum of 8 characters.
27
2.1.6 Editing Numerical Values
•
Select the numeric field to be edited (using the normal option
selection procedure outlined in section 2.1.4).
•
Press the appropriate digit keys to enter the desired value. Enter
a decimal point by pressing
.
•
To make the number negative/positive press
•
Clear floating point numbers by pressing
. Non-floating
point numbers can sometimes be incremented or decremented
, e.g. This is possible when setting the
or
by pressing
SAMPLING PERIOD.
28
.
2.2 SETTING UP INPUTS
In order for the instrument to interpret the output levels of a sensor,
you need to match the sensor’s output current to the value you
would like displayed. The manufacturer of the sensor usually
provides this information.
2.2.1 Channel Selection & Setup
The instrument needs to know what type of sensor is attached to
each input channel. You must set up the input channels one at a
time.
•
Access the main menu (see section 2.1.2).
•
Press Sys ! Setup Inputs… to display the “Setup Channel
Input” window.
•
Press
or
to display the channel drop down menu.
29
•
Select the channel you would like to setup.
Note: Channels can be named by choosing “Edit/Names” from the
”Display” menu on the main menu bar (see section 2.1.2).
These names appear when downloading to a PC.
2.2.2 Wiring Sensors
Two-wire or four-wire sensors that output 4-20mA signals can be
used. A power source is required to produce the 4-20mA output
signal. For information on how sensors should be wired to the
instrument, see Appendix Sensor Wiring.
WARNING: To avoid electrical shock, do not connect any sensor to
a high voltage i.e. a voltage that exceeds 50VDC or 32VAC or the
“safety extra low voltage” (SELV) defined by your local power
authority.
2.2.3 Internal Power to S ensor
The instrument can generate an internal 12 or 24 volt dc supply.
To activate the internal power supply;
•
Press
Sys and then
Power to Sensors. A tick will
appear next to Power to Sensors to indicate that it is enabled.
CAUTION:
When the Power to Sensors is activated it draws more
power from the battery than normal.
Charger socket
RS232 port
RS232
!
Charger
DC out
100ma Max
+12V
+24V
0V
DC in 13.5V-1Amp
+12V
+24V
30
0V
Internal Power
Supply +12V or
+24V dc
2.2.4 Matching Inputs to Sensors
You need to match the inputs from the sensor to the values you
would like displayed, otherwise all recordings will be only in mA.
EXAMPLE: If you have a 4mA - 20mA pressure sensor connected to
channel 1 that produces:
4mA
at
10 psi
and
20mA at
100 psi
then setup the instrument as follows:
•
By setting the sensor endpoints, the instrument can display
correct readings over the entire range.
100 PSI
Display Output
of PSI
43.75 PSI
10mA = 43.75psi
10 PSI
4 mA
10 mA
20 mA
Sensor input-current (mA)
31
2.2.5 Modifying the Inpu t boxes
In this example we will setup the channel to match the following
sensor inputs:
•
From the main menu, press Sys ! Setup Inputs… and select
the channel to be setup.
•
Use the
arrows to move the flashing cursor to the
or
input box you wish to edit.
•
Press
or
to display a list of edit options.
Resetting the Input Values:
•
Select "Set to 4mA & 20mA" to reset the input current values to
the default settings.
Editing the Input Value:
•
Select “Edit Current…” to enter the sensor input current in mA.
•
Press
32
or
to accept the entered value.
Sampling the Input value:
It is also possible to set the input boxes by sampling the voltage or
temperature being monitored by the instrument.
This is very useful if you know what you’re measuring, but do not
know what current your input sensor is providing.
e.g.
6ft
You have a sensor that can
measure the depth of water
based on pressure readings but
have no data that relates the
sensor output current to the
actual depth. However, you do
know that the present depth =
6ft.
•
To match the input box follow the steps from the previous
example, but choose “Sample Input Current”.
•
The input box will update with the sample taken being displayed
in the selected input box.
•
If you are not happy with the sampled value keep selecting
“Sample Input Current” until you are, then press
options menu.
Note:
to close the
• The first input box value must be smaller than the
second input box value.
• The valid range for the inputs are 3.2mA to 24mA.
• Input box readings must be more than 1mA apart.
33
2.2.6 Modifying the Outp ut boxes
•
Use the
arrows to move the flashing cursor to the
or
output box to be altered.
•
Press
or
to edit the value in this box. The box will
become highlighted, with its previous value cleared. Now enter in
the value, and press
or
to accept this value.
•
Now press
arrow to select the next output box (The cursor
should flash beneath it).
•
Press
or
Note:
to begin editing. Type in the number 10.0, and press
to accept this value.
Output box values • Can be positive or negative.
• Can contain decimal places.
• Can be in any order (i.e. box 1 can be
greater than box 2).
2.2.7 Modifying the Units
•
To change the units (e.g. to mm), press
flashing cursors appear below the unit boxes.
•
to begin editing the unit. The “Enter Channel Unit”
Press
window will appear (see section 2.1.5).
34
arrow until two
2.3 SETTING UP CHANNELS
2.3.1 Setting Up Your Re cording (The Trigger
Menu)
Most of the important information involved in your recording is
entered under the trigger menu. Trigger Type, which Channels are
enabled, Sample Period, and Recording length/time.
Below are examples of all the trigger menu items. Each item can be
configured by following the pop-up menus as per previous sections.
Timer and level based trigger options can be selected by the
or
arrows and pressing
or
.
The Trigger Type (how recordings are started).
There are three main types of trigger available:
•
Manual Trigger
•
Time Based Trigger
•
Level Based Trigger
35
Manual Trigger - recordings are started and stopped by
1
pressing
button.
Timer Based Trigger - data is recorded at regular intervals.
2
e.g.
• Log data every day
Starting at 10:05:00am
• Record 5 samples
• Sample Period = 1 second
• After Recording
Power Down
(30 sec sensor warm up)
10:05:00am
10:05:00am
Logging Period = 1 day
Recording Period
Sampling Period
Stay Awake or Power
Down and Warm Up
Instructions
10:05:00am
The user selectable warm
up time can be used to
allow sensors to stabilize
before recording begins.
Recording Period
= 5 Samples
W
Log Period
W
W
Recording
Sample Period
= 1 second
36
Warm up time
= 30 seconds
Waiting
3
Level Based Trigger - data is recorded if a sensor reaches a
specified level.
e.g. Trigger if lake level is
above 6m or below 2m.
6m -
2m (Outside Window Level)
Available level trigger options.
Trigger if signal is:
Level(s)
Above
Below
Inside
Outside
The Level based triggering option also allows for two more
types of triggering to be used:
•
Pre-Triggering
•
Post-Triggering
37
4
Pre-Trigger - record data for a specified time before a level
trigger occurs (level trigger must also be selected).
Chan 1
Acidity
sensor
e.g.
What is the acidity of a crater
lake 60 minutes before an
earth quake?
Crater Lake
Chan 2
Vibration
sensor
Instrument Settings
Channel 1 – No trigger setting
Channel 2 – Trigger if quake level is
above 6 on the Richter
scale
Pre-Trigger set to 60 minutes
Sample period = 1 second
Record for 2 hours
Quake triggers data logger
Pre-trigger
Days/weeks etc.
Press
“Quake”
signal
60 minutes data
recorded before
quake
Data after quake
2 hours data recorded
after quake
Once Pre-trigger is set, the data logger can be left for days, weeks
etc. When the specified trigger level occurs, pre-trigger data is
already saved in memory.
38
5
Post Trigger - start recording data to memory after a specified
time has elapsed once a level trigger has occurred.
Trigger occurs
Data recorded
Post-trigger time
Press
6
Enable Channels - select the channels you would like to
record.
Note:
• Faster sampling rates are available if fewer channels
are selected.
• Less memory is used for recordings if fewer
channels are enabled.
7
Sampling Period - the amount of time between samples.
Water level
Sample
recorded to
memory
Channel 1
1 second
sampling
period
Note:
1 second
sampling
period
1 second
sampling
period
There is a fraction of a second delay between channel
1, 2, 3 etc. recordings.
39
7
Record For… - the amount of time to record for, or the number
of samples to take before recording automatically stops.
Note:
40
If “Auto Repeat Recordings” (under the file menu) is
selected and level trigger is also selected, a new file will
be created as soon as the recording time has finished.
This way you can get a separate file every time a lake
level goes into flood for example.
2.3.2 Setting Display Op tions
To specify how measured data is to be displayed:
•
Access the main menu (see section 2.1.2).
•
To display measured data in the form of text, press Display !
Text. The real-time readings are displayed for each enabled
channel.
•
To display measured data in text with a bar that indicates the
amount of current being measured at the current point in time,
press Display ! Bar.
•
To edit the measurement unit for a channel, press Display !
Edit Channel Units… In the Enter Channel Unit window, select
or
and then edit the name of the
the channel by pressing
unit (see section 2.1.5).
•
To edit the name of a channel, press Display ! Edit Channel
Names… In the Enter Channel Name window, select the
channel by pressing
or
channel (see section 2.1.5).
, and then edit the name of the
41
2.3.3 Graph Controls
To view an xy-graph:
•
Press Display ! Graph.
The following controls are available when viewing a graph. When a
file is being played back, additional cursor and zoom controls are
available.
Option
Meaning
Active cursor moves right
(Playback only)*
Active cursor moves left
(Playback only)*
Toggle active cursor (Playback only)*
Zoom In and Out between cursors
(Playback only)*
KEYS 1 – 8
Select channel 1 to 8
Increase y-axis scale range
(quick key press)
Decrease y-axis scale range
(quick key press)
Scroll graph up
(continuous key press)
Scroll graph down
(continuous key press)
Resets graph settings to default
42
(Playback only)* - Cursors are available only when playing back a
file. For more information on Playback mode please see sections 2.5
and 2.6.
Ch1
Channel being
examined
Note:
123.8 degC
Value at
active cursor
!!
Playback icon
257
Sample
number at
active cursor
To leave the “Playback” environment either press
or select Display ! Exit Playback.
43
2.4 RECORDING DATA
2.4.1 Setting Up the File name
The data recorded in a single recording session is stored as a file.
The name of the file into which data will be recorded is displayed at
the bottom of the data-display screen.
•
To edit the name of the file, press File ! New Recording. In the
New Recording Setup window, select Filename and edit the
filename in the New File Name window (see section 2.1.5).
•
File names are automatically numbered after the first recording
e.g. Lake level, Lake level 1, Lake level 2… etc.
2.4.2 Choosing a Folder
For identification purposes, it is convenient to group files that are
related under a common folder.
•
To choose the folder under which the recording file is to be
grouped, press File ! New Recording. In the New Recording
Setup window, select Folder, and in the Save Recording in
Folder… window, select the folder.
•
If a new folder is required, press Folder in the Save Recording in
Folder… window, select the new folder, and then press Rename
to edit its name. Then select the newly created folder in order to
place the recording file in it.
44
2.4.3 Starting a Recordin g
•
From the main display screen press
to start the recording.
Data will be recorded and displayed according to how the input,
trigger, and display options were set up. The sample number is
updated on the bottom right of the screen as the samples are
collected.
The data is recorded into the file and folder you chose earlier (the
name of the file is displayed at the bottom of the screen).
2.4.4 Auto-Repeating Re cordings
If recordings are level-triggered, the instrument can be instructed to
take recordings repeatedly. This is useful for capturing the next level
trigger event.
To auto-repeat level-triggered recordings:
•
Press File ! Auto Repeat Recordings to check (!) the option.
•
To stop a recording press the
key.
45
2.4.5 Chained Recording s
The instrument has a maximum capability of approx 60,000 data
points per individual recording. When this size is reached, another
file is created and recording continues without intervention or loss of
data.
Note:
Each sample of each channel uses up a data point, e.g. a 4
channel recording of length 10,000 samples uses up
40,000 data points.
Chained recordings are denoted with an x/y extension. Which can be
interpreted as the xth number part of a total of y parts.
e.g.
Untitled 1/2
Untitled 2/2
When transferring to MAS, if the entire folder is selected and sent,
then the chained recordings will be recombined into a single long
recording.
46
2.5 PLAYING BA CK
To play back a recording:
•
Press File ! Examine files…
•
In the Playback File window, select the recording to be played
back and press
Note:
•
.
Recordings can be played back in either the text, bar or
graph display modes, independant of the mode that they
were recorded in.
In the data-display screen, press
to move forward through
to move backwards. Press
to return to
the samples and
the beginning of the recording (the sample number is displayed
at the bottom right of the screen). The instrument beeps when
you have reached the first and last samples.
•
The display type and units can be altered in the playback, any
changes made during playback are only for the duration of the
playback. This allows recordings to be viewed in an alternative
view from the way that they were recorded.
•
To exit Playback mode either press
Playback.
Note:
or Display! Exit
In the Playback File window, there are also options to
rename or erase a folder or recording, create a new folder
and collapse or expand the data tree.
47
2.6 FILE UTILITIE S
In the file selection window (File!Examine Files) the following
utilities are available:
Option
Meaning
1. Shrink /
Expand
Shrinks or Expands the File Folder structure to
make selecting a folder easier and quicker.
2. Folder
Creates a NEW FOLDER.
3. Rename
Renames a file or a folder.
4. Copy
Copies the selected file’s setup (channel names,
units, trigger type etc.) so that the next
recording’s setup is the same.
5. Lock
Prevents a file from being erased with the
“ERASE” option. This option can be used to lock
your recordings so their setups are protected and
can then be copied at a later date. WARNING:
File! Erase All Memory will erase a locked file.
6. Erase
Erases the selected file or folder (does not erase
locked files/folders).
7. Snd to PC
Sends the selected file or folder to the PC (see
section 4).
or
48
Selects a file for playback or selects the active
FOLDER to record into (if Window Title is “Save
Recordings in Folder…”).
2.7 OUTPUTTING SAMPLES
FROM RS232
Press File!Output Samples to RS232 to send real time data in
ASCII format from the instrument’s RS232 port.
This data can be captured by a PC (e.g. using HyperTerminal).
Channel Number
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
Values
4.5000
6.8251
100.02
99.800
4.6000
6.8252
100.00
200.00
Approximately 200ms between
channel readings
Cycle continuously repeats
Format of Data
<channel number><space><channel value><CR><LF>
(8 data bits, no parity bit, 1 stop bit)
The default bit rate is 9600 bits/second, but it is possible to have the
instrument send data at 57600 or 19200 bits/second.
To select a higher rate, send the instrument approximately 20 ’Q’
characters (e.g. press Q in HyperTerminal 20 times) at the bit rate
you desire.
Note:
• ‘∗’ characters will be echoed while the ‘Q’ characters are
being transmitted.
• Operating the instrument’s menus may temporary
disrupt the transmission of samples from the RS232
port.
• Transferring files to MAS cancels RS232 sample
transmission.
• When using Timer Trigger, COMs will default to 9600
bits/second after the first wakeup.
49
50
UTILITIES
This section outlines the procedure for performing utility functions on
your instrument . You will learn to:
•
reset the instrument ;
•
adjust the instrument LCD;
•
set the instrument clock;
•
manage the instrument battery pack;
•
manage memory usage on the instrument ; and
•
troubleshoot the instrument .
WARNING: Read section 1.4 before operating your instrument .
51
3.1 RESETTING T HE
INSTRUMENT
Sometimes, due to electrostatic discharge exceeding 8kV, the
instrument may not respond to any key presses (including
presses). In such cases, it is important to reset the instrument as
soon as possible. To reset the instrument :
•
Press
while holding down
and then release them both
simultaneously, once the initialization screen has been
displayed.
Once reset, the instrument displays the Initialization screen and
resumes normal operation. Resetting the instrument does not erase
data or settings stored in the instrument .
52
3.2 ADJUSTING L CD
3.2.1 Adjusting Contrast
•
Press Sys ! LCD-Contrast…
•
To darken the LCD, press
•
To restore the default contrast, press
. To lighten it, press
then
.
.
If the screen flickers when cursors are moved, make the LCD darker.
3.2.2 Turning Backlight On
To toggle the backlight ON and OFF press
then
.
53
3.3 SETTING CLO CK
3.3.1 Checking Date and Time
•
Press Sys !Clock.
All recordings are date and time stamped according to the clock
shown in the Date & Time window.
3.3.2 Setting Date and T ime
•
Press Sys ! Clock.
•
To cycle to a particular field, press
•
To edit the value of a field, press
•
Press
.
and
.
when you have finished.
If the am/pm hour format is chosen, the hour switches back to 1 at
the thirteenth hour. If the 24h format is chosen, the hour continues
incrementing until 23 before switching back to 0.
54
3.4 MANAGING B ATTERY
3.4.1 Instrument Battery
The instrument is powered by a rechargeable Nickel-Cadmium (NiCad) battery pack. The normal operating voltage is 6.0 to 8.5 Volts.
Some automatic features have been built into the instrument to help
ensure that the battery pack is always sufficiently charged. Below 6.6
icon at the bottom right
Volts, the instrument displays a flashing
corner of the screen and beeps once every minute as a reminder
that the battery pack needs to be charged. Below 6.1 Volts, the
instrument automatically turns off the backlight to prevent further
power draining. Below 80% battery capacity, the instrument
automatically begins to charge the battery pack (if external power is
supplied). At 5.5 Volts, the instrument automatically powers down.
The power saver is another feature that helps conserve power on the
instrument – see section 3.4.6.
There is also an internal backup battery that backs up data and
settings in the instrument in the event that the battery pack is
detached from the instrument . The backup battery is kept charged
by the battery pack if the battery pack is functioning normally.
WARNING: Do not detach the battery pack from the instrument for
more than 2 hours as this will drain the backup battery, thereby
causing data and settings to be lost.
The battery pack can be charged by supplying 13.5 ± 1.5VDC, 1A
power to the instrument charger socket. The power transformer
supplied in the kit provides this DC voltage. The optional car adapter
charging lead may also be used to charge the battery pack in a
vehicle with a 12-Volt negative-chassis power system.
WARNING: Before charging the battery pack, ensure that the power
transformer used is an approved instrument power transformer (13.5
± 1.5VDC, 1A output) and that the voltage and frequency of your
mains AC power match that of the power transformer.
55
3.4.2 Checking Battery C apacity
•
Press Sys
The remaining battery capacity and voltage are displayed.
3.4.3 Charging Powered -up instrument
WARNING: See the warnings in section 3.4.1.
•
Plug the instrument power transformer into a standard power
outlet and its connector to the instrument charger socket. If the
battery capacity is less than 80%, charging begins automatically.
•
If charging does not begin automatically, press Sys ! Charge
Batt Charging, as indicated by the icon in the dropdown menu,
begins.
If the icon is not displayed, check that the mains power is turned
on. Charging stops automatically when complete or you can press
Sys ! Charge Batt to stop it. A full charging cycle takes
approximately 150 minutes. All other functions are usable while the
battery pack is being charged.
3.4.4 Charging Powered -down instrument
WARNING: See the warnings in section 3.4.1.
•
Plug the instrument power transformer into a standard power
outlet and its connector to the instrument charger socket. The
instrument powers up and charging, as indicated by the flashing
“CHARGING” message beside the Charge Batt option in the Sys
dropdown menu.
If the instrument does not power up, reset the instrument (see
section 3.1), or unplug the power transformer connector and re-plug
it in. See also section 3.4.3 notes.
56
3.4.5 Reconditioning Ba ttery Pack
WARNING: See the warnings in section 3.4.1.
Battery reconditioning is the process of first discharging and then
charging batteries. It reduces the undesirable memory effect in NiCad batteries. The battery pack should be reconditioned when it is
first used (for its capacity to be displayed correctly) and monthly
thereafter (to prevent battery degradation). To recondition the battery
pack:
•
Plug the instrument power transformer into a standard power
outlet and its connector to the instrument charger socket.
•
Press Sys ! Recondition Batt.
After discharging the battery pack, the instrument automatically
proceeds to charge it. See also section 3.4.3 notes.
3.4.6 Power Saver
Every time the instrument is powered up, the power saver – a powersaving feature – is automatically turned on. With the power saver
turned on, the following occurs automatically if no keys are pressed
for a period of time and no recording is taking place after 8 minutes,
the LCD is turned off (but any key press will turn it on again) and
after 15 minutes, the instrument is powered down. To turn the power
saver on or off:
•
Press Sys ! Power Saver.
57
3.4.7 Replacing Battery Pack
•
Lift the boot stand.
•
Unscrew the battery pack and screw in the new one using a
suitable screwdriver or coin.
WARNING: Ensure that the battery pack is securely fastened – but
not over-tightened – to the instrument .
58
3.5 ERASING ME MORY
WARNING: Following the procedure below erases ALL folders and
ALL recordings in the instrument .
Before erasing data, you may wish to archive it on your PC (see
section 4.3). To erase all folders and recordings:
•
Press File ! Erase ALL Memory…
•
In the Erase All ! window, press
data to be erased.
together and wait for the
To erase only one particular recording or folder, see section 2.5.
WARNING: Erase All Memory will reset the instrument to factory
default settings. All locked folders and files will be erased.
59
3.6 TROUBLESH OOTING
3.6.1 Power Problems
Symptom
Cause
Remedy
Instrument cannot power
up
Low battery capacity
Charge battery pack
Electrostatic discharge
(ESD) exceeding 8kV
Reset instrument
Instrument powers down
when backlight turned on
Low battery capacity
Charge battery pack
Instrument powers down
shortly after powering up
Low battery capacity
Charge battery pack
Flashing
icon and
beeping every minute
Low battery capacity
Charge battery pack
3.6.2 Data Problems
Symptom
Cause
Remedy
Data lost when battery
pack detached for more
than 2 hours
Flat backup battery
Charge battery pack
Data lost when battery
pack detached for less
than 2 hours
Faulty backup battery
Send instrument to
authorized dealer for
servicing
“Insufficient memory”
displayed
No memory space left
for recordings
Erase obsolete
recordings (transfer to
PC first if necessary)
Measured data seems
incorrect
Sensor wired wrongly
Wire as recommended
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
60
3.6.3 Data-Transfer Prob lems
Symptom
Cause
Remedy
“No PC ?” displayed, and
data cannot be transferred
to PC
Data-transfer cable not
properly connected
Re-secure cable
connections
Data-transfer cable
connected to wrong PC
COM port
Test COM port
availability and use
available port
Baud rate setting in OM3000 MAS too high
Select a lower baud rate
in OM-3000 MAS
Baud rate setting in OM3000 MAS too high
Select a lower baud rate
in OM-3000 MAS
OM-3000 MAS unable to
transfer data and “Transfer
failed” or “MAS Error
Dialog” displayed on PC
3.6.4 Other Problems
Symptom
Cause
Remedy
Instrument does not
respond to any key press
Electrostatic discharge
exceeding 8kV
Reset instrument
“Module fault” displayed
Module† damaged
Send instrument to
authorized dealer for
servicing
“Switch off then connect
module” displayed
Module not properly
plugged into instrument
Power down instrument
then re-secure module,
making sure not to bend
the connection pins
† The “module” is the measurement hardware unit of the instrument . It has the four
or eight current measurement channels attached to it and is fastened to the rest of the
instrument by means of two M3x0.5x12mm screws.
61
62
ANALYSIS
SOFTWARE
Recordings made on your instrument can be transferred to the MAS
software running on a Windows based PC. MAS stands for
Measurement Analysis Software. MAS can be used to store, graph,
analyse, print & export your recordings.
It is assumed that the user of MAS is already familiar with basic
Windows commands. Please refer to the appropriate literature on
Windows if clarification is needed on mouse and keyboard
commands.
Note
Throughout MAS, pressing F1 on your keyboard will bring up
a comprehensive topic-specific Help screen. Also, clicking
the right mouse button anywhere in MAS will bring up a popup menu of the applicable commands.
WARNING: Read section 1.4 before operating your instrument .
63
4.1 INSTALLING OM-3000 MAS
4.1.1 License Agreemen t
Please read the license and warranty agreement printed on the CD
cover found in the jewel case that the MAS CD-Rom was supplied in.
MAS is licensed for individual use and for installation on one
computer. The software contained on the CD-Rom remains the
intellectual property of OMEGA Engineering who retain the title and
ownership of the software.
4.1.2 PC System Require ments
The following are the minimum system requirements for installing
MAS:
•
Pentium or better
•
32MB RAM (64MB recommended)
•
10MB hard disk space
•
CD-Rom drive
•
Windows 95, 98, Me, NT or 2000 operating system
•
Windows compatible display and printer
•
Windows compatible mouse or other pointing device
•
An unused COM Port for communication with the instrument
64
4.1.3 Installing OM-3000 MAS on PC
•
Close all programs on your PC.
•
Insert the MAS CD-Rom into the CD-Rom drive.
•
•
Wait for the MAS Installation program to automatically start.
OR
Run the MAS Install.exe program located on the CD-Rom.
Follow the instructions given to complete the installation.
65
4.2 STARTING UP MAS
4.2.1 Starting up
•
Click Start ! Programs ! OM-3000 ! OM-3000 MAS 5.00
4.2.2 Configuring PC CO M port
•
To allow data transfer between the instrument and the PC, you
must first configure your PC COM port as follows:
•
Connect the instrument to one of the COM ports using the datatransfer cable and power up the instrument .
•
Click Tools menu! Configure COM port.
•
Select the COM port that the instrument is connected to.
•
Select a baud rate. The baud rate is the speed (in bits/second) at
which data is transferred. The lower the baud rate, the less likely
are data-transfer errors. Automatic is the default choice as it is
sufficient for normal transfers.
•
Click Test port
•
Click Yes in the Confirm window to test the connection.
Connection failure may be due to the selection of the wrong
COM port in MAS, the instrument being not powered up,
connectors being not plugged in properly, or the PC serial port
being not set up properly. If the connection is good, continue as
follows:
•
Click OK in the second confirm window to acknowledge that the
instrument is attached to the COM port.
•
Click OK to leave the MAS Configuration window.
66
4.3 TRANSFERR ING DATA TO
THE PC
Data transferred to the PC is stored in MAS files. These are text files
and have the .das extension.
To transfer data from the instrument to the PC:
•
Turn on the instrument Check its battery capacity and if less than
30%, charge the battery pack.
•
Connect the RS232 port of the instrument to the configured PC
COM port using the data-transfer cable. On the PC click the
Receive button.
•
On the instrument , press File menu! Examine Files… Use the
arrow keys to select the individual recording or folder to be
transfered. If a folder is highlighted, all recordings within the
folder will be transferred.
•
Press
SndToPC to send the selected recording or folder.
Once the data-transfer is complete, the data will appear in the
current file in MAS or if no files were open, the data will appear in
a new file.
•
To append more data from the instrument to the current file, click
the Receive button.
•
Alternatively, to receive more data but in its own new file, click
File menu ! Receive from OM-3000 ! Transfer to a New File.
•
To save the data in the current file, click the Save button, name
the file and click Save. If the file was an already existing file,
clicking the Save button will automatically save the file under the
same name and in the same location on the PC.
67
4.4 MANAGING D ATA
4.4.1 Opening a File
•
Click Open button and select the file.
4.4.2 Merging Two Files
•
Open one of the files.
•
Click File menu! Import & Merge a file… and select the other
file to be merged into the open file.
The merged data can be viewed but is not automatically saved on
the computer. To save it, click File menu! Save or Save As.
4.4.3 Using the Navigato r
When a file is open, the navigator that consists of two boxes is
displayed on the left side of the screen. The top box shows all the
folders in the file. The bottom box shows all the recordings in the
selected (highlighted) folder above.
4.4.4 Deleting Data from a Folder
•
Select the folder in the Folder section of the navigator.
•
Using the navigator, select the individual recordings and/or
channels to be deleted.
•
Click File ! Delete, or press the Delete key. You will then be
prompted to confirm that you wish to delete the selected
recordings/channels
68
4.4.5 Editing Recording Details
•
Select the folder, and then the recordings and/or channels to be
edited.
•
Click the Info tab to access the Info page where you can edit the
User Details (eg. Company Name, instrument serial number…),
Folder Name, and the Recording Details (eg. recording name,
remarks, channel labels and units…).
•
From the Edit User Details screen there is access to edit the
Default User Details. These values are written to all future
recordings, while they are being transferred from the instrument .
4.4.6 Viewing and Printin g Data Values
•
Open the file and using the navigator, select the recordings
and/or channels to be viewed and/or printed.
•
Click the Values tab. The data in the selected recordings and/or
channels can now be viewed.
•
To change the value in a cell, click the cell and type in the new
value.
•
To reduce the amount of data by averaging, click the Average
button.
•
To print the data, click the Print button.
•
To copy the values to a spreadsheet program, click the Copy (to
clipboard) button, go to the Spreadsheet program and use its'
"Paste" command.
•
To print a report on the data, click File ! Summary Report or
§
Full Report and select the print option in the Data Summary or
Report Generator window that appears.
‡
‡ The Summary report produces a data summary about the selected
recordings/channels. For more information consult the MAS help file.
69
4.4.7 Exporting data
•
In the Navigator select the folders or recordings to be exported
as a .das file.
•
Click File ! Export and select the option required.
•
Provide the name and location of the export file to be produced
and then click the Save button.
§ The Full report produces an exact printout of the pages selected in the report
generator window. For more information consult the MAS help file.
70
4.5 CALCULATIN G DATA
You can perform calculations on your recorded data by creating new
"calculated" channels:
•
Open the file and using the navigator, select the recordings
and/or channels to be used in calculations.
•
Click the Values tab to display the data and click the Calculate
button to access the Calculate window.
•
Each channel is automatically given a "tag" character that is
used to identify the channel. It is a letter of the alphabet that can
be used to reference the values of a recording for use in
calculations.
•
Expressions can then be derived using the provided functions
**
and the channel tags .
eg. TempChange = ChangePerHr(B) with units degC/hr
This example will create a channel called
"TempChange" which is calculated as the rate of
change per hour of the channel which has tag 'B'.
•
Constants can also be used in calculations. You may need to
use constants in your expressions, for example:
To find the "difference from the mean value" for a particular channel,
say the channel represented by "tag" 'D'.
A constant should be defined to provide the mean value of
channel 'D', "K0 = Mean(D)"
This constant is then used in the expression,
"DiffFromMean = D – K0"
** See Appendix OM-3000 MAS MATH for a complete list of functions available.
71
4.6 PLOTTING DA TA
4.6.1 Plotting Single and Individual Charts
•
Open the file and using the navigator, select the recordings
and/or channels to be plotted.
•
Select the Chart tab and click the Plot button. You can also plot a
recording or channel by double-clicking it in the navigator.
•
To display the selected recordings and/or channels on individual
charts, click the Individual button.
•
To change the format of charts, click the Adjust button to access
the Adjust Axes & Colors window. This window allows for
changes to be made to the axes and colors of the plotted
recordings displayed on the chart.
•
To clear all plotted recordings, click Chart menu ! Clear Chart.
To retain existing plots when adding to the chart, click the Hold
button. A maximum of 16 plots can be displayed at a time
To enlarge a chart, you can hide the legend by clicking Chart menu
! Show Legend. You can also Hide the navigator by clicking
Window menu ! Show Navigator.
72
4.6.2 Zooming & Pannin g
To zoom in on any part of a chart:
• Click a point to the left of that part of the chart and drag a
rectangle across and down to the right over the section to be
enlarged (while holding down the left mouse button). Release the
mouse button to perform the zoom.
To zoom in horizontally:
• Proceed as above, but only move the mouse directly up or down
to select the area to be enlarged. Two horizontal lines will be
displayed across the chart to indicate the selection.
To zoom in vertically:
• Proceed as above, but only move the mouse directly left or right
to select the area to be enlarged. Two vertical lines will be
displayed across the chart to indicate the selection.
To unzoom from any view:
• Left click on any point in the chart and drag a rectangle up and to
the left to display a rectangle with a cross in it. When the mouse
button is released all zooming will be undone and the chart will
be returned to its original view.
Panning
• The chart displayed can be dragged in any direction to display
sections that are hidden from the current view. To pan around
the chart click and hold down the right mouse button in the chart
display. The cursor will turn into a pointing hand icon. Drag the
mouse pointer in the direction that you wish to move the chart.
Note: If you move the cursor off the chart, you will have to release
the right mouse button and return it to within the chart
boundaries to continue panning.
4.6.3 Printing Charts
•
Click Print while the chart is displayed and choose the color
scheme for printing (e.g. Black & White, Full Color or Color on
White bkgnd)
73
4.6.4 Reading and Comp aring Values
To place cursors on charts to read the data values on curves:
•
Plot the recordings and/or channels on a single chart.
•
To place a cursor at a particular point on a curve, place the
mouse cursor at that point, follow the curve until a crosshair
appears, and then click the left mouse button. If the default
cursor options are used, the cursor comprises a horizontal and a
vertical dashed line, and the values indicated by the cursor are
displayed at the edge of the chart next to the dashed lines.
•
To move the cursor to a different point on the same curve, press
the horizontal arrow keys. To move in small steps, hold down the
Ctrl key when pressing the horizontal arrow keys. You can also
move the cursor by clicking the left mouse button on the new
point (first allowing a crosshair to appear).
•
To move the cursor to a different curve, push the vertical arrow
keys. Alternatively, click the left mouse button on the new curve,
or on the appropriate symbol on the legend.
•
To place a second cursor on the chart, place the mouse cursor
at the point of interest, follow the curve until a crosshair appears,
and then click the right mouse button. If the default cursor
options are used, the difference between the values indicated by
the cursors is shown at the top right corner of the chart. Cursor A
corresponds to left mouse button and cursor B to the right.
•
To toggle the focus between the cursors, push the space bar, a
cursor must be focused before it can be moved using the arrow
keys. A cursor is focused if it has a rectangular target.
•
To clear the cursors, push the Esc key.
•
To change cursor options, click Chart menu ! Cursor Options....
74
EXAMPLE: a two-channelled temperature recording with both
cursors displayed (using the default cursor options).
Each cursor displays the x and y axis values and the difference in
both the x and y axis values of the two cursors in the top right hand
side of the chart.
75
4.6.5 Plotting Waterfall C harts
•
Plot the recordings and/or channels on a single chart.
•
Click Chart menu ! Waterfall Chart and select the depth
required.
Waterfall charts are useful for trending data behaviour. As on
ordinary charts, cursor and zooming functions can be used on
waterfall charts.
EXAMPLE: the four curves on the waterfall chart below correspond
to three sets of data pertaining to the same measurement point. It
can be seen that the peak value has a rising trend.
76
4.7 UPGRADING FIRMWARE
When an upgraded instrument firmware version is available, it will be
posted on the OMEGA website. Once you have obtained the
firmware file, the firmware can be upgraded using the
reprogramming procedure below.
WARNING: Upgrading the firmware erases all data in the instrument.
•
Check the instrument battery capacity and if it is less than 30%
charge the battery pack.
•
Connect the RS232 port of the instrument to the configured PC
COM port using the data-transfer cable.
•
Power up the instrument and transfer any data you wish to keep
to MAS on a PC.
•
In MAS click Tools menu! Reprogram OM-3000. In the
Reprogram window click the Reprogram button! Automatic
search.
•
Click Select Drive to Search and select the drive where the new
firmware version is located.
77
•
Click Start Search, and when the search is completed select the
new firmware file.
•
Click Start Reprogram using this file.
Once the reprogramming is complete, the instrument will beep and
the Initialisation screen will appear. If an error occurs, check that the
data-transfer cable has been connected properly and that the
instrument is powered up.
78
Appendix
SPECIFICATIONS
The following are the specifications for:
•
instrument firmware version 2.50
•
OM-3000 MAS software version 5.00
These specifications may be changed in future versions.
79
Models: OM3003-GP4 and OM3004-GP8
Specifications
4 (OM3003-GP4) and 8 (OM3004-GP8)
Current Loop Input Channels with
General Purpose Conversion Software
Remarks
Current Range
Nominal current range
Maximum current range
4 to 20mA
3.2 to 24mA
Current Resolution
2µA (1 part in 2,000 @ 4mA, 1 part in 10,000 @ 20mA)
Current Accuracy
± 0.1% of reading ± 5µA
Instrument offset and span calibrated to nominal values.
Instrument temperature 73 ± 18°F (23 ± 10°C).
Metric and imperial for temperature, displacement, force, pressure,
voltage, current, etc., customizable units, and percentage
pico, nano, micro, milli, kilo, mega, giga, tera
Standard and customizable engineering units and scaling are
user-configurable.
4mA corresponds to 0 units (units selectable in software),
20mA corresponds to full-scale indication. Offset and span are
user-adjustable.
Engineering Units
Units
Scaling
Minimum Sampling
Interval
Number of channels selected
(user-selectable)
Minimum sampling time
(seconds)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
GP4
Data Logging
Data Storage Format
Data Storage
GP8
Model OM3003-GP4 has 4 channels only.
Up to 50 named folders
Multiple files per folders
Up to 59,999 data points per file (files are automatically chained)
512 kilobytes – approximately 400,000 individual samples
Folder Name
Up to 16 alphanumeric characters
Resolution
Viewing Area
Backlight
LCD with graphic capabilities
240 x 128 pixels
4.3" x 2.3" (110mm x 60mm)
Electro-luminescent
Display
Minimum time to scan all selected channels, not each channel.
Sampling interval is programmable from 0.2 seconds to 60
hours.
User-specified name entered from keypad.
Each file has unique time and date stamp.
MAS plots limited to maximum of 15,000 samples per channel.
Non-volatile memory (with battery backup). Number of
samples depends on number of folders and files.
Reprogramming
Allows internal firmware to be upgraded via built-in serial port
Download firmware upgrades via the internet.
Communications
Baud Rate
RS232
9600, 19200, 57600 bits per second
15kV ESD protected. Cable with DB9 connector included.
Automatic baud rate selection.
Input Termination
Screw terminals, 5mm pitch, 2.5mm² wire size
4 pairs for model OM3003-GP4, 8 pairs for OM3004-GP8.
Loop Burden
Maximum 6 Volts at 20mA loop current
Isolation
Optically isolated
Between each current loop input and between each current
input and instrument outputs e.g. RS232 port. The instrument
is not intended for connection to “live” surfaces (voltage
exceeding 50 VDC or 32 VAC).
Battery
Type
Voltage
Capacity
Operating Time
Charger & Conditioner
Fast Charge Rate
Discharge Rate
Custom Nickel-Cadmium pack
7.2 Volts nominal
1500mAh nominal
13 hours nominal with backlight off, 7 hours nominal with backlight on
Built-in dual rate charger – automatic and manual control
0.7A nominal
0.5A nominal
Power transformer (13.5 ± 1.5VDC, 1A output) included in kit.
2.5 hours for complete charge nominal.
Combats Ni-Cad battery memory effect.
9.7" W x 6.1" L x 3.0" H (247mm W x 154mm L x 75mm H)
4.4lb (2kg)
Including protective boot.
Including protective boot and strap.
32°F to 122°F (0°C to 50°C) / 80% RH 32°F to 86°F
70% RH 32°F to 122°F
14°F to 140°F (-10°C to 60°C ) / 95% RH
EN50081-1
EN50082-1
Non-condensing.
Non-condensing.
Mechanical
Size
Weight
Environmental
Temperature/Humidity
Operating
Storage
EMC
© 1999 COMMTEST INSTRUMENTS Ltd.
80
Radiated and conducted emissions.
RF field, ESD and fast transient immunity.
The Manufacturer reserves the right to modify specifications without prior notice
Appendix
SENSOR WIRING
Some common configurations are shown below for two and four wire
††
sensors . The power supply for the sensors can either be taken
from an external source (e.g. a battery or commercial power supply)
or from the internal supply (12 or 24V). To enable the internal supply
select Sys!Power to sensors (this option will drain your battery
faster even if no sensors are connected).
Note:
The following diagram show wiring for 4 channels only. It is
also possible to perform the similar wiring for the 8 channels
of the GP8 module.
WARNING: To avoid electrical shock, do not connect any sensor to
a high voltage i.e. a voltage that exceeds 50VDC or 32VAC or the
“safety extra low voltage” (SELV) defined by your local power
authority.
††
Also known as “transmitters”.
81
6.1 TWO-WIRE 4-2 0mA
SENSORS
6.1.1 Two-Wire 4-20mA S ensors
Connecting Sensors using Internal Power Supply
+ -
+ -
+ -
Two-wire
sensor
–
Two-wire
sensor
–
Two-wire +
sensor
–
Two-wire
sensor
CH 2
CH 3
+
+
+ -
CH 4
CH 1
+
–
+24V
0V
+12V
Note: 12V sensors shown above, 24V can be used also.
82
6.1.2 Connecting Senso rs using External
Power Supply
+
–
Two-wire
sensor
–
Two-wire
sensor
–
Two-wire
sensor
+
–
Two-wire
sensor
+
+
+
24V
Power
Supply
–
+ -
+ -
+ -
+ -
CH 4
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
Note: 24V sensors shown above – other sensor types can be used
also.
83
6.2 FOUR-WIRE 4 -20mA
SENSORS
6.2.1 Connecting Senso rs using Internal
Power Supply
+
Four-wire
sensor
–
–
+
+
Four-wire
– sensor –
+
Signal
from
Sensors
+
Four-wire
sensor –
–
+
Power
to
Sensors
+
Four-wire
sensor
–
–
+
+ -
+ -
+ -
+ -
CH 4
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
+24V
0V
+12V
Note: 12V sensor shown above, 24V can be used also. Consult your
Sensor’s documentation for alternative wiring methods.
84
6.2.2 Connecting Senso rs using External
Power Supply
+
Four-wire
sensor
–
–
+
+
Four-wire
– sensor –
+
+
Four-wire
– sensor –
+
Signal
from
Sensors
+
24V
Power
Supply
Power
to
Sensors
–
+
Four-wire
sensor
–
–
+
+ -
+ -
+ -
+ -
CH 4
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
CH 2
CH 3
+24V
0V
+12V
CH 4
CH 1
Note: 24V sensors shown above – other sensor types can be used
also. Consult your Sensor’s documentation for alternative wiring
methods.
85
86
Appendix
OM-3000
MAS MATH
The following are the mathematical functions and operators that can be used
in OM-3000 MAS calculations.
The symbols A,B,C,… represent channel tags; and L1, L2, …, Ln represent
logical expressions (e.g. int(A) > 3).
The notation used for functions and operators is similar to that used in
common computer-programming languages and spreadsheet programs.
87
7.1 FUNCTIONS
7.1.1 Mathematical Func tions
Function
Meaning
Abs(A)
Absolute value
Cos(A)
Cosine
Deg(A)
Convert from radians to degrees
DegC_to_DegF(A)
Converts Celsius to Fahrenheit
DegF_to_DegC(A)
Converts Fahrenheit to Celsius
Exp1
Base of natural logarithm, e (constant)
Exp(A)
Exponent
Frac(A)
Fractional part
Int(A)
Integer part
Ln(A)
Natural logarithm
Log(A)
Base 10 logarithm
Max(A, B, … )
Return the maximum value
Min(A, B, … )
Return the minimum value
N
Sample number (starting from zero)
Pi
π (constant)
Power(base, power)
base to the power of power e.g.
Pow(A,3) gives A
3
Pow(3,k1)
Pow(A,B)
Rad(A)
Convert from degrees to radians
Round(A)
Rounded value
Sgn(A)
Sign (-1 if negative; +1 if positive; 0 if zero)
Sin(A)
Sine
88
Function
Meaning
Sqr(A)
Square
Sqrt(A)
Square root
Tan(A)
Tangent
ChangePerDay(A)
Rate of change (differentiation)
ChangePerHrs(A)
e.g. If channel ‘A’ changes smoothly from 10 to
25
over
a
1
minute
period,
then
ChangePerMin(A) will be 15 over that period.
ChangePerMin
ChangePerSec
SumOverDays
Summation over time (integration)
SumOverHrs
e.g. If channel ‘A’ is a 2hr recording with all
values = 3.5, then SumOverHrs(A) changes
smoothly from 0 to 7 over the recording.
SumOverMins
SumOverSecs
89
7.1.2 Iterative Functions
The following iterative functions can be used for constants only. Cell level
expressions cannot contain iterative functions.
Function
Meaning
Count(A)
Number of samples
Maxsample(A)
Maximum sample value
Mean(A)
Mean
Minsample(A)
Minimum sample value
Stddev(A)
Standard deviation
Sum(A)
Sum
7.1.3 Logical Functions
Function
Meaning
AND(L1, L2, …, Ln)
Logical AND e.g.
AND(n = 10, k2 > 0.5, k3 > 0.5, k2 <> k3)
False
Logical constant, has value 0
OR(L1, L2, …, Ln)
Logical OR e.g.
OR(k0 = True, k1 < 3, n >= 30)
True
Logical constant, has value 1
AOR(L1, L2, …, Ln)
Logical AOR (exclusive OR) e.g.
AOR(k0 = True, k1 < 3, n >= 30)
NOT(L1, L2, …, Ln)
Logical NOT e.g.
NOT(k1 =True, k2< 10, n>30)
90
7.1.4 Conditional Functio ns
Function
Meaning
IF(L1, true result, false result)
If logical expression L1 is true,
execute true result, otherwise
execute false result e.g.
IF(k2 > k3, k2*A, k3*A)
IF(k0 = True, n, n*2)
IF(n < 10, n, Log(n))
7.1.5 Date and Time Fun ctions
In OM-3000 MAS, the date and time value of when a sample is taken is a
floating-point number. The integer part of the number represents the date: it
is the number of days since the first day of 1 AD. The fractional part of the
number represents the time: it is the proportion of time that has passed since
the beginning of the day.
Function
Meaning
Date(year, month, day)
Return the date in OM-3000 MAS
format e.g.
Date(1999, 07, 25)
Time(hour, minute, second, ms)
Return the time in OM-3000 MAS
format e.g.
Time(16, 59, 31, 965)
Elapsed(sample number)
Return the date and time of the
sample in OM-3000 MAS format e.g.
DAT(36)
SampleDate(n)
Date of the nth sample
SampleTime(n)
Time of the nth sample
91
7.2 OPERATORS
7.2.1 Logical Operators
Operator
Meaning
<
Less than
<=
Less than or equal to
<>
Not equal to
=
Equal to
>=
Greater than or equal to
>
Greater than
7.2.2 Arithmetic Operato rs
Operator
Meaning
+
Addition
–
Subtraction
/
Division
*
Multiplication
The order of precedence is as in standard arithmetic (i.e. /, *, +, –). An
operand between two operators of different precedence is bound to the
operator with higher precedence. An operand between two equal operators
is bound to the one on its left. Expressions within parentheses are evaluated
before being treated as a single operand.
92
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