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Snom M900 User Manual
Multicell Deployment Guide
v 1.01
M900 Base Station
FW 4.50 and higher
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction .......................................................................................................................3
Intended audience ................................................................................................................................. 3
Abbreviations .......................................................................................................................................... 3
DECT deployment assessment .........................................................................................4
Deployment considerations .................................................................................................................. 4
Capacity Planning..................................................................................................................................... 5
Site planning / cell coverage ................................................................................................................ 5
Using the handset to determine cell coverage and quality........................................................ 5
Finding the IP address of the base station.............................................................................. 5
Finding RSSI and RFPI ............................................................................................................... 6
Testing the audio signal ............................................................................................................ 6
Placing the base stations ................................................................................................................ 6
IP configuration ........................................................................................................................................ 6
Repeater placement recommendations ............................................................................................. 7
DECT deployment limitations ............................................................................................................... 7
DECT network deployment considerations ....................................................................................... 8
Case #1: Synchronization chain with one primary sync. .................................................... 8
Case #2: Synchronization chain without alternative sync paths ....................................... 9
Case #3: Synchronization chain with alternative sync paths .......................................... 10
Case #4: Synchronization chain without alternative sync paths ..................................... 10
Installation ...................................................................................................................... 11
Setting up the system .......................................................................................................................... 11
Parameters ............................................................................................................................................ 15
Base station settings ................................................................................................................... 15
Base station group ......................................................................................................................... 16
DECT chain ....................................................................................................................................... 17
LAN sync–IEEE1588 (Precision Time Protocol (PTP)) .................................................. 19
Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 19
IEEE1588 network requirements ................................................................................................ 19
Network delays ............................................................................................................................... 20
IEEE1588 redundancy ................................................................................................................... 21
Sync deployment ............................................................................................................................ 21
LAN sync configuration ................................................................................................................ 22
LAN synchronization ...................................................................................................................... 23
Debugging ......................................................................................................................................... 25
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Introduction
M900 Multicell Deployment Guide
Introduction
This document describes how to set up a multicell DECT system. It addresses DECT and wireless
aspects, as well as network requirements and capacity planning.
For base station and handset setup and administration please see the M900 Admin and Installation
Guide at .... and the User Manual M70 /M80 /M90 Handsets at ...
Intended audience
This document is intended for networking professionals and network administrators who are
planning and designing a multicell DECT solution and for network administrators and IT support
personnel who install, configure, maintain, and monitor the multicell DECT system.
To be able to use this document we assume that the following prerequisites are met:
◦◦
You understand network deployment in gesneral;
◦◦
ou have a working knowledge of basic TCP/IP/SIP protocols, network address translation,
Y
etc.
◦◦
proper site survey of the area/building(s) where the multicell DEC system is to be set up has
A
been performed, and you have access to the plans.
Abbreviations
Abbreviations used in this document:
DHCP:
(T)FTP:
IOS: NAT:
PCMA:
PCMU:
RPN:
RSSI:
RTP:
RPORT:
SIP:
SME:
SRTP:
STUN:
TLS:
VLAN:
TOS:
URL:
UA: UTC:
v1.01
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(Trivial) File Transfer Protocol
Internetworking Operating System
Network Address Translator
A-law Pulse Code Modulation
µ-law Pulse Code Modulation
Radio Fixed Part Number
Received signal strength indication
Real-time Transport Protocol
Response Port (Refer to RFC3581 for details)
Session Initiation Protocol
Small and Medium scale Enterprise
Secure Real-time transport protocol
Session Traversal Utilities for NAT
Transport Layer Security (for SIP encryption
Virtual Local Access Network
Type of Service (policy based routing)
Uniform Resource Locator
User Agent
Coordinated Universal Time (similar to GMT format)
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DECT deployment assessment
M900 Multicell Deployment Guide
DECT deployment assessment
DECT deployment assessment is essential and includes, but is not limited to the following
considerations:
•
•
•
•
the geographical area to be covered;
the type or architecture of building and/or topology, etc. This includes the material and the
thickness of walls.
the estimated traffic in each coverage area;
the blocking criteria in each coverage area.
Deployment considerations
The following radiation-related considerations must be examined before deploying a typical Snom
M900 system. These include, but are not limited to:
•
uilding penetration. When a signal strikes a surface, it is diffracted or absorbed; therefore to
B
some extent the signal is reduced. The amount of absorption depends on the kind of building and
its environment, i.e., the amount of solid structure. This is an important consideration in coverage
planning.
Note: The structure of the building will have an impact on coverage range.
•
Interference sources. Signals from receiving antennas are weakened by interference from other
signals. These signals may be from the same network or other objects. A well-planned DECT
multicell installation should identify potential interference sources for optimal placement of base
stations and repeaters.
Note: Other DECT systems or devices transmitting in similar frequencies weaken reception. Set
up base stations sufficiently close to each other to allow for such an eventuality.
•
Radio/cell range. The suggested distance between two base stations depends on the physical
path between the base stations. If the path loss is lessened, e.g. by minimizing the number of
walls/obstacles in the path, then signals from base stations will cover more distance. In a typical
office building the suggested distance between two base stations is 20–40 m.
Note: Fewer obstacles between two base stations increase the possible distance between two
base stations.
•
Range.
◦◦
◦◦
◦◦
◦◦
◦◦
◦◦
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Office areas: Up to 40 meters
Office areas with obstructions like elevator shafts, stairwells, metal walls: Up to 10 meters
Shop floors: Up to 60 meters
Exhibition halls or production areas without obstacles: Up to 100 meters
Underground garages: Up to 20 meters
Outdoors without obstructions: Up to 200–300 meters (for indoor use only)
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Capacity Planning
Each base station has a maximum limit of parallel calls.
Narrow band
8 calls
5 calls
Base station
Repeater
Wide band
4 calls
2 calls
To avoid a congested DECT network, the capacity should be planned in advance. Due to different
usage patterns, the number of base stations required to fulfil the demand of voice channels may vary.
The total capacity in the coverage area of a base station is always limited to the capacity of a single
base station.
Site planning / cell coverage
In many cases, expensive tools and expert help may not be necessary to determine cell coverage
and quality in an installation. The M-series handsets (M70, M80, M90, M65, M85) have a built-in
RSSI meter that indicates the strength of the signal received from the base; this feature can be
used to determine the ideal and/or necessary locations for base stations in single-cell or multicell
installations.
Use a building plan and check the base station coverage using the handset signal strength indication
(RSSI level) from each base station.
Using the handset to determine cell coverage and quality
Finding the IP address of the base station
1. Press the menu key
on the handset. The main menu is shown on-screen (Fig. 1).
2. Type *47* on the handset‘s keypad.
3. T
he handset will detect all base stations within range and show their MAC addresses on the
display (Fig. 2). If the handset has detected more than one base, compare them with the MAC
address on the type label of your base station to identify and select the right one.
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
4. If necessary, scroll to the MAC address of your base station. The selected item is
highlighted in blue and expands to also show the IP address of the base station (Fig. 2
and 3).
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Finding RSSI and RFPI
5. P
ress the function key underneath Select (Fig. 2 and 3). The selected base station‘s RFPI and
RSSI are shown on the display (Fig. 4).
◦◦
FPI: The Radio Fixed Part Identity is a unique identifier frequently transmitted by the base
R
station.
◦◦
SSI: The Radio Signal Strength Indicator measures the received signal strength in dBm
R
(decibel milliwatts)
Testing the audio signal
6. P
ress the green key
to establish an audio loopback connection to the base station, as indicated
by the message <<HOOK OFF>> (Fig. 5). You can now speak into the microphone of the handset to
hear the echo of your voice in the front loudspeaker.
Note: By plugging in a headset modified for an MP3 player connection, audio from the handset/
MP3 player will be looped back to the handset earpiece. This makes it possible to listen to audio
at the same time as you are reading the RSSI levels of the display. Press the OK key (the center of
the navigation key) to send a 1 kHz soundbite from the base station.
Placing the base stations
1. Place the first M900 base station at the desired position and power it up.
2. U
sing the building plan, check the base station coverage using the handset RSSI levels and mark
the acceptable and non-acceptable spots for placing the second base station on the plan.
Note: Acceptable spots are locations where the handset shows RSSI levels better than
-075 dBm (i.e., -074 dBm, -073 dBm, etc.) and where you verified via audio loopback
that the reception is clear. Poor RSSI levels will result in poor audio quality and/or
dropped calls; the value should never be below -90dBm (i.e., -91 dBm, -92 dBm, etc.).
◦◦
ypically, installations such as office buildings, warehouses and hospitality should be
T
equipped with both base stations and repeaters on several floors to create uniform and
complete radio coverage.
◦◦
o not link two or more multicell base station via repeater. Use repeaters only to extend the
D
coverage of a single base station. If Ethernet is available, use a multicell base station rather
than a repeater.
◦◦
pen areas can be covered with a sparse network of base stations. In such applications, the
O
base stations and/or repeaters cover an extended range due to the extended line-of-sight
radio propagation capability.
IP configuration
The M900 can operate using a variety of IP network settings, allowing it to be configured for different
networks. It can be configured for dynamic IP address retrieval using DHCP or for using a fixed IP
address. The default configuration is dynamic IP-address retrieval using DHCP.
The base station can also be configured for using a virtual LAN (VLAN), which is the recommended
configuration as a dedicated VLAN for voice traffic in a corporate network can provide the optimal
Quality of Service (QoS). No VLAN tag is enabled as default. VLAN can be configured during boot up
via DHCP Option 132 (VLAN ID) and Option 133 (VLAN QoS).
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Dedicated QoS settings in the IP packets for support of DiffServ and ToS can be enabled using the
base station configuration page or Snom Provisioning.
The communication between the base stations is either IP multicast or peer-to-peer communication.
IP multicast is the preferred option as it generates the least traffic, but it requires either a single IP
subnet or IP multicast pass-through in the network switches.
Repeater placement recommendations
The antennas in the base stations are close to omnidirectional; there is no need to consider how the
base stations face each other when deploying them. Recommendations for placement strategies:
•
round corridors. Base stations/repeater should be deployed vertically preferably at corridor
A
intersections where propagation patterns follow the corridor patterns. In case there are high
objects in the area, the base station/repeater should be installed above those objects.
•
Multi-story buildings. Base stations and repeaters can be installed on opposite sides of the
floors to take advantage of the floor-to-floor coverage. The coverage design cannot rely entirely
on floor-to-floor propagation; each case must be verified due to variations in local attenuation
patterns.
•
Large halls. Base stations and repeaters can be deployed in large halls that contain a central
open space area with windows to the other areas. This provides a good coverage for the rooms in
the inner circle on all floors. In large halls, base stations/repeater should be installed vertically in
the middle of the space below the ceiling.
•
Mounting positions. When Base stations and repeater are mounted vertically on a wall, the radio
coverage in front of these devices is twice as large as the coverage at the rear. The base stations
should always be mounted higher that the obstructive objects in the area – e.g. minimum higher
than 2m above floor. Repeaters should be installed in the middle of corridors and small rooms.
•
Metallic structures/objects. Base stations and repeaters should not be deployed near large
metallic objects. This includes metallic in shelves in warehouses.
•
einforced concrete structures. These structures reduce signal strength dramatically
R
inside the building. They reduce the radio coverage range of base stations and repeaters and
therefore require a higher number of base stations or repeaters in the building. Lighter types
of construction materials require fewer base stations since attenuation figures are considerably
lower.
DECT deployment limitations
The M900 system is a very powerful DECT system. Unlike most competitors it does not require
special controllers or licenses for building your DECT network. An installation can be extended with
additional M900 base stations.
Due to the highly integrated system and the sharing of resources there are some limitations and
things to consider while planning or extending an existing installation.
•
ne base station is the primary base station which will organize and manage the installation and
O
synchronize the secondary and lower-level base stations within the network topology.
•
utgoing from the primary base station, up to 23 additional base station levels can be installed,
O
i.e., up to 24 levels in a line (row) including the primary.
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•
Each base station can handle 8 narrow-band or 4 wide-band calls in multicell operation.
•
ingle-cell base stations can hold up to 30 users. In a multicell installation, users exceeding 8 per
S
unit will be distributed between base stations.
DECT network deployment considerations
To deploy a multicell DECT network, there are some requirements to follow and some limitations to
consider. A multicell DECT network is based on a primary/secondary architecture. The primary base
station will ensure that all the secondary ones receive the network layout. This means the secondary
cells are synchronized and "aware" of each other to allow seamless handover for the handsets.
A maximum of 24 sync levels are supported. Starting from the sync primary (level 1), you can deploy
and cascade secondary base stations on 23 levels. For example, if you want to cover a long corridor,
you would set up the primary base station in the middle, allowing the levels to cascade in both
directions.
Case #1: Synchronization chain with one primary sync.
BS 39
BS 39:
BS 01:
BS 02:
BS 05:
•
•
•
•
•
BS 02
BS 01
BS 05
Primary base station, RPN 00
Secondary base station, RPN 04
Secondary base station, RPN 08
Secondary base station, RPN xx
he synchronization chain must always overlap with other base stations in order to latch each
T
other.
A maximum of 24 sync levels (including the primary) can be used in a deployment.
The secondary base stations and the repeaters are connected to the sync primary through the
synchronization chain.
If one of the base stations or repeaters in the sync chain is broken or not working, then the
units that follow the non-working device are cut off from the sync chain, and air-interface
synchronization can be lost. When the air interface synchronization is lost, handover between the
two clusters is not possible.
Sync level concept:
BS 01
BS 08
BS 02
BS 03
Primary
Sync level 1
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Sync level 1
Sync level 2
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Case #2: Synchronization chain without alternative sync paths
Primary base
station, RPN 00
Continuous line: Shows the primary sync paths, with the relevant base stations chained in the multicell network.
Dotted line: Alternative sync paths if base station within range.
Depending on the system setup, we recommend placing the primary sync source in the middle of the
building and to assign numbers/addresses, radio ID (RPN), etc. to each base station or repeater for
easy identification.
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Case #3: Synchronization chain with alternative sync paths
The illustration below shows a multicell network with alternative synchronization paths. When one
base station fails, handovers of handsets to other active cells can still be performed except in the
area covered only by the failed base station.
BS 24
BS 01
BS 21
BS 25
BS 22
BS 26
BS 23
Primary
Case #4: Synchronization chain without alternative sync paths
In this setup, the failure of one base station will affect the further levels of the topology.
BS 24
BS 25
BS 26
BS 01
Primary
BS 21
BS 22
BS 23
•
If BS 25 fails, BS 24 and BS 26 cannot reach primary base station BS 01 directly or via another
base station and are cut off from the sync chain.
•
If BS 22 fails, BS 21 and BS 236 cannot reach primary base station BS 01 directly or via another
base station and are cut off from the sync chain.
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Installation
Start with the intended primary base station. Update and reset all base stations prior to installing
them in a multicell setup.
Note:
◦◦ Secondary base stations must be reset to defaults.
◦◦ They cannot contain any (SIP) server inputs.
◦◦ Disable the plug-and-play option in the Network menu to prevent an automated setup of a
(SIP) server if you have related DHCP options running in your network.
Setting up the system
Note: By default, the system uses the first registered base station as the primary base station.
For the information on setting up a SIP server, creating user accounts, and registering handsets,
see the M900 Administration and Installation Guide.
512
Fig. 1
Settings for this unit
Setting
Default value
Multicell system Disabled
Description
Enable this option to allow the base station to be set in
multicell mode (can be set either as primary or secondary
in the multicell chain system – refer to MAC-units in Chain
section for details).
Valid Inputs: Disabled, Enabled
NOTE: The base station must be rebooted after the multicell
system is enabled.
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Settings for this unit
Setting
Default value
System chain ID 512
Description
This is an identifier (in string format, e.g., 2275) that is
unique for a specific multicell system. The system chain ID
can be modified by provisioning only.
The chain ID is used as a SIP account for check sync; it
therefore cannot have the same identifier as a SIP account
in use, e.g., for an extension. The default value is 512,
which means extension 512 cannot be used unless the chain
ID is modified.
Note: There can be several multicell systems in the
network. Up to 24 levels of base station chains are
permitted in a setup.
Synchronization 60 sec.
time(s)
Data sync.
Multicast
Valid inputs: Up to 5 digits.
This specifies the period in seconds when elements/
nodes (e.g. base stations) in a specific multicell system will
synchronize to each other.
If no keep-alive packets are received within a period of
2*NETWORK_SYNC_TIME, the base will be indicated as lost
in the multicell configuration. The parameter is also used
with the Auto create multi primary feature.
Select between multicast and peer-to-peer data
synchronization mode.
Multicast uses UDP.
The multicast port range and IP addresses used are
calculated from the chain id.
◦◦
◦◦
Primary data
sync. IP
Blank
Port range: 49200 – 49999
IP range: 224.1.0.0 – 225.1.0.0
For multicast operation multicast/IGMP must be enabled on
your switch(es). If it isn't, use peer-to-peer mode.
IP of base station data sync source – the base handling the
data synchronization. When using multicast this base IP is
selected automatically.
The data sync feature uses the port range 49200 – 49999
NOTE: When using peer-to-peer mode, the IP of the base
station used as data sync source MUST be defined.
NOTE: U
sing peer-to-peer mode with a firmware version
below 306 limits the system's automatic recovery
feature as there is no automatic recovery of the data
sync. source in peer-to-peer mode.
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Settings for this unit
Setting
Default value
Multi cell debug None
Description
When this feature is enabled the system catalogs low level
multi-cell debug information or traces.
Options:
•
•
•
•
Data Sync: Writes header information for all packets
received and sent to be used to debug any special
issues. Generates LOTS of SysLog signaling and should
only be enabled for shorts periods when debugging.
Auto Tree: Writes states and data related to the Auto
Tree Configuration feature.
Both: Both Data Sync and Auto Tree are enabled.
Ieee1588 debug: When tjhe system is using LAN sync.
NOTE: Debugging should not be enabled in a normal
running system. Enable it only for debugging purposes.
1. O
n the web interface of the M900, click Country in the menu on the left side of the web interface
to open the Country/Time Settings. Enter the relevant time parameters on this page and click
Save and reboot. Make sure that the time server is working; the multicell feature will not work if
it isn't.
2. Click Multicell in the menu on the left side of the web interface to open the Multicell Settings. Per
default, the multicell system is disabled.
3. Select Enabled in the drop down menu of Multi cell system.
4. Enter the relevant values for System chain ID and Synchronization time (s) respectively.
The system chain ID, for example 2275, is a geographically unique DECT cell identity allocated to
bridge several base stations together in a chain.In one multicell installation all base stations must
have the same system chain ID.
The synchronization time (s) parameter is the window/period of time in seconds a specific base
station synchronizes to the primary base station unit. The default is 60 (seconds).
5. Click Save.
6. Click Home/Status in the menu on the left side of the web interface to open the Welcome page.
7. Click Reboot.
8. R
epeat steps 1–8 for each base station you want to add to the multicell system. It can take up to 5
minutes synchronization time to add a base station to a multicell system.
The Multicell Settings page now shows the base stations synchronized together. By default, the
system uses the first registered base station as the primary base station.
9. In the DECT system settings enable or disable the Auto configure DECT sync option source tree
(see description in the table below).
Note: Enabling this setting allows the network to automatically synchronize the multicell
chain/tree.
The DECT system RFPI parameter is normally recorded by the system (Fig. 2).
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Fig. 2
DECT system parameters
Setting
Default value
RFPI system
Auto configure
DECT sync
source tree
Enabled
Allow multi
primary
Disabled
Description
This is a radio network identity accessed by all base stations
in a multicell system. It is composed of 5 octets, actually 5
different variables combined together.
Enable this to allow the system to automatically synchronize
the multicell chain/tree.
Note: Must be enabled in order to allow a new primary to
recover in case the original primary goes into faulty mode.
This feature is used for multi-location setups. Allows two or
more primaries in the same system.
The two cells will be unsynchronized, and handover will not
be possible.
Auto create
multi primary
Disabled
If Auto Configure DECT sync source tree is disabled, this
setting is not available.
Enable this to allow the system to automatically synchronize
the multicell chain/tree.
Note: Must be enabled in order to allow a new primary to
recover in case the original primary goes into faulty mode.
Note: To run a system with two separate primaries in two locations, Allow multi primary
and Auto configure DECT sync source tree must be enabled. To add the second primary, it
must be configured manually as a primary. Alternatively, the “Auto create multi primary”
must be enabled.
For the information on adding extensions to the system, see the M900 Administration and Installation
Guide.
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Parameters
Settings for this unit: See "Setting up the system" on page 11.
DECT system settings: See "DECT system settings" on page Seite 14.
Base station settings
Base station settings
Setting
Default value
Number of SIP
8
accounts before
distributed load
SIP Server
support for
multiple
registrations
per account
System
combination
(Number of
base stations/
Repeaters per
base station)
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Disabled
50/3
Description
The maximum number of handsets or SIP end nodes that
are permitted to perform location registration on a specific
base station before load is distributed to other base
stations. The parameter can be used to optimize the handset
distribution among visible base stations.
Note: A maximum of 8 simultaneous calls can be routed
through each base station in a multicell setup.
Permitted input: Positive integers (e.g. 6)
Disable this option to allow using the same extension (i.e.
SIP account) on multiple phones (SIP end nodes). These
phones will ring simultaneously for all incoming calls. When
a phone (from a SIP account group) initiates a handover
from base station X to base station Y, it deregisters from
base station X and registers to base station Y after a call.
Permitted input
Disabled: No SIP deregistration will be made when a
handset roams to another base station
Enabled: The old SIP registration will be deleted with a SIP
deregistration when a handset roams to another
base station
Select a basic base station configuration from the dropdown menu. The configuration cannot be modified after
a system is established. It must be set during the initial
multicell configuration. Options:
50/3: 50 bases and 3 repeaters
127/1: 127 bases and 1 repeater
254/0 : 254 bases and 0 repeater
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Base station group
After installing the multicell installation, you can manually configure the synchronization source tree
by enabling the Auto configure DECT sync source tree in the DECT system settings (see "DECT system
settings" on page Seite 14).
DECT sync
Base station group parameters
Setting
Description
ID
Base unit identity in the chained network.
Permitted output: Positive integers
RPN
The Radio Fixed Part Number is an 8-bit DECT cell identity allocated by
the installer. The allocated RPN within the SME must be geographically
unique.
Permitted output: 0 to 255
Version
Base station current firmware version.
Permitted output: positive integers with dot (e.g. 273.1)
MAC address
Contains the hardware Ethernet MAC address of the base station. It
varies from base station to base station.
IP status
Current base station behavior in the SME network. Possible outputs:
Connected: The relevant base station(s) is online in the network
Connection Loss: Base station unexpectedly lost connection to network
This Unit: Base station whose web interface is currently being accessed
DECT sync source
With the setting Auto configure DECT sync source tree enabled, this tree
will be generated automatically. If the setting is disabled, the tree can
be configured manually, and the administrator must choose the relevant
multicell chain level for each base station. The maximum number of
multicell chain levels is 24.
Format of the selection: AAAAAxx: RPNyy (-zz dBm)
• AAAAAxx indicates the sync source of the base station. Can be
"Primary" or "Level x" (Level 1, Level 2, etc.)
• yy indicates the RPN of the sync source, i.e., 00,01, 02, etc.
• zz indicates the RSSI level of the sync source as seen from the base
station whose web interface is currently being accessed.
• "(Any) RPN" indicates that the base station is not synchronized to
another base station, e.g., loss of connection or the state after a
reboot of the chain.
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Base station group parameters
Setting
Description
DECT property
Base station characteristics in connection to the current multi cell
network. Possible output(s):
Primary: Main base station unto which all other nodes in the chain
synchronizes to.
Locked: The base station is currently synchronized and locked to the
primary base station.
Searching: The base station is in the process of locating a primary/
secondary as specified in the Dect sync source
Free Running: A locked base station that suddenly lost synchronization
to the primary.
Unknown: No current connection information from the base station
Assisted lock: The base station has lost its DECT sync source and is
using Ethernet for synchronization.
Sync. Lost: The handset has an active DECT connection to the base
station but the base station has lost its DECT sync source
connection. The base station will continue to work as long as
the call is active and will go into searching mode when the
call has been terminated.
Ieee1588 state
Indicates whether the base station is the primary or a secondary sync
source.
Base station name
Name of base station set on Management Settings page
DECT chain
Below the base station group table is the DECT chain tree, a graphical presentation table levels and
connections of the base station group (Fig. 1 and 2). Repeaters are highlighted in green (Fig. 2),
unconnected units in red (Fig. 3).
Fig. 1
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Fig. 2 - Part of DECT chain tree with repeaters
Fig. 3 - DECT chain tree with lost/unconnected unit
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LAN sync–IEEE1588 (Precision Time Protocol (PTP))
The implemented standard is IEEE1588-2008. PTP is using multicast for message transport. A
multicast IP and port have been standardized.
•
PTP defines
◦◦
domain number embedded in each datagram, which makes it possible to run 128 parallel
a
systems. PTP defines a PTP-Primary role (primary) and a PTP-Secondary role (secondary).
◦◦
The role can be auto negotiated or forced by configuration.
•
nly one primary device can be active within a PTP domain. The device with the primary role
O
dictates the synchronization, and the devices with the secondary role try to follow as closely as
possible.
•
PTP uses the IP network to keep synchronization between the devices.
Overview
IEEE1588 network requirements
In order to minimize the impact from other devices on the network, the installation should comply
with the following requirements for the network infrastructure, and it should use a backbone network.
•
maximum number of 3 cascaded Ethernet switches are supported between the primary device
A
and secondary devices.
•
nly switches fulfilling IEEE1588's requirements for Ethernet synchronization are recommended
O
and officially supported.
•
All base stations must be connected to a dedicated DECT VLAN.
•
he DECT VLAN must be configured to the highest priority in all switches that are connected to the
T
DECT infrastructure.
•
The backbone network load should not exceed 50 percent of the total link capacity.
•
he Ethernet switch must be able to use Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) as QoS
T
parameter. DSCP is a packet header value that can be used, for example, to request high priority
or best-effort delivery for traffic.
•
The network must support multicast datagrams from IEEE1588.
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Backbone network
Legend:
M900 base station
DHCP/SIP
server
Switch
Fig. 1 – Good network topology
Legend:
M900 base station
DHCP/SIP
server
Switch
Fig. 2 – Bad network topology
Backbone network
Legend:
DHCP/SIP
server
Primary
M900 base station
Switch
Fig. 3 – Best location for primary base station
Network delays
PTP is sensitive to rapid changes in network delays. Possible causes of network delays:
•
Rapid fluctuations in the network delay were caused by a backup job in another VLAN.
•
The DECT VLAN was not configured to high priority.
•
The sync offset between base stations was reaching critical levels.
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IEEE1588 redundancy
o minimize the risk of losing sync when the primary device is experiencing a serious failure, set up
T
an extra backup primary, running in hot-standby as fallback.
BS1
BS2
BS3
S
P
S
S
S
S
BS4
BS5
BS6
S
S
S
P
S
S
Legend:
P: Primary
BS7
BS8
BS9
S
S
S
S
S
S: Secondary
: Primary sync source
S
: Hot-standby primary sync source
•
Each base station has two instances of PTP running in separate domains.
•
If sync is lost, each base station will automatically switch to the standby primary to maintain sync.
•
If the failing primary device does not recover, a new primary device is auto-negotiated, and the
other base stations will start using this device as sync source.
Sync deployment
When using DECT, each base station must be able to listen to another base station to maintain sync
(see the illustration for "Case #3: Synchronization chain with alternative sync paths" on page 10).
When using PTP, the distance between base stations can be greater since they do not need to listen to
other base stations to maintain sync (Fig. 1, below).
Please note, however: Whether you are using DECT or PTP, handsets must always be within
range of both base stations for handover between those base stations.
Fig. 1
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LAN sync configuration
When LAN sync is being used, the status of the connected base stations is shown in the Ieee1588
state column of the Base station group on the Multicell Settings page (Fig. 1). The configuration is
done on the LAN sync page (Fig. 2).
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
1. E
nable LAN synchronization in the drop-down menu of IEEE1588 (Fig. 2). The LAN sync settings
appear (Fig. 3).
Fig. 3
2. Enter the applicable parameters as described in the below table and click Save and Reboot.
LAN synchronization parameters
Setting
Default value
Description
Multicast IP
224.0.1.129
IP address of the multicast group.
address
• The IP address must start with 224.0.xx.xx. This cannot
be changed.
• To be compliant with IEEE1588, this port must be the
default value.
• Before setup, make sure no other device uses the given
IP.
Multicast port
319
Defines the port that the system must communicate on.
To be compliant with IEEE1588, this port must be the default
value.
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LAN synchronization parameters
Setting
Default value
Description
Domain number 0
The domain number is used to set the domain this specific
base station belongs to.
Valid input: 0-127
Alternative
64
The alternative domain is used only when the primary sync
domain number
source from the main domain fails. In this case, the base
station will sync with the alternative domain. It must have a
different value than the domain number.
Valid input: 0-127
Multicell debug None
Enable this feature if you want the system to catalog low
mode
level multicell debug information or traces.
Options:
Data Sync: Writes header information for all packets
received and sent to be used to debug any
special issues. Generates LOTS of SysLog
signaling and should only be enabled for short
periods when debugging.
Auto Tree: Writes states and data related to the Auto Tree
Configuration feature.
Both:
Both Data Sync and Auto Tree are enabled.
IEEE1588 Debug: Writes IEEE1588 debug information
NOTE: Use this feature only for debugging. Do not enable
it on a normal running system as it will slow it down
considerably.
LAN synchronization
To join two or more base stations in a multicell system, you need to have one handset added to the
system. For the information on how to add handsets, see the M900 Admin and Installation Guide and
the User Manual M70/M80/M90 Handsets.
3. The LAN sync page also has a base station group table (Fig. 4) where you can assign the preferred
role of each base station (primary, alternate primary, secondary). The default setting is automatic
assignment (Fig. 5).
Fig. 4
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Fig. 5
LAN sync (IEEE1588) base station group parameters
Setting
Description
ID
Base station identity in the chained network.
Permitted output: Positive integers
Status
Base station status within the multicell network. Possible output(s):
Primary: The base station all other nodes in the chain synchronize with.
Locked: The base station is synchronized and locked to the primary.
Searching: The base station is in the process of locating a primary/secondary
as specified in DECT sync source
Free Running: IEEE primary is found and DECT synchronizing
Preferred role
You can assign a preferred role from the drop-down menu. Options:
Automatic - the status of the base station is assigned by the system
automatically.
Primary the base station is the primary sync source.
Alt. primary - the base station is the hot-standby primary, i.e., it will take
over as primary sync source when the primary base station
fails.
Secondary - the base station is synchronized from the primary or another
secondary on the next-higher level.
Current role
The current status of the base station, i.e., primary or secondary.
Sync source
Shows which base station this specific base station is synchronized with
Alternative sync Alternative sync source in case the main sync source fails
source
NWK jitter [ms] Measures how the IEEE1588 packets are received - the lower the jitter, the
(min/avg/max)
better.
MWK delay [ms] Measures the time (in ms) it takes an IEEE packet to travel from the primary
(min/avg/max)
to the secondary base station.
IP status
Current base station behavior in the SME network. Possible outputs:
Connected: The base station is online in the network
Connection Loss: The base station has lost connection to network
This Unit: Indicates the base station whose web interface your are accessing
Base station
Name assigned to this specific base station on its Management settings page
name
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Debugging
Debugging parameters of base station whose web interface you are accessing
Setting
Description
Outlier
Status
DECT to IEEE 1588
Rejects by outlier
Messages
DECT
Frequence trim
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