Elenco | SCROV10 | Owner Manual | Elenco SCROV10 RC Snap Rover® Owner Manual

Elenco SCROV10 RC Snap Rover® Owner Manual
Copyright © 2018 by Elenco® Electronics, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced by
any means; electronic, photocopying, or otherwise without written permission from the publisher.
REV-F
Revised 2018
753131
Table of Contents
Basic Troubleshooting
1
Parts List
2
How to Use It
3
About Your Snap
Circuits® Parts
4
How It Works
5, 6
General Operating
Instructions
6
DOs and DON’Ts of
Building Circuits
7
Advanced Troubleshooting
8
Project 1
9
Project 2
10
Projects 3, 4
Projects 5, 6
Projects 7, 8
Projects 9, 10
Projects 11, 12
Projects 13, 14
Projects 15, 16
Projects 17, 18
Project 19, 20
Projects 21-23
Projects 24-25
Bonus Projects B1-B3
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
WARNING: SHOCK HAZARD - Never connect Snap
Circuits® to the electrical outlets in your home in any way!
A NOTE ABOUT THE FCC
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulates use of the radio frequency spectrum
in the United States to prevent products from interfering with each other.
RC Snap Rover® has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. RC Snap Rover® generates, uses and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions,
may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If RC Snap Rover® does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning RC Snap Rover®
off and on, try to correct the interference by:
1. Moving RC Snap Rover® away from the receiver.
2. Contacting Elenco® Electronics for help by calling (800) 533-2441, or e-mail us at help@
elenco.com.
FCC regulations for your RC Snap Rover® require you to accept any interference from authorized
sources and that you shut down if you are causing interference with other authorized products.
You should never modify the electrical circuit components inside your R/C Receiver (RX1) or Remote
Control transmitter as this may cause malfunctions or violate FCC regulations for this product.The
carrier frequency is 27.145 MHz) and RF output power is 46 dBuV/m.
This device complies with RSS-310 of industry Canada Operation is subject to the condition
that this device does not cause harmful interference.
Under industry Canada regulations, this radio transmitter may only operate using an antenna of a type
and maximum (or lesser) gain approved for the transmitter by industry Canada. To reduce potential
radio interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain should be so chosen that the equivalent
isotropically radiated power (e.i.r.p) is not more than that necessary for successful communication.
-1-
Basic Troubleshooting
1. Most circuit problems are due to
incorrect assembly, always doublecheck that your circuit exactly matches
the drawing for it.
2. Be sure that parts with positive/
negative markings are positioned as
per the drawing.
3. Be sure that all connections are
securely snapped.
4. Try replacing the batteries in the
Rover body and remote control unit.
5. Keep the wheels clean and free of lint,
thread, or dirt.
Elenco ®
Electronics
is
not
responsible for parts damaged due
to incorrect wiring.
Note: If you suspect you have damaged parts, you can follow the Advanced
Troubleshooting procedure on page 8 to determine which ones need replacing.
WARNING:
Always check your
wiring before turning on a circuit.
Never leave a circuit unattended
while the batteries are installed.
Never connect additional batteries
or any other power sources to your
circuits. Discard any cracked or
broken parts.
Adult Supervision:
Because children’s abilities vary so
much, even with age groups, adults
should exercise discretion as to
which experiments are suitable and
safe (the instructions should enable
supervising adults to establish the
! BATTERIES:
● Use only 1.5V “AA” type in the Rover
body and 9V in the remote control (not
included).
● Insert batteries with correct polarity.
● Non-rechargeable batteries should not
be recharged. Rechargable batteries
should only be charged under adult
supervision, and should not be
recharged while in the product.
● Remove batteries when they are used up.
experiment’s suitability for the child).
Make sure your child reads and
follows all of the relevant instructions
and safety procedures, and keeps
them at hand for reference.
This product is intended for use
by adults and children who have
attained sufficient maturity to read
and follow directions and warnings.
Never modify your parts, as doing
so may disable important safety
features in them, and could put your
child at risk of injury. The packaging
has to be kept since it contains
important information.
● Do not mix old and new batteries.
● Do not mix alkaline, standard (carbon-zinc),
or rechargeable (nickel-cadmium) batteries.
● Do not short circuit the battery
terminals.
● Never throw batteries in a fire or
attempt to open its outer casing.
● Batteries are harmful if swallowed, so
keep away from small children.
● Do not connect batteries in parallel.
Conforms to all applicable U.S. government requirements and CAN ICES-3 (B)/NMB-3 (B).
!
Warning to Snap Circuits® Owners: Do not use parts from other Snap Circuits® sets
with this kit. The Snap Rover® uses higher voltage which could damage those parts.
Page 22 has approved circuits that you can use.
Parts List (Colors and styles may vary) Symbols and Numbers
Important: If any parts are missing or damaged, DO NOT RETURN TO RETAILER. Call toll-free (800) 533-2441 or e-mail us at: help@
elenco.com. Customer Service • 150 Carpenter Ave. • Wheeling, IL 60090 U.S.A.
Qty.
ID
Name
Symbol
Part #
Qty.
ID
Name
Symbol
Part #
1
Rover Body
6SCRB
2
C4
100mF Capacitor
6SCC4
1
Remote Control Unit
6SCTX1
1
D4
White LED
6SCD4
1
Base Grid
(11.0” x 7.7”)
6SCBG
1
R1
100W Resistor
6SCR1
1
1-Snap Wire
6SC01
4
R2
1KW Resistor
6SCR2
6
2
2-Snap Wire
6SC02
1
RX1
R/C Receiver
6SCRX1
2
3
3-Snap Wire
6SC03
1
S1
Slide Switch
6SCS1
1
4
4-Snap Wire
6SC04
1
U8
Motor Control IC
6SCU8
1
5
5-Snap Wire
6SC05
1
W1
Horn
6SCW1
1
6
6-Snap Wire
6SC06
1
1
Jumper Wire (Orange)
Jumper Wire (Yellow)
6SCJ3A
6SCJ3B
1
7
7-Snap Wire
6SC07
1
1
Jumper Wire (Green)
Jumper Wire (Purple)
6SCJ3C
6SCJ3D
1
C1
0.02mF Capacitor
6SCC1
1
1
Jumper Wire (Gray)
Jumper Wire (White)
6SCJ3E
6SCJ3F
Note: Colors may vary
and are interchangeable.
2
You may order additional / replacement parts at our web site: www.elenco.com/replacement-parts
-2-
How To Use It
Install six “AA” batteries (not included) into the bottom of the Rover
body and one 9V battery (not included) into the remote control unit.
Antenna
–
Front of Rover
Remote
control
The R/C Snap Rover Kit uses building blocks with snaps to build
the different electrical and electronic circuits in the projects. Each
block has a function: there are switch blocks, LED blocks, different
length wire blocks, etc. These blocks are in different colors and
have numbers on them so that you can easily identify them. The
circuit you will build is shown in color and numbers, identifying the
blocks that you will use and snap together to form a circuit.
There is also a 1-snap wire that is used as a spacer or for
interconnection between different layers.
A large clear plastic base grid is included with this kit to keep the
circuit blocks together, it fits on top of the Rover body. You will see
evenly spaced posts that the different blocks snap into, these keep
your circuit together. The base has rows labeled A-G and columns
labeled 1-10.
Next to each part in every circuit drawing is a small number in
black. This tells you which level the component is placed at. Place
all parts on level 1 first, then all of the parts on level 2, then all of
the parts on level 3, etc.
Jumper wires are used to connect your circuits to the batteries and
motors in the Rover body. Snap them on as shown in the projects.
The colors are interchangeable, so it doesn’t matter which color
you use.
For Example:
This is the switch block which is green and has the marking S1 on it.
This is a blue wire block and comes in different wire lengths. This
one has the number 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , or 7 on it depending on
the length of the wire connection required.
Note: While building the projects, be careful not to accidentally
make a direct electrical connection across the + and – snaps for
the batteries (a “short circuit”), as this may damage and/or quickly
drain the batteries.
Warning to Snap Circuits® owners: Do not use parts from other Snap Circuits®
sets with this kit unless directed to do so. The Snap Rover® uses higher voltage
which could damage those parts. Page 22 and our website www.elenco.com/
product/snap-rover has approved circuits that you can use.
WARNING: CHOKING HAZARD - Small parts. Not for children
under 3 years.
-3-
About Your Snap Circuits® Parts
(Part designs are subject to change without notice).
The base grid functions like the printed circuit boards found in most electronic
products. It is a platform for mounting parts and wires (though the wires are
usually “printed” on the board).
The blue snap wires are just wires used to connect other components, they
are used to transport electricity and do not affect circuit performance. They
come in different lengths to allow orderly arrangement of connections on the
base grid.
The white, orange, yellow, green, gray, and purple jumper wires make
flexible connections for times when using the snap wires would be difficult.
They also are used to make connections off the base grid. The different
colored wires all work the same way, and are interchangeable.
The batteries (in the Rover body) produce an electrical voltage using a
chemical reaction. This “voltage” can be thought of as electrical pressure,
pushing electrical “current” through a circuit. This voltage is much lower
and much safer than that used in your house wiring. Using more batteries
increases the “pressure” and so more electricity flows.
The slide switch (S1) connects (ON) or disconnects (OFF) the wires in a
circuit. When ON it has no effect on circuit performance.
Resistors, such as the 100Ω resistor (R1) and 1KΩ resistor (R2), “resist”
the flow of electricity and are used to control or limit the electricity in a circuit.
Increasing circuit resistance reduces the flow of electricity.
The LED (D4) is a light emitting diode, and may be thought of as a special
one-way light bulb. In the “forward” direction (indicated by the “arrow” in the
symbol) electricity flows if the voltage exceeds a turn-on threshold (about
3V); brightness then increases. A high current will burn out the LED, so
the current must be limited by other components in the circuit. LEDs block
electricity in the “reverse” direction.
The 0.02µF (C1) and 100µF (C4) capacitors are components that can
store electrical pressure (voltage) for periods of time, higher values have
more storage. Because of this storage ability they block unchanging voltage
signals and pass fast changing voltages. Capacitors are used for filtering
and delay circuits. Large values have a “+” marking that should always be
connected to the higher voltage.
The horn (W1) converts electricity into sound by making mechanical
vibrations. These vibrations create variations in air pressure which travel
across the room. You “hear” sound when your ears feel these air pressure
variations.
!
Warning to Snap Circuits® owners: Do not use parts from other Snap Circuits® sets with this kit. The Snap
Rover® uses higher voltage which could damage those parts. Page 22 has approved circuits that you can use.
The R/C Receiver (RX1) is a complex module containing a radio receiver
circuit, a specialized radio decoder integrated circuit, and other supporting
components. It includes resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transistors
that are always needed together. This was done to simplify the connections
you need to make, otherwise this circuitry would not fit on the base grid. A
description for this module is given here for those interested, see project 1
for a connection example:
LBUT
(+)
R/C Receiver:
RBUT
LB
BYP1
RF
BYP2
(–)
(+) - power from batteries
(–) - power return to batteries
RBUT - right button function (active low)
LBUT - left button function (active low)
BYP1 - low frequency bypass
BYP2 - high frequency bypass
RF - right forward output (active high)
RB - right backward output (active high)
LF - left forward output (active high)
LB - left backward output (active high)
ABC switch - selects radio channel
LF
RB
!
Only connect
this part as
shown in the
projects!
The Motor Control (U8) module contains 16 transistors and resistors that are
usually needed to control the motors. A description for this module is given
here for those interested, see project 1 for a connection example:
LF
(+)
LB
(+) - power from batteries
(–) - power return to batteries
RF - right forward control input
RB - right backward control input
LF - left forward control input
LB - left backward control input
R+ - right forward motor drive
R – - right backward motor drive
L+ - left forward motor drive
L – - left backward motor drive
L+
RF
RB
Motor Control:
L–
R–
(–)
R+
!
Only connect
this part as
shown in the
projects!
The motors (in the Rover body) convert electricity into mechanical motion.
Electricity is closely related to magnetism, and an electric current flowing in
a wire has a magnetic field similar to that of a very, very tiny magnet. Inside
the motor is a coil of wire with many loops wrapped around metal plates. If
a large electric current flows through the loops, it will turn ordinary metal
into a magnet. The motor shell also has a magnet on it. When electricity
flows through the coil, it magnetizes the metal plates and they repel from the
magnet on the motor shell - spinning the shaft. A small gear is on the end of
Rover Rear:
the shaft and spins with it.
R–
L–
(+)
Rover Rear
R+
L+
(–)
(+) - power from batteries
(–) - power return to batteries
L+ - left forward motor drive
L – - left backward motor drive
R+ - right forward motor drive
R – - right backward motor drive
-4-
How It Works
Remote Control Transmitter:
When the levers in the Remote Control Unit are pushed, electrical
contacts are made connecting the 9V battery power to the transmitter,
indicating which commands the user wants sent to the Rover. Forwards/
Backwards commands for each set of wheels and two extra functions are
controlled by different levers or buttons. Each of these use a different
set of electrical contacts which encode a sequence of electrical pulses;
the pulse sequence depends on which command(s) are being sent. The
spacing between the sequences represents which channel setting (A-BC) the remote control is on. This allows three units to use the same
operating frequency in the same room at the same time without interfering
with each other. An electrical circuit that is tuned to a frequency of 27
MHz creates a signal that is sent to the antenna when the pulses are
active. The antenna converts this electrical energy into radio energy,
creating a stream of radio energy bursts, which travel through the air
and are picked up by, and understood by, the radio receiver in the car.
The frequency of 27 MHz was selected for your Rover with the approval
of the FCC (the US government) to minimize radio interference between
this product and all other electrical products.
Radio Receiver:
The Rover antenna collects radio energy and converts it back into
electrical energy. If the Rover is turned on, then the radio receiver in the
Rover is continuously monitoring the radio energy from its antenna. The
receiver is basically a filter which is tuned to amplify any energy around
27 MHz and block energy the antenna picks up outside this region. If the
Remote Control Transmitter is sending commands, then its radio signal
LBUT
RBUT
L-F
Encoding
L-B
Circuitry
R-F
R-B
-5-
Characteristics of Radio Reception:
Many factors affect the ability of the Rover to receive commands from
its Remote Control Transmitter. A weak battery in the Transmitter will
result in a weaker transmitted signal; if the battery is very weak then
the Transmitter may not function at all. The Transmitter’s ability to
convert electrical energy to radio energy is best when its antenna is fully
extended and degrades as the antenna length is reduced. The same
thing also applies to the Rover antenna’s ability to convert the radio
signal back into electrical energy for the receiver. The Transmitter’s
antenna transmits energy in all directions so as the range between it
and the Rover is increased, less energy is received at the Rover. When
operated with strong batteries and in an open area, the range will be at
least 25 ft. Obstacles such as walls, furniture, and trees will degrade the
radio signal’s ability to travel through air and reduce the operating range,
but will never block it completely. In some cases more radio energy may
travel from the Transmitter to the Rover by going around obstacles than
by going through them. In the Rover, weak batteries will reduce power to
the motor and degrade the receiver’s ability to filter, amplify, and decode
commands from the Transmitter.
BLOCK DIAGRAM
27 MHz
Signal
Pulse Sequence,
depends on which
command(s) are being
sent and channel used
will be picked up by the receiver and converted back into the original
pulse sequence. Decoding circuitry then determines which commands
were sent by examining the pulses in the sequence. Signals are then
sent to motors that drive the wheels to execute the commands, or the
other R/C Receiver outputs to control other functions. Commands sent
to other receivers using a different channel setting (A-B-C) are ignored.
HOW IT WORKS
Filter/
Amplifier
Sequence
of Radio
Frequency
Pulses
Filter/
Amplifier
Decoding
Circuitry
Pulse Sequence,
depends on which
command(s) were sent
and channel used
Left
Motor
128-1
Gear Ratio
Left
Wheels
Right
Motor
128-1
Gear Ratio
Right
Wheels
Control For Two
Other Functions
How It Works (continued)
Rover Drive Mechanism:
The small gear on the Motor drives a larger gear, which drives a
larger gear, which drives two larger gears (one on each side), which
drive larger gears. The last, largest gears are fixed on shafts that
are attached to the front and back wheels, making them move. Note
that interlocking gears spin in opposite directions. Also notice that
in the sets of interlocking gears between the Motor and the gears on
the wheel shafts, the number of “teeth” is increased each time (40-8,
44-8, 64-44, and 64-20), for 128:1 gear ratio overall. This means the
Motor must rotate 128 times to rotate the wheels once. The reason
for this is that if the Motor were to drive the wheels directly then the
Rover would be so fast that it would be impossible to control. Using
the gears to reduce the speed also makes the wheels move with
much greater force, preventing the Rover from getting stuck in rough
terrain and allowing it to carry heavy loads uphill.
GEARS
General Operating Instructions
Build the circuit for projects 1 or 2. Set the channel switches on the
remote control unit and R/C Receiver module (RX1) to the same setting
(A, B, or C). Place the Rover on a flat, open area, turn the ON/OFF
switch on the remote control unit and the slide switch (S1) to ON, and
extend the antenna on the Remote Control.
Push both levers forward to make Snap Rover® go forward.
Push both levers backward to go backward.
Push the left lever backward and the right lever forward to turn left.
Push the left lever forward and the right lever backward to turn right.
The buttons on the remote control unit are used to control sounds or
lights (or other special functions) as described in the projects.
Never operate Snap Rover® in the street.
Never drive your Rover in rain, snow, mud, sand, dirt, or on a wet
floor, as damage may result.
Antenna
Motor gear
Spins 128 times
faster than wheels
Power ON indicator LED
Power switch
Left control
lever
Left function
button
Right function button
Right control
lever
Wheel shaft
Channel selector switch
-6-
DO’s and DON’Ts of Building Circuits
After building the circuits given in this booklet, you may wish to experiment
on your own. Use the projects in this booklet as a guide, as many
important design concepts are introduced throughout them. Every circuit
will include a power source (the batteries), a resistance (which might be
a resistor, motor, integrated circuit, etc.), and wiring paths between them
and back. You must be careful not to create “short circuits” (very lowresistance paths across the batteries, see examples below) as this will
damage components and/or quickly drain your batteries. Only connect
the ICs using configurations given in the projects, incorrectly doing so
may damage them. Elenco® Electronics is not responsible for parts
damaged due to incorrect wiring.
Here are some important guidelines:
Examples of SHORT CIRCUITS - NEVER DO THESE!!!
(+)
!
NEVER
DO!
Placing a jumper
wire directly across
the battery snaps is
a SHORT CIRCUIT.
(–)
When the switch (S1) is turned on, this large circuit has a SHORT
CIRCUIT path (as shown by the arrows). The short circuit prevents any
other portions of the circuit from ever working.
!
ALWAYS use eye protection when experimenting on your own.
ALWAYS include at least one component that will limit the current
through a circuit, such as a resistor, motor, horn, or the RX1
and U8 modules (which must be connected properly).
!
ALWAYS connect the 100mF capacitors so that the “+” side gets the
higher voltage.
!
ALWAYS use the LED and switches in conjunction with other components
that will limit the current through them. Failure to do so will
create a short circuit and/or damage those parts.
ALWAYS disconnect your batteries immediately and check your wiring if
something appears to be getting hot.
ALWAYS check your wiring before turning on a circuit.
ALWAYS connect the RX1 and U8 modules using configurations given in
the projects or as per the connection descriptions for the parts.
NEVER
DO!
NEVER
DO!
NEVER
DO!
ROVER REAR
(+)
(–)
!
NEVER DO!
NEVER connect to an electrical outlet in your home in any way.
You are encouraged to tell us about new circuits you create. If they
are unique, we will post them with your name and state on our website
at www.elenco.com/for-makers. Send your suggestions to Elenco®:
elenco@elenco.com.
For all of the projects given in this book, the parts may be arranged in
different ways without changing the circuit. For example, the order of
parts connected in series or in parallel does not matter — what matters is
how combinations of these sub-circuits are arranged together.
Elenco® provides a circuit designer so that you can make your own Snap
Circuits® drawings. This Microsoft® Word document can be downloaded
from www.elenco.com/for-makers.
NEVER leave a circuit unattended when it is turned on.
WARNING: SHOCK HAZARD - Never connect Snap Circuits to
the electrical outlets in your home in any way!
-7-
!
Warning to Snap Circuits® owners: Do not use parts from
other Snap Circuits® sets with this kit except for the circuits on
page 22. The Snap Rover® uses higher voltage which could
damage those parts.
(Adult supervision recommended)
Elenco® Electronics is not responsible for parts damaged due to
incorrect wiring.
If you suspect you have damaged parts, you can follow
this procedure to systematically determine which ones
need replacing:
ROVER REAR
Now move the jumper wires to test the other two
wheels, if they don’t move then the Rover body is
damaged. Remove the gray wire, four LEDs on the
side should light.
ROVER REAR
1. Rover body and jumper wires: Flip the Rover body
upside down and make sure the wheel mechanisms
are clean. Install batteries in the Rover body and
connect jumper wires to the Rover rear as shown; two
wheels should move. Replace the orange and gray
jumper wires with each of the other colors to see if any
of the jumpers are damaged. If the wheels don’t move
for any combination of wires, then the Rover body is
damaged. Remove the gray wire; four LEDs on the
side should light.
2. Slide switch (S1): Build project 6 (Helpless Rover)
and test the switch by making it turn the wheels on/off.
3. Snap wires: Build project 6 but replace the switch with each of the snap wires
(including the 1-snaps), test them one at a time.
4. Horn (W1), LED (D4), 100Ω and 1KΩ resistors (R1, R2): Build this minicircuit and turn on the switch, the horn should make a loud noise or it is
damaged. Replace the 3-snap with the 100W resistor, the sound should be
a little less loud or the resistor is defective. Replace the horn with the LED
(“+” side on left, and keep the resistor in), the LED should be bright or it is
damaged. Now replace the 100W resistor with each of the 1KW resistors (one
at time), the LED should still be bright or the resistor is damaged.
ROVER REAR
5. Motor Control (U8) module: Build this circuit and turn it on, both sets of
wheels should turn forward. Now shift the two 1KW resistors (R2) that connect
to U8 down one snap so they are across the snaps labeled A-B and C-D; the
wheels should turn backwards.
A
B
C
D
ROVER REAR
Advanced Troubleshooting
6. 0.02µF and 100µF capacitors (C1, C4): Build project 14. Charge each of the
100mF capacitors as directed and test that it lights the LED, if it doesn’t then
it is damaged. Now do this using the 0.02mF capacitor but look closely at the
front of the LED, you should see a brief dim flash if the capacitor is working.
7. Remote control unit and R/C Receiver (RX1): Check that the light on the
remote control turns on when you turn on its switch, and that its antenna wire
is attached and extended. Then use project 25 to test that the R/C receiver can
receive commands from the buttons and levers on the remote control.
Elenco® Electronics, Inc.
150 Carpenter Avenue • Wheeling, IL 60090 U.S.A.
Phone: (847) 541-3800 • Fax: (847) 520-0085
e-mail: help@elenco.com • Web site: www.elenco.com
You may order additional / replacement parts at:
www.elenco.com/replacement-parts
-8-
Project #1
Night Rover
OBJECTIVE: To build a remote control vehicle that you can
drive in the dark.
ROVER REAR
Note
trol unit.
Channel sw
i
on remote
n
co
h
tc
The Snap Circuits® Kit uses electronic blocks that snap onto a clear plastic
base grid to build different circuits. These blocks have different colors and
numbers on them so that you can easily identify them.
Install six (6) “AA” batteries into the bottom of
the Rover body and one 9V battery into the
remote control unit (batteries not included).
Place the base grid on the Rover body;
you may lock it into position by turning the
hexagonal alignment posts (shown here), if
desired.
Build the circuit shown by placing all the parts with a black 1 next to them
on the clear plastic base grid first. Then, assemble parts marked with a
2, and finally the parts marked with a 3. Be sure to place the C4 (green),
U8 (green), RX1 (red), D4 (black), and W1 (clear) parts with their (+) side
oriented as shown. Connect the colored jumper wires to the rear of the
body as shown (the colors are interchangeable). Set the channel switches
on the remote control unit and R/C Receiver module (RX1) to the same
setting (A, B, or C).
Turn on the slide switch (S1), the LED (D4) shines. Turn on the remote
control unit, extend the antenna, and use the levers to drive the Rover
around. The left button on the remote control activates the horn (W1).
You can use Snap Rover® in a dark room since the LED (D4) is positioned
as a headlight. Spin Snap Rover around and use caution when backing up.
-9-
Project #2
Remote Control Rover
OBJECTIVE: To build a remote control vehicle.
on remote
c
l
tro
unit.
Channe
ls
h
itc
on
w
ROVER REAR
Note
Install six (6) “AA” batteries into the bottom of
the Rover body and one 9V battery into the
remote control unit (batteries not included).
Place the base grid on the Rover body;
you may lock it into position by turning the
hexagonal alignment posts (shown here), if
desired.
Build the circuit shown by placing all the parts with a black 1 next to them
on the clear plastic base grid first. Then, assemble parts marked with a
2, and finally the parts marked with a 3. Be sure to place the C4 (green),
U8 (green), RX1 (red), D4 (black), and W1 (clear) parts with their (+) side
oriented as shown. Connect the colored jumper wires to the rear of the
body as shown (the colors are interchangeable). Set the channel switches
on the remote control unit and R/C Receiver module (RX1) to the same
setting (A, B, or C).
Turn on the slide switch (S1). Turn on the remote control unit, extend the
antenna, and use the levers to drive the Rover around. The buttons on the
remote control activate a horn (W1) or a light (the D4 LED).
-10-
Project #3
Lighthouse
OBJECTIVE: To make a rotating light.
Note
ROVER REAR
Build the circuit, place the base grid
centered on the Rover body, and
connect the jumper wires as shown.
Place the Snap Rover in the middle of
a dimly lit room and turn on the slide
switch (S1). The light will shine around
the room as Snap Rover spins.
Project #4
Backwards Rover
OBJECTIVE: To see if you
can adapt to unusual controls.
ROVER REAR
c
unit.
-11-
on remote
trol
Channel s
h
itc
on
w
Note
Build the circuit shown and turn
on the slide switch (S1). Turn on
the remote control unit, extend
the antenna, and use the levers
try to drive the Rover around.
The wiring has been changed so
that the levers do not control the
Snap Rover in the ways you’d
expect, see how long it takes you
to adjust.
Option A: Swap the connection
points of the white and yellow
jumper wires on the motor
control module (U8).
Project #5
Two-Sound Rover
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To build a remote control vehicle with two sound
levels.
on remote
unit.
Project #6
c
l
tro
Channe
ls
h
itc
on
w
Note
Build the circuit shown and turn on the slide
switch (S1). Turn on the remote control unit,
extend the antenna, and use the levers try to
drive the Rover around. Press the left or right
buttons to activate the horn (W1); press both for
a louder sound.
Helpless Rover
OBJECTIVE: To look at the gears.
ROVER REAR
Rover Rear
(upside down)
Flip the Rover body so it is upside down and connect
the jumper wires to the body and slide switch (S1)
as shown. Turn on the switch to watch the wheels
and gears move.
Notice that the smaller gears are spinning much
faster than the larger gears and wheels. The
smallest gears (on the motor) are actually spinning
128 times faster than the wheels. See page 6 for
more information about the gears.
Option A: Swap the connection points of the gray
and orange jumper wires on the Rover rear. Now
the wheels and gears spin in the opposite direction.
-12-
Project #7
Morse Code
c
trol
Note
unit.
ROVER REAR
on remote
Channel s
h
itc
Build the circuit, connect the jumper wires, and turn
on the slide switch (S1). Turn on the remote control
unit and extend the antenna. Press the buttons on
the remote control to generate long or short bursts of
sound (from the W1 horn) or light (from the D4 LED).
on
w
OBJECTIVE: To learn about Morse code.
You can send secret messages to friends using Morse
code, which uses a series of long and short bursts of
sound or light to represent letters and numbers. A
short burst is represented by a “•”, and a long burst
by a “-”, as shown in this chart:
A• B- •••
C- •- •
D-••
E•
F••-•
G- -•
H••••
I••
J•- - K-•L•-••
M-N-•
O--P•--•
Q- -•R•-•
S•••
TU••V•••W•-X- ••-
Y-•- Z- -••
1•- - - 2••- -3•••-4••••5•••••
6-••••
7--•••
8- --••
9- - - -•
0- - - - -
Morse code was developed in the 19th century to send information over long distances using
telegraph wires and early radios. This equipment had only two states - on or off (that is,
transmitting or not transmitting), and could not send the range of frequencies contained in
human voices or music. The code sent letters as a sequence of short or long transmit bursts.
During World War II Navy ships sometimes communicated by flashing Morse Code messages
between ships using searchlights (they did this because radio transmissions might reveal their
presence or position to the enemy).
You can find more information about Morse code at websites such as http://en.wikipedia.org/
wiki/Morse_code. You can also find websites that will translate and play back Morse code
messages, such as http://www.omnicron.com/~ford/java/NMorse.html.
Project #8
Generator
OBJECTIVE: To produce electricity by spinning the wheels.
Flip the Rover body so it is upside down and connect the jumper wires
to the body and circuit as shown. Turn off the slide switch (S1) for the
time being.
ROVER REAR
Rover rear
(upside down)
-13-
Spin the right wheels with your hands. Depending on how fast you
spin and in which direction, you may light the LEDs in the car body and
the white LED (D4), or hear sound from the horn (W1).
Now turn on the slide switch (S1) and spin the right wheels again. The
wheels now take more effort to spin, and cause the left wheels to also spin.
Note
!
WARNING: Do not use
excessive force to spin the
wheels at abnormally high
speeds. This may burn out
the motors or LEDs.
Spinning the right wheels makes all the inter-connected gears spin,
and spins the shaft on the right motor. The spinning motor shaft
creates electricity using magnetism (opposite to how electricity through
the motor spins the shaft), which powers the LEDs and horn. With the
switch on, the electricity created in the right motor also powers the
left motor, which spins the left wheels. The wheels are harder to spin
now because magnetic fields in both motors must be overcome. No
batteries are used.
Project #9
Slow Turn-Off
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To show how capacitors slow things down.
Note
Project #10
Build the circuit, place the base grid on the
Rover body, and connect the jumper wires as
shown. Turn the switch (S1) on and the LED
is on. Turn the switch off, and the LED goes
out slowly. Electricity stored in the 100mF
capacitors (C4) keeps the LED on after the
batteries have been disconnected.
If you remove one of the capacitors then the
LED will turn off faster, because you aren’t
storing as much electricity. If you remove both
capacitors, the LED will turn off immediately
when the switch is turned off.
Series Capacitors
Note
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To compare types of circuits.
This is the same circuit as project 9, but with
the capacitors connected differently. Build the
circuit and connect the jumper wires as shown.
Turn the switch on and off, and watch how
quickly the LED turns off.
The LED doesn’t stay on as long with this circuit
than it did in project 9, because two capacitors
connected in series store less electricity than
just one. This may seem like a bad way to
connect capacitors, but it allows them to be
used with higher voltages.
-14-
Project #11
Sound & Light
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To build a circuit with sound and light.
Build the circuit, place the base grid centered on
the Rover body, and connect the jumper wires as
shown. Turn on the switch (S1) and electricity flows
from the batteries through the circuit. The horn (W1)
converts electricity into sound and the LED (D4)
converts electricity into light. The four 1KW resistors
(R2) are connected in parallel, to act as a 250W
resistance.
Note
Project #12
Electricity Bank
Note
-15-
Note
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To show how capacitors store electrical charge.
Build the circuit and connect the jumper wires,
leaving one end of the green jumper off as shown.
Touch the loose end of the green jumper to point A
on the 3-snap wire for a moment. The horn (W1)
makes noise while the 100mF capacitors (C4) fill up
with electricity.
Now move the green jumper from point A to point
B on the 2-snap wire. The LED (D4) lights for
a few seconds using the electricity stored in the
capacitors. Move the green jumper back to A to refill
with electricity, and then to B several times.
Project #13
Slow R/C Flashlight
OBJECTIVE: To build a remote control light.
w
on remote
c
unit.
Project #14
h
itc
l
tro
Channe
ls
Note
on
ROVER REAR
Build the circuit shown and turn on the slide switch
(S1). Turn on the remote control unit, and press the
left button. The LED (D4) turns on and off slowly.
Capacitor Battery
OBJECTIVE: To show how capacitors store electrical charge.
Build the circuit shown but leave the 100mF
capacitor (C4) unconnected. The orange and
gray jumper wires are placed on the base grid
at points C10 and E10.
Note
Note
ROVER REAR
Note
Touch the capacitor across the jumper wires
at points C10-E10 to fill it with electricity. Now
place it across points A8-C8 to make noise, or
across points E8-G8 to flash a light. Move the
capacitor back to C10-E10 to refill it, then to
A8-C8 or E8-G8 again.
The 100mF capacitor acts like a battery. It can
store electricity for a while, then release it when
you need it. But a capacitor is a very weak
battery, and can only make noise or light for a
few seconds.
-16-
Project #15
When More Are Less
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To compare types of circuits.
Build the circuit and connect the jumper wires
as shown. The LED (D4) will be on but the
resistor is limiting the electricity through it.
Turn on the switch (S1) to place three other
resistors in parallel with the first one. This
increases the flow of electricity to the LED, and
makes it brighter. Placing other resistors in
parallel reduces the total resistance (to 250W
here), so more are less.
Note
Project #16
When More Are More
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To compare types of circuits.
Note
-17-
Build the circuit and connect the jumper wires
as shown. The LED (D4) will be on but the four
resistors are limiting the electricity through it.
Turn on the switch (S1) to bypass three resistors
that are in series with the first one. This
increases the flow of electricity to the LED, and
makes it brighter. Placing other resistors in
series increases the total resistance, so more
are more.
Project #17
Pencil Buzz
OBJECTIVE: To draw a missing component.
ROVER REAR
Note
Build the circuit at left and connect the jumper wires to it, but leave the loose
ends of the green and white jumpers unconnected for now. There is one more
part you need and you are going to draw it. Take a pencil (No. 2 lead is best
but other types will also work). SHARPEN IT, and fill in the shape below.
You will get better results if you place a hard, flat surface directly beneath this
page while you are drawing. Press hard (but don’t rip the paper), and fill in the
shape several times to be sure you have a thick, even layer of pencil lead.
Turn on the switch and take the loose ends of the jumpers, press them to the
shape and move them around over the drawing. If you don’t hear any sound
then add another layer of pencil lead, or put a drop of water on the jumper
ends to get better contact. You can draw different shapes if you like.
Option A: Replace the horn (W1) with the LED (D4, “+” side on the left), to
shine a light instead of making noise.
Option B: Instead of using a pencil drawing, touch the metal ends of the
jumper wires with your fingers to see how your body can conduct electricity!
Project #18
Stay-on Pencil Light
OBJECTIVE: To draw a missing component.
ROVER REAR
Note
Note
This is the same circuit as project 17, but it stays on if you turn it off. Build
the circuit at left and connect the jumper wires to it, but leave the loose ends
of the green and purple) jumpers unconnected for now. There is one more
part you need and you are going to draw it. Take a pencil (No. 2 lead is best
but other types will also work). SHARPEN IT, and fill in the shape below.
You will get better results if you place a hard, flat surface directly beneath
this page while you are drawing. Press hard (but don’t rip the paper), and
fill in the shape several times to be sure you have a thick, even layer of
pencil lead.
Turn on the switch and take the loose ends of the jumpers, press them to the
shape and move them around over the drawing. It will take a few seconds for the
LED (D4) to turn on, but then it will stay on for a long time after you remove the
jumper wires from the drawing. If the light never comes on then add another layer
of pencil lead, or put a drop of water on the jumper ends to get better contact.
Option A: Replace the LED (D4) with the horn (W1, “+” side on the left), to
make noise instead of shining a light!
Option B: Instead of using a pencil drawing, place the loose ends of the
jumper wires into a cup of water to make a water alarm!
-18-
Project #19
Water Detector
OBJECTIVE: To show how water conducts electricity.
ROVER REAR
Build the circuit at left and connect the jumper wires to it,
but leave the loose ends of the green and yellow jumpers
lying on the table initially. Turn on the slide switch (S1)
- the LED (D4) will be dark because the air separating
the jumpers has very high resistance. Touch the loose
jumper ends to each other and the LED will be bright,
because with a direct connection there is no resistance
separating the jumpers.
Now take the loose ends of the green and yellow jumpers
and place them in a cup of water, without letting them
touch each other. The LED should be lit, indicating you
have detected water!
Note
For this experiment, your LED brightness may vary
depending upon your local water supply. Pure water (like
distilled water) has very high resistance, but drinking water
has impurities mixed in that increase electrical conduction.
Project #20
Salt Water Detector
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To show how adding salt to water changes water’s
electrical characteristics.
Note
-19-
Build the circuit at left and connect the jumper
wires to it, but place the loose ends of the
green and yellow jumpers in a cup of water
as in the preceding project. Turn on the slide
switch (S1), the LED (D4) should be dimly lit.
Slowly add salt to the water and see how the
LED brightness changes, mix it a little so it
dissolves. It will become very bright as you
add more salt. You can use this bright LED
condition as a saltwater detector! You can
then reduce the LED brightness by adding
more water to dilute the salt.
Take another cup of water and try adding other
household substances like sugar to see if they
increase the LED brightness as the salt did.
One-Way Light
OBJECTIVE: To show how an LED works.
OBJECTIVE: To make a circuit that
detects the conduction of electricity in
different materials.
The switch controls the electricity and
the LED (light emitting diode) converts
electricity into light. The resistor limits
how much electricity can flow - without
it the batteries would overload the LED
and damage it! LEDs are used in all
types of electronic equipment to indicate
conditions and pass information to the
user of that equipment.
Reverse the position of the LED (so
that the “+” side is next to the resistor).
Turn on the switch - nothing happens.
LEDs only allow electricity to flow in one
direction, so the circuit doesn’t work if
the LED is backwards.
Project #23
Build the circuit, place the base grid
centered on the Rover body, and
connect the jumper wires as shown.
To complete the circuit, place a
paperclip across the snaps as shown
in the picture. If the paperclip is made
of metal, the LED (D4) will be bright.
Try placing other materials (such as
plastic or wood) across the snaps
instead of the paperclip. If the material
has low resistance, the LED will light.
This circuit can be used to detect which
materials conduct electricity.
Note
Make Your Own Battery
OBJECTIVE: To show how capacitors can store electricity.
Note
ROVER REAR
Note
ROVER REAR
Build the circuit, place the base grid
centered on the Rover body, and
connect the jumper wires as shown.
When you close the slide switch (S1),
electricity flows from the batteries
through the switch (S1), the LED (D4),
the resistor (R1), and back to the battery.
Project #22 Conduction Detector
ROVER REAR
Project #21
Build the circuit and place the base grid centered on
the Rover body. Connect the jumper wires, leaving
one end of the orange jumper off as shown. Touch
the loose end of the orange jumper to point A on
the Rover rear for a moment. This fills up the 100mF
capacitors (C4) with electricity.
Now move the orange jumper from point A to point
B on the 1KW resistor (R2). The LED (D4) lights
for a few seconds using the electricity stored in the
capacitors. Move the orange jumper back to A to
refill with electricity, and then to B several times.
Notice that a capacitor is not very efficient at storing
electricity - compare how long the 100mFs kept the
LED lit for with how your batteries run all of your
projects! That is because capacitors store electrical
energy while a battery stores chemical energy.
-20-
Project #24
Backup Warning
Note
Use the remote control levers to drive Rover
around. Whenever the right wheels back up an
alarm will sound, whenever the left wheels back up
a light will shine.
Channel s
Project #25
OBJECTIVE: To test the functions of the RX1 module.
-21-
E
F
B
G
H
J
K
ROVER REAR
A
D
e
RX1 Test
Note
C
n remot
ol unit.
ntr
Note
ho
itc
co
w
ROVER REAR
OBJECTIVE: To make a warning when the Rover wheel go
backwards.
Build the circuit as shown. Be sure you have the A-B-C
switches on the remote control and R/C receiver (RX1) set
to the same channel, have turned on the remote control,
and are not being interfered with by other remote control
transmitters. Turn on the slide switch (S1), then press the left
button on the remote control to turn on the LED (D4).
B. Shift the LED to be across points A & B (+ on left); now the
right R/C button should turn on the LED.
C. Shift the LED to be across points C & D (+ on left) now
pushing the left R/C lever forward should turn on the LED.
D. Shift the LED to be across points E & F (+ on left) now
pushing the left R/C lever backward should turn on the LED.
E. Shift the LED to be across points G & H (+ on left) now
pushing the right R/C lever forward should turn on the LED.
F. Shift the LED to be across points J & K (+ on left) now
pushing the right R/C lever backward should turn on the LED.
BONUS CIRCUITS FOR SNAP CIRCUITS OWNERS
If you own Snap Circuits® Models SC-300, SC-500, or SC-750 (with 300+ experiments), then you may also build these circuits.
Our web site (www.elenco.com/product/snap-rover) has additional circuits. DO NOT use parts from other Snap Circuits® kits with
your Snap Rover® except in our approved circuits - the Snap Rover® uses higher voltage which could damage those parts.
Project #B1
Machine Gun Rover
Use the remote control levers
to drive the Rover around and
use the left button to activate
a machine gun sound.
!
sw
h
itc
Note
on remote
nit
ro l u .
Channel
sw
c
t
on
Channel
R/C Motor
ol unit.
nt r
co
e
c
The remote control activates the LEDs (D1 & D2) and the horn (W1), and
spins the motor (M1).
WARNING:
Moving parts.
Do not touch
the fan or
motor during
operation.
Note
remot
e
Project #B3
The remote control levers and buttons activate six functions: three LEDs
(D1, D2, & D4), a horn (W1), a lamp, and a siren (U2 with SP).
h on
remot
nit
ro l u .
Project #B2 Six Function R/C
itc
h on
Channel
+
itc
Model UC-90
Upgrade your Snap Rover® to a Deluxe Snap Rover®!
Includes the disc launcher, voice recorder and music
sound modules, parts, and manual
for over 40 new projects. Contact
Elenco® to find out where you
can purchase it.
t
on
sw
ROVER REAR
Note
Deluxe Snap Rover® Upgrade Kit
+
Note
!
WARNING:
Do not lean
over the motor.
-22-
SCROV-10 Snap Rover® Block Layout
Important: If any parts are missing or damaged, DO NOT RETURN TO RETAILER. Call toll-free (800) 533-2441
or e-mail us at: help@elenco.com. Customer Service • 150 Carpenter Ave. • Wheeling, IL 60090 U.S.A.
U8
C4
C4
C1
D4
2 x2
S1
Jumper Wires
R1
2 x2
R2
R2
2 x2
R2
7 x1
RX1
W1
6 x1
R2
3 x2
1 x1
Elenco® Electronics, Inc.
5 x1
4 x1
150 Carpenter Avenue • Wheeling, IL 60090
(847) 541-3800 • Fax: (847) 520-0085 • Web site: www.elenco.com • e-mail: elenco@elenco.com
1 x1
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