Rane | BB22 | manual | Rane BB22 Unbalanced to Balanced Converter Manual

Rane BB22 Unbalanced to Balanced Converter Manual
BB 22
BALANCE BUDDY
Contents
Features
General Description
BB 22 Application Information
BB 22 Specifications
Designator Drawing
Block Diagram
Schematic
Sound System Interconnection
Warranty
2
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
24
Recycle cardboard and paper.
Cartons et papier à recycler.
11259
BB 22
BALANCE BUDDY
Data Sheet / Manual
Features
• 2 Channels of -10 dBV (RCA) to +4 dBu (XLR) Conversion
• Nickel Core “80” Ni Transformers — Wide Bandwidth and Low Distortion
• +24 dBu Maximum Levels
General Description
The Rane BB 22 Balance Buddy is a handy professional-grade tool used to
provide isolation for and convert unbalanced -10 dBV consumer level RCA
outputs up to balanced +4 dBu professional XLR inputs. The BB 22 converts
one pair from -10 dBV to +4 dBu. There are two male XLR connectors and
two RCA jacks.
Unbalanced lines should always be kept under 10 feet (3 meters) to prevent undesirable effects such as hum and noise. The BB 22 allows conversion
to balanced lines that can be run across a studio or a house without loss of
signal quality. For instance, a BB 22 may be mounted to the back of a jukebox
converting its unbalanced outputs to balanced lines, feeding an amplifier in
another room.
Signal-to-noise performance is perfectly preserved using the BB 22, since
it uses only passive transformers to convert signal levels. It adds no additional
noise whatsoever. Use of professional quality nickel core (“80” Ni) transformers guarantee low distortion, wide bandwidth and high signal level handling
capability.
The BB 22’s isolation transformers provide a quick and affordable answer
to most jobs requiring signal level conversion and output balancing.
WEAR PARTS: This product contains no wear parts.
2
BB 22 Application Information
Conversion Ratio
The casual observer would think to convert -10 dBV to +4 dBu, you would
need 14 dB of gain. The casual observer would be wrong. You only need 12
dB of gain. The reason is not only do you change levels, you also change reference levels—from dBV to dBu. The first (dBV) references everything to 1.0
volt, while the second (dBu) references everything to 0.775 volts (this comes
from the old power reference of 0 dBm, which equaled 1mW into 600 Ω,
which equaled .775 volts).
Driving Impedances
Some people wrongly feel you cannot use a transformer to convert between
-10 dBV and +4 dBu because of low impedances. This is not a problem as long
as you use them to interconnect equipment with at least 15k ohms input impedance. Since most professional products have input impedances of 20 kΩ or
greater (50k and 100 kΩ are not uncommon), this should never be difficult.
A 15 kΩ load winds up looking like 1 kΩ to the equipment with the -10 dBV
output (due to transformer action). This may seem excessively low, but is not
in practice. The maximum transformer output level of +24 dBu occurs with
an input level of +10 dBV, which equals 3.16 volts. And 3.16 volts driving 1
kΩ only requires 3.16 milliamps, which is a very modest requirement for any
-10 dBV equipment to deliver.
Wiring
The BB 22 follows AES/ANSI/IEC standards of pin 2 positive and pin 3
negative. Note the shields (commons) of the RCA jacks are not tied together.
This provides better ground isolation of the unbalanced units. A positive signal applied to the tip of the RCA jack causes a positive signal to appear on pin
2 of the XLR, and vice-versa if signal direction is reversed.
Signal Direction
Signal can be converted through the channels either direction. The only problem arises in the gender of the XLR connector. The solution requires same-sex
XLR adaptors or special cables.
WARNING: This product may contain chemicals known to the State of
California to cause cancer, or birth defects or other reproductive harm.
3
Parameter
Specification
Transformer Construction Nickel Core Bobbin Wound
Turns Ratio
1:3.89
Maximum Levels
..........-10 dBV In
+10 (40 Hz-20 kHz); +4.5 (20 Hz)
..........+4 dBu Out
+24 (40 Hz-20 kHz); +18.5 (20 Hz)
Input Impedance
(Load Impedances as Shown)
..........-10 dBV
1k
Insertion Loss
0.5
DC Resistance
47.5 / 200
Frequency Response
20-20 kHz
THD + Noise
less than .05 (40 Hz-20 kHz)
Unit: Conformity
CE, FCC
Unit: Construction
All Steel
..........Size
1.65"H x 5.1"W x 4.25"D
..........Weight
1 lb
Shipping: Size
3.6" x 11.75" x 7.2"
..........Weight
2 lb
All specifications apply both directions, unless noted.
Units
dBV
dBu
Ω
dB
Ω
dB
%
Limit
0.5dB
0.5dB
4
5%
0.1
10%
±2
max
(4.2 cm x 13 cm x 10.8 cm)
(.45 kg)
(9.5 cm x 30 cm x 18 cm)
(.9 kg)
Load impedance 15k Ω
With recommended load impedance
-10 dBV / +4 dBu
+4 dBu out; recom. load impedance
+4 dBu out
Exempt
1% THD point
1% THD point
Conditions/Comments
Grade “80” Ni
-10 dBV (316 mV): +4 dBu (1.23 V)
BB 22 Specifications
Designator Drawing
5
Block Diagram
INPUT 1
OUTPUT 1
-10 dBV
+4 dBu
INPUT 2
OUTPUT 2
-10 dBV
6
+4 dBu
J1
1
J5
CHANNEL 1
CHANNEL 2
H:\BB-LT22\102950.SCH
24-May-1999
NOTE: J1, J2, J3 FOR BB22 ONLY.
J4 FOR LT22 ONLY.
PHONO 1-S GOLD
1
PHONO 1-S GOLD
2
2
T1
11
9
XFMR LINE OUT
4
2
T2
9
RB 2/24/99
DRAWN BY:
ACTION:
CHECKED BY:
PN 03949 FOR BB22
PN 00961 FOR LT22
4
11
XFMR LINE OUT
2
PN 03949 FOR BB22
PN 00961 FOR LT22
BB 22 ONLY
10802 47th Avenue West
Mukilteo WA 98275-5098
J3+XLR MALE
2
- 3
4
1
J2+XLR MALE
2
- 3
4
1
GND
-IN2
6
5
+OUT2
-OUT2
GND
1
of 1
SHEET:
102950
BB22 & LT22 COMPOSITE
EURO 12 POS
1
2
3
+IN2
+OUT1
7
4
-OUT1
GND
8
9
+IN1
-IN1
11
10
GND
J4A
12
LT 22 ONLY
Schematic
7
RaneNote
Sound System Interconnection
• Cause & prevention of ground loops
• Interfacing balanced & unbalanced
• Proper pin connections and wiring
• Chassis ground vs. signal ground
• Ground lift switches
Rane Technical Staff
RaneNote 110
© 1985, 1995, 2006, 2007 Rane Corporation
8
Introduction
This note, originally written in 1985, continues to be one of our most useful
references. It’s popularity stems from the continual and perpetual difficulty
of hooking up audio equipment without suffering through all sorts of bizarre
noises, hums, buzzes, whistles, etc.— not to mention the extreme financial,
physical and psychological price. As technology progresses it is inevitable that
electronic equipment and its wiring should be subject to constant improvement. Many things have improved in the audio industry since 1985, but
unfortunately wiring isn’t one of them. However, finally the Audio Engineering Society (AES) has issued a standards document for interconnection of pro
audio equipment. It is AES48, titled “AES48-2005: AES standard on interconnections —Grounding and EMC practices — Shields of connectors in audio
equipment containing active circuitry.”
Rane’s policy is to accommodate rather than dictate. However, this document contains suggestions for external wiring changes that should ideally only
be implemented by trained technical personnel. Safety regulations require
that all original grounding means provided from the factory be left intact for
safe operation. No guarantee of responsibility for incidental or consequential
damages can be provided. (In other words, don’t modify cables, or try your own
version of grounding unless you really understand exactly what type of output and
input you have to connect.)
9
Ground Loops
Almost all cases of noise can be traced directly to ground loops, grounding or
lack thereof. It is important to understand the mechanism that causes grounding noise in order to effectively eliminate it. Each component of a sound
system produces its own ground internally. This ground is usually called the
audio signal ground. Connecting devices together with the interconnecting cables can tie the signal grounds of the two units together in one place
through the conductors in the cable. Ground loops occur when the grounds of
the two units are also tied together in another place: via the third wire in the
line cord, by tying the metal chassis together through the rack rails, etc. These
situations create a circuit through which current may flow in a closed “loop”
from one unit’s ground out to a second unit and back to the first. It is not simply the presence of this current that creates the hum—it is when this current
flows through a unit’s audio signal ground that creates the hum. In fact, even
without a ground loop, a little noise current always flows through every interconnecting cable (i.e., it is impossible to eliminate these currents entirely). The
mere presence of this ground loop current is no cause for alarm if your system
uses properly implemented and completely balanced interconnects, which are
excellent at rejecting ground loop and other noise currents. Balanced interconnect was developed to be immune to these noise currents, which can never be
entirely eliminated. What makes a ground loop current annoying is when the
audio signal is affected. Unfortunately, many manufacturers of balanced audio equipment design the internal grounding system improperly, thus creating
balanced equipment that is not immune to the cabling’s noise currents. This is
one reason for the bad reputation sometimes given to balanced interconnect.
A second reason for balanced interconnect’s bad reputation comes from
those who think connecting unbalanced equipment into “superior” balanced
equipment should improve things. Sorry. Balanced interconnect is not compatible with unbalanced. The small physical nature and short cable runs of completely unbalanced systems (home audio) also contain these ground loop noise
currents. However, the currents in unbalanced systems never get large enough to
affect the audio to the point where it is a nuisance. Mixing balanced and unbalanced equipment, however, is an entirely different story, since balanced and
unbalanced interconnect are truly not compatible. The rest of this note shows
several recommended implementations for all of these interconnection schemes.
The potential or voltage which pushes these noise currents through the
circuit is developed between the independent grounds of the two or more
units in the system. The impedance of this circuit is low, and even though the
voltage is low, the current is high, thanks to Mr. Ohm, without whose help we
wouldn’t have these problems. It would take a very high resolution ohm meter
to measure the impedance of the steel chassis or the rack rails. We’re talking
thousandths of an ohm. So trying to measure this stuff won’t necessarily help
you. We just thought we’d warn you.
10
The Absolute Best Right Way To Do It
The method specified by AES48 is to use balanced lines and tie the cable shield
to the metal chassis (right where it enters the chassis) at both ends of the cable.
A balanced line requires three separate conductors, two of which are signal
(+ and –) and one shield (see Figure 1a). The shield serves to guard the sensitive audio lines from interference. Only by using balanced line interconnects
can you guarantee (yes, guarantee) hum-free results. Always use twisted pair
cable. Chassis tying the shield at each end also guarantees the best possible
protection from RFI [radio frequency interference] and other noises [neon
signs, lighting dimmers].
Neil Muncy1, an electroacoustic consultant and seasoned veteran of years
of successful system design, chairs the AES Standards Committee (SC-05-05)
working on this subject. He tirelessly tours the world giving seminars and dispensing information on how to successfully hook-up pro audio equipment2.
He makes the simple point that it is absurd that you cannot go out and buy
pro audio equipment from several different manufacturers, buy standard offthe-shelf cable assemblies, come home, hook it all up and have it work hum
and noise free. Plug and play. Sadly, almost never is this the case, despite the
science and rules of noise-free interconnect known and documented for over
60 years (see References for complete information).
It all boils down to using balanced lines, only balanced lines, and nothing
but balanced lines. This is why they were developed. Further, that you tie the
shield to the chassis, at the point it enters the chassis, and at both ends of the cable
(more on ‘both ends’ later).
Since standard XLR cables come with their shields tied to pin 1 at each
end (the shells are not tied, nor need be), this means equipment using 3-pin,
XLR-type connectors must tie pin 1 to the chassis (usually called chassis
ground) — not the audio signal ground as is most common.
Not using signal ground is the most radical departure from common proaudio practice. Not that there is any argument about its validity. There isn’t.
This is the right way to do it. So why doesn’t audio equipment come wired
this way? Well, some does, and since 1993, more of it does. That’s when Rane
started manufacturing some of its products with balanced inputs and outputs
tying pin 1 to chassis. So why doesn’t everyone do it this way? Because life is
messy, some things are hard to change, and there will always be equipment in
use that was made before proper grounding practices were in effect.
Unbalanced equipment is another problem: it is everwhere, easily available
and inexpensive. All those RCA and ¼" TS connectors found on consumer
equipment; effect-loops and insert-points on consoles; signal processing boxes;
digital and analog tape recorders; computer cards; mixing consoles; et cetera.
The next several pages give tips on how to successfully address hooking
up unbalanced equipment. Unbalanced equipment when “blindly” connected
with fully balanced units starts a pattern of hum and undesirable operation,
requiring extra measures to correct the situation.
11
CHASSIS
GROUND
R
S
T
MALE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
FEMALE
RED
2
BLACK
3 C 3
SHIELD
1
1
2
G
–
+
BALANCED OUTPUTS
12
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
Figure 1a. The right way to do it.
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
MALE
1
2
3
G
–
+
CHASSIS SIGNAL
GROUND GROUND
R
S
T
FEMALE
2
C 3
1
BALANCED INPUTS
COMMON (WRONG) PRACTICE
(+)
CASE
RECOMMENDED PRACTICE
(+)
CASE
OPTIONAL
2
2
(–)
3
3
1
CHASSIS
GROUND
(–)
1
SIGNAL
GROUND
CHASSIS
GROUND
CHASSIS
GROUND
Figure 1b. Recommmended practice.
The Next Best Right Way To Do It
The quickest, quietest and most foolproof method to connect balanced and
unbalanced is to transformer isolate all unbalanced connections. See
Figure 2.
Many manufacturers provide several tools for this task, including Rane.
Consult your audio dealer to explore the options available.
The goal of these adaptors is to allow the use of standard cables. With these
transformer isolation boxes, modification of cable assemblies is unnecessary.
Virtually any two pieces of audio equipment can be successfully interfaced
without risk of unwanted hum and noise.
Another way to create the necessary isolation is to use a direct box. Originally named for its use to convert the high impedance, high level output of an
electric guitar to the low impedance, low level input of a recording console, it
allowed the player to plug “directly” into the console. Now this term is commonly used to describe any box used to convert unbalanced lines to balanced
lines.
UNBALANCED
BALANCED
NOT CONNECTED
AT CHASSIS
(PLASTIC JACK)
TRANSFORMER
1/4”
TIP-SLEEVE
2
3
1
EARTH GROUNDED
METAL ENCLOSURE
CASE LUG MAY
CONNECT TO
CHASSIS
(NOT REQUIRED)
CHASSIS IS
GROUNDED TO PIN 1
Figure 2. Transformer Isolation
13
The Last Best Right Way To Do It
If transformer isolation is not an option, special cable assemblies are a
last resort. The key here is to prevent the shield currents from flowing into a
unit whose grounding scheme creates ground loops (hum) in the audio path
(i.e., most audio equipment).
It is true that connecting both ends of the shield is theoretically the best
way to interconnect equipment –though this assumes the interconnected
equipment is internally grounded properly. Since most equipment is not
internally grounded properly, connecting both ends of the shield is not often
practiced, since doing so usually creates noisy interconnections.
A common solution to these noisy hum and buzz problems involves disconnecting one end of the shield, even though one can not buy off-the-shelf
cables with the shield disconnected at one end. The best end to disconnect
is the receiving end. If one end of the shield is disconnected, the noisy hum
current stops flowing and away goes the hum — but only at low frequencies.
A ground-sending-end-only shield connection minimizes the possibility of
high frequency (radio) interference since it prevents the shield from acting as
an antenna to the next input. Many reduce this potential RF interference by
providing an RF path through a small capacitor (0.1 or 0.01 microfarad ceramic disc) connected from the lifted end of the shield to the chassis. (This is
referred to as the “hybrid shield termination” where the sending end is bonded
to the chassis and the receiving end is capacitively coupled. See Neutrik’s
EMC-XLR for example.) The fact that many modern day installers still follow
this one-end-only rule with consistent success indicates this and other acceptable solutions to RF issues exist, though the increasing use of digital and
wireless technology greatly increases the possibility of future RF problems.
If you’ve truly isolated your hum problem to a specific unit, chances are,
even though the documentation indicates proper chassis grounded shields,
the suspect unit is not internally grounded properly. Here is where special test
cable assemblies, shown in Figure 3, really come in handy. These assemblies
allow you to connect the shield to chassis ground at the point of entry, or to pin
1, or to lift one end of the shield. The task becomes more difficult when the
unit you’ve isolated has multiple inputs and outputs. On a suspect unit with
multiple cables, try various configurations on each connection to find out if
special cable assemblies are needed at more than one point.
FEMALE
2
C
3
1
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
MALE
2
3
1
TEST
WIRE
Figure 3. Test cable
14
GROUND CLIP
See Figure 4 for suggested cable assemblies for your particular interconnection needs. Find the appropriate output configuration (down the left side)
and then match this with the correct input configuration (across the top of the
page.) Then refer to the following pages for a recommended wiring diagram.
Ground Lifts
Many units come equipped with ground lift switches. In only a few cases can
it be shown that a ground lift switch improves ground related noise. (Has a
ground lift switch ever really worked for you?) In reality, the presence of a
ground lift switch greatly reduces a unit’s ability to be “properly” grounded
and therefore immune to ground loop hums and buzzes. Ground lifts are simply another Band-Aid ® to try in case of grounding problems. It is true that an
entire system of properly grounded equipment, without ground lift switches,
is guaranteed (yes guaranteed) to be hum free. The problem is most equipment
is not (both internally and externally, AC system wise) grounded properly.
Most units with ground lifts are shipped so the unit is “grounded” —
meaning the chassis is connected to audio signal ground. (This should be the
best and is the “safest” position for a ground lift switch.) If after hooking up
your system it exhibits excessive hum or buzzing, there is an incompatibility
somewhere in the system’s grounding configuration. In addition to these special cable assemblies that may help, here are some more things to try:
1. Try combinations of lifting grounds on units supplied with lift switches (or
links). It is wise to do this with the power off!
2. If you have an entirely balanced system, verify all chassis are tied to a good
earth ground, for safety’s sake and hum protection. Completely unbalanced
systems never earth ground anything (except cable TV, often a ground loop
source). If you have a mixed balanced and unbalanced system, do yourself
a favor and use isolation transformers or, if you can’t do that, try the special
cable assemblies described here and expect it to take many hours to get
things quiet. May the Force be with you.
3. Balanced units with outboard power supplies (wall warts or “bumps” in the
line cord) do not ground the chassis through the line cord. Make sure such
units are solidly grounded by tying the chassis to an earth ground using a
star washer for a reliable contact. (Rane always provides this chassis point
as an external screw with a toothed washer.) Any device with a 3-prong AC
plug, such as an amplifier, may serve as an earth ground point. Rack rails
may or may not serve this purpose depending on screw locations and paint
jobs.
15
Floating, Pseudo, and Quasi-Balancing
During inspection, you may run across a ¼" output called floating unbalanced, sometimes also called psuedo-balanced or quasi-balanced. In this
configuration, the sleeve of the output stage is not connected inside the unit
and the ring is connected (usually through a small resistor) to the audio signal
ground. This allows the tip and ring to “appear” as an equal impedance, notquite balanced output stage, even though the output circuitry is unbalanced.
Floating unbalanced often works to drive either a balanced or unbalanced
input, depending if a TS or TRS standard cable is plugged into it. When it
hums, a special cable is required. See drawings #11 and #12, and do not make
the cross-coupled modification of tying the ring and sleeve together.
Winning the Wiring Wars
• Use balanced connections whenever possible, with the shield bonded to the
metal chassis at both ends.
• Transformer isolate all unbalanced connections from balanced connections.
• Use special cable assemblies when unbalanced lines cannot be transformer
isolated.
• Any unbalanced cable must be kept under 10 feet
(3 m) in length. Lengths longer than this will amplify all the nasty side
effects of unbalanced circuitry's ground loops.
Summary
If you are unable to do things correctly (i.e. use fully balanced wiring with
shields tied to the chassis at both ends, or transformer isolate all unbalanced
signals from balanced signals) then there is no guarantee that a hum-free
interconnect can be achieved, nor is there a definite scheme that will assure
noise-free operation in all configurations.
16
References
1. Neil A. Muncy, “Noise Susceptibility in Analog and Digital Signal Processing Systems,” presented at the 97th AES Convention of Audio Engineering
Society in San Francisco, CA, Nov. 1994.
2. Grounding, Shielding, and Interconnections in Analog & Digital Signal Processing Systems: Understanding the Basics; Workshops designed and presented by Neil Muncy and Cal Perkins, at the 97th AES Convention of Audio
Engineering Society in San Francisco, CA, Nov. 1994.
3. The entire June 1995 AES Journal, Vol. 43, No. 6, available $6 members,
$11 nonmembers from the Audio Engineering Society, 60 E. 42nd St.,
New York, NY, 10165-2520.
4. Phillip Giddings, Audio System Design and Installation (SAMS, Indiana,
1990).
5. Ralph Morrison, Noise and Other Interfering Signals (Wiley, New York,
1992).
6. Henry W. Ott, Noise Reduction Techniques in Electronic Systems, 2nd Edition (Wiley, New York, 1988).
7. Cal Perkins, “Measurement Techniques for Debugging Electronic Systems
and Their Instrumentation,” The Proceedings of the 11th International AES
Conference: Audio Test & Measurement, Portland, OR, May 1992, pp. 8292 (Audio Engineering Society, New York, 1992).
8. Macatee, RaneNote: “Grounding and Shielding Audio Devices,” Rane
Corporation, 1994.
9. Philip Giddings, “Grounding and Shielding for Sound and Video,” S&VC,
Sept. 20th, 1995.
10. AES48-2005: AES standard on interconnections —Grounding and EMC
practices — Shields of connectors in audio equipment containing active circuitry (Audio Engineering Society, New York, 2005).
Band-Aid is a registered trademark of Johnson & Johnson
Figures 4a, 4b, 4c.
Interconnect chart for locating correct cable assemblies on the following pages.
Note: (A) This configuration uses an “off-the-shelf” cable.
Note: (B) This configuration causes a 6 dB signal loss. Compensate by
“turning the system up” 6 dB.
17
From Output
18
From Output
¼” FLOATING UNBALANCED
¼” BALANCED TRS
(EITHER A TRANSFORMER
OR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
¼” BALANCED TRS
(NOT A TRANSFORMER,
NOR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
FEMALE BALANCED XLR
(EITHER A TRANSFORMER
OR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
FEMALE BALANCED XLR
(NOT A TRANSFORMER,
NOR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
CABLE
CONNECTORS
8
22
7
21
A
8
7
A
2
2
1
1
¼" BALANCED
TRS (TIP-RING-SLEEVE)
MALE
BALANCED XLR
11
11
B
9
5
B
3
¼" OR 3.5mm
UNBALANCED
TS (TIP-SLEEVE)
To
ToInput
Input
12
12
B
10
6
B
4
UNBALANCED RCA
GROUND to GROUND
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD NC
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD ONLY
TO EUROBLOCK
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD NC
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD NC
+ to +
– to –
BALANCED
EUROBLOCK
From Output
19
From Output
BALANCED
EUROBLOCK
UNBALANCED RCA
(TIP-SLEEVE)
¼” OR 3.5 mm
UNBALANCED
TS (TIP-SLEEVE)
¼” FLOATING UNBALANCED
TRS (TIP-RING-SLEEVE)
(SLEEVE IN UNIT = NC)
¼” BALANCED TRS
(EITHER A TRANSFORMER
OR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
¼” BALANCED TRS
(NOT A TRANSFORMER,
NOR A CROSS-COUPLED
OUTPUT STAGE)
+ to +
– to –
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD ONLY
TO TRS SLEEVE
18
17
SHIELD ONLY
TO XLR PIN 1
14
13
A
22
21
A
8
7
To Input
8
7
24
A
19
A
15
11
11
B
9
24
A
20
A
16
12
12
B
10
GROUND to GROUND
+ to +
– to –
23
23
GROUND to GROUND
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD NC
+ to +
– to –
SHIELD ONLY
TO EUROBLOCK
+ to +
– to –
From Output
Output
20
6
T=RED
RED
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
BLACK
2=RED
C 3
SHIELD
3=BLACK
1
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT PIN 1 TO PIN 3 AT THIS END
AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2=RED
BLACK
C 3
3=BLACK
SHIELD
1
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT PIN 1 TO PIN 3 AT THIS END
AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2=RED
C 3
3=NC
SHIELD
1
4B
5
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2=RED
C 3
3=NC
SHIELD
1
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2=RED
BLACK
C 3
3=BLACK
SHIELD
1
2
3B
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
1
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
N/C
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
N/C
MALE
MALE
1
2
3
1=NC
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=NC
1=NC
2=RED
3=BLACK
nput
FEMALE
1=SHIELD
RED
2
2=RED
BLACK
C 3
3=BLACK
SHIELD
1
To Input
From O
T=RED
R=NC
S=SHIELD
9B
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
11
12
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
N/C
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
N/C
RED
RED
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
BLACK
BLACK
SHIELD
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT RING TO SLEEVE
AT THIS END AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT RING TO SLEEVE
AT THIS END AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
SHIELD
RED
SHIELD
10B R=NC
S=SHIELD
T=RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
8
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
7
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT PIN 1 TO PIN 3 AT THIS END
AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
MALE
1
2
3
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=NC
1=NC
2=RED
3=BLACK
To Inp
To Input
From Output
21
From Output
m Output
22
18
17
16A
15A
14
13
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=BLACK
T=RED
S=BLACK
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
SHIELD
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
N/C
RED
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
MALE
MALE
1
2
3
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
1=SHIELD
2=RED
3=BLACK
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
1=SHIELD
3 2=RED
3=BLACK
1
2
o Input
RED
BLACK
N/C
To Input
24
23
–
+
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
2-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
1-CONDUCTOR SHIELDED CABLE
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
SHIELD
RED
MALE
1
2
3
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
1=SHIELD
2=RED
3=BLACK
T=RED
S=SHIELD
(CHECK: NO STANDARD POLARITY ON EUROBLOCKS)
RED
+
BLACK
SHIELD
–
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
RED (ANY UNBALANCED CONNECTOR)
T=RED
BLACK
S=BLACK
CROSS-COUPLED OUTPUT ONLY: CONNECT BLACK TO SHIELD AT THIS END
AND SET GROUND LIFT SWITCH TO ‘GROUNDED’ (IF PRESENT).
(CHECK: NO STANDARD POLARITY ON EUROBLOCKS)
(ANY UNBALANCED CONNECTOR)
RED
BLACK
T=RED
S=BLACK
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
22A
21
T=RED
R=BLACK
S=SHIELD
SHIELD
RED
SHIELD
RED
RED
BLACK
SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
S=SHIELD
T=RED
R=BLACK
A S=SHIELD
20A
19A
To
To Input
From
From Output
23
Warranty
Factory Authorized Service
Your unit may be serviced by the Rane Factory or any Authorized Rane Service
Center. To find a Service Center near you, please call the Rane factory, or check the
Rane website. Please do not return your unit to Rane without prior authorization.
Rane Corporation
To obtain service or a Return Authorization, please phone 425-355-6000
or Fax 425-347-7757
The current list of U.S. Rane Authorized Service Centers is on our website:
www.rane.com/service.html
Limited Domestic Warranty
RANE CORPORATION WARRANTS ALL RANE PRODUCTS (EXCEPT THOSE
ITEMS CLASSIFIED AS WEAR PARTS, AND LISTED ON THE MANUAL-1
PAGE OF EACH OPERATORS MANUAL) PURCHASED IN THE U.S. AGAINST
DEFECTS IN MATERIAL OR WORKMANSHIP FOR A PERIOD OF TWO (2)
YEARS. WEAR PARTS ARE LIMITED TO A PERIOD OF NINETY (90) DAYS FROM
THE INITIAL DATE OF RETAIL PURCHASE FROM AN AUTHORIZED RANE
DEALER—WEAR PARTS REQUIRE PROOF OF PURCHASE DATE. This limited
warranty extends to all purchasers or owners of the product during the warranty period
beginning with the original retail purchase. Rane Corporation does not, however, warrant
its products against any and all defects: 1) arising out of material or workmanship not
provided or furnished by Rane, or 2) resulting from abnormal use of the product or use in
violation of instructions, or 3) in products repaired or serviced by other than authorized
Rane repair facilities, or 4) in products with removed or defaced serial numbers, or 5) in
components or parts or products expressly warranted by another manufacturer. Rane agrees
to supply all parts and labor to repair or replace defects covered by this limited warranty
with parts or products of original or improved design, at its option in each respect, if the
defective product is shipped prior to the end of the warranty period to any Rane authorized
warranty repair facility in the U.S. or to the Rane factory in the original packaging or a
replacement supplied by Rane, with all transportation costs and full insurance paid each
way by the purchaser or owner.
24
Limited Warranty Outside the U.S.A.
RANE PRODUCTS ARE WARRANTED ONLY IN THE COUNTRY WHERE
PURCHASED, THROUGH THE AUTHORIZED RANE DISTRIBUTOR IN THAT
COUNTRY, AGAINST DEFECTS IN MATERIAL OR WORKMANSHIP, THE
SPECIFIC PERIOD OF THIS LIMITED WARRANTY SHALL BE THAT WHICH IS
DESCRIBED TO THE ORIGINAL RETAIL PURCHASER BY THE AUTHORIZED
RANE DEALER OR DISTRIBUTOR AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE. Rane
Corporation does not, however, warrant its products against any and all defects: 1) arising
out of materials or workmanship not provided or furnished by Rane, or 2) resulting from
abnormal use of the product or use in violation of instructions, or 3) in products repaired
or serviced by other than authorized Rane repair facilities, or 4) in products with removed
or defaced serial numbers, or 5) in components or parts or products expressly warranted by
another manufacturer. Rane agrees, through the applicable authorized distributor, to repair
or replace defects covered by this limited warranty with parts or products of original or
improved design, at its option in each respect, if the defective product is shipped prior to
the end of the warranty period to the designated authorized Rane warranty repair facility in
the country where purchased, or to the Rane factory in the U.S., in the original packaging
or a replacement supplied by Rane, with all transportation costs and full insurance paid
each way by the purchaser or owner.
ALL REMEDIES AND THE MEASURE OF DAMAGES ARE LIMITED TO THE
ABOVE SERVICES, IT IS POSSIBLE THAT ECONOMIC LOSS OR INJURY TO
PERSON OR PROPERTY MAY RESULT FROM THE FAILURE OF THE PRODUCT;
HOWEVER, EVEN IF RANE HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THIS POSSIBILITY, THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER ANY SUCH CONSEQUENTIAL OR
INCIDENTAL DAMAGES. SOME STATES OR COUNTRIES DO NOT ALLOW
THE LIMITATIONS OR EXCLUSION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
ANY AND ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARISING BY LAW,
COURSE OF DEALING, COURSE OF PERFORMANCE, USAGE OF TRADE, OR
OTHERWISE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE
LIMITED TO A PERIOD OF TWO (2) YEARS FROM EITHER THE DATE OF
ORIGINAL RETAIL PURCHASE OR, IN THE EVENT NO PROOF OF PURCHASE
DATE IS AVAILABLE, THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE, SOME STATES OR
COUNTRIES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND YOU
MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE,
COUNTRY TO COUNTRY.
25
Warranty Procedure - Valid in USA only
NOTICE! You must complete and return the
warranty card or register your product online to
extend the Warranty from 2 years to 3 years!
TO VALIDATE YOUR EXTENDED WARRANTY
Use the postcard that came in the box with your unit, or go to www.rane.com
and click on New Product Registration. Fill out the warranty completely,
being sure to include the model and serial number of the unit since this is how
warranties are tracked. If your Rane product was purchased in the U.S.A., mail
the completed card or register online with to Rane Corporation within 10 days
from the date of purchase. If you purchased the product outside the U.S.A.
you must file your warranty registration with the Rane Distributor in that
country. It is advised that you keep your bill of sale as proof of purchase, should
any difficulties arise concerning the registration of the warranty card. NOTICE:
It is not necessary to register in order to receive Rane Corporation’s standard
two-year limited warranty.
WARRANTY REGISTRATION is made and tracked by model and serial
numbers only, not by the purchaser’s or owner’s name. Therefore any warranty
correspondence or inquires must include the model and serial number of the
product in question. Be sure to fill in the model and serial number in the space
provided below and keep this in a safe place for future reference.
WARR ANTY SERVICE MUST BE PERFOR MED ONLY BY AN
AUTHORIZED R ANE SERVICE FACILITY LOCATED IN THE
COUNTRY WHERE THE UNIT WAS PURCHASED, OR (if product was
purchased in the U.S.) AT THE RANE FACTORY IN THE USA. If the product
is being sent to Rane for repair, please call the factory for a Return Authorization
number. We recommend advance notice be given to the repair facility to avoid
possible needless shipment in case the problem can be solved over the phone.
UNAUTHORIZED SERVICE PERFORMED ON ANY RANE PRODUCT
WILL VOID ITS EXISTING FACTORY WARRANTY.
© R a n e Co r p o r a t i o n
26
1 0 8 0 2 4 7 t h Ave. W. ,
M u k i l t e o WA 9 8 2 7 5 - 5 0 0 0
FACTORY SERVICE
If you wish your Rane product to be serviced at the factory, it must be shipped
fully insured, in the original packing box or equivalent. This warranty will
not cover repairs on products damaged through improper packaging. If possible,
avoid sending products through the U.S. mail. Be sure to include in the package:
1. Complete return street shipping address (P.O. Box numbers are not acceptable).
2. A detailed description of any problems experienced, including the make and
model numbers of any other system equipment.
3. Remote power supply, if applicable.
Repaired products purchased in the U.S. will be returned prepaid freight via the
same method they were sent to Rane. Products purchased in the U.S., but sent
to the factory from outside the U.S. must include return freight funds, and the
sender is fully responsible for all customs procedures, duties, tariffs and deposits.
In order to qualify for Rane’s one year extended
warranty (for a total of 3 years parts and labor),
the warranty must be completely filled out and
sent to us immediately. Valid in the USA only.
We recommend you write your serial number here
in your owners manual and on your sales receipt
for your records.
SERIAL NUMBER:______________________________________
PURCHASE DATE:______________________________________
TEL 425-355-6000
FA X 4 2 5 - 3 4 7 - 7 7 5 7
W E B r a n e. c o m
27
BB 22
1.636"
BALANCE BUDDY
5.1"
0.35"
0.15"
2
OUTPUT 2
-10dBV
-10dBV
RANE CORP.
+4dBu
2.5"
+4dBu
INPUT 2
BB 22
BALANCE
BUDDY
4.225"
INPUT 1
0.775"
1
OUTPUT 1
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