Campbell Scientific LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor Owner Manual

Campbell Scientific LWS  Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor Owner Manual
LWS
Dielectric Leaf
Wetness Sensor
Revision: 11/18
Copyright © 2008 – 2018
Campbell Scientific, Inc.
Limited Warranty
“Products manufactured by CSI are warranted by CSI to be free from defects in
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exclusive remedy under this warranty. The Customer assumes all costs of
removing, reinstalling, and shipping defective Products to CSI. CSI will return
such Products by surface carrier prepaid within the continental United States of
America. To all other locations, CSI will return such Products best way CIP
(port of entry) per Incoterms ® 2010. This warranty shall not apply to any
Products which have been subjected to modification, misuse, neglect, improper
service, accidents of nature, or shipping damage. This warranty is in lieu of all
other warranties, expressed or implied. The warranty for installation services
performed by CSI such as programming to customer specifications, electrical
connections to Products manufactured by CSI, and Product specific training, is
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EXCLUDES ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. CSI hereby disclaims,
to the fullest extent allowed by applicable law, any and all warranties and
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Assistance
Products may not be returned without prior authorization. The following
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served by Campbell Scientific, Inc. directly. Affiliate companies handle repairs
for customers within their territories. Please visit www.campbellsci.com to
determine which Campbell Scientific company serves your country.
To obtain a Returned Materials Authorization (RMA) number, contact
CAMPBELL SCIENTIFIC, INC., phone (435) 227-9000. Please write the
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Scientific’s shipping address is:
CAMPBELL SCIENTIFIC, INC.
RMA#_____
815 West 1800 North
Logan, Utah 84321-1784
For all returns, the customer must fill out a “Statement of Product Cleanliness
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concerns for our employees.
Safety
DANGER — MANY HAZARDS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INSTALLING, USING, MAINTAINING, AND WORKING ON OR AROUND
TRIPODS, TOWERS, AND ANY ATTACHMENTS TO TRIPODS AND TOWERS SUCH AS SENSORS, CROSSARMS, ENCLOSURES,
ANTENNAS, ETC. FAILURE TO PROPERLY AND COMPLETELY ASSEMBLE, INSTALL, OPERATE, USE, AND MAINTAIN TRIPODS,
TOWERS, AND ATTACHMENTS, AND FAILURE TO HEED WARNINGS, INCREASES THE RISK OF DEATH, ACCIDENT, SERIOUS
INJURY, PROPERTY DAMAGE, AND PRODUCT FAILURE. TAKE ALL REASONABLE PRECAUTIONS TO AVOID THESE HAZARDS.
CHECK WITH YOUR ORGANIZATION'S SAFETY COORDINATOR (OR POLICY) FOR PROCEDURES AND REQUIRED PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT PRIOR TO PERFORMING ANY WORK.
Use tripods, towers, and attachments to tripods and towers only for purposes for which they are designed. Do not exceed design limits.
Be familiar and comply with all instructions provided in product manuals. Manuals are available at www.campbellsci.com or by
telephoning (435) 227-9000 (USA). You are responsible for conformance with governing codes and regulations, including safety
regulations, and the integrity and location of structures or land to which towers, tripods, and any attachments are attached. Installation
sites should be evaluated and approved by a qualified engineer. If questions or concerns arise regarding installation, use, or
maintenance of tripods, towers, attachments, or electrical connections, consult with a licensed and qualified engineer or electrician.
General
• Prior to performing site or installation work, obtain required approvals and permits. Comply
with all governing structure-height regulations, such as those of the FAA in the USA.
• Use only qualified personnel for installation, use, and maintenance of tripods and towers, and
any attachments to tripods and towers. The use of licensed and qualified contractors is highly
recommended.
• Read all applicable instructions carefully and understand procedures thoroughly before
beginning work.
• Wear a hardhat and eye protection, and take other appropriate safety precautions while
working on or around tripods and towers.
• Do not climb tripods or towers at any time, and prohibit climbing by other persons. Take
reasonable precautions to secure tripod and tower sites from trespassers.
• Use only manufacturer recommended parts, materials, and tools.
Utility and Electrical
• You can be killed or sustain serious bodily injury if the tripod, tower, or attachments you are
installing, constructing, using, or maintaining, or a tool, stake, or anchor, come in contact with
overhead or underground utility lines.
• Maintain a distance of at least one-and-one-half times structure height, 20 feet, or the distance
required by applicable law, whichever is greater, between overhead utility lines and the
structure (tripod, tower, attachments, or tools).
• Prior to performing site or installation work, inform all utility companies and have all
underground utilities marked.
• Comply with all electrical codes. Electrical equipment and related grounding devices should be
installed by a licensed and qualified electrician.
Elevated Work and Weather
• Exercise extreme caution when performing elevated work.
• Use appropriate equipment and safety practices.
• During installation and maintenance, keep tower and tripod sites clear of un-trained or nonessential personnel. Take precautions to prevent elevated tools and objects from dropping.
• Do not perform any work in inclement weather, including wind, rain, snow, lightning, etc.
Maintenance
• Periodically (at least yearly) check for wear and damage, including corrosion, stress cracks,
frayed cables, loose cable clamps, cable tightness, etc. and take necessary corrective actions.
• Periodically (at least yearly) check electrical ground connections.
WHILE EVERY ATTEMPT IS MADE TO EMBODY THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF SAFETY IN ALL CAMPBELL SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTS,
THE CUSTOMER ASSUMES ALL RISK FROM ANY INJURY RESULTING FROM IMPROPER INSTALLATION, USE, OR
MAINTENANCE OF TRIPODS, TOWERS, OR ATTACHMENTS TO TRIPODS AND TOWERS SUCH AS SENSORS, CROSSARMS,
ENCLOSURES, ANTENNAS, ETC.
Table of Contents
PDF viewers: These page numbers refer to the printed version of this document. Use the
PDF reader bookmarks tab for links to specific sections.
1. Introduction................................................................ 1
2. Precautions ................................................................ 1
3. Initial Inspection ........................................................ 1
4. QuickStart .................................................................. 1
5. Overview .................................................................... 3
5.1
5.2
Measurement ........................................................................................3
Leaf Mimicry .......................................................................................4
6. Specifications ............................................................ 4
7. Installation ................................................................. 5
7.1
7.2
7.3
Field Installation...................................................................................5
Wiring ..................................................................................................6
Programming ........................................................................................6
7.3.1 Voltage Measurement ...................................................................6
7.3.2 Minutes Dry, Minutes Wet or Contaminated, and Minutes Wet ...7
7.3.3 Interpreting Data ...........................................................................7
8. Maintenance ............................................................... 8
9. Acknowledgement ..................................................... 8
Appendices
A. Importing Short Cut Code Into CRBasic Editor ... A-1
B. Example Programs ................................................ B-1
B.1
B.2
Example CR1000X Program............................................................B-1
Example CR6 Program ....................................................................B-2
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor ..................................................5
Top view of a typical LWS installation................................................5
Typical LWS response .........................................................................7
Figures
i
Table of Contents
Tables
B-1.
B-2.
CR1000X Example Program Wiring ...............................................B-1
CR6 Example Program Wiring ........................................................B-2
CRBasic Examples
B-1.
B-2.
CR1000X Program for Measuring the LWS ....................................B-1
CR6 Program for Measuring the LWS .............................................B-2
ii
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
1.
Introduction
Direct measurement of leaf wetness is problematic. Secure long-term
attachment of a sensor to a representative living leaf is difficult. Leaf position,
sun exposure, and health are in constant flux. To avoid these problems, leaf
wetness sensors have been developed to estimate by inference the wetness of
nearby leaves. The LWS estimates leaf surface wetness by measuring the
dielectric constant of the sensor upper surface. The LWS is able to detect the
presence of miniscule amounts of water or ice. Individual sensor calibration is
not normally necessary.
NOTE
2.
3.
4.
This manual provides information only for CRBasic data loggers.
For retired Edlog data logger support, see an older manual at
www.campbellsci.com/old-manuals.
Precautions
•
READ AND UNDERSTAND the Safety section at the front of this
manual.
•
Care should be taken when opening the shipping package to not damage or
cut the cable jacket. If damage to the cable is suspected, contact Campbell
Scientific.
•
Although the LWS is rugged, it should be handled as a precision scientific
instrument.
•
Over time, the accumulation of dust and bird droppings can cause the dry
output to rise. We recommend that the sensor be periodically cleaned
using a moist cloth, or when you detect elevated dry output.
•
The LWS is intended only for applications wherein the data logger
provides short excitation, leaving the sensor quiescent most of the time.
Continuous excitation may cause the sensor to exceed government
specified limits on electromagnetic emissions.
Initial Inspection
•
Upon receipt of the LWS, inspect the packaging and contents for damage.
File damage claims with the shipping company.
•
The model number and cable length are printed on a label at the
connection end of the cable. Check this information against the shipping
documents to ensure the correct product and cable length are received.
QuickStart
A video that describes data logger programming using Short Cut is available at:
www.campbellsci.com/videos/cr1000x-datalogger-getting-started-programpart-3. Short Cut is an easy way to program your data logger to measure the
LWS and assign data logger wiring terminals. Short Cut is available as a
1
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
download on www.campbellsci.com. It is included in installations of
LoggerNet, PC200W, PC400, or RTDAQ.
The following procedure also describes programming with Short Cut.
1.
Open Short Cut and click Create New Program.
2.
Double-click the data logger model.
3.
In the Available Sensors and Devices box, type LWS. You can also
locate the sensor in Sensors | Miscellaneous Sensors folder. Double-click
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor. Enter the Dry threshold (mV) <
and Wet threshold (mV) >= values (see Section 7.3.3, Interpreting Data
(p. 7), for information about determining the dry threshold and wet threshold
values).
4.
Click on the Wiring tab to see how the sensor is to be wired to the data
logger. Click OK after wiring the sensor.
5.
Repeat steps three and four for other sensors. Click Next.
2
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
NOTE
5.
6.
In Output Setup, type the scan rate, meaningful table names, and the
Data Output Storage Interval.
7.
Select the output options.
8.
Click Finish and save the program. Send the program to the data logger if
the data logger is connected to the computer.
9.
If the sensor is connected to the data logger, check the output of the sensor
in LoggerNet, PC400, RTDAQ, or PC200W to make sure it is making
reasonable measurements.
Short Cut uses the execution interval to make the minutes wet, dry,
and contaminated calculations (Section 7.3.2, Minutes Dry,
Minutes Wet or Contaminated, and Minutes Wet (p. 7)). You need
to take this into account while editing the Short Cut program.
Overview
5.1
Measurement
The LWS measures the dielectric constant of a zone approximately 1 cm from
the upper surface of the sensor. The dielectric constant of water (≈80) and ice
3
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
(≈5) are much higher than that of air (≈1), so the measured dielectric constant
is strongly dependent on the presence of moisture or frost on the sensor
surfaces. The sensor outputs a millivolt signal proportional to the dielectric of
the measurement zone, and therefore proportional to the amount of water or ice
on the sensor surface.
5.2
Leaf Mimicry
The LWS is designed to approximate the thermodynamic properties of most
leaves. If the specific heat of a typical leaf is estimated at 3750 J kg–1 K–1,
density estimated at 0.95 g/cm3, and thickness estimated at 0.4 mm, then the
heat capacity of the leaf is ≈1425 J m–2 K–1. This heat capacity is closely
approximated by the thin (0.65 mm) fiberglass construction of the LWS, which
has a heat capacity of 1480 J m–2 K–1. By mimicking the thermodynamic
properties of a leaf, the LWS closely matches the wetness state of the canopy.
The sensor closely matches the radiative properties of real leaves. Healthy
leaves generally absorb solar radiation in much of the visible portion of the
spectrum, but selectively reject much of the energy in the near-infrared. The
surface coating of the LWS absorbs well in the near-infrared region, but the
white color reflects most of the visible radiation. Spectroradiometer
measurements indicate that the overall radiation balance of the sensor closely
matches that of a healthy leaf. During normal use, prolonged exposure to
sunlight can cause some yellowing of the coating, which does not affect the
function of the sensor. The surface coating is hydrophobic — similar to a leaf
with a hydrophobic cuticle. The sensor matches the wetness state of these types
of leaves, but may not match the wetness duration of pubescent leaves or
leaves with less waxy cuticles.
6.
Specifications
Features:
•
Imitates characteristics of a leaf
•
Does not require painting or calibration of individual sensors
•
Detects trace amounts of water or ice on the leaf surface
•
Compatible with Campbell Scientific CRBasic data loggers:
CR200(X) series, CR300 series, CR6 series, CR800 series, CR1000,
CR1000X, CR3000, CR5000, and CR9000(X)
Settling Time:
10 ms
Excitation:
2.5 Vdc (2 mA) to 5.0 Vdc (7 mA)
Minimum Excitation Time:
10 ms
Output:
300 to 1250 mV (depends on excitation
voltage)
Operating Temperature:
–40 to 60 °C
Length:
12.0 cm (4.7 in)
Width:
5.8 cm (2.3 in)
4
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
7.
Height:
0.8 cm (0.3 in)
Maximum Cable Length:
75 m (246 ft)
Interchangeability:
Interchangeable without painting or individual
calibration
Installation
If you are programming your data logger with Short Cut, skip Section 7.2,
Wiring (p. 6), and Section 7.3, Programming (p. 6). Short Cut does this work for
you. See Section 4, QuickStart (p. 1), for a Short Cut tutorial.
7.1
Field Installation
The LWS includes two holes for mounting the sensor on a small diameter rod
by using zip ties or 4-40 bolts (FIGURE 7-1 and FIGURE 7-2). Typical
deployment is in a plant canopy or on a weather station mast.
FIGURE 7-1. LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
FIGURE 7-2. Top view of a typical LWS installation
5
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
7.2
Wiring
TABLE 7-1. Wire Color, Wire Function, and Data Logger Connection
Wire
Color
Wire Function
Data Logger Connection Terminal
Brown or
White
Voltage
excitation input
U configured for voltage excitation1, EX,
VX (voltage excitation)
Orange or
Red
Analog voltage
output
U configured for single-ended analog
input1, SE (single-ended, analog input)
Clear
Shield
⏚ (analog ground)
1U
7.3
terminals are automatically configured by the measurement instruction.
Programming
Short Cut is the best source for up-to-date data logger programming code.
If your data acquisition requirements are simple, you can probably create and
maintain a data logger program exclusively with Short Cut. If your data
acquisition needs are more complex, the files that Short Cut creates are a great
source for programming code to start a new program or add to an existing
custom program.
NOTE
Short Cut cannot edit programs after they are imported and edited
in CRBasic Editor.
A Short Cut tutorial is available in Section 4, QuickStart (p. 1). If you wish to
import Short Cut code into CRBasic Editor to create or add to a customized
program, follow the procedure in Appendix Appendix A, Importing Short Cut
Code Into CRBasic Editor (p. A-1). Programming basics for CRBasic data
loggers are provided in the following sections. Complete program examples for
CRBasic data loggers can be found in Appendix B, Example Programs (p. B-1).
Programming basics and programming examples for Edlog data loggers are
provided at www.campbellsci.com/old-manuals.
7.3.1 Voltage Measurement
The LWS requires excitation voltage between 2.5 and 5 Vdc. It produces an
output voltage dependent on the dielectric constant of the medium surrounding
the sensor. Output voltage ranges from 10 to 50% of the excitation voltage.
Except for the CR200(X), CRBasic data loggers use the BRHalf() instruction
to measure the sensor output. The BRHalf() instruction and parameters are as
follows:
BRHalf(Dest,Reps,Range,SeChan,ExChan,MeasPEx,ExmV,RevEx,Settling,
fN1/Integ,Mult,Offset)
The CR200(X) uses the ExDelSE() CRBasic instruction to measure the sensor
output. The ExDelSE() instruction and parameters are as follows:
ExDelSE( Dest, Reps, SEChan, ExChan, ExmV, Delay, Mult, Offset )
6
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
7.3.2 Minutes Dry, Minutes Wet or Contaminated, and Minutes Wet
The Voltage measurement can be further categorized into Minutes Dry,
Minutes Wet or Contaminated, and Minutes Wet as follows:
If mV < 274 Then
Minutes Dry = Scan Interval in seconds / 60
Else
If mV >= 284 Then
Minutes Wet = Scan Interval in seconds / 60
Else
Minutes Wet or Contaminated = Scan Interval in seconds / 60
End If
End If
Given a 2500 mV excitation, the thresholds of less than 274 mV for dry and
greater or equal to 284 mV for wet are recommended by Meter Environment.
However, the thresholds can be adjusted as needed. Minutes dry, minutes wet
or contaminated, and minutes wet can then be totaled and stored for any given
period (table interval). Minutes wet or contaminated can be considered a wet
condition or a contaminated condition depending on the user’s evaluation of
the sensors condition. The user may also choose to store an average of the
voltage measurement for post processing later.
7.3.3 Interpreting Data
Many leaf wetness applications, such as phytopathology, require a Boolean
interpretation of leaf wetness data. A Boolean threshold is determined by
analyzing a few days of time-series data. The time-series data in FIGURE 7-3,
was obtained using a 5 Vdc excitation. The sensor yields approximately
445 mV when dry, approximately 475 mV when frosted, and greater than
475 mV when wet. Therefore, a Boolean wetness threshold of 500 mV should
serve well for interpreting these data.
FIGURE 7-3. Typical LWS response
7
LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor
Duration of leaf wetness can be determined either by post processing of data,
or by programming the data logger to accumulate time of wetness based on the
Boolean threshold. Accumulation of dust and debris, such as avian fecal
matter, will change the Boolean threshold. So, while having the data logger
accumulate time of leaf wetness, or time of frost, may be convenient, assurance
of data quality requires retention of the base millivolt measurements.
NOTE
8.
Collect data frequently enough to capture changes in surface
wetness. A sample frequency of 15 minutes or less is usually
necessary to accurately capture leaf wetness duration.
Maintenance
The accumulation of dust and debris will cause the dry output to increase and
change the Boolean threshold. Clean the sensing surface with a moist cloth
periodically or when elevated dry output is detected.
The LWS leaf wetness sensor withstands typical outdoor radiation and
precipitation loads for more than two years. If using the LWS in areas with
unusually high radiation loads, Campbell Scientific recommends applying
Revivex UV Protectant (available from www.gearaid.com/products/revivexcare-uv-protect) every 45 days. Revivex UV Protectant is the only tested and
approved UV blocking system for this leaf wetness sensor. Revivex UV
Protectant was formerly known as Gear Aid UV Tech.
To apply Revivex UV Protectant:
9.
1.
Wipe sensor clean.
2.
Spray sensor surface with Revivex UV Protectant.
3.
Rub with soft cloth until dry.
Acknowledgement
Portions of this manual are copyrighted by Meter Environment and are used by
permission.
8
Appendix A. Importing Short Cut Code
Into CRBasic Editor
This tutorial shows:
•
Importing a Short Cut program into a program editor for additional
refinement
•
Importing a wiring diagram from Short Cut into the comments of a
custom program
Short Cut creates files, which can be imported into CRBasic Editor. Assuming
defaults were used when Short Cut was installed, these files reside in the
C:\campbellsci\SCWin folder:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
.DEF (wiring and memory usage information)
.CR2 (CR200(X)-series datalogger code)
.CR300 (CR300-series datalogger code)
.CR6 (CR6-series datalogger code)
.CR8 (CR800-series datalogger code)
.CR1 (CR1000 datalogger code)
.CR1X (CR1000X-series datalogger code)
.CR3 (CR3000 datalogger code)
.CR5 (CR5000 datalogger code)
Import Short Cut code and wiring diagram into CRBasic Editor:
1.
NOTE
Create the Short Cut program following the procedure in Section 4,
QuickStart (p. 1). Finish the program. On the Advanced tab, click the
CRBasic Editor button. The program opens in CRBasic with the name
noname.CR_. Provide a name and save the program.
Once the file is edited with CRBasic Editor, Short Cut can no
longer be used to edit the program it created.
2.
The program can now be edited, saved, and sent to the data logger.
3.
Import wiring information to the program by opening the associated .DEF
file. By default, it is saved in the c:\campbellsci\SCWin folder. Copy and
paste the section beginning with heading “–Wiring for CRXXX–” into the
CRBasic program, usually at the head of the file. After pasting, edit the
information such that an apostrophe (') begins each line. This character
instructs the data logger compiler to ignore the line when compiling. You
can highlight several lines of CRBasic code then right-click and select
Comment Block. (This feature is demonstrated at about 5:10 in the
CRBasic | Features video.)
A-1
Appendix B. Example Programs
For these programs, the dry threshold is 274 and the wet threshold is 284. To
determine minutes dry, minutes wet or contaminated, and minutes wet, the
value 0.8333333 is used. This value was calculated based on a 5 s scan interval
(scan interval/60 s). Refer to Section 7.3.2, Minutes Dry, Minutes Wet or
Contaminated, and Minutes Wet (p. 7), for more information.
B.1 Example CR1000X Program
The wiring for the example is shown in TABLE B-1.
TABLE B-1. CR1000X Example Program Wiring
Color
Function
CR1000X
Brown or White
Excitation
VX1
Orange or Red
Analog Out
SE1
Clear
Analog Ground
⏚
CRBasic Example B-1. CR1000X Program for Measuring the LWS
'CR1000X
'Declare Variables and Units
Public BattV
Public PTemp_C
Public LWmV
Public LWMDry
Public LWMCon
Public LWMWet
Units
Units
Units
Units
Units
Units
BattV=Volts
PTemp_C=Deg C
LWmV=mV
LWMDry=Minutes
LWMCon=Minutes
LWMWet=Minutes
'Define Data Tables
DataTable(Hourly,True,-1)
DataInterval(0,60,Min,10)
Sample(1,BattV,FP2)
Sample(1,PTemp_C,FP2)
Sample(1,LWmV,FP2)
Totalize(1,LWMDry,FP2,False)
Totalize(1,LWMCon,FP2,False)
Totalize(1,LWMWet,FP2,False)
EndTable
DataTable(Daily,True,-1)
DataInterval(0,1440,Min,10)
Minimum(1,BattV,FP2,False,False)
EndTable
'Main Program
BeginProg
'Main Scan
B-1
Appendix B. Example Programs
Scan(5,Sec,1,0)
'Default Data Logger Battery Voltage measurement 'BattV'
Battery(BattV)
'Default Wiring Panel Temperature measurement 'PTemp_C'
PanelTemp(PTemp_C,60)
'LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor measurement 'LWmV'
BrHalf(LWmV,1,mV5000,1,VX1,1,2500,False,10000,60,2500,0)
'Determine Minutes Dry 'LWMDry', Minutes Wet or Contaminated 'LWMCon',
'and Minutes Wet 'LWMWet'. The value 0.08333333 is the scan rate divided by
'60 s (5 s/60 s = 0.08333333).
LWMDry=0
LWMCon=0
LWMWet=0
If LWmV<274 Then
LWMDry=0.08333333
Else
If LWmV>=284 Then
LWMWet=0.08333333
Else
LWMCon=0.08333333
EndIf
EndIf
'Call Data Tables and Store Data
CallTable(Hourly)
CallTable(Daily)
NextScan
EndProg
B.2 Example CR6 Program
The wiring for the example is shown in TABLE B-2.
TABLE B-2. CR6 Example Program Wiring
Color
Function
CR6
Brown or White
Excitation
U1
Orange or Red
Analog Out
U2
Clear
Analog Ground
⏚
CRBasic Example B-2. CR6 Program for Measuring the LWS
'CR6 Series
'Declare Variables and Units
Public BattV
Public PTemp_C
Public LWmV
Public LWMDry
Public LWMCon
Public LWMWet
Units
Units
Units
Units
Units
Units
BattV=Volts
PTemp_C=Deg C
LWmV=mV
LWMDry=Minutes
LWMCon=Minutes
LWMWet=Minutes
B-2
Appendix B. Example Programs
'Define Data Tables
DataTable(Hourly,True,-1)
DataInterval(0,60,Min,10)
Sample(1,LWmV,FP2)
Totalize(1,LWMDry,FP2,False)
Totalize(1,LWMCon,FP2,False)
Totalize(1,LWMWet,FP2,False)
EndTable
DataTable(Daily,True,-1)
DataInterval(0,1440,Min,10)
Minimum(1,BattV,FP2,False,False)
EndTable
'Main Program
BeginProg
'Main Scan
Scan(5,Sec,1,0)
'Default Data Logger Battery Voltage measurement 'BattV'
Battery(BattV)
'Default Wiring Panel Temperature measurement 'PTemp_C'
PanelTemp(PTemp_C,60)
'LWS Dielectric Leaf Wetness Sensor measurement 'LWmV'
BrHalf(LWmV,1,mV5000,U2,U1,1,2500,False,10000,60,2500,0)
'Determine Minutes Dry 'LWMDry', Minutes Wet or Contaminated 'LWMCon',
'and Minutes Wet 'LWMWet'. The value 0.08333333 is the scan rate divided by
'60 s (5 s/60 s = 0.08333333).
LWMDry=0
LWMCon=0
LWMWet=0
If LWmV<274 Then
LWMDry=0.08333333
Else
If LWmV>=284 Then
LWMWet=0.08333333
Else
LWMCon=0.08333333
EndIf
EndIf
'Call Data Tables and Store Data
CallTable Hourly
CallTable Daily
NextScan
EndProg
B-3
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Website: www.campbellsci.com.cn
Costa Rica
Location: San José, Costa Rica
Email: info@campbellsci.cc
Website: www.campbellsci.cc
France
Location: Antony, France
Email: info@campbellsci.fr
Website: www.campbellsci.fr
Germany
Location: Bremen, Germany
Email: info@campbellsci.de
Website: www.campbellsci.de
South Africa
Location: Stellenbosch, South Africa
Email: sales@csafrica.co.za
Website: www.campbellscientific.co.za
Southeast Asia
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Email: info@campbellsci.asia
Website: www.campbellsci.asia
Spain
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Email: info@campbellsci.es
Website: www.campbellsci.es
UK
Location: Shepshed, Loughborough, UK
Email: sales@campbellsci.co.uk
Website: www.campbellsci.co.uk
USA
Location: Logan, UT USA
Email: info@campbellsci.com
Website: www.campbellsci.com
Please visit www.campbellsci.com/contact to obtain contact information
for your local US or international representative.
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