Sennheiser GP ID 3200-IN Instruction Manual

Sennheiser GP ID 3200-IN Instruction Manual
Wireless digital information system
3200
System Manual
Contents
1
Contents
Contents ................................................................................................................ 1-1
Safety Information .............................................................................................. 2-1
General safety information ...................................................................................................................................... 2-2
Intended use .................................................................................................................................................................... 2-2
The warning sign ............................................................................................................................................................. 2-2
Safety information on the equipment ....................................................................................................................
Units with rechargeable batteries ...............................................................................................................................
Units with mains connection ........................................................................................................................................
Risk of electric shock! .....................................................................................................................................................
Risk of fire! ........................................................................................................................................................................
Risk of short circuit! ........................................................................................................................................................
Units with cables and connected accessories ............................................................................................................
Risk of falling! ..................................................................................................................................................................
Danger due to unsuitable accessories and defective cables! .................................................................................
Danger when disconnecting and reconnecting the cables! ....................................................................................
Units requiring permanent installation ......................................................................................................................
Risk of injury! ...................................................................................................................................................................
Units operated on standard or rechargeable batteries ...........................................................................................
Danger due to defective standard and rechargeable batteries! ............................................................................
Units with headphone connection ...............................................................................................................................
Risk of hearing damage! ................................................................................................................................................
Units generating high-frequency alternating electromagnetic fields ..................................................................
Statements regarding FCC and industry Canada ......................................................................................................
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Safety for your computer files .................................................................................................................................
Danger due to data loss! ................................................................................................................................................
Danger of material damage due to loss of or damage to the dongle! .................................................................
Danger of wrong audio data remaining in the receivers! ........................................................................................
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-9
Getting to know the System .............................................................................. 3-1
Accompany the visitors to your exhibition! ........................................................................................................... 3-2
How do you make your exhibition a success? ....................................................................................................... 3-4
What is the best way to give visitors information? ................................................................................................. 3-4
Basics of the Components ................................................................................... 4-1
Overview of the components and
structures of the system ..........................................................................................................................................
The system components ................................................................................................................................................
The receivers ....................................................................................................................................................................
The cell transmitters .......................................................................................................................................................
The portable transmitters .............................................................................................................................................
The antennas ....................................................................................................................................................................
The identifiers ..................................................................................................................................................................
The chargers .....................................................................................................................................................................
The different types of Events .......................................................................................................................................
Storage Events .................................................................................................................................................................
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1-1
Contents
Live Events ........................................................................................................................................................................ 4-5
System Events .................................................................................................................................................................. 4-5
The software .................................................................................................................................................................... 4-6
The structure .................................................................................................................................................................... 4-7
The location with the number zero (location with fixed Events) .......................................................................... 4-7
The information flow in location “0” ........................................................................................................................... 4-7
Other locations (locations with variable Events) ...................................................................................................... 4-9
The information flow in locations with variable Events ........................................................................................ 4-10
The function of the components ...........................................................................................................................
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter ....................................................................................................................................
Transmitters in the overall system ............................................................................................................................
Transmitting the Events to the antennas ................................................................................................................
GP SK 3200 portable transmitter ...............................................................................................................................
Suitable microphones ...................................................................................................................................................
GP AM 3000 active antenna .......................................................................................................................................
Function of the active antennas in the overall system .........................................................................................
Antenna radiation pattern and range .......................................................................................................................
Connecting active antennas to the cell transmitters .............................................................................................
GP ID 3200 identifier ....................................................................................................................................................
GP ID 3200-IN identifier for use in dry, indoor environments ..............................................................................
GP ID 3200-OUT identifier for outdoor installation or use in humid
environments .................................................................................................................................................................
Functions of the identifiers in the overall system ..................................................................................................
Special functions of the identifiers ............................................................................................................................
GP EK 3202 receiver ......................................................................................................................................................
Function of the receivers in the overall system ......................................................................................................
The 4-key receiver .........................................................................................................................................................
The 5-key receiver .........................................................................................................................................................
The 16-key receiver ......................................................................................................................................................
GP L 3200 charger .........................................................................................................................................................
Functions of the chargers in the overall system .....................................................................................................
Index ....................................................................................................................................................................................
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4-19
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4-24
Putting the Components into Operation ......................................................... 5-1
Cell transmitters ......................................................................................................................................................... 5-2
Putting the cell transmitters into operation .............................................................................................................. 5-2
Unpacking the units ........................................................................................................................................................ 5-2
Where to place the cell transmitters ........................................................................................................................... 5-2
Fixing the cell transmitter feet ..................................................................................................................................... 5-2
Mounting the cell transmitters into a rack ................................................................................................................ 5-3
Connecting the mains cable .......................................................................................................................................... 5-3
Connecting the headphones ......................................................................................................................................... 5-3
Connecting sound sources for Live Events ................................................................................................................. 5-4
Connecting cell transmitters to a laptop or Base Station PC .................................................................................. 5-5
Networking several cell transmitters .......................................................................................................................... 5-5
Turning the cell transmitters on/off ........................................................................................................................... 5-5
Operating the cell transmitters .................................................................................................................................... 5-6
The buttons on the cell transmitter ............................................................................................................................ 5-6
The display of the cell transmitter ............................................................................................................................... 5-6
The status display of the cell transmitter .................................................................................................................. 5-7
Selecting a menu item .................................................................................................................................................... 5-7
Displaying the installation parameters ...................................................................................................................... 5-8
Changing the volume of the headphone output ....................................................................................................... 5-9
Selecting an audio source to listen to via the headphone output ....................................................................... 5-10
Damping excessively loud audio signals .................................................................................................................. 5-11
Temporarily changing antenna parameters for test purposes ............................................................................ 5-12
Displaying the firmware version ................................................................................................................................ 5-13
Changing the display contrast .................................................................................................................................... 5-14
1-2
Contents
Carrying out a reset ......................................................................................................................................................
Restoring the factory settings on the cell transmitter ..........................................................................................
Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................................................
Structure of the cell transmitter’s menu ..................................................................................................................
5-14
5-14
5-15
5-15
Portable transmitters .............................................................................................................................................
Putting the portable transmitters into operation ..................................................................................................
Connecting a microphone ............................................................................................................................................
Connecting a line source ..............................................................................................................................................
Connecting the antenna ..............................................................................................................................................
Charging the rechargeable battery ...........................................................................................................................
Attaching the portable transmitter to clothing ......................................................................................................
Adjusting the sensitivity of the microphone input ................................................................................................
Adjusting the sensitivity of the line input ...............................................................................................................
Operating the portable transmitters .........................................................................................................................
Setting the transmission channel ..............................................................................................................................
Turning the portable transmitter on/off ..................................................................................................................
Muting the microphone ...............................................................................................................................................
Conducting a guided tour ............................................................................................................................................
Interrupting the guided tour ......................................................................................................................................
Deactivating a tour interruption ................................................................................................................................
Finishing a guided tour ................................................................................................................................................
Care and maintenance ..................................................................................................................................................
If a problem occurs ... ....................................................................................................................................................
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5-23
Antenna ....................................................................................................................................................................
Putting the active antennas into operation ............................................................................................................
Where to place the antennas ......................................................................................................................................
Mounting the active antennas ...................................................................................................................................
Connecting the active antennas to the cell transmitters ......................................................................................
Connecting the directional antenna to the active antenna ..................................................................................
Assigning the MTS to the antenna ............................................................................................................................
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5-24
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5-25
5-26
5-26
Identifiers ................................................................................................................................................................. 5-27
Putting the identifiers into operation ....................................................................................................................... 5-27
Mounting the identifiers .............................................................................................................................................. 5-27
Adapting the identifiers to the surroundings ......................................................................................................... 5-27
The weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier ........................................................................................................ 5-28
Opening the housing of the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and closing it again so that it is watertight ................................................................................................................................................................................. 5-28
Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing ................................................................................... 5-29
Mounting an identifier ................................................................................................................................................. 5-30
Mounting a GP ID 3200-IN identifier onto a wall .................................................................................................... 5-30
Mounting a GP ID 3200-OUT identifier onto a wall ................................................................................................ 5-30
Connecting an identifier .............................................................................................................................................. 5-31
Connecting an identifier to the power supply ......................................................................................................... 5-31
Mounting an identifier with an external loop antenna ......................................................................................... 5-33
Mounting an identifier with an external switch (trigger operation) .................................................................. 5-34
Battery operation .......................................................................................................................................................... 5-35
Operating the identifiers ............................................................................................................................................. 5-35
Checking the identifiers ............................................................................................................................................... 5-36
Setting up the identifiers ............................................................................................................................................ 5-36
Changing the identifier parameters .......................................................................................................................... 5-37
Checking the internal clock of an identifier ............................................................................................................. 5-37
Setting the internal clock of an identifier ................................................................................................................ 5-38
Receivers ...................................................................................................................................................................
Putting the receivers into operation .........................................................................................................................
Connecting the headphones .......................................................................................................................................
Replacing the ear pads .................................................................................................................................................
Charging the rechargeable batteries of the receivers ...........................................................................................
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1-3
Contents
Attaching the receiver to clothing .............................................................................................................................
Changing the receiver settings ...................................................................................................................................
The presets .....................................................................................................................................................................
Presetting the receivers for groups of visitors ........................................................................................................
Changing the receiver presets permanently ............................................................................................................
Operating the receivers ................................................................................................................................................
Turning the receivers on/off .......................................................................................................................................
Selecting the category (16-key receiver only) ........................................................................................................
Setting the volume .......................................................................................................................................................
Calling up information at an exhibit ..........................................................................................................................
Repeating Storage Events ...........................................................................................................................................
Stopping sound reproduction .....................................................................................................................................
Calling up the Help function (only if the key is available) ....................................................................................
Calling up detailed information (only if the key is available) ..............................................................................
Possible operating states indicated by the red and the green LED ....................................................................
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5-43
Chargers ....................................................................................................................................................................
Putting the chargers into operation ..........................................................................................................................
Where to place the chargers .......................................................................................................................................
Screwing the charger to the base ..............................................................................................................................
Daisy-chaining chargers and connecting them to a PC .........................................................................................
Connecting the mains cable and turning the charger on ......................................................................................
Operating the chargers ................................................................................................................................................
Charging the rechargeable batteries of the receivers ............................................................................................
Index ....................................................................................................................................................................................
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Project planning .................................................................................................. 6-1
Before you start .......................................................................................................................................................... 6-2
The examples ................................................................................................................................................................... 6-2
Example 1: A small gallery ............................................................................................................................................. 6-2
Example 2: A town with several large-scale exhibitions ......................................................................................... 6-3
Frequency planning .................................................................................................................................................... 6-5
Example 1: A small gallery ........................................................................................................................................ 6-6
Planning the content ...................................................................................................................................................... 6-6
General overview of the structure of a project ......................................................................................................... 6-6
How many locations do you need? .............................................................................................................................. 6-6
Providing a location plan of the exhibits .................................................................................................................... 6-7
Planning the number of categories ............................................................................................................................. 6-8
Recording informational texts and setting the audio quality ................................................................................ 6-8
Collecting and structuring all Storage Events ............................................................................................................ 6-9
Collecting and structuring all Live Events ................................................................................................................ 6-11
How many cells do you need? ..................................................................................................................................... 6-12
Technical planning ........................................................................................................................................................ 6-12
How many receivers, headphones and chargers do you need? ........................................................................... 6-13
What type of receiver and how many identifiers do you need? .......................................................................... 6-13
Which software do you need? .................................................................................................................................... 6-14
How many cell transmitters and antennas do you need? ..................................................................................... 6-14
Example 2: A town with several
large-scale exhibitions ............................................................................................................................................ 6-15
Planning the content .................................................................................................................................................... 6-15
General overview of the structure of a project ....................................................................................................... 6-15
How many locations do you need? ............................................................................................................................ 6-15
For which Events is the location “0” suitable? For which Events are the other locations suitable? ............ 6-16
How high should the start ID of the fixed Events be? ........................................................................................... 6-17
Providing a location plan of the exhibits .................................................................................................................. 6-18
Planning the number of categories ........................................................................................................................... 6-19
Creating a list of all Storage Events ........................................................................................................................... 6-20
1-4
Contents
Recording informational texts and setting the audio quality ..............................................................................
Collecting and structuring all Storage Events .........................................................................................................
Collecting and structuring all Live Events ................................................................................................................
How many cells do you need? .....................................................................................................................................
Calculating the number of segments for stationary download in advance ......................................................
Planning guided tours ..................................................................................................................................................
Technical planning ........................................................................................................................................................
How many receivers, headphones and chargers do you need? ...........................................................................
What type of receiver and how many identifiers do you need? ..........................................................................
Which software do you need? ....................................................................................................................................
How many cell transmitters and antennas do you need? ....................................................................................
Would you like to conduct guided tours? .................................................................................................................
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6-23
6-24
6-25
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6-27
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6-28
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6-29
Overview of all Events types ................................................................................................................................. 6-30
The principal restrictions ........................................................................................................................................ 6-33
Further example configurations ............................................................................................................................
Configuration 1 ..............................................................................................................................................................
Configuration 2 ..............................................................................................................................................................
Configuration 3 ..............................................................................................................................................................
Configuration 4 ..............................................................................................................................................................
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Basics of the Software ......................................................................................... 7-1
Possible hardware versions ......................................................................................................................................
Minimum hardware required ........................................................................................................................................
Additional enlargement options ..................................................................................................................................
The Central PC ..................................................................................................................................................................
The network .....................................................................................................................................................................
The Base Station PCs ......................................................................................................................................................
The PC sat the receiver counters (Charger PCs) ........................................................................................................
The PDA .............................................................................................................................................................................
Where to place the computers .....................................................................................................................................
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7-6
System requirements ................................................................................................................................................
Central PC and Administration PC ................................................................................................................................
Base Station PCs ..............................................................................................................................................................
Output, Return and Charger PC ....................................................................................................................................
PDA (PalmTop or Microsoft Pocket PC) .......................................................................................................................
If you use a laptop only ..................................................................................................................................................
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7-9
The software modules ............................................................................................................................................
Basic configuration .......................................................................................................................................................
The Installation Manager (INM) .................................................................................................................................
The Base Station Manager (BSM) ..............................................................................................................................
The Charger Manager (CHM) .......................................................................................................................................
The PDA software Identifier Control (IDC) ...............................................................................................................
Additional modules .......................................................................................................................................................
The Announcement Manager (ANM) ........................................................................................................................
The Statistics Manager (STM) .....................................................................................................................................
Auxiliary modules .........................................................................................................................................................
The Base Station Server (BSS) ....................................................................................................................................
The License Manager Server (LMS) ............................................................................................................................
The Statistics Manager Collector (SMC) ....................................................................................................................
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7-11
The folder structure .................................................................................................................................................
Overview of the folder structure ................................................................................................................................
Contents of the folders ................................................................................................................................................
Software folder ..............................................................................................................................................................
Software file folder “bin” ............................................................................................................................................
Communication folder “sys” .......................................................................................................................................
7-12
7-12
7-12
7-12
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1-5
The installation folder “GPInstallations” ..................................................................................................................
The folders with the name of a location ...................................................................................................................
The folder of compressed audio files (GPP Audio) .................................................................................................
The folder of compressed Intro files (Intro) .............................................................................................................
The folder with cell transmitter files (System) .......................................................................................................
The folder of the audio “wave” files (WAV-Audio) ................................................................................................
The folder of announcements (Announcements) ..................................................................................................
7-13
7-13
7-13
7-13
7-13
7-14
7-14
The system files ....................................................................................................................................................... 7-15
Project file ....................................................................................................................................................................... 7-15
Audio files ....................................................................................................................................................................... 7-15
Windows wave audio files ........................................................................................................................................... 7-15
Encoded audio files ....................................................................................................................................................... 7-16
Cell transmitter files ..................................................................................................................................................... 7-16
Cell transmitter identification filw (TX*.ini) ............................................................................................................ 7-16
Cell transmitter initialization file (Ct*.ini) ................................................................................................................ 7-16
Cell transmitter MTS file (t*.mts) ............................................................................................................................... 7-16
Folders of the STM software ....................................................................................................................................... 7-17
Folder with statistical data on the Charger PC (Stat) ............................................................................................ 7-17
Folder with statistical data on the Central PC (Stat) ............................................................................................. 7-17
Folder with statistical data sorted according to months (Statyyyymm) .......................................................... 7-17
The “List” folder ............................................................................................................................................................ 7-17
Using the software .................................................................................................................................................. 7-18
Working with the dongle ............................................................................................................................................. 7-18
Using the password ...................................................................................................................................................... 7-18
Re-installing, repairing or de-installing software modules .............................................................................. 7-19
Index .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7-20
The Installation Manager (INM) ........................................................................ 8-1
General procedure ...................................................................................................................................................... 8-2
Creating a new project ................................................................................................................................................... 8-2
Time required for creating a new project ................................................................................................................... 8-2
The INM screen ............................................................................................................................................................ 8-3
The 6 buttons on the toolbar ........................................................................................................................................ 8-5
The two tabs “Pending” and “Done” .......................................................................................................................... 8-5
The “Configuration data” box ....................................................................................................................................... 8-6
The “Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field ............................................................... 8-6
The “Connection Host” field .......................................................................................................................................... 8-6
Starting the INM ......................................................................................................................................................... 8-8
Setting up a default project ...................................................................................................................................... 8-9
Four steps to a default project ..................................................................................................................................... 8-9
Configuring the project (detailed description) ...................................................................................................
Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode ........................................................................................
Working with project files ...........................................................................................................................................
Creating a new project .................................................................................................................................................
Opening a project ..........................................................................................................................................................
Saving a project .............................................................................................................................................................
Closing a project ............................................................................................................................................................
Exiting the program ......................................................................................................................................................
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-20
8-21
8-21
8-21
Configuring a location ............................................................................................................................................. 8-23
The “Location configuration” dialog box ................................................................................................................. 8-24
The “Print location data in HTML format”, “Check settings for completeness”, “OK” and “Cancel” buttons . 824
Category information ................................................................................................................................................... 8-25
MTS parameters of the cell transmitters .................................................................................................................. 8-27
The “Events” table ........................................................................................................................................................ 8-29
Contents
Changing the sorting of the table cells .....................................................................................................................
Editing tables .................................................................................................................................................................
How are table cells edited? ..........................................................................................................................................
Adding new table rows ................................................................................................................................................
Changing the width of a table column ......................................................................................................................
If table rows cannot be edited ... ................................................................................................................................
Editing categories .........................................................................................................................................................
Assigning/changing category names .......................................................................................................................
Redirecting the audio information of all Storage Events from one category to another category ..............
Adding categories .........................................................................................................................................................
Removing categories ....................................................................................................................................................
Setting up an Intro ........................................................................................................................................................
Removing/changing an Intro ......................................................................................................................................
Configuring cell transmitters/MTS .............................................................................................................................
Adding or replacing cell transmitters/MTS ..............................................................................................................
Reassigning MTS ............................................................................................................................................................
Removing an MTS ..........................................................................................................................................................
Changing the loader value of an MTS ........................................................................................................................
Entering or changing the site of the cell transmitter ............................................................................................
Selecting the RF channel ..............................................................................................................................................
Setting the transmitting power .................................................................................................................................
Turning the RF output on and off ..............................................................................................................................
Selecting the antenna type .........................................................................................................................................
Entering or changing the site of the antenna .........................................................................................................
Creating cells ..................................................................................................................................................................
The cell in location “0” .................................................................................................................................................
Cells in other locations .................................................................................................................................................
Adding a new cell ..........................................................................................................................................................
Renaming a cell ..............................................................................................................................................................
Removing a cell ..............................................................................................................................................................
Configuring Events ........................................................................................................................................................
Adding a new Event ......................................................................................................................................................
Deleting an Event ..........................................................................................................................................................
Restoring a deleted or deactivated Event ................................................................................................................
Renaming an Event .......................................................................................................................................................
Changing the Event features ......................................................................................................................................
Configuring special Events ..........................................................................................................................................
Assigning an audio source to an Event .....................................................................................................................
Changing the audio source of an Event ....................................................................................................................
Deleting the audio source of an Event ......................................................................................................................
Assigning an MTS for a category to an Event ........................................................................................................
Deleting an assignment to an MTS ............................................................................................................................
Linking the audio information of an Event from one category to another category ......................................
Setting up the identifiers ............................................................................................................................................
Adding identifiers to the identifier table .................................................................................................................
Deleting identifiers .......................................................................................................................................................
Changing the identifier default settings ..................................................................................................................
Reproducing Storage Events .......................................................................................................................................
Assigning the correct location to an Event ..............................................................................................................
Checking the configuration of a location ..................................................................................................................
Printing the configuration data of a location as an HTML document .................................................................
Accepting/discarding the configuration of a location ...........................................................................................
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8-71
8-72
8-73
8-74
8-74
Adding locations ...................................................................................................................................................... 8-75
Adding a new location .................................................................................................................................................. 8-75
Importing a location ..................................................................................................................................................... 8-78
Deleting locations .................................................................................................................................................... 8-82
Configuring jobs ....................................................................................................................................................... 8-83
1-7
Contents
Configuring download jobs .........................................................................................................................................
Configuring a new job ..................................................................................................................................................
Editing download jobs ..................................................................................................................................................
Editing the configuration of a download job ...........................................................................................................
Editing jobs .....................................................................................................................................................................
Defining the project status as the basis for updates .............................................................................................
Removing download jobs ............................................................................................................................................
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8-84
8-88
8-88
8-88
8-88
8-89
Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA .............................................................................................. 8-90
Transferring identifier configurations to a 3Com PalmTop .................................................................................. 8-90
Transferring identifier configurations to a Pocket PC ............................................................................................ 8-91
Changing options ....................................................................................................................................................
Defining the program start settings .........................................................................................................................
Changing the password ................................................................................................................................................
Updating the firmware of the receivers ...................................................................................................................
Updating the alarm signal of the receivers ..............................................................................................................
Updating the jingle of the receivers ..........................................................................................................................
8-93
8-93
8-93
8-94
8-96
8-98
Monitoring the INM ............................................................................................................................................... 8-101
Opening log files ......................................................................................................................................................... 8-101
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode) ............................................................................................................
Checking a project for completeness ......................................................................................................................
Monitoring jobs ...........................................................................................................................................................
Using the online Help .................................................................................................................................................
Displaying the version number of the INM ...........................................................................................................
Displaying the license Information .........................................................................................................................
8-102
8-102
8-103
8-103
8-104
8-104
The “Dongle Info” dialog box .............................................................................................................................. 8-105
Recommendations/Tips ........................................................................................................................................ 8-106
Setting up a Null Event .............................................................................................................................................. 8-106
Index ................................................................................................................................................................................. 8-107
The Base Station Manager (BSM) ..................................................................... 9-1
Before you start .......................................................................................................................................................... 9-2
General procedure ...................................................................................................................................................... 9-2
The BSM screen ........................................................................................................................................................... 9-2
The “Update” window .................................................................................................................................................... 9-3
The “Status” window ..................................................................................................................................................... 9-3
Removing the contents of the “Status” or “Update” window ............................................................................... 9-3
Monitoring USB activity ................................................................................................................................................. 9-3
Searching for connected cell transmitters ................................................................................................................. 9-4
Displaying status information of the cell transmitters ........................................................................................... 9-4
Monitoring the cell transmitter statuses .................................................................................................................... 9-5
Updating the cell transmitter status display ............................................................................................................. 9-7
Selecting the cell transmitter status options ............................................................................................................ 9-7
Opening the “Service Dialog” window ........................................................................................................................ 9-8
Checking the connected antennas ............................................................................................................................... 9-8
Resetting the connected cell transmitters ................................................................................................................. 9-9
Updating the cell transmitter firmware .................................................................................................................... 9-10
Quitting the BSM ........................................................................................................................................................... 9-10
Index .................................................................................................................................................................................... 9-11
The Charger Manager (CHM) ........................................................................... 10-1
Before you start ....................................................................................................................................................... 10-2
General procedure ................................................................................................................................................... 10-3
The two access levels (Access level) .......................................................................................................................... 10-3
The two receiver modes ............................................................................................................................................... 10-3
1-8
Contents
The CHM screen ........................................................................................................................................................
The “Charger Display” area .........................................................................................................................................
The “Device Display” area ...........................................................................................................................................
The “Selection” box ......................................................................................................................................................
10-4
10-5
10-6
10-7
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup) ............................................................................................................ 10-9
Assigning addresses to the strings ......................................................................................................................... 10-10
Reading out statistical data manually or automatically ..................................................................................... 10-10
Adapting the CHM to the receivers in your exhibition (Mode Selection) ........................................................ 10-11
Allowing communication with the VPR .................................................................................................................. 10-11
Inverting the program display .................................................................................................................................. 10-12
Determining the table display .................................................................................................................................. 10-12
Changing the password ............................................................................................................................................. 10-13
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode ......................................................................................... 10-14
Selecting strings, chargers or devices ..................................................................................................................... 10-14
Connecting or removing chargers ............................................................................................................................ 10-15
Displaying the error list .............................................................................................................................................. 10-15
Closing the CHM ........................................................................................................................................................... 10-16
Getting Help ................................................................................................................................................................. 10-16
Changing the receiver presets temporarily ............................................................................................................ 10-16
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode ............................................................................ 10-19
Changing between “Standard Operation” and “Installation Administration” mode .................................... 10-19
Changing the receiver presets permanently ......................................................................................................... 10-19
Displaying the receiver presets (Get Settings) ..................................................................................................... 10-21
Displaying the version numbers of the internal receiver software and hardware ........................................ 10-22
Reading out statistical data manually .................................................................................................................... 10-23
Preparing stationary download ................................................................................................................................ 10-24
Deleting the Storage Events audio data ................................................................................................................ 10-25
Setting the country code for portable transmitters ............................................................................................ 10-25
Displaying the country code of the portable transmitters (Get Settings) ...................................................... 10-26
Index ................................................................................................................................................................................. 10-27
Setting the country code for portable transmitters ............................................................................................ 11-38
The Identifier Control (IDC) ............................................................................. 12-1
Before you start ....................................................................................................................................................... 12-2
General procedure ................................................................................................................................................... 12-4
The screen .................................................................................................................................................................
Starting the software ...................................................................................................................................................
The menu bar .................................................................................................................................................................
The display area ............................................................................................................................................................
Selecting a location (Installation) ..............................................................................................................................
Selecting a cell (Cell) .....................................................................................................................................................
The foot bar ....................................................................................................................................................................
12-5
12-5
12-5
12-5
12-6
12-6
12-6
The menus of the PDA software ............................................................................................................................ 12-7
The “File” menu ............................................................................................................................................................. 12-7
Displaying the software version and the copyright notice (Info) ....................................................................... 12-7
The “Cell” menu ............................................................................................................................................................. 12-7
Searching for a cell (Search, Find next) .................................................................................................................... 12-7
The “Event” menu ......................................................................................................................................................... 12-8
Searching for an Event (Search, Find next) ............................................................................................................. 12-8
Editing the identifier settings (Edit) ......................................................................................................................... 12-8
The “Identifier” menu ................................................................................................................................................ 12-10
Reading the current identifier data (Read Parameters) ..................................................................................... 12-10
Transmitting identifier settings from the PDA to an identifier
(Send Parameters) ...................................................................................................................................................... 12-11
Checking the internal clock of an identifier (Read Time) .................................................................................... 12-11
1-9
Contents
Setting the internal clock of an identifier (Set Time) .........................................................................................
Setting an identifier to standby mode (Standby on) .........................................................................................
Setting an identifier to normal operation (Standby off) ...................................................................................
Transmitting System Events from the PDA to identifiers ..................................................................................
Triggering the switching over of the category (“Cat” System Event ) ...........................................................
Triggering the download of the variable Events of a location (“Location entrance” System Event ) ......
Turning the alarm on/off (“Alarm On” and “Alarm Off” System Events) ......................................................
Setting up the automatic return to the RF channel of the portable transmitter (System Event 97) .......
Index .................................................................................................................................................................................
12-11
12-12
12-12
12-13
12-13
12-14
12-14
12-15
12-17
The Statistics Manager (STM) ......................................................................... 13-1
Before you start ....................................................................................................................................................... 13-2
General procedure ................................................................................................................................................... 13-3
Starting the STM software .......................................................................................................................................... 13-5
The STM screen ........................................................................................................................................................
The 16 buttons on the tool bar ..................................................................................................................................
The “Work List” field ....................................................................................................................................................
The “Detail List” field ...................................................................................................................................................
13-6
13-7
13-7
13-8
The STM menus ........................................................................................................................................................ 13-9
The “File” menu ............................................................................................................................................................. 13-9
Opening a project .......................................................................................................................................................... 13-9
Loading saved statistics ............................................................................................................................................ 13-10
Loading the defaults (statistics settings) ............................................................................................................. 13-10
Saving the defaults .................................................................................................................................................... 13-10
Closing the program .................................................................................................................................................. 13-11
The “Edit” menu ......................................................................................................................................................... 13-11
Editing the defaults ................................................................................................................................................... 13-11
Establishing the connection to the SMC modules on the Charger PCs ............................................................. 13-13
Changing the default TCP/IP port of an SMC module .......................................................................................... 13-15
Setting up jobs ............................................................................................................................................................ 13-16
Selecting the type of job ........................................................................................................................................... 13-17
Selecting the period to be taken into account in the job ................................................................................... 13-18
Selecting the defaults for the job ........................................................................................................................... 13-19
Saving the job ............................................................................................................................................................. 13-21
Deleting a job .............................................................................................................................................................. 13-21
Changing a job ............................................................................................................................................................ 13-22
The “Collectors” menu ............................................................................................................................................... 13-23
Manually transmitting the tour data from the Charger PCs to the Central PC .............................................. 13-23
The “View” menu ....................................................................................................................................................... 13-23
Manually creating Event-related statistics (Event List) ..................................................................................... 13-23
Manually creating visitor-related statistics (Visitor List) .................................................................................. 13-29
Manually creating time-related statistics (Timing List) ..................................................................................... 13-34
Creating group-related statistics (Group List) ..................................................................................................... 13-38
Saving or exporting statistics .................................................................................................................................. 13-43
Updating the “Work List” window ......................................................................................................................... 13-43
The “Help” menu ........................................................................................................................................................ 13-43
Displaying the version number of the STM ........................................................................................................... 13-43
Displaying the license Information ......................................................................................................................... 13-44
Index ........................................................................................................................................................................ 13-45
The Announcement Manager (ANM) ............................................................. 14-1
Before you start .......................................................................................................................................................
Making announcements or executing scheduled jobs ...........................................................................................
Which visitors do you address your announcements to? .....................................................................................
The audio sources for your announcements ............................................................................................................
1-10
14-2
14-3
14-3
14-3
Contents
Administrator and operator ........................................................................................................................................ 14-4
General Procedure ................................................................................................................................................... 14-5
The administrator creates a plan ............................................................................................................................... 14-5
The administrator defines the call targets ............................................................................................................... 14-5
Preparing location “0” for announcements ......................................................................................................... 14-6
The ANM screen ....................................................................................................................................................... 14-8
The eleven buttons on the toolbar .......................................................................................................................... 14-10
The three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” and “Done” .................................................................................................... 14-10
The “Job description” field ........................................................................................................................................ 14-11
Starting the ANM ................................................................................................................................................... 14-13
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode) .................................................................................................... 14-14
Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode ...................................................................................... 14-14
Working with announcement configuration files ................................................................................................. 14-15
Creating a new announcement configuration file ................................................................................................ 14-15
Opening an announcement configuration file ....................................................................................................... 14-16
Saving an announcement configuration file ........................................................................................................ 14-17
Closing the program ................................................................................................................................................... 14-17
Configuring the ANM for your exhibition ............................................................................................................... 14-17
Defining areas .............................................................................................................................................................. 14-18
Defining category groups .......................................................................................................................................... 14-19
Defining call targets ................................................................................................................................................... 14-21
Recording and importing announcements ............................................................................................................. 14-24
Recording announcements with a microphone and saving them ..................................................................... 14-25
Importing and saving announcements as *.wav files .......................................................................................... 14-27
Configuring scheduled jobs ....................................................................................................................................... 14-30
Changing options ........................................................................................................................................................ 14-33
Defining the rights of the operator ......................................................................................................................... 14-33
Opening an announcement configuration file automatically on program start ............................................ 14-34
Changing the password ............................................................................................................................................. 14-35
Preceding all announcements by a jingle ............................................................................................................... 14-35
Monitoring the ANM .............................................................................................................................................. 14-37
Opening log files .......................................................................................................................................................... 14-37
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode) ............................................................................................................. 14-39
Recording and transmitting an immediate announcement .............................................................................. 14-39
Monitoring the jobs .................................................................................................................................................... 14-43
Editing the jobs ............................................................................................................................................................ 14-43
Using the online Help ................................................................................................................................................. 14-44
Displaying the version number of the ANM ........................................................................................................... 14-44
Displaying the license Information .......................................................................................................................... 14-44
Index 45
The Visitor Profiler (VPR) ................................................................................. 15-1
Before you start ....................................................................................................................................................... 15-2
Before you work with the software ........................................................................................................................... 15-2
General procedure ................................................................................................................................................... 15-3
The two access modes .................................................................................................................................................. 15-3
Temporarily or permanently assigning units to a visitor group .......................................................................... 15-3
The VPR screen ......................................................................................................................................................... 15-5
Starting the VPR ...................................................................................................................................................... 15-7
Preparing the VPR for operation (Setup) ............................................................................................................. 15-9
Configuring communication with the CHM .............................................................................................................. 15-9
Creating a configuration .............................................................................................................................................. 15-9
Operating the VPR in Operator mode ................................................................................................................. 15-11
Configuring individual receivers and handing them out ..................................................................................... 15-11
1-11
Contents
Handing out receivers and portable transmitters to a visitor group ...............................................................
Creating and editing visitor groups ........................................................................................................................
Changing/deleting the configuration of visitor groups .....................................................................................
Exiting the VPR ...........................................................................................................................................................
Calling up the online help .........................................................................................................................................
15-13
15-17
15-18
15-21
15-21
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode ........................................................................................................
Starting the Administrator mode ...........................................................................................................................
Configuring transmitters for guided tours ............................................................................................................
Changing the password .............................................................................................................................................
Configuring communication with the CHM ...........................................................................................................
Exiting the Administrator mode ..............................................................................................................................
Calling up the online help .........................................................................................................................................
Displaying the program version ..............................................................................................................................
15-22
15-22
15-22
15-24
15-25
15-25
15-26
15-26
List of VPR messages ............................................................................................................................................ 15-27
Index ........................................................................................................................................................................ 15-28
The License Manager Server (LMS) ................................................................ 16-1
Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS module .................................................................................... 16-2
Changing the network name ................................................................................................................................. 16-3
Checking the network name and the TCP/IP port ............................................................................................... 16-3
Closing the “Dongle Information” dialog box ..................................................................................................... 16-3
Maintenance and Care ...................................................................................... 17-1
Cleaning the units ................................................................................................................................................... 17-2
Replacing batteries/rechargeable batteries ....................................................................................................... 17-2
Problem solving .......................................................................................................................................................
Cell transmitters and antennas ..................................................................................................................................
Receivers .........................................................................................................................................................................
Chargers ..........................................................................................................................................................................
17-2
17-2
17-3
17-4
Customer Service ..................................................................................................................................................... 17-4
Extended periods of disuse .................................................................................................................................... 17-5
Eliminating software faults ................................................................................................................................... 17-5
Index .................................................................................................................................................................................... 17-5
Specifications ..................................................................................................... 18-1
Overall system ............................................................................................................................................................... 18-2
Algorithm of audio data compression ...................................................................................................................... 18-2
GP EK 3202 receiver ...................................................................................................................................................... 18-3
Headphones .................................................................................................................................................................... 18-5
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter .................................................................................................................................... 18-6
Portable transmitter ..................................................................................................................................................... 18-7
RF channels ..................................................................................................................................................................... 18-9
GP AM 3000 active antenna .................................................................................................................................... 18-10
GP ID 3200 identifier ................................................................................................................................................. 18-11
GP L 3200 charger ...................................................................................................................................................... 18-12
Software ....................................................................................................................................................................... 18-13
Accessories .................................................................................................................................................................. 18-14
Index ........................................................................................................................................................................ 18-14
Glossary .............................................................................................................. 19-1
B if A Event ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19-2
1-12
Contents
Category ..........................................................................................................................................................................
Cell ....................................................................................................................................................................................
Detail Event ....................................................................................................................................................................
Entrance Event “Guided Tour” ....................................................................................................................................
Entrance Event “Cell Download” ................................................................................................................................
Event ................................................................................................................................................................................
Guide ................................................................................................................................................................................
Guided Tour ....................................................................................................................................................................
Inactive Event ................................................................................................................................................................
Live Event .......................................................................................................................................................................
Location ...........................................................................................................................................................................
Mobile download ...........................................................................................................................................................
MTS ...................................................................................................................................................................................
Null Event ........................................................................................................................................................................
Stationary download ....................................................................................................................................................
Storage Event .................................................................................................................................................................
Storage Event with lead in ..........................................................................................................................................
Streaming method ........................................................................................................................................................
Tour ..................................................................................................................................................................................
Redirection ......................................................................................................................................................................
19-3
19-3
19-3
19-3
19-3
19-3
19-3
19-4
19-4
19-4
19-4
19-5
19-5
19-5
19-5
19-5
19-6
19-6
19-6
19-7
1-13
2 Safety Information
Please read this safety information before setting up and operating
components and working with your
system.
Contents of the chapter
General safety information..............................................................2-2
Safety information on the equipment ...........................................2-3
Safety for your computer files ........................................................2-8
2-1
General safety information
General safety information
The components of the
system are state-of-the-art and have
been designed to meet the regulations in force. Nevertheless, the units can
be a source of danger if:
! they are not used as intended,
! they are operated by inexpert persons,
! they are altered or converted,
! the following safety instructions are not observed.
Therefore, all persons assembling or setting up the
equipment or
connecting, transporting or using it must read and observe the safety
instructions!
Intended use
The
components are solely intended for the operation of a
wireless digital information system as described in this manual. The
equipment must be operated, cleaned and serviced by experts only.
The warning sign
The warning sign shown on the left indicates important information and
dangers! Please make a point of observing this information in order to
prevent injury to persons and damage to your
system and the
corresponding computer files!
! The term Danger in connection with safety information indicates
danger to human life and health. If you do not observe these danger
warnings, persons can be seriously or even fatally injured!
! The term Caution in connection with safety information indicates
danger for your
equipment and the corresponding computer
systems and files. If you do not observe the warnings, your
equipment, your computer system and the files can be damaged!
! The term Note indicates safety information of importance for the
smooth operation of the
system. If you do not observe this
information, your
system will not function correctly.
2-2
Safety information on the equipment
Safety information on the equipment
Units with rechargeable batteries
If abused or misused, the rechargeable batteries in the receivers or the
portable transmitter may leak. In extreme cases, they may even present:
! a heat hazard,
! a fire hazard,
! a leakage hazard,
! an explosion hazard,
! a smoke or gas hazard.
Sennheiser does not accept any liability for damage arising from abuse or
misuse.
Keep out of reach of children.
Do not heat above 70°C/158°F (e.g. do not expose to sunlight) or throw
into a fire.
After use, insert rechargeable battery-powered devices into the charger.
Do not expose to moisture.
Only charge the rechargeable batteries with the Sennheiser GP L 3200
charger.
Do not short-circuit.
When not using the rechargeable batteries for extended periods of time,
charge them regularly (about every three months).
Do not mutilate or dismantle.
Only charge the rechargeable batteries at ambient temperatures between
10 °C and 40 °C.
Immediately interrupt the charging process of obviously defective devices.
Do not continue to use defective rechargeable batteries.
Dispose of devices with built-in rechargeable batteries at special collection
points or return them to your specialist dealer.
Only use original Sennheiser rechargeable batteries.
2-3
Safety information on the equipment
Units with mains connection
Units which are connected to the mains – cell transmitters and chargers
(and possibly also identifiers) – can cause the following risks:
Risk of electric shock!
If a device with a mains connector should get in contact with humidity or
wetness (e.g. during transport), persons might be killed or seriously injured by electric shock!
If you open units or use damaged mains cables, you could receive a
dangerous electric shock!
! Never open
units yourself! If a
unit should be
defective, repair must be carried out by your Sennheiser service
partner! If units are opened by you in breach of this instruction, the
warranty becomes null and void!
! Do not kink the mains cables!
! Do not squeeze the mains cables!
! Keep sharp or hot objects as well as animals and children away from the
mains cables!
! Do not place anything on the mains cables!
! Replace damaged mains cables immediately!
Risk of fire!
Overheating or overvoltages (caused by lightning striking the mains
supply etc.) can cause units with a mains connection to catch fire!
! Connect units with a mains connection to the mains power supply
(100 – 240 V, 50 – 60 Hz) only!
! Set up the units with sufficient distance between each other and the
wall and in a well-ventilated place!
! Do not stack the units directly one above the other! Use a rack or a shelf
if you want to stack the units.
! Make sure that the air vents of the cell transmitters and chargers are
not covered or blocked! To prevent blockages, clean the air vents with
a vacuum cleaner with a soft brush attachment from time to time if
necessary.
For protection against overvoltage, we recommend the following:
! Use an overvoltage protection for all units with a mains connection as
well as for the computers in your
system!
! In addition, use an uninterruptable power supply to protect your
system against the effects of a power failure.
Risk of short circuit!
If liquids or small parts which conduct electricity find their way into the
interior or to the sockets or plug contacts of the units, this can cause a
short circuit which may damage the units!
After transporting devices from a cold to a warm environment,
condensation water may precipitate within the device. When such a device
is connected to the mains, this may result in a short circuit that destroys
the device!
2-4
Safety information on the equipment
! Keep liquids and small parts which conduct electricity away from the
units! Clean the charging compartments of the chargers with a vacuum
cleaner with a soft brush attachment in order to remove small parts.
! Never allow your
transport!
units to get wet – not even during storage or
! Allow your
units to acclimatize at room temperature for at
least one hour before connecting the unit to the mains!
! For cleaning the units, only use a dry or slightly damp cloth or a vacuum
cleaner with a soft brush attachment (see “Cleaning the units” on
page 17-2)!
Units with cables and connected accessories
Units with cables and connected accessories – cell transmitters, active
antennas, directional antennas, chargers and computers – can cause the
following risks:
Risk of falling!
If persons stumble over cables, they can fall and suffer serious injury! This
can also cause severe damage to units and cables.
! Lay the mains cables, antenna cables, data and network cables as well
as the USB cables of your
system in such a way that no-one
can stumble over them!
Danger due to unsuitable accessories and defective cables!
If you connect unsuitable or defective external equipment or damaged
accessories to your
system components, your
units can
be destroyed!
If you use unsuitable cables to interconnect your
system
components, transmission errors can occur and your
system will
not function correctly.
! Only connect undamaged external units and intact accessories to your
system components!
! Use accessories, external units and cables recommended by
Sennheiser, especially for connecting the chargers to the Charger PC
(see “Recommendations concerning the RS 485 interface” on
page 5-46)!
Danger when disconnecting and reconnecting the cables!
If you change cables while a unit is turned on, this can cause subsequent
errors in signal transmission or voltage peaks which can damage the unit!
! Always disconnect the unit from the mains by removing the plug when
you wish to change cables or move the unit to a different place!
! Never disconnect the USB cable from the cell transmitter while data
transmission is in progress!
Units requiring permanent installation
Units requiring permanent installation – active antennas, directional
antennas, chargers and identifiers – can cause the following risks:
2-5
Safety information on the equipment
Risk of injury!
If you set up the units on an unstable or uneven surface or do not secure
them properly, they can fall down and injure persons and suffer severe
damage!
! Set up chargers and cell transmitters as described in the chapter
“Putting the Components into Operation” on page 5-1.
! Mount active antennas, directional antennas and identifiers as
described in the chapter “Putting the Components into Operation” on
page 5-1.
Units operated on standard or rechargeable batteries
Please observe the following information on units operated on standard or
rechargeable batteries (receivers and identifiers):
Danger due to defective standard and rechargeable batteries!
If you use defective standard or rechargeable batteries, the units can be
damaged or even catch fire!
! Only use intact standard and rechargeable batteries.
! If the receivers’ built-in rechargeable batteries are defective, they must
be replaced by an electrician!
! Only use Sennheiser rechargeable batteries!
! Dispose of old and defective rechargeable batteries according to the
waste disposal regulations!
Units with headphone connection
Cell transmitters and receivers can cause the following risks:
Risk of hearing damage!
Constant exposure to high sound levels can cause permanent hearing
damage.
! Please protect your hearing and set the headphone volume to safe
levels! Sennheiser headphones have an excellent sound quality even at
low volumes.
Units generating high-frequency alternating
electromagnetic fields
antennas are state-of-the-art and have been designed to meet
the regulations in force. The high-frequency alternating electromagnetic
fields generated by
antennas are not dangerous for the persons
who work close to them every day or for visitors to the exhibition. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that very sensitive persons could feel
physically unwell due to the high-frequency alternating electromagnetic
fields generated by the antennas.
Caution!
Danger of interference due to WLAN and Bluetooth transmitters!
Reception of the Events can be subject to interference from WLAN or
Bluetooth units (2.4 GHz) such as laptops, mobile phones and wireless
2-6
Safety information on the equipment
headsets. Make sure that no WLAN or Bluetooth units are operating in
your exhibition.
Caution!
Danger of interference due to fluorescent tubes! Reception of the
identifier signals can be subject to interference from fluorescent
tubes. Make sure that no fluorescent tubes are operating in the
vicinity of the identifiers and receivers.
Statements regarding FCC and industry Canada
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in
a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate
radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with
the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference
to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
1.
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
2.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
3.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
to which the receiver is connected.
4.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This class B digital apparatus complies with the Canadian ICES-003.
Warning: Changes or modifications made to this equipment not expressly
approved by Sennheiser electronic Corp. may void the FCC authorization to
operate this equipment.
2-7
Safety for your computer files
Safety for your computer files
Danger due to data loss!
Computer files can be destroyed by defective hardware (for example hard
disk error, defective boot sectors), by software (e.g. computer viruses,
hard disk partitioning programs etc.) or by magnetic fields (e.g. from
unscreened loudspeakers)!
Persons not trained in handling computers can change, make unusable or
delete computer files by mistake!
! Restrict access to your
computers to absolutely trustworthy
persons who know how to handle them!
! Deactivate the “Autorun” function of all CD-ROM drives of your
system (see Windows manual!)
! Install trustworthy software only or check software with an up-to-date
virus scan program before installing it!
! If computers in your
system are equipped with access to the
Internet:
Protect these computers via a firewall and a virus scan program! Have
an expert set the parameters of the firewall to the highest security
level! Have the firewall and its settings checked from time to time and
have it adapted to new situations! Update your virus scan program as
often as possible!
! If you are holding a relatively large exhibition with a computer
network:
Whenever you create or change an installation, make a backup of the
complete folder “GPInstallations” on at least one more drive – ideally
in parallel on several drives (e.g. mirrored drives on a raid server)! You
can compress the data to save memory space.
Alternatively, make a backup of the drive of your Central PC on which
the folder “GPInstallations” is located using a backup system whenever
you create or change an installation!
! If you are holding a relatively small exhibition without a computer
network:
Make a backup of all data in your
installation on removable
storage media (for example streamer tapes, DVD-ROM or CD-ROM)
whenever you create or change an installation! Keep the removable
storage media in a safe and protected place!
Note:
If the computer files of your
installation are lost, your
exhibition will continue at first as long as the data in the cell
transmitters are not deleted. However, it could be that you can then
no longer edit or change the installation files!
Danger of material damage due to loss of or damage to the dongle!
If you lose or damage your dongle, your Storage and Live Events go on as
before but announcements are no longer transmitted. You cannot carry
out download jobs either.
The dongle cannot be repaired or replaced and you will have to buy the
necessary licenses again!
! For this reason, set up the Central PC with the dongle in a safe place and
restrict access to the Central PC to persons you can trust completely.
2-8
Safety for your computer files
! Be sure to remove the dongle while installing or de-installing software
of any kind on the Central PC.
! Keep liquids away from the dongle.
Danger of wrong audio data remaining in the receivers!
If there is old audio data of another project in your receivers and you
transmit audio data of new project for the first time, the old audio data is
possibly not replaced!
Thus, if you hire out receivers again, it can happen that audio data from
hiring out the receivers remain in the receiver even though it does not
belong to the current project. The wrong audio information is then played
back for the corresponding Events.
For this reason, be sure to delete all old audio data in the receivers as
described under “Deleting the Storage Events audio data” on page 10-25
before transmitting audio data of a new project for the first time.
2-9
3 Getting to know the System
Every exhibition which visitors leave satisfied and well-informed meets
with success. This is because contented visitors come back again, talk
highly of the exhibition and encourage others to visit the exhibition too.
The
system ensures varied and comprehensive information for
your visitors.
is a wireless digital information system which gives visitors to
your exhibition
the right information
in the right place
at the right time.
Contents of the chapter
Accompany the visitors to your exhibition! ..................................3-2
How do you make your exhibition a success?...............................3-4
3-1
Accompany the visitors to your exhibition!
Accompany the visitors to your
exhibition!
Here we’d like to show you the impression which
makes on
visitors to your exhibition. For this purpose we invite you to accompany
Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith as they visit a
-assisted exhibition. The
subject of the exhibition is, let’s say, exotic plants from all over the world.
However, it could also be Vincent van Gogh or Pablo Picasso. Or it could be
communication electronics or the history of cosmology. Or ... the subject of
your exhibition!
Mrs. Richter is here on a visit from Germany. Mr. Smith is from a town
nearby. He is visiting this exhibition for the second time – he has read a lot
of praise for it in the press because of its spectacular exhibits and the
extraordinary way in which they are presented. Although both are curious
about the “digital information system”, Mr. Smith had to persuade Mrs.
Richter to visit the exhibition because her English is not very good.
The doubts of Mrs. Richter are allayed at the entrance to the exhibition,
where both are given a personal guide in their mother tongue. The level of
information can also be chosen individually. Mrs. Richter decides on
“German for Adults”. Mr. Smith, who has visited the exhibition once
already, would like new, more detailed information. He therefore decides
on the “English Expert Version” with detailed scientific background
information. Both are then handed out a small receiver each and
headphones with the exhibition logo printed on them. They put on the
headphones and enter the exhibition.
When they reach the entrance, they hear some friendly words of welcome.
They are told how to adjust the volume of the receiver and how to stop or
continue the information at any time. Mrs. Richter is, of course, welcomed
in German and Mr. Smith is given the same information in English.
They are then given some brief information on the exhibition and special
attractions so that they can immediately find what interests them. They
are both surprised by the excellent sound quality of their “personal guide”
– no noise, no crackling. It all seems quite natural, just as if a guide were
talking to them personally. Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith decide to look at the
tropical garden first.
The door in front of them opens to reveal a tropical greenhouse. The hot
humid air, the water dripping down and the lush greenery mix with sounds
from the headphones: the roar of a waterfall, the cries of exotic birds and
other animals surround Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith by jungle. They are also
given information on the rainforest, its climate and the species living in it.
Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith arrive under a huge mahogany tree with green,
scaly fruits. The corresponding information is given to them via the
headphones – Mrs. Richter receives her information in the version
“German for Adults” whereas Mr. Smith is given his in the “English Expert
Version”. Both hear the information right from the beginning and are not
just thrown into the middle of a lecture already in progress.
The two visitors leave the giant tree and arrive at a dark pond with floating
aquatic plants. The information on the mahogany tree is faded out if it has
not finished yet and the information on the aquatic plants is faded in. They
move completely freely from one exhibit to the next and are always
supplied with the appropriate information as soon as they approach an
exhibit. The personal guide adapts to the wishes and interests of the
visitors. In this way, the exhibit merges with the information to form one
whole “Event”.
3-2
Accompany the visitors to your exhibition!
In front of a large display case containing a large number of carnivorous
plants (and several lazy flies sitting on the walls), the two are only given a
summary at first. Then they are requested to enter a number located next
to each plant via the numeric keys of their receiver if they are especially
interested in the plant in question. Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith can listen to
the information and can take their time to study the plants and the details
to which their attention is drawn. They don’t have to do things like reading
a tiring text on a little sign – maybe even in a language which Mrs. Richter
doesn’t understand properly.
At the exit of the tropical garden, their attention is drawn to a multimedia
presentation on humanoid apes in the jungle and they spontaneously
decide to enter a darkened room in which a video is being shown. The video
soundtrack is gently faded in and transmitted in perfect synchronization
with the picture – in stereo, of course. Mr. Smith listens to the English
original and Mrs. Richter listens to the dubbed German version at the same
time. Other visitors passing by outside are not disturbed by the
soundtrack.
When our two visitors leave the multimedia presentation, the sound is
faded out and they are given a short overview of the following greenhouse
containing desert plants. During their tour, they meet a guided tour
between all the cacti. A Japanese botany professor is explaining the desert
flora to his students. Only the students from his group can hear his lecture
and other visitors are not disturbed. As the information system does not
force them to follow a fixed route, Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith decide to skip
the queue at the cacti and look in there again later.
At the exit of the greenhouse, our two visitors are notified of the new,
temporary orchid exhibition. Mr. Smith read in the newspaper that the
digital information system is updated automatically overnight each time
an exhibition changes.
Our two visitors stroll on and suddenly hear an announcement: The
restaurant which they are passing has just opened. The visitors already in
the restaurant are of course not bothered by this information.
Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith enjoy their meal and spend a stimulating
afternoon at the exhibition. When an announcement is made that the
exhibition is closing, they go to the exit and return their headphones and
the receivers. The headphones are offered to them to buy at a very low
price as a souvenir (or for their next visit).
To their amazement, they are also given a computer printout on which
information on the most outstanding exhibits which they have seen is
compiled in brief – and other highlights which they missed. Of course, they
are also notified of the temporary exhibition taking place during the next
month.
They leave the exhibition highly contented and well-informed and will
report enthusiastically on it when they get home. And they will come back
and bring their friends.
Mrs. Richter and Mr. Smith are no longer at the exhibition, but their visit
will have consequences: when the statistical evaluation is examined at the
end of the month, it is possible to determine which exhibits were viewed
most often and which ones the visitors were not so interested in. In this
way, the acceptance of the orchid exhibition is checked and the average
time spent by visitors in the restaurant determined.
Neither does it go unnoticed that many visitors to the exhibition do not
listen to all of the information on the aquatic plants. Without having to
enter the exhibition, this soundtrack can be listened to at the computer. As
it seems rather long-winded, it is shortened to the necessary degree at the
3-3
How do you make your exhibition a success?
computer. Even before the first visitors arrive at the pond with the aquatic
plants, the shortened version of the text has been installed.
Information on how to set up a successful exhibition with the help of
is given in the next section.
How do you make your exhibition a
success?
Here we’d like to give you some brief information on how
you to set up a successful exhibition.
can help
What is the best way to give visitors information?
One thing should be clear: if the visitors to an exhibition are given no
information at all on the exhibits, even spectacular exhibits soon become
dreary, confusing and even boring.
Signs bearing information and placed next to the exhibits only give a
certain amount of information. Signs of this kind are often not read at all
or, if they are, only very incompletely. For this reason, even visitors with an
above-average interest find reading the signs strenuous after a while.
Also, it is not possible to read the sign and view the exhibit from the
optimum distance at the same time. In a well-frequented exhibition, it can
be that several visitors want to read the sign at once – the visitor has to
wait and soon loses interest in the exhibit or is distracted by something
else.
Exhibitions using multimedia methods seem much more vivid. Videos,
interactive animations, music and lectures liven them up. A video with
interesting expert information will for example not be attractive to
children, and an English multimedia presentation is not much good for
German-speaking visitors. Other visitors standing close to the multimedia
presentation could even feel disturbed by the sound to the picture.
Most visitors therefore prefer personal tours through exhibitions. This requires guides with a very good expert training who can at the same time
convey enthusiasm for the exhibits – in the mother tongue of the visitor.
However, most guided tours are only offered in one or two languages.
The
system allows you to:
! provide a visitor group with special receivers allowing them to go round
the exhibition with a well-trained guide. All visitors in this group hear
the audio coming from the guide in the same excellent quality. Here is
an example: if a visitor in the group is interested in a special exhibit, he
would perhaps like to look at it for rather longer. The group moves on
a few yards but the visitor can still hear the guide as well as before and
catch up with the group later.
! offer the visitor his own personal guide (receiver) which provides the
desired level of information – in the visitor’s mother tongue. The visitor
can start his personal tour with the receiver at any time he wants and
is therefore not bound to certain times. In addition, the visitor can
move freely around the exhibition and return later to exhibits that
attract many visitors.
3-4
How do you make your exhibition a success?
All these advantages are offered by
at considerably lower
running costs; it requires, however, an initial investment to be made in the
necessary technology. At the same time, though, the costs for
sophisticated visitor information graphics can be drastically reduced.
Due to the following features, your investment in the state-of-the-art
system will certainly pay off:
! When handed out to the visitor,
explains itself and is (in more
than one sense of the word) child’s play to operate.
All the visitor has to do is take the receiver, put on the headphones and
enter the exhibition. Operating errors are virtually impossible.
! The information is comprehensible and intelligible.
Comprehensibility depends on the visitor, his previous education, his
interests and of course his mother tongue. With
, the visitor
can choose between various languages and levels of information,
enabling you to offer custom-made guided tours for children, and
adults, tourists and locals, or experts and laypersons.
You can use this
feature to induce the same visitors to visit
your exhibition several times by giving them new and different
information every time.
However, intelligibility depends on the technology used. And here you
can benefit from the accumulated expertise of a world-leading
manufacturer of high-quality audio systems: Sennheiser.
! The information is given in the right place at the right time:
Information is only given in front of the exhibit to which it belongs and
only for as long as the visitor is standing there. When the visitor goes
to a new exhibit, the information, if it has not yet finished, is faded out
smoothly and the new information on the new exhibit is faded in.
! The visitor can choose his own route through the exhibition:
He wants information on the exhibits which interest him: a tape (or a
CD or a MiniDisc) is therefore less suitable because the visitor cannot
choose his own route through the exhibition but has to stick to the
order given by the medium. If he becomes interested in another exhibit
in the meantime, he either receives no information on it or has to
search for it in a complicated way. With
, the visitor does not
have to follow a fixed route. He can look at what interests him and is
only given the information he wants to hear.
!
can be adapted individually to each visitor:
Whenever a visitor approaches an exhibit, he is given the information
from the beginning and does not land in the middle of a tape loop.
However, when the visitor enters a video presentation or a live lecture,
the sound is of course transmitted in perfect synchronization with the
picture or lecture.
!
is ideal if installation work is to be reduced to a minimum:
Especially in old buildings which are under a preservation order, it is out
of the question to lay a mains connection and a data line for each
exhibit.
can do without both if you wish.
!
can be updated quickly and easily:
The more interesting the exhibition, the more disappointed the visitor
will be if it is closed for changes when he arrives. A well-prepared
installation for a temporary exhibition can be set up
automatically overnight. No matter whether you want to re-arrange or
exchange exhibits or change exhibit information: this can be done in
several minutes from a central computer or laptop – and you don’t
need to lay cables first...
3-5
How do you make your exhibition a success?
!
supports multimedia in an optimum way:
In several languages, individually, without disturbing other visitors and
interactively if you wish.
!
ideally supplements personal tours by “real” guides:
Only the group of this one guide hears what he is saying. “Freeloaders”
don’t have a chance. Other groups and visitors are not disturbed.
!
is unobtrusive, and, if installed carefully, even invisible:
The visitor is not distracted or even frightened off by the omnipresence
of high technology.
!
is flexible, expandable and modifiable:
Events can easily be adapted to the optimum viewing distance
for each exhibit.
Events are triggered automatically or
interactively by any desired type of key.
is suitable for
outdoor applications. If you wish, the headphones can come with your
exhibition logo. And your special wishes can be taken into account any
time.
In addition to these basic features,
demand:
offers you the following on
! The visitors can be contacted any time: for example, you can announce
when the exhibition closes in the evening or when the restaurant is
open.
The visitors who are already in the restaurant do not hear the
restaurant announcement and an invitation to a lecture in English is
transmitted to the English visitors only.
Do some of your exhibits come from a country which is interesting as a
holiday destination? If you wish, the up-to-date range of trips offered
by your sponsor is transmitted exclusively to the visitors viewing these
exhibits.
!
gives you feedback:
It can give you information on the acceptance of your exhibits and
feedback on which information the visitors are listening to and which
doesn’t interest them and whether they are listening to all of the
information or not. This gives you the opportunity to react quickly to
the wishes of your visitors. Maybe you will discover new stars among
your exhibits. If you want you can also obtain information on what your
visitors think of areas without exhibits (restaurant, playground, park,
terrace, café...) – an important help for assessing their profitability.
! If you wish, you can link this feedback to information on the visitors. In
this way, you are given expressive information on the interests and
preferences of your different target groups.
With
, you can make sure that the visitors to your exhibition feel
well informed. You can also make your exhibition more entertaining. Static
exhibits in particular are livened up by
and the visitors will
remember them for a longer time and more vividly.
With
, your exhibits come to life.
Would you like to know more about how
works from the point of
view of organisation and technology? You will find a summary of the
principal structures and components of
in the next chapter.
3-6
4 Basics of the Components
This chapter provides information on the structure and technical basics of
.
Within a
project, the Events can be triggered in two different
ways, either automatically via identifiers next to the exhibits or manually
by entering the corresponding Event number on the receivers. This chapter
mainly refers to the automatic triggering of the Events via identifiers.
Contents of the chapter
Overview of the components and structures of the system.......4-2
The function of the components.................................................. 4-12
Index ................................................................................................ 4-24
4-1
Overview of the components and structures of the system
Overview of the components and
structures of the system
The system components
Your
system has a modular structure and consists of the
following components:
! Cell transmitters
! Receivers
! Antennas
! Identifiers
! Chargers
To be able to configure and manage the
components, you require
at least one computer. It will help you to co-ordinate the information which
you provide to your visitors.
The receivers
At the entrance to the exhibition, all visitors are given a receiver and
headphones. The receiver accompanies the visitor for the length of his tour
and serves as an intermediate memory for audio information. As soon as
the visitor with the receiver approaches an exhibit or enters a number on
the receiver, the corresponding audio information is triggered.
The visitors can change the volume on their receivers, stop or repeat
reproduction of the audio information, call up additional in-depth
information and, if necessary, enter the Event number.
There are three different receiver models available.
The cell transmitters
123456
AAU O AAU 1
123456
Code
04 04
AAU O AAU 1
The cell transmitters process audio information which you offer in your
exhibition so that it can be transmitted via the antennas and received by
the receivers. Three fundamentally different principles are used here:
! Stationary download (streaming method):
The audio information is transmitted to the receivers via one single cell
transmitter and one single antenna while the receivers are in the
charging compartment of a charger. The receivers store the audio
information transmitted in this way permanently, i.e. the audio
information is fixed.
Depending on the volume of the audio information, a stationary
download can take a long time and is usually carried out overnight.
! Mobile download:
The audio information is transmitted constantly in small portions via a
large number of cell transmitters and antennas. As soon as a visitor
with his receiver enters the range of an antenna, the receiver can
download this audio information. The receivers only store the audio
information transmitted in this way until the next mobile download, i.e.
the audio information is variable.
A mobile download usually only takes a few minutes and is carried out
while the visitor is viewing the exhibition.
4-2
Overview of the components and structures of the system
! Live audio reproduction:
The audio information is reproduced in real time via additional cell
transmitters to which an audio source is directly connected and via
antennas. This can for example be a transmission from a wireless
microphone during a tour, live music or a synchronized audio
transmission for a video film. As soon as a visitor with his receiver
enters the range of an antenna, the receiver loads this audio
information and reproduces it automatically and in real time. The audio
information is not stored in the receiver.
The portable transmitters
The portable transmitter can be used to conduct guided tours with a guide
without impairing the reception of Storage and Live Events through
interference or intermodulation. Using the Visitor Profiler (VPR) software
module, you link the portable transmitter with the desired number of
receivers quickly and easily to form a group. The guide can interrupt the
guided tour at any time in order to include Live or Storage Events in his
guided tour.
The antennas
The antennas transmit the audio information to the receivers. The
antennas must be mounted so that they completely cover the area in
which the audio information is to be transmitted.
You can install the small and unobtrusive antennas so that they are
invisible to the visitors.
The identifiers
As soon as a visitor arrives at a certain exhibit with his receiver, the
corresponding audio information is reproduced. This is ensured by the
identifiers which are installed next to exhibits and can be completely
integrated into the surroundings.
The identifiers generate a magnetic field which the receivers detect. The
range of this magnetic field can be determined individually.
The identifiers are fitted with an infra-red interface for programming via a
PDA (PalmTop or Pocket PC).
4-3
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The chargers
Once the visitors have returned their receivers at the end of their tour, the
rechargeable batteries are recharged in the chargers and remain there
until they are needed again.
If the chargers are connected to a computer, statistical information can be
read, telling you which exhibits the visitor has viewed and the length of
time he has listened to the explanations. You thus obtain important
information on the acceptance of the different exhibits in your exhibition.
You can also change certain presets of the receivers such as the volume
etc.
The different types of Events
For some (or all) exhibits in your exhibition, you provide audio
information, so-called Events. You can co-ordinate these Events in
different visitor-specific versions (categories), for example in different
languages. You can cause these Events to be triggered in two different
ways, either by means of automatic triggering via identifiers on the
exhibits or by manually entering the corresponding Event number on the
receivers.
There are two different types of
visitors:
Events which are audible to the
! Storage Events
! Live Events
There are also Events which are inaudible to visitors but effectively help
you in co-ordinating and structuring your exhibition, the so-called System
Events.
Storage Events
Storage Events are audio information belonging to a certain exhibit in your
exhibition. This can be exhibit information, music, audio documents, sound
effects or ambient noise, etc. Storage Events are reproduced individually
from the beginning for each visitor. In most exhibitions, the majority of all
Events are Storage Events. Storage Events can be triggered automatically
or manually.
Normal Storage Events:
! are automatically faded in as soon as the visitor arrives at the
corresponding exhibit or enters the corresponding number on the
receiver,
! are automatically faded out as soon as the visitor arrives at a new
exhibit or enters a different number on the receiver,
! are reproduced again as soon as the visitor returns to an exhibit or
enters the corresponding number on the receiver again.
4-4
Overview of the components and structures of the system
In addition to normal Storage Events, there are also Storage Events with
the following features:
Feature
Meaning
! are automatically triggered by an identifier
“Priority” Events
! are always reproduced from the beginning to the end (the 16-key receiver allows “Priority” Events to be stopped
nevertheless)
“on ID range” Events
! are automatically faded out as soon as
the visitor leaves the exhibit
“One-off” Events
! are reproduced only once
Detail Events
! are only reproduced if the visitor presses
the Detail key on the receiver (the receiver must be equipped with the Detail
key)
! have two different sets of audio
information (B1 and B2)
B ifA Events
! Audio information B2 is only reproduced
if the receiver reproduced another
Storage Event beforehand
Inactive Events
! are omitted in certain categories which
you can specify yourself
Events with lead in
! provide introductory information on the
subsequent Event
For detailed information, please refer to the chapter “Overview of all
Events types” on page 6-30.
Live Events
Live Events are audio information in real time which the visitors receive
live, almost like a radio program. This can be a transmission from a wireless
microphone during a guided tour or a video soundtrack that is transmitted
in perfect sync. with the picture.
In other words, each Live Event has an audio source which belongs to it.
This audio source, like a microphone, a DVD player or a video recorder etc.,
is directly connected to a cell transmitter which transmits the audio signal
via an antenna. Live Events are either stereo or mono and can be triggered
automatically or manually.
System Events
System Events do not include any audio information audible to the
visitors. Their purpose is to organize and structure your exhibition and
they can only be triggered automatically via identifiers. You can use the
following System Events:
You need the System Event “Location entrance” to load new data into the
receivers when the receivers enter a location with variable Events
(numbers “1” to “63” max.).
You can use the System Event “Cat” to set the receivers to a certain
category.
4-5
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The purpose of the System Events “Alarm On” and “Alarm Off” is to switch
the alarm signal on and off. This alarm signal for example prevents
receivers from being stolen. The alarm signal function is deactivated ex
works. To be able to use the function, it must be activated in the “Charger
Manager” software by Sennheiser Customer Service. In the case of the 16key receiver only, the alarm can be switched off manually by pressing the
STOP key. All other receivers require the automatic triggering of the
System Event “Alarm Off” via an identifier.
The portable transmitter allows you to conduct guided tours. The guide
can interrupt the guided tour at any time in order to include Live or Storage
Events into his guided tour. You can set up the System Event with the
number 97 in order to automatically switch the receivers participating in
the guided tour back to the RF channel of the portable transmitter. This
cancels playback of the Storage or Live Event and the receivers go back to
receiving the portable transmitter of the guide. This allows the guide to
continue his or her tour at a certain place which those participating in the
tour have to pass.
There are two types of Entrance Events:
Entrance Events “Cell Download” are only available in locations with
variable Events (numbers “1” to “63” max.) and not in the location with
fixed Events (number “0”). They trigger the early transmission of Storage
Events to the receivers in places where there are no exhibits in order to
avoid waiting times for the visitor due to transmission.
Entrance Events “Guided Tour” start a guided tour by automatically
switching the receivers participating in the guided tour to the RF channel
of the portable transmitter.
Null Events are used to deliberately fade out the reproduction of Live
Events and/or to obtain statistical information on certain areas of your
exhibition where there are no exhibits.
The software
The management of the audio information of the whole exhibition is
invisible to the visitors. It is carried out via the software, either via the
central computer of a network or a single computer, e.g. a laptop.
The software has a modular structure. The basic software modules INM
and BSM help you to set up and manage the entire exhibition. These
modules allow you to define locations and categories, group the Events to
form cells, assign the desired Events to your exhibits and transmit the
Storage Events via the cell transmitters and antennas to the receivers. A
software module is installed on a PDA (PalmTop or Pocket PC) and is used
to configure the identifiers.
The additional Announcement Manager software module allows you to
interrupt the running program for e.g. live announcements or advertisements which can be heard either in the whole area of the exhibition or only
in part of it.
The additional Statistics Manager software module allows you to read and
analyze the statistical data in the receivers. It gives you information on the
acceptance of the exhibition by the visitors, the behaviour of the different
visitor groups and the use of the categories provided.
4-6
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The structure
Your
system can connect several exhibitions in an elegant way.
For example, all exhibitors, museums and organizers in one town can share
the advantages of the
system. You can set up locations for this
purpose. You always set up a location with the number “0” and, if
necessary, you can set up new ones (with numbers between “1” and a
maximum of “63”). All locations are managed centrally in one single
project file. There is a distinct difference between the structure of the
location with the number “0” (see page 4-7) and that of the other
locations (see page 4-9).
The location with the number zero (location with fixed Events)
The location with the number “0” contains fixed Events only. These fixed
Events are transmitted to the receivers via the stationary download
(streaming method) and permanently stored in the receivers (for details,
see page 4-7).
The location with the number “0” cannot be divided up into cells.
The information flow in location “0”
The diagram on page 4-8 shows the information flow in location “0”.
1. You set up locations and categories and assign the desired audio
information to the exhibits in your exhibition using the INM software.
2. Once you have configured all Events,
– you transfer the identifier configurations to the PDA and thus program all identifiers in your exhibition one after the other,
– you create a download job for the stationary download of the Storage Events in location “0”.
While this download job is being executed, the audio information of
the Storage Events is transmitted once only to the receivers located
in the chargers via a cell transmitter. Depending on the volume of
the audio information, this transmission can take a long time and is
usually carried out overnight.
3. The receivers store this audio information permanently.
As soon as a receiver detects the magnetic field of an identifier which
triggers a Storage Event, the stored audio information belonging to
this Event is reproduced – in the category selected by the visitor.
When a receiver detects the magnetic field of an identifier which
triggers a Live Event, the live sound is received by an antenna and
reproduced – also in the category selected by the visitor.
4. The audio information remains stored in the receiver unchanged until
you update your exhibition with new audio information and execute a
new download job for the stationary download.
4-7
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The information flow in the location with fixed Events (location “0”)
Central PC
INM
Network (e. g. Ethernet)
Charger PC
Base Station PC
BSM
CHM
Cell transmitter SR 3200
AAU O
AAU 1
Code
04 04
AAU O
AAU 1
CLOSED
Stationary
download of
storage events
Charger
L 3200
Active
antenna unit
AM 3200
Transmission
of live events
Identifier
ID 3200
OPEN
Identifier
ID 3200
Receiver
4-8
Overview of the components and structures of the system
Other locations (locations with variable Events)
The other locations (with the numbers “1” to max. “63”) contain variable
Events only. These variable Events are transmitted to the receivers via the
mobile download (for details see page 4-10).
The variable Events of a location are stored in the receivers until the memory space in the receiver is full during a new mobile download of variable
Events of another location. The size of the internal memory of the receivers
is specified on the type plate on the back. If nothing is specified, the size
of the internal memory of the receiver is 256 MBytes. The following table
provides an overview of how much Event playing time typically fits into
the memory of the receivers. The actually possible playing time can differ
from these typical values: it depends on the frequency spectrum (pitch),
the volume and the dynamics of the audio files stored.
Memory
256 MBytes
512 MBytes
All Storage Events stored in the memory
Quality
Channels
Sampling rate
Playing time
Speech
mono
16 kHz
approx. 10 hours
Speech
stereo
16 kHz
approx. 9 hours
Music
stereo
32 kHz
approx. 5 hours
Music
stereo
48 kHz
approx. 3 hours
Speech
mono
16 kHz
approx. 20 hours
Speech
stereo
16 kHz
approx. 18 hours
Music
stereo
32 kHz
approx. 10 hours
Music
stereo
48 kHz
approx. 6 hours
The variable Events of the locations with the numbers “1” to max. “63” are
put together to make meaningful groups or cells. You can therefore simply
transfer the predefined spatial structure of your exhibition to the
cells, e.g. all exhibits of Vincent van Gogh which are located in one
exhibition room can be put together in the cell “VanGogh” and all exhibits
of Pablo Picasso which are located in another room can be put together in
the cell “Picasso”.
You can assign a so-called Intro to a cell – words of welcome or an
introduction to the subject of the new cell – and thus make your exhibition
very easy to follow for the visitors.
Each cell has its own cell transmitters and antennas which constantly
transmit the variable Events.
4-9
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The information flow in locations with variable Events
The diagram on page 4-11 shows the information flow in locations with
variable Events.
1. You set up locations and categories and assign the desired audio
information to the exhibits in your exhibition using the INM software.
2. Once you have configured all Events,
– you transfer the identifier configurations to the PDA and thus program all identifiers of the location one after the other,
– you create a download job for the mobile download of the Storage
Events of a location with variable Events.
While this download job is being executed, the audio information of
the Storage Events is transmitted once only to the cell transmitters
of the location via Base Station PCs. Depending on the volume of the
audio information, this transmission can take a long time and is usually carried out overnight.
3. The cell transmitters store and transmit this information permanently.
As soon as a receiver detects the magnetic field of any of the identifiers
of this location, it starts to download the audio information of the
current cell. Then the downloaded audio information belonging to this
Event is reproduced – in the category selected by the visitor. When the
receiver enters another cell for the first time, it starts downloading the
audio information of this other cell. The audio information from the
previous cell continues to be stored if there is sufficient memory space
in the receiver. Downloading can take several minutes depending on
the volume of the audio information. You can reduce this waiting time
to a minimum by providing for cleverly placed Entrance Events “Cell
Download” and setting up Intros.
When a receiver detects the magnetic field of an identifier which
triggers a Live Event, the live sound is received by an antenna and
reproduced – also in the category selected by the visitor.
4. The audio information remains stored in the cell transmitters
unchanged until you update your exhibition with new audio information and execute a new download job for the mobile download.
4-10
Overview of the components and structures of the system
The information flow in the locations with variable Events (locations “1” to “63”)
Central PC
Network (e. g. Ethernet)*
Base station PC
Base station PC
Base station PC
Cell transmitter
AAU O
AAU 1
Code
04 04
AAU O
AAU 1
Cell 7
Cell 2
Active
antenna unit
Cell 1
Active
antenna unit
Cell 6
Cell 3
Receiver
Cell 5
Cell 4
4-11
The function of the components
The function of the components
GP EK 3202 receiver
1-key receiver (EK 3202-4)
5-key receiver (EK 3202-5)
GP L 3200 charger
GP SK 3200
portable transmitter
GP ID 3200
identifier
GP AM 3000 active antenna unit (AAU)
123456
AAU O AAU 1
GP SR 3200-2 twin cell transmitter
4-12
16-key receiver (EK 3202-0)
123456
Code
04 04
AAU O AAU 1
The function of the components
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter
The GP SR 3200-2 twin cell transmitter consists of two transmitter units
(“CT 1” and “CT 2”) in a single 19” housing. Both cell transmitters share
the same display and controls on the front panel.
GP SR 3200-2 twin cell transmitter: front and back panel
쐃
123456
AAU O AAU 1
쐄
쐂
쐋 쐏
쐇
쐆
쐊
쐎
쐅
123456
Code
04 04
쐈
AAU O AAU 1
쐉
씈
쐃 Headphone output (¼” jack socket) for monitoring Live Events
쐇 Display
쐋 / rocker button
쐏 SET button
쐄 ON/OFF switch
쐂 Mains connector (100 – 240 V AC, 50 – 60 Hz)
쐆 Cable grip for mains cable
쐊 USB input (USB)
쐎 Antenna connection (CT 1 AAU OUT), 8-pin RJ 45 plug
쐅 Antenna connection (CT 2 AAU OUT), 8-pin RJ 45 plug
쐈 GROUND LIFT switch
쐉 Audio connection CT 1 IN (¼” 3-pole jack socket, balanced) for
direct audio input, x 4
씈 Audio connection CT 2 IN (¼” 3-pole jack socket, balanced) for
direct audio input, x 4
Transmitters in the overall system
The cell transmitters control the transmission of the Storage and Live
Events. This means that the cell transmitter are at the interface between
the computer control of the
system and wireless information
transmission via the antennas.
The
system is set up and managed from a Central PC. Via the
Central PC, the Events to be transmitted are assigned to the cell transmitters. Storage Events and Live Events are then transferred to the cell
transmitters in different ways:
Storage Events
Storage Events are transferred once from the Central PC to the receivers.
They can be transmitted either via a computer network or directly from a
laptop via the connected cell transmitters. Several cell transmitters can be
connected to a laptop or a special computer in the network (Base Station
PC) via USB cables. For a computer to be able to exchange data with the
connected cell transmitters, the Base Station Manager (BSM) software
must be installed and be up and running.
4-13
The function of the components
In the location with fixed Events (location number “0”), one single cell
transmitter transmits all Storage Events once via the streaming method,
usually overnight (stationary download). The receivers store these
Storage Events of location “0”.
In the locations with variable Events (location numbers from “1” to max.
“63”), a cell transmitter permanently stores and transmits all Storage
Events of a cell. Receivers entering this cell receive these Storage Events
and download them (mobile download).
Live Events
Live Events typically come from a CD, DVD, videocassette or another sound
source such as a wireless microphone. The corresponding audio sources
(CD or DVD player, video recorder or the receiver of a wireless microphone)
are directly connected to the audio inputs of the cell transmitters. Each cell
transmitter has four audio inputs to which you can connect four mono
sound sources or two stereo sound sources or one stereo sound source and
two mono sound sources.
Transmitting the Events to the antennas
The cell transmitters, which cannot be seen by the visitors, transmit the
Events to the antennas.
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '0'
MTS '0'
In locations with variable Events, all Events are converted into multiplexed
transport streams (MTS) . Each cell transmitter transmits two independent
MTS (MTS “0” and MTS “1”) and requires two separate antennas (antenna
“0” and antenna “1”) connected in series. Both MTS can contain Storage
Events, but only MTS “0” can contain Live Events. MTS “0” is transmitted
by the active antenna “0” and MTS “1” is transmitted by the active
antenna “1”. Each MTS (each antenna) requires an RF channel of its own.
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '1'
MTS '1'
One MTS can contain Storage Events with a total playing time of approx.
600 seconds (10 minutes). This value is reduced if, apart from Storage
Events, this MTS contains Live Events (see “Assigning an MTS for a
category to an Event” on page 8-65). It is, however, possible to
successively transmit several MTS (up to four) to a receiver.
One MTS only transports Events of one category. It is not possible to mix
Events from different categories and transmit them via the same MTS. You
therefore require at least one antenna in each cell for every category
offered.
The frequency on which the Event data is transmitted from the antennas
to the receivers is set via the software (see “Selecting the RF channel” on
page 8-41 and “RF channels” on page 18-9). This also applies for the
transmitting power and thus the range (see “Setting the transmitting
power” on page 8-42).
In the location with fixed Events (location “0”), only Live Events are
“packed” into MTS; Storage Events, in contrast, are transmitted via the
streaming method (stationary download).
4-14
The function of the components
GP SK 3200 portable transmitter
The “Visitor Profiler” software module is all that is required to configure
the portable transmitter and any number of receivers for a guided tour.
The portable transmitter is easy to use.
During a guided tour, the portable transmitter does not interfere with the
reception of Storage and Live Events. Using the portable transmitter, the
receivers participating in the guided tour can be seamlessly switched
between the guided tour and any Events. The portable transmitter is a
stereo transmitter.
SK 3200 portable transmitter: top, front and rear
쐅
쐃쐇
쐎
씈
쐈쐉
쐋
씉씊
씋
쐏
쐄
쐊
쐂
쐆
쐃 POWER LED
쐎 Numeric keys
쐇 FUNCTION key
쐅 LEVEL– key
쐋 MUTE key
쐈 ANT antenna socket
쐏 READY LED
쐉 LINE LED
쐄 LEVEL+ key
씈 LINE socket (3.5 mm stereo)
쐂 LINE key
씉 MIC LED
쐆 4-pin connector strip
씊 MIC microphone socket
쐊 MIC key
씋 Belt clip
Suitable microphones
You can connect one of the following Sennheiser microphones (need to be
ordered separately) to the portable transmitter:
! Clip-on microphones with 3-pin screw locking LEMO plug:
MKE 2-4 Gold C, MKE 2 P-C, MKE plat-4-C, ME 102, ME 104, ME 105
! Headmic:
HS 2
! Hand-held microphone:
e935 (with XLR-3 to 3-pin screw locking LEMO adapter cable)
In addition, you can connect an audio source to the LINE socket 씈 of the
portable transmitter.
4-15
The function of the components
GP AM 3000 active antenna
�
� �
쐃 Output for the optional connection of a directional antenna
(lockable SMA high-frequency connection)
�
쐇 Addressing switch (0: MTS “0”, 1: MTS “1”)
쐋 Output for 8-pin data cable (RJ 45) for the connection of a second
GP AM 3200 active antenna (MTS-OUT)
쐏 Input for 8-pin data cable (RJ 45) from the cell transmitter or another
active antenna (MTS-IN)
Function of the active antennas in the overall system
The Storage Events are transmitted from the cell transmitters to the first
active antenna via a data cable with a maximum length of 100 m (at least
CAT5) and between the first and second active antenna via a data cable
with a maximum length of 50 m (at least CAT5). The active antennas then
transmit the data to the receivers.
CAUTION!
No reception due to improper mounting of antenna !
In order that the active antennas can optimally transmit
the data to the receivers, there must be direct line of sight
between the active antennas and the receivers!
It is therefore best to mount the active antennas on
the ceiling or – as high as possible – on a wall.
For outdoor applications, you require an isolation
housing for the active antenna!
Never use conductive covers, varnishes or panelling for
the antennas!
Antenna radiation pattern and range
If the active antenna can be mounted as centrally as possible, e.g. in the
center of an exhibition room, it has an omni-directional radiation pattern
and, depending on location, a range of up to 50 m.
If, however, it is mounted to a wall or ceiling or onto a metal base, this will
effect both its radiation pattern and range.
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '1'
MTS '1'
Connecting active antennas to the cell transmitters
Every cell transmitter can output two MTS. For every MTS, it is necessary
to connect an active antenna to the cell transmitter. The active antennas
are connected in series and each of the two data flows (MTS “0” or MTS
“1”) is assigned to an active antenna (antenna “0” or antenna “1”) via an
addressing switch.
4-16
The function of the components
GP ID 3200 identifier
Ther are two types of identifier:
! the GP ID 3200-IN identifier for use in dry, indoor environments or
! the GP ID 3200-OUT identifier with weather-proof housing for outdoor
installation or use in humid environments (protection class IP 65).
GP ID 3200-IN identifier for use in dry, indoor environments
쐃 Name plate
쐇 Infra-red interface
�
쐋 One green and one red operation indicator
�
�
GP ID 3200-OUT identifier for outdoor installation or use in humid
environments
�
쐏
쐇
쐋
쐏
쐏
쐃 Cable bushing
(not inserted ex factory)
쐇 Infra-red interface
쐋 One green and one red operation indicator
쐄
쐏 Screws
쐄 Barometric pressure compensation
쐏
Functions of the identifiers in the overall system
Identifiers trigger the reproduction or transmission of the Events. The
identifiers generate a magnetic field which inductively transmits data to
the receivers.
Each identifier constantly transmits an ID which uniquely identifies the
Event. When the visitor enters the magnetic field of an identifier, the
receiver receives the ID of the identifier. The receiver then fades out the
information on the previous exhibit and fades in the new exhibit
information. The audio information can be a Storage Event, a Live Event or
a System Event.
If the audio information to be transmitted is a Storage Event, the receiver
plays the corresponding information previously stored for any visitor from
the beginning. That means that the visitor does not have to follow a fixed
route, but can choose his own course through the exhibition at his own
pace. Furthermore, he can stop the reproduction of an Event at any time
and can, with Storage Events, even repeat it.
4-17
The function of the components
If the audio information to be transmitted is a Live Event, it is faded in as
soon as the visitor enters the magnetic field of the identifier. The audio
information is faded out when:
! reception of the Live Event is restricted to the range of the magnetic
field of the identifier and the visitor leaves this magnetic field.
! the visitor passes a special identifier at the exit (Null Event) which
fades out the transmission of the Live Event
! the visitor enters the magnetic field of the next identifier (the next
Event is reproduced)
! the visitor leaves the transmission range of the antenna transmitting
the Live Event.
Special functions of the identifiers
Identifiers also trigger System Events, Entrance Events and Null Events
(see “System Events” on page 4-5).
4-18
The function of the components
GP EK 3202 receiver
쐇
쐇
쐋
쐄
쐋
쐄
쐏
쐏
쐎
쐎
쐊
쐊
쐉
쐂
�
�
�
�
�
�
쐈
�
쐅
�
�
5-key receiver
EK 3202-5
쐂
4-key receiver
EK 3202-4
쐉
씈
16-key receiver
EK 3202-0
Rear of all
receivers
쐃 Headphone output (3.5 mm stereo jack socket)
쐇 Operation and battery status indicator, POWER LED (red)
쐋 READY LED (green)
쐏 VOL+ key
쐄 VOL– key
쐂 4-pin connector strip for connection to the charger
쐆 HELP key
쐊 REPEAT key
쐎 STOP key
쐅 LANGUAGE key
쐈 Numeric keypad
쐉 Detail key
씈 Alarm loudspeaker (under the belt clip on the back)
4-19
The function of the components
Function of the receivers in the overall system
The receivers receive the audio information of your exhibition as:
! either Storage Events in a stationary download (in the location with
fixed Events and the location number 0)
! or Storage Events in a mobile download (in the locations with variable
Events and the location numbers from “1” to a maximum of “63”)
! or Live Events.
Storage Events are stored; Live Events are transmitted immediately and
not stored. The dynamic memory for Storage Events stores fixed and
variable Events. You can determine the boundary between fixed and
variable Events yourself and change it, if necessary.
The following example illustrates these two areas and shows which
Storage Event data is stored in them, respectively.
Loc 1
Loc 2
Evt 999
Evt 999
Fixed storage events of
Fixed storage events of
LOC 0
LOC 0
Evt 301
Evt 301
Evt 260
Evt 180
Evt 100
variable storage events of
LOC 1
mobile
download
variable storage events of
Evt 100
LOC 2
1. Memory for fixed Storage Events of location “0” (top light-blue area).
These fixed Storage Events always remain in the memory – even when
the receiver leaves the location “0” and enters another location and a
mobile download takes place.
2. Memory for variable Storage Events of the locations with numbers
from “1” to a max. “63” (bottom dark blue/grey area).
When a receiver leaves the current location (“Loc 1” in this case) and
enters another location (“Loc 2” in this case), the variable Storage
Events of the current location are exchanged for the variable Storage
Events of the new location if necessary (mobile downloads).
You yourself determine the subdivision of the total memory into these two
parts. All Events of your locations are numbered consecutively. The
numbers of the variable Events begin at “100” and end at “300” in the
default setting. The numbers of the fixed Events begin at “301” and end
at “999” in the default setting. The default setting “301” can be changed
to a minimum setting of “101”:
! when you set up the project file (see “Configuring the project (detailed
description)” on page 8-15),
4-20
The function of the components
! at a later time when you add a new one (see “Adding a new location”
on page 8-75),
! or when you import a location (see “Importing a location” on
page 8-78).
The receivers are available with 4, 5 or 16 keys and thus slightly differ in
operation.
The 4-key receiver
The 4-key receiver is largely protected against operating errors and is
suitable for most applications in an exhibition.
The category is preset in the 4-key receiver! If, for example, you have set
up the categories “English” and “German” for your exhibition, the visitors
cannot freely select this category via the 4-key receiver.
It is thus important that the visitor is given a 4-key receiver with the
correct category. The preset category can be changed if the receiver is
inserted into a charger which is connected to a computer. You can then
change the category temporarily (for the duration of a tour) or
permanently via the software. Alternatively, you can set the category for
the visitor via an identifier which triggers the System Event “Cat”.
The 5-key receiver
The 4-key receiver with Detail key is similar to the 4-key receiver but has
an additional key which allows the visitor to trigger Detail Events.
Detail Events contain additional information which deepen the
information given via another Storage Event. The visitor is at first given
general information on an exhibit via a Storage Event. If he is especially
interested in this exhibit, he then presses the Detail key 쐉 for additional
information.
The 16-key receiver
The 16-key receiver is similar to the 4-key receiver but has three additional
features which allow the visitor to make individual settings. In addition,
the 16-key receiver is suitable for checking the
system since it
provides access to all functions of the system.
쐈
쐅
�
! Via the HELP key 쐆 , the visitor can call up operating tips stored
permanently in the receiver. The “help” file is stored permanently in
the receiver’s memory separate from the Storage Events. This function
is a customer-specified option, implemented only on request at the
time of order! At present, the Detail function (see above) can be
activated via this key.
! Via the numeric keys 쐈 , the visitor can start Events without identifiers
by entering a three-figure number.
This operating mode can also be used if your exhibits are too close to
one another (for example in a display case), so that the magnetic fields
of the identifiers would overlap. However, you can also stagger the
information. For this purpose, the visitor is at first only given a short
introduction to a group of exhibits via a Storage Event and, if he is
especially interested in a certain exhibit, is then requested to enter a
three-figure number for additional information.
4-21
The function of the components
Note:
If your exhibition has no identifiers, receivers with numeric keys
(optional) are absolutely necessary.
! The visitor can switch between all categories in the system at any time.
To do so, he has to press the LANGUAGE key 쐅 and enter the twofigure category number (16-key version only).
If, for example, you have set up the categories “English” and “German”,
the visitor can switch from English to German. Please note, however,
that immediately after having switched the category, the Storage
Events of the previous category are still stored in the receiver. For the
transmission of the Storage Events of the new category to the receiver,
it is necessary that the visitor (with the receiver) is within the
transmission range of the antennas.
4-22
The function of the components
GP L 3200 charger
�
쐃 Charging indicator (green LED), x 10
�
쐇 Charging compartment for the receiver, x 10
�
쐋 Ventilation slots
쐏 Operation indicator (red LED)
쐄 POWER switch
�
쐂 Mains connector
쐆 RS 485 interface (DATA IN)
쐊 RS 485 interface (DATA OUT)
�
� �
�
Functions of the chargers in the overall system
The rechargeable batteries of up to 10 receivers are charged
simultaneously in a charger. Each charger has its own mains unit which can
be connected to any mains power supply with 100 to 240 V AC and 50 to
60 Hz AC.
Unused receivers remain in a charger connected to the mains. When
inserted into the charger, the receivers are automatically turned off.
Note:
To ensure reliable operation, the chargers should be screwed onto a
solid base.
You can operate the chargers with or without connecting them to a
computer.
Without connection to a computer, you can only recharge the rechargeable
batteries in the receivers. The preset category (volume or language)
cannot be changed.
If you connect the chargers to a computer:
! You receive detailed information on the inserted receivers and their
rechargeable batteries.
! You can change the preset category or volume of the receivers either
temporarily for the duration of a single tour or permanently.
! You can read statistical data from the receivers. Thus, you can find out
how long the visitors stay at an exhibit and whether they listen to
Storage Events in their entirety or not. This statistical data can be
output anonymously. However, you can also combine them with
personal data of the visitors (age and sex etc.). For this purpose, you
require the STM software module.
Note:
Please note the regulations regarding the protection of person-specific
data!
4-23
Index
Index
Active antenna 4-16
connection to cell transmitter 4-16
function 4-16
radiation pattern 4-16
Antenna 4-3
Cell transmitter 4-2
Charger 4-4, 4-23
function 4-23
Directional antenna 4-17
Event
transmission to antennas 4-14
types 4-4
Identifier 4-3, 4-17
function 4-17
special functions 4-18
Overall system 4-1
components 4-2
drawings 4-12
overview 4-2
Portable transmitter 4-3, 4-15
suitable microphones 4-15
Receiver 4-2, 4-19
16-key version 4-21
4-key version 4-21
function 4-20
Software 4-6
Storage events
Detail Events 4-5
event with the feature on ID range 4-5
4-24
5 Putting the Components into
Operation
This chapter provides information on the technical details of the
components.
Contents of the chapter
Cell transmitters................................................................................5-2
Portable transmitters .................................................................... 5-18
Antenna ........................................................................................... 5-24
Identifiers ........................................................................................ 5-27
Receivers.......................................................................................... 5-39
Chargers........................................................................................... 5-45
Index ................................................................................................ 5-48
5-1
Cell transmitters
Cell transmitters
Putting the cell transmitters into operation
Unpacking the units
Danger!
Moving a unit from a cold environment to a warmer one (after delivery
etc.) can cause condensate to form inside the unit. If you connect a
unit to the mains before it has reached room temperature, the unit
could be destroyed as a result! Persons could be injured or killed by an
electric shock! It is thus necessary to wait at least one hour until the
unit has room temperature before you connect it to the mains!
Where to place the cell transmitters
Warning!
The cell transmitter produces heat. If this heat cannot escape, the cell
transmitter could be destroyed as a result!
Therefore, make sure that the heat can escape freely through the air
vents on the sides of the unit at all times!
Choose a place with the following features:
! Solid, flat and secure against tipping so that the units cannot fall over
! Dust- and dirt-free
! Dry so that the units never get damp or wet
! Sufficiently ventilated so that any heat generated can dissipate
! Vibration-free
! Temperature range: 0°C to 50°C
! Out of direct sunlight
! You can mount the cell transmitters into a 19" rack and screw them
down. Please observe the warning given under “Mounting the cell
transmitters into a rack” on page 5-3!)
Fixing the cell transmitter feet
To ensure that the cell transmitter cannot slip on the surface on which it is
placed, four self-adhesive soft feet are supplied.
Note:
Do not use these feet if rack-mounting the cell transmitter.
Ensure that the base of the cell transmitter is clean and free from
grease before mounting the feet.
Fix the feet to the base of the cell transmitter by peeling off the safety
paper and fitting them as shown in the diagram on the left.
Caution!
Some furniture surfaces have been treated with varnish, polish or
synthetics which might become stained when they come into contact
with other synthetics. Despite a thorough testing of the synthetics
5-2
Cell transmitters
used by us, we cannot rule out the possibility of staining, since we
don’t know your furniture.
Mounting the cell transmitters into a rack
You can mount several cell transmitters into a 19" rack.
Warning!
The cell transmitter produces heat. If this heat cannot escape, the cell
transmitter could be destroyed as a result!
Therefore, make sure that the heat can escape freely through the air
vents on the sides of the unit at all times!
쐃
Mount the cell transmitter into the rack and screw the rack mount
“ears” 쐃 to the rack using suitable screws (not supplied).
Connecting the mains cable
�
The cell transmitter is powered via a built-in switchable mains unit which
is connected to the mains (100 – 240 V AC, 50 – 60 Hz) via a mains cable.
Pass the mains cable through the cable grip 쐋 . This prevents accidental
loosening of the mains connector (e.g. due to vibrations when moving the
unit to a different place).
Connecting the headphones
쐃
Via the headphone output 쐃 , you can monitor any audio source (Live
Event) connected to one of the two cell transmitters – just as the visitors
hear it. Storage Events cannot be monitored via the headphone output.
You can connect any stereo headphones with a ¼" (6.3 mm) jack plug. If
you want to use headphones with a 3.5 mm jack plug, you will require an
adapter.
Note:
If no audio sources are connected or if no Live Events were assigned to
this cell transmitter, no audio signal will be present at the headphone
output!
You can select the audio input and the volume in the “Main” menu under
“Live configuration”:
Select the audio source in the “Set default routing” menu (see
“Selecting an audio source to listen to via the headphone output” on
page 5-10).
Select the headphone volume in the “Set headphone volume”
menu (see “Changing the volume of the headphone output” on
page 5-9).
Danger!
When people use headphones, they tend to choose a higher volume
than with loudspeakers. Listening at high volume levels for long
periods can lead to permanent hearing defects.
5-3
Cell transmitters
Connecting sound sources for Live Events
For Live operation, you can connect mono and stereo sound sources to the
cell transmitters – even both at the same time. One mono sound source is
connected to one of the eight CT IN sockets (¼" (6.3 mm) jack sockets) 쐉
and 씈 , and one stereo sound source is connected to two AF input sockets.
Note:
쐉
Most sound reproduction units such as CD players, cassette recorders,
video recorders, tape recorders, etc. are stereo sound sources.
Apart from a multi-channel surround sound, DVD players and DVD
recorders also output a stereo signal.
Classical mono sound sources are microphones which can be
connected via a microphone preamplifier.
씈
To connect mono sound sources to the ¼" (6.3 mm) jack sockets 쐉
(CT 1) and 씈 (CT 2) of the cell transmitter, proceed as follows:
– connect the first mono sound source to CT IN 1,
쐉
씈
– connect the second mono sound source to CT IN 2, and so on.
To connect two stereo sound sources to the ¼" (6.3 mm) jack sockets
of the cell transmitter, proceed as follows:
– First stereo sound source:
connect the left channel to CT IN 1 and the right channel to CT IN 2
– Second stereo sound source:
connect the left channel to CT IN 3 and the right channel to CT IN 4.
Note:
Please note the restrictions concerning the assignment of Live Events
to an MTS (see “Assigning an MTS for a category to an Event” on
page 8-65).
You can connect sound sources with balanced or unbalanced input signals
to the cell transmitters – even both at the same time.
Note:
Professional studio equipment such as mixing consoles and audio
equipment with XLR sockets output balanced signals.
Most audio equipment with RCA (phono) sockets such as CD players,
cassette recorders, video recorders, tape recorders, etc. output
unbalanced signals.
Use the following connector assignment for balanced input signals:
– Tip: signal +
– Ring: signal –
– Sleeve: signal ground (screen)
Please also observe the illustration at the rear of the cell transmitter.
We recommend the following connector assignment for unbalanced
input signals:
– Tip: signal +
– Ring: signal ground (must be assigned!) *
– Sleeve: signal ground (screen)
*
5-4
(ie: Connect the screen of an unbalanced lead to both ring and sleeve.)
Cell transmitters
쐈
If mains hum occurs during reproduction of the Live Events, set the
GROUND LIFT switch 쐈 at the rear of the cell transmitter to position
ON.
You can connect audio sources with levels of max. 5 Vpp to the cell
transmitters. The input circuit of the cell transmitters has an automatic
level limiter. If the input signal exceeds 300 mVpp, this level is maintained
internally without distorting the signal (no clipping). Input signals below
300 mVpp are processed in a linear way.
Note:
The line outputs of most audio equipment can be connected to a cell
transmitter without problems.
Professional audio equipment such as mixing consoles, etc. have an
adjustable output which can be adjusted to match the audio input of
the cell transmitter. If the output signal of the connected audio unit is
too loud but the unit does not have an adjustable output, you can
damp the corresponding audio input of the cell transmitter (see
“Damping excessively loud audio signals” on page 5-11).
Connecting cell transmitters to a laptop or Base Station PC
쐊
Via the USB input 쐊 , you can transfer data and configurations from a
computer to a cell transmitter. The computer can be either a laptop or a
Base Station PC. In both cases the “Base Station Manager” software must
be installed on the computer.
Networking several cell transmitters
You can network several cell transmitters and thus address them directly
from a PC or laptop by connecting them via a USB hub. To do so, connect
all cell transmitters to the USB hub via their USB inputs 쐊 .
쐊
Turning the cell transmitters on/off
Before turning on the cell transmitter, all connections must be set up.
쐄
Turn the cell transmitter on and off via the mains switch 쐄 . If you
want to turn several cell transmitters on or off, e.g. via a switchable AC
outlet, you must leave all connected cell transmitters turned on. If you
turn on several cell transmitters at the same time via a switchable AC
outlet, high currents flow and the fuse for your premises can blow. The
settings made on the individual unit are stored and are retained in
memory even after power cuts.
Note:
Via the INM software, you can activate or deactivate the RF output of
the antenna (see “Turning the RF output on and off” on page 8-42).
When the RF output is deactivated, the cell transmitter itself is turned
on but does not transmit.
After turn-on, the cell transmitter carries out a self-test. If all settings are
OK, the status display shown on the left appears on the display backlit in
green (see also “The status display of the cell transmitter” on page 5-7).
If, for example, the antennas are not connected or if there is another error
in the configuration, the display is backlit in red. If there is a serious
malfunction in the unit, the display flashes alternately in red and green
(see “Troubleshooting” on page 5-15).
5-5
Cell transmitters
Operating the cell transmitters
The cell transmitter has a dot matrix display, a / rocker button and a
SET button. These allow you to:
! display the operating state of the two cell transmitters,
! monitor communication with the Base Station PC and the connected
antennas,
! select the audio source and volume of the headphone output,
! display all parameters of the current installation
! change several parameters of the current installation
! carry out troubleshooting.
The buttons on the cell transmitter
The cell transmitter’s menu is operated via the / rocker button and the
SET button (see “The display of the cell transmitter” on page 5-6).
The / rocker button allows you to:
! select the next or previous item on the menu,
! select the desired parameter within a menu,
! change the selected parameter (the rocker button increases the
parameter and the rocker button reduces it).
If you keep the / rocker button pressed, the selected parameter or
menu changes continuously (repeat function).
The SET button allows you to:
! confirm the menu selection and access the selected submenu or
parameter,
! store the selected parameter.
Note:
The / rocker button and the SET button are inactive as long as
data is being transferred from a computer to the cell transmitter.
If the displays flashes alternately in red and green, the / rocker
button is inactive.
The display of the cell transmitter
The menu of the cell transmitter consists of:
! the status display
(see “The status display of the cell transmitter” on page 5-7),
! the “Main” menu with the submenus
– “Installation info”,
– “Live event configuration”,
– “Antenna configuration”,
– “Service”,
– “Fallback”.
5-6
Cell transmitters
! the USB activity display,
– If data is transferred to the cell transmitter via the USB input, the
corresponding information is shown on the display.
! the error display:
– If connections or settings of the cell transmitter deviate from the
installation, the display is backlit in red. To eliminate the
error, see “Troubleshooting” on page 5-15.
– If there is a serious malfunction in the unit, the display flashes
alternately in red and green and an error message appears.
The status display of the cell transmitter
The status display appears:
! after turn-on,
! when no button is pressed for approx. 15 seconds,
! when no data is transmitted to one of the two cell transmitters via USB.
The status display shows the following:
쐋 쐃 쐋
123456
AAU O
AAU 1
쐇
Cod
04 04
쐋 쐃 쐋
쐃 The CT ID numbers of the two cell transmitters
– You cannot change these numbers as they are permanently stored
in the unit.
123457
AAU O
AAU 1
쐇 The BSM icon
– is shown in grey if there is no USB connection to a Base Station PC,
쐄
쐏
쐄
– is shown in black if there is no connection.
쐋 The four antenna status symbols
– are shown in grey if no MTS was assigned in the
installation,
– are shown in black if an MTS was assigned in the
installation.
쐏 The numbers (installation IDs) of the current
installations
쐄 The audio inputs switched to the headphone socket
– are shown in grey if not assigned in the
installation,
– are shown in black if assigned in the
installation but not
selected in the “Set default routing” menu,
– are shown inverted if assigned in the
installation and
selected in the “Set default routing” menu.
Selecting a menu item
Normally, the status display appears as shown on the left (see “The status
display of the cell transmitter” on page 5-7).
To change from the status display to the “Main” menu:
Press any button.
The “Main” menu appears on the display. An arrow on the right-hand
margin of the menu indicates the direction in which there are
additional menu items which are currently not visible.
5-7
Cell transmitters
To select a certain menu item or parameter:
Press the / rocker button until the desired menu item or
parameter is marked. Arrows on the right-hand margin of the display
indicate the direction in which there are additional menu items which
are currently not visible.
To confirm your selection, press the SET button.
The selected menu item or parameter is displayed.
To change a parameter:
Press the / rocker button.
The parameter is changed.
Press the SET button.
The change takes effect immediately, but it could be that it is not
stored permanently. When the status display appears after approx.
15 seconds, your change is lost.
If you exit one of the menus for changing parameters by selecting for
example “Back”, a safety query appears (for example “Are you
sure?”). Only when you select “OK” and press the SET button is your
change stored permanently and will be retained in memory on turnoff.
To return to the previous menu level:
Select “Back” and press the SET button.
Note:
If you do not press a button for approx. 15 seconds, the status display
appears.
Displaying the installation parameters
All features of the
installation assigned via the INM software can
be shown on the display of the cell transmitter.
To display the installation parameters:
From the “Main” menu, select “Installation info” as described
under “Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Select device” menu appears.
Select the antenna transmitting the MTS whose installation
information you want to display.
The info menu appears. The headline shows the CT-ID number of the
cell transmitter selected and the antenna selected (“AAU0” or “AAU1”
as well as “1/3” as the first of three pages is displayed.
Scroll through the menu to display the following information:
쐃 Location description of the cell transmitter “Loc”
– You enter the location description when you integrate the cell
transmitter into the
installation (see “Entering or
changing the site of the cell transmitter” on page 8-41).
쐇 Installation number and name “Inst”
– You assign the name when you create a new installation.
– The INM software automatically assigns the number when a new
location is created.
쐋 Installation date and time “Date”
5-8
Cell transmitters
쐏 Number of Events of the selected MTS
쐄 Live Events transmitted via the selected MTS
– If you assigned Live Events to the selected MTS, the audio inputs
assigned to this MTS are displayed here (see “Selecting an audio
source to listen to via the headphone output” on page 5-10).
쐂 Category number and name of the stored Storage Events (a number
between 1 and 31)
– All Events transmitted by a cell transmitter must belong to the
same category.
– You assign the category name when a new category is created (see
“Adding categories” on page 8-34).
쐆 Memory space used by Storage Events in percent
쐊 If an Intro is transmitted in the selected MTS, “Intro” appears; if no
Intro is transmitted, “No Intro” appears.
A list of all Events transmitted from this cell transmitter then follows.
You can scroll through this list using the / rocker button. Every line
corresponds to an Event and shows the following:
쐎 Event number “ID”
– The software automatically assigns the Event number when the
Event is created (see “Adding a new Event” on page 8-46).
쐅 Event type “Mod”
– “STO” or “Live”. You determine the Event type when the Event is
created.
쐈 Duration of the Event in seconds “Dur”
– Is only displayed if the Event in question is a Storage Event.
쐉 Category number to which the Event belongs “Cat”
씈 Priority status “P”
– An “x” appears if you defined a Storage Event with priority status.
씉 Restriction of Event reproduction to the area of the magnetic field of
the identifier “R”
– An “x” appears if you defined that reproduction is to be restricted
to the area of the magnetic field of the identifier (“on ID range”).
Changing the volume of the headphone output
To change the volume of the headphone output:
From the “Main” menu, select “Live configuration” as described
under “Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Live configuration” menu appears.
From the “Live configuration” menu, select “Set headphone
volume”.
The volume display appears.
On the rocker button, press to increase the volume or press to
reduce the volume. The volume can be changed in 32 steps.
The volume display shows the value set. The setting becomes effective
immediately but is not stored permanently.
Live event configuration
5-9
Cell transmitters
Press the SET button.
“Storing value...” briefly appears on the display. The volume is
stored permanently.
Note:
If you do not press the SET button and the status display appears after
approx. 15 seconds, the volume reverts to its original value.
Selecting an audio source to listen to via the headphone output
To select an audio source for reproduction via the headphone output:
From the “Main” menu, select “Live event configuration” as
described under “Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Live event configuration” menu appears.
From the “Live
Live event configuration
event
configuration”
menu, select “Set
default routing”.
The “Set default routing” menu appears, showing all Live Events
assigned to these two cell transmitters in the
installation.
쐄 쐏
쐃
쐃
Set default routing
c
123456
123457
O
O
O
O
쐃 The CT ID numbers of the two cell transmitters
– are shown inverted if selected.
쐇 The four audio inputs of the cell transmitters
– are shown in grey if not assigned in the
-10 O O O
– are shown in black if assigned in the
쐇
쐋
– are shown inverted if assigned in the
connected through to the headphone output.
installation,
installation,
installation and
쐋 The display of the damping of the audio signal
– shows “0” if the audio signal is not damped,
– shows “-10” if if the audio signal is damped.
쐏 The level indicator
– shows the current signal strength of the selected audio source,
– should show as high a level as possible but should never reach the
uppermost segment.
쐄 The clipping display “c”
– appears for three seconds if the audio signal is momentarily
overmodulated and the limiter has to correct the signal strength in
order to avoid distortion (pumping sound).
Caution!
If the clipping display “c” appears, the signal level of the connected
audio unit is too high! You then have to reduce the audio output level
of the connected audio unit or – if the audio unit does not have an
adjustable audio output – damp the corresponding audio input of the
cell transmitter (see next section).
5-10
Select the desired audio source.
You can immediately hear the selected audio source via the
headphones, but this selection is not stored permanently.
You can hear stereo Live Events (occupy two audio inputs) in stereo
via the connected headphones; you can hear mono Live Events
(occupy one audio input only) in mono.
Press the SET button.
“Storing value...” briefly appears on the display. The selected
Cell transmitters
audio souce is permanently connected through to the headphone
output. The selected audio input is shown inverted on the status
display. With stereo sources, the two audio inputs are shown inverted
on the status display.
Damping excessively loud audio signals
If the output signal of the connected audio unit is too loud but the unit
does not have an adjustable audio output, you have to damp the
corresponding audio input at the cell transmitter in order to prevent
distortion. The damping of an audio input has an effect on both the
headphone output of the cell transmitter and the antenna output.
To damp an audio signal:
Live event configuration
From the “Main” menu, select “Live event configuration” as
described under “Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Live event configuration” menu appears.
From the “Live
event
configuration”
menu, select “Set
damping”.
The “Set damping” menu appears (see also “Selecting an audio
source to listen to via the headphone output” on page 5-10).
쐃 The CT ID numbers of the two cell transmitters
– are shown inverted if selected.
쐇 The four audio inputs of the cell transmitters
– are shown in grey if not assigned in the
– are shown in black if assigned in the
– are shown inverted if assigned in the
connected through to the headphone output.
installation,
installation,
installation and
쐋 The display of the damping of the audio signal
– shows “0” if the audio signal is not damped,
– shows “-10” if if the audio signal is damped.
쐏 The level indicator
– shows the current signal strength of the selected audio source,
– should show as high a level as possible but should never reach the
uppermost segment.
쐄 The clipping display “c”
– appears for three seconds if the audio signal is momentarily
overmodulated and the limiter has to correct the signal strength in
order to avoid distortion (pumping sound).
– “Back” to return to the main menu.
From the “Set
damped.
damping”
Press the SET button to activate damping or deactivate it again.
Below the audio input (for stereo Live Events: below the two audio
inputs), “-10” appears if damping is active and “0” appears if it is not.
The selected damping becomes effective immediately but is not stored
permanently.
menu, select the audio source to be
5-11
Cell transmitters
To permanently store the damping, select “Back” and press the SET
button.
The “Store values?” menu appears.
Select “OK” to permanently store the damping settings; select
“Cancel” to exit the menu without saving the changes.
Temporarily changing antenna parameters for test purposes
You usually create a
installation by entering all parameters into
the INM software. All parameters, including the antenna parameters, are
then transferred to the cell transmitters using a job.
However, if you only want to optimize your
installation and want
to change antenna parameters temporarily for this purpose (for example
in order to test the range of the antenna signal) you can reprogram the
parameters directly at the cell transmitter as described below.
Note!
As soon as you temporarily reprogram an antenna parameter, this
parameter no longer corresponds to the
project file. The
display therefore is backlit in red.
The temporarily reprogrammed parameters will be lost on the next
download to the cell transmitters and when you turn off the cell
transmitters. In order not to lose temporarily reprogrammed
parameters, you have to transfer these to the
installation by
changing the parameters in the INM software and then performing a
cell transmitter download!
The following antenna parameters can be changed directly at the cell
transmitters:
! Antenna type (active antenna or directional antenna)
! Transmitting power
! On/Off
The RF channel via which the antenna is transmitting is also displayed.
To temporarily reprogram an antenna parameter:
From the “Main” menu, select “Antenna configuration” as
described under “Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Select device” menu appears.
Select the antenna transmitting the MTS whose antenna parameters
you want to change temporarily.
The “Configuration” menu appears. The headline contains the
selected antenna and the cell transmitter.
From the “Configuration” menu, select the parameter you want to
change temporarily and press the SET button.
– “RFOutput” is for switching the antenna on and off,
– “Power” is for changing the transmitting power,
– “Type” is for activating/deactivating an external directional
antenna,
– “Channel” indicates the RF channel via which the antenna is
transmitting (cannot be changed on the cell transmitter).
5-12
Cell transmitters
As soon as you change a parameter, the value is preceded by an “x” in
order to indicate that this value no longer corresponds to the
installation created via the INM software. However, the new parameter
does not yet become active!
To activate the temporarily changed parameter(s):
Select “Reprogram AAU”.
The safety query “Are you sure?” appears.
Select “Ok” to activate the temporarily changed parameters.
“Processing...” briefly appears on the display. The backlighting of
the display changes to red. All temporarily changed antenna
parameters become active.
However, they are overwritten when a new
installation is
transmitted via USB. If the cell transmitter is turned on and off again,
all temporarily changed parameters revert to the values of the current
installation.
To restore the original parameters of the selected antenna:
Select “Restore AAU”.
The safety query “Are you sure?” appears.
Select “Ok” to restore the original parameters of the selected antenna.
“Processing...” briefly appears on the display. The antenna
parameters of the last
installation transferred to the cell
transmitters are restored. The backlighting of the display changes to
green.
To restore the original parameters of all four antennas:
Select “Restore all AAUs”.
The safety query “Are you sure?” appears.
Select “Ok” to restore the original parameters of all four antennas.
“Processing...” briefly appears on the display. The antenna
parameters of the last
installation transferred to the cell
transmitters are restored. The backlighting of the display changes to
green.
Displaying the firmware version
The firmware is the internal software of the cell transmitter. This software
can be updated.
To display the current version information:
From the “Main” menu, select “Service” as described under
“Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Service” menu appears.
From the “Service” menu, select “Display version”.
The version information appears on the display.
쐃 Firmware version number
쐇 Hardware version number
쐋 Date of the last firmware update
5-13
Cell transmitters
Changing the display contrast
To change the display contrast:
From the “Main” menu, select “Service” as described under
“Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Service” menu appears.
From the “Service” menu, select “Set display contrast”.
The contrast indication appears.
On the rocker button, press to increase the contrast or press to
reduce the contrast. The contrast can be changed in 16 steps.
The contrast indication shows the value set. The setting becomes
effective immediately but is not stored permanently.
Press the SET button.
The setting is stored permanently.
Note:
If you do not press the SET button and the status display appears after
approx. 15 seconds, the contrast reverts to its original value.
Carrying out a reset
After you have removed or reconnected audio sources, it could be
necessary to carry out a reset so that the cell transmitter can detect the
change.
From the “Main” menu, select “Service” as described under
“Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Service” menu appears.
From the “Service” menu, select “Reset SR3200”.
The safety query “Are you sure?” appears.
Select “OK” and press the SET button.
The cell transmitter restarts. All temporarily changed antenna
parameters are reset to the original parameters of the
installation. The status display appears on the display.
Restoring the factory settings on the cell transmitter
You can reset the cell transmitter to the factory settings.
Caution!
If you reset the cell transmitter to the factory settings, all data of the
current
installation are deleted! Parts of your exhibition will
then not function! All settings such as display contrast and volume of
the headphone input are reset to the factory settings.
5-14
From the “Main” menu, select “Service” as described under
“Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Service” menu appears.
Cell transmitters
From the “Service” menu, select “Restore factory settings”.
The safety query “Are you sure?” appears.
Select “OK” and press the SET button
The cell transmitter restarts. All
installation data is deleted
and the cell transmitter does not transmit any Events. The status
display appears on the display.
Troubleshooting
If the display flashes alternately in red and green, there is a serious
malfunction in the unit.
Press the SET button.
The cell transmitter carries out a restart. If, after that, the display is
still flashing alternately in red and green, there is a serious
malfunction in the unit. Please contact the Sennheiser electronic
customer service (see “Customer Service” on page 17-4).
If the display is backlit in red, a few features of the cell transmitter do not
correspond to the
installation which you created via the INM
software. To eliminate this error, proceed as follows:
From the “Main” menu, select “Service” as described under
“Selecting a menu item” on page 5-7.
The “Service” menu appears.
From the “Service” menu, select “Display warning”.
The first problem is shown in clear text on the display.
Example:
If an antenna assigned in the
installation is not connected,
“AAU0 (CT1) not found!” or something similar is displayed.
Eliminate the first problem.
The display of the first problem disappears and the other problems are
displayed one after the other.
Eliminate all problems one after the other until “No warnings”
appears on the display.
Structure of the cell transmitter’s menu
The following two-page spread gives you an overview of the structure of
the cell transmitter’s menu.
5-15
Cell transmitters
5-16
Cell transmitters
5-17
Portable transmitters
Portable transmitters
Putting the portable transmitters into operation
Connecting a microphone
You can connect one of the following Sennheiser microphones (need to be
ordered separately) to the portable transmitter:
! Clip-on microphones with 3-pin screw locking LEMO plug:
MKE 2-4 Gold C,
MKE plat-4-C,
ME 102 (only with the KA 100S-4 cable),
ME 104 (only with the KA 100-4 cable),
ME 105 (only with the KA 100-4 cable)
! Headmic:
HS 2
! Hand-held microphone:
e935 (with XLR-3 to 3-pin screw locking LEMO adapter cable)
The voltage necessary to operate the microphones is available at the
MIC microphone socket 씊 of the portable transmitter.
씊
Connect the plug from the microphone cable to the MIC microphone
socket 씊 of the portable transmitter.
Lock the plug by screwing down the coupling ring.
Connecting a line source
You can connect an external audio source such as a CD player (or other
audio device) to the portable transmitter. For this, you require a cable with
a 3.5 mm stereo jack plug.
씈
Connect the line output of the audio device to the LINE socket 씈 of
the portable transmitter.
Connecting the antenna
쐈
Connect the supplied antenna to the ANT antenna socket 쐈 .
Lock the antenna by screwing down the coupling ring.
Charging the rechargeable battery
5-18
Insert the portable transmitter into any charging compartment of the
L 3200 charger.
All LEDs go off. The portable transmitter turns off automatically. The
charge status of the rechargeable battery is indicated by the LEDs on
Portable transmitters
the charger (see “Charging the rechargeable batteries of the
receivers” on page 5-47) and in the “Device Display” area of the
“Charger Manager” software (see page 10-6).
Note:
Charging takes approx. 4 hours. With a fully charged rechargeable
battery, the portable transmitter’s operating time is approx. 8 hours.
Attaching the portable transmitter to clothing
ATTENTION!
Danger of short-circuit!
If you put the portable transmitter into a pocket with
small parts which conduct electricity such as coins, etc.,
these can short out the 4-pin connector strip 쐆 .
Keep small parts which conduct electricity away from
the portable transmitter.
씋
The portable transmitter is best attached to clothing (e.g. belt, waistband,
pocket) with the belt clip 씋 .
In addition, you can attach a neck strap to the belt clip 씋 and wear the
portable transmitter around your neck.
Adjusting the sensitivity of the microphone input
쐅
쐊
쐄
Make sure that the microphone is connected and then speak in a
normal voice.
Keep the MIC key 쐊 pressed and simultaneously press the
LEVEL+ key 쐄 or the LEVEL– key 쐅 several times so that the
MIC LED 씉 always lights up yellow. The MIC LED 씉 should only briefly
light up red during the loudest passages.
Adjusting the sensitivity of the line input
쐅
쐄
쐂
Connect the external audio source, turn it on and start playback.
Keep the LINE key 쐂 pressed and simultaneously press the
LEVEL+ key 쐄 or the LEVEL– key 쐅 several times so that the
LINE LED 쐉 always lights up yellow. The LINE LED 쐉 should only
briefly light up red during the loudest passages.
5-19
Portable transmitters
Operating the portable transmitters
Setting the transmission channel
For all receivers participating in the guided tour to reproduce the signal of
the portable transmitter and not the Events belonging to the exhibition,
the portable transmitter and receivers must be set to the same channel:
the RF channel of the guide. This RF channel is set via the “Visitor Profiler”
software (see “Configuring transmitters for guided tours” on page 15-22).
For this purpose, the portable transmitter and all receivers which are to
participate in the tour have to be inserted into chargers and configured.
Turning the portable transmitter on/off
The portable transmitter turns on automatically as soon as it is removed
from the charger and turns off automatically as soon as it is replaced in the
charger. You can also turn the portable transmitter on and off
automatically as follows:
Briefly press the FUNCTION key 쐇 to turn the portable transmitter on.
The POWER LED 쐃 and the READY LED 쐏 light up.
Note:
If the READY LED 쐏 does not light up, make sure that a transmission
channel was assigned using the Charger Manager or Visitor Profiler
software module.
Press the MUTE key 쐋 for five seconds to turn the portable
transmitter off.
The POWER LED 쐃 and the READY LED 쐏 go off.
Note:
Your Sennheiser partner can deactivate the turn-off function of the
MUTE key 쐋 .
Muting the microphone
Press the MUTE key 쐋 .
The MIC LED 씉 flashes red slowly. The microphone is immediately
muted.
Note:
An audio signal (e.g. music) fed in via the LINE socket 씈 is not muted.
To mute the Line input, the audio device must be turned off or set to
Pause mode.
Press either the MIC key 쐊 or the MUTE key 쐋 .
The muting function is deactivated.
Conducting a guided tour
Once the units have been configured and removed from the charger, the
guided tour can begin without delay. During the guided tour, the receivers
do not react to identifiers or key presses and do not reproduce Storage or
Live Events.
5-20
In order to ensure good reception quality, make sure that all receivers
participating in the guided tour are not further than 20 m from the
portable transmitter.
Portable transmitters
Interrupting the guided tour
You can interrupt the guided tour temporarily in order to allow visitors to
hear certain events in the original audio. You can either trigger this Event
automatically by standing close to the corresponding identifier or
manually by entering the desired Event number via the numeric keys.
During the tour interruption, the receivers continue to ignore all identifiers
or key presses.
Note:
Your microphone is not muted during a tour interruption!
To automatically trigger a certain Event for the tour interruption:
Stand as close as possible to the Identifier triggering the Event which
the receivers are to reproduce during the tour interruption.
The portable transmitter automatically recognizes the Event number
of this Event.
Press the FUNCTION key 쐇 for three seconds.
The READY LED 쐏 flashes green slowly. The portable transmitter
automatically transmits the Event number to all receivers
participating in the guided tour. The receivers start reproducing the
corresponding Storage or Live Event in the category assigned to the
receivers before the tour started.
For information on how to stop reproduction of the Event and to continue
the guided tour, see “Deactivating a tour interruption” on page 5-21.
To manually trigger a certain Event for the tour interruption:
Briefly press the FUNCTION key 쐇 .
The READY LED 쐏 flashes green rapidly.
Via the numeric keys 쐎 , enter the three-figure Event number of the
Event which is to be reproduced.
The READY LED 쐏 flashes green slowly. All receivers participating in
the guided tour start reproducing the corresponding Storage or Live
Event in the category assigned to the receivers before the tour
started.
For information on how to stop reproduction of the Event and to continue
the guided tour, see next section.
Note:
Receivers cannot receive announcements of the ANM during a
temporary tour interruption (see “The Announcement Manager
(ANM)” on page 14-1). If announcements are made by chance during
a temporary tour interruption, the following happens:
– If the receivers transmit a Live Event during the tour interruption,
the receivers are immediately switched back to the RF channel of the
portable transmitter. This cancels the tour interruption and the
transmission of the Live Event is stopped.
– If the receivers reproduce a Storage Event during the tour interruption, the Storage Event is reproduced completely to the end.
Deactivating a tour interruption
There are three ways of deactivating a tour interruption so that the
receivers can receive the portable transmitter's signal again:
5-21
Portable transmitters
1. Using the “Charger Manager” software, Sennheiser Customer Service
can set the portable transmitter to a maximum interruption time
before the tour starts. After expiration of this maximum interruption
time, reproduction of the Event is stopped automatically.
2. If the receivers participating in the guided tour receive a signal from
an identifier which triggers the System Event with the ID number 97
(see “Setting up the automatic return to the RF channel of the
portable transmitter (System Event 97)” on page 12-15),
reproduction of the Event is stopped automatically.
3. In addition, you can deactivate the tour interruption manually as
follows – but only if a Storage Event and not a Live Event is being
reproduced and the receivers are not carrying out a download:
Press the MIC key 쐊 .
The READY LED 쐏 lights up green. All receivers participating in the
guided tour stop reproducing the Storage Event and receive the
transmitter signal again.
Finishing a guided tour
If you want to finish your guided tour, you have to interrupt the connection
between portable transmitter and receivers as follows in order that the
receivers can reproduce Storage and Live Events in the same way as they
do for visitors not participating in a guided tour:
Simultaneously press the FUNCTION key 쐇 and the MUTE key 쐋 for
three seconds.
The READY LED 쐏 , the LINE LED 쐉 and the MIC LED 씉 go off. All
receivers participating in the guided tour react to identifiers or key
presses again and reproduce the corresponding Storage or Live Events
in the category assigned to the receivers before the tour started.
Care and maintenance
CAUTION!
Water or other liquid can damage the electronics of the
portable transmitter!
Water or other liquid entering the housing of the portable
transmitter can cause a short-circuit and damage the
electronics.
Only use a clean dry cloth to clean the portable
transmitter. Do not use any cleansing agents or
solvents.
5-22
Portable transmitters
If a problem occurs ...
Problem Possible cause
Portable transmitter’s
rechargeable battery is flat
(POWER LED 쐃 is off)
Possible solution
Recharge the rechargeable
battery (see page 5-18)
No audio is heard by the receiver(s)
Portable transmitter is muted Deactivate the muting
function (see page 5-20)
(MIC LED 씉 flashes red
slowly)
Tour interruption is activated Deactivate the tour
(READY LED 쐏 flashes green interruption function
(see page 5-21)
slowly), but the selected
Event has finished playing
Guided tour is finished
(LINE LED 쐉 and MIC LED 씉
are both off)
Reconfigure the portable
transmitter and the receivers
and restart the tour
Volume on the receiver is
adjusted too low
Increase the volume on the
receiver
Transmitter is out of range
(approx. 20 m)
Reduce the distance between
receiver and portable
transmitter
Portable transmitter and
receiver(s) are not on the
same channel
Configure the portable
transmitter and all receivers
together
Portable transmitter is not
assigned an RF channel
Configure the portable transmittern (see page 5-21)
Receivers’s rechargeable
battery is flat
Recharge the rechargeable
battery (see page 5-18)
If a problem occurs that is not listed in the above table or if the problem
cannot be solved with the proposed solutions, please contact your local
Sennheiser agent for assistance.
5-23
Antenna
Antenna
Putting the active antennas into operation
Where to place the antennas
For optimum reception in a room or a cell, you must place the antennas so
that there is always a direct line of sight between the receiver and the
antenna.
Therefore, if you mount an antenna on the wall, it should be at a height of
at least two meters. If possible, however, mount the antenna on the
ceiling.
Lay the cables connecting the cell transmitters to the antennas so that noone can trip over them!
You can also mount the antenna concealed behind a false ceiling or wall
covering. However, when choosing the material for the covering, make
sure that radio waves can travel through it and that it has no metallic
content.
! Recommended materials are:
Wood, plastic, fabric, paper
! Unsuitable materials are:
Metals, fabrics or plastics with metallic content
If you have doubts as to whether the material you want to use is no
obstacle for radio waves, carry out a test before mounting.
Caution!
If you want to install antennas or identifiers outside, you must use
weatherproof housings!
Mounting the active antennas
Note:
If you mount several antennas on a wall, make sure that the antennas
are separated by a minimum distance of 8 cm and that the SMA RF
socket 쐃 points away from the wall.
Together with the active antenna, you receive a mounting plate and four
industrial strength Velcro tapes.
�
Screw the mounting plate to the wall or ceiling.
Stick the loop side of the Velcro tape to the mounting plate
Stick the hook side of the Velcro tape to the side of the antenna.
Please note that you have to mount the antenna so that the SMA RF
socket 쐃 points away from the wall.
Fix the active antenna to the mounting plate with the Velcro tape so
that the SMA RF socket 쐃 points away from the wall.
Note:
Besides the location, the surface on which the antenna is mounted
also affects the characteristic of the antenna. If you mount the active
5-24
Antenna
antenna on a metal surface, its radiation pattern is no longer omnidirectional!
The antenna housing can be painted in order to blend in with the
surrounding decor. However, metallic paints must not be used.
Connecting the active antennas to the cell transmitters
The GP AM 3200 active antennas are connected to the cell transmitters via
an 8-pin data cable with an RJ 45 plug. The length of the data cable
between the cell transmitter and the first active antenna must not exceed
100 m. Keep the distance between the cell transmitter and the active
antenna as short as possible.
�
Connect the data cable to the RJ 45 socket 쐎 at the rear of the cell
transmitter.
Connect the other end of the data cable to the RJ 45 socket 쐆 of the
active antenna.
�
Caution!
The length of the cable between the cell transmitter and the first
active antenna must not exceed 100 m. The length of the cable
between the first and the second active antenna must not exceed
50 m.
The data cable and the plug must meet the following specifications:
! 100 MHz communication cable (Ethernet cable or AnyLAN cable)
! Maximum length: 150 m
! Category 5 (or better)
! 4 x 2 Twisted Pair
! Screening: aluminum-covered polyester film and tinned copper braid
! Halogen-free jacket
! Screened RJ 45 plug (or FCC68)
Note:
The following cables from KERPEN GmbH & Co. KG meet the required
specifications:
Kerpen MegaLine 526 SC flex 4x2xAWG26 / 7–100 Ω,
Kerpen MegaLine 726.
When making cables with RJ 45 plugs, please observe the following
assignments:
! Wire pair 1: pin 4 and pin 5
! Wire pair 2: pin 3 and pin 6
! Wire pair 3: pin 1 and pin 2
! Wire pair 4: pin 7 and pin 8
Note:
This assignment complies with EIA/TIA (Ethernet connection).
5-25
Antenna
Connecting the directional antenna to the active antenna
You can use external directional antennas made by another manufacturer
if the radiation pattern of the active antennas is not suitable for your
premises.
Directional antennas are connected to the active antenna via a coaxial
cable with an SMA plug. The coaxial cable has a length of approx. 20 cm
and should not be extended as this would seriously reduce the range of the
connected directional antenna. The coaxial cable is permanently connected
to the directional antenna.
�
�
Connect the SMA plug of the coaxial cable to the socket 쐊 of the
active antenna.
Activate the directional antenna via the software (see “Selecting the
antenna type” on page 8-43).
Now the external directional antenna transmits the data in the place
of the active antenna.
Assigning the MTS to the antenna
One cell transmitter supplies two MTS (MTS “0” and MTS “1”) to two active
antennas “0” and “1”. Via the addressing switch 쐎 , select which MTS is to
be transmitted via which antenna. MTS “0” is always transmitted by the
active antenna “0” and MTS “1” is always transmitted by the active
antenna “1”. The addressing switch determines which of the two
connected active antennas is “0” and which is “1”.
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
Active Antenna '1'
MTS '1'
�
5-26
�
The cable from the cell transmitter to the first active antenna can have a
maximum length of 100 m and the cable from the first to the second active
antenna can have a maximum length of 50 m.
The Live Events are copied to the cell transmitters via the audio inputs.
Each cell transmitter has four audio inputs to which you can connect four
mono sound sources or two stereo sound sources or one stereo sound
source and two mono sound sources. The signals of the sound sources are
combined and sent to an antenna as a data stream with or without
Storage Events.
Identifiers
Identifiers
Putting the identifiers into operation
Mounting the identifiers
To mount the identifiers, proceed as follows:
! Use the supplied drilling template to mark the position of the required
drill holes.
! Screw the identifiers next to the corresponding exhibit and connect – if
desired – an external loop antenna, an external trigger and an external
power supply. Lay all cables so that no-one can trip over them!
! Light from fluorescent tubes must not fall onto the infra-red interface
window of the identifier (if this happens, the green LED will light up
occasionally).
! Protect the identifiers from strong sunlight by using a suitable sun
protection.
! If you want to install the identifiers outside, use the outdoor version
and install it in a weather-proof housing.
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
If you mount the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier
incorrectly, moisture can get into the unit and destroy it!
The weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier must
only be mounted by an electronics expert!
Adapting the identifiers to the surroundings
Mount the identifier next to the exhibit.
�
To make the identifier blend in with its surroundings, its surface can be
painted. Before painting, cover the infra-red interface window 쐃 with
adhesive tape. The paint would make it impossible to program the
identifier. Also, the LEDs of the infra-red interface must remain visible so
that you can always check whether the identifier is operational.
You can mount the identifiers in an open or concealed way. With concealed
mounting, make sure that you can easily access the identifier to change
the batteries and that the red LED remains visible. When selecting the
covering material, make sure that it is no obstacle for the identifier’s
magnetic field and does not have any metallic content.
! Recommended materials are:
Wood, plastic, fabric, paper
! Unsuitable materials are:
Metals, fabrics or plastics with metallic content
Note:
The lifetime of the batteries depends on the daily operating time, the
repetition rate and the transmitting power: at a transmitting power of
100 %, a repetition rate of 1 second and a daily operating time of
8 hours and when the internal antenna is used, the batteries have a
lifetime of approx. 3 months.
5-27
Identifiers
Do not use rechargeable batteries instead of standard alkaline
batteries!
However, interfering signals, e.g. caused by fluorescent tubes, can
keep the internal processor of the identifier constantly occupied and
thus increase the power consumption. In this case, the green LED of
the identifier lights up occasionally. You should therefore mount
battery-operated identifiers so that interfering signals do not reach
the infra-red interface window.
The weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
Dust and moisture can get into the housing of the
weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and destroy it, if
you:
! open the housing and do not close it correctly again,
! drill through the housing in order to install cables.
The weather-proof identifier must therefore only be
mounted by an electronics expert!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT
identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove
before you close the unit again.
If you drill holes in the housing of the weather-proof
identifier to order to insert cables, please use the supplied cable bushing (see “Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing” on page 5-29)!
It is only permitted to connect cables approved for
outdoor use or in damp locations according to VDE, the
Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies.
Opening the housing of the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and
closing it again so that it is watertight
The housing of the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier must be
opened:
! to mount the identifier,
! to connect an external DC power supply,
! to connect an external loop antenna,
! to connect an external switch (trigger operation),
! to change the batteries.
5-28
Identifiers
쐄
To open the housing:
쐏
쐏
Loosen the four screw 쐏 .
Lever off the cover.
To prevent dampness from getting into the housing after closing it:
쐏
Make sure that the o-ring rubber seal 쐄 is in its groove before closing
the unit again.
쐏
Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing
The housing of the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier must be
drilled through:
! to connect an external DC power supply or
! to connect an external loop antenna or
! to connect an external switch (trigger operation).
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
Dust and moisture can get into the housing of the
weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and destroy it, if
you:
! open the housing and do not close it correctly again,
! drill through the housing in order to install cables.
The weather-proof identifier must therefore only be
mounted by an electronics expert!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT
identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove
before you close the unit again.
If you drill holes in the housing of the weather-proof
identifier to order to insert cables, please use the supplied cable bushing (see “Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing” on page 5-29)!
It is only permitted to connect cables approved for
outdoor use or in damp locations according to VDE, the
Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies.
쐄
쐆
Open the housing as described in the previous section.
Drill a hole (diameter 5 mm) for the cables at a suitable place.
Insert the supplied cable bushing 쐆 into the hole.
Pull the cable through the cable bushing.
Note:
You can also drill several holes, but then you will require additional
cable bushings.
Connect the cables to the terminals. Please observe correct polarity.
The terminals are located in the same place as in an indoor identifier
(please see the following sections).
5-29
Identifiers
Make sure that the o-ring rubber seal 쐄 is in its groove before closing
the unit again.
Screw the cover back onto the housing.
Mounting an identifier
Mounting a GP ID 3200-IN identifier onto a wall
To mount a GP ID 3200-IN identifier to an object or wall, you require a flat
surface with a width of at least 102 mm and a height of 140 mm. Use the
supplied drilling template for mounting.
Use a screwdriver to push in the lug 쐇 in the middle of the bottom of
the identifier. Then pull the cover 쐋 forwards off the identifier.
Attach the lower part 쐏 of the identifier to the wall through the now
visible mounting holes 쐎 .
Connect an external switch, an external DC power supply and/or an
external loop antenna or insert the batteries as described below.
Replace the cover 쐋 by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at
the top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the
cover until the lug at the bottom 쐇 clicks home.
쐋
쐇
쐋
쐎
쐏
쐎
Mounting a GP ID 3200-OUT identifier onto a wall
To mount a GP ID 3200-IOUT identifier to a wall, you require a flat surface
with a width of at least 200 mm and a height of 200 mm. Use the supplied
drilling template for mounting.
5-30
Identifiers
쐄
쐏
쐏
Loosen the four screws 쐏 .
Lever off the cover.
Attach the lower part of the identifier to the wall through the now
visible mounting holes 쐏 ..
CAUTION!
쐏
Danger due to improper mounting!
If you mount the identifier to a sloping wall, guide the
cable bushing downwards.
쐏
Connect an external switch, an external DC power supply and/or an
external loop antenna or insert the batteries as described below.
Make sure that the o-ring rubber seal 쐄 is in its groove before closing
the unit again.
Screw the cover back onto the housing.
Connecting an identifier
Connecting an identifier to the power supply
You should connect the identifier to an external DC power supply (8 –
15 V):
! if you are using an external loop antenna,
! if the transmission of the identifier ID is triggered via an external
switch.
Several identifiers can be supplied via a DC ring circuit or each identifier can
be supplied individually via its own mains unit.
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
Dust and moisture can get into the housing of the
weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and destroy it, if
you:
! open the housing and do not close it correctly again,
! drill through the housing in order to install cables.
The weather-proof identifier must therefore only be
mounted by an electronics expert!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT
identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove
before you close the unit again.
If you drill holes in the housing of the weather-proof
identifier to order to insert cables, please use the supplied cable bushing (see “Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing” on page 5-29)!
It is only permitted to connect cables approved for
outdoor use or in damp locations according to VDE, the
Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies.
5-31
Identifiers
Connection to a mains unit:
Drill a hole for the cable at one of the positions marked 쐂 .
Connect the low-voltage DC cable to the terminals 쐄 making sure
that correct polarity is maintained.
Replace the cover by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at the
top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the cover
until the lug at the bottom clicks home.
쐄
쐂
Connection to a DC ring circuit:
To connect the identifiers to a DC ring circuit, daisy-chain the identifiers as
follows:
Drill two holes for the cables at the positions 쐂 .
At the first identifier, connect the low-voltage DC cables from the
mains unit and the cables leading to the next identifier to the
terminals 쐄 making sure that correct polarity is maintained.
Connect the other identifiers in the same way.
Replace the cover by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at the
top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the cover
until the lug at the bottom clicks home.
Note:
The maximum power consumption of the identifiers is 10 mA (if you
connect an external loop antenna or during trigger operation).
5-32
Identifiers
Mounting an identifier with an external loop antenna
If you connect an external loop antenna to the identifier, the identifier
should be operated via an external DC power supply (see “Connecting an
identifier” on page 5-31).
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
Dust and moisture can get into the housing of the
weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and destroy it, if
you:
! open the housing and do not close it correctly again,
! drill through the housing in order to install cables.
The weather-proof identifier must therefore only be
mounted by an electronics expert!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT
identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove
before you close the unit again.
If you drill holes in the housing of the weather-proof
identifier to order to insert cables, please use the supplied cable bushing (see “Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing” on page 5-29)!
It is only permitted to connect cables approved for
outdoor use or in damp locations according to VDE, the
Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies.
Drill two holes for the cables at the positions 쐂 .
CAUTION!
Danger due to wrong loop antenna!
The resistance of the loop antenna must not exceed
10 Ω!
쐊
쐂
쐄
Connect both ends of the loop antenna to the “LOOP” terminals 쐊 .
Connect the cables of the power supply to the terminals 쐄 .
Replace the cover by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at the
top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the cover
until the lug at the bottom clicks home.
Lay the loop antenna around the exhibit or inside the display case as
invisibly as possible.
5-33
Identifiers
Mounting an identifier with an external switch (trigger operation)
If an external switch is to trigger the identifier to transmit its ID, the
identifier should be operated via a 12 V DC power supply.
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
Dust and moisture can get into the housing of the
weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier and destroy it, if
you:
! open the housing and do not close it correctly again,
! drill through the housing in order to install cables.
The weather-proof identifier must therefore only be
mounted by an electronics expert!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT
identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove
before you close the unit again.
If you drill holes in the housing of the weather-proof
identifier to order to insert cables, please use the supplied cable bushing (see “Moving the cable into the inside of the identifier housing” on page 5-29)!
It is only permitted to connect cables approved for
outdoor use or in damp locations according to VDE, the
Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies.
쐈
쐂
쐄
Drill two holes for the cables at the positions 쐂 .
Connect both ends of the cable leading to the external switch to the
terminals 쐈 . Lay this cable around the battery compartment and out
through one of the drill holes.
Connect the low-voltage DC cables of the power supply to the
terminals 쐄 making sure that correct polarity is maintained.
Replace the cover by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at the
top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the cover
until the lug at the bottom clicks home.
When the trigger contact is closed, the green LED lights up and the
identifier transmits its signal 10 times at the repetition rate and the
power you programmed.
CAUTION!
Trigger operation is only possible outside the operating
time set via the INM software!
If, for example, an identifier is to run in trigger operation
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., its daily operating time should be set
via the INM software to between 7.30 a.m. and 8.00 a.m.
From 7.30 a.m. to 8.00 a.m., the identifier then runs in automatic mode. During these 30 minutes, its readiness for
operation is indicated via the flashing green LED. After
8.00 a.m., the identifier only transmits when the trigger
contact is closed.
If an identifier is to be controlled via an external switch,
the daily operating time should be set to a time before
operation via the external switch!
5-34
Identifiers
Battery operation
With batteries, the operating time depends on the repetition rate and is
approx. 3 months.
CAUTION!
Failure of the identifier due to flat batteries!
When the batteries are flat, the identifier can no longer
function.
쐆
Check the batteries regularly. Make a note in your
calendar when the batteries are due for replacement.
! Insert four alkaline-manganese batteries (AA size, 1.5 V) into the
battery compartment 쐆 .
CAUTION!
Danger of loss of the protection class IP65!
If you mount the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier
incorrectly, moisture can get into the unit and destroy it!
If you open the weather-proof GP ID 3200-OUT identifier, make sure that the o-ring 쐄 is in its groove before
you close the unit again.
Replace the cover by engaging the upper lugs into the two slots at the
top of the identifier and then push down the lower part of the cover
until the lug at the bottom clicks home.
Operating the identifiers
To operate the identifiers, you must use a PDA, namely:
! either a 3Com PalmTop with Palm OS and HotSync 4.0 (or higher, see
page 8-90)
! or a Pocket PC with Microsoft® Windows Mobile (see page 8-91) and
! either Microsoft® ActiveSync
(if you are using Windows 2000 or XP)
! or Windows Mobile Device Center
(if you are using Windows Vista)
The “Identifier Control” (IDC) software must be installed on the PDA. All
functions of the identifier can be controlled via an infra-red connection
between the PDA and the identifier.
5-35
Identifiers
Checking the identifiers
During the first 30 minutes after the set turn-on time, the green LED 쐃 on
the identifier flashes, indicating that the identifier is ready for operation.
�
Check the identifiers during the first 30 minutes after turn-on every
day.
During the first 30 minutes after turn-on, the LEDs indicate the following:
! The green LED flashes:
The identifier is ready for operation and is transmitting its signal.
! The red LED flashes (battery operation only):
The identifier is no longer working! The batteries are flat and must be
replaced.
! The red and the green LED do not light up (battery operation only):
The identifier is no longer working! The batteries are flat and must be
replaced. You must then reprogram the time and possibly also the
parameters at the identifier (see “Setting the internal clock of an
identifier” on page 5-38 and “Transmitting identifier settings from the
PDA to an identifier (Send Parameters)” on page 12-11).
After the first 30 minutes after turn-on, the LEDs indicate the following:
! The red and the green LED do not light up:
The identifier is ready for operation and is transmitting the signal.
! If the identifier is operated via an external key:
The green LED lights up when the key is operated.
! The green LED lights up permanently:
The identifier is communicating with the PDA.
Setting up the identifiers
When setting up an exhibition for the first time, set the following
parameters for the individual identifiers via the INM software:
! daily operating time
! transmitting power (in percent)
! repetition rate (0.5 to 1 second)
! antenna type (internal antenna or large loop antenna)
You also assign an unambiguous name to the identifier. This name
represents the relationship to the Event which it is to trigger.
After you have created the installation via the INM, copy this information
to the PDA (see “Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA” on
page 8-90).
You then go to the identifiers in your exhibition one by one and copy the
data from the PDA to the identifiers via infra-red (“Transmitting identifier
settings from the PDA to an identifier (Send Parameters)” on page 12-11).
5-36
Identifiers
Changing the identifier parameters
You can easily change the following parameters of an identifier at any time
via a PDA without having to edit the installation on the Central PC and
create and transmit new system files:
! daily operating time
! transmitting power
! repetition rate
! antenna type
! standby mode on/off
To change individual parameters of an identifiers:
Go to the desired identifier with the PDA and start the IDC software.
Point the infra-red panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose “Read Parameters” from the “Identifier” menu (see “Reading
the current identifier data (Read Parameters)” on page 12-10).
The settings of the identifier are then displayed on the PDA.
Change the desired parameters (see “Editing the identifier settings
(Edit)” on page 12-8).
Copy the changed parameters back to the identifier (see
“Transmitting identifier settings from the PDA to an identifier (Send
Parameters)” on page 12-11).
Note:
Please note that your current installation now deviates from the
planning you did via the INM software! You should therefore also enter
the changed parameters of this identifier into the installation
database at the Central PC (see “Setting up the identifiers” on
page 8-67) in order to avoid problems the next time you update your
exhibition. Your colleagues who obtain the data not from the PDA but
from the Central PC would otherwise be confused.
Checking the internal clock of an identifier
IDC
The identifiers have an internal clock via which the daily operating time is
controlled.
To display the time of this internal clock on the PDA:
Go to the desired identifier with the PDA and start the IDC software.
Point the infra-red panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose “Read Time” from the “Identifier” menu (see “Checking the
internal clock of an identifier (Read Time)” on page 12-11).
The internal clock of the identifier is then synchronized with the clock
of the PDA.
5-37
Identifiers
Setting the internal clock of an identifier
IDC
When the power supply to the identifier is interrupted or summer time is
changed to winter time and vice versa, the internal clock of the identifier
must be reset.
The clock can handle short interruptions in the power supply with a
maximum duration of three minutes without problems. If the power
supply is interrupted for more than three minutes, the clocks stops
running.
Note:
Before setting the internal clock of the identifiers, please make sure
that the PDA’s internal clock is set to the correct time!
To set the internal clock of an identifier:
Internal clock and
external power supply
Go to the desired identifier with the PDA and start the IDC software.
Point the infra-red panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose “Set time” from the “Identifier” menu (see “Setting the
internal clock of an identifier (Set Time)” on page 12-11).
The internal clock of the identifier is then synchronized with the clock
of the PDA.
What must be observed if your identifiers are connected to an external
power supply which is turned off centrally overnight? In this case, all
identifiers loose the current time setting overnight. You should therefore
– in addition to the external power supply – insert four alkaline batteries
(AA size, 1.5 V) into the battery compartment. If the external power
supply is turned off, the internal clock of the identifier is then powered via
the batteries.
Note:
Please set the turn-on and turn-off time of the identifier so that the
identifier does not transmit while the external power supply is turned
off – the batteries would discharge as during normal battery
operation.
5-38
Receivers
Receivers
Putting the receivers into operation
Connecting the headphones
쐃
With the receiver, each visitor is handed out a pair of headphones with a
3.5 mm jack plug which he can connect to the socket 쐃 of the receiver. For
optimum operation of the receiver, only use original Sennheiser
headphones.
Note:
When people use headphones, they tend to choose a higher volume
than with loudspeakers. Listening at high volume levels for long
periods can lead to permanent hearing defects. Please protect your
hearing, Sennheiser headphones also sound exceptionally good at low
volumes!
Replacing the ear pads
We recommend replacing the ear pads of the headphones after every use
or using hygiene pads which are available as accessories. Replacement ear
pads are available from your local Sennheiser distributor (see
“Accessories” on page 18-14).
Charging the rechargeable batteries of the receivers
Before putting the receivers into operation for the first time, their built-in
rechargeable batteries must be charged. If the receivers are not used for a
longer period of time, the rechargeable batteries slowly discharge and
must therefore be recharged before the receivers are used again.
The charging time is approx. 4 hours. For more details, please see
“Operating the chargers” on page 5-47.
Attaching the receiver to clothing
With the belt clip, the visitor can attach the receiver to clothing, e.g. belt or
jacket pocket.
The visitor can also attach a neck strap (GP 3200 L) to the clip in order to
carry the receiver around the neck during the tour.
5-39
Receivers
Changing the receiver settings
The presets
Certain values for volume, starting channel, category and location are
factory-preset in the receivers. These presets can be changed, either
permanently or temporarily for the duration of a tour, via the Charger
Manager software (see “Changing the receiver presets temporarily” on
page 10-16 and “Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19). For changing the presets, the chargers with the inserted
receivers must be connected to a PC.
The preset for the category of the receivers can additionally be changed for
one single visitor tour via System Events (see “Triggering the switching
over of the category (“Cat” System Event )” on page 12-13).
Presets and preprogrammed values:
! Volume:
85 %
! Starting channel: RF channel 1
(for tuning the installation ID and the EAT)
! Category:
1
! Location:
1
The following presets can be changed permanently:
! Volume
(via the Charger Manager software)
! Starting channel (via the Charger Manager software)
! Category
(via the Charger Manager software)
! Location
(by the Sennheiser Customer Service only)
The following presets can be changed temporarily:
! Category
(via the Charger Manager software and
System Events)
During the tour, the visitor can individually set the volume (4- and 16-key
receivers) and the category (16-key receiver only). If the receiver is
inserted into a charger at the end of the tour, the presets are restored
automatically. To restore the presets of the receiver, the chargers do not
need to be connected to a PC.
Presetting the receivers for groups of visitors
If you are expecting a large visitor group, you can temporarily preset a
corresponding number of receivers to the desired language and program.
The visitors then do not have to make any changes to the settings (see
“Changing the receiver presets temporarily” on page 10-16). This
temporary change of the presets is not protected by a password and can
be carried out quickly and easily by the staff at the counter.
Example:
Most visitors to your exhibition will be English-speaking adults. For
this reason, you have preset the category “English, adult” on the
receivers. You are now expecting approx. 200 German-speaking
children and would like to change the category to “German, child”.
For this, the chargers with the inserted receivers must be connected to
a computer or laptop on which the Visitor Profiler or Charger Manager
5-40
Receivers
software is installed. Via the software, you can change the presets by
first selecting the chargers and then changing the categories (see
“Changing the receiver presets temporarily” on page 10-16 and
“Changing the receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19).
Changing the receiver presets permanently
Certain values for volume, starting channel and category are preset in the
receivers. These presets can be changed permanently via the Charger
Manager software. For this purpose, the chargers must be connected to a
PC (or laptop) on which the Charger Manager software is installed.
This permanent change of the presets is protected by a password. The
receivers to which you have made permanent changes should be marked
accordingly (e.g. with a national flag).
If temporary changes to the settings are made, either by the visitor or via
the Visitor Profiler or Charger Manager software (see above), the new
presets are restored automatically when the receivers are inserted into a
charger.
Operating the receivers
Turning the receivers on/off
When you remove the receivers from the charger, the receivers turn on
automatically. If the receivers are insterted into the charger, they
automatically turn off. However, you can also manually turn on and off the
receivers.
To manually turn on the receivers:
Press the REPEAT key.
The READY LED lights up green.
To manually turn off the receivers:
Press the STOP key for approx. 3 seconds.
The READY LED goes off.
Selecting the category (16-key receiver only)
쐇
�
�
�
The language and level of information (such as “child”, “adult” or
“expert”) are categories. The category which is downloaded from the
antennas is preset in the receiver. The visitor can thus only change the
receiver category temporarily (with a 16-key receiver only). If the receiver
is inserted into a charger at the end of the tour, the presets are restored
automatically.
Press the LANGUAGE key 쐏 .
The green LED 쐄 flashes rapidly.
Via the numeric keys 쐂 , enter the two-figure number of the desired
category (e.g. “01” for “English, adult” or “02” for “German, adult”). If
the selected category number is valid, the red LED 쐇 flashes rapidly
and the green LED 쐄 lights up permanently.
Note:
After the visitor has pressed the LANGUAGE key 쐏 , the receiver
expects the entry of the two-figure category number within the
factory-preset time slot. The green LED flashes rapidly until the visitor
5-41
Receivers
has entered the number. Once the time limit for entering the numer is
exceeded, the green LED lights up permanently again and the category
remains unchanged.
Note for locations with varaible Events:
If the visitor has changed the category and enters the magnetic field
of an identifier, the Storage Events of the newly set category must
first be downloaded. However, if the visitor changes the category but
is not within the range of the antenna for this category, he cannot
hear anything until he enters the range of the antenna again and the
Storage Events of the new category can be downloaded.
Setting the volume
�
The volume of the receiver is preset to a fixed value. The visitor can set the
volume individually via the VOL+ 쐆 and VOL– 쐊 keys.
�
�
When the receiver is inserted into a charger, the preset volume setting is
restored.
�
Calling up information at an exhibit
There are two ways of obtaining information at an exhibit:
1. The visitor enters the magnetic field of an identifier which is installed
next to the exhibit. The receiver then starts playing the corresponding
information.
2. Receivers with numeric keys only:
Via the numeric keys 쐂 , the visitor enters the three-figure number of
the exhibit and the receiver plays the information (provided the
corresponding information is stored in the receiver).
When a visitor enters an Event number for which audio information is
not available, the red LED 쐇 flashes rapidly and the green LED 쐄 is
off.
Note:
Once the visitor has pressed the first digit, the receiver expects the
entry of the next two digits within a factory-preset time slot. The
green LED 쐄 flashes rapidly until the visitor has entered all three
digits. Once the time limit for entering the numer is exceeded, the
green LED lights up permanently again and the visitor continues to
hear the previous Event.
5-42
Receivers
Repeating Storage Events
쐈
The visitor can listen to the stored information (Storage Events) as often
as he wants to by pressing the REPEAT key 쐅 . The last Storage Event
listened to is then repeated completely.
Note:
쐅
The visitor can only repeat the information reproduced last. If the
information on another exhibit is to be repeated, he must enter the
corresponding Event number again or re-enter the range of the
corresponding identifier. However, Live Events cannot be repeated as
they are live transmissions in real time.
Stopping sound reproduction
The STOP key 쐈 allows the visitor to stop the transmission of Live and the
reproduction of Storage Events. Sound reproduction or transmission does
not stop completely but is faded out. A new Storage or Live Event does not
start until the visitor enters the range of an identifier or enters a new
Event number via the numeric keys.
The last Storage Event listened to can be repeated via the REPEAT key 쐅 .
Any desired Storage Event of the cell the visitor has entered can be
listened to again via the numeric keys. If the visitor presses the REPEAT
key 쐅 while he is in the area of a Live Event, this is faded in again.
Calling up the Help function (only if the key is available)
The HELP key 쐉 of these devices is without function. With the 16-key
receiver, the HELP key allows to call up detailed information (see
“Configuring special Events” on page 8-51).
Calling up detailed information (only if the key is available)
If a Storage Event offers detailed information, you can call it up by pressing
the Detail key 쐉 while the receiver is within the magnetic field of the
identifier.
A Detail key 쐉 is available on:
! the 5-key receiver EK 3200-5-1
! the 5-key receiver EK 3202-5
! the 16-key receiver EK 3202-0
On the 16-key receiver EK 3200-0-1, press the HELP key 쐉 instead.
Possible operating states indicated by the red and the green LED
The red POWER LED 쐇 and the green READY LED 쐋 indicate the operating
state of the receiver:
5-43
Receivers
! The red LED 쐇 and the green LED 쐋 light up permanently:
�
쐎
쐈
�
�
쐅
– The receiver is ready for operation. Storage Event data has been
transmitted and stored and can be reproduced. The memory
capacity is sufficient for Storage Event data up to a total playing
time of 10 hours.
! Both LEDs light up permanently but the visitor cannot hear anything:
– The visitor has pressed the STOP key 쐈 . Sound reproduction is
stopped. To continue sound reproduction, he has to press the
REPEAT key 쐅 .
– Or: the visitor set the volume to zero via the VOL– key 쐎 . To
increase the volume, he has to press the VOL+ key 쐊 .
– Or: Storage Event reproduction is over. The visitor can go to the next
exhibit or repeat the information by pressing the REPEAT key 쐅 .
– Or: there is no identifier to trigger an Event.
! The red LED 쐇 flashes:
– The built-in rechargeable battery is going flat and must be
recharged. To recharge the battery, the receiver must be inserted
into the charger.
– The charging time is approx. 4 hours.
Typical operating times
The operating time of fully charged rechargeable batteries depends on the
proportions of Live and Storage Events: Live Event transmission uses up
more energy because the receiver has to work constantly.
Operating mode
Total time until battery flat
Live Event transmission
approx. 8 hrs
Storage Event reproduction approx. 12 hrs
The battery runtimes stated in the above table are for new, fully charged
batteries. If the visitor turns the receiver off in-between use, energy is
saved and the operating time is extended.
Caution!
If the rechargeable batteries are defective, please have them replaced
by an electronics expert.
! The green LED 쐋 flashes:
Storage Event data is currently being transmitted from an antenna to
the receiver. Depending on the extent of data to be transmitted, this
process can take up to 160 seconds. During this time, the visitor cannot
listen to any Storage Events via the headphones. However, it is possible
to assign an Intro to a cell. The Intro is played after about 5 seconds
although transmission of the Storage Event data continues. Once
transmission is over, the green LED lights up permanently again.
5-44
Chargers
Chargers
Putting the chargers into operation
Where to place the chargers
Choose a place with the following features:
– Solid, flat and secure against tipping so that the units cannot fall
over
– Dust- and dirt-free
– Dry (the units must never get wet – or damp even)
– Sufficiently ventilated so that any heat generated can dissipate
– Vibration-free
– Temperature range: 0°C – 40°C
– Sufficiently lit
– No direct sunlight
�
Screw the chargers onto a base (see below) in order to be able to
remove the receivers easily and safely from the charging
compartments or if you want to place the chargers on a surface which
is not horizontal.
– Ensure sufficient distance between the chargers so that any heat
generated can dissipate. The ventilation slots 쐃 on the unit must
never be covered or blocked!
To ensure that the charger cannot slip on a horizontal surface, four
soft rubber feet are fitted to the bottom of the charger.
Caution!
Some furniture surfaces have been treated with varnish, polish or
synthetics which might become stained when they come into contact
with other synthetics. Despite a thorough testing of the synthetics
used by us, we cannot rule out the possibility of staining, since we
don’t know your furniture.
Screwing the charger to the base
In order to be able to remove receivers from the charging compartments
or insert them with only one hand, the chargers should be screwed onto a
base. For this purpose, the bottom sides of the chargers have keyhole
recesses into which screw heads with a diameter of up to 8 mm can
protrude which clamp the charger to the base. The chargers can then be
mounted vertically, horizontally or at an angle (max. 90°).
Use the supplied drilling template to mark the position of the 3 screws
onto the base.
Screw in the screws (max. Ø 4 – 5 mm) into the base until the screw
heads protrude by 8 mm. Type and length of the screws depend on the
material of the base.
Place the chargers with the keyhole recesses over the screws.
Slide the chargers onto the screws so that that they are clamped tight.
5-45
Chargers
Daisy-chaining chargers and connecting them to a PC
If you connect the chargers to a computer, you can program the receiver
presets (volume and category) via the Charger Manager (CHM) software.
The CHM also allows you to monitor the charging process for several
thousand receivers on your computer screen.
You can connect a string of 32 chargers to one RS 485 interface of your
Charger PC. Up to 16 charger strings (RS 485 interfaces) can be monitored
simultaneously via the software. One PC can thus manage up to 5,120
receivers at the same time.
To daisy-chain the chargers, proceed as follows:
�
Connect one end of the RS 485 cable to one RS 485 interface of your
Charger PC. The length of this cable must not exceed 20 m.
If your Charger PC does not have an RS 485 interface, it can be
retrofitted (plug-in card or interface converter: see below).
Insert the other end of the RS 485 cable into the RS 485 interface
“DATA IN” 쐇 of the first charger.
�
Note:
The plugs of the cable (RJ 11 and MJ plug) cannot be confused, so that
there is only one possible way of connecting the cable.
Insert one end of the next RS 485 cable into the RS 485 interface
“DATA OUT” 쐋 of the first charger.
Connect the other end of the cable to the RS 485 interface “DATA IN”
of the next charger, and so on.
Connect a terminal connector to the last charger in the string (see
“Accessories” on page 18-14)!
Warning!
RS 485 hardware from different manufacturers is not compatible! To
avoid problems, please observe the following recommendations:
The RS 485 interface at the PC should be as follows:
Recommendations
concerning the RS 485 interface
! RS 232-to-RS 485 interface converter:
This allows you to connect a string to the RS 232 interface available on
almost every computer.
We recommend: W&T 86201.
! RS 485 PCI interface card:
2 to 4 strings per card can be connected to a desktop PC.
The PC requires one free PCI slot per card.
We recommend: W&T 13611.
! RS 485-PCMCIA interface card (PC card):
This allows you to connect 1 to 2 strings to a laptop. For this the laptop
requires one free Type II PCMCIA slot.
We recommend: ADVANTECH COMpad-85.
Ready-made connection cables from Sennheiser are available as
accessories with different lengths (see “Accessories” on page 18-14).
! Ready-made cable for connecting a charger to the interface converter
or PCI interface card from W&T. Length: 10 m.
5-46
Chargers
! Ready-made cable for connecting a charger to the ISA or PCI interface
card from ADVANTECH. Length: 5 m.
! Ready-made cable for connecting two chargers. Length: 50 cm.
Connecting the mains cable and turning the charger on
The chargers must be connected to a power supply (100 – 240 V AC; 50 –
60 Hz). However, you can only connect a limited number of chargers to an
AC outlet or the fuse will blow.
�
Connect the charger to the mains via a mains cable.
Set the POWER switch 쐄 to “I”.
The red operation LED 쐂 lights up, showing that the charger is
connected to the mains. Leave the chargers turned on at all times.
�
�
Operating the chargers
Charging the rechargeable batteries of the receivers
The charging time for the rechargeable batteries is approx. 4 hours.
�
�
Insert the receiver into the charging compartment 쐆 so that the
guide at the rear of the receiver fits into the recess of the charging
compartment.
The green LED 쐊 next to the charging compartment can show four
different states:
– LED lights up permanently:
The rechargeable battery is fully charged and the receiver is ready
for operation.
– LED flashes slowly:
The rechargeable battery is being charged.
– LED flashes quickly:
Data exchange with the receiver is in progress (reading of the
statistical data and/or programming of the presets).
The rechargeable battery is defective or the receiver is not correctly
inserted into the charging compartment and the 4-pin connector
strip only has partial contact. Or the charging compartment is
defective, e.g. because the charging compartment fuse has blown
(see “Problem solving” on page 17-2).
– LED does not light up:
The receiver is not correctly inserted into the charging compartment
or the charging compartment is defective, e.g. because the charging
compartment fuse has blown (see “Problem solving” on page 17-2).
5-47
Index
Index
Active antenna
connection to cell transmitter 5-25
mounting 5-24
Antenna 5-24
assigning a data stream (MTS) 5-26
where to place 5-24
Cell transmitter 5-2
connecting sound sources 5-4
connecting the headphones 5-3
connecting the mains cable 5-3
connection to laptop or Base Station PC 5-5
mounting the rubber feet 5-2
networking 5-5
operating buttons 5-6
putting into operation 5-2
rack-mounting 5-3
structure of operating menu 5-15
turning on and off 5-5
where to place 5-2
replacing ear pads 5-39
help key 5-43
LEDs 5-43
presets 5-40
putting into operation 5-39
repeating Storage Events 5-43
setting the volume 5-42
stopping sound reproduction 5-43
Repairing defective units
chargers
communication problems 5-46
Charger 5-45
connecting the mains cable 5-47
connection to computer 5-46
daisy-chaining 5-46
operation 5-47
putting into operation 5-45
screwing onto a base 5-45
turning on 5-47
Directional antenna
connection to active antenna 5-26
Identifier 5-27
adapting to the surroundings 5-27
battery operation 5-35
checking 5-36
connection to power supply 5-31
mounting onto a wall 5-30
mounting with external switch 5-34
mounting with loop antenna 5-33
putting into operation 5-27
setting up 5-35
Mounting
antenna 5-24
cell transmitter 5-2
charger 5-45
identifier 5-27
Portable transmitter 5-18
Receiver 5-39
attachment to clothing 5-39
calling up detailed information 5-43
calling up exhibit information 5-42
changing presets temporarily 5-40
charging rechargeable batteries 5-39, 5-47
headphones
connecting 5-39
5-48
6 Project planning
In this chapter, we will provide two examples showing you what you
should take into account when planning a
project.
Using the example of a small gallery, we will show you how to plan a small
exhibition; using the example of a town with several large-scale
exhibitions, we will show you what to take into account when planning
exhibitions of that size.
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.................................................................................6-2
Example 1: A small gallery ...............................................................6-6
Example 2: A town with several large-scale exhibitions .......... 6-15
Overview of all Events types ........................................................ 6-30
The principal restrictions............................................................... 6-33
Further example configurations .................................................. 6-34
6-1
The examples
Before you start
Before you plan a
project, you require the following:
! A short overview of the possibilities and characteristics of a
system (locations, categories, Events) (see “Basics of the Components”
on page 4-1)
! Knowledge of the principal characteristics of the
components
! Knowledge of the marginal conditions of your exhibition
The examples
Any exhibition is suitable for realizing guided tours using
, no
matter whether it is for a museum or art gallery, a factory or building, a
leisure or theme park, a changing exhibition, a shopping centre or any
other site.
We shall use the following two examples to illustrate the individual
planning phases.
Example 1: A small gallery
The exhibition
The first example is a small gallery housed in a listed art nouveau villa and
exhibiting contemporary paintings, drawings and sculptures by four
artists well-known on a national level.
The gallery is funded by a private circle of friends of the gallery and works
on a small budget
Exhibits and exhibition venue
The 55 exhibits are shown on two floors in a total of four very large rooms
(60 to 75 m2 each). One small room is empty. All of the exhibits are in the
possession of the friends of the gallery and are neither hired out nor
exchanged. No new exhibits are expected for the next few years.
There is also a large foyer selling prints and catalogues, a stairway and a
pavilion in a small park.
Visitors
Up to 100 visitors come on rainy Sunday afternoons. The gallery is mainly
visited by rather older adults, 15 % of which do not speak any English.
Once or twice a month, a group of about 40 French-speaking persons come
for a tour of the gallery. Although they give plenty of notice beforehand,
this situation is still a bottleneck because the group is too large for a
personal tour.
On special request, the artists themselves offer tours for groups. The
proportion of visitors who come several times is estimated at no more than
about 5 %. The visitors stay for an average of two or three hours.
Aims
What the gallery wants:
! To attract more visitors via a personal presentation and a video film;
the numerous students of a nearby art academy would be interesting
as a target group.
! To encourage its visitors to come several times.
! To be able to offer personal tours at any time and without prior notice
– regardless of the schedule of the artists involved and the number of
employees off sick.
! To be more well-prepared for peak demand for tours in French.
6-2
The examples
! To be able to so without taking on additional technical staff.
! To have next to no installation work to carry out as the building is
listed.
If no sponsor can be found for the exhibition, it is planned to either charge
an additional fee for
tours or hire out the necessary equipment.
Example 2: A town with several large-scale exhibitions
The exhibition
The second example is a town with a population of 500,000 in which
several museums and galleries, a shopping centre, a leisure park, three
factories, one exhibition and extensive sightseeing tours use the
system together. The visitors can smoothly change between the different
tours – for example from a sightseeing tour to a museum.
The
system is already in use in this town. The sightseeing tours,
general information and all exhibits which do not change are set up in
location “0”. Location “0” has 8 categories and uses the Event numbers
from 501 to 999. This means that the number and content of the
categories as well as the number of possible Events in all other locations
are already fixed.
The zoo wants to become more attractive for its visitors and therefore
takes part in
. The costs are covered by a subsidy from the
municipality and by a sponsor who would like to transmit announcements
in the zoo.
Exhibits and exhibition venue
The zoo has 500 different varieties of animals, presented in an open-air
area of 1,200 x 2,800 m and in 7 independent buildings, some of which
have several storeys. The zoo includes a dolphinarium, an insectarium, a
combined aquarium and terrarium, a darkened building housing nocturnal
animals, a self-service restaurant, three souvenir shops, a large adventure
playground and 12 kiosks.
The attractions include newly-born animals, daily feeding sessions and
regular scientific presentations contributed by the zoological institute of
the university. Guided tours conducted by a guide are also very popular
with visitors even though the zoo charges extra for this. These guided
tours live from the charisma of the guide, who can give personal attention
to individual visitors and answer their questions. Unfortunately, these
guided tours often cause intelligibility problems because the groups tend
to be too large. The large groups disturb other visitors not participating in
a guided tour. Finally, visitors who have not paid the extra charge often
take part in the guided tours too.
A number of Events change regularly because the zoo often exchanges
animals with other zoos, young animals are born or information is added
or removed for seasonal reasons because some animals can only be held
inside the building in winter or only in the open air in summer or have to
be kept separate from their herd at certain times.
The zoo has three entrances. All buildings have cable Internet connections.
The zoo has an intranet of its own which is used by the merchandise
planning and control system, the accounts department, time management
and e-mail communication. Two system administrators make sure that the
intranet functions smoothly at all times.
Visitors
At fine summer weekends, up to 15,000 visitors come to this zoo, and 55%
of them are children. About 20 % of the visitors have a season ticket, i.e.
they come to the zoo several times a season.
6-3
The examples
Aims
What the zoo wants:
! To permanently increase its attractiveness by addressing people
personally and in a way suited to the target groups involved.
! To avoid forcing a certain sequence onto the visitors. People should be
able to see what they want to see and avoid what doesn't interest
them.
! To organize the flow of visitors more evenly so that everyone gets to
see something during tours, feeding sessions and presentations
without their enjoyment being impaired by large crowds.
! To address the visitors directly, even through soundproof glass and
over relatively large distances, without disturbing other visitors with
loudspeaker noise.
! To continue offering the extremely popular guided tours – but in such
a way that all visitors to the tour can hear the guide at all times without
disturbing other visitors.
! To have a flexible system which can be adjusted over night to
accommodate changed exhibits.
! To obtain feedback on the attractiveness of the exhibits – including the
restaurant and the souvenir shops.
! To make announcements to visitors about special events such as
feeding sessions, encourage people to “adopt” animals and transmit
advertisements from sponsors.
! To prevent visitors from noticing the technology used.
! To prevent visitors from taking their receiver away with them – but
without having to ask for a deposit.
! To relieve the burden on the staff carrying out the tours.
! To avoid having to take on additional technical staff.
6-4
The examples
Frequency planning
In order for the wireless transmission of the signals to function, you have
to ensure that the following two frequency ranges are approved in your
country. Other transmitters and receivers, such as WLAN or Bluetooth,
must not use these frequency ranges in the vicinity of your exhibition!
! The 100-150 kHz frequency window must be available for the signals
of the identifiers.
! The 2.400-2.483 GHz frequency window must be approved for
transmitting the Events from the antennas to the receivers.
Both frequency ranges are approved in most countries.
94 RF channels are available (see “RF channels” on page 18-9) and can be
assigned to the individual antennas via the INM software (see “Selecting
the RF channel” on page 8-41).
CAUTION!
Reception interference due to wrong RF channels!
The assignment of RF channels depends to a great extent
on your exhibition rooms or grounds. The correct choice of
the RF channels is very important in order to avoid
reception interference.
Within one cell, we strongly recommend using the
following eight channels: 1, 7, 17, 25, 45, 57, 79, 93.
If you have to use more channels, leave at least five
channels free between two channels (e.g. 1, 7, 13,
19...).
If you have to use even more channels, please contact
Sennheiser electronic.
6-5
Planning the content
Example 1: A small gallery
This example shows how the small gallery is organized and what is
required for it.
Planning the content
Planning the content comprises structuring the exhibition to form
categories, locations, cells and Events as well as structuring the necessary
software files.
General overview of the structure of a project
To be able to plan a “project”, you have to organize your exhibits according
to “locations” and possibly “cells”.
Project
Loc 0
Loc 1
Cell 1
Cell 2 Cell 3
Loc 2
Loc 3
Cell 1
Cell 1
Cell 2 Cell 3
Cell 4
Cell 6 Cell 5
The term project is used for all
exhibitions of a town. A location is
a self-contained exhibition in this town. The Events of locations “1” to
“63” (variable Events) are also divided up into cells. Location “0” (fixed
Events) does not have any cells
How many locations do you need?
You will only need location “0” if all of the following apply:
! You have a small exhibition with a maximum of 899 Events (at one or
several exhibition venues).
! None of your Events are updated frequently.
! Your exhibition will never be part of an integrated exhibition concept
(for example one combining several
exhibitions in your town).
All of these circumstances are true for the small gallery.
6-6
Planning the content
You will need more than one location if at least one of the following
applies:
! You have more than 899 Events.
! You want to allow visitors to change between several exhibitions in
your town without having to replace the receiver.
! You frequently update parts of your exhibition.
! You expect other exhibitions in your town to link up with your
system in future.
None of these circumstances is true for the small gallery.
The location of the small gallery
The small gallery thus requires one location only. It is most practical of all
to select location “0” because all Storage Events in this location are
transmitted once via one single antenna using the streaming method. The
receivers receive and save these Events.
The advantage: low investments and extremely little installation work. As
soon as an Event is triggered, the playback of the audio information which
you assigned to the Event starts without delay.
There are two options:
! As only one cell transmitter is required for location “0”, all Events are
set up in location “0”. The cell transmitter is also used for the video
presentation (Live Event). The small gallery manages and organizes its
system by itself.
! A professional hire company is commissioned with setting up and
planning. The necessary
hardware is also hired out.
Providing a location plan of the exhibits
You will definitely require a scale location plan showing the location of
each exhibit. This location plan must later show where the
components are installed and where cables can be laid. It must be possible
to see exactly which routes the visitors will be taking through the
exhibition.
The location plan of the small
gallery
The gallery has no plans of the art nouveau villa. As there are only four
rooms with several columns, they are measured using a folding rule and
the plan is drawn by hand. The diagram on the bottom left shows a room
of this kind.
In the second step, all exhibits presented in this room are inserted (Events
� to 씋 , see below diagram on the right). Exhibits 쐊 to 씋 are later
combined to form one Event.
6-7
Planning the content
Planning the number of categories
You will have to decide how many categories you want to offer to your
visitors. If there are a lot of categories directed at different target groups,
your exhibition will become more user-friendly but also rather more
complicated.
All locations have to have the same categories, i. e. it is absolutely
necessary to make sure that the number and the content of all categories
is the same in all locations. For example, if the audio information of
category 1 is in “English” in location “0”, the audio information of category
1 must be in “English” in all other locations too!
Categories can only be added or deleted in location “0”. Categories added
in location “0” are automatically taken over by the locations with variable
Events; categories deleted in location “0” are also automatically deleted
from all locations with variable Events.
Note:
If the audio information for a certain category is missing in a certain
location, you have to redirect the audio information from another
category to it (see “Redirecting the audio information of all Storage
Events from one category to another category” on page 8-33). If not,
the visitor with a receiver set to this category will not hear any audio
information at all in that location.
The categories of the small
gallery
As all exhibits of the gallery are set up in location “0”, the gallery can
decide itself which categories it wants to set up. As 15 % of the visitors do
not speak English, the category “French” is set up. Also, as all visitors are
to visit the gallery several times if possible, various large tours are offered
in English too:
Number
Name of the category
1
English: Without special prior knowledge
2
English: Original comments of the artists
3
English: Focus on art history
4
French: Without special prior knowledge
Recording informational texts and setting the audio quality
For every exhibit there must be an informational text read out by a
professional speaker, mixed and recorded on a CD or hard disk in a
recording studio if possible.
Characteristics of the audio files
In order for your Events to have optimum sound quality when they reach
the visitor, you should create the audio files in high quality. High quality is
achieved with the help of excellent microphones, high-quality recording
equipment and a file format with a high sampling rate (we recommend
44.1 or 48 kHz). You can record in mono or in stereo as you wish.
In order that the INM software can process the audio files, it is vital that the
audio files have the following two characteristics:
! File format: Windows Wave (.wav)
If you want to use recordings from a conventional audio CD (file
extension .cda), you will have to convert them to the Windows WAV
format using suitable sound processing software.
! Resolution: 16 bits per sample
The INM cannot process higher or lower resolutions.
6-8
Planning the content
How should the audio files be
compressed?
The INM software compresses the WAV files (.wav) automatically as soon
as you assign them to a Storage Event. The Ogg Vorbis format (.ogg) is
used to compress WAV files in stereo (for licensing information see
page 18-2) and Sennheiser's own compression method is used for WAV
files in mono. Both methods guarantee excellent sound quality with
minimum strain on the memory.
When you assign an audio file to an Event using the INM software , you can
choose between the following compression levels, which differ in the
number of channels (mono or stereo) and in the sampling rate (16 to 48
kHz) used:
Channels Sampling rate (kHz) suitabel for Designation in the INM
1 (Mono)
16
Speech
Speech mono (low)
2 (Stereo)
16
Speech
Speech stereo (low)
2 (Stereo)
32
Music
Music stereo (middle)
2 (Stereo)
48
Music
Music stereo (high)
A sampling rate of 16 kHz is sufficient for speech. If you additionally want
to use music or sound effects, you should select a higher sampling rate.
The following diagram compares the sampling rates of the usual audio
media with those of the
system:
Channel/Quality
Sampling rate
Example
0 kHz
mono
stereo, low quality
stereo, medium quality
16 kHz
32 kHz
stereo, high quality
48 kHz
Professional
sound studio recording
> 96 kHz
Telephone (approx. 8 kHz)
CD Audio,
MiniDisk (44,1 kHz)
Digital Audio Tape (DAT)
The sampling rate affects the fidelity of a recording and the maximum
pitch which can be recorded.
Note:
The INM can change the number of channels and the sampling rate of
an audio file (resampling), but it cannot be used to improve the sound
quality of an audio file afterwards. For this reason, you should never
change an audio file from a lower to a higher sampling rate or from
mono to stereo because this only causes the memory space
requirements to increase and the sound quality can be impaired as a
result.
Collecting and structuring all Storage Events
Of each of these informational texts, which can have background music or
sound effects too, there must be a suitable version (translation) for each
category. The list of exhibits must include the length of time (in minutes
or seconds) for which these informational texts are to be played back.
6-9
Planning the content
The maximum possible length of an Event is restricted: in location “0” for
example, it is restricted to 60 minutes (3,600 seconds). This restriction is
only independent of the audio quality in location “0”. For the maximum
possible length of an Event in locations “1” to “63”, please see the
following table with typical values. However, the maximum length of the
Event can deviate from the typical values, for it depends on the memory
requirements. These are influenced by the frequency range (pitch), the
volume and the dynamics of the audio file.
Playing time per Event in minutes
(seconds)
Quality
Location “0”
Mono
approx. 10:00 (600)
Stereo, low quality
Stereo, medium quality
approx. 60:00
(3,600)
Stereo, high quality
The list of Storage Events of the
small gallery
Location “1” to “63”
approx. 8:30 (510)
approx. 4:30 (270)
approx. 3:00 (180)
The gallery designs and produces the sound files itself. For category 2, the
artists speak commentaries on their own works. The texts are recorded on
hard disk using a high-quality microphone and sound editing software and
normalized and given an unambiguous name. Then the playing time of
each individual sound file is determined.
The list of Storage Events and their playing times is as follows for the room
described in the location plan on page 6-7:
Storage Event
No.
Cell
Name
Category [seconds]
1
2
3
4
301 Sculpture “The Dream”
1
72
99
85
69
302 Painting “The Sleep”
1
52
122 61
48
303 Etching “Anna”
1
55
21
62
50
304 Sculpture “The Minotaur”
1
88
93
90
81
305 Sculpture “The Archer”
1
44
41
48
40
306 Installation “Glass”
1
54
35
38
52
307 Painting “Black”
1
87
129 144 82
308 Nine artist dolls
1
155 120 161 139
! In the “No.” column, note down the number of the Event.
In location “0”, you begin with the start ID of the fixed Events (usually
the number 301). In other locations, you begin with the number 100.
For Detail Events, you do not enter a number but “D” and the number
of the Event to which the Detail Event belongs (e.g. “D 315”).
! In the “Name” column, note down the name of the WAV file to be
reproduced for the Event.
! In the “Cell” column, note down the cell to which the Event is assigned.
As location “0” consists of one single cell only, you can also leave this
column empty in location “0”.
! In the “Category” column, note down the playing time of the file in
seconds for each category.
Saving files in a structured way
6-10
In order to allow these WAV files to be found quickly via INM and assigned
to the Events correctly, we urgently recommend the following procedure:
Planning the content
On the Central PC of your
system, create a project folder with
the name of your project (e.g. “Project” in the example below).
Specify this folder as the project folder when you create a new project
using the INM (see “Creating a new project” on page 8-15).
Create a subfolder for every further location and assign it the intended
name of the location.
In each location folder, create a new folder with the name “WAV
Audio”.
In the “WAV Audio” folder, create a folder for each category of your
exhibition and name these “English”, “German”, “Japanese”, etc.
Save the WAV files of your Storage Events divided into different
categories in these folders.
We recommend that you name the WAV files as follows:
– in location “0”: “Exhibit.category.WAV”
Example: Autumn Landscape.English.WAV
– in locations with variable Events: “Cell-Exhibit.category.WAV”
Example: VanGogh-Autumn Landscape.German.WAV
The folder structure of the
small gallery
Collecting and structuring all Live Events
All Live Events, which are virtually transmitted in real time, are reproduced
by audio sound reproduction units (e.g. CD or DVD player, video recorder
etc.) which are directly connected to the cell transmitters. However, it is
also possible to copy Live Events to the hard disk of a Base Station PC in
the form of MP3 or WAV files and reproduce them via the line output of a
sound card connected to a cell transmitter.
The list of Live Events of the
small gallery
A film crew accompanied and documented the genesis of various works of
art over a comparatively long period. The result was an interesting 20minute compilation. The artist possesses the rights to this film and makes
it available to the small gallery as a DVD. The gallery equips a projection
room with a DVD player and a monitor. Amplifiers and loudspeakers are
not required, of course – noise of any kind would only spoil the atmosphere
of the exhibition.
6-11
Technical planning
The list of Live Events consists of the sound of this one DVD film only. There
are no dubbed versions; in all categories, only the original English sound in
mono is available.
Event
No.
Name
Category CT ID-MTS Audio-In
1: Mono 265198-0 1
327 Video: “The genesis of a work of art”
2: –
–
–
3: –
–
–
4: –
–
–
! In the “No.” column, note down the number of the Live Event, which can
be seen from the location plan.
! In the “Name” column, note down the name of the Live Event.
! In the “Category” column, note down the categories for which you have
a version of the Live Event in each case and whether it is a mono or
stereo source.
In this example, you have one version only, i.e. the original sound in
English and in mono. In order for the visitors who chose one of the three
categories 2, 3 or 4 to hear it too, the sound of category 1 must later be
rerouted to the three categories 2, 3 and 4 via the INM.
! In the “CT ID-MTS” column, note down the number and the MTS of the
cell transmitter which is to transmit the Live Event.
Each cell transmitter can transmit two MTS: MTS “0” and MTS “1”. Live
Events can only be transmitted via MTS “0”.
! In the “Audio-In” column, note down the audio input of the cell
transmitter which is to transmit the Live Event.
How many cells do you need?
Location “0”, whose Events are downloaded in a stationary download, is
not divided up into cells. Instead, all Storage Events of location “0” are
transmitted to the receivers using the streaming method while the
receivers are in the chargers.
Note:
You can also set up other locations for stationary download using the
streaming method by assigning all Events to fictitious MTS and
transmitting the data with a job using the streaming method (see
“Configuring a new job” on page 8-84) – provided that there is
sufficient memory space in the receivers.
The gallery sets up all Events in location “0”, i.e. a division into cells it is not
necessary.
Technical planning
Technical planning determines which receivers, chargers, cell transmitters,
antennas, identifiers, computers and software are required. It also
ascertains which type of receiver is right for your exhibition. The frequency
ranges required for wireless data transmission should be determined in
advance (see “Frequency planning” on page 6-5).
6-12
Technical planning
How many receivers, headphones and chargers do you need?
You need an adequate number of receivers in order to have a receiver for
each visitor even at times with the maximum number of visitors
A pair of headphones belongs to each receiver. It is best to choose
headphones which suit the demands of your exhibition. For spoken texts
with no sound effects, a simpler model will suffice. If you want to convey a
special atmosphere with music, sound effects and an acoustic background,
you should choose a more elaborate model.
You require a charger for every 10 receivers.
If you want to change receiver settings such as the preset category, you
will also require a computer with RS 485 interfaces and the CHM software
(Charger PC).
Number of receivers
for the small gallery
The small gallery requires approx. 100 receivers and 10 chargers. To be
able to change the preset category of the receivers, it is also necessary to
have a Charger PC.
What type of receiver and how many identifiers do you need?
If you want to trigger reproduction of your Events automatically, you will
require at least one identifier per Event; if you want to trigger reproduction
of your Events manually, you do not require identifiers.
Note:
You require further identifiers if you want to set up System Events,
Entrance Events or Null Events. In contrast, identifiers are not required
for Detail Events with additional in-depth information.
If you want to install identifiers outdoors, you will require weather-proof
ID 3200-OUT identifiers.
If you use identifiers, you can decide on any desired receiver type. If an
Event does not have an identifier, it can only be triggered manually by
entering the three-figure Event number on a 16-key receiver. Thus, if you
don’t have any identifiers, you will definitely require 16-key receivers!
Receiver type and identifiers for
the small gallery
The small gallery decides on 16-key receivers. Only two identifiers are
purchased. One is there to automatically trigger the first Event (explaining
how to operate the receivers) as soon as the visitors enter the exhibition
and the other one triggers sound playback for the planned video when the
visitors enter the room in which the video is presented. All of the other
Events are triggered manually.
6-13
Technical planning
Which software do you need?
If you leave it up to a hire company to set up your Events, you do not need
any software. To be able to change the receiver settings without having to
give the equipment away for this to be done, you require the CHM
software, which is free of charge. The VPR software ensures that the
procedure at the receiver counter is handled very quickly and easily.
If you want to set up your Events yourself, you will need the
SYS
software package. If you want to output statistical data, you will also
require the STM software. If you want to make announcements, you will
need the ANM software.
How many cell transmitters and antennas do you need?
123456
AAU O AAU 1
The number of cell transmitters and antennas required depends on the
subdivision into locations and cells and on the quantity of audio
information. A cell transmitter can transmit two MTS and a twin cell
transmitter can transmit four.
123456
Code
04 04
AAU O AAU 1
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
active antenna '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
active antenna '1'
MTS '1'
6-14
The gallery requires only one single cell transmitter. After the Events have
been set up, one stationary download is carried out via the MTS “1” of this
cell transmitter outside of the opening hours of the gallery. The necessary
antenna is mounted to the ceiling above the receiver counter in order to
ensure a direct line of sight to the receivers when they are in the chargers.
During the opening hours of the exhibition, the cell transmitter transmits
the sound of the planned video via the MTS “0”. The necessary antenna is
mounted to the ceiling of the projection room in order to ensure a direct a
direct line of sight to the receivers during the presentation.
As there is only one mono audio version of the video for all categories, it is
enough to have one MTS and one antenna. If the video had other audio
tracks (for example a second stereo channel or a synchronized French
version), each additional track would require one more MTS and one more
antenna.
Planning the content
Example 2: A town with several
large-scale exhibitions
This example shows how the zoo is organized and how it is integrated into
the town's
system.
Planning the content
Planning the content comprises structuring all exhibitions in the town to
form categories, locations, cells and Events as well as structuring the
necessary software files.
General overview of the structure of a project
To be able to plan a “project”, you have to organize your exhibits according
to “locations” and possibly “cells”.
Project
Loc 0
Loc 1
Cell 1
Cell 2 Cell 3
Loc 2
Loc 3
Cell 1
Cell 1
Cell 2 Cell 3
Cell 4
Cell 6 Cell 5
The term project is used for all
exhibitions of a town. A location is
a self-contained exhibition in this town. The Events of locations “1” to
“63” (variable Events) are also divided up into cells. Location “0” (fixed
Events) does not have any cells.
How many locations do you need?
You will only need location “0” if all of the following apply:
! You have a small exhibition with a maximum of 899 Events (at one or
several exhibition venues).
! None of your Events are updated frequently.
! Your exhibition will never be part of an integrated exhibition concept
(for example one combining several
exhibitions in your town).
None of these circumstances are true for the zoo.
6-15
Planning the content
You will need more than one location if at least one of the following
applies:
! You have more than 899 Events.
! You want to allow visitors to change between several exhibitions in
your town without having to replace the receiver.
! You frequently update parts of your exhibition.
! You expect other exhibitions in your town to link up with your
system in future.
Several of these circumstances are true for the zoo. The town will thus
establish several locations and assign one of them to the zoo.
For which Events is the location “0” suitable? For which Events are the
other locations suitable?
If you want to set up several locations, please spread your Events between
location “0” and other locations as follows:
Location “0”
(location with fixed Events)
Location “0” is always the central or higher location. It is automatically
named after the project and contains
! Events which do not have to be updated regularly
(e.g. “Historical City Tour”),
! Events which are heard in identical form in different locations
(e.g. “Operating the receiver”),
! fixed Storage Events of locations “1” to “63” which do not need to be
updated or exchanged regularly and still fit into the memory of
location “0”
(e.g. information on the architecture of the exhibition venue).
All Storage Events in location “0” are usually transmitted once via one
single cell transmitter and one single antenna using the streaming
method. The receivers receive and store them. Advantage: as soon as the
Event is triggered, the audio information assigned to the Event is
reproduced immediately without a waiting time.
Other Locations
(locations with variable Events)
All other locations contain
! Events which no longer fit into the memory of location “0”,
! Events whose audio information depends on the area of the exhibition
and which have to be updated frequently (for example changing
exhibitions)
! Events which are stored in different cell transmitters and can be
individually downloaded from the receivers.
All Storage Events of locations “1” to “63” are transmitted to separate cell
transmitters and stored there. The cell transmitters transmit this data
permanently, so it can be downloaded at any time. As soon as a receiver is
made to carry out a download, it first downloads the audio information
belonging to this location from the cell transmitter. Audio information
from other locations with variable Events – but not from location “0” – can
be deleted.
Note:
There can be a waiting time before a certain Event is reproduced as
missing audio information has to be loaded first.
The locations of the town
6-16
The town assigns a location number to all exhibitions. The zoo is assigned
location 4. The heads of the exhibitions held in the town determine how
Planning the content
many Events they want to set up. The following table shows all locations
of the municipality and the number of Events in each location:
No.
Name of the location
Number of Events
0 Historical City Tour
99
1 City tour “Fountains, basins and channels”
96
2 City tour “The Bauhaus School”
105
3 City tour “Parks and Nature”
136
4 Zoo
500
5 Trade Fair
565
6 Gallery “Art in the Park”
120
7 Gallery “Louise”
185
8 Fun park
165
9 Museum of Old Masters
96
10 Museum of Modern Art
202
11 Museum
35
12 Shopping mall “City Point”
30
13 Guided tour “Sennheiser”
22
How high should the start ID of the fixed Events be?
The number of Events in each location is required by the town in order to
determine the start ID of the fixed Events.
All Events have an Event number between 100 and 999. As the start ID of
the fixed Events, choose a suitable ID number between these two (the
preset number is 301). The Event numbers between the start ID of the
fixed Event and 999 are available for location “0”; the Event numbers
between 100 and the start ID of the fixed Events are available for locations
“1” to “63”:
Range for
variable Events:
Range for
fixed Events:
Trade fair:
100 – 800
Historical
city tour:
801 – 999
Location
1 – 63
0
100
Location 0
801
Reserve = 135
999
Reserve = 99
The audio information which you later assign to these Event numbers
always stays the same in location “0”, it always stays stored in the
receivers and is never changed. In locations “1” to “63”, however, this
audio information is changed depending on the location.
6-17
Planning the content
Determine the start ID of the fixed Events so that sufficient Event
numbers are available for all locations.
The above table shows that
– location “0” requires 99 Event numbers. This means that the start ID
of the fixed Events can be 900 at the most (999 minus 99).
– the location with the most Events requires 565 Event numbers. This
means that the start ID of the fixed Events must be at least 665 (100
plus 565).
Range for
variable Events:
Range for
fixed Events:
Location
1 – 63
0
100
Location 0
999
301
Preset for the start
ID of the fixed
Events, dynamic
The town includes some reserve in its planning and chooses 801 as the
start ID of the fixed Events:
Range for
variable Events:
Range for
fixed Events:
Historical
city tour:
801 – 999
Trade fair:
100 – 800
Location
1 – 63
0
100
Location 0
801
Reserve = 135
999
Reserve = 99
Providing a location plan of the exhibits
You will definitely require a scale location plan showing the location of
each exhibit. This location plan must later show where the
components are installed and where cables can be laid. It must be possible
to see exactly which routes the visitors will be taking through the
exhibition.
The locations plans of the zoo
6-18
The zoo possesses scale location plans drawn up by the architects. These
can be copied and used to design the
installation.
As an example of part of the zoo, the diagram on the bottom left shows
the so-called “gorilla mountain” and the building housing the great apes.
As shown on the right, this plan includes all points at which the visitors are
Planning the content
later to hear the information texts. These points are on the route later to
be taken by the visitors.
There are 13 points in this example (Events � to 쐉 , see diagram on the
right).
Planning the number of categories
You will have to decide how many categories you want to offer to your
visitors. If there are a lot of categories directed at different target groups,
your exhibition will become more user-friendly but also rather more
complicated.
All locations have to have the same categories, i. e. it is absolutely
necessary to make sure that the number and the content of all categories
is the same in all locations. For example, if the audio information of
category 1 is in “English” in location “0”, the audio information of category
1 must be in “English” in all other locations too!
Categories can only be added or deleted in location “0”. Categories added
in location “0” are automatically taken over by the locations with variable
Events; categories deleted in location “0” are also automatically deleted
from all locations with variable Events.
The categories of the zoo
The locations are managed and assigned by the town. The municipality
assigns location 4 to the zoo. The zoo must take over the same categories
which the municipality set up in location “0”. It cannot set up new
categories and can on no account use the category numbers in a way
different to that fixed by the municipality beforehand.
Number
Name of the category
1
English for children
2
English for adults
3
French for children
4
French for adults
5
German
6
Italian
7
Chinese
8
Japanese
6-19
Planning the content
Note:
If the audio information for a certain category is missing in a certain
location, you have to redirect the audio information from another
category to it (see “Redirecting the audio information of all Storage
Events from one category to another category” on page 8-33). If not,
the visitor with a receiver set to this category will not hear any audio
information at all in that location.
Creating a list of all Storage Events
You require a list of all Storage Events. On it, the exhibits must be sorted
according to the locations in which they are to be presented.
Recording informational texts and setting the audio quality
For every exhibit there must be an informational text read out by a
professional speaker, mixed and recorded on a CD or hard disk in a
recording studio if possible.
Characteristics of the audio files
In order for your Events to have optimum sound quality when they reach
the visitor, you should create the audio files in high quality. High quality is
achieved with the help of excellent microphones, high-quality recording
equipment and a file format with a high sampling rate (we recommend
44.1 or 48 kHz). You can record in mono or in stereo as you wish.
In order that the INM software can process the audio files, it is vital that the
audio files have the following two characteristics:
How should the audio files be
compressed?
! File format:
Windows Wave (.wav)
If you want to use recordings from a conventional audio
CD (file extension .cda), you will have to convert them to
the Windows WAV format using suitable sound
processing software.
! Resolution:
16 bits per sample
The INM cannot process higher or lower resolutions.
The INM software compresses the WAV files (.wav) automatically as soon
as you assign them to a Storage Event. The Ogg Vorbis format (.ogg) is
used to compress WAV files in stereo (for licensing information see
page 18-2) and Sennheiser's own compression method is used for WAV
files in mono. Both methods guarantee excellent sound quality with
minimum strain on the memory.
When you assign an audio file to an Event using the INM software, you can
choose between the following compression levels, which differ in the
number of channels (mono or stereo) and in the sampling rate (16 to 48
kHz) used:
Channels
Sampling rate
(kHz)
Suitable for
1 (Mono)
16
Speech
Speech mono (low)
2 (Stereo)
16
Speech
Speech stereo (low)
2 (Stereo)
32
Music
Music stereo (middle)
2 (Stereo)
48
Music
Music stereo (high)
Designation in the INM
A sampling rate of 16 kHz is sufficient for speech. If you additionally want
to use music or sound effects, you should select a higher sampling rate.
The following diagram compares the sampling rates of the usual audio
6-20
Planning the content
media with those of the
Channel/Quality
system:
Sampling rate
Example
0 kHz
mono
stereo, low quality
stereo, medium quality
16 kHz
32 kHz
stereo, high quality
48 kHz
Professional
sound studio recording
> 96 kHz
Telephone (approx. 8 kHz)
CD Audio,
MiniDisk (44,1 kHz)
Digital Audio Tape (DAT)
The sampling rate affects the fidelity of a recording and the maximum
pitch which can be recorded.
Note:
The INM can change the number of channels and the sampling rate of
an audio file (resampling), but it cannot be used to improve the sound
quality of an audio file afterwards. For this reason, you should never
change an audio file from a lower to a higher sampling rate or from
mono to stereo because this only causes the memory space
requirements to increase and the sound quality can be impaired as a
result.
Collecting and structuring all Storage Events
Of each of these informational texts, which can have background music or
sound effects too, there must be a suitable version (translation) for each
category. The list of exhibits must include the length of time (in minutes
or seconds) for which these informational texts are to be played back.
The maximum possible length of an Event is restricted: in location “0” for
example, it is restricted to 60 minutes (3,600 seconds). This restriction is
only independent of the audio quality in location “0”. For the maximum
possible length of an Event in locations “1” to “63”, please see the
following table with typical values. The actually possible Event playing
times can differ from these typical values as they depend on the frequency
spectrum (pitch), the volume and the dynamics of the audio file.
Quality
Playing time per Event in minutes
(seconds)
Location “0”
Mono
Stereo, low quality
Stereo, medium quality
Stereo, high quality
Tabelle der Storage Events
des Zoos
Location “1” to “63”
approx. 10:00 (600)
approx. 60:00
(3,600)
approx. 8:30 (510)
approx. 4:30 (270)
approx. 3:00 (180)
The zoo commissions a team of zoologists, animal keepers and marketing
experts to write the texts. They make sure that the texts are suited to the
target groups involved, interesting and not too long. Each text is given a
completely unambiguous name composed of the exhibit and the category.
6-21
Planning the content
Translators then translate the texts into the languages of the other
categories.
Professional speakers finally speak and record the texts in a recording
studio. The zoo acquires the rights to use natural sounds, animal sounds
and music. The recording studio mixes the spoken texts with the noises of
nature, animal sounds, music etc. to form attractive, entertaining Events
suited to the target groups involved.
The recording studio provides the audio files of the later Storage Events in
the file format Windows WAV in stereo with a resolution of 16 bits per
sample and a sampling rate of 48 kHz. That is the highest audio quality
which the INM software module is able to process. However, when
assigning an audio file to an exhibit, the zoo can also use a lower sampling
rate in order to save memory space.
A list of names and playing times for each Event is already included in the
form of a Microsoft Excel® table sheet:
Event
No.
Playing time in category [seconds]
Cell
Identifier
Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
Address of welcome (Intro)
30
12
25
34
32
12
25
30
Gorilla mountain 1 ID 123
2
Evolution
33
22
36
37
41
22
36
33
Gorilla mountain 1 ID 124
3
Perspective
52
38
48
66
69
38
48
52
Gorilla mountain 1 ID 125
4
Feeding time
5
Environment of Borneo
55
45
33
48
55
45
33
55
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 127
6
Environment of Sumatra
38
29
29
44
46
29
29
38
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 128
7
The Orang-utans
99
82
87
102 109 82
87
99
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 129
8
The Bonobos
133 45
9
The Chimpanzees
155 114 141 180 185 114 141 155 Gorilla mountain 2 ID 131
Live
Gorilla mountain 1 ID 126
125 148 169 45
125 133 Gorilla mountain 2 ID 130
10 The Gorillas 1
84
78
78
99
102 78
78
84
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 132
11 The Gorillas 2
79
69
69
88
96
69
69
79
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 133
12 The Gorilla Nursery
101 92
92
112 113 92
92
101 Gorilla mountain 2 ID 134
13 Summary
33
30
44
30
33
30
38
30
Gorilla mountain 2 ID 135
Event no. 1 is an introductory welcome text which refers to all following
Events (Intro). Event no. 4 (feeding time) is not a Storage Event but a Live
Event which the animal keeper will later speak live.
You can fill in the “Cell” and “Identifier” columns later once you have
ascertained how many cells you require (see “The cells of the gorilla
mountain” on page 6-25).
Saving files in a structured way
Recommendation
6-22
In order to allow these WAV files to be found quickly via INM and assigned
to the Events correctly, we urgently recommend the following procedure:
On the Central PC of your
system, create a project folder with
the name of your project (e.g. “Stadt Kassel” in the example below).
Specify this folder as the project folder when you create a new project
using the INM (see “Creating a new project” on page 8-15).
Create a subfolder for every further location and assign it the intended
name of the location.
We recommend the following procedure for obtaining a particularly clear
folder structure:
Planning the content
In each location folder, create a new folder with the name “WAV
Audio”.
In the “WAV Audio” folder, create a folder for each category of your
exhibition and name these “English”, “German”, “Japanese”, etc.
Save the WAV files of your Storage Events divided into different
categories in these folders.
We recommend that you name the WAV files as follows:
– in location “0”: “Exhibit.category.WAV”
Example: Autumn Landscape.English.WAV
– in locations with variable Events: “Cell-Exhibit.category.WAV”
Example: VanGogh-Autumn Landscape.German.WAV
The folder structure of the town
–
Collecting and structuring all Live Events
All Live Events, which are virtually transmitted in real time, are reproduced
by audio sound reproduction units (e.g. CD or DVD player, video recorder
etc.) which are directly connected to the cell transmitters. However, it is
also possible to copy Live Events to the hard disk of a Base Station PC in
the form of MP3 or WAV files and reproduce them via the line output of a
sound card connected to a cell transmitter.
The list of Live Events is as follows for the gorilla mountain described in the
location plan on page 6-18:
Cell
Event
No.
Gorilla mountain 1 327
Name
Feeding of the
primates
Category
CT ID
AF-IN
1: Mono
150251 2
2: –
–
3: Mono
150251 1
4: –
–
–
5: –
–
–
6: –
–
–
7: –
–
–
8: –
–
–
–
! In the “Cell” column, note down the cell to which the Live Event belongs
(see page 6-24).
! In the “No.” column, note down the number of the Live Event, which can
be seen from the location plan.
6-23
Planning the content
! In the “Name” column, note down the name of the Live Event.
! In the “Category” column, note down the categories for which you have
a version of the Live Event in each case and whether it is a mono or
stereo source.
In this example, you have two mono versions, i.e. one with an animal
keeper speaking in English and one with him or her speaking in French.
Their receivers for wireless microphones are connected to the specified
audio inputs of the cell transmitter. In order to allow visitors who
selected one of the categories in which nothing is being transmitted to
hear it too, the sound of category 3 is later rerouted to these categories
via the INM.
How many cells do you need?
Stationary download
(streaming method)
Location “0”, whose Events are downloaded in a stationary download, is
not divided up into cells. Instead, all Storage Events of location “0” are
transmitted to the receivers using the streaming method while the
receivers are in the chargers.
Note:
You can also set up other locations for stationary download using the
streaming method by assigning all Events to fictitious MTS and
transmitting the data with a job using the streaming method (see
“Configuring a new job” on page 8-84) – provided that there is
sufficient memory space in the receivers.
Mobile download
(no streaming method)
Only locations “1” to “63” whose Events are downloaded in a mobile
download have to be divided up into cells. A cell is defined by the Events it
contains. A cell can include Storage Events as well as Live Events. All Events
of a cell are transmitted together as an MTS by a cell transmitter. For this
reason, the size of a cell is also determined by the memory capacity of the
MTS.
Sum of the total playing time of
the Storage Events
To divide your exhibition up into cells, you have to add up the playing times
of the Storage Events. Up to 600 seconds (10 minutes) of Storage Events
or two stereo Live Events fit into an MTS.
Note:
Live Events can only be contained in an MTS with the number 0.
If you mix Storage Events and Live Events in one MTS, it can cause
waiting times for the visitors. This is because Storage Events cannot
be transmitted to the receivers during playback of a Live Event.
For this reason, playback of a Live Event should not be triggered until
all Storage Events have been downloaded and stored by the receivers.
In one cell, there are several audio files for each exhibit: one for each
category. Each category requires an MTS of its own. It is not possible to mix
Events from different categories in the same MTS.
Intro
You can also add an Intro to a cell. An Intro is an introduction to the
exhibits in the cell which bridges the time required to transmit the Storage
Events from the antenna to the receivers. An Intro must not last for longer
than 35 seconds.
If you assign an Intro to the cell, this reduces the memory space available
for Storage Events. The memory space in the MTS required by an Intro
depends on the length of the Intro and on the number of Live Events also
transmitted with the MTS. An Intro requires more memory space than a
Storage Event with the same playing time.
6-24
Planning the content
The cells of the gorilla mountain
For each category, the zoo adds up the playing times of all Storage Events
(without the Intro and with no Live Events) as shown in the following table
of Events associated with the gorilla mountain:
Event
No.
Name
Playing time in category
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
Address of welcome
2
Evolution
33
22
36
37
41
22
36
33
3
Perspective
52
38
48
66
69
38
48
52
4
Feeding time
5
Environment of Borneo
55
45
33
48
55
45
33
55
6
Environment of Sumatra 38
29
29
44
46
29
29
38
7
The Orang-utans
99
82
87
102
109
82
87
99
8
The Bonobos
133 45
125 148
169
45
125 133
9
The Chimpanzees
155 114 141 180
185
114 141 155
10
The Gorillas 1
84
78
78
99
102
78
78
84
11
The Gorillas 2
79
69
69
88
96
69
69
79
12
The Gorilla Nursery
101 92
92
112
113
92
92
101
13
Summary
33
30
44
38
30
30
33
Total playing time:
Intro (not counted)
Live (not counted)
30
862 644 768 968
1023 644 768 862
As a cell only has room for a maximum of approx. 600 seconds of Storage
Events, the gorilla mountain is divided up into two cells:
! The “Gorilla mountain 1” cell includes Events 2 to 4, a Live Event and an
Intro.
! The “Gorilla mountain 2” cell includes Events 5 to 13.
Calculating the number of segments for stationary download in advance
As a result of the internal system structure, all data is divided up into socalled segments before stationary download:
! There are at least two segments: 1 segment for the EAT (“Event
Assignment Table”) and 1 segment for the audio data.
! A maximum of 511 segments can be transmitted in one single
stationary download.
If you want to transmit more than 511 segments, you have to either
! establish mobile download areas for locations “1” to “63” or
! execute several stationary download jobs in succession.
The number of segments required can be calculated in advance via the
following formula:
Number of categories· 2 · Number of cells = Number of segmente
In location “0”, the number of cells is always 1.
Example a) – Location “0” with one single category:
1 category · 2 · 1 cell = 2 segments
Example b) – Location “0” with 31 categories:
31 categories · 2 · 1 cell = 62 segments
6-25
Planning the content
Example c) – two locations, “0” and “1”: location “0” has 1 cell and
location “1” has 10 cells, so the number of lines is 11. The entire
project has 5 categories:
5 categories · 2 · 11 cells = 110 segmente
Planning guided tours
Besides Storage and Live Events, the zoo would also like to continue
offering the successful guided tours with a tour guide. For this reason it is
necessary to set the receivers participating in these guided tours to the RF
channel of the portable transmitter. As a result, the visitors hear the tour
guide during the guided tour and no Storage or Live Events.
Three different methods are used to configure receivers for guided tours:
1. The zoo can install special touch-screen computers at the receiver
counter. These allow the personnel to configure the receivers (and the
portable transmitter) for guided tours using the VPR software module
(see page 15-11 and page 15-13).
The system administrator can preset visitor groups for guided tours
using the VPR (see page 15-17). He can also use it to permanently
configure receivers for guided tours so that it is not necessary to set
receivers again for every guided tour.
2. Sennheiser Customer Service or a professional equipment hire
company can configure receivers and portable transmitters for guided
tours using the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode.
3. You can use the INM to configure an Entrance Event “Guided Tour”.
The identifier which triggers this Event automatically switches all
receivers entering its magnetic field to the RF channel of a mobile
transmitter.
To configure portable transmitters for guided tours:
! the system administrator uses the VPR software module (see
page 15-22)
! or the CHM software module
6-26
Technical planning
Technical planning
Technical planning determines which receivers, chargers, cell transmitters,
antennas, identifiers, computers and software are required. It also
ascertains which type of receiver is right for your exhibition. The frequency
ranges required for wireless data transmission should be determined in
advance (see “Frequency planning” on page 6-5).
How many receivers, headphones and chargers do you need?
You need an adequate number of receivers in order to have a receiver for
each visitor even at times with the maximum number of visitors.
A pair of headphones belongs to each receiver. It is best to choose
headphones which suit the demands of your exhibition. For spoken texts
with no sound effects, a simpler model will suffice. If you want to convey a
special atmosphere with music, sound effects and an acoustic background,
you should choose a more elaborate model.
You require a charger for every 10 receivers.
The zoo requires 15,000 receivers, 1,500 chargers as well as several copies
of the CHM software. As a computer can address up to 5,120 receivers, it is
sufficient to have a charger at each of the three entrances to the zoo,
where 5,000 receivers are available in each case.
What type of receiver and how many identifiers do you need?
If you want to trigger reproduction of your Events automatically, you will
require at least one identifier per Event. If the Event is very large, for
example if visitors can approach it from several different directions, you
will require several identifiers. If you want to trigger reproduction of your
Events manually, you do not require identifiers.
Note:
You require further identifiers if you want to set up System Events,
Entrance Events or Null Events. In contrast, identifiers are not required
for Detail Events with additional in-depth information.
If you want to install identifiers outdoors, you will require weather-proof
ID 3200-OUT identifiers.
If you use identifiers, you can decide on any desired receiver type. If an
Event does not have an identifier, it can only be triggered manually by
entering the three-figure Event number on a 16-key receiver. Thus, if you
don’t have any identifiers, you will definitely require 16-key receivers!
The zoo does not want Events to be triggered manually because of the risk
of incorrect operation (especially by children) and because the technology
used is to be as unobtrusive as possible. For this reason, it requires an
identifier for each exhibit. A few large exhibits as well as exhibits which
visitors can approach from different directions require several identifiers.
There are other identifiers in the souvenir shops, in the playing area and in
the restaurant for collecting feedback information. Other cleverly
6-27
Technical planning
positioned identifiers at the entrances to the cells and the three entrances
to the zoo ensure that the information required in each case is downloaded
by an antenna in time so that the visitors do not have to wait.
It is also possible to position identifiers at the three exits which trigger an
alarm signal. This makes it possible to prevent visitors from taking their
receivers away with them.
Which software do you need?
The zoo would like to set up its
system and adapt it at any time
by itself. This requires the SYS software package.
In addition, the zoo would like to transmit announcements from sponsors
via the
system. This requires the Announcement Manager
(ANM) software.
Finally, the zoo would like some feedback on the popularity of its different
exhibits and facilities. This requires the Statistics Manager (STM) software.
In order to be able to configure the receivers as conveniently as possible
and hand them out quickly, the Visitor Profiler (VPR) software module is
also required.
All computers are connected to the Central PC in the office via the zoo's
own Ethernet.
How many cell transmitters and antennas do you need?
123456
AAU O AAU 1
The number of cell transmitters and antennas required depends on the
subdivision into locations and cells and on the quantity of audio
information. The number of categories is also important.
123456
Code
04 04
AAU O AAU 1
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
active antenna '0'
MTS '0'
The zoo has eight categories. The gorilla mountain of the zoo consists of
two cells. Each cell needs one MTS for each category. A total of 16 MTS are
therefore required. These are provided by four twin cell transmitters. The
16 antennas are installed in two groups:
! Group 1 (transmits the Intro, the Live Event and the Storage Events 1
to 4) supplies the entrance area and the area in which feeding takes
place.
MTS '0'
MTS '1'
active antenna '1'
MTS '1'
! Group 2 (transmits the remaining Storage Events) supplies the area
from Event 5 onwards.
If the equipment is to be installed outdoors, it is also necessary to have
weather protection housings for the antennas.
The antennas are connected to the cell transmitters located in the
equipment rooms. The Base Station PCs are also located here. All
computers are connected to the intranet of the zoo.
We recommend that you create a table according to the following model
which shows the sites and numbers of all cell transmitters:
Loc.
6-28
Cell
Site
CT ID
4
Gorilla mountain 1 Equipment room A15 597153
4
Gorilla mountain 1 Equipment room A15 257413
MTS
Antenna
0
Installation mast
1
Installation mast
0
Installation mast
1
Installation mast
Technical planning
Loc.
Cell
Site
CT ID
4
Gorilla mountain 2 Equipment room A15 297541
4
Gorilla mountain 2 Equipment room A15 975216
MTS
Antenna
0
Wall of monkey house
1
Wall of monkey house
0
Wall of monkey house
1
Wall of monkey house
! In the “Loc.” Column, note down your location.
! In the “Cell” column, note down the cell to which the cell transmitter
belongs.
! In the “Site” column, note down the room in which the cell transmitter
is located.
! In the “CT ID” column, note down the ID number of the cell transmitter.
! In the “MTS” column, note down the number of the MTS.
! In the “Antenna” column, note down the site at which the antenna is
mounted.
We also recommend that you include the antenna sites in the location
plan.
Would you like to conduct guided tours?
As the zoo wants to continue to offer the extremely popular guided tours,
a number of portable transmitters are purchased.
The Visitor Profiler (VPR) software module links one portable transmitter
at a time with several receivers to form a permanent group. There is no
pushing and shoving in this group because the guide can be understood
perfectly at all times.
6-29
Technical planning
Overview of all Events types
For basic information on the different types of Events, see “The different
types of Events” on page 4-4 and the “Glossary” on page 19-1.
The INM software allows you to influence when playback of an Event starts
and ends, by assigning one or more of the parameters “on ID range”, “oneoff” or “priority”.
Use the following list to determine for each exhibit which parameters
are to be used for the start and end of playback.
1. Entrance Event “Cell Download”
A non-reproducible Event. When a receiver receives the number of an
Entrance Event, a download (update) of the audio information of the
corresponding cell can be triggered.
Entrance Events are not advisable in location “0” as the audio
information is already stored in the receiver and does not need to be
downloaded.
2. Entrance Event “Guided Tour”
A non-reproducible Event which switches receivers to the RF channel of
a portable transmitter.
All visitors entering the range of the identifier triggering this Event
participate in the guided tour and hear the tour guide via his portable
transmitter and not the Events at the exhibition.
3. Live
Live Events are transmitted in “real time”. Live Events contain audio
information which is reproduced in sync with a video or a speaker with
a microphone etc. For this purpose, the video or DVD player or the
preamplifier of the microphone is connected to a cell transmitter.
Reproduction of the Live Event starts automatically
- as soon as the receiver enters the magnetic field of the corresponding
identifier,
- or the three-figure Event number is entered in a 16-key receiver.
Transmission of the Live Event stops automatically
- as soon as the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other
identifier,
- another Event number is entered on a 16-key receiver,
- or the receiver leaves the transmission range of the antenna.
In contrast to Storage Events, the identifier assigned must always be
installed within the transmission range of the antenna as the Live
Event is transmitted live and is not downloaded and stored before
reproduction like a Storage Event.
4. Live, on ID range
Transmission of this Live Event is interrupted as soon as the receiver
leaves the magnetic field of the identifier (or the transmission range of
the antenna). Transmission is continued when the receiver enters the
magnetic field of the identifier again.
5. Storage
Contains audio information downloaded from the receiver beforehand
and stored. Storage Events are started individually each time the
receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier or when the threefigure Event number is entered on a 16-key receiver.
6-30
Technical planning
Reproduction of the Storage Event ends automatically as soon as the
receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier or the audio
information has been reproduced completely.
If the receiver enters the magnetic field of the same identifier again,
the Event is reproduced from the beginning again.
6. Storage, one-off
Reproduction of this Storage Event starts and ends like that of a normal
Storage Event.
However, reproduction of this Storage Event is not started again if the
receiver enters the magnetic field of the same identifier a second time.
7. Storage, on ID range
Reproduction of this Storage Event starts like that of a normal Storage
Event.
Reproduction of this Storage Event is interrupted as soon as the
receiver leaves the magnetic field of the identifier. Reproduction is
continued when the receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier
again. This creates the effect of a sound shower which is especially
suitable for evoking a certain atmosphere using noises, sounds or
music.
8. Storage, one-off, on ID range
Reproduction of this Storage Event starts like that of a normal Storage
Event.
Reproduction of this Storage Event is interrupted as soon as the
receiver leaves the magnetic field of the identifier. If the visitor enters
the same magnetic field again, the Event is faded in 5 seconds before
the point at which it was faded out.
After being reproduced completely or stopped manually by the visitor,
this Storage Event is not started again if the receiver receives the
identifier signal of this Event again.
9. Storage, priority
This Storage Event is always reproduced completely and any other
identifier signals are ignored, i.e. the visitor has to listen to the
complete Event, even if he has arrived at another exhibit in the
meantime.
The 16-key receiver allows “Priority” Events to be stopped
nevertheless.
10.Storage, priority, one-off
This Storage Event is also reproduced completely and identifier signals
of any other Events are ignored.
After being reproduced completely or stopped manually by the visitor,
this Storage Event is not started again if the receiver receives the
identifier signal of this Event again.
11.B ifA Event
This Storage Event has two different sets of audio information: audio
information “B1” and audio information “B2”.
Reproduction of audio information “B1” or “B2” only starts when the
receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier at the corresponding
exhibit “B” or the three-figure Event number of the corresponding
Event “B” is entered via the 16-key receiver.
The receiver starts reproduction of audio information “B1”. Audio
information “B2” is only reproduced if the receiver reproduced audio
information “B1” and Event “A” beforehand.
6-31
Technical planning
This for example allows you to ensure that visitors hear the word
“Welcome” upon entering the exhibition and “Goodbye” upon leaving
it.
The receiver stops reproduction of audio information “B2” or “B1”:
– when the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier,
– when the STOP key is pressed,
– when the information has been reproduced completely once.
Audio A
Audio B2
Audio B1
12.Inactive Event
This Storage Event is omitted in certain categories which you can
specify yourself, i.e. the audio information is only reproduced in certain
categories.
This for example allows you to conduct shorter tours or more detailed
ones. Visitors who decide on the “Short” category automatically omit
the Inactive Events; visitors who decide on the “Detailed” category
hear the audio information assigned to the Inactive Event.
13.Storage Event with lead in
The introduction (lead in) in is triggered by the identifier of another
Event.
This for example allows you to create an introduction to a Live Event.
When a receiver enters the magnetic field of an identifier which
triggers the Live Event, the Storage Event with lead in is reproduced
first. The visitors hear an announcement or receive introductory
information on the subsequent Live Event. Not until then does the Live
Event start.
14.Detail Events
Detail Events are normal Storage Events whose reproduction is not
triggered by an identifier or by entering the three-figure Event ID
number but by pressing the Detail key on the receiver. Detail Events
contain additional in-depth information and are fixedly linked to
another Storage Event.
The visitor can also stop reproduction of each Event at any time by
pressing the STOP key on his receiver. The REPEAT key has to be pressed in
order for reproduction to continue.
6-32
Technical planning
The principal restrictions
The following table shows the most important data regarding the
organizational structure of your
system:
In location “0”
(fixed Events)
Parameter
Number of Events per
location*
In locations “1” to “63”
(variable Events)
0 to 899
0 to 899
Event No. 101 to 999
900 Event numbers from
Preset: 699
100 to 999
Event No. 301 to 999
Categories per
location
Event No. 100 to 998
Preset: 200
Event No. 100 to 300
max. 31
Cells per location
1
1 to 255
Events per cell
0 to 899
max. 127
0 (for Storage
Events)
1 to 4 (for Storage
Events)
only 1 MTS required for
all Events of all
categories
with the automatic
reloading process
MTS per category and
cell
Live Events require additional memory space in
the MTS.
* The number of possible Events per
project is theoretically 56,638 as
the variable Events of locations “1” to “63” can be exchanged at any time.
The following table shows the most important data regarding the Storage
Events of your
system:
Storage Event
In Location “0” In Locations “1” to “63”
(fixed Events)
(variable Events)
File format of the Storage Events
Windows Wave (wav)
Sampling rate
as desired, recommendation: 44.1 or 48
kHz
Resolution
16 bits per sample
Channels
mono or stereo
Max. playing time per Event,
quality: “mono”
approx. 600 seconds
(approx. 10 minutes)
Max. playing time per Event,
quality: “stereo, low quality”
approx. 510 seconds
(approx. 8:30 minutes)
Max. playing time per Event,
quality: “stereo, medium
quality”
3,600 seconds
(60 minutes)
Max. playing time per Event,
quality: “stereo, high quality”
Total playing time per MTS
Total playing time per cell and
category
approx. 270 seconds
(approx. 4:30 minutes)
approx. 180 seconds
(approx. 3:00 minutes)
–
approx. 600 seconds
(approx. 10 minutes)
–
2559 seconds
(approx. 40 minutes)
6-33
Further example configurations
The above examples 1 (small gallery) and 2 (zoo) are only a few of the
possibilities. You will find four short descriptions of more advances stages
in the following.
Configuration 1
Even just the basic equipment including receivers, headphones and
chargers is enough to operate a very efficient
system. These
components allow the user to start information playback manually - by
simply entering the corresponding number on the receiver.
! Manual triggering of the Events by visitors (this requires 16-key
receivers)
! Space-saving
! Mobile
! Information is already stored in the receivers
Configuration 2
You can offer more convenience to your visitors by means of the automatic
triggering of audio information. Just add identifiers to your system.
Information playback then starts automatically as soon as a visitor enters
an individually adjustable range in the vicinity of an exhibit.
! Automatic triggering of the Events via identifiers
! Different modes can be programmed
Configuration 3
Audio information on a multimedia or video presentation can be
transmitted in perfect sync. with the picture. Even complicated
presentations in different languages or with different information
volumes are easy to realize and control online via cell transmitters and
antennas. Special information levels, for example for children and the
visually impaired, as well as different languages can be offered.
! Integration of multimedia presentations and live audio
Configuration 4
Choose the attractive
software packages from. These give you
programming and evaluation tools allowing you to use your
system to the full. Organize and program your
system yourself.
Analyze the visitor behaviour in order to optimize your exhibition. Talk to
the visitors to your exhibition.
! GP SYS system software: for programming and organizing the system
! Statistics Manager: for analyzing visitor behaviour
! Announcement Manager: for making announcements to your visitors
7 Basics of the Software
The modular structure of the
software allows you to control
configuration and operation of the entire
system. To use the
possibilities of the system to the full, you should
! have basic knowledge of the operating system
(MS Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows Vista),
! know how to create and share folders,
! know how to operate a PDA.
CAUTION!
Different dongles may interfere with each other!
For the
software to work without restrictions, you
will require the
dongle. If another dongle from the
“Aladdin” company is connected in your network, neither
of the dongles will work.
Only the
network.
dongle must be connected in your
Note:
Make yourself familiar with the following basics before installing the
software and working with it!
Contents of the chapter
Possible hardware versions .............................................................7-2
System requirements .......................................................................7-7
The software modules ................................................................... 7-10
The folder structure ....................................................................... 7-12
The system files.............................................................................. 7-15
Using the software......................................................................... 7-18
Re-installing, repairing or de-installing software modules ..... 7-19
Index ................................................................................................ 7-20
7-1
Possible hardware versions
Possible hardware versions
hardware and software have a modular structure. This allows you
to adapt the system to the type and size of your exhibition.
Minimum hardware required
For a small gallery, presenting a manageable number of exhibits which do
not change often, a laptop, a PDA and the basic software equipment are
sufficient.
INM
BSM
PalmTop
At least the following software modules must be installed on the laptop.
They are all part of the
basic software requirement:
! the “Installation Manager” (INM),
! the “Base Station Manager” (BSM),
Laptop
! the “Charger Manager” (CHM)
Note:
The INM software module can only be used if you use GP EK 3200
receivers in your exhibition. If you use GP EK 3000 receivers instead,
you must use the ADM and TRM software modules.
You manage your exhibition from one location only. To be able to use the
streaming method, which only requires one single cell transmitter, please
use location “0”. To perform the stationary download, connect your laptop
to the cell transmitter and the chargers and directly copy the settings
made previously as well as the audio data via the cell transmitter to the
receivers. The PDA serves to configure the identifiers.
The minimum hardware version is suitable for:
! relatively small exhibitions with a manageable number of exhibits,
! exhibitions which stay the same and are only changed rarely,
! itinerant exhibitions which must be set up and put into operation with
as little installation work as possible,
! less visitor-friendly exhibitions in which the receiver presets are not
reprogrammed or which offer one category only and in which the
visitors set the desired category themselves via a 16-key receiver,
! all exhibitions which do not require permanent and central access to
the individual components,
! exhibitions in which announcements to the visitors are not planned.
7-2
Possible hardware versions
Additional enlargement options
INM
STM
ANM
IDC
PalmTop
CHM
In order to manage and update several large exhibitions with many or
frequently changing exhibits, you can equip the
system with
additional computers and a network.
CHM
The enlargement options with additional hardware and software
described on the following pages are suitable for:
LAN
BSM
BSM
BSM
USB-Hub
USB-Hub
! large exhibitions with many exhibits, many categories or cell
transmitters located at great distances from each other,
! constantly renewed exhibitions in which the exhibits or the
information on the exhibits change constantly,
! growing exhibitions to which new exhibits are often added,
Location 1
Location 0
Location 2
! exhibitions which offer up-to-date announcements such as visitor
information, safety tips or sponsor advertising,
! visitor-friendly exhibitions with many categories and preset 4-key
receivers (protected against operating errors) and the appropriate
markings,
! exhibition managers who require detailed feedback from their visitors,
e.g. for cost-benefit analysis or certifying the success of individual
exhibits.
The Central PC
Creating and transmitting
installations
The Central PC is the core of your
system. Here you can collect the
audio data, plan and configure your exhibition and start the data transfer
to the cell transmitters using the INM software.
Note:
The INM software is only compatible with the GP EK 3200 receivers.
For smaller exhibitions with only one PC and a relatively small number of
cell transmitters, the cell transmitters can be connected directly to the
Central PC. For larger exhibitions with a large number of cell transmitters,
you can perform this task quickly, easily and automatically by transferring
the data to the cell transmitters via a network and other PCs.
Transmitting announcements
This network can also be used to transmit announcements from the
Central PC to the visitors at all times. For this purpose, the “Announcement
Manager” (ANM) software must be installed e.g. on the Central PC and
your Central PC must have a permanent connection to the cell transmitters
via a network. The Central PC must also be equipped with a sound card,
loudspeakers and a high-quality microphone.
If the announcements are to reach the visitors, your receivers must be
within the transmitting range of the antennas.
Evaluating visitor behavior
At the Central PC, you can also carry out statistical evaluation of the tours
and acquire a detailed picture of visitor behavior. You thus receive
feedback on your exhibition from the visitors.
For this, the Central PC must be connected to the Charger PCs via the
network. The “Charger Manager” (CHM) software and the “Statistics
Manager Collector” (SMC) auxiliary software must be installed on all
Charger PCs in order to be able to read the statistical data from the
receivers and transmit it to the Central PC. The “Statistics Manager” (STM)
software serves to process, compare and output the data.
7-3
Possible hardware versions
Dongle
When purchasing the software, you also receive a dongle which releases
the software for your installation. If you expand your
system
later, the additional software is either released by
! the same dongle, which was programmed accordingly (please contact
your Sennheiser partner), or
! by an additional dongle (please contact your Sennheiser partner).
CAUTION!
Different dongles may interfere with each other!
For the
software to work without restrictions, you
will require the
dongle. If another dongle from the
“Aladdin” company is connected in your network, neither
of the dongles will work.
Only the
network.
CAUTION!
dongle must be connected in your
Danger of high costs due to loss of or damage to the
dongle !
If you lose or damage your dongle, your Storage and Live
Events go on as before but announcements are no longer
transmitted. You cannot carry out download jobs either.
The dongle cannot be repaired or replaced and you will
have to buy the necessary licenses again!
For this reason, set up the Central PC with the dongle in
a safe place and restrict access to the Central PC to
persons you can trust completely.
Be sure to remove the dongle while installing or deinstalling software of any kind on the Central PC.
Keep liquids away from the dongle.
However, individual components of the
system also work without
the dongle. For example, you can easily prepare and edit a
project
on other computers. However, in order to transfer this preparatory project
to the cell transmitters, you always require the dongle.
The network
You can directly transfer a project prepared on a Central PC to the cell
transmitters, but you have to connect all cell transmitters of your
exhibition to the Central PC one after another. With a network, you are
more flexible with regard to the positioning of the cell transmitters, as the
cell transmitters do not all have to be located in the immediate vicinity of
the computer.
If you have to transfer to cell transmitters located at great distances from
each other or often update your exhibition, this time-consuming task can
be performed quickly, easily and automatically if the Central PC is
connected to Base Station PCs via a network (100 Mbit/s Ethernet) and the
cell transmitters are connected to the Base Station PCs. In order to allow
communication between the computers, the BSM software must be
installed and run on the Base Station PCs. With a network of this kind, you
can automatically transfer a large
installation to all cell transmitters of a location overnight.
7-4
Possible hardware versions
The Base Station PCs
The Base Station PCs control and monitor data transmission from the
Central PC to the cell transmitters via the network. For this purpose, the
BSM software must be installed on the Base Station PCs. The BSM receives
its commands from the INM software so that all Base Station PCs can be
controlled from the Central PC.
The cell transmitters are connected to the various Base Station PCs either
directly or via a USB hub. The Base Station PCs are therefore located close
to the cell transmitters, e.g. in special rooms for technical equipment.
The PC sat the receiver counters (Charger PCs)
At the receiver counter, the visitors obtain the receivers and return them
again after their visit. This is also where the rechargeable batteries of the
receivers are charged.
Monitoring the charging cycle
If you set up a PC at the receiver counter, you can connect the chargers to
it and install the CHM software. On the one hand, this allows you to
conveniently, simultaneously and centrally monitor the charging process
of up to 5,120 receiver rechargeable batteries.
Programming the receivers
On the other hand, the Charger PC together with the CHM software allows
you to change the preset category and the volume of the receivers. In this
way, you can quickly adapt the receivers to the expected numbers of
visitors any time.
For example, if 30 % of your daily visitors are children, you can set 30 % of
your receivers permanently to the category “child” (permanent
programming) and mark them accordingly with a sticker. You are then
ideally prepared for your average audience. You can immediately hand out
these marked and permanently programmed receivers to the visitors in
question.
If, however, 200 German-speaking visitors visit your exhibition in an
exceptional case and you only have 50 receivers with the preset category
“German”, you can reprogram 200 receivers of your choice to “German” at
any time and hand them out immediately (temporary programming for
the duration of a visit). When these receivers are returned after the visit,
this temporary programming is automatically replaced by the permanent
one.
Evaluating visitor behavior
The CHM software, together with the SMC auxiliary software, also allows
you to read statistical data. The “Statistics Manager” (STM) software is
necessary for the display and evaluation of the statistics.
The PDA
The identifiers are operated via the PDA. You can use different PDA models
(see page 7-8). The IDC software module must be installed on the PDA (see
“The Identifier Control (IDC)” on page 12-1).
The identifier parameters of a location are planned on the Central PC with
the INM software and then transferred to the PDA (synchronization). With
the PDA, you go to one identifier after another in your exhibition and
transfer the parameters to the identifiers via infra-red.
You can also change the parameters of individual identifiers at any time
without being dependent on the Central PC.
7-5
Possible hardware versions
Where to place the computers
Choose a place with the following features:
! Dust-free
! Dry
! Sufficiently ventilated
! Vibration-free
! Temperature range: 16°C – 22°C
! No direct sunlight
! No magnetic fields (loudspeakers etc.) close to the computer or
monitor
7-6
System requirements
System requirements
Caution!
For the
software to work without restrictions, you will require
the
dongle. If another dongle from the “Aladdin” company is
connected in your network, neither of the dongles will work.
Only the
dongle must be connected in your network.
Your computers must meet the following minimum requirements:
Central PC and Administration PC
! 866 MHz processor (Intel Pentium or AMD Athlon)
! 128 MB RAM or more
! 30 GB hard disk or larger
! CD-ROM drive (optional: DVD-ROM)
! Graphics card, 19" monitor (or 17" TFT flat screen)
Resolution: 1280 x 1024 pixels (recommended)
! A sound card which supports the 16 kHz sampling rate, active stereo
loudspeakers, headphone connection, high-quality microphone,
headphones
! A drive for removable storage data for data backup (for example CD
recorder, DVD recorder, streamer drive, removable hard disks or
similar)
! Network card (100 Mbit/s Ethernet)
! RS 485 interface
! USB interfaces
! Printer
! Microsoft Windows 2000 (Service Pack 4) or Microsoft Windows XP or
Microsoft Windows Vista, each with Microsoft Media Player
Note:
You will require the following for the INM software :
– either a larger RAM (at least 512 MB)
– or sufficient space on your hard disk for an outsourced file. Set the
virtual memory of your operating system so that the virtual memory
and the RAM add up to a value of at least 350 MB.
Base Station PCs
! 666 MHz processor (e.g. Intel Celeron or AMD Duron) or higher
! 64 MB RAM
! 6 GB hard disk
! CD-ROM drive
! Graphics card, 17" monitor (or 15" TFT flat screen) with a resolution of
1024 x 768 pixels (this monitor is only required for setting up the PCs
and can be put to a different use afterwards)
! Network card (100 Mbit/s Ethernet)
7-7
System requirements
! USB interfaces
! USB hub for connecting the cell transmitters (recommended)
! Microsoft Windows 2000 (Service Pack 4) or Microsoft Windows XP
(Service Pack 1) or Microsoft Windows Vista
Instead of a full-format desktop PC, industrial PCs in a 19" housing are also
suitable.
Output, Return and Charger PC
! 666 MHz processor (Intel Pentium or AMD Athlon)
! 64 MB RAM
! 40 GB hard disk
! CD-ROM drive
! Graphics card, 17" monitor (or 15" TFT flat screen)
Resolution: 1024 x 768 pixels
! Network card (100 Mbit/s Ethernet)
! RS 485 card for connecting the chargers
! Microsoft Windows 2000 or Microsoft Windows XP or Microsoft
Windows Vista
Note:
Only use an RS 485 interface card recommended by Sennheiser (see
“Recommendations concerning the RS 485 interface” on page 5-46).
PDA (PalmTop or Microsoft Pocket PC)
You can use one of two different PDAs:
Hardware
Operating
system
3Com PalmTop
with infra-red
interface
(IrDA-IrCOMM)
OS version
3.50 to 4.x
Microsoft
Pocket PC
Microsoft
Windows
Mobile
Synchronization software
HotSync 4.0 or higher
if you are using Windows 2000 or
XP: Microsoft ActiveSync
if you are using Windows Vista:
Windows Mobile Device Center
The docking station (also called “base station” or “cradle” depending on
the PDA model) must be connected to the PC on which the INM software is
installed.
Note:
PDAs with Symbian or Linux operating system cannot be used. Only
use a PDA recommended by Sennheiser. If in doubt, please ask your
Sennheiser dealer.
7-8
System requirements
If you use a laptop only
! 866 MHz processor (Mobile Intel Pentium or Mobile AMD Athlon)
! 128 MB RAM or more
! 20 GB hard disk or larger
! CD-ROM drive (optional: DVD-ROM or DVD-ROM/CD RW combo drive)
! 14" TFT flat screen (or larger) with a resolution of 1280 x 768 pixels (or
higher)
! A sound chip which supports the 16 kHz sampling rate, high-quality
microphone, headphones and external active stereo loudspeakers
(recommended)
! RS 485 interfaces (e.g. PMCIA card or RS 232 to RS 485 interface
converter)
! USB interfaces
! Printer
! Microsoft Windows 2000 (Service Pack 4) or Microsoft Windows XP
(Service Pack 1) or Microsoft Windows Vista, each with Microsoft Media
Player
7-9
The software modules
The software modules
The
software consists of the following modules:
Basic configuration
The Installation Manager (INM)
! typically runs on the Central PC
! serves to configure the entire exhibition and to manage all data
! is used to transmit all data to the cell transmitters and the PDA
Note:
The INM software is compatible with receivers of the EK 3200 type
only and not with receivers of the EK 3000 type.
If you want to use EK 3000 receivers:
– you cannot set up and manage locations,
– the
system cannot carry out stationary downloads via the
streaming method
– you require the ADM and TRM modules in place of the INM,
– you require the “GP 3000” system manual.
The Base Station Manager (BSM)
! is installed on all Base Station PCs
! co-ordinates and controls data exchange with the cell transmitters
The Charger Manager (CHM)
! is installed on all Charger PCs
! monitors the charging process of the receiver rechargeable batteries
! allows to change the receiver presettings (e.g. category and volume)
The PDA software Identifier Control (IDC)
! is installed on a PDA
! serves to configure the identifiers
Additional modules
The Announcement Manager (ANM)
! is typically installed on the Central PC
! allows announcements to be made to visitors
The Statistics Manager (STM)
! is installed on the Administration PC or the Central PC
! allows statistical evaluations of tours
7-10
The software modules
Auxiliary modules
The auxiliary modules are initialized automatically during installation. The
corresponding icon appears on the Windows task bar. The auxiliary
modules work independently in the background. You do not need to enter
or configure anything.
The Base Station Server (BSS)
! is installed on all Base Station PCs
! is intended for communication between BSM und ANM
The License Manager Server (LMS)
! is installed on the PC in whose USB port the dongle is inserted
! is necessary for controlling the
hardware
The Statistics Manager Collector (SMC)
! is installed on the output PC
! collects the tour data read from the receivers and makes them
available for evaluation by the STM
7-11
The folder structure
The folder structure
The following overview shows all folders required by your
system.
This structure is identical on all computers on which
software
modules are installed. Most folders are created automatically at setup or
generated by the software itself. However, some folders must be created
manually.
The
software modules communicate via system files saved in
certain folders (locally or in a network). As several software modules
access certain folders in a network, you must manually enable “Full
Control” sharing for these folders. For information on how to share folders,
please refer to your Microsoft Windows manual.
Overview of the folder structure
The
software uses two folders:
1. The software folder “guidePORT” with the subfolders “bin” and
“sys”.
The software folder “guidePORT” is created during setup, usually on
drive C:\Programmes”. The subfolder “bin” contains the program
files; the subfolder “sys” must be shared for full control on all computers.
2. The installation folder “GPInstallations” with several subfolders.
You must create this folder manually on a drive of your choice. The
installation folder contains the installation files, e.g. the project file,
Storage Events, statistics files and announcements.
Contents of the folders
Software folder
This folder is created with all subfolders during setup. You should not
move or change this folder and the files contained in it.
Software file folder “bin”
This is the location of all software modules, drivers and program libraries
installed on a computer.
Communication folder “sys”
The
folder.
software modules communicate via system files saved in this
Note:
During software installation, this folder is automatically shared (for
full control) as “sys”. This property must not be changed!
7-12
The folder structure
The installation folder “GPInstallations”
This folder contains all data of your
project:
Note:
You must create this folder manually and enable “Full Control” sharing
for this folder as “GPInst” before creating your first
location
with the INM.
CAUTION!
Danger of data loss!
Data can be destroyed by damaged hard disks or computer
viruses!
For this reason, save this folder on at least one other
drive or on a removable storage medium (CD, DVD etc.)
as soon as you have created a project file!
The folders with the name of a location
All files belonging to a
location are saved in a subfolder with the
name of the location. These location folders are automatically created by
the INM when you set up a new location in your project.
The folder of compressed audio files (GPP Audio)
This folder and its subfolder are created automatically by the INM software
as soon as you select an audio file for an Intro or a Storage Event. For each
category in your exhibition, this folder includes a subfolder with a name
showing the category number (e.g. “Category1_”).
This is where all audio files converted from the wav format into the gpp
format are saved before they are transferred to the cell transmitters.
The folder of compressed Intro files (Intro)
If you assign an Intro to a cell with the INM software, the selected wav file
is automatically compressed and saved in a subfolder of this folder.
The folder with cell transmitter files (System)
This folder contains the system files created by the INM software, e.g.
“CT*.ini” or “CT*.mts”. The BSM software reads these files and
transfers them to the cell transmitters.
7-13
The folder structure
The folder of the audio “wave” files (WAV-Audio)
This is the location of all audio files for Storage Events and announcements
in the uncompressed Windows wave format.
Note:
We recommend that you create this folder manually and copy all Storage Events and Intros – divided into categories –, which you typically
received on CD, to it. This makes it easier to keep track when assigning
the Events to the exhibits. If you do not create this folder yourself, it is
automatically created by the INM software as soon as you assign a
wav file to a Storage Event or an Intro. The INM then copies the wav
file into a subfolder which is given the name of the current category.
The folder of announcements (Announcements)
The announcements will typically be available on CD. We recommend
creating this folder manually and copying all announcements to it, sorted
according to categories. This makes it easier to later assign the announcements.
7-14
The system files
The system files
processes four types of system files:
! Project files
! Audio files
! Files for the cell transmitters
! Communication files
Project file
The project file is the core of your
exhibition. The file is created
with the INM and is given the name of your
project and the file
extension “xml”. It defines the categories, cells and Events in your
exhibition and contains the assignment of the Events to the exhibits.
Audio files
uses audio files with different formats: uncompressed wav audio
and compressed gpp audio or OggVorbis audio.
Windows wave audio files
In order that the INM software can process the audio files, it is vital that the
audio files have the following two characteristics:
! File format: Windows Wave (.wav)
If you want to use recordings from a conventional audio CD (file
extension .cda), you will have to convert them to the Windows WAV
format using suitable sound processing software.
! Resolution: 16 bits per sample
The INM cannot process higher or lower resolutions.
In order to obtain Windows wave files in this format, it could be necessary
to convert the audio information usually supplied by the sound studio on
CD in the audio CD format to wav files via a suitable audio software.
In contrast, it is not necessary to convert audio information intended for
Live Events and it is also not necessary to save them on the hard disk. They
are reproduced later directly from the CD, DVD, videocassette etc.
In order to manage several hundred Storage Events and announcements
without losing track, we recommend naming the wav files as follows:
Naming the wav files using the
Event number
If you already know the number of the exhibit to which the wav file
belongs (for example via the planning assistant), we recommend the
following name: “Event number. Category number (or name). wav”.
Example:
“Evt301.Cat01.wav” or “Evt302.English.wav”.
Naming the wav files using the
Event name
If you do not yet know the number of the exhibit to which the wav file
belongs, we recommend the following name:
In location “0”: “Event name.category name.wav”
In other locations:
“Name of location.Name of cell.Event name.Category name.wav”
7-15
The system files
Examples:
“Autumn Landscape.English.wav” or
”Louvre.VanGogh.Autumn Landscape.German.wav”
Save the Storage Event files in the category subfolders of the
“WAV Audio” folder and the announcements – also divided into
categories – in the folder “Announcements”. This makes it easier for you
to find and identify these audio files later.
Note:
Never use the same name for two audio files, even if the audio files are
in different subfolders!
Encoded audio files
The INM or ANM software compresses Windows wave audio files into
encoded audio files (gpp).
The INM uses the Ogg Vorbis compression algorithm (for licensing
information see page 18-2) to compress stereo wav files.
Cell transmitter files
The cell transmitter files are either read from the cell transmitters or saved
in the cell transmitters.
Cell transmitter identification filw (TX*.ini)
Every cell transmitter has a unique identification number (ID number)
which is stored permanently in the unit. When a cell transmitter is
connected to a Base Station PC via USB, the BSM software reads this ID
number. Then a cell transmitter identification file (Tx*.ini,
* corresponds to the ID number of the cell transmitter) is saved in the
“sys” folder of the Base Station PC. The INM software opens this file via
the network. You can then address each connected cell transmitter in your
exhibition individually.
Cell transmitter initialization file (Ct*.ini)
In locations with variable Events, you assign all Events to be transferred by
a cell transmitter to this specific cell transmitter via the INM software and
set up the connected antennas. The INM then writes this configuration
information to the cell transmitter initialization files (Ct*.ini,
* corresponds to the ID number of the cell transmitter) and saves it in the
“System” folder on the Central PC. For each cell transmitter to which you
have assigned Events in your exhibition, there is a Ct*.ini file.
Cell transmitter MTS file (t*.mts)
If, in locations with variable Events, you assign a wav file to an exhibit as
a Storage Event via the INM software, this wav file is compressed into a
gpp file. When transmitting data to the cell transmitter (mobile download
job), the gpp files of all Storage Events of one cell transmitter are united
to make an interlaced data stream (MTS, Multiplexed Transport Stream).
Both data streams a cell transmitter can transmit are combined in a cell
transmitter MTS file (ct*.mts, * corresponds to the six-figure ID number
of the cell transmitter) and saved in the “System” folder on the Central
7-16
The system files
PC. This file can be very large (max. 20 MBytes).
Thus, for every cell transmitter to which you have assigned Storage Events
in your exhibition, there is a Ct*.mts file.
Folders of the STM software
When you install the STM software, the following folders and files (among
others) are added to the
folder structure.
Folder with statistical data on the Charger PC (Stat)
The CHM software saves the tour data read from the receivers in the
“guidePORT\Stat” folder on the Charger PC. These are either the
normal tour data (bin_CHM20062410.Sta) or the more extensive
service tour data (bin_CHM20062410.Ser). Each file contains the tour
data for one day.
Folder with statistical data on the Central PC (Stat)
The STM software saves statistics defaults, jobs and collector information
in the XML format in the “GPInstallations\Location folder\
Stat” folder on the Central PC.
Folder with statistical data sorted according to months (Statyyyymm)
The STM software saves the statistical data read from the receivers and
transferred to the Central PC in the “GPInstallations\Location
folder\Stat\Statyyyymm” folder (“yyyy” = year, “mm” = month),
i.e. the data is sorted according to months.
The tour data of a Charger PC for one day are put together in one file. For
example, the “bin_CHMR_11(CHPC01-31543.Sta” file contains the
tour data for the eleventh day of the month which come from the Charger
PC “CHPC01”. If you want to carry out data backup for the tour data, we
recommend saving these files every month.
The “List” folder
If – using the STM – you have set up jobs which create certain statistics
once a day, once a week or once a month etc., these statistics are saved in
the HTML format in the “List” folder on the Central PC. The names of the
HTML files consist of the name of the job (which you specify when creating
the job) as well as the day and time at which the job was created.
These HTML files can be viewed or presented using a browser or processed
further via Microsoft Excel.
Note:
If STM saves statistics files in the HTML format, the “Bars” folder containing the bar graphs is saved in the same folder. This means that, if
you pass on the HTML files, you also have to pass on the “Bars”
folder!
7-17
Using the software
Using the software
Working with the dongle
You can install and use the individual
software modules without
restrictions on any desired computer, for example in order to learn about
operation or to prepare or edit installations. However, in order to control a
real
system with the software, the dongle is absolutely
necessary.
Insert the dongle into a free USB port of your Central PC or laptop. Your
system is now ready for operation.
Using the password
You need a password for some functions. This password is
GuidePort
Please note small and capital letters!
CAUTION!
Risk of password abuse!
Anyone who knows this password can spy for example on
visitor data, change basic receiver settings (volume and
category) or manipulate announcements!
For this reason, change the password immediately
once you have installed the software!
7-18
Re-installing, repairing or de-installing software modules
Re-installing, repairing or de-installing
software modules
To change the installed
software:
Click “Software” on the Control Panel or select the software package to
be removed and click “Remove” or start the setup program from the
setup CD. The “Install Shield Wizard” dialog box opens.
Select
– “Modify” to re-install or de-install individual software modules.
– “Repair” to re-install software modules which have already been
installed (in order to eliminate problems etc.),
– “Remove” to de-install all software modules installed on the
computer.
7-19
Index
Index
Announcement Manager (ANM) 7-10
Announcements
transmitting 7-3
Audio files 7-15
*.gpp format 7-13, 7-16
*.wav format 7-15
encoded 7-16
Windows wave format 7-14, 7-15
Base Station Manager (BSM) 7-10
Base Station PC 7-5
system requirements 7-7
Base Station Server (BSS) 7-11
Central PC 7-3
system requirements 7-7
Charger Manager (CHM) 7-10
Charger PC 7-5
Computer
hardware versions 7-2
system requirements 7-7
where to place 7-6
Dongle 7-4
Folder structure 7-12
overview 7-12
Folders
contents 7-12
GPInstallations 7-13
installation folder 7-13
sharing 7-12
software folder 7-12
Hardware
enlargement options 7-3
minimum requirements 7-2
system requirements 7-7
Identifier Control (IDC) 7-10
Installation folder
announcements 7-14
cell transmitter files 7-13
wave audio files 7-14
Laptop
system requirements 7-9
License Manager Server (LMS) 7-11
MTS
MTS file (ct*.mts) 7-16
Naming wav files
Event name 7-15
Event number 7-15
Network 7-4
PalmTop 7-5
operating system required 7-8
7-20
Software
additional modules 7-10
basic configuration 7-10
basics 7-1
software modules 7-10
Software folder
bin 7-12
communication folder 7-12
guidePORT 7-12
software files 7-12
sys 7-12
Statistics Manager (STM) 7-10
Statistics Manager Collector (SMC) 7-11
System files
audio files 7-15
cell transmitter files 7-16
cell transmitter identification file (tx*.ini) 7-16
cell transmitter initialization file (ct*.ini) 7-16
MTS file (ct*.mts) 7-16
8 The Installation Manager (INM)
! Typically runs on the Central PC
! Creates and manages
projects
! Collects and structures all audio and configuration data
! Creates system files required by the other software modules
! In conjunction with the BSM software, controls and monitors data
transfer to the SR 3200-2 cell transmitters and the EK 3200 receivers
Note:
When using the EK 3000 receivers, the data must be created and
managed via the ADM and TRM software modules!
Contents of the chapter
General procedure .............................................................................8-2
The INM screen...................................................................................8-3
Starting the INM ................................................................................8-8
Setting up a default project.............................................................8-9
Configuring the project (detailed description) .......................... 8-15
Configuring a location ................................................................... 8-23
Adding locations............................................................................. 8-75
Deleting locations .......................................................................... 8-82
Configuring jobs ............................................................................. 8-83
Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA .................... 8-90
Changing options ........................................................................... 8-93
Monitoring the INM...................................................................... 8-101
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode) ................................... 8-102
The “Dongle Info” dialog box ..................................................... 8-105
Recommendations/Tips .............................................................. 8-106
Index .............................................................................................. 8-107
The software names mentioned in this system manual are registered
trademarks and, as such, are subject to the legal regulations.
8-1
General procedure
General procedure
Creating a new project
When creating a new
project for the first time using the INM
software, please proceed as follows:
! Create a new project (see “Creating a new project” on page 8-15).
! Configure the location with the figure zero:
– First configure the categories (see “Editing categories” on
page 8-33),
– Configure the MTS parameters of the cell transmitters for locations
with variable Events (see “Configuring cell transmitters/MTS” on
page 8-38),
– Edit the Events one after the other (see “Configuring Events” on
page 8-46),
– Check the settings of the location (see “Checking the configuration
of a location” on page 8-73).
! Add further locations if necessary (see “Adding locations” on
page 8-75) and configure and check them.
! Set up jobs for data transmission (see “Configuring jobs” on
page 8-83).
Time required for creating a new project
Most time is needed to edit the Events. The editing time depends on the
number of Events and categories. However, the categories, cell
transmitters and cells can be edited in a few minutes.
Note:
The more detailed and precise the location plan of your exhibition and
the tables of the Events, the faster you can make your entries!
Once you have completed the whole project with the Installation
Manager:
! you transmit the configurations of the identifiers to a PDA,
! you transmit the Storage Events to the receivers via one or more cell
transmitters using a job. In large exhibitions, we recommend that you
execute this job over night.
8-2
The INM screen
The INM screen
The INM screen in
Administrator mode:
The INM screen in
Operator mode:
The INM screen consists of the following elements:
! The title bar providing the usual Windows functions.
.
The title bar displays the name of the current project. You choose the
name yourself when creating the project (see “Creating a new project”
on page 8-15).
! The menu bar with the four menus “File”, “Edit”, “Tools” and “Help”.
! The toolbar with the 6 buttons (see “The 6 buttons on the toolbar” on
page 8-5).
(Some buttons are not active in Operator mode.)
8-3
The INM screen
! The two tabs “Pending” and “Done” with the relevant tables
containing all jobs (see “The two tabs “Pending” and “Done”” on
page 8-5).
! If you right-click a job on one of the two tabs “Pending” or “Done”, the
shortcut menu opens.
In Operator mode, several commands on the shortcut menu are not
active.
! The “Configuration data” box which displays a detailed description of
the jobs in Administrator mode (see “The “Configuration data” box”
on page 8-6).
! The “Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field
which, in Administrator mode, lists all Base Station PCs with the
connected cell transmitters addressed by the selected job.
There are two different displays for the “Cell transmitter parameters
in the locations of the project” field. Jobs for the updating of the data
in several cell transmitters are displayed as in the top illustration; jobs
for data transmission using the streaming method which only address
one single cell transmitter of a Base Station PC are displayed as in the
bottom illustration (see “The “Cell transmitter parameters in the
locations of the project” field” on page 8-6).
! The “Connection Host” field which lists, in Administrator mode, the
status of the Base Station PCs and cell transmitters used by the
selected job during execution of the job (see “The “Connection Host”
field” on page 8-6).
! The status bar with the display of the project folder and the log on
status.
8-4
The INM screen
The 6 buttons on the toolbar
The toolbar contains the following buttons:
Button
Function
Button
Function
Create new configuration
(see page 8-15)
Configure
download jobs
(see page 8-83)
Load configuration (F4)
(see page 8-20)
Options
(see page 8-93)
Save configuration
(see page 8-21)
Help (see
page 8-83)
The two tabs “Pending” and “Done”
The two tabs display all the jobs.
! The “Pending” tab displays all jobs to be executed in the future.
! The “Done” tab displays all jobs already executed.
A table gives you the following information on each of these jobs:
! In the “Job” column:
The name of the job.
! In the “Job description” column:
The download type (either data transmission to the receivers or to the
cell transmitters).
! In the “Status” column:
The status of the job.
– If the job is waiting to be executed, “Idle” is displayed.
– If the job is in the process of being executed, “Running” is displayed.
– If the job has already been executed, “Done” is displayed.
! In the “Target time” column:
Date and time of the execution of the job.
! In the “Last info” column:
– If the job is waiting to be executed, “Idle” is displayed.
– If the job has been executed, “OK” is displayed.
– If the job has not been executed, for example because certain cell
transmitters were not turned on or antennas were not connected,
“Error” is displayed.
8-5
The INM screen
If you right-click a job on one of the two tabs “Pending” or “Done”, the
shortcut menu opens. The commands on the shortcut menu allow you to
change, delete, temporarily stop and repeat jobs etc.
The “Configuration data” box
In Administrator mode, the “Configuration data” box provides a short
description of the job clicked on one of the tabs:
! The “Job name” field displays the name of the job. You specify the
name yourself when setting up the job.
! The “Job indication” field displays the download method. The job
either starts data transmission using the streaming method or for
permanent storing in the cell transmitters.
! The “Frequency” field displays “Once”. The job is executed only once.
! The “Status” field displays the current status of the job (just as on the
tab, see also “The two tabs “Pending” and “Done”” on page 8-5).
! The “Target time” field displays the date and time of the next
execution of the job (just as on the tab, see also “The two tabs
“Pending” and “Done”” on page 8-5).
! The “Last info” field displays “OK” if the job was executed without
errors or “Error” if the job was not executed without errors.
The “Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field
In Administrator mode, the folder tree of the Base Station PCs and cell
transmitters is displayed in the “Cell transmitter parameters in the
locations of the project” field (see “The “Configuration data” box” on
page 8-6). All cell transmitters used by the current job are marked.
Job for data transmission using the Job for updating the data in the cell
streaming method
transmitters
The cell transmitter transmitting
data using the streaming method
is marked in each location.
All cell transmitters whose data is to
be updated are marked.
The “Connection Host” field
In Administrator mode, the status of the Base Station PCs and cell
transmitters addressed by the selected job are listed during execution of
the job (see “The “Configuration data” box” on page 8-6).
! The “BSM PC” column shows the name of the Base Station PC to which
the cell transmitter via which or to which the data is transmitted is
connected.
8-6
The INM screen
! The “Transmitter” column shows the ID number of the cell transmitter
via with or to which the data is transmitted.
If the job transmits the data using the streaming method, only one cell
transmitter per location is included here.
! The “Status” column shows the error status for the cell transmitter.
– If no errors occurred during the execution of the job, “OK” is
displayed here.
– If errors occurred during the execution of the job, the description of
the problem is displayed here.
8-7
Starting the INM
Starting the INM
When you start the Installation Manager, the “Log on window” dialog box
appears. You first have to log on before you can work with the ANM.
To log on as “Operator”:
Click the “Operator” option button.
Click “OK”.
The “Log on” dialog box closes and the INM starts. The last project
opened is loaded automatically provided this option has not been
deactivated (see “Defining the program start settings” on page 8-93).
All you can do with the INM is to:
– save projects (see page 8-21),
– check projects for completeness (see page 8-102),
– close projects (see page 8-21),
– configure jobs (see page 8-83),
– delete jobs (see page 8-89).
To log on as “Administrator”:
Click the “Administrator” option button.
The “Password” field appears.
Type the current password into the “Password” field.
Note:
The password is given on page 7-18. You can change this password as
described under “Changing the password” on page 8-93.
Click “OK”.
The “Log on” dialog box closes and the INM starts. The last project
opened is loaded automatically provided this option has not been
deactivated (see “Defining the program start settings” on page 8-93).
You can now use the INM to:
– create, import, open and delete locations (see “Configuring a
location” on page 8-23),
– create, edit and delete categories, cells, Events and MTS (see “The
“Location configuration” dialog box” on page 8-24),
– create, change and delete jobs in order to carry out data
transmission (see “Configuring jobs” on page 8-83),
– transfer data to the PDA in order to program the identifiers (see
“Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA” on page 8-90),
– change your password (see “Changing the password” on
page 8-93).
Note:
If nothing is entered into the “Password” field within 30 seconds, the
dialog box closes and the INM starts in Operator mode.
8-8
Setting up a default project
Setting up a default project
The following section shortly describes how to set up a simple
project with the following default features:
! You manage all Events of your project in a single location
(location “0”).
! All Events of your project are transmitted via a single cell transmitter
using the streaming method (stationary download).
! You do not work on a network. All
installed on the same computer.
software modules are
! Your project has less than 699 Events.
! Your project has no Live Events.
If the features of your project differ from the default features described
above, please refer to the chapter “Configuring the project (detailed
description)” on page 8-15.
Four steps to a default project
1. Setting up a default project
Make sure that the INM is running in Administrator mode (see
“Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on
page 8-15).
From the “File” menu, choose “New” or press the key combination Ctrl
+ N or click the “Create new configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “New project” dialog box appears.
Click
and enter the project folder and the desired name for the
project file.
In the “Number of categories” field, enter the number of categories
that your project should have.
In the “Number of Events” field, enter the number of Events that your
project should have.
Click “Advanced” and, in the “Country code” box, click the option
button for the region for which you are setting up the project.
8-9
Setting up a default project
In the “Start ID of fixed Events” box, you can enter the limit between
fixed Events of location “0” and variable Events of locations “1” to
“63”.
The start ID of fixed Events is factory preset to “301”.
In the “New project” dialog box, click “OK”.
The “Location configuration” dialog box opens (see “The “Location
configuration” dialog box” on page 8-24 and “Configuring a location”
on page 8-23).
Note:
For detailed information on how to set up projects, see “Configuring
the project (detailed description)” on page 8-15.
2. Configuring the cell
transmitter
Make sure that the cell transmitter is connected to your computer and
turned on and that the
software modules BSM and BSS are
running.
Either:
In the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table, double-click a table cell. Then click the button shown on the left
or press the F4 key.
Under “Search in”, select the “Network environment\...\SYS”
folder and open the Tx000000.ini file of the cell transmitter.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
Note:
You can also create virtual Tx000000.ini files with any desired ID
numbers. This, for example, allows you to simulate a project and learn
about the operation of the software without
hardware.
With such virtual ID numbers, you can also set up a project
independent of a certain location on a laptop to which no cell
transmitters are connected. Later you can replace the virtual cell
transmitters by the ones actually connected.
Please note, however, that your virtual ID numbers must not be
identical to the real ones! You should therefore use virtual ID numbers
which are lower than 100,000 (e.g. 000001, 000002, 000003 etc.).
8-10
Setting up a default project
Or:
In the text field, enter “Tx” and/or only the six-figure ID number which
you noted down.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
An MTS with the specified ID number is then added to the “MTS
parameters in cell transmitter” table.
Note:
For detailed information on how to configure cell transmitters, see
“Configuring cell transmitters/MTS” on page 8-38.
3. Assigning audio information to
Storage Events
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the first category.
There are three ways of assigning audio files to Storage Events:
1. You can assign an audio file to a Storage Event via the selection dialog.
2. You can assign an audio file to a Storage Event via Drag & Drop.
3. You can assign several audio files to several Storage Events at the
same time via Drag & Drop.
The first way of assigning audio files to Storage Events (for detailed
instructions, see “Assigning an audio file to a Storage Event via Drag &
Drop” on page 8-59):
In the Windows Explorer, select the audio file you want to assign to
the Storage Event.
Use Drag & Drop to move an audio file from the Windows Explorer into
the “Events” table, that is, into the row of the Event to which you
want to assign this audio file.
Select the audio quality which the Event is to have.
The path and the file name of the audio file then appear in the field.
Use caution when selecting the audio quality!
The INM can change the number of channels and the sampling rate of
an audio file (resampling), but it cannot be used to improve the sound
quality of an audio file afterwards. For this reason, you should never
change an audio file from a lower to a higher sampling rate or from
mono to stereo because this only causes the memory space
requirements to increase and the sound quality can be impaired as a
result.
The second way of assigning audio files to Storage Events (for detailed
instructions, see “Assigning several audio files to several Storage Events at
the same time via Drag & Drop” on page 8-61):
NOTE
Windows 2000 reports errors when accessing WAV files!
If you select WAV files in the Windows Explorer and move
them to the INM via drag and drop, the following error
message can appear: “The process cannot access the file
because it is beung used by another process”. This means
that the Windows Media Player (or another program
which can play back WAV files) is preventing the INM
from accessing the selected WAV files.
In the Windows Explorer, click “Folder Options” in the
“Tools” menu and then the “File formats” tab. In the
“Web View” group, activate the “Use Classic Windows
Folders” check box. Then click “Apply” and “OK”.
8-11
Setting up a default project
In the Windows Explorer, select several audio files you want to assign
to the Storage Events.
Use Drag & Drop to move these audio files from the Windows Explorer
into the “Events” table, that is, into the row of the first Event.
The “Assign audio files to storage events” dialog box appears.
There are two ways of assigning the different audio files to the Events:
Either use the mouse to drag one audio file after the other from the
right-hand “Audio files” field and drop it onto one of the Events in the
left-hand “Storage events” field.
Or:
In the left-hand “Storage events” field, click the Event to which you
want to assign an audio file.
In the right-hand “Audio files” field, click the audio file which you want
to assign to this Event.
Click the “<” button.
Events to which an audio file has been assigned appear in bold type in
the left-hand “Storage events” field.
Audio files which have been assigned to an Event appear in red in the
right-hand “Audio files” field.
Note:
You can cancel this assignment again by
– using the mouse to drag the audio file from the left-hand “Storage
events” field back to the right-hand “Audio files” field or
– double-clicking the Event In the left-hand “Storage events” field or
– first clicking the Event in the left-hand “Storage events” field and
then “>”.
8-12
Setting up a default project
For every Event in the left-hand “Storage events” field, click the preset
audio quality (“Speech stereo (middle)”).
A menu then opens.
Note:
You can change the default audio quality suggested by the INM as
follows:
Open the “GP_INM.INI” file located in the program folder. In the area
[Configuration]
replace
the
number
X
in
the
“DefaultAudioQualityLevel=X” line by the number of the desired
default audio quality.
No.
Default audio quality
0
Speech mono (low)
1
Speech stereo (low)
2
Music stereo (middle)
3
Music stereo (high)
Save the “GP_INM.INI” file and restart the INM.
On the menu, click the desired audio quality and then click “OK”.
All audio files which you assign to an Event are compressed. The
compressed file is then saved automatically. This process can take a
few seconds depending on the size of the WAV files.
The “Event audio parameter configuration” dialog box is shown for
the duration of compression.
The file path of the WAV file then appears in the “Audio source”
column.
The third way of assigning audio files to Storage Events (for detailed
instructions, see “Assigning an audio file to a Storage Event via the
selection dialog” on page 8-57):
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
first Event.
8-13
Setting up a default project
The “Event audio parameter configuration” dialog box appears.
In the “Input audio file” field, click the
button and select the audio
file which you want to assign to the Storage Event. Then click “Open”.
From the “Quality level” drop down list, select the desired audio
quality.
Click “Convert”.
The audio file is compressed and then saved automatically. This
process can take a few seconds depending on the size of the WAV file.
The file path of the WAV file then appears in the “Audio source”
column.
Repeat for all other Events of this category.
If you have further categories: in the “Category information” tree
structure, click these categories one after the other and assign each
Event an audio file.
In the “Location configuration” dialog box, click “OK”.
Note:
For detailed information on how to configure Events, see “Configuring
Events” on page 8-46.
4. Configuring a job
8-14
In order to transmit the project data to the receivers, configure a job
as described under “Configuring download jobs” on page 8-83.
In the “Update option” box, click “Transmit the entire project”.
In the “Download type” box, click “Stationary receiver data
download”.
After execution of the job, the project is ready for operation.
Configuring the project (detailed description)
Configuring the project (detailed
description)
Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode
To change from Operator mode to Administrator mode:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Administrator”.
The “Administrator logging on” dialog box appears.
Enter the password and click “OK”.
All menus and button on the toolbar are activated.
A tick appears in front of “Administrator” on the “Tools” menu.
Note:
The password is given on page 7-18. You can change this password as
described under “Changing the password” on page 8-93.
To change back to Operator mode:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Administrator”.
The tick in front of “Administrator” on the “Tools” menu disappears.
All menus and buttons on the toolbar for which the operator has no
rights are deactivated.
Working with project files
All features of your categories, Events, MTS and jobs are saved in a project
file (file format *.xml). The administrator creates, opens and saves
projects using the commands on the “File” menu.
Note:
In Operator mode, most commands on the “File” menu are not
available.
Creating a new project
To create a new project, you have to specify the project folder and the
name of the project. All settings of your project are collected in a project
file (file format *.xml) and saved in the project folder. If you have
followed our recommendations, you have already created the project
folder.
8-15
Configuring the project (detailed description)
To specify the name and the path of the project file:
Make sure that the INM is running in Administrator mode (see
“Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on
page 8-15).
From the “File” menu, choose “New” or press the key combination Ctrl
+ N or click the “Create new configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “New project” dialog box appears.
Click the button.
The file selection box opens.
Select the project folder and enter the desired name for the project file
in the “File name” field.
You can now make additional entries as follows in order to speed up later
configuration of the Events.
8-16
If you have already fixed the total number of categories in your
project, enter the number in the “Number of categories”
field.
Your project will then be preconfigured with this number of categories.
You can add or delete categories later whenever you want (see
“Adding locations” on page 8-75 and “Deleting locations” on
page 8-82).
If you have already fixed the total number of Events in location “0”,
enter this number in the “Number of Events” field. The number of
Events in other locations (locations with variable Events) must not be
counted in.
Your project will then be preconfigured with this number of Events.
You can add or delete Events later whenever you want (see “Adding a
new Event” on page 8-46 and “Deleting an Event” on page 8-46).
Configuring the project (detailed description)
Entering the country code
Click “Advanced”.
The dialog box is expanded.
If you are setting up a project for the USA, click the “USA” option
button in the “Country code ” box. If you are setting up a project for
another country, click the “Others” option button.
Note:
In the USA, the maximum transmitting power allowed is 1 mW; up to
10 mW are allowed in other countries. These facts are taken into
account automatically in the later configuration of your cell transmitters and antennas.
Specifying the default settings
for the identifiers
You can specify the default settings for the identifiers in the “Default
settings for identifier transmitters” box. The software initially uses the
default settings for all identifiers, so you don't need to keep on entering
common settings for each identifier. You can adapt each identifier
individually (see “Setting up the identifiers” on page 8-67) and change
the standard configuration of the identifiers later (see “Changing the
identifier default settings” on page 8-71).
In the “Start” and “Stop” columns, select the start and the end of the
daily operating time of the identifiers as described under “Start /
Stop” on page 8-68.
8-17
Configuring the project (detailed description)
Setting the start ID number
of the fixed Events
In the “Power” column, select the range of the identifier signals as
described under “Power” on page 8-68.
In the “Cycle” column, select the clock period of the identifier signals
as described under “Cycle” on page 8-69.
In the “Antenna” column, select the identifier antenna type as
described under “Antenna” on page 8-69.
In the “Trigger” column, select the type of triggering as described
under “Trigger” on page 8-69.
In the “Voltage” column, select the power supply of the identifiers as
described under “Voltage” on page 8-70.
All Events in your
project are assigned an ID number.
! The Events of the locations with variable Events are assigned ID
numbers upwards of 100 up to the number before the start ID number
of the fixed Events.
! The Events of location “0” are assigned ID numbers going from the
start ID number of the fixed Events up to a maximum of 999.
Examples
– Set the start ID number of the fixed Events to 301.
– Let the number of Events of location “0” (fixed Events) be 250.
This results in Event numbers from 301 to 550.
– Let the number of Events of location “1” (variable Events) be 30.
This results in Event numbers from 100 to 129.
– Let the number of Events of location 2 (variable Events) be 75.
This results in Event numbers from 100 to 174.
8-18
In the “Start ID of fixed Events” box, enter the start ID number of the
fixed Events.
The start ID number of the fixed Events can be between 101 and 999.
Select the start ID number of the fixed Events so that sufficient Event
numbers for the Events of location “0” and the Events of the locations
with variable Events are available!
Configuring the project (detailed description)
Setting the default Event type
In the “Event type (default)” box, set the default Event type.
Preselect the Event type most frequently planned in your project
(usually Storage Events).
Type of Event
Characteristics
Entrance
… Cell download:
Event without sound. Serves to purposefully
trigger data transmission at the entrance to
the cell. This is only recommended for
locations with variable Events.
… Guided Tour:
Event without sound. Serves to purposefully
switch receivers to the RF channel of a
portable transmitter.
Live
Includes sound reproduced in sync with a
video as soon as the receiver enters the
magnetic field of the identifier.
Storage
Includes sound started individually for each
receiver as soon as the latter enters the
magnetic field of the identifier.
... on ID-range
Is reproduced for as long as the receiver is
within the magnetic field of the identifier.
... one-off
Is not repeated if the receiver enters the
magnetic field of the same identifier for the
second time during the same tour.
... priority
Is reproduced completely to the end and
ignores all identifier signals.
All newly set up Events are temporarily set up as Events of the default
Event type selected here. You can change the selected default event
type at any time (see “Changing the Event features” on page 8-49).
To use the settings for creating the new project:
Click “OK”.
The file path of the project file appears on the status bar. The file
name of the project file appears on the title bar of the main window.
Location “0” appears in the “Cell transmitter parameters in the
locations of the projects” field. The “Location configuration” dialog
box opens (see “Configuring a location” on page 8-23).
The “Location configuration” dialog box allows you to:
! edit categories (see page 8-33),
! configure cell transmitters (see page 8-38),
! create cells (see page 8-43),
! configure Events (see page 8-46).
8-19
Configuring the project (detailed description)
The main window allows you to:
! add locations (see page 8-75 and page 8-78),
! delete locations (see page 8-82),
! set up download jobs for transmitting data to the receivers (see
page 8-83),
! transfer data to the PDA in order to program the identifiers (see
page 8-90).
Caution!
The project file is not saved until you save it manually (see “Saving a
project” on page 8-21) or execute a job. If you exit the program
without saving the project beforehand, all settings you entered are
lost!
Opening a project
When you start the INM, the last project edited is loaded automatically.
The file path of the project file appears on the status bar. The name of the
project appears on the title bar of the main window.
To manually open a previously saved project:
Make sure that the INM is running in Administrator mode (see
“Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on
page 8-15).
From the “File” menu, choose “Open” or click the “Load configuration”
button ( ) on the toolbar or press the key combination Ctrl + O.
The file selection box opens.
Select the desired file and click “Open”.
The file path of the project file appears on the status bar. The name of
the project appears on the title bar of the main window.
The “Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the projects” field
shows all locations in the project in a tree structure complete with the
names of the corresponding Base Station PCs and the connected cell
transmitters. The download jobs already set up are displayed on the
“Pending” tab.
Alternatively, you can choose “Recently opened project files” from the
“File” menu. The list of the last projects opened then appears. Click the
desired project on this list.
The main window allows you to:
! add locations (see page 8-75),
! delete locations (see page 8-82),
! configure download jobs for transmitting the data to the receivers
(see page 8-83),
! transfer data to the PDA in order to program the identifiers (see
page 8-90).
8-20
Configuring the project (detailed description)
Saving a project
The project is always saved automatically when a job using the streaming
method is started.
To manually save the project:
From the “File” menu, choose “Save” or press the key combination Ctrl
+ S or click the “Save configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The project is saved.
To save the project under a different name (as a backup etc.):
Make sure that the INM is running in Administrator mode (see
“Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on
page 8-15).
From the “File” menu, choose “Save as”.
The file selection box opens.
Enter the file path and name and click “Save”.
The project is saved. The file path of the project file appears on the
status bar. The name of the project appears on the title bar of the
main window.
Closing a project
To close the project
From the “File” menu, choose “Close”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens – provided that you changed the
project but did not save it.
To save the changes made:
Click “Yes”.
To discard the changes made:
Click “No”.
All changes made are lost.
Exiting the program
To exit the INM:
From the “File” menu, choose “Exit”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens – provided that you changed the
project but did not save it.
8-21
Configuring the project (detailed description)
To save the changes made:
Click “Yes”.
All changes made are saved and the program is exited.
To discard the changes made:
8-22
Click “No”.
The program is exited and all changes made are lost.
Configuring a location
Configuring a location
In order to work effectively with locations, you must have basic
knowledge of the cell transmitters and antennas (see “Basics of the
Components” on page 4-1) and have the plans and tables of your
exhibition. It is also necessary to have basic knowledge of Windows and
computer networks.
All features of a location are edited in the “Location configuration” dialog
box. To open this dialog box:
Double-click the desired location in the “Cell transmitter parameters in
the locations of the project” field of the main window.
Or:
In the main window, use the tab key to navigate to the “Cell
transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field. Then use
the arrow keys to select a location and press the ENTER key.
Or:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Open location” and then click the
desired location.
Note:
When a location configuration is opened, the INM checks the file path
of the location folder. If this file path does not correct, for example
because you moved the project to another computer or drive or
renamed folders, the following warning appears:
Click “OK”. A dialog box opens and you can reassign the location folder
as described under “Adding a new location” on page 8-75.
You can also start the reassignment of a location folder by rightclicking the tree node of the desired location in the “Cell transmitter
parameters in the locations of the project” field in the main window
and then clicking “Reassign location path” in the shortcut menu.
8-23
Configuring a location
The “Location configuration” dialog box
The “Location configuration” dialog box consists of:
! the “Category information” tree structure,
! the “Events” table,
! the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table,
! the “Help”, “Print location data in HTML format”, “Check settings for
completeness”, “OK” and “Cancel” buttons.
The “Print location data in HTML format”, “Check settings for
completeness”, “OK” and “Cancel” buttons
If you click the adjacent “Print location data in HTML format” button, you
can print the following configuration data of a location as an HTML
document:
! MTS data
! Event settings
! Identifier settings
If you click the adjacent “Check settings for completeness” button, a
check is made as to whether the current location is completely configured
or not (see also “Checking the configuration of a location” on page 8-73).
You entries in the “Location configuration” dialog box are not used in the
project until you click the “OK” button (see also “Accepting/discarding
the configuration of a location” on page 8-74).
If you click the “Cancel” button or the
button for closing the “Location
configuration” dialog box, all changes made are discarded and the
configuration present before opening the location is restored.
8-24
Configuring a location
Category information
The “Category information” area shows the features of the categories in
the active cell as a tree structure. If you click one of the “Category” nodes
or a subnode of it, the settings of the corresponding category are
displayed or highlighted in the “MTS parameters of the cell transmitters”
and “Events” tables.
You can open or close this tree structure as in the Windows Explorer by
clicking the nodes (plus or minus sign) or by double-clicking the desired
line.
! “Category”:
The number of the category. This number cannot be changed.
! “Status”:
The source of the audio information in the category.
– “Rerouted” means:
The category does not have any audio information of its own for the
Storage Events and the Intro. The audio information of another
category is reproduced instead (redirection).
– “Rerouting target” means:
The category has audio information of its own for the Storage Events
and the Intro. This audio information is also reproduced in at least
one other category (redirection).
– “?” means:
The category has audio information of its own for the Storage Events
and the Intro. This audio information is not reproduced in any other
category.
For how to set up redirections, see “Redirecting the audio information of
all Storage Events from one category to another category” on page 8-33
and “Linking the audio information of an Event from one category to
another category” on page 8-66.
! “Name”:
The name of the category. For how to enter or change the name, see
“Assigning/changing category names” on page 8-33.
! “Rerouted to category”:
The redirection of the Storage Events and the Intro of the category.
– A number means:
The number of the reference category whose audio information is
reproduced in this category.
– “?” means:
Special audio information for the Storage Events and the Intro are
reproduced in this category.
! “Intro”:
If you have set up an Intro for the current cell and category, the path
and the name of the audio file of the Intro are displayed, and “?” in all
other cases.
You can reproduce the Intro by clicking
.
For how to set up Intros, see “Setting up an Intro” on page 8-35.
Note:
Intros cannot be set up for location “0”.
! “Nominal volume [Mbytes]”:
Total size of the category data in Mbytes.
8-25
Configuring a location
Note:
The category data must fit into the internal memory of the receivers.
The type plate on the back of the receivers shows how large the
internal memory of the receiver is. If it does not, the receiver has a
memory of 256 MBytes. The following table shows how much playing
time the memory allows as a function of the audio quality used.
Memory
256 MBytes
512 MBytes
All Storage Events stored in the memory
Quality
Channels
Sampling rate
Playing time
Speech
mono
16 kHz
approx. 10 hours
Speech
stereo
16 kHz
approx. 9 hours
Music
stereo
32 kHz
approx. 5 hours
Music
stereo
48 kHz
approx. 3 hours
Speech
mono
16 kHz
approx. 20 hours
Speech
stereo
16 kHz
approx. 18 hours
Music
stereo
32 kHz
approx. 10 hours
Music
stereo
48 kHz
approx. 6 hours
! “Ready to transmit?”:
If the configuration of the category is complete and ready to be
transmitted via stationary download, the remark “Yes” appears.
For how to check the configuration for completeness, see “Checking
the configuration of a location” on page 8-73.
You can present the information in your exhibition in visitor-specific
versions, so-called “categories”. Via the “Category information” tree
structure, you can edit these categories.
Example 1
Your exhibition is often visited by adults and children and you want to
offer each of these groups a category of its own. You also want to
provide more background information if someone visits your
exhibition a second time and is thus already familiar with the subject.
You could thus create three categories: “Children”, “Adults” and
“Experts”.
Example 2
You have a high proportion of international visitors. For this reason,
you offer different languages, for example resulting in the following
categories: “English”, “German”, “Japanese”, etc.
Which category a visitor listens to on his tour depends on three factors:
! At the counter, the visitor is given a 4-key or 5-key receiver with the
preset category he desires.
This preset category cannot be changed by the visitor.
! At the counter, the visitor is given a 16-key receiver.
With this receiver, the visitor can select another category any time
If you have newly created a category, it is displayed in the “Category
Information” tree structure as shown on the left.
Note:
The row “Intro” is not available in location “0” as you cannot configure
Intros in this location.
8-26
Configuring a location
Edit these categories by clicking the hyperlinks one after the other.
MTS parameters of the cell transmitters
The “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table shows the features of the
cell transmitters/MTS via which the audio information is transmitted.
! The “MTS ID” column shows the identification numbers (ID numbers)
of the cell transmitters. These ID numbers are stored permanently in
the unit. As soon as a cell transmitter is connected to a Base Station PC
and both the cell transmitter and Base Station PC are turned on, these
ID numbers are automatically read by the BSM software and are
stored as files (format: “Tx000000.ini”) in the “SYS” folder of the Base
Station PC.
A cell transmitter transmits two MTS (MTS *: Multiplexed Transport
Stream) and each MTS is transmitted by one antenna (antenna “0”
and antenna “1”). The cell transmitter ID number can thus appear
twice in this list: once with “0” and once with “1” as additional index.
For how to add cell transmitters/MTS to a cell, see “Adding or
replacing cell transmitters/MTS” on page 8-38.
Note:
In location “0”, the audio information of all Storage Events is
automatically transmitted via one joint MTS by the streaming method.
The receivers download this audio information and store it
permanently. For this reason it is sufficient to configure one single
MTS for this purpose in location “0”.
In locations with variable Events, you have to assign each Storage
Event to an MTS. As it is not permitted to assign the audio information
of Storage Events from different categories to the same MTS and as
the capacity of an MTS is limited, you will usually need several MTS in
locations with variable Events.
! The “Host” column shows the name of the Base station PC to which
the cell transmitter is connected.
The “Host” column cannot be edited.
! Each cell transmitter has four audio inputs via which Live Events
sources can be connected. The “Audio input” column shows if sound
reproduction units are connected to these audio inputs. Audio inputs
to which no sound reproduction unit is connected are shown in white,
audio inputs to which a sound reproduction unit is connected are
shown in black.
For how to assign an MTS to a Live Event, see “Live Event” in the
chapter “Assigning an audio source to an Event” on page 8-57.
*
The term MTS is used for the antenna of a cell transmitter or for the data
stream transmitted via this antenna.
8-27
Configuring a location
! The “Charge” column shows the internal cell transmitter memory (as a
bar graph and in percent) available for the MTS.
The “Charge” column cannot be edited.
Note:
The capacity utilization of the MTS which, in location “0”, transmits
the Storage Events to the receivers by the streaming method is always
0%. Live Events permanently utilize the capacity of the MTS.
! The automatic reloading process allows you to distribute the audio
information of a category on up to 4 MTS. In the “Loader” column, MTS
transmitted via the automatic reloading process are assigned
numbers from “0” to “3”.
The “Loader” column can be edited via the “Change loader value to”
command on the tables’s shortcut menu (see “Changing the loader
value of an MTS” on page 8-40).
! The “Storage | Live” column shows the category numbers of the
categories whose audio information is transmitted via this MTS. On
the left is the category number of the category whose Storage Events
are transmitted via this MTS; on the right are the category numbers of
the categories whose Live Events are transmitted via this MTS.
Example
MTS does not transmit reproducible audio information
MTS only transmits audio information of Live Events of Category 2
MTS only transmits audio information of Live Events of Categories 1 and 2
MTS only transmits audio information of Storage Events of Category 1
MTS transmits audio information of Storage Events of Category 1 and
Live Events of Category 2
All MTS which transmit audio information of the selected category are
highlighted. In the above example, category 2 is selected.
The “Storage | Live” column cannot be edited.
! The “Site” column shows the site of the cell transmitter.
For how to enter the site of a cell transmitter, see “Entering or
changing the site of the cell transmitter” on page 8-41.
! The “RF channel” column shows the RF channel on which the MTS is
transmitted.
For how to select the RF channel, see “Selecting the RF channel” on
page 8-41.
! The “RF power” column shows the transmitting power of the antenna.
The transmitting power determines the range of the MTS signal.
For how to enter the transmitting power and the range, see “Setting
the transmitting power” on page 8-42.
! The “RF output” column shows whether the transmitting antenna is
turned on or off via the software.
For how to turn the transmitting antenna on or off via the software,
see “Turning the RF output on and off” on page 8-42.
! The “RF ant. Type” column shows the antenna type which transmits
the MTS: active antenna (INT) or directional antenna (EXT).
For how to select the antenna type, see “Selecting the antenna type”
on page 8-43.
8-28
Configuring a location
! The “Ant. site” column shows the site of the connected antenna.
For how to enter the site of the antenna, see “Entering or changing the
site of the antenna” on page 8-43.
The “Events” table
The “Events” table displays the features of all Events.
! The “Name” column contains the names of the Events.
The INM automatically assigns names to the Events. A name consists
of the word “Event” and the Event number (see next section) (e.g.
“Event301).
For how to change this name, see “Renaming an Event” on page 8-48.
! The INM automatically assigns sequential numbers to the Events.
These numbers are displayed in the “Number” column.
You specify the first Event number (start ID number of the fixed
Events) in location “0” when creating the project (see “Creating a new
project” on page 8-15); in all other locations, the Event numbers
always start with “100”.
The Event number of an Events cannot be changed.
! The “Type” column shows the type of Event.
For an overview of the different types of Events, see page 19-1. For
how to determine the type of Event, see “Changing the Event
features” on page 8-49.
! The “Audio source” column shows:
– for Storage Events:
file path and name of the Storage Event file
– for Live Events:
the assignment of the audio inputs of the cell transmitter
– for Entrance Events “Guided Tour”:
the number of the RF channel of the portable transmitter
– for Entrance Events “Cell Download”:
the column is empty
For how to assign an audio source to an Event, see “Assigning an audio
source to an Event” on page 8-57.
! The “CT-ID/MTS” column shows:
– for Storage Events:
the MTS used to transmit the audio information of the Live Event –
but only in locations with variable Events; in location “0”, this
column stays empty and cannot be edited if the Event in question is
a Storage Event.
8-29
Configuring a location
– for Live-Events:
the MTS used to transmit the audio information of the Live Event
– for Entrance Events:
the column is empty
For how to assign an MTS to an Event, see “Assigning an MTS for a
category to an Event” on page 8-65.
! The “Rerouted” column shows:
– “Yes”,
if the audio information for an Event is redirected from another
category.
– “No”,
if the audio information for an Event is not redirected from another
category.
For how to set up redirections, see “Redirecting the audio information
of all Storage Events from one category to another category” on
page 8-33 and “Linking the audio information of an Event from one
category to another category” on page 8-66.
! The “Related to” column displays the Event numbers of the Events with
which the current Event is linked:
– If you have set up a B if A Event (see page 6-30), the Event numbers
of the two Events “A” and “B” are displayed (for general information
on B if A Events, see page 6-31; for how to set up B if A Events, see
page 8-51).
– If you have set up an Event with lead in, the Event number of the
Event which is first played back as an introductory information (lead
in) is displayed (for general information on Events with lead in, see
page 6-32; ufor how to set up Events with lead in, see page 8-54).
! If you have assigned a Detail Event to a Storage Event, the Event
number of the assigned Detail Event is displayed (for general
information on Detail Events, see page 6-32; for how to set up Detail
Events, see page 8-51).
! The “Identifiers” column shows the number of identifiers which
trigger the reproduction of the Event. When you click this column, an
embedded table opens and shows all identifiers currently configured
for the Event and the identifier parameters.
For how to assign identifiers to an Event, see “Setting up the
identifiers” on page 8-67.
! The “Inactive” column allows you to deactivate Events. Deactivated
Events cannot be heard in the corresponding category.
For how to deactivate an Event in a category, see page 8-46.
! The “Event Info” column shows:
– for Storage Events:
the playing time in seconds,
– for redirected Live Events:
the number of the category into which the Event is redirected,
– for Events with detail:
the Event number of the assigned Detail Event,
– for B if A Events:
the Event numbers of the two Events “A” and “B” (see page 6-31),
– for Events with lead in:
the Event number of the Event which is first played back as an
introductory information (lead in).
8-30
Configuring a location
In location “0” only:
The “Location” column displays the location “1” to “63”, in which the
Event is played back although it has been set up in location “0”.
Storage Events of locations “1” to “63” which are not updated or replaced
regularly und still fit into the memory of the fixed Events in location “0”
can be set up in location “0”. This is for example fixed information on the
exhibition venue. In this way, these Events are transmitted once to the
receivers via stationary download and do not need to be transmitted
permanently via mobile download. In order that the STM software can
assign the statistical data to the correct locations and thus evaluate them
correctly, you have to assign the correct locations to the Events (see
“Assigning the correct location to an Event” on page 8-72).
Since all categories describe the same exhibit, each Event exists in all
categories with the same name and number. Only the corresponding cell
transmitters (“CT-ID/MTS” column) and audio files (“Audio source”
column) differ from category to category.
Changing the sorting of the table cells
You can display the table rows in the “Events” table sorted according to
the “Name”, “Number”, “Type”, “Audio source” or “CT-ID/MTS” columns.
To change the sorting of the table rows:
Click the header of the desired column.
The table is sorted according to this column. If you click the same
header again, the sorting changes from ascending to descending.
Editing tables
How are table cells edited?
The table cells in the two tables “Events” and “MTS parameters of the cell
transmitters” are edited as follows:
Double-click the table cell you want to edit
or navigate to the table cell you want to edit using the arrow keys and
press the ENTER key.
If the table cell allows a direct text input (“Name”, “Site”, “Ant. site”
columns), a text field opens.
If the table cell requires the selection of a file (“Audio source”, “CT-ID/
MTS” columns), a button appears which you can click in order to open
the file selection box. Alternatively, you can press the F4 key.
If the table cell requires prespecified values (“Type”, “CT-ID/MTS”,
“Detail information”, “RF channel”, “RF power” columns), either a drop
down arrow allowing you to open a drop down list or a pair of arrows
allowing you to increase or decrease the value appears.
If the table cell requires extensive inputs (“Identifiers” column), an
embedded table opens.
If the table cell contains option buttons or check boxes:
8-31
Configuring a location
Click the desired option button or check box or press the space bar.
The option is changed immediately.
Adding new table rows
You can expand the table by adding new rows.
Right-click the table.
One of the following shortcut menus opens.
Select “Define new event” or “Add new cell transmitter MTS” from the
shortcut menu.
A new row is added to the bottom of the table.
Changing the width of a table column
The width of the table columns is automatically adapted to the contents.
To change the width of a table column manually:
In the table header, click the line separating two columns and move it
to the right or left while keeping the mouse button pressed.
If table rows cannot be edited ...
The following table rows cannot be edited. They are only for your
Information:
! In the “Events” table:
The columns “Number”, “Rerouted” and “Info”.
! In the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table:
The columns “Host”, “Audio input”, “Charge”, “Loader” and “Storage |
Live”.
Certain rules apply for all other table cells. If you cannot edit one of these
table cells, the “Warning” dialog box, which appears after a double-click,
gives the reason.
In order to avoid this:
8-32
Edit the table cells in the order described in this manual.
Configuring a location
Example:
In order to edit the table cells in the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the
“Events” table, you must first define at least one MTS in the “MTS
parameter of the cell transmitter” table.
If a dialog box containing an error message appears:
Close the dialog box.
Cancel the entries fixing the current settings.
Examples:
In order to edit the table cells in the “Type” or “Audio source” columns
of the “Events” table, you must first select “None” in the “CT-ID/MTS”
column. In order to edit an Event, you have to cancel an existing
category redirection or deactivation of this Event.
Editing categories
Assigning/changing category names
To assign the category a name:
Click the hyperlink behind “Name=”.
The field for entering the name appears.
Enter the desired name.
To take over the name:
Press the ENTER key or click outside the field for entering the name.
To close the field for entering the name without changing the name:
Press the ESC key.
To change the name of a category:
Click the name.
The field for changing the name appears.
Enter the new name and press the ENTER key.
Redirecting the audio information of all Storage Events from one
category to another category
You can redirect the audio information of all Storage Events of one cell
from one category (source category) to another category (target
category). The target category then has no audio information of its own
for Storage Events, but reproduces instead the audio information of the
source category.
It is not possible to redirect an individual Storage Event. Redirection
always concerns all Storage Events including the Intro of a cell and
category. You can, however, redirect the audio information of an
individual Live Event or Entrance Event “Guide Tour” as described on
page 8-66.
Redirection is advisable if you are planning a new category but the
translations for the Storage Events are still missing. Then you can
temporarily redirect audio information from another category.
To redirect all Storage Events of a cell, proceed as follows:
8-33
Configuring a location
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the target category
to which you want to redirect the audio information of the source
category.
Only if you are editing a location with variable Events (with a number
higher than zero):
Click the cell (see page 8-43) to which you want to redirect the audio
information of the source category.
Click the hyperlink behind “Rerouted to category=”.
The selection box with the category numbers appears.
Click the category number of the source category from which you want
to redirect the audio information.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
Click “OK”.
The selected category number appears behind “Rerouted to
category=”. “Rerouting target” appears on the “Status” line of the
target category. In the “Events” table, the Storage Events
automatically use the configurations of the selected source category.
The “Rerouted” column shows “Yes” for all Storage Events.
Adding categories
To add a new category:
Make sure that you edit location “0”.
All locations must have the same number of categories. Adding and
deleting categories is only possible in location “0” and these changes
are automatically adopted by all other locations.
Right-click the “Category information” tree structure.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Add new category” from the shortcut menu.
The new category appears at the bottom of the “Category
Information” tree structure. The new category is automatically
assigned the next sequential category number and a name. The name
consists of the word “Category” and the number of the category (e.g.
“Category6”).
Removing categories
Note:
If you remove a category, it is irrevocably removed from all locations
of your project!
You can only remove the category with the highest category number.
Your project must have at least one category.
Example:
If your project has 5 categories, you can only remove the category
with the number 5. Then you can only delete the category with the
number 4 etc.
To remove the last category:
8-34
Make sure that you edit location “0”.
All locations must have the same number of categories. Adding and
deleting categories is only possible in location “0” and these changes
are automatically adopted by all other locations.
Configuring a location
Right-click the “Category information” tree structure.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Remove last category” from the shortcut menu.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
To remove the last category:
Click “Yes”.
The category is removed from all locations of the project.
Note:
If you remove the category, its data is first only removed from the
RAM. The data is still present in the project file on the hard disk. In
order to finally remove the data from the project file on the hard disk,
you have to save the project (for example when you exit the
program).
Setting up an Intro
Note:
You cannot set up Intros in location “0”.
An Intro is a short text, a piece of music, a few words of welcome or some
information the visitors can listen to while the Storage Events are being
downloaded.
In all locations with variable Events, you can set up a special Intro for each
category for each cell. The Intro is downloaded from the antenna with the
Storage Events. Depending on the capacity utilization of the MTS, this can
take several minutes. If reception conditions are good, however, the Intro
is reproduced after a few seconds while the rest of the data is still being
downloaded. The Storage Events are only reproduced if the receiver
enters the magnetic field of an identifier.
To set up an Intro:
Click the first hyperlink behind “Intro”.
The file selection box opens.
In the file selection box, select the desired folder and select the WAV
file which visitors are to hear as an Intro. This file must comply with
the following specification:
– Sampling rate:
16 kHz
– Resolution:
16 bit
– Format:
mono
– Max. playing time: 36 s
The relative file path appears behind “Intro”. A compressed copy of
the WAV file is created automatically.
8-35
Configuring a location
Note:
If you assign a WAV file to the Intro and the WAV file has not been
saved in a subfolder of the project folder, the INM automatically makes
a copy of the WAV file. This copy is saved in a subfolder of the “WAV
Audio” folder. The subfolder is automatically given the name which
consists of the word “Category” and the category number (e.g.
“Category3”).
Click the second hyperlink behind “Intro”.
The selection dialog box containing the available MTS appears.
Click the available MTS via which the audio information of the Intro is
to be transmitted.
The only MTS displayed is the one with the loader value “0”.
The MTS appears behind “Intro”. The Intro is now set up.
You can reproduce the Intro by clicking the button with the green arrow.
The Intro is then reproduced via the sound card of your computer and the
connected loudspeakers or headphones.
Note:
There must be enough memory space for the Intro in the selected MTS.
It can be that an Intro is integrated into the MTS several times and
thus requires more memory space than a Storage Event of the same
length.
If the available MTS does not have enough memory space, you can
assign the loader value “0” to another MTS with more memory space
(see “Changing the loader value of an MTS” on page 8-40).
Please also note that one MTS serves one category only. It is not
possible to mix the audio information of Storage Events and Intros
from different categories in one MTS!
Removing/changing an Intro
To remove or change the assignment of the audio file of the Intro:
8-36
Make sure that the category has audio information of its own for the
Events and no audio information is redirected or change the Intro in
the category with the status “Rerouting target”.
Make sure that the correct cell is selected.
Click the MTS assigned to the Intro.
The selection dialog box containing the available MTS appears.
Click “None”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
Click “OK”.
The assignment of the MTS to the Intro is removed. The “Category
Information” tree structure shows “?” instead of the MTS.
Configuring a location
Right-click the file path of the Intro’s audio file.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Reset intro file”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
Click “Yes”.
The link to the audio file is removed. The “Category Information” tree
structure shows “?” instead of the file path of the Intro’s audio file.
You can now assign a different audio file as described under “Setting
up an Intro” on page 8-35.
8-37
Configuring a location
Configuring cell transmitters/MTS
You configure the MTS of your project in the “MTS parameters in the cell
transmitter” table.
Adding or replacing cell transmitters/MTS
Working on a network
If you work on a network to which the Base Station PCs with the cell
transmitters are connected, the cell transmitters are automatically
detected by the Base Station Manager (BSM) software and the
corresponding Tx000000.ini files are automatically created in the “SYS”
folder of the Base Station PCs.
To be able to address these cell transmitters from the Central PC:
Click the cell to which you want to assign the MTS.
In the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table, double-click a table
cell in the “CT-ID/MTS” column.
A text field and the button for opening the file selection box appear.
Click the button for opening the file selection box.
Under “Search in”, select the “Network environment\...\Base Station
PC\SYS” folder and open the Tx000000.ini file of the cell transmitter.
The cell transmitter ID number appears in the “CT-ID/MTS” column.
Confirm your entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
Note:
Each Tx000000.ini file can be added twice to the table. “0” is
automatically assigned to the MTS the first time it is entered and “1”
the second time.
Working without a network
If you do not work on a network and address the cell transmitters e.g. via
a laptop, you must start the Base Station Manager (BSM) software and
successively connect all (new) cell transmitters to your laptop. The BSM
software automatically detects the cell transmitters and the Tx000000.ini
files are read. If you have a very large number of cell transmitters
installed in different rooms, you can simplify this procedure as follows:
Note down the six-figure IDs of all cell transmitters (to display the ID
on the display of the cell transmitters see “Structure of the cell
transmitter’s menu” on page 5-15 and following). Please note that
the twin cell transmitter consists of two complete transmitters with
separate ID numbers.
For each ID number, also note down the site of the cell transmitter and
the type of antennas connected.
In the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table, double-click a table row.
A text field and the button for opening the file selection box appear.
Either:
8-38
Click the button for opening the file selection box.
Under “Search in”, select the “Network environment\...\SYS” folder
and open the Tx000000.ini file of the cell transmitter.
Configuring a location
Or:
In the text field, enter “Tx” and/or only the six-figure ID number which
you noted down.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
An MTS with the specified ID number is then added to the “MTS
parameters in cell transmitter” table.
Note:
You can also create virtual Tx000000.ini files with any desired ID
numbers. This, for example, allows you to simulate a project and learn
about the operation of the software without
hardware.
With such virtual ID numbers, you can also set up a project
independent of a certain location on a laptop to which no cell
transmitters are connected. Later you can replace the virtual cell
transmitters by the ones actually connected
Please note, however, that your virtual ID numbers must not be
identical to the real ones! You should therefore use virtual ID numbers
which are lower than 100,000 (e.g. 000001, 000002, 000003 etc.).
Reassigning MTS
The INM can no longer address the cell transmitters if you:
! move your
Windows Explorer,
project to a different computer using the
! change the network name of a computer on which one of the software
modules INM or BSM is installed.
To reestablish the connection to the cell transmitters:
In the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table, right-click the corresponding table cell.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Reassign cell transmitter host” from the shortcut menu.
The “Reassign cell transmitter host” dialog box opens:
8-39
Configuring a location
If all cell transmitters listed in the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table are connected to the computer on which the INM is installed:
Click the “Local host for all” option button and then click “OK”.
If the cell transmitters are connected to other computers:
Click the “Individual reassignment” option button.
In the “Host (new)” column, double-click the cell transmitter/MTS you
want to reassign.
The button for opening the folder selection box appears.
Click the button for opening the folder selection box or press the F4
key.
The folder selection box opens.
Via “Network environment”, select any folder on the computer to
which the cell transmitters are connected.
Click “OK”.
The “Host” column is updated. The cell transmittes can again be
addressed by jobs via the INM.
Removing an MTS
MTS no longer required can be removed from the “MTS parameters in cell
transmitter” table.
Note:
Each cell transmitter ID can be listed twice in the “MTS parameters in
cell transmitter” table – once with MTS “0” and once with MTS “1”.
MTS “1” can be removed any time. MTS “0” can only be removed if
MTS “1” is no longer available. Thus, to remove MTS “0”, it could be
necessary to first remove MTS “1”.
To remove an MTS:
In the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table, right-click the MTS
you want to remove.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Remove” from the shortcut menu.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
To remove the MTS:
Click “OK”.
The MTS is removed. All assignments to this MTS are also removed.
Changing the loader value of an MTS
In locations “1” to “63”, the memory capacity of an MTS is limited to
approx. 10 min. If you want to transmit more audio information, you have
to configure more than one MTS. The INM software assigns a loader value
to all configured MTS automatically and at random. This loader value can
be between “0” and “3”. These MTS with consecutive loader values are
8-40
Configuring a location
automatically transmitted to the receivers together during mobile
download (automatic reloading method). Live Events and an Intro can
only be assigned to the MTS with the loader value “0”. When you
configure your location, it can happen that the MTS with the loader value
“0” no longer has enough memory capacity in order to assign an Intro
and/or Live Events to it. In order to nevertheless be able to transmit an
Intro and/or Live Events, you have to assign the loader value “0” to an
MTS with sufficient memory capacity (preferably the one with the lowest
degree of utilization) as follows:
In the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table, right-click the MTS
to which you want to assign the loader value “0”.
The shortcut menu open.
Select “Change loader value to” from the shortcut menu.
The selection box with the possible loader values appears.
Click the loader value “0”.
The selected MTS is automatically assigned the loader value “0”. The
other MTS are assigned loader values automatically and at random.
According to the number of MTS configured, these go from “1” to “3”.
Entering or changing the site of the cell transmitter
You can enter the site for each cell transmitter. This allows you to find the
cell transmitter quickly and easily when you need it.
In the “Site” column of the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table,
double-click the desired MTS.
The text is highlighted.
Enter the description of the cell transmitter site.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The site appears in the table cell. If you have specified the site of the
cell transmitter for the first MTS, it is automatically adopted by the
second MTS.
Selecting the RF channel
The correct choice of the RF channel is very important in order to avoid
interference. The assignment of RF channels depends to a great extent on
your exhibition rooms or grounds and must be planned individually by an
RF expert before you can assign channel numbers via the INM!
To assign or change channels:
In the “RF channel” column of the “MTS parameters in cell
transmitter” table, double-click the desired MTS.
The pair of arrows for changing the RF channel then appears and the
RF channel is highlighted.
Click one of the two arrows to change the RF channel or enter the
desired RF channel.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The selected RF channel is shown in the “RF channel” column.
8-41
Configuring a location
Setting the transmitting power
To make sure that the antenna signals cover the desired area or to
prevent the signals from overlapping, you can change the range of the
antenna signal by increasing or reducing the transmitting power.
In the “RF power” column of “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table, double-click the desired MTS.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
The drop down list opens.
Click the desired transmitting power.
The maximum possible transmitting power depends on the country
code of your project and the transmitting antenna:
Country code
Antenna (see “RF ant.
(see page 8-17) Type” column)
Others
USA
RF power
min.
max.
INT
0.1 mW
10
mW
EXT
0.2 mW
10
mW
INT
0.1 mW
1
mW
EXT
0.2 mW
1
mW
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The transmitting power is shown in the “RF power” column.
Note:
Please note: If you halve the RF power, the range is reduced to about a
quarter (ie: to double the range you need four times the power –
inverse square law)!
Possible range:
With a direct line of sight between antenna and receiver, you can achieve
a range of up to 30 m. Besides the transmitting power, the range of the
antenna signal depends on several other factors, e.g.:
! Size and ground plan of your exhibition rooms or outside exhibition
grounds.
! Is there a visual connection between the antenna and the receiver at
all times?
! The material of the surface on which the antenna is mounted.
Therefore, we cannot generally guarantee maximum ranges. If necessary,
try out which transmitting power is sufficient for your exhibition rooms.
Turning the RF output on and off
The two option buttons “On” and “Off” in the “RF output” column allow
you to turn the transmitting antenna on and off via the software. For
normal operation, the “On” option button must always be selected.
To turn the transmitting antenna on:
8-42
Click “On”.
Configuring a location
Note:
For example, if you are setting up a trial installation without wanting
to physically transmit or if a certain cell transmitter is not needed for a
while due to a change in the exhibition, you can turn off the carrier
signal of the connected antenna by clicking “Off”. All settings of the
cell transmitter remain unchanged.
Selecting the antenna type
You can use two different types of antenna. Internal active antennas
(INT) transmit in all directions with the same intensity whereas external
directional antennas (EXT) transmit in one direction only.
To select the antenna type:
In the “RF ant. Type” column of the “MTS parameters in cell
transmitter” table, click the desired MTS.
– If the MTS is transmitted via an active antenna, click “INT”.
– If the MTS is transmitted via an external directional antenna, click
“EXT”.
Note:
As a result of their concentrated radiation, external directional
antennas with a lower transmitting power achieve the same range as
internal antennas with a higher transmitting power. In order to fulfil
the legal specifications, the transmitting power is adjusted
automatically when external directional antennas are used.
Entering or changing the site of the antenna
You can enter the site for each antenna. This helps to make your project
clear. Two antennas are usually connected to a cell transmitter, one for
each MTS.
! The antenna of location “0” is usually located close to the receiver
chargers.
! The antennas of the other locations are typically at the entrance to a
cell and are located at a maximum distance of 150 m from the cell
transmitters
To enter the antenna site:
In the “Ant. site” column of the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter”
table, double-click the desired MTS.
The text is highlighted.
Enter the description of the antenna site.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
Creating cells
The cell in location “0”
You only require one cell in location “0” and cannot create any others. The
entire location “0” consists of one single cell which you can only rename
(see “Renaming a cell” on page 8-44).
8-43
Configuring a location
Cells in other locations
A cell is a unit which combines several Events and several MTS. These
combinations result from the planning of your exhibition with regard to
content and the use of space.
Example:
In an art gallery, paintings by Van Gogh are presented in one room.
Drawings by the same artist are presented in another room. The
Events for the paintings are thus combined to form the “Paintings”
cell and the Events for the drawings are combined to form the
“Drawings” cell.
The cells are displayed as tabs in the “Events” table:
To select a cell:
Click the desired tab.
Adding a new cell
If you want to expand your location by adding a coherent complex, you
must first create a new cell and assign it a name. To add a cell:
Right-click any cell tab.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Add new cell”.
A new cell tab is added.
Note:
It is not possible to move the tab of a cell to another position.
Renaming a cell
To rename a cell:
8-44
Right-click the tab of the cell you want to rename.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Rename cell”.
The “Rename cell” dialog box opens.
Enter the desired cell name and press the ENTER key.
The new name appears on the cell tab.
Configuring a location
Removing a cell
You can remove cells. Use this command if you want to close down or
replace coherent parts of the exhibition. However, if you want to regularly
update or change part of an exhibition (temporary exhibition), we
recommend managing this part in a project or in a location of its own.
You can only remove cells if
! the Events of this cell constantly have the highest event numbers of
the whole location,
! in the entire location, there is no cell transmitter whose MTS 0 is
assigned to Events of the cell to be removed whereas the MTS 1 is
assigned to Events of another cell.
To remove a cell:
Click the tab of the cell you want to remove.
The tab moves to the front.
Right-click this tab.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Remove cell”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
To remove the cell:
Click “OK”.
The cell is removed.
8-45
Configuring a location
Configuring Events
Each exhibit in your exhibition is assigned an Event. Reproduction and
downloading of the Events are normally triggered by the identifiers.
However, in an exhibition without identifiers, Events can also be triggered
if the visitors enter a three-figure number in their 16-key receivers.
A detailed overview of all Event types is given on page 19-1 and
following.
To ensure the correct configuration of an Event, you have to:
! define the Event type (see next section and “Changing the Event
features” on page 8-49),
! assign an audio source to every category (see “Assigning an audio
source to an Event” on page 8-57),
! assign an MTS to every category – if you edit a location with variable
Events or Live Events.
! assign the correct location to Events which have been set up in
location “0” but actually belong to a different location (for example
fixed information on the exhibition venue) (see “Assigning the correct
location to an Event” on page 8-72).
You can also:
! assign the Event a name (see “Renaming an Event” on page 8-48),
! redirect the audio information of individual Live Events (see
“Redirecting the audio information of all Storage Events from one
category to another category” on page 8-33),
! assign a Detail Event to Storage Events (see “Configuring special
Events” on page 8-51).
Adding a new Event
When the project is created, you can specify the number of Events (see
“Creating a new project” on page 8-15). However, you can also add other
Events at any time as follows:
Right-click the “Events” table.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Define new event”.
A row for the Event is added to the “Events” table. The new Event is
automatically assigned the next higher Event number in the location
and is set up as the default Event type. You can now configure this
Event as described under “Changing the Event features” on page 8-49.
Deleting an Event
You have two options for deleting an Event:
Deleting an Event
1. Deleting an Event in all categories:
The Event is deactivated in all categories. The visitors of all categories
no longer hear the audio files assigned to this Event.
– If the Event has the highest Event number in the location, the Event
is deleted from cell. The Event number is released.
8-46
Configuring a location
– If the Event does not have the highest Event number in the location,
the complete row of this Event in the “Events” table is grayed out.
Additionally, In the “Inactive” column, a tick appears in each
category. The assignment of the Event to its MTS (in the “CT-ID/
MTS” column, see page 8-65) is deleted. The Event number is not
released.
Deactivating an Event
2. Deactivating an Event in the current category only:
The Event is deactivated in the current category only. The only visitors
who do not hear the Event are those who selected this category. All
visitors who selected another category hear the audio file assigned to
the Event in the relevant category.
– In the “Inactive” column, a tick appears in the current category. The
assignment of the Event to its MTS (in the “CT-ID/MTS” column, see
page 8-65) is deleted.
Note:
When an Event is deleted or deactivated, the audio files assigned to it
are not deleted from the hard disk but merely removed from the
configuration.
The deletion of Events is subject to the following restrictions:
! It is not possible to completely delete an Event from the middle of the
“Event” table so that its Event number is released again! Only the
assignment of the Event to an MTS is deleted so that the Event is
merely deactivated.
! Only the last Event entered (with the highest Event number of the
project) can be completely deleted. The Event number is released
again.
! A Live Event can only be deleted if it is assigned to the highest audio
inputs of the cell transmitter/MTS, i.e. you can only delete a stereo
Live Event assigned to audio inputs 1 and 2 of the cell transmitter if
audio inputs 3 and 4 of this cell transmitter are not assigned to a
different Live Event.
To delete an Event from all categories:
In the “Events” table, right-click the table row with the Event you
want to delete.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Delete event”.
The “Confirm” dialog box opens.
Click “OK”.
The Event is deleted from all categories.
8-47
Configuring a location
To deactivate an Event in only one category:
In the “Inactive” column of the “Events” table, click the check box or
navigate to this table cell and press the space bar.
The Event is deactivated in the current category.
Restoring a deleted or deactivated Event
You can restore deleted (=grayed out) or deactivated (=tick in the
“Inactive” column) Events.
To restore an Event in all categories:
In the “Events” table, right-click the table row with the Event you
want to restore.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Restore event”.
The Event is restored in all categories. The tick in the “Inactive”
column disappears and the table row is no longer grayed out.
Reassign this Event an MTS zu (see “Assigning an MTS for a category
to an Event” on page 8-65).
The Event is restored.
To restore an event in only one category:
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category in
which you want to restore the Event.
In the “Inactive” column of the “Events” table, click the check box with
the tick.
The Event is restored in the current category. The tick in the “Inactive”
column disappears.
Reassign this Event an MTS zu (see “Assigning an MTS for a category
to an Event” on page 8-65).
The Event is restored.
Renaming an Event
The INM automatically assigns names to the Events. The name consists of
the word “Event” and the Event number (e.g. “Event301).
To rename an Event:
8-48
In the “Name” column of the “Events” table, double-click the desired
Event.
The text is highlighted.
Enter the name of the Event.
This name can only be assigned once for the location!
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The name is shown in the table cell.
Configuring a location
If you use Events which are closely linked with other Events (B if A Events,
Events with lead in or Detail Events), we recommend giving the
subordinated Events the following names:
Event type
Recommended
name
Examples
Normal Storage Event
Name of the exhibit
VanGoghStilLife
Normal Live Event
Art und Name des
Exponats
Video Contemporary
History
Event B2, which is
subordinated to a
B if A Event:
Contents of the
alternative
information,
preceded by “B”
B Farewell
Detail Event
Name of the exhibit D VanGoghStilLife
to which the
detailed information
belongs, preceded
by “D”
Event with introductory
information, which is
subordinated to an
Event with lead in
Name of the exhibit E Video Contemporary
to which the
History
introductory
information belongs,
preceded by “E”
The preceding letters B, D or E allow you to identify these Events if you
program the identifiers in your exhibition using the PDA as described in
the chapter “The Identifier Control (IDC)” on page 12-1. As these Events
are not triggered by identifiers but by the Events to which they are
subordinated, it is not permitted to assign these Events to an identifier!
Changing the Event features
The INM gives Event designers great freedom. In order to present your
exhibits in a professional, entertaining and plausible way, you require the
following:
! an overview of all Event types (see page 6-30)
! the location plan of the exhibits (see page 6-7 and page 6-18)
! reliable project planning (see page 6-1)
Once you have newly set up an Event, the default Event type which you
specified when creating the project is initially assigned to this Event (see
page 8-19).
Configuring normal Events
To change the default Event type:
In the “Type” or “Related to” column of the “Events” table, doubleclick the Event to which you want to assign a different Event type.
The “Configure event features” dialog box opens.
8-49
Configuring a location
To protect the system from accidental changes, the changing of the
Event type is blocked. To remove this block:
Click the “Edit event type” check box.
You can now change the Event type.
In the “Type” field, click the desired Event type.
The selected Event type is set.
If you want to configure a normal Storage or Live Event:
Configuring special Events
Click “OK”.
Assign an audio source to the normal Storage or Live Event (see
page 8-57) and assign an MTS (see page 8-65) and one or several
identifiers (see page 8-67).
If you want to:
! configure Events which are closely linked to other Events (B if A
Events, Events with lead in or Detail Events) or
! assign special features (“one-off”, “on Id range” or “Priority”) to a
Storage or Live Event or
! specify the feature of an Entrance Event (“Cell Download” or “Guided
Tour”)
In the “Features” field, click the features which you want to assign to
the Event.
Entrance Events have one of the following two features:
– “Cell Download” is for the purposeful triggering of a mobile
download in locations with variable Events. The audio files of the
Intro and of the Storage Events in the current cell are downloaded
from a constantly active cell transmitter via an antenna.
– “Guided Tour” is for the automatic switching of the receivers to the
RF channel of a portable transmitter. The identifier which triggers
this Entrance Event “Guided Tour” marks the beginning of a guided
tour with a portable transmitter. During the guided tour, the
8-50
Configuring a location
receivers cannot receive Storage and Live Events until the tour guide
interrupts or ends the guided tour.
Storage and Live Events can have the following features:
– “With relation” is for configuring B if A Events, Events with lead in
and Detail Events.
– “One-off” is for configuring Storage Events which are only played
back one single time during a tour.
– “On Id range” is for configuring Events which are automatically
faded out as soon as the receiver leaves the range of the identifier.
– “Priority” is for configuring Storage Events which are always played
back completely to the end.
If desired, you can assign several of these features to an Event:
Feature
Storage
Live
Entrance
"
"
#
With lead in
"
"
#
With detail
"
#
#
One-off
"
#
#
On Id range
"
"
#
Priority
"
#
#
Cell Download
#
#
"
Guided Tour
#
#
"
With relation
B if A
" means: possible
# means: not possible
If the “Function” and “Rule” fields appear:
In the “Function” field, click the Event type you want to configure.
In the “Rule” field, enter the desired Event number as described in the
following section.
Configuring special Events
Configuring an “one-off” Event
Normal Storage Events are played back once more if a visitor returns to an
exhibit whose Event he has already listened to previously. To configure a
Storage Event which is played back one time only:
Click the “One-off” check box in the “Features” field or
click “Set event as one-off” in the shortcut menu of the “Events”
table.
The Event is played back once only during a tour. If a visitor returns to
this Event repeatedly, it is not played back again. If a visitor does not
listen to this Event to the end the first time, there will be no
opportunity to listen to the remaining part later.
8-51
Configuring a location
To deactivate the “one-off” feature:
Configuring an “on Id range”
Event
Unclick the “One-off” check box or
click “Undo set event as one-off” in the shortcut menu of the “Events”
table.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “one-off” feature is deactivated.
Normal Storage Events are still played back if the receiver has left the
range of the identifier but has not yet arrived at a new identifier. To
configure a Storage Event which is automatically faded out as soon as the
receiver leaves the range of the identifier:
Click the “On Id range” check box in the “Features” field or
click “Set event on identifier range” in the shortcut menu of the
“Events” table.
The Event is faded out as soon as the receiver leaves the range of the
identifier. As the range of the identifier signal can be very small (see
page 8-67), Events of this type are for example suitable for creating
the effect of a sound shower – various sound effects are faded in and
out in quick succession while the visitor moves on. The Event is also
faded out if the visitor presses the STOP key on the receiver.
To deactivate the “on Id range” feature:
Configuring a “priority” Event
Unclick the “On Id range” check box or
click “Undo set event on identifier range” in the shortcut menu of the
“Events” table.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “on Id range” feature is deactivated.
Normal Storage Events are faded out as soon as the receiver detects the
signal from another identifier. It can thus happen that a visitor who
passes by an exhibit quickly because he is not interested does not hear
this Event completely. To configure a Storage Event which is always
played back completely to the end:
Click the “Priority” check box in the “Features” field or
click “Set event as priority” in the shortcut menu of the “Events”
table.
The Event is always played back completely to the end, even if the
visitor has arrived at another exhibit in the meantime. The visitor is
virtually forced to listen to the Event completely and can only fade out
the Event if he presses the STOP key on the receiver. This Event is for
example suitable for safety-relevant information on escape routes or
services for which a charge is made.
To deactivate the “priority” feature:
Configuring a B if A Event
8-52
Unclick the “Priority” check box or
click “Undo set event as priority” in the shortcut menu of the “Events”
table.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “priority” feature is deactivated.
A normal Storage or Live Event consists of one single piece of audio
information only. Whenever the receiver detects the signal of the
corresponding identifier, this audio information is played back.
However, you can also configure a Storage or Live Event which plays back
Configuring a location
different audio information depending on whether another Event was
played back in the meantime. We proceed from the following model here:
One of your exhibition rooms has only one narrow entrance/exit. Only one
single identifier can be mounted here as the signal coming from two
identifiers would overlap otherwise. When the visitors enter the room,
they should for example hear “You are now entering the graphical
collection…” (Event B1), and when they leave the room, they should for
example hear “You are now leaving the graphical collection…” (Event B2).
The first Event, which all visitors hear when they enter the room, is the
Event “Graphic of a landscape” (Event A).
Audio A
Audio B2
Audio B1
First configure Event B2 (no Event “with relation”!) as described under
“Changing the Event features” on page 8-49.
– We recommend preceding the Event name with the letter B.
– You do not need to configure an identifier for this Event and it is not
permitted to program an identifier with this Event! The configuration
of the identifiers belonging to this Event is automatically reset to
default values if you subordinate it to a B if A Event.
– You cannot change the configuration of this Event once you have
subordinated it to another Event as additional information.
Configure Event A as any desired Live or Storage Event (no Event
“with relation”!).
Then configure Event B1 as a B if A Event by first clicking “With
relation” in the “Features” field and then “B if A” in the “Function”
field.
The “Rule” field appears.
From drop down list “A”, select the Event number of Event A which is
located in the room. It should be an Event which is – as a result of the
exhibit or of the position of its identifier – invariably triggered for
every visitor entering the room.
From drop down list “B”, select the Event number of Event B2 which is
to be played back when the visitor leaves the room.
Complete the configuration of the features by clicking “OK” .
8-53
Configuring a location
Assign the audio information B1 to the B if A Event (see page 8-57)
and assign an MTS (see page 8-65) and one or several identifiers (see
page 8-67).
When a receiver detects this B if A Event before detecting Event A, the
audio information B1 is played back (e.g.: “You are now entering the
graphical collection…”).
When a receiver detects this B if A Event after detecting Event A, the audio
information B2 is played back (e.g.: “You are now leaving the graphical
collection…”).
To deactivate the “B if A” feature of an Event:
Configuring an Event with lead in
In the “Type” or “Related to” column of the “Events” table, doubleclick the Event whose “B if A” feature you want to deactivate.
The “Configure event features” dialog box opens.
Click the “With relation” check box in the “Features” field.
The “Function” and “Rule” fields disappear.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “B if A” feature is deactivated.
Normal Storage or Live Events are faded in immediately as soon as the
receiver detects the signal of the corresponding identifier or a visitor
enters the three-figure Event number into the 16-key receiver. However,
you can configure introductory information (lead in) which is played back
before the actual Event begins. We proceed from the following model
here:
One of the highlights of your exhibition is an interactive multimedia
presentation which the visitors can influence via gestures. Several
cameras detect where the visitor is pointing at and the multimedia
presentation reacts accordingly. If no visitor gestures are detected, the
multimedia presentation runs automatically like a video. The
accompanying sound is transmitted as a Live Event. In order for the
visitors to see immediately how to influence the multimedia presentation,
you should give this information as an introduction (lead in).
First configure the introduction (lead in) as a normal Storage Event as
described under “Changing the Event features” on page 8-49.
– We recommend preceding the Event name with the letter E.
– You do not need to configure an identifier for this Event and it is not
permitted to program an identifier with this Event! The configuration
of the identifiers belonging to this Event is automatically reset to
default values if you subordinate it to an Event with lead in.
– You cannot change the configuration of this Event once you have
subordinated it to another Event as additional information.
Then configure the Event with lead in by first clicking “With relation”
in the “Features” field and then “Event with lead in” in the “Function”
field.
The “Rule” field appears.
8-54
Configuring a location
From the drop down list, select the Event number of the Event to be
played as an introduction (lead in).
Complete the configuration of the features by clicking “OK” .
Assign the desired audio information to the Event with lead in (see
page 8-57) and assign an MTS (see page 8-65) and one or several
identifiers (see page 8-67).
When a receiver detects this Event with lead in, the introduction (lead
in) is played back first. Then the audio information of the Event is
played back automatically.
To deactivate the “with lead in” feature of an Event:
Configuring a Detail Event
In the “Type” or “Related to” column of the “Events” table, doubleclick the Event whose “with lead in” feature you want to deactivate.
The “Configure event features” dialog box opens.
Click the “With relation” check box in the “Features” field.
The “Function” and “Rule” fields disappear.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “with lead in” feature is deactivated.
A normal Storage Event consists of one single piece of audio information
only. Every time the receiver detects the signal of the corresponding
identifier, this audio information is played back. You can configure
additional, supplementary or in-depth information which is not played
back until the visitor presses the Detail key on the receiver (see “Calling
up detailed information (only if the key is available)” on page 5-43).
First configure the additional information as a normal Storage Event
as described under “Changing the Event features” on page 8-49.
– We recommend preceding the Event name with the letter D.
– You do not need to configure an identifier for this Event.
– In locations with variable Events, assign the same MTS to this Event
as you do to the main Event.
– You cannot change the configuration of this Event once you have
subordinated it to another Event as additional information.
Then configure the main information by first clicking “With relation”
in the “Features” field and then “Event with detail” in the “Function”
field.
The “Rule” field appears.
From the drop down list, select the Event number of the Event which is
to be played back as additional information when the Detail key on
the receiver is pressed.
Complete the configuration of the features by clicking “OK”.
Assign the desired audio information to the Event (see page 8-57)
and assign an MTS (see page 8-65) and one or several identifiers (see
page 8-67).
8-55
Configuring a location
When a receiver detects this Event, the audio information of this Event
is played back first. Once the Event has been played back completely,
the visitor can start playback of the additional information by
pressing the Detail key on the receiver.
To deactivate the “with detail” feature of an Event:
Configuring an Entrance Event
“Guided Tour“
In the “Type” or “Related to” column of the “Events” table, doubleclick the Event whose “with detail” feature you want to deactivate.
The “Configure event features” dialog box opens.
Click the “With relation” check box in the “Features” field.
The “Function” and “Rule” fields disappear.
In the “Configure event features” dialog box, click “OK” to complete
the configuration.
The “with detail” feature is deactivated. An identifier with the default
configuration is automatically reassigned to the Event with the
additional information. The “Information” dialog box appears.
Click “OK”.
The Entrance Event “Guided Tour“ is one of three options for configuring
receivers for a guided tour (see also “Planning guided tours” on
page 6-26).
Before you configure the Entrance Event:
! Configure at least one portable transmitter for guided tours:
– either via the VPR as described on page 15-22
– or via the CHM as described on page 11-35
! Note down the number of the RF channel of the portable transmitter.
! In the INM, click the category (or one of the categories) whose
receivers are to be switched to the RF channel of a mobile transmitter
via the Entrance Event.
To configure an Event as an Entrance Event “Guided Tour“:
8-56
Click the “Guided Tour” option button in the “Trigger for” field and
confirm your selection by clicking “OK”.
“Eingang, Führung” appears in the “Type” column of the “Events”
table.
In the row of the Entrance Event, double-click the “Audio source”
column.
The “Assign Mobile Transmitter RF Channel” dialog box opens.
In the “Mobile Transmitter RF Channel” drop down list, click the
number of the RF channle of the desired portable transmitter.
When receivers from the current category detect this Event, they
automatically switch to this RF channel of the portable transmitter
Configuring a location
If the same guided tour is suitable for several categories (the tour guide
equally addresses visitors belonging to different categories):
Set up the redirection of audio information in all categories whose
visitors participate in the same tour as described under “Linking the
audio information of an Event from one category to another category”
on page 8-66.
If you want to set up separate guided tours for each category (each tour
guide only addresses the visitors belonging to a certain category):
Assign a different RF channel to this Event in each category.
You then require a separate portable transmitter for each category.
These portable transmitters must be set to different RF channels.
Assigning an audio source to an Event
You can assign an audio source for a certain category to each Event as
follows (exception: an audio source is not assigned to Entrance Events):
! You assign an audio file stored on the hard disk to Storage Events (see
next section).
! You assign audio inputs of a cell transmitter to Live Events (see
page 8-63)
Assigning an audio file to a
Storage Event
In order that the INM software module can process the audio files, it is vital
that the audio files have the following two characteristics:
! File format:Windows Wave (.wav)
! Resolution:16 bits per sample
We also recommend that you use audio files with a sampling rate of
44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.
There are three ways of assigning audio files to Storage Events:
1. You can assign an audio file to a Storage Event via the selection dialog
(see next section).
2. You can assign an audio file to a Storage Event via Drag & Drop (see
page 8-59).
3. You can assign several audio files to several Storage Events at the
same time via Drag & Drop (see page 8-61). This method is especially
fast and convenient.
Assigning an audio file to a
Storage Event via the selection
dialog
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category in
which you want to assign an audio source to the Event.
All settings for this category are displayed in the “Events” table.
There are two ways of selecting an Event to which you want to assign an
audio source:
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
row containing the Event.
Or:
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, mark the desired
cell.
Press the ENTER key or click the table cell again.
8-57
Configuring a location
If it is a Storage Event, the “Event audio parameter configuration”
dialog box appears.
In the “Input audio file” field, click the
The “Open” dialog box opens.
Select the audio file which you want to assign to the Storage Event
and then click “Open”.
The file path of the selected audio file then appears in the “Audio file”
field. The main characteristics of the selected WAV file are to be found
below it:
button.
– Channels:
“Mono” or “Stereo”
– Resolution:
the INM can only handle WAV files with a resolution of 16 bits per
sample!
– Sampling rate:
Sampling rate of the original file (16 kHz, 32 kHz, 44.1 kHz or
48 kHz).
– Length:
Playing time is seconds.
8-58
From the “Quality level” drop down list, select the desired audio
quality.
Configuring a location
The four quality levels differ in the number of channels (mono or
stereo) and in the sampling rate (16 to 48 kHz):
Channels
Sampling rate
(kHz)
suitable for
Designation in the INM
1 (Mono)
16
Speech
Speech mono (low)
2 (Stereo)
16
Speech
Speech stereo (low)
2 (Stereo)
32
Music
Music stereo (middle)
2 (Stereo)
48
Music
Music stereo (high)
Caution!
The INM can change the number of channels and the sampling rate of
an audio file (resampling), but it cannot be used to improve the sound
quality of an audio file afterwards. For this reason, you should never
change an audio file from a lower to a higher sampling rate or from
mono to stereo because this only causes the memory space
requirements to increase and the sound quality can be impaired as a
result.
Click “Convert”.
The audio file is compressed. The Ogg Vorbis format (.ogg) is used to
compress WAV files in stereo (for licensing information see
page 18-2) and Sennheiser's own compression method is used for
WAV files in mono.
If you selected a different sampling rate than the original, the INM also
changes the sampling rate.
The compressed file is the automatically saved by the INM. Depending
on the size of the WAV file, this whole process can take some time. The
file path of the WAV file then appears in the “Audio source” column.
Note:
If you assign a WAV file to the Storage Event and the WAV file has not
been saved in a subfolder of the project folder, the INM automatically
makes a copy of the WAV file. This copy is saved in a subfolder of the
“WAV Audio” folder. The subfolder is automatically given a name
consisting of the word “Category” and the category number (e.g.
“Category3”).
Example:
You assign a file on CD (file path “CD (E:)\StoEvt.WAV”) to a Storage
Event belonging to the category 3 of the project “VanGoghExhibition”.
The INM then automatically copies this file to the location folder
“C:\VanGoghExhibition\ WAV Audio\Category3\StoEvt.WAV”.
Assigning an audio file to a
Storage Event via Drag & Drop
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category in
which you want to assign an audio source to the Event.
All settings for this category are displayed in the “Events” table.
In the Windows Explorer, open the folder containing the audio file
which you want to assign.
Use Drag & Drop to move the desired audio file from the Windows
Explorer into the “Events” table, that is, into the row of the Event to
which you want to assign this audio file.
8-59
Configuring a location
The “Audio quality setting” dialog box opens.
Note:
You can change the default audio quality suggested by the INM as
follows:
Open the “GP_INM.INI” file located in the program folder. In the area
[Configuration]
replace
the
number
X
in
the
“DefaultAudioQualityLevel=X” line by the number of the desired
default audio quality.
No.
Default audio quality
0
Speech mono (low)
1
Speech stereo (low)
2
Music stereo (middle)
3
Music stereo (high)
Save the “GP_INM.INI” file and restart the INM.
8-60
Select the desired audio quality.
The audio file is compressed. The Ogg Vorbis format (.ogg) is used to
compress WAV files in stereo (for licensing information see
page 18-2) and Sennheiser's own compression method is used for
WAV files in mono.
If you selected a different sampling rate than the original, the INM also
changes the sampling rate.
The compressed file is the automatically saved by the INM. Depending
on the size of the WAV file, this whole process can take some time.
The “Event audio parameter configuration” dialog box is shown for
the duration of compression.
Configuring a location
The file path of the WAV file then appears in the “Audio source”
column.
Assigning several audio files to
several Storage Events at the
same time via Drag & Drop
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category in
which you want to assign an audio source to the Event.
All settings for this category are displayed in the “Events” table.
In the Windows Explorer, open the folder containing the audio file
which you want to assign.
In this folder, mark all audio files which you want to assign to the
Events.
NOTE
Windows 2000 reports errors when accessing WAV files!!
If you select WAV files in the Windows Explorer and move
them to the INM via drag and drop, the following error
message can appear: “The process cannot access the file
because it is beung used by another process”. This means
that the Windows Media Player (or another program
which can play back WAV files) is preventing the INM
from accessing the selected WAV files.
In the Windows Explorer, click “Folder Options” in the
“Tools” menu and then the “File formats” tab. In the
“Web View” group, activate the “Use Classic Windows
Folders” check box. Then click “Apply” and “OK”.
If you have already set up Events for these audio files:
Use Drag & Drop to move these audio files from the Windows Explorer
into the “Events” table, that is, into the row of the first Event to which
you want to assign one of these audio files.
If you have not yet set up any Events for these audio files:
Use the mouse to drag the marked audio files from the Windows
Explorer into the “Events” table. Drop them at the end of the table and
not onto an existing Event.
The Events are automatically added to the table.
The “Assign audio files to storage events” dialog box appears.
8-61
Configuring a location
The left-hand “Storage events” field contains all Storage Events to
which an audio file has not yet been assigned in the current category.
These begin with the Event number onto which you dropped the audio
files from the Windows Explorer.
The right-hand “Audio files” field contains all audio files which you
dragged from the Windows Explorer.
You can add additional audio files to the right-hand “Audio files” field
by either
– right-clicking the “Audio files” field and then clicking “Add audio
files” in the shortcut menu or by
– pressing the key combination Ctrl + A.
There are two ways of assigning the different audio files to the Events:
Either use the mouse to drag one audio file after the other from the
right-hand “Audio files” field and drop it onto one of the Events in the
left-hand “Storage events” field.
Or:
In the left-hand “Storage events” field, click the Event to which you
want to assign an audio file.
In the right-hand “Audio files” field, click the audio file which you want
to assign to this Event.
Click the “<” button.
Events to which an audio file has been assigned appear in bold type in
the left-hand “Storage events” field.
Audio files which have been assigned to an Event appear in red in the
right-hand “Audio files” field.
Note:
You can cancel this assignment again by
– using the mouse to drag the audio file from the left-hand “Storage
events” field back to the right-hand “Audio files” field or
– double-clicking the Event In the left-hand “Storage events” field or
– first clicking the Event in the left-hand “Storage events” field and
then “>”.
For every Event in the left-hand “Storage events” field, click the preset
audio quality (“Speech stereo (middle)”).
A menu then opens.
Note:
You can change the default audio quality suggested by the INM as
follows:
Open the “GP_INM.INI” file located in the program folder. In the area
[Configuration]
replace
the
number
X
in
the
“DefaultAudioQualityLevel=X” line by the number of the desired
8-62
Configuring a location
default audio quality.
No.
Default audio quality
0
Speech mono (low)
1
Speech stereo (low)
2
Music stereo (middle)
3
Music stereo (high)
Save the “GP_INM.INI” file and restart the INM.
On the menu, click the desired audio quality.
Caution!
The INM can change the number of channels and the sampling rate of
an audio file (resampling), but it cannot be used to improve the sound
quality of an audio file afterwards. For this reason, you should never
change an audio file from a lower to a higher sampling rate or from
mono to stereo because this only causes the memory space
requirements to increase and the sound quality can be impaired as a
result.
Once you have assigned all audio files to a Storage Event:
Click “OK”.
All audio files which you assigned to an Event are compressed. The
Ogg Vorbis format (.ogg) is used to compress WAV files in stereo (for
licensing information see page 18-2) and Sennheiser's own
compression method is used for WAV files in mono.
If you selected a different sampling rate than the original, the INM also
changes the sampling rate.
The compressed audio file is automatically saved by the INM. This
process can take a few seconds depending on the size of the WAV file.
The “Event audio parameter configuration” dialog box is shown for
the duration of compression.
The file path of the WAV file then appears in the “Audio source”
column.
Assigning audio information
to a Live Event
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category in
which you want to assign an audio source to the Event.
All settings for this category are displayed in the “Events” table.
8-63
Configuring a location
There are two ways of selecting a Live Event to which you want to assign
an audio source:
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
row containing the Event.
Or:
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, mark the desired
cell.
Press the ENTER key or click the table cell again. If the Event is a Live
Event, the drop down arrow for opening the drop down list for audio
inputs appears.
Click this arrow and select the audio inputs you want to assign to the
Live Event in this category. For this purpose, see also the “table of all
Live Events” of your exhibition.
– “Stereo AF IN 1 & 2” is assigned to the two audio inputs “Analog
Audio 1” and “Analog Audio 2” of a cell transmitter.
– “Stereo AF IN 3 & 4” is assigned to the two audio inputs “Analog
Audio 3” and “Analog Audio 4” of a cell transmitter.
– “Mono AF IN 1” is assigned to the audio input “Analog Audio 1” of a
cell transmitter.
– “Mono AF IN 2” is assigned to the audio input “Analog Audio 2” of a
cell transmitter.
– “Mono AF IN 3” is assigned to the audio input “Analog Audio 3” of a
cell transmitter.
– “Mono AF IN 4” is assigned to the audio input “Analog Audio 4” of a
cell transmitter.
Changing the audio source of an Event
To change the assignment of an audio source of an Event for a certain
category:
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category whose
audio source you want to change.
All settings for this category are displayed in the “Events” table.
Make sure that no MTS is assigned to the Event to be edited or delete
the corresponding MTS assignment as described under “Assigning an
MTS for a category to an Event” on page 8-65.
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
Event whose audio source you want to change.
A button then appears in the table cell.
Assign the new audio source as described in the preceding section.
Deleting the audio source of an Event
You can delete the assignment of an audio source to a Storage Event. The
configuration for the MTS is deleted in the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the
table. The Event itself, the audio file and all other configurations for the
Event remain as they are.
To delete the assignment of the audio source:
8-64
Configuring a location
In the “Audio source” column of the “Events” table, right-click the
audio source you want to delete.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Reset the category audio information assignment” from the
shortcut menu.
The “Confirm” dialog box opens.
To delete the assignment of the audio source, click “Yes”.
The assignemnt is deleted and the cell is displayed without contents.
You can now assign a new audio source to the Event (see “Assigning
an audio source to an Event” on page 8-57).
Assigning an MTS for a category to an Event
In location “0”, you can only assign an MTS to Live Events. In the locations
with variable Events, however, you have to assign an MTS to every
Storage Event and every Live Event for each category.
Note:
With Live Events, the assignment of the audio inputs of the cell
transmitters is subject to the following restrictions (among others):
– You can only assign MTS 0 to the audio inputs 1 and 2.
– You can only assign MTS 0 to the audio inputs 3 and 4 if the same
MTS 0 does not transmit Storage Events or Intros, otherwise you can
only assign MTS 1.
To assign an MTS for a category to an Event:
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the category which
includes the audio source of the Event to which you want to assign an
MTS.
If you edit a location with variable Events:
Click the cell in which you want to make the MTS assignment
In the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
Event to which you want to assign an MTS.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
The drop down list containing the available MTS for this category
opens.
If an MTS does not appear in the drop down list although you created
it in the “MTS parameters in cell transmitter” table, this can have one
of the following causes:
– The MTS is being utilized to its full capacity. There is no free memory
space or no audio input of a cell transmitter available.
– Audio information of another category has already been assigned to
this MTS. It is not possible to mix audio information from different
categories in the same MTS.
8-65
Configuring a location
In the drop down list, click the MTS to which you want to assign the
audio information of the Event.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The selected MTS is shown in the table cell.
Deleting an assignment to an MTS
Before you can change the audio source of an Event, you might first have
to delete the assignment of the Event to an MTS. This assignment is
deleted automatically if you
! redirect the Event (see “Redirecting the audio information of all
Storage Events from one category to another category” on page 8-33
and “Linking the audio information of an Event from one category to
another category” on page 8-66),
! delete the Event (see “Deleting an Event” on page 8-46).
To delete the MTS assignment:
In the “CT-ID/MTS” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
Event whose assignment to an MTS you want to delete.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
The drop down list opens.
Select “None” from the drop down list.
The assignment of the Event to this MTS is deleted. You can now
change the audio source of the Event.
Linking the audio information of an Event from one category to another
category
You can redirect the audio information of individual Events from one
category (source category) to another category (target category). The
target category then has no audio information of its own for this Event,
but reproduces instead the audio information of the source category.
It is possible to redirect the audio information of Events for:
! Live Events (see this chapter)
! Entrance Events “Guided Tour” (see this chapter)
! Storage Events – but only for all Storage Events of a cell together (see
page 8-33).
This redirection of audio information makes sense if visitors belonging to
different categories are to hear the same audio information, i.e.:
! the same sound for a video
(for example music or a live performance via a microphone or because
a dubbed version of the video sound is not available)
! the same tour guide for a guided tour
(because the tour guide equally addresses the visitors belonging to
different categories)
The principle in redirecting audio information is as follows:
1. You first assign the desired audio information to the Event in the
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Configuring a location
source category.
– for Live Events, you assign the desired audio source (see “Assigning
audio information to a Live Event” on page 8-63)
– for Entrance Events “Guided Tour”, you assign the number of the RF
channel
of
the
desired
portable
transmitter
(see
“Configuring an Entrance Event “Guided Tour“” on page 8-56)
2. You then click the target category which is to take over this audio
information and configure the redirections of the audio information as
follows:
In the “Category information” tree structure, click the target category
into which you want to link the audio information from the source
category.
Click the cell (see page 8-45) which contains the Event whose audio
information you want link to another category.
Right-click the Live Event or the Entrance Event “Guided Tour” whose
audio information you want link from another category.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Reroute event to” from the shortcut menu.
The category menu opens.
Click the category from which you want to link the audio information.
“Rerouting target is category...” appears in the “Info” column..
You do not need to configure an audio source or an MTS for this Event.
If you had configured an audio source and an MTS for this Event, this
configuration remains ineffective.
Setting up the identifiers
All Live Events and Storage Events can be assigned at least one identifier
which triggers the reproduction of the Event at the exhibit. These settings
are later copied to a PDA and then transferred to the identifier located
next to the exhibit via infra-red.
Note:
You can also realize an exhibition without identifiers. The Events are
then triggered by entering the three-figure Event number (e.g. “123”)
via the 16-key receiver.
To configure the settings of the identifiers which trigger the Event:
In the “Identifiers” column of the “Events” table, double-click the
Event whose identifier you want to set up.
The identifier table appears. Each row of the table corresponds to an
identifier.
A default identifier has already been set up. This is configured
according to the specifications made when you created the project
(see “Creating a new project” on page 8-15).
You can now change this pre-specified default setting of all identifiers
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Configuring a location
as described under “Changing the identifier default settings” on
page 8-71.
Note:
The lifetime of the identifier batteries largely depend on the settings
made in the “Start”, “Stop”, “Power” and “Cycle” columns. With an
operating time of 8 hours, full power (100 %) and a slow clock period
(1s), the batteries last for approx. three months. With an operating
time of 8 hours (e.g. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.), 50 % power and a slow
clock period, the batteries last for approx. four months.
You can:
! set up the identifiers as described in this chapter,
! add new identifiers (see page 8-71),
! use an identifier configuration as default setting for all other
identifiers (see “Changing the identifier default settings” on
page 8-71),
! delete identifiers (see page 8-71).
Start / Stop
To set the daily operating time, enter the times at which the identifier is
to start or stop transmitting its magnetic field. Outside this time, the
identifier switches to energy saving mode, i.e. you do not have to replace
the batteries so often.
In the “Start” column, double-click the identifier whose starting time
you want to set.
The time is highlighted and a pair of arrows appears.
Enter the desired start of the daily operating time (hours, minutes and
seconds separated by a colon) or
click hours, minutes or seconds one after the other and then one of the
two arrows.
Enter the end of the daily operating time in the same way.
Note:
If your exhibition has different opening hours on different days of the
week, you must enter the longest period here.
Power
You can adjust the transmission range of the identifier by increasing or
decreasing the power – this is done in steps of 10 % each.
In the “Power” column, double-click the identifier whose transmitting
power you want to set.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
A drop down list opens.
Select the desired transmitting power.
– 100 % power corresponds to a range of approx. 3 m.
– 80 % power corresponds to a range of approx. 1.5 m.
– 50 % power corresponds to a range of approx. 0.7 m.
In practice, the surrounding environment can affect the actual range –
it is best, therefore, to set the range by trial and error until the correct
range is achieved. Adjust the range of the magnetic field to the
identifier site so that the following is ensured:
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Configuring a location
– All visitors approaching the exhibit have to walk through this
magnetic field.
– The magnetic field of the identifier does not overlap with the
magnetic field of other identifiers
Cycle
To ensure that the signal reaches every visitor, you must adapt the clock
period of the identifiers to the identifier site. For example, if the identifier
is mounted in an area where the visitors walk through quickly, e.g. a door,
the clock period must be set to a lower value.
To set the clock period:
Antenna
In the “Cycle” column, double-click the identifier whose clock period
you want to set.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
A drop down list opens.
Select the desired clock period.
Identifiers can transmit their signal either via the integrated antenna or
via an external loop antenna. The loop antenna can, for example, be
installed in the floor or in a long display case. The loop antenna generates
a magnetic field with a larger range than the integrated antenna.
In the “Antenna” column, double-click the identifier whose antenna
type you want to set.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
A drop down list opens.
If the identifier signal is transmitted via the integrated antenna:
Click “Intern”.
If the identifier signal is transmitted via an external loop antenna:
Trigger
Make sure that an external loop antenna is connected to the selected
identifier!
Click “Loop”.
Identifiers can transmit their signal either automatically or triggered by
an external switch.
In the “Trigger” column, double-click the identifier whose trigger type
you want to set.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
A drop down list opens.
If the identifier is to transmit its signal automatically:
Select “AUTO”.
The identifier transmits its signal within the period of time set in the
“Start” and “Stop” columns!
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Configuring a location
If the identifier is to transmit its signal triggered by an external switch:
Note:
If you connect an external switch to an identifier, the power
consumption rises and the lifetime of the battery drops. We therefore
recommend using an external power supply for all identifiers operated
via an external switch.
Make sure that an external switch is connected to the selected
identifier!
Note:
The triggering of the identifier from an external switch is only possible
outside the operating time set in the “Start” and “Stop” columns!
Voltage
If the identifier is to be controlled via an external switch, set the
operating time to a period of time outside the opening time via the
“Start” and “Stop” columns.
Select “EXT”.
If the switch is activated, the identifier transmits the signal 10 times
at the clock period set in the “Cycle” column.
Identifiers can be powered via internal batteries or via external DC from a
plug-in power supply or ring circuit from a central power supply. The
powering mode must be set as follows:
In the “Voltage” column, double-click the identifier whose power
supply you want to set.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
A drop down list opens.
If the identifier is battery-operated:
Select “Battery”.
Make sure that the identifier is battery-powered! Only then is this
powering mode activated – the settings in the “Voltage” column are
for information purposes only.
If the identifier is powered via external DC from a plug-in power supply or
ring circuit from a central power supply:
Assigning the settings to the
identifier
Select “Line voltage”.
Make sure that an external DC supply is connected to the selected
identifier! Only then is this powering mode activated – the settings in
the “Voltage” column are for information purposes only.
Once you have selected the identifier settings as described above, you can
assign these settings to the identifier as follows:
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Click outside of the identifier table or press the ESC key.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
Configuring a location
To assign all identifier settings:
Click “Yes”.
The settings are assigend.
Adding identifiers to the identifier table
Reproduction of most Events is triggered by one single identifier at the
exhibit. However, particularly large exhibits or exhibits which visitors can
approach from different directions require several identifiers (a maximum
of 5 are possible).
To add an identifier to an Event:
Right-click the identifier table.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “New identifier transmitter”.
A new row is added to the bottom of the identifier table.
Deleting identifiers
To delete identifiers from the identifier table, proceed as follows:
Right-click the identifier table.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Remove”.
The row at the bottom of the identifier table is deleted.
Note:
At least one identifier must be assigned to an Entrance Event!
Changing the identifier default settings
When you created the project, you specified the default settings for the
identifiers (see “Creating a new project” on page 8-15). All identifiers are
initially assigned these pre-specified default settings.
To change these pre-specified default settings:
Configure any desired identifier with the settings you want to assign
to all other identifiers as described in the preceding section from
page 8-67 onwards.
Right-click the identifier table.
The shortcut menu opens.
Click “Set as default identifier”.
All identifiers are assigned the settings of the default identifier.
Reproducing Storage Events
This command gives you an overview of the existing project and allows
you to check whether the correct audio files are assigned to the Storage
Event.
Note:
Live Events cannot be played at the computer. If you want to monitor
Live Events, you must connect headphones to the monitoring socket
of the cell transmitter which is transmitting the Live Event.
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Configuring a location
To listen to a WAV file already assigned to a Storage Event:
In the “Events” table, right-click the Event to which the WAV file you
want to listen to is assigned.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select “Play the event audio content” from the shortcut menu.
The WAV file is played back via the sound card of your computer and
the loudspeakers or headphones connected to it. The “Audio
playback” dialog box appears.
The buttons in the “Audio playback” dialog box allow you to pause,
stop and restart the playback. The “Volume” control allows you to
change the volume. The dialog box closes automatically as soon as the
audio file has been played back completely, but it can also be closed
manually by clicking “Close”.
Assigning the correct location to an Event
Locations “1” to “63” can contain Events which do not need to be
updated or replaced regularly (for example fixed information on the
exhibition venue). If memory space is still free in location “0”, you can set
up these fixed Events of locations “1” to “63” in location “0”. In this way,
these Events are transmitted once to the receivers via stationary
download and do not need to be transmitted permanently via mobile
download. In order that the STM software can assign the statistical data
of these fixed Storage Events to the correct locations and thus evaluate
them correctly, you have to assign the correct locations to the Events as
follows:
8-72
In the “Location” column of the “Events” table, double-click the Event
to which you want to assign a different location.
A drop down arrow appears.
Click the drop down arrow.
The drop down list opens.
From the drop down list, select the number of the desired location.
Confirm you entry by pressing the ENTER key or clicking an adjacent
table cell.
The new location is displayed in the table cell. The STM software
assigns the statistical data of this Event to this location.
Configuring a location
Checking the configuration of a location
To check whether you have configured the Events of a location correctly:
In the “Location configuration” dialog box, click the button shown on
the left.
The “Location check” dialog box opens.
If the text “Location: All required parameters have been set.” appears in
green at the bottom of the dialog box, you location is configured so that
all data can be transmitted. You can now transmit the data of this
configuration to the cell transmitters using a job.
If the text “Location: Not all required parameters have been set” appears
in red at the bottom of the dialog box, your location is not configured
completely. If you transmit this configuration to the cell transmitters
using a job, only the data of completely configured categories are
transmitted.
You can find the cause of the incompleteness by searching through the
folder tree in the “Location check” dialog box. The folder tree is divided up
into locations, categories, cells and Events.
Events configured completely are marked with a green tick.
Events not configured completely are marked with a red cross. Missing
settings are displayed in plain text for Events of this kind.
If “Missing audio source” is displayed, assign an audio source to this
Event in the corresponding category (see “Assigning an audio source
to an Event” on page 8-57).
If “Missing MTS assignment” is displayed, assign an MTS to this Event
in the corresponding category (see “Assigning an MTS for a category
to an Event” on page 8-65).
If “Modified” is displayed in red, the corresponding parameter has
been changed in such a way that it is necessary to update the data in
the receivers.
If “RF channel shared with” is displayed at the bottom of the folder
tree, there is a risk of interference. You must therefore change the RF
channel for the corresponding MTS (see page 8-41).
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Configuring a location
Printing the configuration data of a location as an
HTML document
With the “Print location data in HTML format” button, you can print the
following configuration data of a location as an HTML document:
! MTS data
! Event settings
! Identifier settings
To print the configuration data as an HTML document:
In the “Location configuration” dialog box, click the “Print location
data in HTML format” button.
The “Print” dialog box opens.
Click the desired option button.
Click “OK”.
The browser opens and displays the HTML document. In addition, the
HTML document is saved in the project folder and is given the name of
the location with the respective suffix (e.g. _MTS, _Event) and the
extension .html.
– For the “MTS data in the location” print option
e.g.: “...\VanGoghExhibition_MTS.html”.
– For the “Event settings in the location” print option
e.g.: “...\VanGoghExhibition_Event.html”.
– For the “Identifier settings of the location events” print option
e.g.: “...\VanGoghExhibition_Ids.html”.
The displayed HTML document can be printed using the print feature of
your browser.
If you click “Cancel” or the buttton, the operation is cancelled and no
HTML document is printed and saved.
Accepting/discarding the configuration of a location
Although you have configured categories, MTS and Events, you still have
to confirm all settings made:
To do so, click “OK” in the “Location configuration” dialog box.
If you click “Cancel” or the
discarded.
8-74
button instead, all changes made are
Adding locations
Adding locations
You can add locations to your project in two different ways. Besides
location “0” with fixed Events, the INM can manage up to 63 locations
with variable Events.
1. You can create a new location and configure it via the INM as described
in the preceding chapter.
2. You can import a
installation created using the ADM software
(delivered with GP 3000 series units) as a location (see “Importing a
location” on page 8-78). You can further edit this location using the
INM.
If you import a
installation:
! It must have precisely the same number of categories as you specified
for location “0”.
! The content of the categories should correspond (e.g. Category 1
should be “English” in all locations and Category 2 should be
“German” in all locations).
These added locations differ considerably from location “0”.
Adding a new location
To add a new location:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Add location” and then “Create new
location”.
The “New location” dialog box opens.
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Adding locations
Click
.
The folder selection box opens.
If necessary, create a new location folder by clicking the “New folder”
button.
Select the desired folder and confirm your selection.
The location folder is displayed in the “Path” field.
In the “ID” field, the INM suggests an ID number for the location. You
can change this ID number if you wish.
It is not possible to assign the same ID number to several locations.
In the “Number of cells” field, enter the number of cells planned for
the location.
You can later add or delete cells at any time.
To make additional specifications in order to accelerate the later
configuration of the Events, proceed as follows:
8-76
Click “Advanced”.
The dialog box is expanded.
Adding locations
In the “Default settings for identifier transmitters” box, specify the
default configuration for the identifiers as described under “Setting
up the identifiers” on page 8-67.
In the “Event type (default)” box, click the event type planned most
frequently in your project.
The number of possible Events of all locations with variable Events is
limited by the number in the “Start ID of fixed Events” box. If this number
is for example set to “301”, the Event numbers 100 to 300 are available
for each location with variable Events, i.e. memory spaces for 200 variable
Events. If you require more memory spaces for variable Events, you can
increase the number in the “Start ID of fixed Events” box. This also
reduces the number of fixed Events of location “0”. You can only increase
the Event numbers of the variable Events by the number of Events free in
location “0”.
Caution!
If you change the start ID of the fixed Events, all Events of location “0”
are given new Event numbers.
In order to ensure that the identifiers trigger the correct Events, you
have to transmit the new data to all receivers and identifiers.
To increase the start ID of fixed Events:
Right-click the title bar of the “New location” dialog box.
The system menu opens.
Click “Change the start ID of fixed events”.
The “Set the start number of fixed events” dialog box opens.
In the “First number of fixed events” box, enter the desired Event
number or click one of the arrows until the desired value appears in
the box.
If the value entered is outside the permissible range, the “Error”
window appears.
In this case, click “OK” and enter a value within the permissible range
into “First number of fixed events” box.
Click “OK” in the “Set the start number of fixed events” dialog box.
The value entered is displayed in grey in the “Start ID of fixed Events”
box in the “New location” dialog box. The fixed Events of location “0”
are then renumbered.
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Adding locations
Click “OK” in the “New location” dialog box.
The location is added to the project and displayed in the “Cell
transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field.
The “Location configuration” dialog box opens (see “Configuring a
location” on page 8-23). You can now edit the location.
Caution!
The location configuration is not saved until you save it manually (see
“Saving a project” on page 8-21). If you exit the program without
saving the project beforehand, all settings you entered are lost!
Importing a location
To import a location:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Add location” and then “Import from
ADM database”.
The “New location: Data import from an ADM database” dialog box
opens.
8-78
Click
.
The file selection box opens.
Search through the folder containing the
installation and
select the ADM database (*.MDB).
File path and name are displayed in the “Database with the guidePORT
installation” box.
The name of the installation is displayed in the “Name” field.
The number of the location is displayed in the “ID” box.
Adding locations
If the selected ADM database has a lower number of categories than the
existing
project, the “Warning” dialog box is displayed.
To confirm the warning:
Click “OK”.
File path and name are displayed in the “Database with the guidePORT
installation” box.
The name of the installation appears in the “Name” filed.
The number of the location is shown in the “ID” box.
If you click “Cancel”, the process is cancelled, the “Warning” dialog box
is closed and the “New location: Data import from an ADM database”
dialog box appears with empty fields.
If the selected ADM database has a larger number of categories than the
existing
project, the “Error” window is displayed and the ADM
database cannot be imported.
To confirm the error:
Click “OK”.
The process is cancelled, the “Error” window is closed and the “New
location: Data import from an ADM database” dialog box appears with
empty fields.
If the selected ADM database is not to be found in the project folder, the
“Confirm” dialog box is displayed.
To continue the process and confirm the dialog box:
Click “Yes”.
All data of the ADM installation (including audio data) is copied to the
project folder.
If you click “No”, the process is cancelled, the “Confirm” dialog box is
closed and the “New location: Data import from an ADM database”
dialog box appears with empty fields.
8-79
Adding locations
If the project folder already contains a subfolder of the same name, the
“Confirm” dialog box is displayed.
Danger of data loss!
When files are copied to other folders, all files with the same name are
overwritten and the existing files are replaced by the new files. The old
files are lost irrevocably and the exhibition is changed irrevocably too.
Please make sure that no files with the same name are to be found in
the new folder.
To overwrite the existing subfolder and copy the files:
Click “OK”.
All data of the ADM installation (including audio data) is copied to the
project folder and the existing files are overwritten.
If you click “Cancel”, the process is cancelled, the “Confirm” dialog box
is closed and the “New location: Data import from an ADM database”
diialog box appears with empty fields.
If no dialog boxes are displayed or you want all dialog boxes displayed to
be confirmed, the file path and name appears in the “Database with the
guidePORT installation” box in the “New location: Data import from an
ADM database” dialog box.
The name of the installation appears in the “Name” field.
You can change the number of the location displayed in the “ID” box.
You can change the number of the location by selecting a number
from the “ID” box.
If you want to overwrite an existing location, select a number that has
already been assigned. The “Confirm” dialog box opens.
Danger of data loss!
When existing locations are overwritten, all files with the same name
are overwritten and the existing files are replaced by the new files.
The old files are lost irrevocably and the exhibition is changed
irrevocably too.
Please make sure that you really want to replace the existing files by
new ones.
To overwrite the existing location, delete the existing files irrevocably and
replace them with new files:
8-80
Click “Yes”.
The existing location is irrevocably overwritten with the data of the
ADM database. The “Location configuration” dialog box opens.
Adding locations
The number of possible Events of all locations with variable Events is
limited by the number in the “Start ID of fixed Events” box. If this number
is for example set to “301”, the Event numbers 100 to 300 are available
for each location with variable Events, i.e. memory spaces for 200 variable
Events. If you require more memory spaces for variable Events, you can
increase the number in the “Start ID of fixed Events” box. This also
reduces the number of fixed Events of location “0”. You can only increase
the Event numbers of the variable Events by the number of Events free in
location “0”.
Caution!
If you change the start ID of the fixed Events, all Events of location “0”
are given new Event numbers.
In order to ensure that the identifiers trigger the correct Events, you
have to transmit the new data to all receivers and identifiers.
To increase the start ID of fixed Events:
Right-click the title bar of the “New location” dialog box.
The system menu opens.
Click “Change the start ID of fixed events”.
The “Set the start number of fixed events” dialog box opens.
In the “First number of fixed events” box, enter the desired Event
number or click one of the arrows until the desired value appears in
the box.
If the value entered is outside the permissible range, the “Error”
window appears.
In this case, click “OK” and enter a value within the permissible range
into “First number of fixed events” box.
Click “OK” in the “Set the start number of fixed events” dialog box.
The value entered is displayed in grey in the “Start ID of fixed Events”
box in the “New location” dialog box. The fixed Events of location “0”
are then renumbered.
Once you have made all settings and confirmed all dialog boxes, you can
complete the importing of a location.
Click “OK” In the “New location: Data import from an ADM database”
dialog box.
The installation is added to the
project and displayed in the
“Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the project” field.
The “Location configuration” dialog box opens (see “Configuring a
location” on page 8-23). You can now edit the location.
Caution!
The project configuration is not saved until you save it manually (see
“Saving a project” on page 8-21). If you exit the program without
saving the project beforehand, all settings you entered are lost!
8-81
Deleting locations
Deleting locations
To delete a location:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Delete location” and then the location
you want to delete.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
To delete the location:
Click “Yes”.
The location is deleted complete with all configurations and possibly
all jobs concerning the location.
Note:
The location has been deleted, but the data is still in the memory. Only
when the project is saved (for example when you close the program) is
the location finally deleted from the project.
8-82
Configuring jobs
Configuring jobs
As the administrator, you plan the transmission of the configuration data
for the updating of the cell transmitters and receivers. These planned jobs
are started automatically as soon as the planned time has come. The
following job types are available:
! Download job for data transmission for immediate reproduction for
the stationary download to the receivers (streaming method).
! Download job for data transmission to cell transmitters for the
updating of the cell transmitters for the mobile download to the
receivers.
Configuring download jobs
To configure a download job for data transmission to the cell
transmitters:
Note:
If you configure a download job for an incompletely configured
project, the following warning appears:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Configure download jobs” or click the
“Configure download jobs” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure download jobs” dialog box opens.
The “Download job” field contains all jobs configured up to now.
8-83
Configuring jobs
The details of the configuration of the job you clicked in the “Download
job” field appear in the “Settings of the selected download job” field.
The “Target objects” field lists the Base Station PCs and cell transmitters
to be addressed by the job clicked in the “Download job” field.
Job for data transmission using the Job for updating the data in the cell
streaming method
transmitters
The cell transmitter transmitting
data using the streaming method
is marked in each location.
All cell transmitters whose data is
updated are marked.
There are three buttons at the bottom left of the “Configure download
jobs”dialog box:
“Add” for configuring new jobs,
“Edit” for changing the configuration of a job,
“Remove” for deleting jobs.
Configuring a new job
To configure a new job:
8-84
In the “Configure download jobs” dialog box, click “Add”.
The “Download configuration” dialog box opens.
Configuring jobs
In the “Download job name” field, enter an unambiguous, selfexplanatory name for the job.
In the “Download type” box, define the type of job as follows:
– Click “Stationary receiver data download” if data transmission via
the streaming method is to be carried out for stationary receiver
download.
– Click “Cell transmitter data transfer for mobile receiver data update”
if updating of the cell transmitters is to be carried out for mobile
receiver download.
Only if you have selected “Stationary receiver data download” In the
“Download type” box:
In the “Update option” box, define the volume of the job as follows:
– Click “Transmit the entire project” if all completely configured data
of the project has to be transmitted – regardless of whether part of
the data was transmitted at an earlier date. Depending on the size of
your exhibition, this can take quite some time.
– Click “Transmit only changes” if only the data changed since the last
fixed updating process has to be transmitted (see “Defining the
project status as the basis for updates” on page 8-88).
Caution!
If there is old audio data of another project in your receivers and you
transmit audio data of new project for the first time, the old audio
data is possibly not replaced!
For this reason, be sure to delete all old audio data in the receivers as
described under “Deleting the Storage Events audio data” on
page 10-25 before transmitting audio data of a new project for the
first time.
Only if you have selected “Stationary receiver data download” In the
“Download type” box:
In the “Selected locations” group, click the check boxes of the locations
for which the job is to be configured.
Only the data of locations selected via a tick are transmitted.
In the “Date” field of the “Target date” box, click either
– day, month and year one after the other and enter the desired date
on which the job is to be executed
– or the drop down arrow.
The calendar list field appears.
In the calendar list field, click the day on which the job is to be
executed.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
In the “Time” field of the “Target date” box, click either
– hours and minutes one after the other and enter the desired time at
which the job is to be executed
– or the arrow buttons
minutes.
to increase or decrease the hours and
Note:
Please take the following into account when scheduling jobs: the INM
attempts to start the job at the selected time. If another job is
8-85
Configuring jobs
executed at this time, the INM postpones the start by up to 20
minutes. If the job cannot be started within 20 minutes after the
deadline because another job is still being executed, the job is never
started again!
In the “Transmitters” field, click the CT ID numbers of all cell
transmitters transmitting data one after the other.
Job for data transmission using
the streaming method
Job for updating the data in the
cell transmitters
You mark the cell transmitter
transmitting data using the
streaming method in each
location.
You mark all cell transmitters
whose data is to be updated.
Note:
Make sure that the following components of your
turned on at the selected time:
system are
– All Base Station PCs required (the BSS and BSM software must be
running on all Base Station PCs)
– All cell transmitters required
– The Central PC (the INM and LMS software must be running)
Only when you configure a job for data transmission via the streaming
method, you must define an RF channel for transmission as follows:
In the “Transmitters” field, click the hyperlink behind “RF Channel”
after all Base Station PCs whose cell transmitter the job requires.
The channel selection box opens.
To avoid reception interference, select a channel via which no Live
Event is transmitted during the entire project.
To complete the configuration of the job:
Click “OK” in the “Download configuration” dialog box.
The job is then displayed in the “Download job” field of the “Configure
download jobs” dialog box.
Click “OK” again in the “Download job” dialog box.
The job is then displayed on the “Pending” tab in the main window
(see “The two tabs “Pending” and “Done”” on page 8-5).
As soon as the job is started, the “Jobstatus” dialog box appears:
The INM now generates the EAT (Event Assignment Table) as well as the
MTS data and saves them in the temporary folder of the operating system
8-86
Configuring jobs
in the “guidePort” folder. Depending on the data volume, this can take
some time.
If data communication between the INM and CHM software is possible, the
saved EAT and MTS data are automatically transmitted to the cell
transmitters and the “Information” dialog box appears.
Make sure that the number of segments does not exceed 511 (see
“Calculating the number of segments for stationary download in
advance” on page 6-25).
In the CHM software, enter the parameters displayed here (download
channel and number of segments) as described under “The Charger
Manager (CHM)” on page 10-1 and following.
Make sure that the receivers carrying out the download are ready to
receive data (the LEDs of the receivers flash and a dialog box in the
CHM software appears, indicating that the receivers are ready for
downloading).
Click “OK”.
Transmission of the saved EAT and MTS data to the cell transmitters
begins. The progress of data transmission is displayed by a progress
bar.
When the data transmission is finished, the progress bar disappears.
CAUTION!
Danger when skipping job segments!
The data is divided into so-called job segments which are
then transmitted. These job segments are displayed
during data transmission. If individual job segments have
already been transmitted, you can skip these segments.
Only skip individual job segments when you are sure
that this data has already been transmitted.
To skip a job segment, right-click the job on the
“Pending” tab and select “Skip job segment” from the
shortcut menu.
8-87
Configuring jobs
Editing download jobs
Editing the configuration of a download job
To edit the configuration of a download job:
In the “Configure download jobs” dialog box or the “Download job”
field, double-click the job whose configuration you want to edit.
Click “Edit”.
Or:
On the “Pending” or “Done” tab, double-click the job whose
configuration you want to edit.
The “Download configuration” dialog box opens.
Enter the desired changes as described under “Configuring a new job”
on page 8-84 and click “OK”.
Editing jobs
To edit jobs:
In Administrator mode, right-click the job you want to edit on the
“Pending” or “Done” tab.
The shortcut menu opens. The following commands on the shortcut
menu are available for each job:
– To edit the configuration of a job (the schedule or the name of the
job etc.), click “Edit job configuration”.
– To stop a job during execution, click “Stop job”. Execution of the job
is cancelled. “Cancelled” is displayed in the “Status” column.
– To delete a job, click “Delete job”. The job is removed from the tab
and never executed again.
– To re-activate a temporarily deactivated job, click “Activate job”.
– To temporarily deactivate a job, click “Deactivate job”. The job is not
executed until you activate it again.
– To repeat a job, click “Repeat job” (only available on the “Done” tab).
– To skip the currently transmitted segment of a job using the
streaming method (e.g. Event information of a category or audio
information for a category of a cell), click “Skip job segment”.
Defining the project status as the basis for updates
You can define the project status as the basis for updates. This allows you
to only transmit the changes made since this project status in the future.
Caution!
We urgently recommend defining the project status as the basis for
updates immediately once you have successfully carried out transmission of the entire project for stationary receiver download!
8-88
Configuring jobs
To define the project status as the basis for updates:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Define the project status as basis for
updates”.
The “Confirmation” dialog box opens.
Click “Yes”.
The update status of the project is fixed.
Removing download jobs
To remove a download job for data transmission to the cell transmitters:
In the “Configure download jobs” dialog box or the “Download job”
field, click the job you want to remove.
The configuration of the job appears in the “Settings of the selected
download job” field.
The Base Station PCs and cell transmitters which the job tries to
address appear in the “Target objects” field.
Click “Remove”.
The “Confirm” dialog box opens.
To remove the job:
Click “Yes”.
The job is removed from the “Download job” field.
8-89
Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA
Transferring identifier configurations to
the PDA
The system files for controlling the identifiers must be transferred to a
PDA. From there they are transferred one after the other to the individual
identifiers in your exhibition (see “Transmitting identifier settings from
the PDA to an identifier (Send Parameters)” on page 12-11).
You can use
! either a 3Com PalmTop with Palm OS and HotSync 4.0 (or higher) (see
next section)
! or a Pocket PC with Microsoft Windows Mobile (see page 8-91) and a
synchronization software matching the operating system:
– either Microsoft® ActiveSync
(if you are using Windows 2000 or XP)
– or Microsoft Windows Mobile Device Center
(if you are using Windows Vista)
Transferring identifier configurations to a 3Com
PalmTop
To generate identifier system files which are to be transferred to the
identifiers using a 3Com PalmTop:
Make sure that the Hotsync synchronization software (version 4.o or
higher) is installed on the Central PC.
Connect the PalmTop to the Central PC.
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Create identifier data for PalmOS” and
then the desired location.
The “Palm data transfer” dialog box opens.
8-90
Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA
Select the desired memory position from the “PDA target installation”
box.
The PalmTop can save data records of up to three locations.
If you had copied identifier system files to the selected memory
position of the PalmTop at an earlier stage, the principal
characteristics of the data transmitted earlier can be found in the
“Target installation status since last transfer” box.
Click “Prepare”.
The “Information” dialog box opens.
Trigger the HotSync function of the PalmTop.
The dialog box disappears automatically as soon as data tranfer
begins. A location copied to the selected memory position at an earlier
stage is deleted on the PalmTop!
If you cancel the process, a dialog box appears and you can trigger data
transfer afterwards.
This allows you to set up the identifiers of another location before
triggering data transfer to the PalmTop.
Transferring identifier configurations to a Pocket PC
To generate identifier system files which are to be transferred to the
identifiers using a Microsoft Pocket PC:
Make sure that a synchronization software matching the operating
system is installed on the Central PC:
– either Microsoft® ActiveSync
(if you are using Windows 2000 or XP)
– or Microsoft Windows Mobile Device Center
(if you are using Windows Vista)
Make the connection between Pocket PC and central PC.
Depending on the Pocket PC model used, this can be a cable
connection, a docking station or a wireless infrared or Bluetooth
connection.
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Create identifier data for Microsoft®
Pocket PC” and then the desired location.
8-91
Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA
The “PDA data preparation” dialog box opens.
Select the desired memory position from the “Palm target
installation” box.
The Pocket PC can save data records of up to three locations.
If you had copied identifier system files to the selected memory
position of the Pocket PC at an earlier stage, the principal
characteristics of the data transmitted earlier can be found in the
“Target installation status since last transfer” box.
Click “Prepare”.
The “Confirm” dialog box opens.
Click:
– “No” if you first want to configure identifiers belonging to another
location and later want to transmit the system files of several
locations to the PDA together.
“Yes” if you want to transmit the data configured up to now to the
PDA.
A status message appears.
The result of the transmission
acknowledgement message.
8-92
is
now
indicated
by
an
Changing options
Changing options
The “Options” command on the “Tools” menu allows you to:
! define the program start settings,
! change the Administrator password,
! control the special functions.
Defining the program start settings
You can configure the program so that the last project file opened will
automatically be loaded on program start:
Make sure that the project file to be loaded automatically on program
start is loaded.
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options” or click the “Options” button
( ) on the toolbar.
The “Options” dialog box opens.
To automatically load the last project file opened on program start:
On the “System files” tab, click the “Load file automatically when
application is started” check box so that a tick appears.
To not load a project file on program start:
On the “System files” tab, click the “Load file automatically when
application is started” check box so that the tick disappears.
Changing the password
You need the password in order to change from Operator mode to
Administrator mode. To change this password:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
8-93
Changing options
Click the “Password” tab.
In the “Enter old password” field, enter the current password.
In the “Enter new password” field, enter the new password.
In the “Re-enter new password” field, re-enter the new password.
Click “Apply”.
The new password is applied.
Updating the firmware of the receivers
You can update the internal software of the receivers (firmware) by
transferring the firmware like the audio information of a Storage Events
by means of a job:
8-94
Make sure that Sennheiser Customer Service has enable the updating
of the receiver firmware in the “Charger Manager” software.
Check the www.guideport.de page for the latest version of the receiver
firmware.
Download the new firmware file (file format *.hex) and save it on the
hard disk.
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Special functions” tab.
Changing options
Click the “Activate EK3200 firmware updating” check box and click
“OK”.
The new command “EK3200 firmware update” is added to the “Edit”
menu.
Make sure that your project is loaded.
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Special download job for” and then
“EK3200 firmware update”.
The “Download configuration” dialog box opens.
Configure the job as described under “Configuring a new job” on
page 8-84.
In the “Task” box, click the
button or use the tab key to navigate
to the “Firmware file” field and press the F4 key.
The file selection box opens.
Select the firmware file that you saved on your hard disk.
Once you have made all the settings:
Click “OK” in the “Download configuration” dialog box.
The “Information” dialog box appears.
8-95
Changing options
The Sennheiser Customer Service requires these parameters.
Once the Sennheiser Customer Service has transmitted these
parameters to the receivers via the “Charger Manager” software, click
“OK” in the “Information” dialog box.
The firmware is updated as soon as the job is executed.
Updating the alarm signal of the receivers
You can update the alarm signal of the receivers by transferring new
alarm audio file by means of a job.
Caution!
Very loud and continuous alarm signals reduce the range of the
identifier which triggers the “Alarm Off” System Event. Thus, if you set
a very loud or continuous tone as an alarm signal, we recommend that
you set the transmission power of the identifier triggering the “Alarm
Off” System Event to “100 %” using the IDC software. In order that
this identifier can reliably switch off the very loud or continuous tone,
the receiver must be closer than 1 m to the identifier!
Alarm signals becoming louder or quieter do not affect the range of
the identifier.
To update the alarms signal of the receivers:
8-96
Make sure that Sennheiser Customer Service has enable the updating
of the alarm signal in the “Charger Manager” software.
Save the audio file (file format *.wav) of the new alarm signal on the
hard disk.
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Special functions” tab.
Changing options
Click the “Activate update for alarm signal” check box and click “OK”.
The new command “Alarm signal update” is added to the “Edit” menu.
Make sure that your project is loaded.
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Special download job for” and then
“Alarm signal update”.
The “Download configuration” dialog box opens.
Configure the job as described under “Configuring a new job” on
page 8-84.
In the “Task” box, click the
button or use the tab key to navigate
to the “Firmware file” field and press the F4 key.
The file selection box opens.
Select the audio file that you saved on your hard disk.
Once you have made all the settings:
Click “OK” in the “Download configuration” dialog box.
The “Information” dialog box appears.
8-97
Changing options
The Sennheiser Customer Service requires these parameters.
Once the Sennheiser Customer Service has transmitted these
parameters to the receivers via the “Charger Manager” software, click
“OK” in the “Information” dialog box.
The alarm signal is updated as soon as the job is executed.
Updating the jingle of the receivers
You can update the jingle of the receivers by transferring new audio
information by means of a job.
8-98
Make sure that Sennheiser Customer Service has enable the updating
of the jingle in the “Charger Manager” software.
Save the audio file (file format *.wav) of the new jingle on the hard
disk.
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Special functions” tab.
Click the “Activate jingle update” check box and click “OK”.
The new command “Jingle update” is added to the “Edit” menu.
Changing options
Make sure that your project is loaded.
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Special download job for” and then
“Jingle update”.
The “Download configuration” dialog box opens.
Configure the job as described under “Configuring a new job” on
page 8-84.
In the “Task” box, click the
button or use the tab key to navigate
to the “Firmware file” field and press the F4 key.
The file selection box opens.
Select the audio file that you saved on your hard disk.
Once you have made all the settings:
Click “OK” in the “Download configuration” dialog box.
The “Information” dialog box appears.
8-99
Changing options
The Sennheiser Customer Service requires these parameters.
8-100
Once the Sennheiser Customer Service has transmitted these
parameters to the receivers via the “Charger Manager” software, click
“OK” in the “Information” dialog box.
The jingle is updated as soon as the job is executed.
Monitoring the INM
Monitoring the INM
All jobs which the INM carries out on one day are recorded in a log file. If
problems occurred during execution of a job, all relevant information is to
be found here.
Opening log files
The “guidePORT \ bin \ LOG” folder contains a subfolder (e.g.
“LOG-2005-01”) for each month in which jobs were executed. The INM
saves the log files in these subfolders. The INM save one file per day. The
file names contain the name of the installation and the date (e.g.
“VanGoghExhibition_2005-01-15”).
Open the log file with the desired date (for example in the Windows
editor).
24.11.2006 08:44:27
Update changes
Data download to Rx
24.11.2006 08:45:20
Update Van Gogh Exhibition Data download to cell transmitter
24.11.2006 08:46:49
Update The Old Masters
24.11.2006 08:45:20
Update Van Gogh Exhibition Data download to cell transmitter
Data download to cell transmitter
Example of a log file
Each line contains the following information:
! The time at which the job was started
! The update options of the job (see “Configuring a new job” on
page 8-84)
! The download type of the job (see “Configuring a new job” on
page 8-84)
! The error message of the cell transmitter. If there are no errors: “OK”
If an error occurs during execution of a job, the “Error” dialog box is
displayed in the INM. The dialog box with the error message remains
visible until the error message is confirmed. This confirmation is entered
in the log file with the date and time of confirmation, for example:
====> Error message ACKNOWLEDGED on: 8/16/2004 3:57:42 PM <====
8-101
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
The Operator mode is used for:
! checking the project for completeness,
! deleting jobs.
Checking a project for completeness
To check whether you have configured the Events of all locations
correctly:
From the “Edit” menu, choose “Check for project completeness”.
The “Project check” dialog box opens.
If the text “Project: All required parameters have been set.” appears in
green at the bottom of the dialog box, you location is configured so that
all data can be transmitted. You can now transmit the data of this
configuration to the cell transmitters using a job.
If the text “Project: Not all required parameters have been set” appears in
red at the bottom of the dialog box, your location is not configured
completely. If you transmit this configuration to the cell transmitters
using a job, only the data of completely configured categories are
transmitted.
You can find the cause of the incompleteness by searching through the
folder tree in the “Location check” dialog box. The folder tree is divided up
into locations, categories, cells and Events.
Events configured completely are marked with a green tick.
Events not configured completely are marked with a red cross. Missing
settings are displayed in plain text for Events of this kind. If you want to
set up a download job with an incomplete project configuration, the
8-102
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
following warning appears:
Monitoring jobs
The operator should monitor the execution of jobs as follows:
Regularly check the jobs on the “Done” tab and make sure that “OK” is
always displayed in the “Last Info” column.
If “Data error” is displayed, the below “Error” window is activated or
the below semitransparent blue window appears on the top left
margin of the screen, the job was not executed as planned!
Note:
If you click a job in Administrator mode, a detailed description of the
jobs and any problems occurred during execution appear. Incorrect
execution of jobs can have the following causes:
– Error during creation of the configuration
– Base Station PCs are not turned on or not connected
– Cell transmitters are not turned on or not connected
– Antennas are not connected
– License is missing
Using the online Help
To get online Help on the INM:
From the “Help” menu, choose “Help” or press the F1 key.
The online Help opens.
8-103
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Displaying the version number of the INM
To display the version number of the INM:
From the “Help” menu, choose “About...”.
The Installation Manager dialog box opens.
Displaying the license Information
The “Dongle Info” dialog box opens automatically and displays the up-todate license information in the following cases:
! The dongle is not inserted
! The TCP/IP connection to the LMS module does not function
To display the license information manually:
From the “Help” menu, choose “Dongle”.
The “Dongle Info” dialog box opens (see the following section).
Note:
If the “Dongle Info” dialog box is open, all jobs which are currently
being executed are interrupted until the “Dongle Info” dialog box is
closed.
8-104
The “Dongle Info” dialog box
The “Dongle Info” dialog box
The “Dongle Info” dialog box opens automatically if the dongle is not
inserted or it is not possible to establish the connection to the LMS
module.
It displays the up-to-date license information:
! “Address”:
Network name of the computer on which the LMS software is installed.
! “Port”:
TCP/IP port via which the STM communicates with the LMS module.
! “Status”:
General information, for example on whether the dongle was
detected.
! “Serial Number”:
Serial number of the dongle.
! “gP_SYS”:
License information for the
SYS software package including
the INM software module (is only displayed if you click the “Check”
button).
! “gP_STM”:
License information for the
! “gP_ANM”:
License information for the
if you click the “Check” button).
STM software.
ANM software (is only displayed
Detailed information on the LMS software is given in the chapter see “The
License Manager Server (LMS)” on page 16-1.
8-105
Recommendations/Tips
Recommendations/Tips
Setting up a Null Event
In some special cases, it can be desirable to set up a Storage Event
without a content (Null Event). This is advisable when:
! For example, if you want feedback on whether the visitors pass by an
area with no exhibits (park, playground, restaurant etc.) or stay there
for a while, you can install an identifier which triggers a Null Event in
this area. This happens unnoticed by the visitors. However, when the
receivers are returned and the statistical data read, you are given
information on the acceptance of these areas.
! If you offer a multimedia presentation or video show in your
exhibition, the corresponding sound is transmitted as a Live Event.
When the visitors leave the presentation, they continue to hear the
sound until they either leave the transmission range of the antennas
transmitting the Live Events or they enter the magnetic field of
another identifier. It can therefore happen that the visitors still receive
the soundtrack of the video although they have already left the room.
In rooms larger than the magnetic field of the identifier you cannot
use the “Live, on ID range” Event as visitors not directly within the
magnetic field will not be able to hear anything.
However, you can fade out the soundtrack of the video at the exit of
the room by setting up a Null Event which is then assigned to an
identifier at the exit.
To set up a Null Event:
Use a sound processing software to create a small WAV file containing
a “digital zero” (also known as “digital silence” depending on the
sound processing software):
– Sampling rate:
8-106
16 kHz
– Resolution:
16 bit
– Format:
mono
– Playing time:
0.5 s
Set up a Storage Event as described under “Configuring Events” on
page 8-46. Name this Event a “Null Event”.
Assign this WAV file with digital silence to the Null Event.
Index
Index
Keywords in blue indicate texts from the software like menus, fields, tabs and so on.
A
Activate EK3200 firmware updating 8-95
Activate jingle update 8-98
Activate update for alarm signal 8-97
Add new category 8-34
Add new cell 8-44
Administrator 8-8
activating the Administrator mode 8-15
changing the password 8-93
entering the password 8-8
Alarm signal 8-96
Ant. site 8-29, 8-43
Antenna of the cell transmitter
entering the site 8-43
selecting the antenna type 8-43
Antenna of the identifier 8-18, 8-69
Audio input 8-27
Audio quality
selecting 8-60, 8-63
Audio source 8-13, 8-29, 8-57, 8-58, 8-60, 8-64,
8-65
B
B if A 8-52
B if A Event 8-30
configuring 8-49, 8-52
BSM PC 8-6
C
Categories
adding 8-34
assigning a name 8-33
changing the name 8-33
editing 8-33
removing 8-34
Category 8-25
Category 8-25
Category information 8-25
Cell transmitter data transfer for mobile receiver data
update 8-85
Cell transmitter parameters in the locations of the
project 8-4, 8-6
Cell transmitter table 8-27
Cell transmitters
adding 8-38
assigning an RF channel 8-41
configuring 8-38
replacing 8-38
setting the transmitting power 8-42
site 8-41
turning the transmitting antenna on and off via the
software 8-42
Cells
adding 8-44
cell tab 8-44
creating 8-43
in location 0 8-43
removing 8-45
renaming 8-44
Changing the Event type 8-49
changing the loader value 8-40
Charge 8-28
Check settings for completeness 8-24
Configuration data 8-4, 8-6
Configure download jobs 8-5, 8-83
Connection Host 8-4, 8-6
Convert 8-59
Country code 8-9, 8-17
Create new configuration 8-5, 8-9, 8-16
CT-ID/MTS 8-29
Cycle 8-18, 8-69
D
Date 8-85
Default settings for identifier transmitters
8-77
Define new Event 8-46
Delete event 8-47
Detail Event 8-30
configuring 8-49, 8-55
setting up 8-49
Done 8-4, 8-5
editing jobs 8-88
tab 8-5
Dongle 8-104, 8-105
displaying license information 8-104
Download channel 8-87
Download job 8-83
Download type 8-14, 8-85
8-17,
E
Edit
Add location 8-75, 8-78
Check for project completeness
8-102
8-107
Index
Configure download jobs 8-83
Create Palm data 8-90, 8-91
Delete location 8-82
Download job for EK3200 firmware 8-95, 8-97,
8-99
Fix the project update state 8-89
Open location 8-23
Eingang
Guided Tour Event konfigurieren 8-56
Empfänger
auf Führungskanal eines Mobilsenders
einstellen 8-56
Entrance Event
configuring 8-49
Error message
in log file 8-101
when editing table rows 8-32
Event
B if A 8-52
Changing the Event type 8-49
Detail 8-55
Event Info 8-30
Event table 8-29
Event with lead in 8-30
configuring 8-49
Events
adding 8-46
assigning an audio source 8-57
assigning an MTS 8-65
Assigning the correct location 8-72
changing the audio source 8-64
configuring 8-46
deleting 8-46
deleting an MTS assignment 8-66
deleting the audio source 8-64
renaming 8-48
restoring a deleted Event 8-48
Events 8-29
F
File 8-15
Close 8-21
Exit 8-21
New 8-9, 8-16
Open 8-20
Recently opened project files 8-20
Save 8-21
Save as 8-21
Frequency 8-6
G
Geführte Tour
Empfänger konfigurieren
8-108
8-56
H
Help
opening 8-103
Help 8-5, 8-103
About... 8-104
Dongle 8-104
Host 8-27
I
ID 8-76
ID transmitter 8-67
Identifiers
adding 8-71
changing the default settings 8-71
configuring 8-67
deleting 8-71
lifetime of batteries 8-68
specifying the default settings 8-17
transferring configuration to PalmTop
Idle 8-5
Inactive 8-30, 8-48
Intro 8-25, 8-35
Intros
changing 8-36
removing 8-36
setting up 8-35
J
Jingle 8-98
Job 8-5
Job indication 8-5, 8-6
Job name 8-6
Jobs
configuring 8-83
configuring a new job 8-84
editing 8-88
monitoring 8-103
removing 8-89
L
Last info 8-5, 8-6
License
displaying 8-104
Live Event
configuring 8-49
Live Events
redirecting audio information
Load configuration 8-5, 8-20
Loader 8-28
Location
assigning to an event 8-72
8-66
8-90
Index
printing the configuration data 8-74
Location 8-72
Location check 8-73
Location configuration 8-23, 8-24
Location folder 8-23
Location folder
changing 8-23
Locations
accepting the configuration 8-74
adding 8-75
checking the configuration 8-73
configuring 8-23
deleting 8-82
importing 8-78
opening 8-23
Log file 8-101
M
Nominal volume 8-25
Menu bar 8-3
Mobile download 8-85
MTS
configuring 8-38
deleting 8-40
loader value 8-40
removing 8-40
table 8-27
MTS ID 8-27
MTS parameters in cell transmitter 8-27
N
Name 8-25, 8-29, 8-48
Name= 8-33
New identifier transmitter 8-71
Null Event
setting up 8-106
Number 8-29
Number of categories 8-9, 8-16
Number of cells 8-76
Number of Events 8-9, 8-16
O
On Id range
configuring 8-49
Operator 8-102
activating the Operator mode
logging on as 8-8
Options 8-93
Options 8-5
8-15
P
PalmTop 8-90
Password
changing 8-93
Password 8-94
Pending 8-4
editing jobs 8-88
tab 8-5
Play the event audio content 8-72
Power 8-18, 8-68
Print location data in HTML format 8-74
Priority
configuring 8-49
Program
exiting 8-21
Project
automatic loading on program start 8-93
checking the configuration 8-102
closing 8-21
creating 8-15
general procedure 8-2
creating (short description) 8-9
opening 8-20
project file 8-15
saving 8-21
Project check 8-102
R
Ready to transmit? 8-26
Receivers
updating the alarm signal 8-96
updating the firmware 8-94
updating the jingle 8-98
Redirection
Live Event 8-66
Storage Event 8-33
Related to 8-30, 8-49, 8-54, 8-55, 8-56
Remove
identifiers 8-71
MTS 8-40
Remove cell 8-45
Remove last category 8-35
Rename cell 8-44
Reroute event to 8-67
Rerouted 8-30
Rerouted to category 8-25
Rerouted to category= 8-34
Reset intro file 8-37
RF ant. Type 8-28, 8-43
RF Channel 8-86
RF channel 8-28, 8-41
RF output 8-28, 8-42
8-109
Index
RF power 8-28, 8-42
Running 8-5
S
Save configuration 8-5, 8-21
Segments 8-87
Set as default identifier 8-71
Settings of the selected download job 8-84
Site 8-28, 8-41
Special functions 8-94, 8-96, 8-98
Start 8-17, 8-68
Start ID of fixed Events
increase 8-81
Start ID of fixed Events 8-10, 8-18, 8-77, 8-81
Stationary download 8-14, 8-85
Stationary receiver data download 8-14, 8-85
Status 8-5, 8-6, 8-7, 8-25
Status bar 8-4
Stop 8-17, 8-68
Storage | Live 8-28
Storage Event
Assigning an audio file 8-57
configuring 8-49
Storage Events
playing 8-71
redirecting audio information 8-33
reproducing 8-71
Streaming method
configuring jobs 8-85
defining an RF channel 8-86
T
Table
adding rows 8-32
changing the column width 8-32
changing the sorting 8-31
changing the sorting of the table rows
check box 8-32
editing 8-31
option button 8-32
selection of a file 8-31
text input 8-31
Target objects 8-84
Target time
“Configuration data” box 8-6
tab 8-5
Time 8-85
Title bar 8-3
Toolbar 8-3, 8-5
Tools
Administrator 8-15
Options 8-93, 8-94, 8-96, 8-98
8-110
8-31
Transmit only changes 8-85
Transmit the entire project 8-14, 8-85
Transmitter 8-7
Transmitters 8-86
Transmitting power 8-42
Trigger 8-18, 8-69
Type 8-29, 8-49, 8-54, 8-55, 8-56
U
Update option
8-14, 8-85
V
Version number
displaying 8-104
Voltage 8-18, 8-70
9 The Base Station Manager (BSM)
! Runs on all Base Station PCs
! Communicates with the INM software
! Copies the system files to the connected cell transmitters
! Records all actions
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.................................................................................9-2
General procedure .............................................................................9-2
The BSM screen..................................................................................9-2
Index ................................................................................................ 9-11
9-1
Before you start
Before you start
Together with the INM software , the BSM software controls data exchange
between the cell transmitters and the Central PC. In order that the BSM can
perform its task, the cell transmitters must be connected and turned on.
We also recommend linking the BSM software to the “Autostart” program
group of the Base Station PC. In this case, it is then sufficient that the Base
Station PC is turned on in order to be able to address the cell transmitters
via the Central PC.
General procedure
The BSM works at the command of the INM software. You can thus check
all functions of the BSM from the Central PC via the INM.
However, you can also manually call up the status inquiry at a selectable
connected cell transmitter or add new cell transmitters.
The BSM screen
The BSM screen contains the two windows “Update” and “Status”, which
each have a
button and various other buttons.
9-2
The BSM screen
The “Update” window
This window displays information on the data currently being copied to
the cell transmitters.
During data transmission to the cell transmitters, the status and
information on the current transmission are displayed here. This
information shows the planned status of the location.
Note:
Data transmission is triggered via the INM software at the Central PC
(see “Configuring jobs” on page 8-83). You cannot transmit data to
the connected cell transmitters via the BSM. The “Update” window
therefore shows the local result of the job that you execute at the
Central PC for all Base Station PCs.
The “Status” window
If you carry out a manual status inquiry of a cell transmitter (see
“Displaying status information of the cell transmitters” on page 9-4), the
result is displayed here. This information shows the actual status of the cell
transmitters.
Note:
The “Status” window refers to the last status inquiry carried out!
Removing the contents of the “Status” or “Update” window
Use the
button to remove the contents of the corresponding window.
Monitoring USB activity
When data is transferred to or from the cell transmitters via USB, “USB
busy” is displayed next to a red square.
When no data is transferred to the cell transmitters via USB, “USB not
busy” is displayed next to a green square.
9-3
The BSM screen
Searching for connected cell transmitters
At start-up, the BSM software automatically searches for connected cell
transmitters. The number of cell transmitters detected (e.g.
) is
displayed next to the
button in the “Find connected
transmitters” box. The ID numbers of all connected cell transmitters (e.g.
) re displayed in the drop down list in the “Current transmitter”
box.
Caution!
If you connect cell transmitters or disconnect them from the Base
Station PC during data transmission, the data is not transmitted
completely and you have to transmit the data again.
We recommend exiting the BSM software before you connect new cell
transmitters or disconnect them from the Base Station PC.
To search for (newly) connected cell transmitters:
Click
.
The “Base Station Manager Info” window appears, indicating the
number of cell transmitters found:
The number of cell transmitters found is afterwards also displayed in
the “Find connected transmitters” box. The ID numbers are displayed
in the drop down list in the “Current transmitter” box.
Displaying status information of the cell transmitters
The BSM allows you to query the status of individual cell transmitters
manually.
To display the status of a cell transmitter:
9-4
From the drop down list in the “Current Transmitter” box, select the
cell transmitter (e.g.
).
Click
.
The “Status” window then displays:
The BSM screen
Under “Global information “SR3200”
! The ID number and site of the cell transmitter
! The number and name of the location currently stored in the cell
transmitter
! The location date
! The version number of the software and hardware of the cell
transmitter
Under “AAU0” or “AAU1”:
! Separately for each of the two connected antennas (“AAU0” or
“AAU1”):
– the status (“on” or “off”) and the transmitting power in mW
– the RF channel
– the country (“Europe” or “USA”)
– the selected antennatype (“intern” or “extern”),
For each audio input on the cell transmitter (“RTA1” to “RTA4”):
– the status (“on” or “off”)
– the ID number and the name of the Live Event
The size of the EAT (in ASCII-Bytes, EAT = Event Assignment Table, a file
with the assignments of the Events to the categories)
Monitoring the cell transmitter statuses
The statuses of the connected cell transmitters are shown on the cell
transmitter displays. However, you can also monitor the statuses of all cell
transmitters centrally via the Base Station PC:
Click the
check box.
The “Cell Transmitter Status Information” window opens.
Caution!
The “Cell Transmitter Status Information” window only displays the
cell transmitters connected to the Base Station PC and turned on. Cell
transmitters which are turned off or are not connected correctly are
not displayed!
The status information can only be read from the new cell transmitter
model SR 3200-2. The older cell transmitter models SR 3000-1 and
SR 3000-2 are displayed on a line of their own, but no status
information appears.
9-5
The BSM screen
The following information is to be found in the columns of this window:
Note:
You can display or hide certain columns as described under “Selecting
the cell transmitter status options” on page 9-7.
! “CT”:
The CT ID numbers of all connected and turned on cell transmitters.
! “Timestamp”:
Date and time of the last status inquiry. The status inquiry is usually
carried out automatically every 10 seconds. You can also permanently
turn off the status inquiries (see “Selecting the cell transmitter status
options” on page 9-7) or carry out a manual status inquiry at any time
(see “Updating the cell transmitter status display” on page 9-7).
! “Status”:
The status of the cell transmitter at a certain point in time
– If the cell transmitter functions without problems and all antenna
parameters correspond with the
database, the display of
the cell transmitter is backlit in green and a green circle appears in
the “Status” column.
– If the antenna parameters do not correspond with the
database, the display of the cell transmitter is backlit in red and a
red circle appears in the “Status” column.
– If there is a serious malfunction in the unit, an error message
appears on the cell transmitter display. The display flashes
alternately in red and green. The circle in the “Status” column also
flashes alternately in red and green.
! “AAU0” and “AAU1”:
The antenna symbols in the “AAU0” and “AAU1” columns display the
statuses of the connected active antennas:
– If the antenna was correctly initialized with the data of the current
database when the cell transmitter was turned on, the
antenna symbol appears in green.
– If the antenna was not correctly initialized with the data of the
current
database when the cell transmitter was turned on,
the antenna symbol appears in red. The corresponding MTS is not
transmitted or not transmitted correctly!
– If no MTS was assigned to this antenna in the
antenna symbol appears in grey.
database, the
! “Action”:
Shows the mode in which the cell transmitter is working:
– If the cell transmitter is working normally, “Normal Mode” appears.
– If the cell transmitter has just been turned on, “Setup Mode”
appears for a short time.
– If an announcement is being transmitted via this cell transmitter
using the “Announcement Manager” software, the following appear
one after the other: “Config GC”, “Prepare GC”, “Send GC”, “Send
Payload” and “Stop GC”.
! “Display warning”:
If a warning is displayed on the cell transmitter display, it is also shown
in the “Display warning” column.
– If there is no warning, “No Warning” is displayed.
9-6
The BSM screen
– If the cell transmitter is transmitting using antenna parameters
which deviate from the
database, a message such as “No
ADM CT1 AAU0” appears.
– If the antenna was not initialized correctly, a message such as “Error
CT1 AAU0” appears.
! “Last error”:
– If there is no error, “OK” appears.
– If there is a serious malfunction in the unit, an error message
appears on the cell transmitter display. The display flashes
alternately in red and green. The same error message appears in the
“Last error” column.
Updating the cell transmitter status display
The status display of the connected cell transmitters is updated
automatically after each data transmission to the cell transmitter via the
USB port. In addition, you can manually update the status display of the
connected cell transmitters at all times as follows:
Open the “Cell transmitter Status Information” window as described
under “Monitoring the cell transmitter statuses” on page 9-5.
Select “Refresh” from the “View” menu or press F5.
The display is updated immediately. Data and time of updating are
displayed in the “Timestamp” column.
Selecting the cell transmitter status options
In the “Cell Transmitter Status Information” window, you can display or
hide certain columns of cell transmitter status display,
Open the “Cell Transmitter Status Information” window as described
under “Monitoring the cell transmitter statuses” on page 9-5.
Select “Options” from the “View” menu.
The “Cell Transmitter Status Options” window opens.
To display or hide certain columns of the “Cell Transmitter Status
Information” window, click the corresponding check box in the
“Display columns” box.
9-7
The BSM screen
Opening the “Service Dialog” window
Some functions of BSM can only be carried out after a password check in
order to prevent damage to your location. These password-protected
functions are:
! Reprogramming of the antennas (Reprogram AAU)
! Resetting the cell transmitters (Reset)
! Updating of the cell transmitter firmware
To carry out these functions, you have to open the “Service Dialog”
window as follows:
Click the icon (
) on the title bar.
The system menu opens.
Click “Service”.
The “Enter Service Password” window opens.
Enter the password and click “OK”.
The “Service Dialog” window opens.
Note:
The password is to be found page 7-18. You cannot change this
password.
Checking the connected antennas
At turn-on, the cell transmitter checks whether all antenna provided for in
the
database are connected and initializes them using the current
antenna parameters. Thus, if an antenna is accidentally disconnected from
the cell transmitter during operation, this remains unnoticed at first!
If you do not turn on the cell transmitters every day, causing the antennas
9-8
The BSM screen
to be checked automatically during initialization, you can check the
connected antennas by initializing them manually.
Open the “Service dialog” window as described on page 9-8.
To reinitialize all connected antennas, select “All CTs” in the “Cell
transmitter selection” box; to only reinitialize the antennas of the cell
transmitter selected under “Current transmitter” in the main window,
select “Current selected CT” in the “Cell transmitter selection” box.
Click the “Reprogram AAU” button.
The antennas are reinitialized. If certain antennas cannot be
addressed, the corresponding messages appear in the “Cell
Transmitter Status Information” window.
Resetting the connected cell transmitters
You can reset the connected cell transmitters as follows
Open the “Service dialog” window as described on page 9-8.
To reset all connected cell transmitters, select “All CTs” in the “Cell
transmitter selection” box; to only reset the cell transmitter selected
9-9
The BSM screen
under “Current transmitter” in the main window, select “Current
selected CT” in the “Cell transmitter selection” box.
Click the “Reset” button.
The cell transmitter carries out a reset. The messages in the “Cell
Transmitter Status Information” window are updated.
Updating the cell transmitter firmware
To update the firmware of the cell transmitters, you first require the new
software. This is available from Sennheiser electronic, for example via the
Internet.
Save the new cell transmitter firmware (*.h86) in any folder.
Open the “Service dialog” window as described on page 9-8.
To update all connected cell transmitters, select “All CTs” in the “Cell
transmitter selection” box; to only update the cell transmitter selected
under “Current transmitter” in the main window, select “Current
selected CT” in the “Cell transmitter selection” box.
Click the “…” button and select the folder in which you stored the new
cell transmitter firmware (*.h86).
Click the “Start” button”.
The software is transferred to the cell transmitters. “SW Update”
appears on the cell transmitter display. The cell transmitters then
automatically carry out a restart.
Quitting the BSM
To quit the software:
9-10
Click
.
The “Are you sure you want to quit?” dialog box appears.
Click
.
The BSM is closed. The connected cell transmitters can now no longer
be addressed via the computer network.
Index
Index
“Status” window 9-3
“Update” window 9-3
commands
Get Status 9-4
Search 9-4
9-11
10 The Charger Manager (CHM)
! Runs on the Charger PCs
! Monitors the charging process of the rechargeable batteries and
detects errors (defective rechargeable batteries, etc.)
! Allows the temporary changing of the permanently preset category
! Allows the permanent changing of the receiver presets (category and
volume)
! Allows the reading of statistical data from the receivers
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.............................................................................. 10-2
General procedure .......................................................................... 10-3
The CHM screen............................................................................... 10-4
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup) .................................. 10-9
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode ................ 10-14
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode... 10-19
Index .............................................................................................. 10-27
10-1
Before you start
Before you start
The CHM software allows you to monitor the connected chargers and to
program the receivers inserted into the chargers.
Before you can work with the CHM software:
! The CHM requires operational RS 485 ports. These can be the ports of
an RS 485 card built in the computer or made available via an RS 232to-RS 485 interface converter.
Note:
If possible, use an RS 485 card (or an RS 232-to-RS 485 interface
converter) recommended by Sennheiser for connecting the chargers
to the Charger PC (see “Recommendations concerning the RS 485
interface” on page 5-46).
! The driver for the RS 485 ports must be installed and the Windows
Device Manager must recognize the RS 485 ports as being
“operational”!
! The chargers must be correctly connected to the serial RS 485
interfaces of the computer by means of suitable cables.
Note:
When using self-made cables for connecting the chargers to the
Charger PC, observe the correct wire assignment of the cables (please
contact your local Sennheiser dealer for assistance).
! A string (daisy-chain) with a maximum of 32 chargers can be
connected to each RS 485 interface. Each charger has ten charging
compartments (slots) for inserting the receivers. A maximum of 320
charging slots per string can thus be accessed.
! The CHM can manage a maximum of 16 strings (i.e. 5,120 receivers).
! The receivers must be inserted completely into the charging
compartments.
10-2
General procedure
General procedure
The two access levels (Access level)
The CHM is used in the following two ”access levels”:
“Standard Operation” and ”Installation Administration”.
In ”Standard Operation” mode:
! You do not require a password.
! You have restricted rights only.
! You mainly monitor the charging process of the rechargeable batteries
of the inserted receivers and can remedy relatively small problems
yourself.
! You can change the preset category of receivers for a visitor tour (see
“Changing the receiver presets temporarily” on page 10-16).
In ”Installation Administration” mode:
! You require a password.
! You have all rights (including those of ”Standard Operation” mode).
! You configure the setup settings such as the COM ports to which the
chargers are connected (see “Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)”
on page 10-9).
! You can permanently change all receiver presets such as the category
and the volume (see “Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19).
! You can read out statistics manually (see “Reading out statistical data
manually” on page 10-23).
! You can display the receiver presets (see “Displaying the receiver
presets (Get Settings)” on page 10-21).
! You can read out the version numbers of the receivers (see “Displaying
the version numbers of the internal receiver software and hardware”
on page 10-22).
During day-to-day operation, the program usually runs in ”Standard
Operation” mode. In this mode, the program mainly serves to monitor the
charging of the rechargeable batteries of the inserted receivers. From a
central point, you can easily monitor the charging of the rechargeable
batteries of several thousand receivers. For this reason, be sure to check
the display regularly in order to identify any problems occurring during the
charging process of the rechargeable batteries.
To permanently change the receiver presets or remedy errors, please
change to ”Installation Administration” mode. This requires the password.
The two receiver modes
The CHM is used in the following two receiver modes: “EK 3x00 mixed” and
”EK 3200 only”.
! The only functions available in ”EK 3x00 mixed” mode are the ones
supported by the receivers of EK 3000 type.
! The ”EK 3200 only” mode also includes the functions supported by the
receivers of EK 3200 type.
! Make sure that the CHM is adapted to the receiver types you use, as
described under “Adapting the CHM to the receivers in your exhibition
(Mode Selection)” on page 10-11.
10-3
The CHM screen
The CHM screen
The largest part of the CHM screen displays status information of the
connected chargers and the inserted receivers and allows you to select
chargers or receivers to program presets or read statistical data.
In ”Standard Operation” mode, the CHM screen contains:
! the “Device Display” area (top left, see “The “Device Display” area” on
page 10-6)
! the “Charger Display” area (bottom left, see “The “Charger Display”
area” on page 10-5)
! the “Selection” box (top right, see “The “Selection” box” on page 10-7)
! the
button for initializing strings
(see “Connecting or removing chargers” on page 10-15)
! the
button for displaying the error list
(see “Displaying the error list” on page 10-15)
! the
button for closing the CHM
(see “Closing the CHM” on page 10-16)
! the
button for opening the online Help
(see “Getting Help” on page 10-16)
In “Installation Administration” mode, the following buttons are dispayed
in addition to the above buttons:
10-4
!
(only in “EK 3200 only” receiver mode) For updating the
Storage Events audio data in the receivers (see page 10-24) and for
deleting the Storage Event audio data from the receivers (see
page 10-25)
!
For reading out the statistics files manually (see page 10-23)
The CHM screen
!
For displaying the version numbers of the internal receiver
software and hardware (see page 10-22)
!
For changing the receiver presets permanently (see
page 10-19)
!
For establishing the basic configuration of the CHM (see
page 10-9)
If you have inverted the display (see “Inverting the program display” on
page 10-12), the CHM screen (in ”Installation Administration” mode)
looks as follows:
The “Charger Display” area
The “Charger Display” area displays the status information of the
individual chargers. The chargers are connected to one another to form
strings. One string consists of a maximum of 32 chargers. Each string is
connected to one physical RS 485 port on the Charger PC.
10-5
The CHM screen
A row in the “Charger Display” area corresponds to a string and, within this
row, each charger is represented by an individual symbol. The symbols
have the following meanings:
A charger symbol shown in red:
! At least one charging compartment (slot) or one receiver inserted into
the charger is defective.
! The connection to this charger is faulty.
Click this string to display the individual chargers and receivers in the
“Device Display” area. You can then identify the unit which caused the
problem and eliminate the error.
A charger symbol shown in green:
! Problems did not occur with this charger.
A monitor symbol instead of the charger symbol:
! The chargers checked by the CHM software one by one. The monitor
symbol shows the checking activity within a string.
Empty charger positions at the end of a string:
! It was not possible to assign addresses to the chargers.
Possible cause: no charger connected, charger not detected, charger
not turned on.
The whole string is deactivated and cannot be selected:
! The corresponding RS 485 port could not be initialized.
Possible cause: interface is defective or is being used by another
application.
! The RS 485 port is not being used.
! The RS 485 port was not assigned a COM port.
The monitor symbol for the string is shown in red:
! The RS 485 port was initialized (e.g. via Setup), but no string was
detected via activated “Hot Plug In”.
! The connection is defective or has been removed. No charger was
detected.
! A wrong COM port was assigned.
The monitor symbol for the string is shown in blue:
! The string has been detected.
! Or “Hot Plug In” is deactivated.
The “Device Display” area
The “Device Display” area displays all chargers and the inserted receivers
of the string selected in the “Charger Display” area. Each charger is shown
as a vertical box. Each of the 10 charging compartments of a charger is
represented by a colored LED. The color of the LED indicates the status of
the receiver (see “The “Selection” box” on page 10-7).
The chargers of a string as well as the charging compartments into which
the receivers are inserted are marked with numbers. A greyed-out number
10-6
The CHM screen
means that there is no receiver at the relevant position.
For the meanings of the different colors and symbols in the vertical boxes,
see the table on page 10-8. For the meanings of the other displays:
The whole box is shown in grey:
! The charger is deactivated
! No charger is connected
! It was not possible to assign an address to the charger
The charger symbol at the top of the box shows a red cross and the whole
box is shown in grey:
! There are communication problems with this charger
The “Selection” box
In the “Selection” box, you can select chargers, strings and receivers in the
way known from the Windows Explorer (i.e. SHIFT-click and CTRL-click can
be used as in the Windows Explorer). The status messages of the selected
chargers are also displayed in clear text.
The option buttons in the “Selection” box allow you to switch between the
three displays “Device”, “Charger” and “String”.
“Device”
“Charger”
“String”
10-7
The CHM screen
The clear text displays in the “Device” display have the following meanings:
Symbol
Clear text
Abbreviation* Meaning
“Slot
empty”
–
The charging compartment (slot) is empty, no receiver is
inserted.
flashes green “Charging”
slowly
–
The rechargeable battery in the receiver is being charged.
green
“Ready”
–
The charging process of the rechargeable battery is
completed.
yellow
Text of the
current
status
Abbreviation The receiver is busy (for example reading out statistics
for the current data, deleting data, responding to a request for information
status
or carrying out a stationary download).
dark green
flashes
Text of the
green
current
slowly or
status
lights up
green
permanently
Abbreviation The preset category and/or RF channel has been changed
for the current temporarily as described on page 10-16. The device is
status
switched on and can now be removed from the charger.
flashes red
slowly
“Battery
Error”
“Bat”
A battery error has been detected. Try to charge the
rechargeable battery in another charging compartment. If
this does not work, have the battery replaced, preferably by
the Sennheiser Customer Service.
flashes red
rapidly
“Slot/Rx
Error”
“Sl/Rx”
Either: The charging compartment is trying to charge, but
the receiver was not detected. Possible cause: The receiver
is not properly inserted into the charging compartment or
there is a foreign object in the charging compartment.
Or: The charging compartment is defective, e.g. because the
charging compartment fuse has been triggered (see
“Chargers” on page 17-4.
red
“Fatal Error” “Fat”
Communication with the receiver is disturbed because the
charging compartment or the receiver is faulty. Please
contact the Sennheiser Customer Service if this fault cannot
be remedied by inserting the receiver into another charging
compartment.
red
“Download
Error”
“DL”
Data transmission to the receiver is disturbed. Please
contact the Sennheiser Customer Service if this fault cannot
be remedied by inserting the receiver into another charging
compartment
red
“Flash Full
Error”
“Full”
The internal memory of the receiver is full.
red
“No
Answer”
“NA”
Data transmission to the receiver is disturbed. Please
contact the Sennheiser Customer Service if this fault cannot
be remedied by inserting the receiver into another charging
compartment
grey
“Unknown”
–
The status of the charging compartment is unknown as the
status inquiry has not yet been carried out. When a new
string has been connected, it takes about 5 seconds until
the status inquiry is carried out
–
Data exchange with the receiver is in progress (reading of
statistical data or programming of the receiver presets).
This can take up to 4 seconds.
communicati –
on symbol
*
) If several problems occur with one receiver, the following abbreviations of the clear text displays of any
problems occurring are shown. Example: “Sl/Rx, SN, NA, Full”.
10-8
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
Before you can work with the CHM, you must first go into Setup and assign
addresses to the COM ports in order to ensure that the CHM recognizes the
chargers connected. You can also configure certain basic settings of the
CHM in Setup.
To carry out Setup:
Change to ”Installation Administration” mode as described under
“Changing between “Standard Operation” and “Installation
Administration” mode” on page 10-19.
Click the ”CHM Setup” button.
The ”Setup” dialog box opens.
The ”Setup” dialog box is divided up into seven areas:
1. The ”COM-Port Selection” box with
– the ”String No. - Port: Name” field,
– the ”COM-Port” drop down list,
– the ”Name” field and
– the ”Delete” button
is used for assigning addresses to the COM ports (see “Assigning
addresses to the strings” on page 10-10).
2. The ”Rx Statistics readout” box is used for determining the method
used to read out the statistical data of the tours (see “Reading out
statistical data manually or automatically” on page 10-10).
3. The ”Mode Selection” box is used for adjusting the CHM to the
receivers used in your exhibition (see “Adapting the CHM to the
receivers in your exhibition (Mode Selection)” on page 10-11).
4. The “Visitor Profiler Server” box is for activating the Visitor Profiler
Server. In this operating mode, the VPR software can communicate
with the CHM and thus configure receivers and portable transmitters
for guided tours (see “Allowing communication with the VPR” on
page 10-11).
5. The ”Display inverted” check box is used for inverting the display (see
“Inverting the program display” on page 10-12).
6. The CHM can output straightforward tables containing the receiver
presets (see “Displaying the receiver presets (Get Settings)” on
page 10-21) or the firmware version numbers (see “Displaying the
version numbers of the internal receiver software and hardware” on
page 10-22). These tables are always created as HTML files. If you use
Microsoft Excel®, you can open these HTML tables automatically via
Microsoft Excel®, for example in order to edit them. To do so, activate
the ”Use MS Excel® for Export” check box.
7. There are also three buttons:
– The ”New Password” button for changing the password (see
“Changing the password” on page 10-13)
– The ”OK” button for taking over the settings in the ”Setup” dialog
box
– The ”Cancel” button for discarding the settings in the ”Setup” dialog
box
Note:
If you exit the ”Setup” dialog box using the ”Cancel” button, all
changes entered by you are reset and not taken over.
10-9
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
Assigning addresses to the strings
For the CHM to be able to detect the connected chargers, addresses have
to be assigned to the COM ports as follows:
Make sure that all chargers are connected to the COM ports of your RS
485 card(s) and are turned on.
Look in the Windows Control Panel to find out which COM port
numbers belong to your RS 485 card.
Note:
On most Windows PCs, the COM ports 1 to 4 are assigned to other
interfaces. The first RS 485 port of your card then probably has the
number 5.
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
The list shown on the left appears in the ”COM-Port Selection” box.
Click the first entry in the list and select the first physical COM port
provided by your RS 485 card from the ”COM-Port” drop down list.
A monitor symbol and the number of the selected COM port appear in
front of this COM port on the list.
You can give this COM port a name by entering a name in the ”Name”
field (for example ”Str01”).
You can only enter a maximum of 5 characters for the name.
The entered name appears on the list in place of ”Empty”.
Click the next entries in the list one after the other and assign a
physical COM port and a name to each of them until an address has
been assigned to all COM ports of the RS 485 card.
Once you have confirmed your entries in the ”Setup” window via ”OK”,
the strings connected to the COM ports are displayed in the ”Charger
Display” area.
If you want to change the address assigned to a string:
In the ”COM-Port Selection” box, click a string whose addresses you
want to change.
From the ”COM-Port” drop down list, select the physical COM port
which you want to assign to the string.
If you want to deactivate the address assigned to a string (for example
because you have removed this string):
In the ”COM-Port Selection” box, click the string whose address you
want to deactivate.
In the ”COM-Port” drop down list, click the uppermost blank entry or
click the ”Delete” button.
This entry is removed from the list and ”00-Empty:Empty” appears.
The CHM can now no longer address this string.
Reading out statistical data manually or automatically
You can read out two different types of statistical data from the receivers:
1. Statistical data for analysis via the STM can be read out automatically
when the receivers are inserted into a charging compartment or
manually (see “Reading out statistical data manually” on
page 10-23).
10-10
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
2. Service statistics data can only be read out manually (see “Reading
out statistical data manually” on page 10-23).
To specify how the statistical data are to be read out for analysis via the
STM:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
In the ”Rx Statistics readout” box, click the ”manual” option button to
read out the data manually.
Once you have confirmed your entries into the ”Setup” dialog box by
clicking ”OK”, you can read out statistical data for analysis via the STM
as well as Service statistics data manually as described under
“Reading out statistical data manually” on page 10-23.
Statistical data intended for analysis by the STM are not read out
automatically. This setting is recommended if you do not use the STM.
In the ”Rx Statistics readout” box, click the ”automatic” option button
to read out the data automatically.
Once you have confirmed your entries into the ”Setup” dialog box by
clicking ”OK”, only Service statistics data can be read out manually as
described under “Reading out statistical data manually” on
page 10-23. Statistical data for analysis by the STM are read out
automatically.
Adapting the CHM to the receivers in your exhibition (Mode Selection)
The CHM is compatible with both types of receiver (EK 3000 and EK 3200)
but must be adjusted to the receivers you use as follows:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
If you are using EK 3200 receivers only:
In the “Mode Selection” box, click the “EK 3200 only” option button
and click “OK”.
Once you have confirmed your entries into the ”Setup” dialog box by
clicking ”OK”, the CHM changes to the EK 3200-compatible mode. All
displays and program functions are activated.
If you are using receivers of the EK 3000 type or both types of receiver in
parallel:
In the “Mode Selection” box, click the “EK 3x00 mixed” option button
and click “OK”.
Once you have confirmed your entries into the ”Setup” dialog box by
clicking ”OK”, the CHM changes to the EK 3000-compatible mode. All
displays and program functions which require the EK 3200 or EK 3202
type receiver are deactivated.
Allowing communication with the VPR
You can configure the CHM so that the VPR software is able to communicate with the CHM. This makes it possible to configure receivers and portable
transmitters for guided tours using the VPR.
In the “Visitor Profiler Server” box, click the “active” check box.
Once you have confirmed your entries into the ”Setup” dialog box by
clicking ”OK”, the CHM accepts communication with the VPR via the
TCP/IP port. The TCP/IP port number is to be found in the “Port” field.
10-11
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
Make sure that this port number is also set in the VPR software (see
“Configuring communication with the CHM” on page 15-25).
Note:
If you work with the VPR software, you can only configure the units
using the VPR. In this case, you must run the CHM software in the
background.
Inverting the program display
You can invert the display of the strings and chargers on the CHM screen.
This allows you to adjust the CHM screen to the actual arrangement of your
chargers.
To invert the displays of the strings and chargers on the CHM screen:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
Click the “Display inverted ” check box.
Confirm by clicking ”OK” in the ”Setup” dialog box.
Setup is closed and a dialog box opens.
Click ”OK” in the dialog box and restart the CHM.
The displays in the ”Device Display” and ”Charger Display” areas are
inverted.
Determining the table display
The CHM can output straightforward tables containing the receiver presets
(see “Displaying the receiver presets (Get Settings)” on page 10-21) or
the firmware version numbers (see “Displaying the version numbers of the
internal receiver software and hardware” on page 10-22). These tables
can be exported. The ”Use MS Excel® for Export” check box is used for
determining the display format of these tables.
If you use Microsoft Excel®:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
Click the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box.
Confirm by clicking ”OK” in the ”Setup” dialog box.
Setup is closed. When you export one of these tables (see page 10-21
and page 10-22), the
button appears. If you click this button,
the data is saved in HTML format and automatically opened in
Microsoft Excel®. You can edit these tables directly using Microsoft
Excel®.
If you do not use Microsoft Excel®:
10-12
Make sure that the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box is not clicked.
Confirm by clicking ”OK” in the ”Setup” dialog box.
Setup is closed. When you save one of these tables (see page 10-21
and page 10-22), the
button appears. If you click this button,
the data is saved in HTML format. You can then display these tables in
an Internet browser or table calculation program.
Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)
Changing the password
You require a password in order to change to ”Installation Administration”
mode. At delivery, the default password to be found on page 49 of the
documentation supplied with your system software CD is valid. To prevent
illicit access, you should change this password immediately:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9.
Click the “New Password” button.
The “New Security Key” dialog box opens.
In the “Old Password” field, type the old password.
In the “New Password” field, type the new password.
You can use a maximum of 10 characters. Asterisks (*) are shown
instead of your entry.
In the “Repeat” filed, re-type the new password.
Confirm your entries with ”OK” to take over the new password or click
”Cancel” to keep the old password.
Note:
If the “CHM.ini” belonging to the CHM is lost or damaged, the
password is automatically reset to the default password and the
message “No password found” appears.
10-13
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode
Operating the CHM in “Standard
Operation” mode
When you start the program, the CHM is automatically in ”Standard
Operation” mode. To change to ”Installation Administration” mode, see
“Changing between “Standard Operation” and “Installation
Administration” mode” on page 10-19. All functions available in
“Standard Operation” mode are also available in “Installation
Administration” mode.
Selecting strings, chargers or devices
Before you can program individual or several receivers with presets or
reinitialize them, you must first select these receivers. You can select
individual receivers or a group of chargers or strings, e.g. in order to
program a large number of receivers.
Selecting receivers
Selecting chargers
Selecting strings
10-14
To select one or several receivers in a charger:
In the “Selection” box, click the “Device” option button.
In the “Charger Display” area, click the string to which the receiver
belongs.
The string is highlighted in light blue.
In the “Device Display” area, click the charger into which the receiver is
inserted.
The box for the selected charger is highlighted in light blue.
In the “Selection” box, click the receiver or receivers you want to select
one by one. SHIFT-click and CTRL-click allow you to select several
receivers simultaneously.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
To remove selected receivers from the selection, press the CTRL key
and click the corresponding receivers in the “Selection” box.
To select one or several chargers in a string:
In the “Selection” box, click the “Charger” option button.
In the “Charger Display” area, click the string to which the chargers
belong.
The string is highlighted in light blue.
In the “Device Display” area, click the chargers you want to select one
after the other. Alternatively, you can select the chargers by SHIFTclicking or CTRL-clicking them in the “Selection” box.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
To remove selected chargers from the selection, press the CTRL key
and click the corresponding chargers in the “Selection” box or click the
corresponding chargers in the “Charger Display” area.
To select one or several strings:
In the “Selection” box, click the “String” option button.
In the “Charger Display” area, click the strings which you want to
select one by one. Alternatively, you can select the strings by SHIFTclicking or CTRL-clicking them in the “Selection” box.
The selected strings are highlighted in dark blue.
To remove selected strings from the selection, press the CTRL key and
click the corresponding strings in the “Selection” box or click the
corresponding strings in the “Charger Display” area.
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode
Connecting or removing chargers
If chargers are newly connected or removed during operation, the CHM
only detects these chargers with a delay and displays this change on the
CHM screen only after approx. 2.5 seconds. The “Restart String” command
serves to detect undetected chargers after elimination of a communication
error or a defective cable.
Note:
Use an RS 485 card recommended by Sennheiser to connect the
chargers to the Charger PC (see “System requirements” on page 7-7).
To display undetected strings or chargers on the CHM screen and to
eliminate error messages:
Select the string or strings which you have newly connected or
removed as described under “Selecting strings, chargers or devices”
on page 10-14.
Click the “Restart String” button.
The “Restart String(s)” dialog box opens.
Click “OK”.
After about 5 seconds, the selected strings are reset and reinitialized.
Displaying the error list
If the Charger PC is located at a great distance from the chargers, you
cannot immediately solve any problem which occurs with a receiver. In this
case, you should print all errors as clear-text error messages. This list will
help you to find defective receivers or receivers which have not been
inserted correctly or to eliminate communication problems with the
chargers.
To display the error list:
Click the “Get Errorlist” button.
The “Errorlist” dialog box appears, displaying all error messages
sorted according to strings and chargers.
10-15
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode
To print the error list, click “Print”.
The “Print” dialog box of the operating system opens.
To close the “Errorlist” dialog box, click “Close”.
Closing the CHM
There are five ways to close the CHM:
Click the “Close” button.
Click the software icon , on the title bar.
The system menu opens.
Click “Close”.
Double-click the software icon
Click the close button ⌧ on the title bar.
Press the key combination ALT + F4.
.
Getting Help
To open the CHM online Help:
Click the “?” button.
The CHM Help opens.
Changing the receiver presets temporarily
Each receiver in your exhibition has the following factory-preset
parameters:
Parameter Factory Who can change the parameter?
preset to
Visitor: No
Location
number
Category
number
“Standard Operation” mode: No
“0”
“01”
“Installation Administration” mode: Yes (see
“Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19)
Visitor: Only with a 16-key receiver
(see “Selecting the category (16-key receiver
only)” on page 5-41)
or via an identifier which triggers the System
Event “Cat ” (see “Triggering the switching over
of the category (“Cat” System Event )” on
page 12-13)
“Standard Operation” mode: Only for the
duration of a single tour (see this chapter)
“Installation Administration” mode:
Permanently (see “Changing the receiver presets
permanently” on page 10-19)
Visitor: Yes – at any time (see “Setting the
volume” on page 5-42)
Volume
“85%”
“Standard Operation” mode: No
“Installation Administration” mode:
Permanently (see “Changing the receiver presets
permanently” on page 10-19)
10-16
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode
Parameter Factory Who can change the parameter?
preset to
Visitor: No
“Standard Operation” mode: No
RF channel “01”
“Installation Administration” mode: Yes (see
“Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19)
Visitor: No
Guided
Tour
none
“Standard Operation” mode: Only for the
duration of a single tour (see this chapter)
“Installation Administration” mode: Only for the
duration of a single tour (see this chapter)
You can change the following parameters preset permanently in
“Installation Administration” mode for the duration of a single tour:
! The categories of the receivers (see page 10-19)
If, for example, the number of children coming to your exhibition exceeds the number of available receivers preset to the category ”Child”,
the additional receivers required can be taken from another category
and changed to the category ”Child”.
! The categories for guided tours
(only possible if Sennheiser Customer Service has provided for it).
If, for example, more visitors want to participate in a guided tour than
receivers preset in a suitable way are available, the additional receivers
required can be added to this guided tour.
When the receivers are returned at the end of the tour and inserted into a
charger, the presets for category, guided tour and volume are
automatically reset to their values preset in “Installation Administration”
mode.
To temporarily change the presets of the receivers (for the duration of a
single tour):
Completely insert all receivers whose presets you want to change for
the duration of a single tour into the charging compartments of a
charger.
Select the receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers or
devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Right-click the unit selection.
The “Prog. Start Values” dialog box opens.
Note:
The “Guide” drop down list in the “Prog. Start Values” dialog box is
only available if Sennheiser Customer Service has provided for this.
10-17
Operating the CHM in “Standard Operation” mode
10-18
From the “Category” drop down list, select the number of the category
you want to assign to the selected receivers.
Alternatively, from the “Guide” drop down list, select the guided tour
you want to assign to the selected receivers
or instead select “No Guide” in order to remove the assignment of a
receiver to a guided tour.
Confirm your selection with “OK”.
The selected receivers are then programmed to the new values.
While data transmission is in progress, the communication symbol
appears in front of the selected receivers in the “Selection” box.
Once the receivers have been programmed, the green tick
appears
in front of the selected receivers in the “Selection” box.
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
Operating the CHM in “Installation
Administration” mode
Changing between “Standard Operation” and “Installation
Administration” mode
When you start the program, the CHM is automatically in ”Standard
Operation” mode. To change to ”Installation Administration” mode:
Click the program symbol (
The system menu opens.
Click “Access Level”.
The ”Access Level” dialog box opens.
From the ”Select Operation Mode” dropdown list, select ”Installation
Administration”.
) on the title bar.
Note:
Sennheiser Customer Service requires ”System Setup & Configuration”
and ”Technical System Service” from the drop down list.
Type the password “GPconfig” into the “Enter Password” field.
The “Content Mgmt”, “RX Statistic”, “RX Version”, “RX Config” and
“CHM Setup” buttons appear. “[Installation Administration]” is
displayed on the title bar.
Note:
When starting Setup for the first time, you must use the default
password. The default password is to be found on page 49 of the
documentation supplied with your system software CD. To prevent
illicit access, you should change this password immediately (see
“Changing the password” on page 10-13)!
If the “CHM.ini” belonging to the CHM is lost or damaged, the
password is automatically reset to the default password and the
message “No password found” appears.
To change to ”Standard Operation” mode:
From the ”Select Operation Mode” dropdown list in the ”Access Level”
dialog box, select “Standard Operation”.
The “Content Mgmt”, “RX Statistic”, “RX Version”, “RX Config” and
“CHM Setup” buttons disappear. “[Standard Operation]” is displayed
on the title bar.
Changing the receiver presets permanently
Each receiver in your exhibition has a fixed preset category and a fixed
preset volume (see “Changing the receiver presets temporarily” on
page 10-16).
In ”Installation Administration” mode, you can permanently adapt the
receivers in your exhibition to the expected visitor groups as described
below. For example, if you know that 20% of the visitors to your exhibition
are children, you can preset 20% of the receivers to the fixed preset
category ”English, child”. This preset remains stored permanently. Each
time the receivers are inserted into a charging compartment, they are
reset to the preset category “English, child” (and the fixed preset volume
and RF channel).
10-19
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
In ”Standard Operation” mode, this preset category can be changed for the
duration of a visitor tour as described under “Changing the receiver
presets temporarily” on page 10-16. When these receivers are inserted
into a charging compartment, they are reset to the fixed preset category
(and the fixed preset volume and RF channel).
To avoid confusion, we recommend that you clearly and permanently mark
the preset categories onto the receivers.
To permanently program the receivers to a category and volume:
Completely insert all receivers to be programmed into a charging
compartment.
Select the receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers or
devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “RX Config” button.
The “Receiver Configuration” dialog box opens.
EK 3000 and EK 3200 receivers
only
To change the category preset:
EK 3000 and EK 3200 receivers
only
To change the volume preset:
EK 3000 receivers only
Click the ”Default Category” check box and select the number of the
category you want to permanently program from the drop down list.
Click the ”Default Audio Volume” check box and select the volume you
want to permanently program from the drop down list.
Each time an EK 3000 receiver is removed from the charger, it
automatically starts searching for an RF channel in order to check whether
its internal EAT (Event Assignment Table) data matches the data of the
current installation. The receiver searches through all channels one after
the other starting with 1, 4, 7, 11. If you cannot use these channels at the
receiver counter for technical reasons, you can accelerate this process by
specifying the channel number of any RF channel which is transmitted at
the receiver counter. Please compare the location plan of your exhibition
with the assignment of the RF channel numbers to the different cells and
categories.
Click the ”Initial Freq. Scan Channel” check box and select the number
of the RF channel you want to permanently program from the drop
down list.
– If you specify a location with variable Events (location ID “1” or
higher), it can happen that not all Storage Events of this location are
already stored in the receivers immediately after the receivers are
handed out. In this case the Storage Events first have to be
downloaded via mobile download.
EK 3200 receivers only
If you use the INM for managing your exhibition and operate several
locations, you can select one of these locations as follows:
10-20
Click the ”Default Location ID” check box and select the number of the
location you want to permanently program from the drop down list.
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
Displaying the receiver presets (Get Settings)
You can display the settings you have programmed into the EK 3200
receivers in a straightforward table and export this table.
Insert all EK 3200 receivers whose settings you want to display into
the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blu.
Click the ”RX Config” button.
The ”Receiver Configuration” dialog box open.
Click the ”Get Settings” button.
The ”CHM Settings” window opens.
Key to the eight column headings:
Column
Meaning
String
Name of the COM port to which the string is connected
(you have to specify this name yourself as described
under “Assigning addresses to the strings” on
page 10-10)
Chg
Number of the charger in which the receiver is located
RX
Number of the charging compartment in which the
receiver is located
SerNo
Serial number of the receiver
Cat
Number of the category permanently assigned to the
receiver
Vol
Volume permanently assigned to the receiver
DefCh
Number of the RF channel permanently assigned to the
receiver
Loc
Number of the location permanently assigned to the
receiver
10-21
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
To save or export this table:
Click the “Export” or “Save” button.
The “Save” dialog box opens.
Specify the file name under which the table is to be saved and the
folder in which it is to be stored.
If you deactivated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format.
If you activated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format and additionally
opened in Microsoft Excel®.
Displaying the version numbers of the internal receiver software and
hardware
To display the current version numbers of the internal receiver software
and hardware, proceed als follows:
Click the “Device Version” button.
The “Version Status” window opens.
Key to the seven column headings:
Column
Meaning
String
Name of the COM port to which the string is connected
(you have to specify this name yourself as described
under “Assigning addresses to the strings” on
page 10-10)
Chg
Number of the charger in which the receiver is located
RX
Number of the charging compartment in which the
receiver is located
SerNo
Serial number of the receiver
Firmware
Version number of the internal receiver software
Hardware
Version number of the internal receiver hardware
BootLoader
Version number of the bootloader
To save or export this table:
10-22
Click the “Export” or “Save” button.
The “Save” dialog box opens.
Specify the file name under which the table is to be saved and the
folder in which it is to be stored.
If you deactivated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format.
If you activated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format and additionally
opened in Microsoft Excel®.
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
Reading out statistical data manually
While visitors are moving through the exhibition with their receivers, the
receivers collect statistical data. There are two different types of statistical
data:
1. Statistical data for analysis via the STM:
This statistical data is always collected automatically. If you want to
evaluate this data using the STM software, you have to read out this
statistical data manually or automatically as soon as a receiver is
reinserted into the charging compartment of a charger.
2. Service statistics data:
Service statistics data include additional information (download times,
volume settings and the time at which Events were downloaded,
reproduced and terminated).
Sennheiser Customer Service can activate the reading out of service
statistics data in order to analyze and remedy problems occurring with
one of the receivers.
To read out statistical data manually:
Insert all receivers whose statistical data you want to read into the
charging compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “RX Config” button.
The “CHM Statistics” dialog box opens.
Click the type of statistical data you want to read out.
– “Get Operator Statistics” (statistical data for analysis via the STM):
You cannot select this option if you have activated the ”automatic”
option button in the ”Rx Statistics readout” box in the ”Setup” dialog
box (see “Reading out statistical data manually or automatically” on
page 10-10), for then the statistical data for analysis via the STM are
automatically read out as soon as the receiver is reinserted into a
charging compartment after a visitor tour.
– “Get Service Statistics” (service statistics data):
Sennheiser Customer Service can read out all service statistics data
stored in the receiver or only the service statistics data added since
the last time service statistics were read out (for the latter option,
the ”From last readout” check box must be clicked).
– “Delete Statistics”:
If you want to delete all statistical data from the receivers: The
statistical data is saved in a toroidal-core memory in the receivers.
Besides the statistical data of the last visitor tour, the memory
usually contains the statistical data of previous tours. This older
statistical data can be incomplete and is automatically ignored
during reading as it has already been read. For this reason it is not
necessary to delete the statistical data on a regular basis.
However, if you want to make sure that the toroidal-core memory
does not contain any more statistical data (for example if you want
to lend out receivers or isolate the tour data of one special person),
then select this option.
Click “OK”.
The statistical data is read and made available for analysis. You can
now use the STM software to transfer this data to the Central PC and
analyze it.
10-23
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
Or: All statistical data is deleted from the toroidal-core memories of
the selected receivers.
Preparing stationary download
Before stationary download can be carried out, all receivers must be
prepared for it.
Caution!
If there is old audio data of another project in your receivers and you
transmit audio data of new project for the first time, the old audio
data is possibly not replaced!
For this reason, be sure to delete all old audio data in the receivers as
described under “Deleting the Storage Events audio data” on
page 10-25 before transmitting audio data of a new project for the
first time.
When the INM starts a job for stationary receiver data download, an
information window similar to the following one is displayed in the
”Information” dialog box:
The “Information” dialog box shows:
! the number of the RF channel used to transmit the data In the
“Download Channel” line and
! the number of download segments in the “Download segments” line.
Both pieces of information are passed on to the receivers as follows:
10-24
Insert all receivers which are to download the data into the charging
compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue
Click the “Content Mgmt” button.
The “Content Management” dialog box opens.
From the “Type” drop down list, select “Update Project Audio
Content”.
In the ”Channel” drop down list, enter the number of the RF channel
displayed in the ”Download channel” line of the ”Information” dialog
box of the INM.
In the ”Number of Segments” drop down list, enter the number of the
download segments displayed in the ”Download channel” line of the
”Information” dialog box of the INM.
Click “OK” in the “Content Management” dialog box.
Start stationary download by clicking “OK” in the ”Information” dialog
box of the INM.
Now all receivers which you selected via the CHM software are turned
on and prepared for data transmission.
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
Make sure of the following during stationary download:
– All receivers in the CHM software must be marked with a yellow LED
symbol.
– The red LEDs of all receivers must be lit up permanently.
– The green LEDs of all receivers must be flashing.
Once stationary download is complete:
– All receivers turn off.
– All receivers in the CHM software are marked with a green LED
symbol (or a red one if there are any problems).
Deleting the Storage Events audio data
You can delete the Storage Events audio data transmitted to the receivers.
It is recommended to do this before the receivers are hired out.
Insert all receivers whose audio data you want to delete into the
charging compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “Content Mgmt” button.
The “Content Management” dialog box opens.
From the “Type” drop down list, select “Remove fixed Events” in order
to only deleted the audio data in locationn 0 or select “Remove all
Events” in order to delete the audio data in all locations.
Click “OK ” in the “Content Management” dialog box.
The audio data is deleted.
Setting the country code for portable transmitters
In the USA, the maximum transmitting power allowed is 1 mW; up to
10 mW are allowed in other countries. Set the country code for the
portable transmitters as follows:
Make sure that the CHM runs in EK 3200-compatible mode (see
page 10-11).
Completely insert all portable transmitters whose country code you
want to change into the charging compartments of a charger.
Select the portable transmitters to be configured as described under
“Selecting strings, chargers or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected portable transmitters are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “Device Config” button.
The “Device Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the “Transmitter” button.
The “Transmitter Configuration” dialog box opens.
If you are setting up portable transmitters for a project in the USA,
select “USA” from the “RF Country Limitation” drop down list. If you
10-25
Operating the CHM in “Installation Administration” mode
are setting up portable transmitters for a project in another country,
select “other”.
Click “OK”.
The maximum transmitting power of the portable transmitters is set.
Displaying the country code of the portable transmitters (Get Settings)
You can display the country code you have programmed into the portable
transmitters in a straightforward table and export this table.
Completely insert all portable transmitters whose country code you
want to display into the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these portable transmitters as described under “Selecting
strings, chargers or devices” on page 10-14.
The selected portable transmitters are highlighted in dark blue
Click the “Device Config” button.
The “Device Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the “Transmitter” button.
The “Transmitter Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the ”Get Settings” button.
The ”CHM Settings” window opens.
Key to the five column headings:
Column
Meaning
String
Name of the COM port to which the string is connected (you
have to specify this name yourself as described under
“Assigning addresses to the strings” on page 10-10)
Chg
Number of the charger in which the portable transmitter is
located
Slot
Number of the charging compartment in which the portable
transmitter is located
SerNo
Serial number of the portable transmitter
RfLimit
Country code of the serial transmitter
To save or export this table:
10-26
Click the “Export” or “Save” button.
The “Save” dialog box opens.
Specify the file name under which the table is to be saved and the
folder in which it is to be stored.
If you deactivated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format.
If you activated the “Use MS Excel® for Export” check box in the
“Setup” dialog box, the table is saved in HTML format and additionally
opened in Microsoft Excel®.
Index
Index
Device 10-7
String 10-7
Battery Error 10-8
Setup 10-9
Category preset
changing permanently 10-19
Slot empty 10-8
Charger Manager (CHM) 10-1
“Charger Display” area 10-5
“Receiver Display” area 10-6
“Selection” box 10-4, 10-7
displaying the error list 10-15
selecting
strings, chargers, receivers 10-14
Chargers
assigning addresses to strings 10-10
Slot/Rx Error 10-8
Stationary download 10-24
Statistical data
automatic readout 10-10
deleting 10-23
manual readout 10-10, 10-23
Storage Events
deleting audio data 10-25
Unknown 10-8
CHM Setup 10-5
Update Project Audio Content 10-24
Close 10-4
Use MS Excel® for Export 10-12
Content Mgmt 10-4, 10-24, 10-25
volume preset
changing permanently 10-19
Country code 10-25
Delete Statistics 10-23
Device Statistic 10-4
Device Version 10-5, 10-22
Display inverted 10-12
Displaying the version number 10-22
Download Channel 10-24
Download Error 10-8
Download segments 10-24
Fatal Error 10-8
Flash Full Error 10-8
Get Errorlist 10-4
Get Operator Statistics 10-23
Get Service Statistics 10-23
Help 10-4
Installation Administration mode 10-19
No Answer 10-8
Password
entering 10-19
Portable transmitter
contry code 10-25
Receiver presets
changing permanently 10-19
Receivers
hiring out 10-25
Remove all Events 10-25
Remove fixed Events 10-25
Restart String 10-4
RF channel preset
changing permanently 10-19
RX Config 10-5
Selection
Charger 10-7
10-27
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Operating the CHM in the “System
Setup & Configuration” mode
This chapter contains special information on the “System Setup &
Configuration” mode of the CHM software and is exclusively intended for
Sennheiser Customer Service. General information on the “Standard
Operation” and “Installation Administration” modes of the CHM software
is to be found in the
system manual from page 10-1 onwards.
The “System Setup & Configuration” mode of the CHM software is for:
! updating the firmware in the receivers (see page 11-42) and in the
portable transmitter (see page 11-45),
! updating and configuring the alarm signals in the receivers (see
page 11-42),
! updating the jingle in the receivers (see page 11-42),
! activating/deactivating announcements (see page 11-32) and
allowing announcements to be made in location “0” (see page 11-33),
! activating/deactivating “Auto Frequency Scan” (see page 11-33),
! activating/deactivating “Power Off after Charging” (see page 11-34),
! allowing the visitor to turn off the receiver or preventing him from
doing so (see page 11-34),
! page 11-41).
Caution!
If you work with the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
and select a very large number of receivers, the CHM can require a
relatively long time to address all receivers. For this reason, please
don't start a new query, setting or data update until you have
completed the last operation!
Changing to the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
When you start the program, the CHM is automatically in the “Standard
Operation” mode. “[Standard Operation]” is displayed on the title bar. To
change to the “System Setup & Configuration” mode:
Click the program symbol (
The system menu opens.
Click ”Access Level”.
The ”Access Level” dialog box opens.
From the “Select Operation Mode” dropdown list, select ”System
Setup & Configuration”.
Type the password “GPconfig” into the “Enter Password” field. The
entry is case-sensitive.
) on the title bar.
Note:
This password cannot be changed. Please make sure that it does not
get into the hands of the final users of the
system.
Click ”OK”.
“[System Setup & Configuration]” is displayed on the title bar. A
number of additional buttons appear:
11-29
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
For updating the jingle, the alarm signal and the firmware in the
receivers (see page 11-42) and for updating the Storage Event audio
data in the receivers (see page 10-24 of the
system manual).
For reading out the statistics files manually (no difference to the
“Installation Administration” mode).
For displaying the version numbers of the internal receiver software
and hardware (no difference to the “Installation Administration”
mode).
For changing the receiver settings permanently (see page 11-31).
For establishing the basic configuration of the CHM (no difference to
the “Installation Administration” mode).
To return to the “Standard Operation” mode:
In the “Access Level” dialog box, select “Standard Operation” from the
“Select Operation Mode” drop down list.
The additional buttons disappear. The title bar displays “[Standard
Operation]”.
Adjusting the CHM to the receivers in your exhibition
(Mode Selection)
The CHM is compatible with both types of receiver (EK 3000 and EK 3200)
but must be adjusted to the receivers you use as follows:
Open Setup as described under “Preparing the CHM for operation
(Setup)” on page 10-9 of the
system manual.
If you are using EK 3200 receivers only:
In the “Mode Selection” box, click the “EK 3200 only” option button
and click “OK”.
The CHM changes to the EK 3200-compatible mode. All displays and
program functions are activated.
If you are using receivers of the EK 3000 type or both types of receiver in
parallel:
11-30
In the “Mode Selection” box, click the “EK 3x00 mixed” option button
and click “OK”.
The CHM changes to the EK 3000-compatible mode. All displays and
program functions which require the EK 3200 type receiver are
deactivated.
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Changing the receiver settings
To change the receiver settings:
Insert all receivers whose settings you want to change into the
charging compartment of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system manual.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the ”RX Config” button.
The ”Receiver Configuration” dialog box opens.
The “Receiver Configuration” dialog box in the EK 3200-compatible mode
(see page 11-30)
The “Receiver Configuration” dialog box in the EK 3000-compatible mode
(see page 11-30)
In the EK 3000-compatible mode, this dialog box shows the left-hand
side only. The settings on the right-hand side are not available for
EK 3000 receivers.
11-31
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Note:
All entries you make in this dialog box are stored permanently.
Exception: The setting under ”Power Off after Charger” (see
page 11-34) is always deactivated after being executed once.
Changing the category default setting
“Default Category” is used for presetting the category (see “Changing the
receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19 of the
system
manual).
Changing the volume default setting
“Default Audio Volume” is used for presetting the volume (see “Changing
the receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19 of the
system
manual).
Changing the starting channel default setting
“Initial Freq. Scan Channel” is used for presetting the starting channel (see
“Changing the receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19 of the
system manual).
Note:
The frequency scan carried out after the receiver is removed from the
charger is only carried out in the EK 3200-compatible mode and only if
you set “Auto Frequency Scan” to “enable” (see page 11-33).
Switching the reception of announcements on/off
You can enable or disable the reception of announcements.
Activate the desired setting under “Announcements”:
– “enable”:
The receivers can receive announcements transmitted via the ANM
software.
Use this setting if announcements are transmitted in the exhibition
via the ANM software.
– “disable”:
It is not possible to receive announcements.
Use this setting if announcements are never transmitted in the
exhibition.
Setting the location ID number
You can specify the ID number of the location whose Storage Events are to
be ready for playback as soon as the receiver is removed from the charger
(see “Changing the receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19 of the
system manual).
11-32
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Activate the desired setting under ”Default Location ID”:
– select “1” to “63” if you want the selected receivers to be used
mainly or exclusively in a certain location. In this case, enter the
number of the location here.
If you specify a “Default Location” here, you do not need to
configure a “Location Entrance” System Event identifier for this
location.
– Select “0” if only fixed Events of location “0” were configured in the
entire project and there are no other locations.
Presetting the installation ID number
If Event configurations are changed in a
3000 exhibition and then
system files are generated, the ID number of the installation automatically
goes up by 1. You can specify how EK 3200 receivers are to behave in such
a
3000 system.
Note:
Only activate this setting if you are using EK 3200 receivers in a
3000 exhibition. If you are using EK 3200 receivers only, the
CHM automatically sets the correct ID number. In this case, do not
change the setting.
Activate the desired setting under ”Default Installation ID”:
– If you select the ID number set in the ADM, the EK 3200 receivers are
not adjusted to the current installation when removed from the
charger.
– If you select a different ID number than the one set in the ADM, this
causes the EK 3200 receivers to be adjusted to the current
installation when removed from the charger.
Switching the automatic frequency scan on/off
You can enable or disable the receivers to perform an automatic frequency
scan after being removed from the charger.
Activate the desired setting under ”Auto Frequency Scan”:
– If you have fixed Events only, select “disable”. After removing the
receiver from the charger, the receiver does not carry out an
automatic frequency scan.
– If you have variable Events in addition to fixed ones, select “enable”
and, if necessary, specify the starting channel used to download the
data at the receiver output under “Initial Freq. Scan Channel” (see
page 10-19 of the
system manual). The receiver performs
an automatic frequency scan after being removed from the charger.
Assigning the RF channels for announcements in location “0”
Location “0” has no cell structure and thus no fixed MTS assignment. In
order to be able to transmit announcements in location “0” nevertheless,
you have to install additional antennas.
To allow the receivers to receive the announcements in the dummy
location:
11-33
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Enter the RF channels assigned to the MTS in the dummy location
under “Explicit Announcement Channels”.
Configuring the alarm signals of the EK 3200 receiver
You can enable or disable the alarm signal. You can also set the volume and
the duration of the alarm signal.
Activate the desired setting under ”Alarm Signal”:
– Select “disable” if you do not want to use an alarm signal.
Receivers configured in this way do not play back an alarm signal if
an identifier triggers the “Alarm On” System Event.
– Select “enable” to enable the alarm signal, enter the desired volume
under “Volume” and enter the desired duration of the alarm signal
under “Duration”.
Receivers configured in this way play back the alarm signal as soon
as an identifier triggers the “Alarm On” System Event.
Caution!
Particularly loud alarm signals reduce the range of the identifier
triggering the “Alarm Off” System Event. Thus, if you set a particularly
loud tone as an alarm signal, we recommend that you set the
transmission power of the identifier triggering the “Alarm Off”
System Event to “100 %” using the IDC software. In order that this
identifier can reliably turn off the particularly loud tone, the receiver
must be closer than 1 m to the identifier!
Quieter alarm signals do not affect the range of the identifier.
Suppressing the turn-on of the receivers once
When a receiver is removed from the charger, it automatically turns on and
is ready for operation. The rechargeable battery empties slowly. If you, for
example, want to ship receivers, you can suppress this automatic turn-on
once. This prevents the rechargeable battery from being empty after
shipping.
Activate the desired setting under ”Power Off after Charger”:
– “disable”:
The receiver turns on as usual after being removed from the charger.
– “enable”:
Automatic turn-on is suppressed once. If, after being removed and
inserted into a charger again, the receiver is removed once more, it
turns on as usual.
Activating/deactivating the turn-on/turn-off functions of the EK 3200
receiver
You can allow visitors to the exhibition to turn their receivers on and off or
prevent this.
11-34
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Caution!
When the receiver is off, the alarm signal is off too. The receiver can
even be turned off if the alarm signal has just been triggered. This
disables the theft protection. For this reason, we recommend
deactivating this function in installations with an alarm signal.
Activate the desired setting under ”Off via Keypad”:
– “enable”:
Any visitor can turn this receiver off by pressing the STOP key for a
long time and turn it on again by pressing the REPEAT key for a short
time.
– “disable”:
No visitor can turn this receiver on or off.
Presetting receivers for guided tours
You can preset receivers so that they are switched to the RF channel of a
portable transmitter immediately after being removed from the charger.
The receivers then do not reproduce Storage and Live Events belonging to
the exhibition but participate in a guided tour with a guide instead.
Activate the desired setting under ”Guided Tour”:
– “Guided Tour: enable”:
Use this setting to preset receivers for guided tours. The receivers
are switched to the RF channel of a portable transmitter when they
are removed from the charger.
– “Guided Tour: disable”:
Use this setting to exclude receivers from guided tours. When
removed from the charger, the receivers receive the Storage and Live
Events belonging to the exhibition.
– “Tour Mode: temporary”:
Use this setting to preset receivers for a single guided tour only.
– “Tour Mode: permanent”:
Use this setting to preset receivers permanently for guided tours.
– “Tour Channel”:
Select the desired RF channel. It is vital to make sure that the same
RF channel is also set in the portable transmitter with which the
guide conducts the guided tour (siehe „Presetting portable
transmitters for guided tours“ auf Seite 11-41)!
Enabling the change of the presets for guided tours in “Standard
Operation” mode
By default, the preset guided tour of a receiver can only be changed using
the VPR software module. This allows the personnel at the receiver counter
to for instance temporarily add receivers to guided tours if more visitors
want to participate in a guided tour than receivers are available.
However, in order to enable the presets for guided tours to be changed via
the CHM software module in “Standard Operation” mode, you can also
proceed as follows:
Close the CHM.
Start the Windows editor and open the “GP_CHM.INI” file which is to
be found in the “Programs\guidePORT\bin” folder.
Add a line with the content “GUIDE_LIST:” to the end of this file.
11-35
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Under it, add a line with the content “No.-Name” for each guided tour.
This consists of the following:
– “No.”: for the two-figure number of the RF channel of the portable
transmitter, for example “07” or “91” (see page 18-9).
– “-”: the hyphen is necessary, and it must not be preceded or followed
by a space.
– “Name”: for the name of the guided tour.
Example of an exhibition offering four different guided tours:
GUIDE_LIST:
60-Museum Tour English
71-Museum Tour German
83-City Tour By Bus English
91-City Tour By Bus German
Save the “GP_CHM.INI” file.
Start the CHM.
In “Standard Operation” mode, one of these guided tours can be assigned to all portable transmitters and receivers temporarily (for the
duration of a single tour) as described under “Changing the receiver
presets temporarily” on page 10-16.
Displaying the receiver presets (Get Settings)
You can display the settings you have programmed into the EK 3200
receivers in a straightforward table and export this table.
Insert all EK 3200 receivers whose settings you want to display into
the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system manual.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the ”RX Config” button.
The ”Receiver Configuration” dialog box open.
Click the ”Get Settings” button.
The ”CHM Settings” window opens.
Key to the 20 column headings:
Column Meaning
11-36
String
Number of the COM port to which the string is connected
Chg
Number of the charger in which the receiver is located
RX
Number of the charging compartment in which the receiver is
located
SerNo
Serial number of the receiver
Cat
Number of the category permanently assigned to the receiver
Vol
Volume permanently assigned to the receiver
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Column Meaning
DefCh
Number of the RF channel permanently assigned to the
receiver
Loc
Number of the location permanently assigned to the receiver
Inst
Number of the installation permanently assigned to the
receiver
ANM
Announcement status (”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
AnCh1
Number of the first RF channel for announcements in
location ”0”
AnCh2
Number of the second RF channel for announcements in
location ”0”
AnCh3
Number of the third RF channel for announcements in
location ”0”
AnCh4
Number of the fourth RF channel for announcements in
location ”0”
Alarm
Status of the alarm signal (”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
AlVol
Volume of the alarm signal in %
AlDur
Duration of the alarm signal in seconds
PwrOff
Status of turn-on suppression (”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
OffKey
Status of the turn-off and turn-on functions
(”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
PermCH Number of the RF channel, if the receiver is permanently set for
guided tours
TempCH Number of the RF channel, if the receiver is temporarily set for
one individual guided tour only
You can export this table as described under “Displaying the receiver
presets (Get Settings)” on page 10-21 of the
system manual.
Changing the portable transmitter presets
To configure portable transmitters for guided tours:
Make sure that the CHM runs in EK 3200-compatible mode (see
page 11-30).
Completely insert all portable transmitters to be configured into the
charging compartments of a charger.
Select the portable transmitters to be configured as described under
“Selecting strings, chargers or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system manual.
The selected portable transmitters are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “Device Config” button.
The “Device Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the “Transmitter” button.
The “Transmitter Configuration” dialog box opens.
11-37
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
The presets which you select in the “Transmitter Configuration” dialog box
do not become effective until you click the “OK” button! The “Cancel”
buttons allows you to exit the dialog box without taking over any changes.
The “Receiver” button allows you to change back to the “Receiver
Configuration” dialog box. The “Get Settings” button allows you to display
the settings programmed into the portable transmitters (see page 11-41).
Setting the country code for portable transmitters
In the USA, the maximum transmitting power allowed is 1 mW; up to
10 mW are allowed in other countries. Set the country code for the
portable transmitters as follows:
If you are setting up portable transmitters for a project in the USA,
select “USA” from the “RF Country Limitation” drop down list. If you
are setting up portable transmitters for a project in another country,
select “other”.
Setting the options for finishing the guided tour
You can permit the guide to temporarily interrupt or permanently finish
his guided tour or prevent him from doing so:
Activate the desired setting under “Tour Exit Modes”:
– “Temporary Exit: enable”:
The guide can temporarily interrupt the guided tour as described
under “Interrupting the guided tour” on page 5-21.
Use this preset if the guide is to have the option of interrupting his
guided tour in order to integrate a Storage or Live Event into his
guided tour.
Note:
There are three ways to deactivate the tour interruption (siehe
„Setting the maximum interruption time“ auf Seite 11-39).
– “Temporary Exit: disable”:
The guide cannot interrupt his guided tour. The receivers stay
11-38
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
switched to the RF channel of his portable transmitter until the
guided tour is finished.
– “Permanent Exit: enable”:
The guide can permanently finish the guided tour as described under
“Finishing a guided tour” on page 5-22.
Use this preset if, after the guided tour, the visitors are to have the
opportunity to listen to the Events belonging to the exhibition.
– “Permanent Exit: disable”:
The guide cannot finish the guided tour.
Use this preset if you want to prevent the visitors from listening to
the Events belonging to the exhibition after completion of the
guided tour.
Setting the maximum interruption time
You can permit the guide to temporarily interrupt his guided tour as
described in the preceding section “Setting the options for finishing the
guided tour” on page 11-38. During this tour interruption, the receivers
receive a Storage or Live Event and no longer the RF signal of the portable
transmitter. There are three ways of deactivating this tour interruption so
that the receivers can receive the portable transmitter again:
1. Before the tour starts, the portable transmitter can be set to a
maximum interruption time using the “Charger Manager” software as
described in this section. When this maximum interruption time has
expired, Event repreoduction is stopped automatically.
2. You can position an identifier which triggers the System Event with
the ID number 97. If the receivers participating in the guided tour
receive the signal from this identifier during a tour interruption, Event
reproduction is stopped automatically.
3. In addition, the guide can deactivate the tour interruption manually as
described under “Deactivating a tour interruption” on page 5-21 – but
only if a Storage Event is reproduced and not a Live Event and if the
receivers are not busy with a download.
To set the portable transmitter to a maximum interruption time:
Make sure that the guide is able to temporarily interrupt his guided
tour (siehe „Setting the options for finishing the guided tour“ auf
Seite 11-38).
Activate the desired setting under “Tour Exit Timeout”:
– “Infinite”:
The receivers do not automatically return to the RF channel of the
portable transmitter after a certain time.
Use this preset if the return to the RF channel is triggered by the
System Event with the ID number 97 or the guide deactivates the
interruption manually.
– “Time”:
Set the maximum interruption time in hours, minutes and seconds.
At the expiration of this period, every tour interruption ends
automatically. Event reproduction is stopped automatically and all
receivers return to the RF channel of the guide.
Make sure that the value for the maximum interruption time exceeds
the duration of the longest Storage Event or Live Event in all
categories.
11-39
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Presetting the sensitivity of the microphone input and the line input
You can preset the sensitivity of the microphone input and the line input
in order to optimally adjust the portable transmitter for example to the
microphone used. However, the guide can change both settings at any
time as described under “Adjusting the sensitivity of the microphone
input” on page 5-19 and “Adjusting the sensitivity of the line input” on
page 5-19.
Activate the desired setting under “Audio Level”:
– “Microphone”:
Enter the desired sensitivity in dB. You can enter values from -100 dB
(very low sensitivity) up to +44 dB (very high sensitivity). Every time
the portable transmitter is removed from the charger, this preset
sensitivity is restored.
Use the “Ignore” setting if you don't want to make a preset. The
portable transmitter then always keeps the sensitivity last set by the
guide.
– “Line”:
Enter the desired sensitivity in dB. You can enter values from -100 dB
(very low sensitivity) up to +44 dB (very high sensitivity). Every time
the portable transmitter is removed from the charger, this preset
sensitivity is restored.
Use the “Ignore” setting if you don't want to make a preset. The
portable transmitter then always keeps the sensitivity last set by the
guide.
Suppressing the turn-on of the portable transmitters once
When a portable transmitter is removed from the charger, it automatically
turns on and is ready for operation. The rechargeable battery empties
slowly. If you, for example, want to ship portable transmitters, you can
suppress this automatic turn-on once. This prevents the rechargeable
battery from being empty after shipping.
Activate the desired setting under “Power Off after Charger”:
– “disable”:
The portable transmitter turns on as usual after being removed from
the charger.
– “enable”:
Automatic turn-on is suppressed once. If, after being removed and
inserted into a charger again, the portable transmitter is removed
once more, it turns on as usual.
Activating/deactivating the turn-on/turn-off functions of the SK 3200
portable transmitter
You can allow the guide to turn his portable transmitter on and off or
prevent this.
Activate the desired setting under “Off via Keypad”:
– “enable”:
The guide can turn his portable transmitter off by pressing the MUTE
key for a long time and turn it on again by pressing the FUNCTION
key for a short time.
– “disable”:
The guide cannot turn off his portable transmitter.
11-40
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Presetting portable transmitters for guided tours
Activate the desired setting under “Guided Tour”:
– “Guided Tour: enable”:
Use this setting to preset portable transmitters for guided tours.
– “Guided Tour: disable”:
Use this setting to exclude portable transmitters from guided tours.
– “Tour Mode: temporary”:
Use this setting to preset portable transmitters for one individual
guided tour only.
– “Tour Mode: permanent”:
Use this setting to preset portable transmitters permanently for
guided tours.
– “Tour Channel”:
Select the desired RF channel. It is vital to make sure that this RF
channel is not used a second time in the part of your exhibition in
which the guided tours are conducted!
Displaying the portable transmitter presets
(Get Settings)
You can display the settings you have programmed into the portable
transmitters in a straightforward table and export this table.
Insert all portable transmitters whose settings you want to display
into the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these portable transmittes as described under “Selecting
strings, chargers or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system
manual.
The selected portable transmitters are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the “Device Config” button.
The ”Device Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the “Transmitter” button.
The “Transmitter Configuration” dialog box opens.
Click the ”Get Settings” button.
The ”CHM Settings” window opens.
Key to the 13 column headings:
Column
Meaning
String
Number of the COM port to which the string is connected
Chg
Number of the charger in which the portable transmitter is
located
Slot
Number of the charging compartment in which the
portable transmitter is located
SerNo
Serial number of the portable transmitter
11-41
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
Column
Meaning
TempExt
Status of the temporary tour interruption
(”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
PermExit
Status of the permanent tour interruption
(”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
ExitTimeOut Max. tour interruption time
MicLevel
Sensitivity of the microphone input in dB
LineLevel
Sensitivity of the line input in dB
PwrOff
Status of turn-on suppression
(”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
OffKey
Status of the turn-off and turn-on functions
(”X”: ”enable”, ”-”: ”disable”)
PermCH
Number of the RF channel, if the portable transmitter is
permanently set for guided tours
TempCH
Number of the RF channel, if the portable transmitter is
temporarily set for a single guided tour only
Updating the jingle, alarm signal or firmware in the
receivers
General procedure
To update the firmware, the alarm signal or the jingle in the receivers,
proceed as follows:
! Use the CHM software to select the receivers whose jingle, alarm signal
or firmware is to be updated and prepare transmission of the data.
! You use the INM software to configure the relevant special download
job, i.e. either:
– a special download job for updating the jingle,
– a special download job for updating the alarm signal or
– a special download job for updating the firmware,
The INM software then starts this special download job. The INM
subsequently provides information on the download channel (and
possibly also on the firmware version).
! You enter this information on the download channel (and possibly also
on the firmware version) into the CHM software.
! You start the job, monitor its execution and check the result.
Preparing the CHM
11-42
Insert all receivers which are to receive the jingle, alarm signal or
firmware update into the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these receivers as described under “Selecting strings, chargers
or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system manual.
The selected receivers are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the ”Content Mgmt” button.
The ”Content Management” dialog box opens.
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
To update the jingle, select “Update Jingle” from the “Type” dropdown
list; to update the alarm signal, select “Update Alarm Signal” instead.
The “Channel” dropdown list appears
To update the firmware, select “Update EK3x00 Firmware” from the
“Type” dropdown list.
Four “Version” dropdown lists and the “Channel” dropdown list appear.
Leave this dialog box open. Do not click “OK” or “Cancel”!
Configuring the special download job
First make sure the files required are available and save them on the
Central PC.
! The audio file for the jingle must be available in Windows wave format:
– Sampling rate:
16 kHz
– Resolution:
16 bit
– Format:
mono
– Max. redproduction time: 5 s
! The audio file for the alarm signal:
Caution!
Continuous alarm signals reduce the range of the identifier which
triggers the “Alarm Off” System Event. Thus, if you set a continuous
tone as an alarm signal, we recommend that you set the transmission
power of the identifier triggering the “Alarm Off” System Event to
“100 %” using the IDC software. In order that this identifier can
reliably turn off the continuous tone, the receiver must be closer than
1 m to the identifier!
Alarm signals becoming louder or quieter do not affect the range of
the identifier.
– Sampling rate:
16 kHz
– Resolution:
16 bit
– Format:
mono
– Max. redproduction time: 10 s
! The firmware file
“hex” file name extension
Activate the updating of the jingle, the alarm signal or the firmware in
the receivers using the INM software. Then configure a special
download job. Further information is available as follows:
– Information on the special download job “Jingle update” on
page 8-98 of the
system manual
– Information on the special download job “Alarm signal update” on
page 8-96 of the
system manual.
– Information on the special download job “Firmware update” on
page 8-94 of the
system manual.
11-43
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
For a special download job, enter the following into the “Download
Configuration” dialog box of the INM:
쐃 A name for the special download (e.g. “20060731 EK Jingle Update”)
쐇 The Ct ID number of the cell transmitter which is to transmit the data
An antenna whose signal can reach all receivers in the chargers must
be connected to this cell transmitter.
쐋 The RF channel
쐏 The audio file of the jingle, the alarm signal or the firmware file
쐄 The deadline “Now”
Starting the job
11-44
In the ”Download Configuration” dialog box, click ”OK”.
The INM software starts the special download job after a short time.
The “Information” dialog box appears.
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
The “Information” dialog box shows the following parameters:
! the number of the RF channel used to transmit the data In the
“Download Channel” line and
! (in the case of the special download job “Firmware Transmission” only)
the firmware version number in the “Firmware Version” line.
Transferring the information into the CHM software
Enter the parameters displayed in the “Information” dialog box into
the still open “Content Management” dialog box in the CHM software
and click “OK”.
All receivers selected via the CHM software are turned on and made
ready for data transmission.
Make sure that
– all receivers in the CHM software are marked with a yellow LED
symbol,
– the red LED of all receivers is lit permanently and
– the green LED of all receivers is flashing.
In the “Information” dialog box in the INM software, click “OK”.
The INM software transmits the firmware to the receivers via the
connected cell transmitters.
When updating is complete,
– all receivers turn off,
– all receivers in the CHM software are marked with a green LED
symbol (or a red one if problems occur).
Updating the firmware in the portable transmitters
Make sure that the required firmware file with the file extension “hex”
is available and save this file on the Cental PC. (For detailed
information on the special download job, please refer to the
corresponding service information).
Insert all portable transmitters which are to receive the firmware
update into the charging compartments of a charger.
Select these portable transmitters as described under “Selecting
strings, chargers or devices” on page 10-14 of the
system
manual.
The selected portable transmitters are highlighted in dark blue.
Click the ”Content Mgmt” button.
The ”Content Management” dialog box opens.
11-45
Operating the CHM in the “System Setup & Configuration” mode
11-46
Click the “Transmitter” button.
The “Transmitter Update” dialog box opens.
Click “Open” and select the firmware file with the file extension “hex”
which you saved on the Central PC.
The version number of the firmware is displayed in the “Version” field.
Click “Start”.
The firmware is transmitted to the selected portable transmitters.
12 The Identifier Control (IDC)
! Runs on a PDA (either PalmTop or Pocket PC)
! Serves to set up the identifiers
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.............................................................................. 12-2
General procedure .......................................................................... 12-4
The screen ....................................................................................... 12-5
The menus of the PDA software .................................................. 12-7
Transmitting System Events from the PDA to identifiers....... 12-13
Index .............................................................................................. 12-17
12-1
Before you start
Before you start
Before programming the identifiers of your exhibition via your PDA, please
ensure the following:
! Your PDA must be equipped with the correct operating system:
– PalmTop:
OS version 3.50 to 4.x
– Pocket PC:
Microsoft Windows Mobile (version 1.0 CE)
! Before installing the
software on the Central PC, the
synchronization software should be installed on the PDA:
– PalmTop:
HotSync 4.0 or higher
– Pocket PC:
either Microsoft ActiveSync
(if you are using Windows XP)or Windows Mobile
Device Center (component of Windows Vista)
! After setting up the
software, the Identifier Control (IDC)
software must be installed on the PDA using the synchronization
software.
! You must be familiar with the operation and text input (Graffiti or
handwriting recognition) of the PDA.
! The PDA’s internal clock must be set to the correct time!
! If you are using a PalmTop, the cradle (docking station) must be
connected to your Central PC.
! If you are using a PDA with Windows Mobile, you must proceed as
follows in order to ensure that the infrared interface is initialized and
configured correctly:
Tap “Start” and “Settings” one after the other.
The settings screen opens.
12-2
Before you start
On the “Connections” tab, tap “Beam”.
The infrared communication setting is displayed.
Activate the “Receive all incoming beams” check box and then tap
“OK”.
On the “Connections” tab:
Deactivate the “Receive all incoming beams” check box and then tap
“OK”.
12-3
General procedure
General procedure
You use the IDC PDA software to set up the identifiers of your exhibition.
! First, make sure that your Events are completely configured (see
“Checking a project for completeness” on page 8-102).
! Connect the PDA cradle (docking station) to your Central PC or laptop
(see PDA manual).
! Using the INM software, create the system files for setting up the
identifiers and transfer these files to the PDA using HotSync (see
“Transferring identifier configurations to the PDA” on page 8-90).
! Then walk through your exhibition with the PDA, set up an infra-red
connection to each identifier one after the other and start data
transmission (see “Transmitting identifier settings from the PDA to an
identifier (Send Parameters)” on page 12-11).
In doing so, you also set up System Events such as “Cat”, “Location
entrance”, “Alarm on” or “Alarm off”.
! You can also check the parameters of the identifiers via the IDC PDA
software and set the internal clock of the identifiers (see “Reading the
current identifier data (Read Parameters)” on page 12-10 and “Setting
the internal clock of an identifier (Set Time)” on page 12-11).
12-4
The screen
The screen
Starting the software
After you have installed the IDC software on the PDA, you can start the
software as follows:
If you are using a PalmTop:
Tap the
icon.
The software starts. You can continue working with the software at
the point where you stopped.
If you are using a Pocket PC:
Tap “Start”, “Programs” and “Guideport” one after the other.
The software starts.
The menu bar
The
Tapping the
and
software.
button is located on the menu bar.
button takes you to the four menus
,
,
. These menus allow you to control all functions of the
The display area
The display area shows:
! In the “Installation” row:
The number and name of the currently open location. The IDC can store
data of up to three locations. Tapping the “ ” after
allows
you to open a selection menu via which you can change to another of
the three locations already copied to the PDA.
! In the “Cell” row:
The number and name of the currently open cell. Tapping the “ ” after
allows you to select all cells of the currently open location. All Events
assigned to the selected cell appear in the table in numerical order
(Event ID). Location “0” consists of one single cell, locations with
variable Events consist of many cellls. In addition, each location has a
cell with the number “0” and the name “System functions”.
! In the “Event Name” table:
The number and name of all Events in the currently open cell.
12-5
The screen
Selecting a location (Installation)
To select an installation stored in your PDA:
Tap the “ ” after
.
The location selection menu opens. All locations stored in your PDA are
displayed.
Tap the name of the location you want to open. The Events of the last
selected cell of this location are displayed.
Selecting a cell (Cell)
To select a cell in the current location:
Tap the “ ” after .
The cell selection menu opens. Location “0” consists of one single cell,
locations with variable Events consist of many cellls (see screenshot
shown on the left). In addition, each location has a cell with the
number “0” and the name “System functions”.
Tap the cell whose Events you want to display.
The name and the number as well as the Events of the selected cell are
then displayed.
The foot bar
The foot bar contains the last menu items you selected. These can also be
activated via the four keys of the PDA. This gives you quick access to the
most frequently used functions.
12-6
The menus of the PDA software
The menus of the PDA software
You can control all functions of the software via the
,
,
and
menus. You can open these menus by tapping the “Guideport”
button.
In the PalmTop software, the four menus are next to each other on the top
margin of the display. This type of display is shown in this manual.
In the Windows Mobile software, these menus are to be found one below
the other.
The “File” menu
The
menu allows you to display the software version and the copyright
notice of the IDC software.
Displaying the software version and the copyright notice (Info)
To display the software version and the copyright notice of the IDC
software:
Choose
from the
menu.
The “Info” window opens and the copyright notice, the version
number and the CRC version of the software are displayed.
Note:
The IDC PalmTop software must be equipped with with the version
2.1.0 crc or higher (see version number in the “Info” window shown on
the left) in order that the identifiers transmit the data so that the
receivers can detect and process the signals.
The “Cell” menu
The
menu allows you to select the cell whose identifiers you want to
configure.
Searching for a cell (Search, Find next)
To search for the number or name of a cell in all locations stored in the PDA:
Choose
from the
menu.
The “Search Cell” dialog box opens.
Enter the name of the cell and choose
or enter the number of
the cell and choose
.
The search for the cell starts in the installation currently displayed.
The first cell that agrees with the search specification is displayed.
If the cell displayed is not the one you searched for:
Choose
from the
menu.
The search for the cell name or number previously entered continues.
12-7
The menus of the PDA software
The next cell that agrees with the search specification is then
displayed.
Repeat until the cell you are looking for is displayed.
The “Event” menu
Searching for an Event (Search, Find next)
You can search for the name and number of an Event in a location.
To search for an Event:
Choose
from the
menu.
The “Search Event” dialog box opens.
Enter the number of the Event and choose
or enter the name
of the Event and choose
.
All installations stored in the PDA are then searched through for the
number or name. The first Event that agrees with the search
specifications is displayed and marked. If the search specification is
not found, the display remains unchanged.
If the Event displayed is not the one you searched for:
Choose
from the
menu.
The search for the Event number or name entered previously
continues.
The next Event that agrees with the search specification is displayed
and marked.
Repeat until the Event you are looking for is displayed.
Editing the identifier settings (Edit)
The following identifier settings which you configured on the Central PC
with the INM software can be edited:
! the transmitting power
! the antenna type
! the clock period
! the daily operating time
Note:
This allows you to quickly and easily change individual parameters of
the identifier programming without having to create new system files
via the INM.
12-8
The menus of the PDA software
To edit the identifier settings:
In the display area, tap the Event whose identifier settings you want
to edit.
Choose
from the
menu.
The settings of the selected identifier are displayed.
Tap one of the “ ” symbols or the value of the setting you want to
edit.
The corresponding menu opens and you can select another value. The
new value is stored when you choose
.
Note:
On the subject of the different settings, please refer to the section
“Configuring Events” on page 8-46.
If you tap “Turn on at” or “Turn off at”, the “On-/Off-Time” dialog box
opens.
To edit the turn-on time of the identifier:
Tap the value in the
In the left-hand list, tap the hour at which the identifier is to switch to
normal operation. The changed turn-on hour is displayed in the
box.
In the right-hand list, tap the minute at which the identifier is to
switch to normal operation. The changed turn-on minute is displayed
in the
box.
box.
Note:
If you enter a new “Turn on at” time, the time in the “End time” box is
changed automatically so that the daily operating time of the
identifier remains unchanged. This makes it easier for you to switch
e.g. from summer time to winter time.
To edit the turn-off time of the identifier:
Tap the value in the
In the left-hand list, tap the hour at which the identifier is to switch to
energy saving mode. The changed turn-off hour is displayed in the
box.
In the right-hand list, tap the minute at which the identifier is to
switch to energy saving mode. The changed turn-off minute is
displayed in the
box.
Confirm your entries by tapping
.
The changes are saved and can then be transmitted to an identifier.
box.
Note:
Operating an identifier via an external switch is only possible outside
the daily operating time. You should set the daily operating time to a
value before trigger operation (see “Mounting an identifier with an
external switch (trigger operation)” on page 5-34)!
The
button in the “On-/Off-Time” dialog box may appear but
has no function.
Tapping
in the “On-/Off-Time” dialog box, provides information on the
entry of the “Start time” and “End time”.
12-9
The menus of the PDA software
The “Identifier” menu
The
menu allows you to transmit the system files to an
identifier, check and set the internal clock of the identifiers and activate or
deactivate the standby mode of the identifiers.
Reading the current identifier data (Read Parameters)
On the PDA, you can display the parameters currently stored in the
identifier and compare them with the parameters stored in the PDA.
Note:
You can edit these parameters and then copy them back to the
identifier. In this way, you can change individual parameters any time
without the INM software.
To display the parameters currently stored in the identifier on the PDA:
Point the infra-red interface of the PDA at the infra-red interface of
the identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose
from the
menu.
“Reading parameters” is displayed in the “Identifier” window.
Note:
If you opened an installation on the PDA in which several identifiers
(up to 5) have the same Event number as the identifier whose
parameters are currently being read, a selection menu appears. You
must then select one of the up to five identifiers for data comparison.
In the display area, the Event properties of the identifier are displayed:
! Installation number and name
! Cell number and name
! Event number and name
The parameters of this identifiers are displayed in the left column. The
right column contains the parameters of an identifier with the same Event
number from the current installation:
! Transmitting power of the identifier
! Antenna type
! Clock period
! Turn-on time
! Turn-off time
! Standby mode
! Current time of the identifier
Note:
If no data connection to the identifier is established within 8 seconds,
an error message appears.
12-10
The menus of the PDA software
Transmitting identifier settings from the PDA to an identifier
(Send Parameters)
The “Send Parameters” command allows you to set up an identifier. The
settings created via the INM software or edited on the PDA are transmitted
to the identifier.
In the display area, tap the Event whose parameters you want to
transmit to the identifier.
Point the infra-read panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose
from the
menu.
“Sending parameters” is displayed in the “Identifier” window. The
parameters of the selected Event are transmitted to the identifier and
the internal clock of the identifier is synchronized with the clock of the
PDA. (NB: Make sure the internal clock of the PDA is set to the correct
time before transmitting the data.)
Once data transmission is completed, the message “Data successfully
submitted” appears in the “Sending Data” window. Close the window
by tapping
.
Note:
If no data connection to the identifier is established within 8 seconds,
an error message appears.
Checking the internal clock of an identifier (Read Time)
On the PDA, you can display the internal time of an identifier.
Point the infra-red panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
Choose
from the
menu.
“Reading time” is displayed in the “Identifier” window.
The identifier time is then displayed.
Note:
If no data connection to the identifier is established within 8 seconds,
an error message appears.
Setting the internal clock of an identifier (Set Time)
You can set the internal clock of an identifier. The internal clock of the
identifier is synchronized with the clock of the PDA.
Point the infra-red panel of the PDA at the infra-red panel of the
desired identifier. The distance between PDA and identifier must not
exceed 1 m.
12-11
The menus of the PDA software
Choose
from the
menu.
“Setting time” is displayed in the “Identifier” window.
The internal clock of the identifier is synchronized with the clock of the
PDA. “Time was successfully set” is displayed in the “Identifier”
window.
Note:
If no data connection to the identifier is established within 8 seconds,
an error message appears.
Setting an identifier to standby mode (Standby on)
You can set individual identifiers to standby mode. You should do this if
the corresponding exhibit is not currently on show.
In standby mode, the identifier does not transmit a signal, but the set
parameters remain stored.
To set the identifier to standby mode:
Choose
from the
menu.
“Turning Standby on” is displayed in the “Identifier” window.
The identifier is set to standby mode if the message “Standby mode
successfully set” is displayed in the “Standby” window.
The identifier indicates standby operation during the first 30 minutes
of the daily operating time via a different flashing rhythm. The green
LED flashes twice for a short time and then makes a longer pause.
Setting an identifier to normal operation (Standby off)
To deactivate the standby mode:
12-12
Choose
from the
menu.
“Turning Standby off” is displayed in the “Identifier” window.
The identifier flashes normally again during the first 30 minutes of the
daily operating time and transmits the signal according to the
parameters set.
The menus of the PDA software
Transmitting System Events from the PDA to identifiers
When the PDA data is transmitted from the Central PC to the PDA, the INM
software automatically generates the cell O named “System functions”
(see the screenhsot shown on the left). This cell includes the System
Events allowing you to set up identifiers for switching between categories,
downloading the variable Events of a location or turning the alarm on and
off.
Triggering the switching over of the category (“Cat” System Event )
You have preset the receivers in your exhibition to a certain category via
the CHM software (see “Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19). The IDC software allows you to program an identifier with
the “Cat” System Event so that it changes the receivers’ preset category
for the duration of a visitor tour.
This for example allows the receivers of all persons passing through a
certain door to then receive a certain category. Alternatively, you can
position a receiver triggered by an external switch at the receiver counter
and use it to set all identifiers positioned in the vicinity to a certain
category at the push of a button (it is vital that the receivers are not
inserted into the charging compartments of a charger).
To program an identifier so that it changes the preset category of the
receivers:
Open the cell 0 “System functions” as described on page 12-6.
The System Events are displayed. For each category configured via the
INM software, there is a System Event named “Cat:Name of the
category”.
In the display area, tap the number or name of the “Cat” System Event
you want to assign to the identifier.
Example:
If the identifier is to switch all receivers entering its magnetic field to
category 2, tap the Event number “002” or the Event name
“Cat:Category2”.
Configure the transmitting power, the clock period and the turn-on
and turn-off time of the identifier as described under “Editing the
identifier settings (Edit)” on page 12-8.
Transmit this Event to the desired identifier as described on
page 12-11.
The identifier is programmed with the System Event. All receivers
entering its magnetic field are switched over to the corresponding
category. This switching over of the category is only temporary (for
one single visitor tour). When the receivers are returned after the
visitor tour and inserted into the charging compartment of a charger,
their category setting is automatically reset to the preset which the
system administrator programmed permanently via the CHM (see
“Changing the receiver presets permanently” on page 10-19).
12-13
The menus of the PDA software
Triggering the download of the variable Events of a location (“Location
entrance” System Event )
You have preset the receivers in your exhibition to a certain location via
the CHM software (see “Changing the receiver presets permanently” on
page 10-19). The IDC software allows you to program identifiers with the
“Location entrance” System Event so that the receivers’ preset location is
changed.
You require identifiers programmed in this way at all entrances to
locations with variable Events (location numbers “1” to “63”). This makes
it possible for the receivers of all persons entering the location to reliably
detect this new location and for the correct Events to be downloaded at
the first identifier of the new location.
At the entrances to location “0”, you do not require identifiers which
trigger the “Location entrance” System Event. This is because the Storage
Events of location “0” are fixed Events which are stored in the receiver at
all times and do not need to be downloaded first.
To program an identifier so that it triggers the “Location entrance” System
Event:
Open the location whose Storage Events are to be downloaded (see
“Selecting a location (Installation)” on page 12-6).
The Events of the last opened cell of this location are displayed.
Open the cell 0 “System functions” as described on page 12-6.
The System Events are displayed.
In the display area, tap the number or name of the “Location
entrance” System Event.
Configure the transmitting power, the antenna, the clock period and
the turn-on and turn-off time of the identifier as described under
“Editing the identifier settings (Edit)” on page 12-8.
Transmit this Event to the desired identifier as described on
page 12-11.
The identifier is programmed with the “Location entrance” System
Event. All receivers entering its magnetic field start the mobile
download of the variable Storage Event data of the corresponding
location. These data remain stored in the receiver until another
“Location entrance” identifier triggers the mobile download of the
variable Events of another location.
Turning the alarm on/off (“Alarm On” and “Alarm Off” System Events)
The EK 3200 receivers have a built-in loudspeaker which generates an
alarm signal as soon as the receiver enters the magnetic field of an
identifier which triggers the “Alarm On” System Event. This allows you to
prevent visitors from removing the receiver from your exhibition
unnoticed.
Note!
The alarm signal function is deactivated ex works. If you want to use
this function, it must be activated in the CHM software by the
Sennheiser Customer Service.
The alarm signal can only be turned off manually by pressing the STOP key
on the 16-key receiver. All other receivers require the automatic triggering
of the “Alarm Off” System Event via an identifier programmed
accordingly.
12-14
The menus of the PDA software
Note!
The sound of the alarm signal can be changed via the INM software as
described under “Updating the alarm signal of the receivers” on
page 8-96.
To program an identifier so that it triggers the alarm signal for all receivers
entering its magnetic field:
Open the cell 0 “System functions” as described on page 12-6.
The System Events are displayed.
In the display area, tap the number or name of the “Alarm on” System
Event.
Configure the transmitting power, the antenna, the clock period and
the turn-on and turn-off time of the identifier as described under
“Editing the identifier settings (Edit)” on page 12-8.
Transmit this Event to the desired identifier as described on
page 12-11.
The identifier is programmed with the “Alarm On” System Event. All
receivers entering its magnetic field reproduce the alarm signal which
you determined via the INM as described on page 8-96. The alarm
signal can only be turned off via the “Alarm Off” System Event.
To be able to turn off the alarm signal:
Program an identifier with the “Alarm Off” System Event. Proceed as
described above.
The identifier is programmed with the “Alarm Off” System Event. All
receivers entering its magnetic field terminate the alarm signal.
Caution!
Particularly loud and continuous alarm signals reduce the range of the
identifier which triggers the “Alarm Off” System Event. Thus, if you set
a particularly loud or continuous tone as an alarm signal, we
recommend that you set the transmission power of the identifier
triggering the “Alarm Off” System Event to “100 %” using the IDC
software. In order that this identifier can reliably turn off the
continuous tone, the receiver must be closer than 1 m to the identifier!
Alarm signals becoming louder or quiter as well as less loud alarm
signals do not affect the range of the identifier.
Setting up the automatic return to the RF channel of the portable
transmitter (System Event 97)
You can offer guided tours using a portable transmitter in your exhibition.
During the guided tour, the receivers participating in the tour do not
receive Storage and Live Events but the RF signal of the portable
transmitter.
However, the guide can temporarily interrupt his guided tour as described
under “Interrupting the guided tour” on page 5-21. During this tour
interruption, the receivers receive a certain Storage or Live Event. The
microphone of the guide is not muted.
There are three ways of deactivating this tour interruption so that the
receivers can receive the portable transmitter again:
1. Before the tour starts, the portable transmitter can be set to a
maximum interruption time using the “Charger Manager” software.
When this maximum interruption time has expired, Event
repreoduction is stopped automatically.
12-15
The menus of the PDA software
2. You can position an identifier which triggers the System Event with
the ID number 97. If the receivers participating in the guided tour
receive the signal from this identifier during a tour interruption, Event
reproduction is stopped automatically.
3. In addition, the guide can deactivate the tour interruption manually as
described under “Interrupting the guided tour” on page 5-21 – but
only:
– if a Storage Event is reproduced and not a Live Event (if a Live Event
is transmitted, it can only be interrupted by the corresponding
identifier)
– if the receivers are not busy with a download.
The guide can either trigger this Event automatically by standing close
to the corresponding identifier or manually by entering the desired
Event number via the numeric keys.
To program an identifier so that it triggers the return to the RF channel of
the portable transmitter for all receivers entering its magnetic field:
12-16
Open the cell 0 “System functions” as described on page 12-6.
The System Events are displayed.
In the display area, tap the number or name of System Events with the
number 97.
Configure the transmitting power, the antenna, the clock period and
the turn-on and turn-off time of the identifier as described under
“Editing the identifier settings (Edit)” on page 12-8.
Transmit this Event to the desired identifier as described on
page 12-11.
The identifier is programmed with the System Event. All receivers
entering its magnetic field return to the RF channel of the portable
transmitter.
Index
Index
Alarm 12-14
Download of the variable Events of a location 12-14
Identifier
reading data 12-10
set up via PalmTop 12-11
time
checking 12-11
setting 12-11
Identifier Control (IDC) 12-1
Location entrance 12-14
PalmTop
searching for an Event 12-8
setting up an identifier 12-11
Parameters
transmitting 12-11
Selecting a cell 12-6
Selecting a location 12-6
Switching over of the category 12-13
System Event 12-13
Alarm Off 12-14
Alarm On 12-14
Cat 12-13
Location entrance 12-14
Transmitting parameters 12-11
12-17
13
The Statistics Manager (STM)
! Typically runs on the Central PC
! Collects, evaluates and displays statistical data concerning the visitors
to your exhibition and the exhibits
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.............................................................................. 13-2
General procedure .......................................................................... 13-3
The STM screen ............................................................................... 13-6
The STM menus............................................................................... 13-9
Index .............................................................................................. 13-45
13-1
Before you start
Before you start
The Statistics Manager helps you to analyze how interested your visitors
are and how attractive the exhibits turn out to be. It can also help you to
optimize the technical quality of your exhibition (for example duration of
reproduction and volume of the Events, reliable reception, overlapping of
Events, etc.).
Before you start working with the Statistics Manager, please make sure of
the following:
! The Statistics Manager must be installed on a PC in your network, ideally on the Central PC.
! The SMC (Statistics Manager Collector) module delivered with the STM
must be installed on every Charger PC used in your exhibition (SMC is
installed automatically in conjunction with CHM). The Autostart group
must include a link to the SMC module. The SMC icon shown on the left
must appear on the Windows task bar with a green checkmark (if a red
X appears, see “Changing the default TCP/IP port of an SMC module” on
page 13-15).
! In order for the SMC module to automatically read the tour data from
the receivers, automatic reading of the statistics files must be activated in the CHM software (see “Reading out statistical data manually or
automatically” on page 10-10).
! All Charger PCs must be integrated into the
switched on.
CAUTION!
network and
No data is transferred if the port is blocked!
The STM uses the TCP/IP protocol to transmit the statistical data from the Charger PC to the Central PC. Usually,
transmissions use port 31543.
Make sure no other program is using this port!
Make sure this port is not blocked (e. g., by a firewall)!
Or, change the port number as described in “Changing
the default TCP/IP port of an SMC module” on
page 13-15.
! The License Manager Server (LMS) module delivered with the STM must
be installed on the computer at the USB port to which the dongle is connected.
The LMS icon shown on the left must appear on the
Windows task bar with a green checkmark (if a red X appears, see
“Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS module” on page 16-2).
! The dongle must be inserted into a free USB port of your Central PC.
! Locations “1” to “63” can contain Events which do not need to be updated or replaced regularly (for example fixed information on the exhibition venue). You can assign these fixed Events of locations “1” to
“63” to location “0”. This way, these Events are transmitted once to the
receivers via stationary download and do not need to be constantly
transmitted via mobile download. In order for the STM software to assign the statistical data of these fixed Storage Events to the correct locations and thus evaluate them correctly, you have to assign the correct locations to the Events using the INM software (see “Assigning the
correct location to an Event” on page 8-72).
13-2
General procedure
Caution!
It is absolutely necessary to comply with the rules and regulations
valid in your country for recording and passing on statistical data.
General procedure
Automatic data recording
When a visitor has completed his tour, his receiver is reinserted into the
charging compartment of one of the chargers. If automatic reading of statistical data is activated in the CHM software, the CHM then reads the tour
data. If this function is not activated, you can manually read the statistical
data (see “Reading out statistical data manually or automatically” on
page 10-10). When the tour data of all receivers has been read, the CHM
software stores it in the “guidePORT\Stat” directory on the Charger PC.
Each file includes the tour data of one day. This tour data can be collected
using the SMC software. The STM software analyzes this data and, with the
help of the INM project file, prepares statistics which are stored in the
“GPInstallations\Location folder\Stat” directory on the
Central PC.
CAUTION!
Erroneous statistics result if receivers are not replaced
into the charger after every tour!
If receivers are not replaced into the charger after every
tour, the statistics can be adulterated.
In order for the statistical data to be completely read out:
Activate automatic read out of statistical data in the
CHM software (see page 10-10)!
Place the receivers back into the charger after every
tour!
Leave the receivers in the charger until:
– the device display area of the CHM no longer displays a yellow LED (see page 10-6),
– the device display area of the CHM no longer displays
the communication symbol (see
page 10-6),
– the green charging LED 쐃 on the charging compartment of the receiver no longer quickly flashes*).
*) quick flashing means: Still reading out the statistical data or programming the defaults
slow flashing means: battery is charging (see also page 5-47)
You can create four types of statistics with the Statistics Manager:
Event list
1. Event-related statistics (Event list) allow you to examine the following:
– How many visitors did an Event attract?
– How long did they listen to the Event?
– How much time passed on average between the end of one Event
and the beginning of the next?
– What triggered reproduction of the Event and what terminated it?
13-3
General procedure
– Was reproduction of the Event terminated or repeated by the user,
or was the volume changed?
– Was the transmission of Storage Events started by antennas to the
receivers (download) or by playing back intros?
Visitor list
2. Visitor-related statistics (visitor list) allow you to examine the following:
– How many visitors came to your exhibition on a certain day?
– To which category did they belong?
Timing list
3. Time-related statistics (timing list) allow you to examine the following:
– On average, how long did visitors remain in your exhibition?
– To which category did they belong?
Group list
4. Group-related statistics (group list) allow you to examine the following:
– How many visitors visited the exhibition in groups configured with
the VPR software?
– How many of these visitors were guided as groups; how many were
unguided?
– How long did the tour guide guide the visitors?
– How long did visitors remain in the exhibit upon completion of a
guided tour?
You always create the statistics for certain periods, for example one week
or one month. This, for example, allows you to identify the number of visitors and the times with low numbers of visitors.
Note:
The CHM software must have completely collected all tour data for one
day (from 0.00 to 23.59.59 hrs) before the STM can analyze them.
Therefore, tour data can only be transferred from the Charger PCs to
the STM until the presentation!
Manual/automatic
creation
You can either create the statistics manually or plan them in advance and
save them as a job. These jobs are executed automatically daily, weekly or
monthly as soon as the required tour data is available.
Exporting statistics
You can display all statistics using the STM and can then save them in
HTML format or open them in Microsoft® Excel.
! If you use Microsoft® Excel, the “Open Excel” button appears in each
statistic. If you click on this, the statistic is temporarily saved as an
HTML file. This is then automatically opened in Microsoft® Excel, where
you can process and save the statistics.
! If you do not use Microsoft® Excel, the “Open Excel” button is not displayed. However, you can save your statistics by clicking on the “Save
As” button. The statistics are then saved in the HTML format. You can,
for example, send these HTML files per email, display them in a browser,
and import them into a suitable program for further processing.
Note:
When the STM saves statistics files in the HTML format, the “Bars”
folder containing the bar graphs is saved in the same folder. Thus,
when you pass on the HTML files, you have to pass on the “Bars”
folder too.
13-4
General procedure
Starting the STM software
To start the STM software:
Double-click the program icon on the desktop or click “STM” in the
“Start\Programs\guidePORT” menu.
The STM program window opens.
If the dongle is not inserted or communication with the LMS module
does not work, the “Dongle Information” dialog box also opens (see
page 16-1).
Note:
Do not open the STM several times at once – not even on different
computers. This can lead to conflicts with simultaneous access to the
tour data of the Charger PC.
13-5
The STM screen
The STM screen
The STM screen consists of:
! The title bar providing the usual Windows functions,
! The menu bar with five menus – “File”, “Edit”, “Collectors”, “View” and
“Help”,
! The tool bar with 16 buttons (see also page 13-7),
! The display of the
project and the working directory,
! The “Work List” field (see alsopage 13-7) which includes an overview
of all actions carried out or planned and which belong to the currently
open
project,
! The “Detail List” field (see also page 13-8) which displays details regarding the action clicked in the “Work List” window,
! The status bar with the display of the available memory space, file status and current time,
! The Windows task bar with the icons of the Statistics Manager Collector
(SMC) module and the License Manager Server (LMS) module – provided that they are installed on this computer.
13-6
The STM screen
The 16 buttons on the tool bar
The tool bar contains the following buttons:
Button
Function
Button
Function
Open Installation
(see page 13-9)
View Event List
(see page 13-23)
Open Default Values
(see page 13-10)
View Visitor List
(see page 13-29)
Save Default Values
(see page 13-10)
View Timing List
(see page 13-34)
Open Statistics File
(see page 13-10)
View Group List
(see page 13-38)
Edit Default Values
(see page 13-11)
Update Work List
(see page 13-43)
Edit Collectors
(see page 13-13)
About
(see page 13-43)
Edit Jobs
(see page 13-16)
Dongle Information
(see page 16-1)
Download Statistics
Files
(see page 13-23)
Help
(see page 13-43)
The “Work List” field
The “Work List” field includes overviews of the various protocols. For details on the individual protocols, click one of them. The details are then displayed in the “Detail List” window.
! The “History” folder protocols all manual actions (collecting the tour
data, preparation of a statistics file) as well as jobs carried out automatically. It does this monthly and saves them in a folder.
! Actions completed successfully are marked by this symbol.
! Actions cancelled are marked by this symbol.
Reasons for cancelled actions can be, for example, Charger PCs which
are not connected or switched on, or a dongle which has not been inserted.
13-7
The STM screen
! The “STM Collector List” folder displays the SMC modules selected and
their status (see also “Establishing the connection to the SMC modules
on the Charger PCs” on page 13-13).
! The “Job List” folder displays all jobs you set up.
The “Detail List” field
The “Detail List” field displays a detailed, step-by-step protocol (with date
and time) of the action clicked or last performed in the “Work List” window.
! Steps completed successfully are marked by this symbol.
! Steps cancelled are marked by this symbol.
Reasons for cancelled steps can be, for example, Charger PCs which are
not connected or switched on or a dongle which has not been inserted.
If there are problems transmitting the tour data from the Charger PCs to
the Central PC, the “Detail List” field shows a clear-text message which will
help you to identify and solve the problem.
13-8
The STM menus
The STM menus
The “File” menu
The commands in the “File” menu allow you to open and save
project files (*.xml)
installation databases (*.mdb), statistical
data and preset statistics settings (defaults).
Opening a project
In order for statistical data to be related to the Events, you must first open
the current
project file (*.xml) created via the INM software or
the
installation database (*.mdb) created via the ADM software.
Click “Open Installation” in the “File” menu, or click the “Open Installation” button
in the tool bar.
The “Open Database” file selection box opens.
Select a project file (*.xml) or an installation database (*.mdb) and
click “Open”.
– If you open an installation database (*.mdb): If it has not yet been
created, a subfolder with the name “Stat” is created in the project
folder in which all statistical data of this
project is saved.
The selected project name and the path of the “Stat” folder appear
in the display of the
project and the working directory.
The “Work List” and “Detail List” fields display the actions already
planned and performed for this project.
If you open a project file (*.xml), the “Select location” window opens.
Click the button
and select the desired location from the drop
down list.
The statistical evaluations that you create with STM relate exclusively
to this location. It is not possible to evaluate the same statistics in
multiple locations.
Note:
It is possible to create Events with the INM in location “0”, but assign
them to another location, as described in “Assigning the correct location to an Event” on page 8-72. The STM takes this into account. The
statistical data of these Events do not appear in location “0”, but
rather in the location to which the Events were assigned.
Click “OK”.
If it has not yet been created, a subfolder with the name “Stat” is created in the project folder in which all statistical data of this
project is saved.
The selected project name and the path of the “Stat” folder appear in
the display of the
project and the working directory.
The “Work List” and “Detail List” fields display the actions already
planned and performed for this project.
13-9
The STM menus
Loading saved statistics
If you have already created and saved statistics, you can display them as
follows:
Click “Open Statistics File” in the “File” menu, or click the “Open Statistics File” button
in the tool bar.
The “Open Statistics File” file selection box opens.
Select a statistics file (*.htm) and click “Open”.
The “Open Statistics File” window opens.
– If you open Event-related statistics (Event List), they appear as described under “Manually creating Event-related statistics (Event
List)” on page 13-23.
– If you open visitor-related statistics (Visitor List), they appear as described under “Manually creating visitor-related statistics (Visitor
List)” on page 13-29.
– If you open time-related statistics (Time List), they appear as described under “Manually creating time-related statistics (Timing
List)” on page 13-34.
– If you open group-related statistics (Group List), they appear as described under “Creating group-related statistics (Group List)” on
page 13-38.
Note:
You can also open these statistics in an Internet browser or table calculation program such as Microsoft® Excel.
Loading the defaults (statistics settings)
The defaults allow you to specify the scope of the statistics to be created.
By using the same defaults at all times, you ensure that your statistics always have a uniform appearance. In addition, you can change the working
directory by loading the defaults.
Click “Open Defaults” in the “File” menu, or click the “Open Defaults”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Open Defaults” file selection box opens.
Select a default file (*.xml) and click “Open”.
The defaults saved in the default file become visible as soon as you
choose “Defaults” from the “Edit” menu or click the “Edit Default Values” button
on the tool bar (see “Editing the defaults” on
page 13-11).
Saving the defaults
After editing the defaults (see “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11) and
confirming the changes by clicking “OK”, the defaults are saved automatically in the “Stat” folder of the current project folder.
If you save the defaults, e. g., in a different folder, you also change the
working directory of the STM.
13-10
Click “Save Defaults As...” in the “File” menu, or click the “Save Default
Values” button
in the tool bar.
The “Save Default Values As” file selection box opens.
The STM menus
Enter a name and click “Save”.
The default file is saved in the XML format. The display of the working
directory changes appropriately, and the planned and already performs actions of the working directory are displayed in the “Work List”
and “Detail List” fields.
Closing the program
To close the STM:
Click “Quit” in the “File” menu, or click the
button in the title bar.
The “Edit” menu
The commands in the “Edit” menu allow you to edit the defaults, set up
jobs and establish the connection to the SMC modules on the Charger PCs
from which the tour data is collected.
Editing the defaults
To display and edit the defaults:
Click “Defaults” in the “Edit” menu, or click the “Edit Default Values”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Edit Default Values” window opens.
In the “Reference Times” box, specify which average times are to
apply for the “Event List” statistics. These average times are values
drawn from experience, and differ depending on the exhibition. Later,
the average times influence the percentages and the length of the bar
graphs in the statistics.
– “Pause (sec)” (from several seconds to several minutes depending
on the density of the Events)
defines the average time which passes between the end of one Event
and the beginning of the next. If the visitors need more time than
13-11
The STM menus
you specified under “Pause”, the pause time is considered as being
above average (more than 100 %), and if they need less time, the
pause time is considered as being below average (lower than
100 %).
Percentages and bar graphs concerning the “Pause” only appear in
the statistics if you specified more than 0 seconds under “Pause”.
– “RTA Playing Time (sec)” (from 10 seconds to several minutes depending on the average duration of Live Event reproduction)
is the average duration of a Live Event. If visitors listen to a Live
Event longer than this time, the Live Event is considered to have
been heard more than 100 %.
Recommendation: Enter the time of the longest Live Event of your
exhibition.
– “Min.Playing Time (sec)” (usually 0 to 10 seconds)
is the minimum duration for which an Event must be reproduced in
order to be considered as heard.
If the identifier areas overlap or are too close to each other, reproduction can constantly switch back and forth between both Events. The
specification made under “Min.Playing Time” ensures that these unintentional short bursts are not counted as correct hearing of the
Events.
– “Period Time (min)” (1min to 60 min depending on the precision required)
defines the time resolution of your “Timing List” statistics. The
shorter the period, the longer the statistics.
In the “Data Shown” box, you can specify which data is to be included
in the “Event List” statistics (see “Manually creating Event-related
statistics (Event List)” on page 13-23).
– If you click the “Contacts” check box, the “Contacts” column (see also
page 13-27) later appears in the “Event List” statistics with the
number of visitors who heard the Event in the specified period.
– If you click the “Played” check box, the “Play” column (see also
page 13-27) later appears in the “Event List” statistics with the average time for which the Event was reproduced.
– If you click the “Pauses” check box, the “Pause” column (see also
page 13-27) later appears in the “Event List” statistics with the average time between the end of one Event and the beginning of the
next.
– If you click the “Keys Used” check box, the “Keys Used” column (see
alsopage 13-28) later appears in the “Event List” statistics. This
shows you how often the VOL+, VOL–, STOP and REPEAT receiver buttons were pressed at this Event during the specified period.
– If you click the “Stopped by” check box, the “Ended” column (see
alsopage 13-28) later appears in the “Event List” statistics. This
shows in which way the Event was mainly terminated (by pressing
the STOP key or via another Event) and whether the Event was transmitted to the receiver as planned or not.
– If you click the “Triggered by” check box, the “Trigger” column (see
alsopage 13-29) later appears in the “Event List” statistics. This
shows in which way the Event was mainly triggered (via an identifier
or by entering the three-digit Event number using the numeric keypad of a 16-key receiver).
– If you click the “RX Action” checkbox, the “RX Action” (see
alsopage 13-29) later appears in the “Event List” statistics. This
shows you whether – on contact with the Event, e. g. an Entrance
13-12
The STM menus
Event – an intro or the Event data were transmitted from an antenna
to the receivers.
In the “Show” area, you determine how the statistical data is displayed.
– If you click the “Percentages” checkbox, you add a percentage to
specific statistics.
– If you click the “Bar Graphs” checkbox, you add a bar graph to specific statistics.
Reading out and processing statistical data only works reliably if the internal software
! matches the EK 3000 receiver, version 1.2.1.8 (or higher),
! matches the EK 3200 receiver, version 0.1.1.0 (or higher).
In order to ensure that all your receivers have this internal receiver software:
Using the CHM software, check the version of the internal software of
the receiver, as described in “Displaying the version numbers of the
internal receiver software and hardware” on page 10-22.
Click the “Check RX Software” check box.
The check of the receiver's software used to create the tour data is
switched on. If the following are used in your exhibition:
– Receivers EK 3000 with software version less than 1.2.1.8 or
– Receivers EK 3200 with software version less than 0.1.1.0,
a corresponding message appears in the “Checking Installation” window. This window is displayed if you click the “Default Values” button
in the “Settings” window (see also “Selecting the defaults for the job”
on page 13-19).
If you administer your exhibition using the ADM software, you can ensure
that only current
projects are processed by doing the following:
Click the “Check Inst.ID” check box.
Tour data from
projects with a different ID number is rejected
automatically.
Establishing the connection to the SMC modules on the Charger PCs
Before you can create statistics, the tour data read from the chargers and
saved on the Charger PC must be transmitted to the STM. It is therefore
necessary to establish the connections to the Charger PCs once and for all.
To define from which Charger PCs the tour data is to be collected:
Make sure that the CHM and SMC software modules are installed on all
Charger PCs and that the Charger PCs are switched on.
Click “Collectors” in the “Edit” menu, or click the “Edit Collectors” button
in the tool bar.
13-13
The STM menus
The “Statistic Manager Collector List” window opens and indicates the
status of the last connection to those Charger PCs to which a connection was already established.
“OK” means:
The last connection was properly ended.
“Unknown Status” means:
No previous connection has been established.
“Connection Error” means:
The last connection attempt failed. The Charger PC was either
switched off or the SMC software was not installed or started.
“Download Statistic Files” means:
Tour data from the Charger PC in question is currently being
transferred to the STM.
“Error when …” means:
Additional possible errors in the clear text.
Add the desired Charger PCs to the list by clicking the “Add” button.
The “Collector Information” dialog box opens.
Enter the network name of the Charger PC you want to add into the
“Address” field.
If the default TCP/IP port 31543 on this Charger PC is already occupied
by another program, the SMC icon appears with a red X ( ) on the
Windows task bar of the Charger PC. In this case, change the standard
TCP/IP port as described in page 13-15.
To test the network name and the TCP/IP port, click the “Connect” button.
The status of the TCP/IP connection is displayed in the status line.
If the TCP/IP connection functions without problems, click “OK”.
The selected Charger PC is added to the list in the “Statistics Manager
Collector List” window. The tour data of all Charger PCs displayed here
is transmitted to the Central PC as soon as you choose “Download Statistics Files” from the “Collectors” menu.
To change the TCP/IP port or the network name of a Charger PC:
Click the desired Charger PC in the list of the “Statistics Manager Collector List” window.
Click the “Edit” button.
The “Collector Information” dialog box appears.
Enter the new network name or the new TCP/IP port as described
above.
To delete Charger PCs from the list:
13-14
Click the desired Charger PC in the list of the “Statistics Manager Collector List” window.
Click the “Remove” button.
The Charger PC is removed from the list. The tour data of this Charger
PC is omitted from all future statistics!
The STM menus
Changing the default TCP/IP port of an SMC module
If, after installation of the SMC module on a Charger PC, the SMC icon appears with a red X ( ) on the Windows task bar, the default TCP/IP port
31543 is already occupied by another program. In this case, change the
TCP/IP port as follows:
On the Charger PC:
Close the SMC module of the Charger PC in question by right-clicking
the SMC icon on the Windows task bar and then click “Close Collector”.
Use the Windows editor to open the GP_SMC.INI file in the “bin”
folder in the project directory.
In the “Port=31543” line, replace the old TCP/IP port number with a
new one.
Note:
As certain TCP/IP port numbers are already occupied on most PCs and
are thus unsuitable, we recommend entering a TCP/IP port number
higher than 30000.
Caution!
If you install an SMC module and the LMS module on the same computer, it is absolutely necessary for both modules to have different
TCP/IP port numbers! (changing the TCP/IP port number of the LMS
module, see “Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS module”
on page 16-2.)
Save the GP_SMC.INI file and restart the SMC module.
On the PC on which the STM is installed:
Click “Collectors” in the “Edit” menu.
The “Statistic Manager Collector List” window opens and indicates the
status of the last connection to those Charger PCs to which a connection was already established.
“OK” means:
The last connection was properly ended.
“Unknown Status” means:
No previous connection has been established.
“Connection Error” means:
The last connection attempt failed. The Charger PC was either
switched off or the SMC software was not installed or started.
“Download Statistic Files” means:
Tour data from the Charger PC in question is currently being
transferred to the STM.
“Error when …” means:
Additional possible errors in the clear text.
Click the Charger PC whose standard TCP/IP port number you changed.
Click the “Edit” button.
The “Collector Information” dialog box appears.
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The STM menus
Enter the same TCP/IP port number which you entered in the
GP_SMC.INI file in the “Port” field of the selected Charger PC.
To test the new TCP/IP port, click the “Connect” button.
The status of the TCP/IP connection is displayed in the status line.
If the TCP/IP connection functions without problems, click “OK”.
Setting up jobs
To create statistics so that they recur automatically, set up a job. There are
five types of jobs:
Five job types
1. “Download Statistics” jobs do not create statistics, but retrieve the
current tour data from the Charger PCs for analysis. The following four
jobs require this tour data to be able to create statistics from it.
To trigger this process manually instead, see “Manually transmitting
the tour data from the Charger PCs to the Central PC” on page 13-23.
2. “Event” jobs automatically create Event statistics.
To trigger this process manually instead, see “Manually creating Eventrelated statistics (Event List)” on page 13-23.
Note:
Locations “1” to “63” can contain Events which do not need to be
updated or replaced regularly (for example fixed information on the
exhibition venue). You can assign these fixed Events of locations “1”
to “63” to location “0”. In this way, these Events are transmitted once
to the receivers via stationary download and do not need to be constantly transmitted via mobile download. In order that the STM software can assign the statistical data of these fixed Storage Events to
the correct locations and thus evaluate them correctly, you have to
assign the correct locations to the Events using the INM software (see
“Assigning the correct location to an Event” on page 8-72).
3. “Timing” jobs automatically create timing statistics.
To trigger this process manually instead, see “Manually creating timerelated statistics (Timing List)” on page 13-34.
4. “Visitor” jobs automatically create visitor statistics.
To trigger this process manually instead, see “Manually creating visitor-related statistics (Visitor List)” on page 13-29.
5. “Group” jobs automatically create a group list.
To trigger this process manually instead, see “Creating group-related
statistics (Group List)” on page 13-38.
Job period
Jobs only include tour data from a certain period. Just like statistics created
manually, jobs triggered automatically only include tour data collected up
to 23.59.59 hrs on the previous day!
! “One Month” takes the tour data of one month into account,
! “One Week” takes the tour data of one week into account,
! “One Day” takes the tour data of one day into account,
! “Select Date” takes the tour data of a freely selectable period into account.
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The STM menus
Automatic repetition
Jobs are Events which recur automatically. For example, once a “One
Month” job has been carried out, the period is adapted automatically and
the job is repeated one month later. “One Week” are repeated the next
week and “One Day” jobs the next day. “Select Date” jobs are also automatically repeated. They always take the number of days which you selected into account, and the periods included always link up without gaps.
Four steps to a job
Jobs are set up in four steps:
1. You select the type of job (“Download Statistics”, “Event”, “Visitor”,
“Timing” or “Group”, see page 13-17).
2. Specify the period to be taken into account by the job (see
page 13-18).
3. (This step is not carried out for “Download Statistics” jobs.)
Determine the scope and appearance of jobs by specifying the
defaults (see page 13-19).
4. (This step is carried out automatically for “Download Statistics” jobs.)
Save the job (see page 13-21).
As soon as the tour data for the planned job for the STM is available,
the program calculates the desired statistics. At the same time, it
changes the periods to be taken into account, so that the job is ready
to be repeated.
Selecting the type of job
Click “Jobs” in the “Edit” menu, or click the “Edit Jobs” button
the tool bar.
The “Statistics Manager Job List” window opens.
Add the desired job to the list by clicking the “Add” button.
The “Job Settings” dialog box appears.
in
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The STM menus
Click the desired job in the “Type of Job” group:
– If you select “Event”, the automatic creation of an “Event List” is programmed.
– If you select “Visitor”, the automatic creation of an “Visitor List” is
programmed.
– If you select “Timing”, the automatic creation of an “Timing List” is
programmed.
– If you select “Group”, the automatic creation of an “Group List” is
programmed.
– If you select “Download Statistics”, the automatic collection of the
tour data from the Charger PCs is programmed.
Example:
If you want to create statistics automatically for the previous month,
first add the “Download Statistics” job in order to collect the current
tour data from the Charger PCs on the first of the new month in each
case. Then add an “Event”, “Visitor”, “Timing” or “Group” job in order
to create the desired statistics from the current tour data.
After you have selected a job and clicked “OK”, a window opens to create
the job similar to the following sample illustration, “Creating Event Statistics”.
Selecting the period to be taken into account in the job
The windows for creating the job each have the “Time” group. Here, select
the period of time that the job should consider.
Caution!
Make sure that all Charger PCs and the Central PC are connected to the
network correctly and switched on when the job is carried out. If
Charger PCs for the job cannot be addressed, error messages appear in
the “Work List” and “Detail List” fields and the statistics cannot be
created!
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The STM menus
In the “From” calendar list field, click the first day whose tour data is
to be taken into account in the job.
The selected day is shown in blue. The current date is shown in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
If you set up a “Download Statistics” job, you can also preselect the
time.
Caution!
Transmission of tour data from several Charger PCs to the STM can put
your network under a heavy load, thereby making other network
applications very slow. For this reason, select a time for the “Download
Statistics” job when the Charger PCs are switched on but as few network applications as possible are running.
Avoid the time 0:00:00 hrs if possible! If the clocks of the computers
on your
network are not synchronized, tour data can be lost.
Either click the time period in the center list field for which the tour
data in the job shall be considered (“One Month”, “One Week” or “One
Day”).
Or click “Select Date” in the center list field and then on the last day
for which tour data is to be taken into account in the job in the “To”
calendar list field.
The selected day is shown in blue.
Selecting the defaults for the job
Once you have selected the type of job (page 13-17) and the period
(page 13-18), you can specify the defaults, check the tour data from the
selected period and specify the extent of the statistics.
Note:
This step is not carried out with “Download Statistics” jobs.
To specify the scope of the statistics to be created:
Click the “Default Values” button and change the defaults if necessary
(see “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
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The STM menus
To check the tour data from the selected period:
Click “Check Installation”.
The “Checking Installation” window opens. The tour data of the
selected period is searched.
In the “Checking Installation” window, you will see, for example
– when new categories were added,
– if the installation ID of the ADM database changed,
– whether additional external information is available,
– If you have activated the “Check RX Software” checkbox in the defaults of the “Editing Default Values” window:
whether there are EK 3000 receivers with a software version less
than 1.2.1.8 or EK 3200 receivers with a software version less than
0.1.1.0, and therefore problems in evaluating the statistical data
could occur.
13-20
To take all tour data available for the selected period into account in
the statistics, click the “All Data” check box.
If you want to exclude certain information, deactivate the “All Data”
check box. Then select the information you want to include in the statistics from the information list below it.
If the statistics are to take all categories of your exhibition into
account, make sure that the “All Categories” check box is clicked.
If you only want to create statistics from one or a few categories,
deactivate the “All Categories” check box. Then select the category/
categories you want to include in the statistics from the category list
below it.
The STM menus
Saving the job
Once you have selected the type of job (page 13-17), selected the period
(page 13-18), defined the scope of the statistics (page 13-19) and clicked
“OK”, a file selection box appears.
To save the job:
Enter a file name and a path for the job in the file selection box and
click “Save”.
The statistics are later also saved under this name. The file name will
be expanded to ensure that new statistics do not overwrite already
saved ones.
The newly set up job appears in the “Statistics Manager Job List” window under the specified name. The jobs in the “Statistics Manager Job
List” window are carried out automatically as soon as the required
tour data is available.
Deleting a job
To delete a job:
Click “Jobs” in the “Edit” menu.
The “Statistics Manager Job List” window opens.
Click the job you want to delete.
Click the “Remove” button.
The job is deleted from the job list.
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The STM menus
Changing a job
To change the properties of a job:
13-22
Click “Jobs” in the “Edit” menu.
The “Statistics Manager Job List” window opens.
Click the job whose properties you want to change.
Click the “Edit” button.
A window to create the job opens.
Change the desired properties of the job and click “OK”.
Save the job.
The STM menus
The “Collectors” menu
The “Download Statistics Files” command on the “Collectors” menu allows
you to manually start transmission of the current tour data from the selected Charger PCs to the Central PC so that the STM can create statistics
from it.
Manually transmitting the tour data from the Charger PCs to the Central
PC
To collect the current tour data from the Charger PCs manually:
Caution!
Make sure that all Charger PCs are connected to the network correctly
and switched on. If Charger PCs cannot be addressed, error messages
appear in the “Work List” and “Detail List” fields and the tour data
cannot be retrieved!
Click “Download Statistics Files” in the “Collectors” menu, or click the
“Download Statistics Files button
in the tool bar.
The current tour data is transmitted. The progress made by transmission is shown by a blue bar on the bottom line.
After the transmission has been finished successfully, waiting jobs for
the creation of statistics are executed. You can also manually create
statistics with this data.
The “View” menu
The commands in the “View” menu allow you to create statistics manually.
Manually creating Event-related statistics (Event List)
Note:
Locations “1” to “63” can contain Events which do not need to be
updated or replaced regularly (for example fixed information on the
exhibition venue). You can assign these fixed Events of locations “1”
to “63” to location “0”. In this way, these Events are transmitted once
to the receivers via stationary download and do not need to be constantly transmitted via mobile download. In order for the STM software to be able to assign the statistical data of these fixed Storage
Events to the correct locations and thus evaluate them correctly, you
have to assign the correct locations to the Events using the INM software (see “Assigning the correct location to an Event” on page 8-72).
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The STM menus
To create an “Event List” manually:
Click “Event List” in the “View” menu, or click the “View Event List”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Creating Events Statistics” window opens.
In the “Time” box, select the period to be taken into account in the statistics as follows:
13-24
In the “From” calendar list field, click the first day for which the tour
data is to be taken into account.
The selected day is shown in blue. The current date is shown in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
Either click the time period in the center list field for which the tour
data in the statistics shall be considered (“One Month”, “One Week” or
“One Day”).
Alternatively, click “Select Date” in the center list field and then, in the
“To” calendar list field, the last day whose tour data is to be taken into
account in the statistics.
The selected day is shown in blue.
To specify the scope of the statistics to be created, click the “Default
Values” button and then change the defaults (see “Editing the
defaults” on page 13-11).
If you want to first check the tour data from the selected period, click
“Check Installation”.
The STM menus
The “Checking Installation” window opens. The tour data of the selected period is searched and then displayed.
In the “Checking Installation” window, you will see, for example
– when new categories were added,
– when the installation ID of the ADM database changed,
– whether additional external information is available,
– If you have activated the “Check RX Software” checkbox in the defaults of the “Editing Default Values” window:
whether there are EK 3000 receivers with a software version less
than 1.2.1.8 or EK 3200 receivers with a software version less than
0.1.1.0, and therefore problems in evaluating the statistical data
could occur.
To take all tour data available (including external data) for the
selected period into account in the statistics, click the “All Data” check
box.
If you want to exclude certain information, deactivate the “All Data”
check box and then select the information to be taken into account
from the information list below it.
If the statistics are to take all categories of your exhibition into
account, make sure that the “All Categories” check box is clicked.
If you only want to create statistics from one or a few categories,
deactivate the “All Categories” check box.Then select the category/
categories you want to include in the statistics from the category list
below it.
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The STM menus
Once you have selected the period and clicked “OK”, the “Showing Statistics” window appears.
The header of the “Showing Statistics” window provides the following information:
! “Inst. ID” or “Loc. ID”:
ID number of the project or location
! “Database” or “Location”:
Name of the ADM installation or the INM project
! “From”:
The first day for which tour data is taken into account in the statistics.
! “To”:
The last day for which tour data is taken into account in the statistics.
! “Tours”:
The number of visitor tours taken into account in the statistics. Once
you have restricted the tour data to be taken into account, for example
by excluding certain categories, this number is smaller than the total
number of all tours of the specified period (value in brackets).
The table with the statistics is below the header. This includes the following information at most:
In the “Event” column:
! “No.”:
Three-digit Event number
– In location “0”, only the statistical data of the fixed Events assigned
to no other location but location “0” are taken into account.
! “Name”:
The name of the Event.
! “Mode”:
Type of Event: Cell Entrance (Entrance Event “Cell Download”), RTA
(Live Event) or STR (Storage Event)
Note:
Which of the following columns are included in the statistics depends
on the defaults you selected before creating the statistics (see “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
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The STM menus
In the “Contacts” column:
! “Count”:
Number of visitors who heard the Event in the specified period. If visitors hear the same Event several times, this will be ignored, so the number can never exceed the total number of tours (“Tours” in the header
of the “Showing Statistics” window).
! “%”:
Percentage of visitors who heard the Event in the specified period.
100 % corresponds to the total number of visitors (“Tours” in the header) in the specified period.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
! “Total”:
Absolute total of all contacts. If visitors hear the same Event several
times, this total can be larger than the total number of tours (“Tours”
in the header of the “Showing Statistics” window).
! “Factor”:
An indicator of how often the Event was heard (“Total” divided by
“Tour”).
If this factor is too high, it may be that the associated Event is in a tight
area, and a visitor just passing by can trigger it. Check whether different placement of the Event leads to a better visitor flow, and whether
visitors are bothered or hindered at the Event.
In the “Play” column:
! “Sec”:
Average duration of reproduction in seconds.
...
! “%”:
With Storage Events: what percent of the duration of reproduction was
actually played. If visitors hear the event several times, this number will
exceed 100 %.
With Live Events: what percent of the duration of reproduction was actually played. 100 % corresponds to the time that you preset in “RTAPlaying Time (sec)” in the “Editing Default Values” window (see also
“Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage of played back duration of reproduction in a
bar graph.
In the “Pause” column:
...
! “Sec”:
The average time which passes between the end of reproduction and
the beginning of the next Event.
! “%”:
Only appears if the “Pause” selected in the defaults is larger than 0 s
(see “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
Percentage of the average time which passes between the end of reproduction and the beginning of the next Event (100 % corresponds to
the specification made under “Pause” in the “Edit Default Values” dialog box. See also “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
In the illustrated example, the pause time was set at 100 seconds. Thus
one second corresponds to 1 %.
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The STM menus
! “Bar Graph”:
Only appears if the “Pause” selected in the defaults is larger than 0 s
(see “Editing the defaults” on page 13-11).
Illustrates the percentage of the average time which passes between
the end of reproduction and the beginning of the next Event via a bar
graph.
The length of this bar visualizes the visitor interest or distance to the
next Event. Long bars indicate high interest or long distance. The visitors may have spent additional time at this Event after listening to it
before the next Event was triggered.
In the “Keys Used” column:
The numerators in the column increase by one each if a visitor presses the
appropriate button at least once at this Event.
...
! “Vol+”:
The number of times that visitors press the VOL+ key of the receiver at
least once (to raise the volume) during Event reproduction in the specified period.
Possible causes why many visitors pressed the VOL+ button on the receiver at an Event:
– The audio file was recorded too quietly. Since a uniform volume for
all Events is most comfortable for the visitors, we recommend that
the audio recording be adapted.
– The environment of the Event is noisy.
! “Vol–”:
The number of times that visitors press the VOL– key of the receiver at
least once (to lower the volume) during Event reproduction in the specified period.
Possible causes why many visitors pressed the VOL– button on the receiver at an Event:
– The receiving volume of the receiver is too high. You can change the
receiving volume that the receivers have after removal from the
charger using the CHM software module, as described in page 10-19.
! “Stop”:
The number of times that visitors press the STOP key of the receiver at
least once (to stop reproduction) in the specified period.
! “Repeat”:
The number of times that visitors press the REPEAT key of the receiver
at least once (to repeat reproduction) in the specified period.
Possible causes why many visitors pressed the REPEAT button on the
receiver at an Event:
– Noise sources near this Event,
– minimal speech intelligibility of the audio recording
– presentation with content difficult to understand.
In the “Ended” column:
! “Normal”:
How often the Event was reproduced in the specified period.
...
! “Stop Key”:
The number of times that visitors press the STOP key of the receiver to
stop reproduction of an Event in the specified period.
! “New Ev.”:
How often the play back of the Event was canceled because the receiver
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The STM menus
came into range of a different identifier or a new Event number was entered on the 16 key receiver.
! “No Play”:
The number of times that this Event is not played back at all although
the receiver entered the magnetic field of the identifier in question.
Possible causes:
– The Event involved is a Cell Entrance Event or
– The vent was not transmitted by the antennae to the receivers, because, for example
reception was interrupted or
the receivers left the area covered by the antenna before the Event
could be completely download
or a different Event was triggered before the Event could be completely downloaded.
In the “Trigger” column:
...
! “By ID”:
How often the Event was triggered by an identifier in the specified period.
! “By Key”:
How often the Event was triggered in the specified period by entry of
the three-digit Event numbers using the number keys of a 16-key receiver. If 16-key receivers are not provided at your exhibition, this value is always zero.
In the “RX Action” column:
...
! “Download”:
How often data transmission ran from one antenna to the receiver or
was started at the Event in the specified period.
! “Intro”:
How often an intro was reproduced at the Event in the specified period.
Manually creating visitor-related statistics (Visitor List)
To create a “Visitor List” manually:
Click “Visitor List” in the “View” menu, or click the “View Visitor List”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Creating Visitor Statistics” window opens.
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The STM menus
Select the period to be taken into account in the statistics as follows:
In the “From” calendar list field, click the first day for which the tour
data is to be taken into account.
The selected day is shown in blue. The current date is shown in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
Either click the time period in the center list field for which the tour
data in the statistics shall be considered (“One Month”, “One Week” or
“One Day”).
Alternatively, click “Select Date” in the center list field and then, in the
“To” calendar list field, the last day whose tour data is to be taken into
account in the statistics.
The selected day is shown in blue.
To specify the scope of the statistics to be created, click the “Default
Values” button and then change the defaults (see “Editing the
defaults” on page 13-11).
If you want to first check the tour data from the selected period, click
“Check Installation”.
The “Checking Installation” window opens. The tour data of the
selected period is searched and then displayed.
In the “Checking Installation” window, you will see, for example
– when new categories were added,
– when the installation ID of the ADM database changed,
– whether additional external information is available,
– If you have activated the “Check RX Software” checkbox in the defaults of the “Editing Default Values” window:
whether there are EK 3000 receivers with a software version less
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The STM menus
than 1.2.1.8 or EK 3200 receivers with a software version less than
0.1.1.0, and therefore problems in evaluating the statistical data
could occur.
To take all tour data available (including external data) for the
selected period into account in the statistics, click the “All Data” check
box.
If you want to exclude certain information, deactivate the “All Data”
check box and then select the information to be taken into account
from the information list below it.
If the statistics are to take all categories of your exhibition into
account, make sure that the “All Categories” check box is clicked. If
you only want to create statistics from one or a few categories, deactivate the “All Categories” check box. Then select the category/categories you want to include in the statistics from the category list below
it.
Once you have selected the period and clicked “OK”, the “Showing Statistics” window appears.
The header of the “Showing Statistics” window provides the following information:
! “Inst. ID” or “Loc. ID”:
ID number of the project or location
! “Database” or “Location”:
Name of the ADM installation or the INM project:
! “From”:
The first day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “To”:
The last day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “Tours”:
The number of visitor tours taken into account in the statistics
Once you have restricted the tour data to be taken into account, for example by excluding certain categories, this number is smaller than the total
number of all tours of the specified period (value in brackets). Below the
header is the table with the statistics comprising the following information:
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The STM menus
In the “Day” column:
! The statistics include a line for each day of the selected period.
In the “Tours” column:
! “Count”:
The number of tours that ended in the relevant period.
A tour begins as soon as a receiver is removed from the charger and
ends when it is returned to the charger.
! “%”:
The percentage of tours compared to the total number
The example shows: On Sunday 08/10/08, 800 tours were registered.
That is 53.09% of the total of 1507 tours that were registered from 08/
04/08 to 08/10/08.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
In the “All Categories” column:
...
! “Detected”:
The number of categories triggered during the tours (including guided
tours).
Within the same tour, several different categories can be triggered – either by a System Event or by a visitor entering the category number on
his 16-key receiver, as described on page 5-41. Each triggered category
is counted separately as long as at least two Events were played back.
The following example compares the two columns, “Tours” and “All
Categories”:
The visitors come on the weekend. The exhibit is probably very interesting to families due to its selection and scope.
On Monday, only three categories were triggered. Since the exhibit is
closed on Monday, this may have been a test or special tour.
The “Tour” column indicates that 1507 tours took place in the relevant
period. However, the statistics in the “All Categories” column indicate
1716 triggered categories, so 209 additional instances. This may be the
result of the following causes:
– Visitors changed categories (triggered by selecting on the 16 key receiver or by a System Event) – possibly even several times. In the
new category, they heard a minimum of two Events.
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The STM menus
– If visitors hear at least two Events after a guided tour, this is counted
separately – in the category that was preset before issuing the device.
! “%”:
The percentage of triggered categories on the relevant day compared
to the detected categories in the overall period.
The example indicates: On Sunday 08/10/08, 973 categories and guided tours were triggered. That is 54.6 % of the total 1716 categories
that were triggered from 08/04/08 to 08/10/08.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
In the “guided” column:
Guided tours are treated as independent categories by the STM and are
separately listed in this column.
...
! “Detected”:
The number of guided tours.
The example indicates: guided tours only took place on the weekend –
72 on Saturday and 168 on Sunday.
! “%”:
The percentage of guided tours compared to the triggered categories
on the relevant day.
The example indicates: The 168 guided tours that took place on Sunday
correspond to a percentage of 17.93% of the total 973 categories that
were triggered on Sunday (see also “All Categories” column). Therefore, almost a fifth of the visitors participated in a guided tour on this
Sunday.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
In the Categories columns:
The following columns each relate to a category which was set by the VPR
or CHM before a receiver was issued to a visitor (in the example: “english”
and “german”).
...
! “Detected”:
The number of detected categories on the relevant day.
The example indicates: Most of the visitors listened to the “English”
category (1370 of a total 1716). Only a few visitors heard the “German” category. Depending on the location of the exhibit, you should
check whether the large group of visitors that heard the “English” category also hides persons of other language groups, like, for example
Italians, Spaniards or French. By offering separate categories for these
language groups, you can further increase the attractiveness of your
exhibit.
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The STM menus
! “%”:
The percentage of the category compared to all triggered categories on
the relevant day.
The example indicates: On Sunday, a total of 973 categories were triggered (see also “All Categories” column), this corresponds with 100%.
The “English” category was triggered 762 times on Sunday, which corresponds to 81.32%. The remaining percents apply to the “German”
category (0.75%) as well as guided tours (17.93%, see also “guided”
column).
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
Manually creating time-related statistics (Timing List)
To create a “Timing List” manually:
Click “Timing List” in the “View” menu, or click the “View Timing List”
button in the tool bar .
The “Creating Timing Statistics” window opens.
Select the period to be taken into account in the statistics as follows:
13-34
In the “From” calendar list field, click the first day for which the tour
data is to be taken into account.
The selected day is shown in blue. The current date is shown in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
Either click the time period in the center list field for which the tour
data in the statistics shall be considered (“One Month”, “One Week” or
“One Day”).
Alternatively, click “Select Date” in the center list field and then, in the
“To” calendar list field, the last day whose tour data is to be taken into
account in the statistics.
The selected day is shown in blue.
To specify the scope of the statistics to be created, click the “Default
Values” button and then change the defaults (see “Editing the
defaults” on page 13-11).
The STM menus
If you want to first check the tour data from the selected period, click
“Check Installation”.
The “Checking Installation” window opens. The tour data of the
selected period is searched and then displayed.
In the “Checking Installation” window, you will see, for example
– when new categories were added,
– when the installation ID of the ADM database changed,
– whether additional external information is available,
– If you have activated the “Check RX Software” checkbox in the defaults of the “Editing Default Values” window:
whether there are EK 3000 receivers with a software version less
than 1.2.1.8 or EK 3200 receivers with a software version less than
0.1.1.0, and therefore problems in evaluating the statistical data
could occur.
To take all tour data available (including external data) for the
selected period into account in the statistics, click the “All Data” check
box.
If you want to exclude certain information, deactivate the “All Data”
check box and then select the information to be taken into account
from the information list below it.
If the statistics are to take all categories of your exhibition into
account, make sure that the “All Categories” check box is clicked. If
you only want to create statistics from one or a few categories, deactivate the “All Categories” check box. Then select the category/categories you want to include in the statistics from the category list below
it.
13-35
The STM menus
Once you have selected the period and clicked “OK”, the “Showing Statistics” window appears.
The header of the “Showing Statistics” window provides the following information:
! “Inst. ID” or “Loc. ID”:
ID number of the project or location
! “Database” or “Location”:
Name of the ADM installation or the INM project
! “From”:
The first day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “To”:
The last day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “Tours”:
The number of visitor tours taken into account in the statistics
Once you have restricted the tour data to be taken into account, for example by excluding certain categories, this number is smaller than the total
number of all tours of the specified period (value in brackets). Below the
header is the table with the statistics comprising the following information:
In the “Time” column:
! The list of the periods (you enter these periods in the “Editing Default
Values” under “Period Time (min)” (see page 13-12). The statistics include a line for every period.
Here “30 min) was selected as the period. Therefore, the “00:30” line
lists all tours ended more than 30 minutes and less than 60 minutes after the receiver was handed over to the visitor.
The timing in location “0” is:
– The time elapsed from removing the receiver from the charger to returning it – the entire time spent in the exhibition.
The timing in locations “1” to “63” is:
– The time the visitors spent in each location. If the visitors changed location, the receiver in the System Event “Location Entrance” detects
this. Thus, the STM correctly allocates the timing.
– The times for playing back intros as well as downloading data are not
considered in the locations “1” to “63”.
Times during which the visitors had their receivers turned off are not
considered in any location.
13-36
The STM menus
In the “Tours” column:
! “Count”:
The number of tours ended in this period.
A tour begins as soon as a receiver is removed from the charger and
ends when it is returned to the charger.
! “%”:
The percentage of tours ended in this period.
The example indicates: 35.51% of all tours that were completed from
08/04/2008 to 08/10/2008 lasted longer than 1½ and less than 2
hours.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
In the “All Categories” column:
! “Detected”:
The number of categories triggered during the tours (including guided
tours).
...
Within the same tour, several different categories can be triggered – either by a System Event or by a visitor entering the category number on
his 16-key receiver, as described on page 5-41. Each triggered category
is counted separately as long as at least two Events were played back.
! “%”:
The percentage of categories triggered in a period compared to the
number detected in the total period.
The example indicates: All together, 1716 categories were triggered
during all tours from 08/04/2008 to 08/10/2008. 611 categories (corresponds to 35.6 %) were heard longer than 1 and less than 1½ hours.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
The “guided” column includes all tours completed with a mobile transmitter:
...
! “Tours”:
The number of guided tours ended in this period.
The example indicates: Altogether, 240 tours took place from 08/04/
2008 to 08/10/2008. 97 guided tours took longer than 30 and less
than 60 minutes. 143 guided tours took longer than 60 and less than
90 minutes.
These times include removing the receiver from the charger
– until either they are returned to the charger
– or until the receivers are released from the guided tour by the tour
guide, as described under “Finishing a guided tour” on page 5-22.
The group statistics indicate whether visitors remained in the exhibit
after the guided tours to listen to Events (see “Creating group-related
statistics (Group List)” on page 13-38).
! “%”:
The percentage of guided tours compared to the number of all triggered categories and guided tours within this period.
The example indicates: Altogether, 611 (equals 100%) categories and
guided tours were triggered whose tours lasted longer than 60 and less
than 90 minutes (see “All Categories” column). Of those, 143 (equals
23.4%) were guided tours. The remaining percents were distributed to
the “english” and “german” categories (see next column).
13-37
The STM menus
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
The columns of categories:
The following columns each relate to the category which was set by the
VPR software module before a receiver was issued to a visitor (in the example: “english” and “german”).
...
! “Detected”:
The number of tours during which each of the categories were triggered, and which were ended during this period.
The example indicates: Most of the visitors listened to the “English”
category. These visitors also remained in the exhibit longer than the
few visitors who listened to the “German” category. Why is the exhibit
less interesting to this visitor group?
! “%”:
The percentage of each category compared to the number of the categories and guided tours triggered in a period.
The example indicates: Of the 611 total triggered categories (see “All
Categories” column) which were heard longer than 60 and less than 90
minutes, 436 triggers (equals 71.36%) were for the “English” category.
Only 32 triggers (equals 5.25%) were for the “German” category. The
remaining percents were for guided tours (see previous column, “guided”).
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
Creating group-related statistics (Group List)
In order to manually create statistics regarding visitor groups:
13-38
Click “Group List” in the “View” menu, or click the “View Group List”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Creating Events Statistics” window opens.
The STM menus
Select the period to be taken into account in the statistics as follows:
In the “From” calendar list field, click the first day for which the tour
data is to be taken into account.
The selected day is shown in blue. The current date is shown in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
Either click the time period in the center list field for which the tour
data in the statistics shall be considered (“One Month”, “One Week” or
“One Day”).
Alternatively, click “Select Date” in the center list field and then, in the
“To” calendar list field, the last day whose tour data is to be taken into
account in the statistics.
The selected day is shown in blue.
To specify the scope of the statistics to be created, click the “Default
Values” button and then change the defaults (see “Editing the
defaults” on page 13-11).
If you want to first check the tour data from the selected period, click
“Check Installation”.
The “Checking Installation” window opens. The tour data of the
selected period is searched and then displayed.
In the “Checking Installation” window, you will see, for example
– when new categories were added,
– if the installation ID of the ADM database changed,
– whether additional external information is available,
– If you have activated the “Check RX Software” checkbox in the defaults of the “Editing Default Values” window:
whether there are EK 3000 receivers with a software version less
13-39
The STM menus
than 1.2.1.8 or EK 3200 receivers with a software version less than
0.1.1.0, and therefore problems in evaluating the statistical data
could occur.
To take all tour data available (including external data) for the
selected period into account in the statistics, click the “All Data” check
box.
If you want to exclude certain information, deactivate the “All Data”
check box and then select the information to be taken into account
from the information list below it.
If the statistics are to take all categories of your exhibition into
account, make sure that the “All Categories” check box is clicked. If
you only want to create statistics from one or a few categories, deactivate the “All Categories” check box. Then select the category/categories you want to include in the statistics from the category list below
it.
Once you have selected the period and clicked “OK”, the “Showing Statistics” window appears.
The header of the “Showing Statistics” window provides the following information:
! “Inst. ID” or “Loc. ID”:
ID number of the project or location
! “Database”:
The path and name of the project.
! “From”:
The first day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “To”:
The last day whose tour data is taken into account in the statistics
! “Tours”:
The number of visitor tours taken into account in the statistics
Once you have restricted the tour data to be taken into account, for example by excluding certain categories, this number is smaller than the total
number of all tours of the specified period (value in brackets). Below the
header is the table with the statistics comprising the following information:
13-40
The STM menus
In the “Group” column:
! The list of the groups that were in the exhibit during the relevant time.
You enter these groups yourself using the VPR software module, as describe in “Creating and editing visitor groups” on page 15-17.
There are two types of groups.
– without a tour guide
in the example, only the “Travel Tour” group, a closed group from a
travel company
– with a tour guide (using a mobile transmitter)
in the example, all the groups except “Travel Tour”.
In the “Tours” column:
Here you will find information regarding the tours that take place in
groups.
! “Count”:
The number of tours in groups.
The example indicates: In the “Guide 1” group, 124 tours were given.
These tours lasted an average of 138 minutes and 8 seconds.
! “%”:
The percentage of tours in groups.
The example indicates: Altogether, 325 tours (equals 100%) were given during the relevant period. 124 tours were for the “Guide 1” group
(equals 38.15%).
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
! “Average min”:
The average duration of the tours in minutes and seconds.
In the “unguided” column:
Here you will find information regarding tours that took place in a group
without a tour guide.
...
! “Count”:
The number of tours in unguided groups.
The example indicates: The only unguided tours belonged to the “Travel Tour” group. This is a closed group of a travel company.
! “%”:
The percentage of tours that were unguided.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
! “Average min”:
The average duration of the unguided tours in minutes and seconds.
The example indicates: The tours of the “Travel Tour” group lasted an
average of 94 minutes and 20 seconds.
In the “guided” column:
...
Here you will find information regarding tours that took place in a group
with a tour guide. The following two columns, “with Guide” and “without
Guide” refer to this column:
! “Counted”:
The number of guided tours.
13-41
The STM menus
The example indicates: The tour guide “Guide 1” guided 124 people in
the relevant period.
! “%”:
The percentage of tours that took place in guided groups.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
! “Average min”:
The average duration of the whole tour – guided tour plus possible further stay in the exhibit – in minutes and seconds.
The example indicates: The visitors that participated in the “Guide 1”
group tours stayed in the exhibit an average of 138 minutes and 8 seconds.
In the “with Guide” column:
...
! “Min”:
The time in minutes and seconds from when the tour guide ends the
guided tour, as described in “Finishing a guided tour” on page 5-22, or
the receiver is returned to the charger.
The example indicates: The guided tours of the “Guide 1” group took an
average of 73 minutes and 9 seconds.
! “%”:
The percentage of the time until the tour guide ended the guided tour.
The example indicates: The tours of the “Guide 1” group lasted an average of 138 minutes and 8 seconds (equals 100%, see “guided” column. The actual guided part of the tour lasted an average of 73
minutes and 9 seconds. This equals 52.96%. The visitors spent the remaining time without a tour guide.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
In the “without Guide” column:
...
! “Min”:
The time in minutes and seconds from the end of the guided tour to
when the receiver was returned to the charger.
The example indicates:
– After the tours from the “Guide 1” tour guide were ended, visitors remained in the exhibit another 47 minutes and 4 seconds.
– The “System House” group did not hear any Events after the guided
tour. Apparently they had other things scheduled.
Temporary interruptions to guided tours (see also “Interrupting the
guided tour” on page 5-21) are not included.
! “%”:
The percentage of time that the visitors remained in the exhibit once
the guided tour ended.
The example indicates: The tours of the “Guide 1” group lasted an average of 138 minutes and 8 seconds (equals 100%, see “guided” column. After the “Guide 1” group tours ended, visitors remained in the
exhibit another 64 minutes and 59 seconds and listened to Events. This
equals 47.04%.
! “Bar Graph”:
Illustrates the percentage via a bar graph.
13-42
The STM menus
Saving or exporting statistics
If Microsoft® Excel is installed, the “Open Excel” button appears in each
statistic.
Click “Open Excel”.
The statistics are saved in a temporary HTML file and then automatically opened in Microsoft® Excel. You can now process and save the
statistics.
If Microsoft® Excel is not installed, the “Open Excel” button is not displayed. To save your statistics anyway:
Click the “Save As” button.
The file selection box opens.
Select “Statistics File (*.htm)” in the file selection box.
Specify a path and a name under which the file is to be saved and click
“OK”.
The statistics are saved in HTML format. You can, for example, send
this HTML file per email, display them in a browser, and import them
into a suitable program for further processing.
You can save the statistics as a job too as described below. Here the period
and the defaults of these statistics are automatically taken over into the
job.
Click the “Save As” button.
The file selection box opens.
Select “Job File (*.htm)” in the file selection box.
Enter a path and a name under which the job is to be saved and click
“OK”.
The statistics are saved as a job.
Updating the “Work List” window
To update the “Work List” window:
Click “Update” in the “View” menu, or click the “Update Work List”
button
in the tool bar.
The “Work List” window is updated.
The “Help” menu
The commands on the “Help” menu show the version number of the STM
and the up-to-date license information.
Displaying the version number of the STM
To display the version number of the STM:
Click “About” in the “Help” menu.
The Info window opens.
13-43
The STM menus
Displaying the license Information
The “Dongle Information” dialog box opens automatically and displays the
up-to-date license information in the following cases:
! The dongle is not inserted
! The TCP/IP connection to the LMS module does not function
To display the license information manually:
13-44
From the “Help” menu, choose “Dongle” or click the “Dongle Information” button ( ) on the tool bar.
The “Dongle Information” dialog box opens (see page 16-1).
Index
Index
Keywords that refer to texts of the software interface (menus, fields, tabs, etc.) are shown in blue.
About 13-43
All Categories 13-32, 13-37
Collectors 13-13
Contacts 13-27
Day 13-32
Defaults
Bar Graphs 13-13
Check Inst.-ID 13-13
Check RX Software 13-13
Contacts 13-12
Data Shown 13-12
editing 13-11
Keys Udes 13-12
Min Playing Time 13-12
Pause 13-11
Pauses 13-12
Percentages 13-13
Period Time 13-12
Played 13-12
Reference Times 13-11
RTA Playing Time 13-12
RX Action 13-12
Show 13-13
Stopped by 13-12
Triggered by 13-12
Defaults 13-11
Detail List 13-8
Dongle
displaying license Information 13-44
Dongle 13-44
Download Statistics Files 13-23
Ended 13-28
Event 13-26
Event List 13-3
creating manually 13-23
Event List 13-24
Group 13-41
Group List 13-4
creating manually 13-38
Group List 13-38
guided 13-37, 13-41
Job 13-4
changing 13-22
deleting 13-21
Event 13-18
Get Statistic 13-18
Group 13-18
selecting the type 13-17
setting up 13-16
Timing 13-18
Visitor 13-18
Keys Used 13-28
License 13-44
Matching receivers 13-13
Open Defaults 13-10
Open installation 13-9
Open Statistics File 13-10
Pause 13-27
Play 13-27
Quit 13-11
RX Action 13-29
SMC 13-13, 13-15
closing 13-15
Statistics
exporting 13-43
saving 13-43
Statistics Manager Collector 13-13, 13-15
closing 13-15
Time 13-36
Timing List 13-4
creating manually 13-34
Timing List 13-34
Tours 13-32, 13-37, 13-41
Trigger 13-29
unguided 13-41
Update 13-43
Version number 13-43
Visitor List 13-4
creating manually 13-29
Visitor List 13-29
with Guide 13-42
without Guide 13-42
Work List 13-7
updating 13-43
13-45
14 The Announcement Manager (ANM)
! Typically runs on the Central PC
! Serves to create, edit, manage and transmit announcements
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.............................................................................. 14-2
General Procedure .......................................................................... 14-5
The ANM screen .............................................................................. 14-8
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode) ........................... 14-14
Monitoring the ANM .................................................................... 14-37
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode) ................................... 14-39
Index .............................................................................................. 14-45
14-1
Before you start
Before you start
The Announcement Manager allows you to cut into your
exhibition during operation. As soon as you transmit an announcement,
certain Storage and/or Live Events are faded out and the visitors hear the
announcement instead.
Like Live Events, announcements are transmitted by certain cell transmitters.
Caution!
As soon as a cell transmitter transmits an announcement, it can
transmit neither Storage nor Live Events. This interrupts transmission
of Events and Intros from the antennas to the receivers. This can lead
to waiting times for some visitors.
If you use the Announcement Manager intensively, we recommend
keeping a special cell transmitter/MTS ready for announcements.
Note!
Location “0” usually only has one cell transmitter and one antenna for
stationary download. This means that not enough cell transmitters
and antennas are available to you for making announcements in all
areas of location “0”.
To make announcements in all areas of location “0”, you can set up up
to four cell transmitters with antennas (see “Preparing location “0”
for announcements” on page 14-6).
Note:
Receivers cannot receive announcements of the ANM during a
temporary tour interruption (see “Interrupting the guided tour” on
page 5-21). If announcements are made by chance during a
temporary tour interruption, the following happens:
– If the receivers transmit a Live Event during the tour interruption,
the receivers are immediately switched back to the RF channel of the
portable transmitter. This cancels the tour interruption and the
transmission of the Live Event is stopped.
– If the receivers reproduce a Storage Event during the tour interruption, the Storage Event is reproduced completely to the end.
Before you start working with the ANM, please make sure of the following:
! The
License Manager Server (LMS) module delivered with
the
SYS software package must be installed on the computer
at the USB port to which the dongle is connected. The LMS icon shown
on the left must appear on the Windows task bar with a green tick (if a
red cross appears, see “Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS
module” on page 16-2.
! The dongle must be inserted into a free USB port of your Central PC
! The Base Station PCs must be switched on.
! The BSS software module must be installed and running on all Base
Station PCs. The BSS icon shown on the left must appear on the
Windows task bar with a green tick.
14-2
Before you start
! For the ANM to transmit announcements, there must be a functioning
network connection to the Base Station PCs and the cell transmitters
must be connected to your Base Station PCs via USB and turned on.
! The ANM only works with the SR 3200-2 cell transmitters!
Making announcements or executing scheduled jobs
Announcements are made in the form of jobs. There are two types of jobs:
! Immediate jobs:
These are created spontaneously and executed immediately.
! Scheduled jobs:
These are created in advance and executed automatically according to
a certain time schedule
Immediate jobs are for example executed in order to page a certain person
or group and announce special one-off Events.
Scheduled jobs are usually created for periodically returning Events such
as the restaurant opening, the venue closing or for advertising purposes.
Note:
The length of the recording is limited to 30 seconds!
Which visitors do you address your announcements to?
You can address your announcements directly to certain visitors to your
exhibition.
! Areas:
These are defined in order to address announcements to visitors in
certain parts (cells or groups of cells) in your exhibition only.
! Category groups:
These are defined in order to address announcements directly to
visitors listening to certain categories (languages etc.).
! You can of course also address announcements to all visitors to your
exhibition.
The audio sources for your announcements
All your announcements must first be recorded using a microphone or
imported as a *.wav file.
! Pre-recorded texts:
Can be recorded by a professional announcer and then saved in a folder
on the hard disk (file format: *.wav, 16 kHz, mono).
! Spontaneous recordings:
Can be made by you using the ANM. This requires a microphone to be
connected to the sound card of the PC.
! Silence:
Can be transmitted instead of an announcement. Silence suppresses
the reproduction of all Storage and Live Events, allowing you, for
example, to attract the Caution of the visitors to a subsequent
important announcement, mute parts of your exhibition for the
duration of a live performance or fade out all Events before closing the
exhibition.
14-3
Before you start
Administrator and operator
The ANM is used in two different modes.
! In Administrator mode:
– you require a password (see “Changing the password” on
page 14-35),
– you have all rights,
– you must know the location plan of your
project precisely,
– you can configure and manage all announcements by defining the
area and category groups and thus creating the so-called “call
targets”,
– you can view detailed information (area, category group and call
target of transmitted and scheduled jobs and, in case of failure,
status of the cell transmitters and name of the corresponding Base
Station PCs),
– you define the rights of the operator (see “Defining the rights of the
operator” on page 14-33),
– you must preset the announcement configuration file to be opened
in Operator mode (see “Opening an announcement configuration file
automatically on program start” on page 14-34).
! In Operator mode:
– you do not require a password,
– you have restricted rights only,
– you can create jobs which are to be executed immediately or at
certain times,
– you can carry out other tasks assigned to you by the administrator.
In day-to-day operation, the program usually runs in Operator mode.
To define or edit areas, category groups and call targets, you have to
change to Administrator mode. A password is required for this.
14-4
General Procedure
General Procedure
The ANM allows you to do the following:
The administrator creates a plan
Before you start working with the ANM, please clarify the following:
! Which announcements do you want to transmit at certain times?
You require audio files for time-controlled announcements (file format:
*.wav, sampling rate: 16 kHz, resolution: 16 bits, channels: mono).
! How often do you want to transmit time-controlled announcements?
You can transmit the announcements once only or once per hour, day,
week, month or year. Time-controlled announcements are saved as
“scheduled jobs” which are transmitted automatically at the preset
time. Spontaneous announcements, in contrast, are transmitted
straight away as “immediate jobs”.
! How often is an announcement to be played?
You configure an announcement so that it is played repeatedly, e.g.
twice, three times or again and again.
! Which visitors (category groups) do you want to address the
announcements to?
You should create a category group for every language you offer in
your exhibition, for example by combining the categories “English/
Experts” and “English/Children” to form the category group “English”.
This ensures that you reach all visitors you want to reach.
! Which areas (groups of cells) do you want to transmit the
announcements in?
You define certain groups of cells as “areas” in order to transmit
announcements directly in certain parts of your exhibition. This allows
you to address visitors directly, for example those who are close to a
certain restaurant, shop of part of the exhibition which the
announcement refers to.
! Which cell transmitters/MTS are to transmit the announcements?
You require one MTS per cell. For this you require the location plan of
your exhibition, from which you take the CT ID numbers of the desired
cell transmitters.
The administrator defines the call targets
To be able to transmit announcements in your exhibition, you have to
define “call targets” (see “Defining call targets” on page 14-21).
A call target includes:
! one or several areas in which the announcements are to be
transmitted,
! the category groups to which the announcements are addressed,
! and for every cell of the selected areas, the cell transmitter/MTS which
is to transmit the announcements.
14-5
Preparing location “0” for announcements
Preparing location “0” for announcements
In location “0”, you have no cell structure with its own cell transmitters
and antennas for each cell. If, in addition, you have no Live Events in
location “0”, there is possibly only one single antenna which you use for
stationary download. With only one single antenna, it is usually difficult to
transmit in the whole location “0” as the range is limited. To expand the
area for announcements in location “0”, proceed as follows:
If antennas are already available
If you have at least four Live Events in location “0” and their antennas are
mounted in such a way that location “0” is largely covered, you can use the
same antennas and cell transmitters which usually broadcast the Live
Events for the purpose of making announcements. During the
announcements, transmission of the Live Event is interrupted
automatically and continued automatically after the end of the
announcement.
If antennas are not yet available
Use the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode (see adjacent
screenshot) to program the receivers with the same four RF channels
which you assigned to the four Live Events via the INM software
module (see “Assigning the RF channels for announcements in location “0”” on page 11-33).
This ensures that all receivers constantly check these four channels for
announcements. If an announcement is transmitted on one of these
four channels, transmission of the Live Events is automatically interrupted and the visitor hears the announcement.
Define areas, category groups and call targets as described under
“Configuring the ANM for your exhibition” on page 14-17.
If you have no Live Events in location “0” whose antennas you can use for
broadcasting announcements:
Mount up to four additional antennas and preferably connect them to
the same twin cell transmitter. You do not need to connect audio sources to this cell transmitter.
Use the INM to configure these cell transmitters and antennas (see
“Adding or replacing cell transmitters/MTS” on page 8-38) and make
sure that four suitable interference- and intermodulation-free RF
channels are set (see “RF channels” on page 18-9). Example:
Use the INM to set a sufficient number of additional Live Events in
location “0” according to the following pattern:
– If you only have one single category, define four Live Events.
– If you have two or three categories, define two Live Events.
– If you have more than three categories, define one Live Event.
14-6
Assign the four new cell transmitters/MTS to these Live Events.
Preparing location “0” for announcements
Example:
This ensures that the four additional antennas are constantly ready
for announcements.
Use the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode to set the same
four RF channels which you assigned to the four additional cell transmitters via the INM software module.
This ensures that all receivers constantly check these four channels for
announcements. If an announcement is transmitted on one of these
four channels, transmission of the Live Events is automatically interrupted and the visitor hears the announcement.
Use the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode (see adjacent
screenshot) to program the receivers with the same four RF channels
which you assigned to the four Live Events via the INM software
module (see “Assigning the RF channels for announcements in location “0”” on page 11-33).
This ensures that all receivers constantly check these four channels for
announcements. If an announcement is transmitted on one of these
four channels, transmission of the Live Events is automatically interrupted and the visitor hears the announcement.
Define areas, category groups and call targets as described under
“Configuring the ANM for your exhibition” on page 14-17.
14-7
The ANM screen
The ANM screen
The ANM screen in Administrator mode:
The ANM screen in Operator mode:
14-8
The ANM screen
The ANM screen consists of:
! the title bar providing the usual Windows functions,
! the menu bar with the four menus “File”, “Configure”, “Tools” and
“Help”,
! the toolbar with the 11 buttons (see “The eleven buttons on the
toolbar” on page 14-10),
(some buttons are not active in Operator mode)
! the “Job description” field which displays a detailed description of the
jobs in Administrator mode (see “The “Job description” field” on
page 14-11),
! the three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” and “Done” with the relevant tables
containing all jobs (see “The three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” and
“Done”” on page 14-10),
! the status bar with the display of the corresponding installation
database.
14-9
The ANM screen
The eleven buttons on the toolbar
The toolbar contains the following buttons:
Button
Function
Button
Function
Create new announcement
configuration
(see page 14-15)
Record audio
recordings
(see page 14-39)
Load announcement
configuration
(see page 14-16)
New immediate
announcement
(see page 14-39)
Save announcement
configuration
(see page 14-17)
Define scheduled jobs
(see page 14-30)
Configure areas
(see page 14-18)
Options
(see page 14-33 to
page 14-33)
Configure category
groups
(see page 14-19)
Help
(see page 14-44)
Configure call targets
(see page 14-21)
The three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” and “Done”
The three tabs display all the jobs.
! The “Pending” tab displays all jobs to be executed soon.
! The “Cyclic” tab displays all jobs to be executed repeatedly.
! The “Done” tab displays all jobs already executed.
A table gives you the following information on each of these jobs:
! In the “Job” column:
The name of the job.
! In the “Announcement” column:
The name of the audio file or “Silence” if silence is transmitted.
! In the “Status” column:
The status of the job.
– If the job is waiting to be executed, “Idle” is displayed.
– If the job is in the process of being executed, “Running” is displayed.
– If the job has already been executed, “Done” is displayed.
! In the “Target time” column:
Date and time of execution of the job.
! In the “Last info” column:
14-10
The ANM screen
– If the job is waiting to be executed, “Idle” is displayed.
– If the job has been carrie d out , “OK” is displayed.
– If the job has not been carried, for example because certain cell
transmitters were not switched on or antennas were not connected,
“Error” is displayed.
If you right-click a job on one of the three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” or
“Done”, the shortcut menu opens. The commands on the shortcut menu
allow you to add, change or delete jobs etc.
The “Job description” field
In Administrator mode, the “Job description” field provides a detailed
description of the job clicked on one of the index cards
! The “Job name” field displays the name of the job. You specify the
names of scheduled jobs yourself when setting them up. Immediate
jobs are automatically given a name on the pattern
“Immediate_23:59:59”. If a job transmits silence, it is given the
name “Silence”.
! The “Announcement name” field displays the name of the *.wav file to
be transmitted. You assign this name yourself when recording or
importing the wav file.
! The “Frequency” field displays the interval at which the job is repeated
(“Once”, “Hourly”, “Daily”, “Weekly”, “Monthly” or “Yearly”).
! The “Status” field displays the current status of the job (just as on the
tab, see also “The three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” and “Done”” on
page 14-10).
! The “Target time” field displays the date and time of the next
execution of the job (just as on the tab, see also “The three tabs
“Pending”, “Cyclic” and “Done”” on page 14-10).
! The “Last info” field displays “OK” if the job was executed without
errors or “Error” if the job was not executed without errors.
! The “Call target” field displays the call target to which the job was
transmitted.
! The two tables in the center display all details on the categories to
which the announcement is addressed:
– The “Category group” column displays the category group defined in
the call target.
– The “Category” column displays all categories belonging to this
category group.
– The “Areas” column displays all areas defined in the call target.
– The “Cells” column displays all cells belonging to the defined areas.
! The bottom table displays all details on the Base Station PCs via which
the announcement is transmitted:
– The “BSM name” column displays the name of the Base Station PC
via which the announcement is transmitted:
– The “Cell transmitter” column displays the CT ID numbers of all cell
transmitters required when the announcement is transmitted.
14-11
The ANM screen
– The “Status” column displays “OK” if the cell transmitter does not
report any errors. In the opposite case, the error description of the
cell transmitter is displayed.
If errors occurred during execution of the job, the description of the
problem is displayed here.
14-12
Starting the ANM
Starting the ANM
When you start the Announcement Manager, the “Log on window” dialog
box appears. You first have to log on before you can work with the ANM.
To log on as “Operator”:
Click the “Operator” option button.
Click “Close”.
The “Log on window” dialog box closes. You can now work with the
ANM. You have the rights assigned to you by the administrator.
To log on as “Administrator”:
Click the “Administrator” option button.
The “Password” field appears.
Type the current password into the “Password” field.
Note:
The password is given on page 7-18. You can change this password as
described under “Changing the password” on page 14-35.
Click “Close”.
The “Log on window” dialog box closes. You can now work with the
ANM. You have all the rights of an administrator.
Note:
If nothing is entered into the “Password” field within 30 seconds, the
dialog box closes and the ANM starts in Operator mode.
14-13
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
The Administrator mode is used for:
! creating, editing and saving announcement configuration data, i.e.:
– defining areas (see “Defining areas” on page 14-18),
– defining category groups (see “Defining category groups” on
page 14-19),
– defining call targets (see “Defining call targets” on page 14-21).
! creating and managing the audio files for later transmission as
announcements (see “Recording announcements with a microphone
and saving them” on page 14-25):
– by importing wav files,
– by recording with a microphone.
! setting up scheduled jobs (see page 14-30).
! changing the options (see page 14-33), i.e.:
– granting or refusing operator rights,
– activating the automatic opening on program start of the
announcement configuration file that was last open,
– activating the jingle before each announcement and
– changing the administrator password.
Note:
The operator can also carry out many of these tasks if the
administrator has granted him the necessary rights (see “Defining the
rights of the operator” on page 14-33).
Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode
To change from Operator mode to Administrator mode:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Administrator”.
The “Administrator logging on” dialog box appears.
Enter the password and click “OK”.
All menus and button on the toolbar are activated.
A tick appears in front of “Administrator” on the “Tools” menu.
Note:
The password is given on page 7-18. You can change this password as
described under “Changing the password” on page 14-35.
14-14
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
To change back to Operator mode:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Administrator”.
The tick in front of “Administrator” on the “Tools” menu disappears.
All menus and buttons on the toolbar for which the operator has no
rights are deactivated.
Working with announcement configuration files
All configuration settings and jobs are saved in an announcement
configuration file (file format *.xml). The administrator creates, opens
and saves these configuration files using the commands on the “File”
menu.
Note:
In Operator mode, most commands of the “File” menu are not
available.
Creating a new announcement configuration file
Before you can assign your announcements to the desired areas and
categories of your current exhibition, you first have to create an
announcement configuration file as follows:
Make sure that the ANM is running in Administrator mode (see “Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on page 14-14).
From the “File” menu, choose “New” or click the “Create new
announcement configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “New announcement configuration” dialog box appears.
In the “Load project data from” box, click the option button of the
project type for which you want to create announcements.
– “INM project”: Project file (*.xml) of a
the INM software.
project created via
– “ADM database”: database file (*.mdb) of a
installation
created via the ADM software (delivered with GP 3000 series units).
Click the
button, select the
project for which you want
to create announcements and click “Open”.
The file name of the selected
project appears in the “Project
file with the guidePORT Installation” field. The program then suggests
14-15
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
a name for the announcement configuration file in the “Announcement configuration” field. You can change this name if desired.
Click “OK”.
The file is created. File path and name of the selected
project (*.mdb or *.xml) appear in the status bar. The ANM is now
ready to define the areas, category groups, call targets and audio
recordings.
If you want to configure announcements for a
project file
(*.xml) created via the INM software, the “Select location” window
opens.
Click the
down list.
Click “OK”.
The file is created. File path and name of the selected
project (*.xml) appear in the status bar. The ANM is now ready to define
the areas, category groups, call targets and audio recordings.
button and select the desired location from the drop
Opening an announcement configuration file
To open a previously saved announcement configuration file:
Make sure that the ANM is running in Administrator mode (see “Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on page 14-14).
From the “File” menu, choose “Open” or click the “Load announcement
configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The file selection box opens.
Select the desired file and click “Open”.
The jobs already set up are displayed on the “Pending” and “Cyclic”.
tabs. You can now edit these announcement configuration file or start
transmitting the announcements.
Note:
You can configure the ANM so that the announcement configuration
file that was last open will automatically open each time you start the
program (see page 14-34).
If a “Warning” dialog box like the following one appears after opening,
your announcement configuration file deviates from the configuration of
the project file. This could be due to a change of the project file with the
INM software, for example if a new cell transmitter was added, removed or
replaced. The announcement configuration file detects this deviation
automatically. You have to adapt the announcement configuration file as
follows:
14-16
Click “OK”.
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Check the announcement configuration and adapt it to the changes of
the project file. Please pay attention to the following:
– missing cell transmitters
– new cell transmitters
– modified categories
– modified cells
Saving an announcement configuration file
To save an announcement configuration file:
From the “File” menu, choose “Save” or click the “Save announcement
configuration” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The file is saved in the project folder.
To save the announcement configuration file under a different name (as a
backup etc.):
Make sure that the ANM is running in Administrator mode (see “Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on page 14-14).
From the “File” menu, choose “Save as”.
The file selection box opens.
Enter the file name and click “Save”. It is not permitted to change
folders.
The file is saved in the project folder.
Closing the program
To close the ANM:
From the “File” menu, choose “Close”.
The “Warning” dialog box appears.
Click “OK”.
The program window closes.
If you have changed the configuration, you are first given the option
of saving the changed announcement configuration file.
Configuring the ANM for your exhibition
The commands on the “Configure” menu allow you to:
! create jobs, i.e.:
– immediate jobs
– scheduled jobs
! define areas (groups consisting of one or several cells),
! define category groups,
! record announcements or import them as a wav file,
! set up call targets.
Note:
In Operator mode, various commands of the “Configure” menu are not
available. In order to make these commands available in Operator
mode too, the administrator has to assign the necessary rights (see
“Defining the rights of the operator” on page 14-33).
14-17
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Defining areas
Areas are used for transmitting announcements to certain places in your
exhibition. Areas consist of one or several cells. The largest possible area
comprises all cells in your location.
To define areas:
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Areas” or click the “Configure
areas” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure areas” dialog box appears.
A list of all areas already defined is displayed on the left-hand side of
the “Configure areas” dialog box. If you click one of these areas, a list
of the cells belonging to the clicked area appears under “Selected
cells” on the right-hand side of the dialog box.
To add a new area:
14-18
Click the “Add” button.
The “Define area” dialog box appears.
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
In the “Available cells” field, click the individual cells you want to add
to the desired area one after the other and click the
button after
each one. Alternatively, you can double-click the cells.
The selected cells are moved to the “Selected Cells” field.
In the “Area name” field, enter an unambiguous, self-explanatory
name. Every ANM user must be able to see straight away from this
name which area it refers to.
Click “OK”.
The area is added to the list of areas in the “Configure areas” field.
To edit areas which have already been defined:
Note:
If you have already assigned a job to an area, this area cannot be
edited any more.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure areas” dialog box, click the
area you want to edit.
Click the “Edit” button.
The “Define area” dialog box appears.
Add other cells to the area by clicking the
button or remove cells
from the area by clicking the
button or change the name of the
area.
Click “OK”.
The area is changed.
To delete areas:
Note:
You cannot delete areas that have already been assigned as a target
address in a job.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure areas” dialog box, click the
area you want to delete.
Click the “Remove” button.
The “Confirm” dialog box appears.
Click “Yes”.
The selected areas is deleted.
Defining category groups
Category groups are used to combine certain categories in your exhibition
so that announcements can be addressed to visitors from different
categories at the same time.
To be able to reach all visitors to your exhibition with the same
announcement, you need a category group which includes all categories in
your exhibition.
To define category groups:
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Category groups” or click the
“Configure category groups” button ( ) on the toolbar.
14-19
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
The “Configure category groups” dialog box appears.
A list of all catagory groups already defined is displayed on the lefthand side of the “Configure category groups” dialog box. If you click
one of these category groups, a list of the categories belonging to the
clicked category group appears under “Selected categories” on the
right-hand side of the dialog box.
To add a new category group:
14-20
Click the “Add” button.
The “Define category group” dialog box appears.
In the “Available categories” field, click the individual categories you
want to add to the desired category group one after the other and
click the
button after each one. Alternatively, you can double-click
the categories.
The selected categories are moved to the “Selected Categories” field.
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
In the “Name of the category group” field, enter an unambiguous, selfexplanatory name. Every ANM user must be able to see straight away
from this name which category group it refers to.
Click “OK”.
The area is added to the list of category groups in the “Configure category groups” field.
To edit category groups which have already been defined:
Note:
You can no longer edit category groups that have already been
assigned as a target address in a job.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure category groups” dialog box,
click the category group you want to edit.
Click the “Edit” button.
The “Define category group” dialog box appears.
Add other categories to the category group by clicking the
button
or remove categories from the category group by clicking the
button or change the name of the category group.
Click “OK”.
The category group is changed.
Note:
Redirections of Events to other categories also apply to announcements:
For example, if you have redirected Events from the category “English
Adults” to the category “English Children”, announcements to the
category “English Adults” are also heard in the category “English
Children”.
To delete category groups:
Note:
You cannot delete category groups that have already been assigned
as a target address in a job.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure category groups” dialog box,
click the category group you want to delete.
Click the “Remove” button.
The “Confirm” dialog box appears.
Click “Yes”.
The selected category group is deleted.
Defining call targets
To be able to transmit announcements, you have to specify a call target.
Call targets determine the target address to which an announcement is to
be transmitted. A call target therefore consists of:
! the areas to which the announcements are addressed,
! the category groups to which the announcements are transmitted,
! the cell transmitters/MTS which are to transmit the announcement .
14-21
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Note:
To define the call targets, you require a location plan of all cell
transmitters in your exhibition showing the numbers of the cell
transmitters (CT IDs).
To define the call targets:
Make sure that all required areas and category groups have already
been defined.
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Call targets” or click the
“Configure call target” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure call targets” dialog box appears.
A list of the call targets already defined appears on the left-hand side
of the “Configure call targets” dialog box. If you click one of these call
targets, the following appears on the right-hand side of the dialog
box:
– Under “Selected cells”:
The list of cells which you have assigned to this call target
and the announcement cell transmitter/MTS assigned in each case.
– Under “Selected category groups”
The category groups which you have assigned to this call target
and the categories combined in this category group.
Note:
When you point to a cell with the mouse pointer, a short info field
appears with additional information on the cell transmitter which
transmits the announcement in this cell.
To define a new call target:
14-22
Click the “Add” button.
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
The “Define call targets” dialog box appears.
The “Define call targets” dialog box box consists of the following five
parts:
– The “Name” field with the name of the call target
– The “Areas” field with all areas
– The “Category groups” field with all category groups
– The “Cells” field with the cells of all areas which you clicked in the
“Areas” field
– The “Cell Transmitter MTS” field with the numbers (CT IDs) of all cell
transmitters of the cell which you selected in the “Cells” field
In the “Areas” field, click the individual check boxes or areas you want
to include into the call target.
All cells belonging to the areas clicked appear in the “Cells” field.
In the “Category groups” field, click the individual check boxes of all
category groups you want to include in the call target.
In the “Cells” field, click each cell one after the other.
The numbers (CT IDs) of all cell transmitters of this cell which are able
to transmit appear in the “Cell Transmitter MTS” field.
14-23
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
If you configure call targets in location “0”, skip the following step:
In the “Cell Transmitter MTS” field, click the cell transmitter/MTS
which is to transmit the announcements in this cell and then click the
button. Alternatively, you can double-click the cell transmitters.
The selected cell transmitter/MTS appears in the “Cells” field next to
the name of the cell.
Note:
When you point to a cell transmitter/MTS with the mouse pointer, a
short info field appears with additional information on the cell
transmitter/MTS.
Once you have assigned a cell transmitter to each cell, enter an unambiguous, self-explanatory name into the “Name” field. Every ANM user
must be able to see straight away from this name which call target it
refers to.
The call target is added to the list in the “Configure call targets” dialog
box.
Now you can configure announcements as jobs by transmitting a prerecorded or imported audio file to this call target.
To edit call targets:
Note:
If you have already assigned a call target to a job, this call target
cannot be edited any more.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure call targets” dialog box, click
the call target you want to edit.
Click the “Edit” button.
The “Define call targets” dialog box appears.
Change the configuration of the call target and click “OK”.
The change is saved.
To delete call targets:
Note:
If you have already assigned a call target to a job, this call target
cannot be deleted any more.
On the left-hand side of the “Configure call targets” dialog box, click
the call target you want to delete.
Click the “Remove” button.
The “Confirm” dialog box appears.
Click “Yes”.
The selected call target is deleted.
Recording and importing announcements
You can record your announcements yourself using the ANM and a
microphone connected to the sound card of your PC (see next section) or
import announcements made by professional announcers as WAV files
(see “Importing and saving announcements as *.wav files” on
page 14-27).
All announcements are collected in a list.
14-24
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Recording announcements with a microphone and saving them
To record announcements yourself using a microphone:
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Audio recordings” or click the
“Record audio recordings” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure audio recordings” dialog box appears.
A list of pre-recorded or imported announcements appears on the lefthand side of the “Configure audio recordings” dialog box. If you click
one of these announcements, the file path and name of the announcement appears under “Corresponding file” on the right-hand side of the
dialog box. You can play the announcement by clicking “Play”. Click
“Stop” to cancel playing the announcement.
Add the desired announcement by clicking “Add”.
The “Create/import audio recordings” dialog box appears.
14-25
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Click the “Audio recording via sound card” tab.
From the “Source” drop down list, select the channel of your sound
card which you want to record. Depending on the manufacturer and
the type, your sound card can for example use the following recording
sources:
Channel of your sound Recording
card
CD player
CD drive of the PC
Microphone
Microphone input of the sound card
AUX
AUX input of the sound card
Line in
Line input of the sound card
Headphones
Headphone output of the sound card
Mono output
Mono output of the sound card
Wave output mix
Sum output of the sound card
Note:
If the desired recording source does not appear in this drop down list,
the sound card is either not connected correctly or not configured
correctly (see “Systemsteuerung/Soundkarte”).
In the “Synchronised start” check box, select how the recording is to
be started:
A tick in the “Synchronised start” check box means “automatic start”.
Once you have clicked the Record button
, recording does not start
until the audio signal has exceeded a certain threshold volume. This
threshold volume is selected from “dB” the drop down list (between 20 dB (quiet) and -50 dB (virtually inaudible).
No tick in the “Synchronised start” check box means “manual start”.
Once you have clicked the Record button
ately.
, recording starts immedi-
Click the Record button
and speak the announcement into the
microphone or start playback of the unit connected to the sound card.
The “Progress” bar and the “Playing time (s)” display indicate the
progress of the recording. The “Channel recording level” display shows
the current signal level separately for the left and right channel.
14-26
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Make sure that the “Level” control is set so that – even during the loudest passages of the entire recording – the level display for the left
and right channel barely reaches the “0°dB” marking (yellow area).
If the level display exceeds the level of 0 dB (red area) for longer than
fractions of a section, your recording will sound distorted. For this
reason, you should readjust the “Level” control and repeat the recording.
Note:
The length of the recording is limited to 30 seconds!
Click the Stop button
To listen to the announcement you have just recorded, click the Play
to end the recording.
button
.
The recording is played back via the sound card of your computer and
the connected loudspeakers. To end playback, click the Stop button
.
If you want to repeat the recording, click the Record button
again
and speak the announcement into the microphone again or start playback of the unit connected to the sound card.
If you are happy with the recording, enter an unambiguous self-explanatory name into the “Announcement name” field. Every ANM user
must be able to see straight away from this name which announcement it refers to.
Note:
Ideally, the name you enter should be the text of the announcement. If
make announcements in different languages, you should also specify
the language of the announcement. The names can have a maximum
of 50 characters.
Click “OK”.
Your recording is added to the list in the “Configure audio recordings”
dialog box under the name entered. Your recording is also saved as an
audio file in the working directory of the ANM under this name.
Importing and saving announcements as *.wav files
To import audio files:
All audio files you want to import must be available as *.wav files
(sampling rate: 16 kHz, resolution: 16 bits, format: mono). The length
of the *.wav files is limited to 30 seconds.
Give your *.wav files an unambiguous, self-explanatory name. Every
ANM user must be able to see straight away from this name which
announcement it refers to.
Note:
Ideally, the name you enter should be the text of the announcement. If
make announcements in different languages, you should also specify
14-27
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
the language of the announcement. The names can have a maximum
of 50 characters.
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Audio recordings” or click the
“Record audio recordings” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure audio recordings” dialog box appears.
14-28
Add the desired announcement by clicking “Add”.
The “Create/import audio recordings” dialog box appears.
Click the “Audio from existing file” tab.
Click the
button and select the *.wav file with the desired
announcement.
The name of the selected *.wav file appears in the “Audio message
name” field. You cannot change this file name using the ANM.
To listen to the selected announcement, click the Play button
The
recording is played back via the sound card of your computer and the
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
connected loudspeakers. The “Audio spectrum” area displays the
audio signal of the file.
To end playback, click the Stop button
Click “OK”.
Your recording is added to the list in the “Configure audio recordings”
dialog box.
.
14-29
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Configuring scheduled jobs
As the administrator, you can configure time-controlled announcements.
These scheduled jobs are executed automatically as soon as the scheduled
time arrives.
Three steps are required to configure scheduled jobs:
1. You select an announcement. You can also transmit silence instead of
an announcement.
2. You select a call target.
3. You configure the schedule.
To select an announcement:
14-30
Point to “New call” on the “Configure” menu and then click “Scheduled
job: new” or click the “Define scheduled job” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Scheduled announcements” dialog box appears.
Enter an unambiguous, self-explanatory name into the “Job name”
field. Every ANM user must be able to see straight away from this
name which scheduled job it refers to.
On the “Announcement” tab, click the desired announcement.
In the “Number of play sequences” box, click the number of times that
the selected announcement is to be played in succession at one certain
transmission time.
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
To transmit silence instead of an announcement:
Click the “Silence” tab.
In the “Maximum duration” field, click the hours, minutes and seconds
one after the other and enter the duration of the silence to be transmitted in hours, minutes and seconds. You can also increase or decrease the hours, minutes and seconds using the arrow buttons.
To select the call target:
In the “Call target” list on the right-hand side of the dialog box, click
the call target to which the announcement is to be addressed in each
case.
To configure the schedule
In the “Frequency” box, click the intervals in which the announcement
is to be transmitted.
– Select “Once” to transmit the announcement once at one single
time.
– Select “Hourly” to transmit the announcement once per hour.
– Select “Daily” to transmit the announcement once per day.
– Select “Weekly” to transmit the announcement once per week.
– Select “Monthly” to transmit the announcement once per month.
In the “Start” box, click the “Date” drop down list.
The calendar list field appears.
14-31
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
In the calendar list field, click the day on which the job is to be
executed for the first time.
The selected day is highlighted in blue. The current date is highlighted
in red.
To select a different month, click the arrow buttons on the top left or
top right of the calendar list field.
In the “Time” field, click the hours and minutes one after the other and
enter the hour and minute at which the job is to be transmitted for the
first time. You can also increase or decrease the hours and minutes
using the arrow buttons .
To complete the job:
In the “Scheduled announcement” dialog box, click “OK”.
The scheduled job with the selected schedule is entered in the tables
on the “Pending” or “Cyclic” tabs. It is executed automatically as soon
as the selected time arrives. If you configured several jobs with the
same time, they are executed one immediately after the other.
Note:
For how to configure immediate jobs, see “Day-to-day operation
(Operator mode)” on page 14-39.
14-32
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
Changing options
The “Options” command on the “Tools” menu allows you to:
! define the rights of the operator,
! specify whether the announcement configuration file that was last
open will automatically open each time you start the program,
! change the password,
! specify whether each announcement is to be automatically preceded
by a jingle.
Defining the rights of the operator
The administrator can restrict or extend the rights of the operator as
follows:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Operator rights” tab.
Click the check boxes to assign or remove rights.
To assign the right in question to the operator, there must be a tick in
the check box; to remove the right in question from the operator,
there must be no tick in the check box.
– “Make audio recordings”:
Allows the operator to record announcements and save them on the
hard disk.
It also allows the operator to import announcements as *.wav files.
– “Define areas”:
Allows the operator to define, edit and delete areas (groups of cells).
– “Create category groups”:
Allows the operator to define, edit and delete category groups.
– “Define call targets”:
Allows the operator to define, edit and delete call targets.
– “Create new jobs”:
Allows the operator to configure scheduled jobs.
14-33
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
– “Modify existing jobs”:
Allows the operator to modify the jobs on the “Pending”, “Cyclic”
and “Done” tabs (e.g. to modify the schedule).
– “Activate/deactivate jobs”:
Allows the operator to deactivate the jobs on the “Pending” and
“Cyclic” tabs, so that they are temporarily not executed, or to
activate them again.
Note:
The following rights cannot be assigned to the operator at all:
– Creating and opening configuration files and saving them under a
different name
– Viewing detailed protocols in the “Description” field
– Editing the options of the ANM
In the “Options” dialog box, click “OK”.
The Operator rights are assigned.
Opening an announcement configuration file automatically on program start
The ANM requires two system files: the
project file (*.mdb or
*.xml) and the corresponding announcement configuration file (*.xml).
You can configure the ANM so that the announcement configuration file is
opened automatically on program start.
Note:
As the program is usually started in Operator mode, it is crucial for the
administrator to preset the announcement configuration file to be
opened as the operator cannot open an announcement configuration
file himself!
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “System Files” tab.
The file path and name name of the
project appears in the
“Project file with the guidePORT Installation” field. The file path and
name name of the announcement configuration file appears in the
14-34
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
“Announcement configuration file” field. Neither of the file paths can
be edited.
To open the announcement configuration file automatically when the
program is started, click the “Load configuration file automatically
when application is started” check box.
In the “Options” dialog box, click “OK”.
The ANM is configured for program start as specified.
Changing the password
You need the password in order to change from Operator mode to
Administrator mode. To change this password:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Password” tab.
In the “Enter old password” field, enter the current password.
In the “Enter new password” field, enter the new password.
In the “Re-enter new password” field, re-enter the new password.
Click “Apply”.
The new password is applied.
Preceding all announcements by a jingle
To distinguish announcements better from the Events, you can
automatically precede each announcement by a jingle. This jingle is
configured by Sennheiser electronic Customer Service before the software
is installed. The jingle must not be longer than 5 seconds. You cannot
change this jingle later.
To automatically precede all announcements by the jingle:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
14-35
Configuring the ANM (Administrator mode)
14-36
Click the “Jingle” tab.
Click the “Jingle will be played with every announcement” check box.
In the “Options” dialog box, click “OK”.
All announcements are automatically preceded by the jingle.
Monitoring the ANM
Monitoring the ANM
All jobs which the ANM carries out on one day are recorded in a log file. If
problems occurred during execution of a job, all relevant information is to
be found here.
Opening log files
The “guidePORT\bin\LOG” folder contains a subfolder (e.g. “LOG2005-01”) for each month in which jobs were executed. The ANM saves
the log files in these subfolders. For every day one file is saved. The file
names contain the name of the location and the date (e.g.
“VanGoghExhibition_2005-01-15”).
Open the log file with the desired date (for example in the Windows
editor).
Example of a log file
For every job executed without errors, a line ending with “OK” appears, for
example:
8/16/20041:35:13 PMImmediate_1:35:13 PMoutofcontrol
OK
This line contains the following information:
! The time at which the job was started
14-37
Monitoring the ANM
! The name of the jobs as displayed on the tabs
! The name of the announcement (the name of the audio file or
“Silence”)
! “OK” for jobs executed without errors, otherwise “Error”
If errors occurred during execution of a job, lines are added providing
information on the status of each cell transmitter addressed during
execution of the job, for example:
8/16/20042:10:20 PMImmediate_2:10:20 PMoutofcontrol
Error
"BS_PC01""Ct596231":Antenna not connected.
"BS_PC02""Ct356842":OK
"BS_PC03""Ct125472":OK
The additional lines contain the following information:
! The name of the Base Station PC to which the cell transmitter is
connected
! The CT ID number of the cell transmitter
! The error message of the cell transmitter. If there are no errors: “OK”
If an error occurs during execution of a job, the “Error” dialog box is
displayed in the ANM. The dialog box with the error message remains
visible until the error message is confirmed. This confirmation is entered in
the log file with the date and time of confirmation, for example:
====> Error message
3:57:42 PM <====
14-38
ACKNOWLEDGED
on:
8/16/2004
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
The Operator mode is used for:
! monitoring the jobs
! transmitting immediate announcements
Recording and transmitting an immediate announcement
To make an immediate announcement, you have to do the following:
1. You record the announcement (or select a pre-recorded announcement).
2. You transmit the selected announcement.
To record an immediate announcement:
Make sure that the ANM is running in Administrator mode (see “Changing from Operator mode to Administrator mode” on page 14-14) or
that the operator has the right to make audio recordings (see “Defining the rights of the operator” on page 14-33).
From the “Configure” menu, choose “Audio recordings” or click the
“Record audio recordings” button ( ) on the toolbar.
The “Configure audio recordings” dialog box appears.
A list of all announcements recorded up to now is displayed on the
left-hand side of the dialog box. You can listen to an announcement by
clicking it and then clicking the “Play” button on the right-hand side of
the dialog box. The announcement is played via the sound card of your
computer and the connected loudspeakers.
14-39
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Click “Add”.
The “Create/import audio recordings” dialog box appears.
Click the “Audio recording via sound card” tab.
From the “Source” drop down list, select the channel of your sound
card which you want to record. Depending on the manufacturer and
the type, your sound card can for example use the following recording
sources:
Channel of your sound Recording
card
CD player
CD drive of the PC
Microphone
Microphone input of the sound card
AUX
AUX input of the sound card
Line in
Line input of the sound card
Headphones
Headphone output of the sound card
Mono output
Mono output of the sound card
Wave output mix
Sum output of the sound card
Note:
If the desired recording source does not appear in this drop down list,
the sound card is either not connected correctly or not configured
correctly (see “Systemsteuerung/Soundkarte”).
In the “Synchronised start” check box, select how the recording is to
be started:
A tick in the “Synchronised start” check box means “automatic start”.
Once you have clicked the Record button
, recording does not start
until the audio signal has exceeded a certain threshold volume. This
threshold volume is selected from “dB” the drop down list (between 20 dB (quiet) and -50 dB (virtually inaudible).
No tick in the “Synchronised start” check box means “manual start”.
Once you have clicked the Record button
ately.
14-40
, recording starts immedi-
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Click the Record button
and speak the announcement into the
microphone or start playback of the unit connected to the sound card.
The “Progress” bar and the “Playing time (s)” display indicate the
progress of the recording. The “Channel recording level” display shows
the current signal level separately for the left and right channel.
Make sure that the “Level” control is set so that – even during the loudest passages of the entire recording – the level display for the left
and right channel barely reaches the “0°dB” marking (yellow area).
If the level display exceeds the level of 0 dB (red area) for longer than
fractions of a section, your recording will sound distorted. For this
reason, you should readjust the “Level” control and repeat the recording.
Note:
The length of the recording is limited to 30 seconds!
Click the Stop button
To listen to the announcement you have just recorded, click the Play
to end the recording.
button
.
The recording is played back via the sound card of your computer and
the connected loudspeakers. To end playback, click the Stop button
.
If you want to repeat the recording, click the Record button
again
and speak the announcement into the microphone again or restart
playback of the unit connected to the sound card.
If you are happy with the recording, enter an unambiguous self-explanatory name into the “Announcement name” field. Every ANM user
must be able to see straight away from this name which announcement it refers to.
Note:
Ideally, the name you enter should be the text of the announcement. If
make announcements in different languages, you should also specify
the language of the announcement. The names can have a maximum
of 50 characters.
14-41
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Click “OK”.
Your recording is added to the list in the “Configure audio recordings”
dialog box.
To transmit the immediate announcement:
Point to “New call” on the “Configure” menu and then click “Immediate job: new” or click the “New immediate announcement” button
( ) on the toolbar.
The “Immediate announcement” dialog box appears.
Click the announcement you want to transmit on the “Announcement” tab or – if you want to transmit silence – the “Silence” tab and
select the maximum duration of the silence in the “Maximum duration” field. To do so, click the hours, minutes and seconds one after the
other and enter the desired number or increase or decrease the value
using the arrow keys.
In the “Call targets” list, click the call target to which you want to
transmit the announcement.
In the “Number of play sequences” box, click one of the option buttons
to determine how many times in succession the announcement is to
be transmitted.
Click “OK”.
The announcement appears as an immediate job in the table on the
“Pending” tab (the job is given a name on the pattern
“Immediate_23:59:59”). Execution starts automatically after a
few seconds. “Running” appears in the “Status” column during execution. Once the announcement has been transmitted, the job disappears from the “Pending” tab and appears on the “Done” tab.
The execution of a job takes an average of 20 seconds. The more Base
Station PCs and areas addressed, the longer the duration of execution.
14-42
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Monitoring the jobs
The operator should monitor the execution of jobs as follows:
Regularly check the jobs on the “Done” tab and make sure that “OK” is
always displayed in the “Last Info” column.
If “Error” is displayed or the warning shown below appears, the announcement was not transmitted as planned!
Note:
If you click a job in Administrator mode, a detailed description of the
jobs and any problems occurred during execution appear in the
“Description” field. Incorrect execution of jobs can have the following
causes among others:
- Base Station PCs not switched on or not connected
- Cell transmitters not switched on or not connected
- Antennas not connected
Editing the jobs
Scheduled jobs can also be edited during day-to-day operation via the
shortcut menu. If you do not have the necessary rights, certain commands
on the shortcut menu will be deactivated.
To open the shortcut menu:
On one of the three tabs “Pending”, “Cyclic” or “Done”, right-click a
job.
The shortcut menu opens.
Select the desired command from the shortcut menu:
– To define a new job, click “Scheduled job: new”.
– To change the properties of a job (the schedule or the name of the
job etc.), click “Edit Job”.
– To stop a job during execution, click “Stop Job”. Execution of the job
is cancelled. “Cancelled” is displayed in the “Status” column. The job
will be executed normally again at the next scheduled time.
– To delete a job, click “Delete Job”. The job is removed from the tab
and never executed again.
– To temporarily deactivate a job, click “Deactivate Job”. The job is not
executed until you activate it again.
– To re-activate a temporarily deactivated job, click “Activate Job”.
– To repeat a job, click “Repeat Job” (only available on the “Done”
tab).
14-43
Day-to-day operation (Operator mode)
Using the online Help
To get online Help on the ANM:
From the “Help” menu, choose “Content”.
The online Help opens.
Displaying the version number of the ANM
To display the version number of the ANM:
From the “Help” menu, choose “About”.
The Info window opens.
Displaying the license Information
The “Dongle Information” dialog box opens automatically and displays the
up-to-date license information in the following cases:
! The dongle is not inserted
! The TCP/IP connection to the LMS module does not function
To display the license information manually:
From the “Help” menu, choose “Dongle”.
The “Dongle Information” dialog box opens (see the following
section).
Note:
If the “Dongle Information” dialog box is open, all jobs which are
currently being executed are interrupted until the “Dongle
Information” dialog box is closed.
14-44
Index
Index
Announcement
areas
defining 14-18
call target
defining 14-21
category groups
defining 14-19
Announcement configuration file 14-15
opening 14-16
saving 14-17
Announcement Manager 14-1
Administrator 14-14
commands
About 14-44
Administrator 14-14
Areas 14-18
Audio recordings 14-25, 14-28
Call targets 14-22
Category groups 14-19
Close 14-17
New 14-15
Open 14-16
Save 14-17
jobs
editing 14-43
monitoring 14-43
Operator 14-39
defining the Operator rights 14-33
Announcements
immediate announcements
recording and transmitting 14-39
importing as a wav file 14-27
scheduled jobs
configuring 14-30
Announcment configuration file
creating a new 14-15
Announcment Manager
commands
Dongle 14-44
Dongle
displaying the license information 14-44
14-45
15 The Visitor Profiler (VPR)
! Typically runs on the Charger PC
! Serves to configure the receivers before they are handed out to the
visitors
! Serves to configure the portable transmitter and the receivers
participating in a guided tour
Contents of the chapter
Before you start.............................................................................. 15-2
General procedure .......................................................................... 15-3
The VPR screen ............................................................................... 15-5
Starting the VPR............................................................................. 15-7
Preparing the VPR for operation (Setup) ................................... 15-9
Operating the VPR in Operator mode ........................................ 15-11
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode............................... 15-22
List of VPR messages ................................................................... 15-27
Index .............................................................................................. 15-28
15-1
Before you start
Before you start
The VPR software allows you to configure receivers and portable
transmitters before handing them out to the visitors. You can make sure
that every visitor gets the receiver he requires, configured for the correct
category and the desired guided tour with a guide.
You can operate the software in two different ways:
! via a touch-sensitive monitor (touch screen), by pressing the relevant
buttons on the touch screen,
! and via mouse and keyboard.
These instructions assume that a touch screen as well as a mouse and a
keyboard are connected to the computer.
CAUTION!
Computer blocked due to password-protected screen
saver!
If you operate the VPR without a keyboard and protect the
screen saver with a password, no one can enter the
password in order to exit the screen saver!
Either turn off the screen saver.
Or deactivate the screen saver password protection.
Before you work with the software
To be able to use the VPR, make sure that the following requirements are
met:
1. The CHM software must be installed on the Charger PC and ready for
operation, i.e.:
– the CHM must have version 1.0.4.0 or higher. If you use an older CHM,
you should first acquire a CHM update from Sennheiser electronic
and install it.
– the CHM must be up and running. If you close the CHM, the following
error message appears in the VPR and you can no longer configure
receivers and portable transmitters:
– the “Visitor Profiler Server” in the CHM (in “Installation &
Administration” mode) must be activated as described under
“Preparing the CHM for operation (Setup)” on page 10-9.
2. The software requires a network connection to the Charger PC to
which the chargers are connected, i.e.:
– the Charger PC must be turned on and configured ready for
operation.
– the network connection to the Charger PC must be correctly set up in
the CHM (see page 10-11) and VPR (see page 15-9) software.
– the chargers must be correctly connected to the RS 485 interfaces of
the Charger PC using suitable cables.
– the receivers and portable transmitters must be inserted completely
into the charging compartments of the chargers.
15-2
General procedure
General procedure
The two access modes
The VPR can be used in two different modes.
In Administrator mode:
! you need a password,
! you need a keyboard,
! you can set up the VPR for your
project (Setup),
! you can configure receivers,
! you can configure portable transmitters,
! you can permanently combine several receivers with a portable
transmitter to form a guided tour,
! you can permanently set receivers to a certain category.
In Operator mode:
! you don't require a password,
! you don't require a keyboard,
! you can configure the receivers and (if necessary) the portable
transmitter and hand them out to the visitors and to the tour guide,
! you can ensure that every visitor gets a receiver set to the category he
requires,
! you can define and edit the visitor groups.
In the course of day-to-day operation, the program usually runs in
Operator mode and is used for handing out the receivers quickly and
easily. These instructions assume that you use a touch screen in Operator
mode.
To set up the VPR once and adapt it to your
project as well as to
permanently change the presets of the receivers or portable transmitters,
change to Administrator mode. The password is required for this.
Temporarily or permanently assigning units to a visitor group
Visitor groups are for the planning, organization and preparation of visitor
traffic. You can assign receivers and portable transmitters to visitor groups
temporarily or permanently.
Temporarily assigning units to a
visitor group
If you temporarily assign units to a visitor group, this visitor group exists
for one single guided tour only. As soon as the receivers and the portable
transmitter are inserted into the chargers again after completion of a
guided tour, the assignment to the visitor group is cancelled automatically.
These visitor groups can be of different sizes. Every time you assign
receivers to a visitor group, you can select a different number of receivers
(see page 15-13) – depending on how many visitors are participating in
the guided tour.
In addition, you can delete or edit these visitor groups at any time in
Operator mode, for example in order to change the name afterwards and
add or remove a guide (see page 15-18).
15-3
General procedure
The guide can temporarily remove receivers from the visitor group at any
time in order to allow the visitors to hear certain Events specified by the
guide.
Permanently assigning units to a
visitor group
The receivers and the portable transmitter permanently stay in the same
visitor group – even if they are inserted into a charger after completion of
the guided tour.
These permanent visitor groups are always the same size and always have
the same portable transmitter.
Permanent visitor groups can only be configured, modified or deleted
using the CHM software.
15-4
The VPR screen
The VPR screen
The VPR screen in Administrator
mode
In Administrator mode, the VPR screen consists of:
! The title bar providing the usual Windows functions
The title bar displays the name of the current project. The project is
specified in Administrator mode (see “Creating a configuration” on
page 15-9).
! The menu bar
! The status bar
The status bar displays the project file and the current access mode.
15-5
The VPR screen
The VPR screen in Operator mode
The title, menu and status bar are missing in Operator mode.
! “Hand guidePORT out” button:
for setting the desired category of individual or several receivers
! “Group Hand guidePORT out” button:
for configuring receivers and possibly also a portable transmitter for a
visitor group, e.g. for a guided tour
! “Define new group” button:
for creating and configuring a visitor group
! “Edit group” button:
for deleting or changing the configuration of a visitor group
! “Administrator log in” button:
for changing to Administrator mode
15-6
Starting the VPR
Starting the VPR
CAUTION!
Receivers and portable transmitter not ready for handing
out as program start takes too long!
Once you have started the VPR, it queries all units one after
the other via a network connection to the CHM – and thus
to the chargers with the inserted receivers and portable
transmitters. Depending on your number of receivers and
portable transmitters, this query can take a long time
(approx. 45 minutes for 1,000 units). During this query,
the VPR is not ready for operation and cannot configure
receivers and portable transmitters.
Either start the VPR early enough so that the query is
completed before your exhibition opens.
Or leave your Charger PCs turned on all the time and let
the CHM and VPR software run uninterruptedly.
When you start the Visitor Profiler, the “Log on window” dialog box opens.
You have to log on before you can work with the VPR.
To log on as “Operator”:
Press the “Operator” option button.
Press “OK”.
The “Log on window” dialog box closes and the VPR starts in Operator
mode. The configuration of the last project opened is loaded
automatically.
You can now use the VPR to:
– set individual or several receivers to the desired category in order to
hand them out to the visitors (see page 15-11),
– set receivers to the desired category and hand them out to a visitor
group – if necessary in conjunction with a portable transmitter, e.g.
for a guided tour (see page 15-13),
– create and configure new visitor groups (see page 15-17),
– change the configuration of existing visitor groups (see
page 15-18).
To log on as “Administrator”:
Click the “Administrator” option button.
The “Password” field appears.
Type the current password into the “Password” field.
15-7
Starting the VPR
Note:
The password is given on page 7-18. You can change this password as
described on page 15-24.
Click “OK”.
The “Log on window” dialog box closes and the VPR starts in
Administrator mode. The title bar and the menu bar are visible. In the
“Tools” menu, a tick appears in front of “Administrator”. The
configuration of the last project opened is loaded automatically.
Note:
If nothing is entered into the “Password” field within 30 seconds, the
dialog box closes and the VPR starts in Operator mode.
15-8
Preparing the VPR for operation (Setup)
Preparing the VPR for operation (Setup)
Configuring communication with the CHM
For communication with the portable transmitters and receivers, the VPR
requires a network connection to the CHM. Both software modules are
delivered with a preset which works in most computer networks without
any further configuration.
However, if communication with the CHM is not possible after starting the
VPR, one of the following two error messages appears:
In this case, configure the network connection as described under
“Configuring communication with the CHM” on page 15-25.
Make sure that your Charger PC is turned on and that the CHM is
running.
Note:
If you work with the VPR software, you can only configure the units
using the VPR. In this case, you must run the CHM software in the
background.
Creating a configuration
Before you can work with the VPR, you must first go into Setup and make
sure that the VPR has a connection to the CHM software and knows the
main features of your
project.
Make sure that your Charger PC is turned on and configured correctly
(see page 10-11).
Make sure that the chargers are correctly connected to the Charger PC
and that receivers and portable transmitters are completely inserted
into the chargers.
Start the VPR in Administrator mode (see “Starting the VPR” on
page 15-7) or change to Administrator mode as described under
“Starting the Administrator mode” on page 15-22.
15-9
Preparing the VPR for operation (Setup)
In the “File” menu, click “New” or press the key combination Ctrl + N.
The “New VPR configuration” dialog box opens.
Note:
The “Open”, “Save” and “Save As” commands on the “File” menu
allow you to open, edit and save an existing configuration.
15-10
Click the
button, click your
project file and then “Open”.
The file name of the selected
project appears in the “Project
with the guidePORT installation” box. The VPR also prepares a VPR
configuration file whose path and name appear in the “VPR
configuration file” box. You cannot edit this file and this path.
Click “OK”.
The “New VPR configuration” dialog box closes. The title bar displays
the file name of the selected project. The VPR is now ready for
operation. When you start the VPR the next time, the last
configuration opened is opened automatically.
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
In Operator mode, you can:
! set receivers to the desired category before handing them out to the
visitors (see page 15-11),
! set receivers to the desired category and hand them out to a visitor
group – if necessary in conjunction with a portable transmitter, e.g. for
a guided tour (see page 15-13),
! create and configure new visitor groups (see page 15-17),
! change the configuration of existing visitor groups (see page 15-18).
When you start one of these operations, the following is displayed on the
left-hand side of the screen:
! information on the step of the operation you are currently on,
! tips on what to do in each case.
Follow these tips.
Configuring individual receivers and handing them out
The “Hand guidePORT out” button allows you to assign a category to a
certain number of receivers in three steps. Then you hand out these
receivers to the visitors.
The receivers configured in this way
! are set for a normal tour during which the visitors hear the Events
belonging to your exhibition,
! do not belong to a visitor group,
! are not suitable for a guided tour.
Step 1: Selecting the category
Make sure that enough receivers with a fully charged rechargeable are
inserted into the chargers.
Press “Hand guidePORT out”.
The category selection appears.
15-11
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Note:
You can cancel the category assignment whenever you wish by
pressing “Cancel”.
Press the button for the desired category.
The selected category is highlighted in blue. The “Next” button
becomes active.
Note:
You can scroll through the list of categories by pressing the arrow keys
on the right-hand margin.
Step 2: Entering the number of
receivers
Press “Next”.
The numeric input box appears.
Enter the desired number of receivers using the numeric buttons.
You can configure up to 999 receivers at once. The number entered is
displayed. The “Next” button becomes active.
Press “Next”.
The progress bar appears.
The selected number of receivers is configured with the desired
category. The READY LED of the configured receivers lights up green.
15-12
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
The “handout check” window appears.
The “handout check” window displays the number of configured
receivers which are now ready for handing out.
Step 3: Handing out the receivers
Remove all receivers with an active green READY LED from the
chargers and hand them out to the visitors.
Each time you remove a receiver with an active green READY LED from
a charger, the number of receivers displayed is reduced by one.
Once you have removed all receivers with an active green READY LED
from the chargers, the standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is
ready for the next configuration.
If you do not want to remove all receivers from the chargers, press
“Cancel”. The remaining receivers with an active green READY LED are
turned off and the standard VPR screen appears.
Handing out receivers and portable transmitters to a
visitor group
Note:
Before you can hand out receivers to visitor groups, you must first set
up at least one visitor group (see page 15-17).
The “Group Hand guidePORT out” button allows you to assign the
configuration of a visitor group (name and guide) and one or several
categories to receivers in six steps. You can then hand out these receivers
to the visitor group.
If a portable transmitter belongs to the visitor group, it is configured
automatically. You can hand out this portable transmitter to the tour
guide.
The receivers configured in this way
! belong to a coherent visitor group from an organizational point of view,
! are suitable for a guided tour if the visitor group was configured using
a guide.
! If the visitor group was configured with a guide, the receivers are not
set for a normal tour to the exhibition during which the visitors hear
the Events belonging to your exhibits, but can be removed from the
visitor group temporarily or permanently and then behave like
perfectly normal receivers.
15-13
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Step 1: Selecting the visitor group
Make sure that enough receivers with a fully charged rechargeable
battery are inserted into the chargers.
Press “Group Hand guidePORT out”.
The group selection appears.
Note:
You can cancel the configuration of the visitor group whenever you
wish by pressing “Cancel”.
Press the button for the desired visitor group. The selected visitor
group is highlighted in blue. The “Next” button becomes active.
Note:
You can scroll through the list of visitor groups by pressing the arrow
buttons on the right-hand margin.
Step 2: Selecting the category
Press “Next”.
The category selection appears.
Press the button for the desired category.
The selected category is highlighted in blue. The “Next” button
becomes active.
Note:
You can scroll through the list of categories by pressing the arrow
buttons on the right-hand margin. You will later have the option of
adding further receivers with another category to this visitor group.
15-14
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Step 3: Entering the number of
receivers
Press “Next”.
The numeric input box appears.
Enter the desired number of receivers using the numeric buttons.
You can add up to 999 receivers to a visitor group at once. The number
entered is displayed. The “Next” button becomes active.
Press “Next”.
The progress bar appears.
The selected number of receivers is configured with the desired
category. The READY LED of the configured receivers lights up green.
The “handout check” window appears.
The “handout check” window displays the number of configured
receivers which are now ready for handing out.
15-15
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Press “Next”.
If you have configured a group with a guide, the list of guides appears
(see Step 4). If this is not the case, continue reading from Step 5.
Step 4: Changing the guide
(only for groups with a
configured guide)
You can now change the guide assigned to the visitor group as follows:
In the list of guides, press the desired guide in order to assign a
personalized portable transmitter.
Alternatively, press “automatic” in the list of guides to assign a nonpersonalized portable transmitter. The next available RF channel is
set.
Note:
You can scroll through the list of guides by pressing the arrow buttons
on the right-hand margin.
Press “Next”.
The progress bar appears.
Step 5: Handing out the receivers
Remove all receivers with an active green READY LED from the
chargers and hand them out to the visitors.
Each time you remove a receiver with an active green READY LED from
a charger, the number of receivers displayed is reduced by one.
Once you have removed all receivers with an active green READY LED
from the chargers, a query appears and asks whether you want to
hand out more units.
Step 6: Adding receivers
If you do want to hand out more receivers, press “No”.
The standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is ready for the next
configuration.
15-16
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
If you want to add more receivers (e.g. with a different category
setting), press “Yes”.
The category selection appears.
Continue as described under “Step 2: Selecting the category” on
page 15-14.
Creating and editing visitor groups
The “Define new group” button allows you to create a visitor group in
three steps. Here you can specify:
! the name of the visitor group,
! whether a guide is assigned to the visitor group or not.
With a guide
If you assign a guide to the visitor group, all receivers which you assign to
this visitor group later are configured for a guided tour. This means that
these receivers are set to the RF channel of a portable transmitter after
removal from the chargers and do not play back Storage and Live Events.
The portable transmitter belonging to a visitor group with a guide is
configured automatically.
Without a guide
If you do not assign a guide to the visitor group, all receivers you assign to
this visitor group are configured for a normal tour to the exhibition. This
means that these receivers play back the Storage and Live Events
belonging to your exhibition after removal from the chargers. These
receivers cannot participate in a guided tour.
Step 1: Entering a name
Press “Define new group”.
The text input box appears.
Note:
You can cancel the creation of the visitor group whenever you wish by
pressing “Cancel”. You can return to the last step at any time by
pressing “Back”.
Enter the name of the visitor group by pressing the letter buttons. You
can enter a maximum of 25 characters. It is not possible to enter
spaces here. The “Next” button becomes active.
15-17
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Note:
If you make a mistake, you can delete the characters you have entered
up to now by pressing “Clear” or delete the last character entered by
pressing the “%” button.
Step 2: Selecting a guide
Press “Next”.
The guide query appears.
If you want to create a visitor group for guided tours with a guide,
press “Guided”; if you want to create a visitor group for normal tours
to the exhibition without a guide, press “Not Guided”.
Press “Next”.
The summary appears.
Note:
You can still assign a certain guide at this point by pressing the
“Guide” button and selecting a name from the list.
Changing/deleting the configuration of visitor groups
The “Edit group” button allows you to:
! change the name of visitor groups,
! add a guide to visitor groups without a guide afterwards,
! remove the guide from a visitor group afterwards,
! delete visitor groups.
15-18
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Step 1: Selecting a group
Press “Edit group”.
The group selection appears.
Note:
You can cancel the change made to the visitor group at any time by
pressing “Cancel”.
Press the button for the desired visitor group.
The selected visitor group is highlighted in blue. The “Next” button
becomes active.
Note:
You can scroll through the list of visitor groups by pressing the arrow
buttons on the right-hand margin.
Step 2: Selecting the change option
Press “Next”.
The following selection appears.
Depending on what you want to change, press one of the buttons:
If you want to change the name of a visitor group, press “Edit group
name”.
The text input box appears.
Enter the name as described “Step 1: Entering a name” on page 15-17.
The name is changed. A summary appears.
Press “Next”.
The standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is ready for the next
operation.
15-19
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
If you want to delete a visitor group, press “Delete group”.
A safety query appears.
Press “Yes”.
The visitor group is deleted. A summary appears.
Press “Next”.
The standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is ready for the next
operation.
Note:
“Set guide” is only displayed if a guide is not yet assigned to the
visitor group.
If you want to add a guide to a visitor group afterwards, press “Set
guide”.
The guide is added. The visitor group is now configured for guided
tours with a guide. A summary appears.
Note:
You can still assign a certain guide at this point by pressing the
“Guide” button and selecting a name from the list.
Press “Next”.
The standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is ready for the next
operation.
Note:
“Remove guide” is only displayed if a guide is assigned to the visitor
group.
15-20
If you want to remove the guide from the visitor group afterwards,
press “Remove guide”.
The guide is removed. The visitor group is now configured for normal
tours to the exhibition without a guide. A summary appears.
Press “Next”.
The standard VPR screen appears and the VPR is ready for the next
operation.
Operating the VPR in Operator mode
Exiting the VPR
CAUTION!
Receivers and portable transmitter not ready for handing
out as program start takes too long!
Once you have started the VPR, it queries all units one after
the other via a network connection to the CHM – and thus
to the chargers with the inserted receivers and portable
transmitters. Depending on your number of receivers and
portable transmitters, this query can take a long time
(approx. 45 minutes for 1,000 units). During this query,
the VPR is not ready for operation and cannot configure
receivers and portable transmitters.
Either start the VPR early enough so that the query is
completed before your exhibition opens.
Or leave your Charger PCs turned on all the time and let
the CHM and VPR software run uninterruptedly.
To exit the VPR in Operator mode, you need the keyboard.
Press the key combination ALT + F4.
The VPR is exited.
Calling up the online help
To call up the online help in Operator mode, you need the keyboard.
Press the F1 key.
The online help appears.
15-21
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
Note:
In order to be able to operate the VPR in Administrator mode, a
keyboard and if possible a mouse must be connected to the computer!
Starting the Administrator mode
Press the “Administrator log in” button.
The “Administrator logging on” dialog box opens.
Enter the current password into the field and press “OK”.
The Administrator mode starts. The title bar and the menu bar appear.
Configuring transmitters for guided tours
In order that guided tours with portable transmitters do not interfere with
the reception of the Storage and Live Events belonging to your exhibition,
you have to set a suitable RF channel for each portable transmitter. You
can also personalize the portable transmitters by entering the name of a
guide.
15-22
Insert all portable transmitters you want to configure into a free
charging compartment of a charger.
In the “Configure” menu, click “Device parameters”.
The “Device parameters” window opens.
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
Each line in the table corresponds to a portable transmitter:
– The “RF channel” column displays the RF channels already set via
which the portable transmitters transmit.
– The “SK 3200 serial number” column displays the serial numbers of
all portable transmitters which are currently available.
– The “Guide” column displays the names of the personalised portable
transmitters.
– The “Programmed” column displays a tick if the corresponding
portable transmitter is configured for the RF channel displayed in the
“RF channel” column.
You can add lines to the table by pressing the “Ins” key and delete lines
by pressing the “Del” key.
Enter the following into each line:
In the dropdown list in the “RF channel” column, click the desired RF
channel for the respective portable transmitter.
CAUTION!
Reception interference as a result of an unsuitable RF
channel!
If you set an unsuitable RF channel, the corresponding
portable transmitter can interfere with the reception of
Live Events and with the mobile or stationary download of
Events! This can bring about that visitors cannot hear any
Events.
Make sure to select a channel which is not used in your
entire
project!
Observe the note on the recommended RF channels on
page 18-9!
If you have installed many cell transmitters and
antennas or are using a large number of portable
transmitters at the same time, consult an RF technician
in order to ensure that the RF channel of the portable
transmitter does not cause any intermodulation or
interference with the other portable transmitters or
cell transmitters in your exhibition!
In the dropdown list in the “SK 3200 serial number” column, click the
serial number of the portable transmitter to which this RF channel is to
be assigned.
In the “Guide” column, you can enter the name of a guide or a certain
guided tour.
This personalizes the portable transmitter. When you assign this
portable transmitter to a visitor group (see page 15-17), this name
always appears and you can select precisely this portable transmitter.
If you do not enter a name, the serial number of the portable
transmitter appears instead.
Once you have edited all lines, transmit the data entered to the portable
transmitters as follows:
Mark all lines in which you have made an entry or a change in the way
known from the Windows Explorer (i.e. SHIFT-click and CTRL-click can
15-23
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
be used as in the Windows Explorer).
The lines appear highlighted in blue.
Right-click one of the lines highlighted in blue.
The shortcut menu opens.
In the shortcut menu, click “Program selected personalised tour guide
transmitters”.
A progress bar appears. All selected portable transmitters are
configured as shown in the table. Once configuration has been
completed successfully, a tick appears in the “Programmed” column.
You can cancel the configuration of the portable transmitters again by
selecting them as described above and clicking “Reset selected
personalised transmitters” in the shortcut menu.
The name is deleted from the “Guide” column.
Changing the password
You need a password in order to change from Operator mode to
Administrator mode. At delivery, the default password to be found on
page 7-18 is valid. To prevent illicit access, you should change this
password immediately:
15-24
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “Password” tab.
In the “Enter old password” field, enter the current password.
In the “Enter new password” field, enter the new password.
You can use a maximum of 10 characters. Asterisks (*) are shown
instead of your entry.
In the “Re-enter new password” field, re-enter the new password.
Confirm your entries with ”OK” to take over the new password.
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
Note:
If the password you selected should not work due to damaged
software, it is automatically reset to the default password and the
message “No password found” appears.
Configuring communication with the CHM
For communication with the portable transmitters and receivers, the VPR
requires a network connection to the CHM. To configure the network
connection:
From the “Tools” menu, choose “Options”.
The “Options” dialog box appears.
Click the “CHM server” tab.
In the “IP address” field, enter the IP address of the PC on which the
CHM is installed.
This IP address can be obtained from your system administrator.
Activate the “Visitor Profiler Server” in the CHM (in “Installation &
Administration” mode) (see page 10-11).
Make sure that
– the same port number is set in the CHM and the VPR,
– no other program in your computer network is using this port.
Exiting the Administrator mode
In the “Tools” menu, click “Administrator”.
The Operator mode starts. The title bar and the menu bar disappear.
15-25
Operating the VPR in Administrator mode
Calling up the online help
To call up the online help in Administrator mode:
Press the F1 key.
Or:
In the “Help” menu, click “Help”.
The online help appears.
Displaying the program version
15-26
In the “Help” menu, click “About...”.
The program version is displayed.
List of VPR messages
List of VPR messages
The VPR outputs information on the operating state and on any errors in a
semitransparent window which is always uppermost on the desktop.
Message
Meaning
In order to communicate with the portable transmitters and receivers, the
VPR requires a network connection to the CHM software. If you close the
CHM or turn off the Charger PC, this communication is no longer possible
and the error message shown on the left appears.
In order to communicate with the portable transmitters and receivers, the
VPR requires a network connection to the CHM software (socket
connection). For this purpose, the “Visitor Profiler Server” has to be
activated in the CHM and the same port number must be set in the CHM
(see page 10-11) and the VPR (see page 15-9). If the “Visitor Profiler
Server” is not active or the same port number is not set, the message
shown on the left appears.
Once you have started the VPR, it queries all units one after the other via
a network connection to the CHM – and thus to the chargers with the
inserted receivers and portable transmitters. Depending on your number
of receivers and portable transmitters, this query can take a long time
(approx. 45 minutes for 1,000 units). During this query, the VPR is not
ready for operation and cannot configure receivers and portable
transmitters. The message shown on the left appears during the query.
If you start the VPR without starting the CHM beforehand, the message
shown on the left appears.
15-27
Index
Index
Access mode 15-3
Administrator 15-3
Administrator mode 15-3
Charger PC 15-2, 15-9
CHM 15-9
Configuration 15-9
Define new group 15-17
Edit group 15-18
Group Hand guidePORT out 15-14
Hand guidePORT out 15-11
Mode 15-3
network connection 15-2
Operator 15-3
Operator mode 15-3
Password 15-7
Portable transmitter
assigning the RF channel 15-23
entering the name of the guide 15-23
Setup 15-9
Touch screen 15-2
Visistor group
adding a guide afterwards 15-20
Visitor group 15-3
assigning units permanently 15-4
assigning units temporarily 15-3
deleting 15-20
removing the guide afterwards 15-20
15-28
16 The License Manager Server (LMS)
! Runs on the Central PC
! Serves for communication with the dongle
Contents of the chapter
Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS module ........... 16-2
Changing the network name ........................................................ 16-3
Checking the network name and the TCP/IP port ..................... 16-3
Closing the “Dongle Information” dialog box ............................ 16-3
16-1
Changing the standard TCP/IP port of the LMS module
Changing the standard TCP/IP port of
the LMS module
If – after installation of the LMS module – the LMS icon appears with a red
cross ( ) on the Windows task bar, the default TCP/IP port 31345 is already occupied by another program.
In this case, change the TCP/IP port as follows:
Close the LMS module by right-clicking the LMS icon on the Windows
task bar and then click “Close LMS”.
Use the Windows editor to open the GP_LMS.INI file in the bin
folder in the
project folder.
In the “Port=31345” line, replace the old TCP/IP port number by a
new one.
Note:
As certain TCP/IP port numbers are already occupied on most PCs and
are thus unsuitable, we recommend entering a TCP/IP port number
higher than 30000.
Caution!
Besides the LMS module, other modules can be installed on the computers in your network (for example BSS modules on all Base Station
PCs or SMC modules on all Charger PCs). It is imperative for the LMS
module to have a TCP/IP port number of its own. No other module is
permitted to use this TCP/IP port number!
You can determine the TCP/IP port number of a module by right-clicking the BSS icon on the Windows task bar and then “Via Base Station Server” or “Via Statistics Manager Collector”. The TCP/IP port
number of the module is displayed after “Port”.
16-2
Save the GP_LMS.INI file and restart the LMS module.
Open the “Dongle Information” dialog box as described under “Displaying the license Information” on page 8-104.
In the “Dongle Information” dialog box, click the “Edit” button.
In the “Port” field, enter the same TCP/IP port number which you
entered in the GP_LMS.INI file.
To test the new TCP/IP port, click the “Check” button.
The status of the TCP/IP connection is displayed in the status line.
If the TCP/IP connection functions without problems, click “OK”.
Changing the network name
Changing the network name
The network name defines the PC in whose USB port the dongle is inserted
and on which the LMS module is installed. To define a new PC in your
network, you can change this network name as follows:
In the “Dongle Information” dialog box, click the “Edit” button.
In the “Address” field, enter the correct network name of the PC to
which the dongle is connected.
Insert the dongle into a free USB port of the corresponding PC.
To test the new TCP/IP port, click the “Check” button.
The status of the TCP/IP connection is displayed in the status line.
If the TCP/IP connection functions without problems, click “OK”.
Checking the network name and the
TCP/IP port
To check the network name of the PC in whose USB port the dongle is inserted as well as the TCP/IP port:
In the “Dongle Information” dialog box, click the “Check” button.
The status of the TCP/IP connection is displayed in the status line.
Closing the “Dongle Information” dialog
box
To close the “Dongle Information” dialog box:
In the “Dongle Information” dialog box, click “OK”.
16-3
17 Maintenance and Care
Please observe the information given in this chapter in order to ensure
reliable operation of your
system.
Contents of the chapter
Cleaning the units .......................................................................... 17-2
Replacing batteries/rechargeable batteries .............................. 17-2
Problem solving.............................................................................. 17-2
Customer Service ............................................................................ 17-4
Extended periods of disuse........................................................... 17-5
Eliminating software faults .......................................................... 17-5
Index ................................................................................................ 17-5
17-1
Cleaning the units
Cleaning the units
Always keep your units clean!
! Use a dry or slightly damp cloth to clean the surfaces of the units.
! Never use cleansing agents, solvents, abrasive cleaners, alcohol or
turps!
! Use a vacuum cleaner with a soft brush attachment to clean the
charging compartments of dust and small parts which have fallen in.
Replacing batteries/rechargeable batteries
Identifiers can be powered by internal batteries or via an external DC
supply.
! Replace the batteries of an identifier when the red LED of the identifier
is flashing permanently or when the red and green LEDs do not light up
any more (see “Battery operation” on page 5-35).
! Check the internal clock of the identifier and reset it if necessary (see
“Checking the internal clock of an identifier” on page 5-37/“Checking
the internal clock of an identifier (Read Time)” on page 12-11 and
“Setting the internal clock of an identifier” on page 5-38/“Setting the
internal clock of an identifier (Set Time)” on page 12-11).
! Check the programmed parameters of the identifier and, if necessary,
recopy these from the PDA to the identifier (see “Setting up the
identifiers” on page 5-36 and “Transmitting identifier settings from
the PDA to an identifier (Send Parameters)” on page 12-11).
! Dispose of used batteries according to the waste disposal regulations
of your country.
Note:
If a rechargeable battery should be defective, have it replaced,
prefereably by a Sennheiser service agent.
Problem solving
You can often solve small problems with
units by yourself. If a
problem persists, please send the defective unit to the Sennheiser
Customer Service (see page 17-4).
Cell transmitters and antennas
No display:
After turn-on, the cell transmitter display remains dark:
17-2
Check the power supply (mains connection, mains cable and, if necessary, the multisocket strip) and make sure that the ON/OFF switch of
the cell transmitter is set to position “I”.
Problem solving
No data transmission:
The cell transmitter does not transmits data to the connected antennas
and the antennas do not transmit a signal:
Check the “AAU OUT” connections and the cable connections to the
active antennas as well as the “MTS IN” and “MTS OUT” connections
on the antennas: the plugs must be connected properly to the sockets!
Check the addressing switches of the connected active antennas.
One antenna must transmit the MTS “1” and the other must transmit
the MTS “2”.
Make sure that the carrier signal of the antenna has been turned on
via the software (see “Turning the RF output on and off” on
page 8-42).
Note:
If you later turn on the carrier signal of the antenna via the software,
you must create the system files again and at least transmit them to
the cell transmitters whose settings you have changed!
Faulty data transmission:
A problem occurred during data transmission from a computer to the cell
transmitter (e.g. the USB cable was disconnected too early). The data was
transmitted incompletely or incorrectly and the cell transmitter does not
accept an input:
Turn off the cell transmitter and turn it on again after a few seconds.
Use the BSM software to carry out the “Search” command (see
“Searching for connected cell transmitters” on page 9-4).
Re-transmit the data to this cell transmitter.
Receivers
No audio signal available:
Other causes:
The visitor cannot hear anything because the STOP key on the receiver is
pressed or because the volume is set too low via the VOL- key:
Press the REPEAT key.
Press the VOL+ key repeatedly to set the volume to a sufficient value.
The visitor cannot hear anything, even if the receiver is operational, in the
following cases:
! No Storage Events were transmitted to the receiver (e.g. the receiver is
not within the range of the antenna or data transmission to the
receiver is disturbed due to interference or intermodulation).
! He enters – via a 16-keys receiver – an Event number for which audio
information is not available (in this case, the red LED flashes rapidly
and the green LED is off).
! The receiver has not received an identifier ID for reproduction of a
Storage or Live Event (e.g. the batteries of the identifier are empty or
the identifier runs in trigger operation and no switch was pressed or, in
an exhibition without identifiers, a three-figure Event ID was not
entered via the 16-key receiver).
! Reproduction of a Live Event was triggered, but the receiver is not
within the range of the antennas or transmission is disturbed.
! The headphones are defective or not connected correctly.
17-3
Customer Service
Chargers
Not operational
Communication problems
Problems in charging the
rechargeable batteries
Error messages of the CHM
The red operation LED does not light up. The charger is not operational:
Check the voltage supply (mains cable and mains socket) and set the
mains switch “POWER” to position “I”.
Have an electronics expert check whether the (non-self-healing SMD)
charger fuse has triggered (e.g. due to a short-circuit) and have it soldered out and replaced. Replacement fuses are available from your
Sennheiser dealer (see “Customer Service” on page 17-4).
The charger is connected to a PC, but the inserted receivers cannot be
programmed and the statistical data cannot be read:
Check all RS 485 plugs and cables of the charger string! The RS 485
hardware of different manufacturers is not compatible! However, you
will not have any problems if you only use the RS 485 interfaces and
cables recommended by Sennheiser (see “Recommendations concerning the RS 485 interface” on page 5-46).
Use the Device Manager in the System Control of the Charger PC to
check whether the RS 485 ports are identified correctly by the operating system.
The rechargeable batteries of the receivers inserted into the charging
compartments cannot be charged. The green LED charging indicator next
to the compartment flashes quickly or does not light up at all.
Insert the receiver into the compartment correctly and completely.
Check whether small parts have fallen into the compartments and
remove them (e.g. by using a vacuum cleaner with a soft brush attachment). The 4-pin multisocket strips at the bottom of the compartment
and the bottom of the receiver must be absolutely clean!
Each charging compartment has a fuse (non-self-healing SMD). Have
an electronics expert check whether this fuse has triggered (e.g. due
to a short-circuit) and have it soldered out and replaced if necessary.
You can monitor the charging process for several thousand receivers via
the CHM software module.
In the “Selection” area of the CHM, error messages are output if problems occur. There you will also find tips on eliminating the errors (see
“The “Selection” box” on page 10-7).
Customer Service
You can contact Sennheiser Customer Service as follows:
Phone:++49 (0) 5130 600 0
Fax: ++49 (0) 5130 600 30 07
The following items are available:
! Spare parts, e.g. hygiene pads for headphones
! Spare rechargeable batteries for the receivers
17-4
Extended periods of disuse
Extended periods of disuse
If you do not use your
units for long periods of time:
Remove the batteries from the unused identifiers or turn off the external voltage supply of the unused identifiers.
Turn off all unused units with mains connection and disconnect them
from the mains.
Keep all units in a dry, sufficiently ventilated place at room temperature.
Eliminating software faults
If a software problem occurs due to a fault in the computer or operating
system, first remove and then re-install the involved software modules
(see “Re-installing, repairing or de-installing software modules” on
page 7-19).
Please also note the information on the safety for your computer data (see
“Safety for your computer files” on page 2-8).
Index
Care 17-1
cleaning the units 17-2
Customer Service 17-4
Eliminating software faults 17-5
Longer periods of disuse 17-5
Maintenance 17-1
repairing software 17-5
replacing batteries 17-2
software problems 17-5
Repairing defective units 17-2
cell transmitters 17-2
faulty data transmission 17-3
no data transmission 17-3
no display 17-2
cell transmitters and antennas 17-2
chargers 17-4
CHM error messages 17-4
communication problems 17-4
not operational 17-4
problems in charging 17-4
receivers 17-3
no audio signal available 17-3
other causes 17-3
17-5
18 Specifications
Contents of the chapter
Overall system ................................................................................ 18-2
Algorithm of audio data compression......................................... 18-2
GP EK 3202 receiver ....................................................................... 18-3
Headphones .................................................................................... 18-5
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter ...................................................... 18-6
Portable transmitter...................................................................... 18-7
RF channels ..................................................................................... 18-9
GP AM 3000 active antenna ....................................................... 18-10
GP ID 3200 identifier.................................................................... 18-11
GP L 3200 charger ........................................................................ 18-12
Software ........................................................................................ 18-13
Accessories .................................................................................... 18-14
Index .............................................................................................. 18-14
18-1
Overall system
Overall system
Characteristic quantities and restrictions of a
Events per
Categories per
Cells per
project:
system:
max. 900
project: max. 31
project:
max. 255
Events per cell:
max. 127
MTS per category and cell:
up to 4 using the automatic reloading
process
Storage Events per MTS:
10 minutes 39 seconds audio data
Algorithm of audio data compression
The Sennheiser
libraries:
•
ogg.dll
•
vorbis.dll
•
vorbisenc.dll
•
vorbisfile.dll
•
in_vorbis.dll
system uses the following precompiled software
The following licensing regulations apply to these products:
© 2007, Xiph.Org Foundation
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification,
are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
•
Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
•
Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
•
Neither the name of the Xiph.org Foundation nor the names of its
contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived
from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS
“AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE FOUNDATION OR
CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY,
WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR
OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
18-2
•
libsamplerate.dll (a license for commercial use has been acquired for
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG)
•
bass.dll (license for unrestricted commercial use in the possession of
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG)
GP EK 3202 receiver
GP EK 3202 receiver
Digital diversity receiver, available as 4-key, receiver with detail key or 16key receiver.
Standard unit:
Cat. No. 500538:
4-key receiver
(GP EK 3202-4-1)
Extended units:
Cat. No. 500539:
Receiver with detail key
(EK 3202-5-1)
Cat. No. 500537:
16-key receiver
(GP EK 3202-0-1)
Operating elements:
membrane keyboard with volume control,
stop and repeat function
Housing:
rugged, impact-resistant plastic housing
Dimensions:
113 x 65 x 30 mm (incl. belt clip)
Weight:
approx. 180 g incl. rechargeable batteries
Attachment:
belt clip, neck strap
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +50 °C
Max. beep level,
1 m distance:
90 dB SPL (3.2 kHz sinus tone)
Standard unit:
Alarm signal
Electrical characteristics:
Power supply:
built-in NiMH rechargeable battery pack with
two AA size cells, 1.2 V, 1200 mAh
Max. current consumption:approx. 220 mA
RF characteristics:
Bulk memory
Interfaces:
Typical operating time:
max. 8 hrs
Charging time of
rechargeable batteries:
approx. 4 hrs
Receiving frequency range:2.401920 – 2.482272 GHz (data transmission)
127 kHz (identifier ID)
Frequency adjustment:
automatically onto one of 94 channels
Channel grid:
864 kHz
Channel spacing:
2.592 MHz (every third channel)
Modulation:
FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)
Input sensitivity:
–93 dBm at the internal antenna input
Memory type:
NAND
Memory capacity:
depending on unit, starting with
256 Mbyte (approx. 10 hrs)
Interface:
42-pin contact
4-pin contact:
for communication with the charger (Charger
Manager) and for charging the rechargeable
batteries
Headphone socket:
1 x 3.5 mm stereo jack socket
18-3
GP EK 3202 receiver
Headphone output:
Frequency response:
40 Hz – 14 kHz ± 3 dB (A) for Live Events
40 Hz – 7 kHz ± 3 dB (A) for Storage Events
Power:
> 20 mW at 2 x 16 Ω
THD:
typ. 0.5 % with Live Events
S/N ratio:
≥ 70 dB (A)
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG declare
that these units comply with the applicable
EU standards and regulations.
18-4
Headphones
Headphones
Headphones for connection to the
receiver, available in different
mono and stereo versions and with your exhibition logo printed on them.
GP 30 stereo headphones:
GP 03 stereo clip-on earphones:
GP 03-M mono clip-on earhone:
Cat. No. 005255:
dynamic stereo headphones (GP 30)
Cat. No. 005225:
dynamic stereo clip-on earphones (GP 03)
Cat. No. 005230:
dynamic mono clip-on earphone (GP 03-M),
single-sided version with clip for the right ear
Type:
open, supra-aural
Weight:
approx. 65 g
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +50 °C
Frequency response:
30 Hz – 20 kHz
Characteristic SPL:
110 dB
THD:
<1%
Impedance:
32 Ω
Type:
open, supra-aural
Weight:
approx. 30 g
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +50 °C
Frequency response:
30 Hz – 18 kHz
Characteristic SPL:
110 dB
THD:
<1%
Impedance:
32 Ω
Type:
open, supra-aural
Weight:
approx. 15 g
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +50 °C
Frequency response:
30 Hz – 18 kHz
Characteristic SPL:
110 dB
THD:
<1%
Impedance:
32 Ω
If desired, the headphones can be supplied with your logo printed on them.
You can also use any low-impedance Sennheiser headphones or earphones
with 3.5 mm plug.
18-5
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter
GP SR 3200-2 cell transmitter
Cat. No. 500193:
GP SR 3200-2 twin cell transmitter
Housing:
metal housing
Dimensions (W/H/D):
19" (483 mm) x 1 U (42 mm) x 248 mm
Weight:
approx. 3.100 g
Temperature range:
0 °C to +50 °C
Power supply:
100 – 240 V AC
50 – 60 Hz
Max. current consumption:≤ 200 mA at 100 V
≤ 100 mA at 230 V
Interfaces per transmitter unit:
Audio input:
8 x ¼" (6.3 mm) stereo jack plug, balanced,
analog, tip (+), ring (-)
Mono connection:
CT 1 IN 1, 2, 3, 4
CT 2 IN 1, 2, 3, 4
Stereo connection:
CT 1 IN 1 and 2 (1 = left, 2 = right) and
CT 1 IN 3 and 4 (3 = left, 4 = right)
CT 2 IN 1 and 2 (1 = left, 2 = right) and
CT 2 IN 3 and 4 (3 = left, 4 = right)
Audio inputs:
Headphone output:
Headphone socket:
1 x ¼" (6.3 mm) stereo jack socket
AAU-OUT:
2 x 8-pin RJ 45 plug,
+15 V, 300 mA each, 1024 Mbit/s
USB:
1 x type B
Frequency response:
50 Hz – 14 kHz ± 3 dB (A)
Impedance:
600 Ω
Frequency response:
50 Hz – 14 kHz
THD:
typ. 0.45 %
Load impedance:
min. 2 x 8 Ω
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG declare
that these units comply with the applicable
EU standards and regulations.
18-6
Portable transmitter
Portable transmitter
General
Electrical characteristics
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +50 °C
Weight (incl.
rechargeable batteries:
approx. 180 g
Firmware update:
possible via “Charger Manager” software
Power supply:
built-in NiMH rechargeable battery pack
with two AA size cells, 1.2 V, 2100 mAh
Max. current consumption:220 mA
RF characteristics
Microphone connection
Typ. operating time:
approx. 8 hrs
Charging time of
rechargeable batteries:
approx. 4 hrs
Transmission
frequency range:
2.401920 to 2.481408 GHz
Identifier receiving
frequency:
127 kHz
Frequency adjustment:
one of 93 channels via the “Visitor Profiler”
software
Channel grid:
864 kHz
Channel spacing:
2.592 MHz (every third channel)
Modulation:
FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)
Frequeny deviation:
± 350 kHz
Data rate:
1024 kbit/s
Radiated RF power:
USA:
Europe
1 mW,
10 mW
1 x 3-pin Lemo
Frequency response:
80–14,000 Hz, –3 dB cut-off frequency
Max. input level:
7 mVrms at max. input gain
270 mVrms at min. input gain
THD:
<1 % at 7 mVeff input level,
max. input gain
<1 % at 270 mVrms input level,
min. input gain
Signal-to-noise ratio:
Line connection
≥65 dB (A)
1 x 3.5 mm stereo jack socket
Frequency response:
80–14,000 Hz, –3 dB cut-off frequency
Max. input level:
0.55 Vrms at max. input gain
1.4 Vrms at min. input gain
THD:
<1 % at 0.55 Vrmsf input level,
max. input gain
<1 % at 1.4 Vrms input level,
min. input gain
Signal-to-noise ratio:
≥65 dB (A)
18-7
Portable transmitter
Charger connection
4-pin connector strip:
Charging the rechargeable batteries
For communication with the “Charger Manager” and “Visitor Profiler”
software modules via the charger
Antenn connection
1 x 1-pin coaxial Lemo
Type approvals
Area
USA:
Canada:
Conformity
FCC-Part 15, 15.249
FCC ID: DMOSK3200
RSS-123
IC: 2099A-SK3200
according to R&TTE
EN 60065
EU:
ETSI EN 300 440-1/-2
ETSI EN 301 489-1/-3
18-8
RF channels
RF channels
The following 94 RF channels are available and can be assigned to the
individual antennas via the INM software.
CAUTION!
Reception interference due to wrong RF channels!
The assignment of RF channels depends to a great extent
on your exhibition rooms or grounds. The correct choice of
the RF channels is very important in order to avoid
interference.
Within one cell, we strongly recommend using the
following eight channels: 1, 7, 17, 25, 45, 57, 79, 93.
If you have to use more channels, leave at least five
channels free between two channels (e.g. 1, 7, 13,
19...).
If you have to use even more channels, please contact
Sennheiser electronic.
No.
Frequency
(MHz)
No.
Frequency
(MHz)
No.
Frequency
(MHz)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
2401.920
2402.784
2403.648
2404.512
2405.376
2406.240
2407.104
2407.968
2408.832
2409.696
2410.560
2411.424
2412.288
2413.152
2414.016
2414.880
2415.744
2416.608
2417.472
2418.336
2419.200
2420.064
2420.928
2421.792
2422.656
2423.520
2424.348
2425.248
2426.112
2426.976
2427.840
2428.704
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
2429.568
2430.432
2431.296
2432.160
2433.024
2433.888
2434.752
2435.616
2436.480
2437.344
2438.208
2439.072
2439.936
2440.800
2441.664
2442.528
2443.392
2444.256
2445.120
2445.984
2446.848
2447.712
2448.576
2449.440
2450.304
2451.168
2452.032
2452.896
2453.760
2454.624
2455.488
2456.352
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
2457.216
2458.080
2458.944
2459.808
2460.672
2461.536
2462.400
2463.264
2464.128
2464.992
2465.856
2466.720
2467.584
2468.448
2469.312
2470.176
2471.040
2471.904
2472.768
2473.632
2474.496
2475.360
2476.224
2477.088
2477.952
2478.816
2479.680
2480.544
2481.408
2482.272
Channel spacing:
2.59 MHz
18-9
GP AM 3000 active antenna
GP AM 3000 active antenna
The active antenna transmits an MTS in the ISM band.
RF characteristics:
Connections:
Cat. No. 004899:
GP AM 3200 active antenna
Dimensions:
114 mm x 31 mm x 76 mm (without holder)
Weight:
approx. 148 g
Temperature range:
–10 °C to +55 °C
Addressing switch:
recessed head screw for selecting the MTS
MTS 0: address “0”
MTS 1: address “1”
other addresses are not defined
Frequency range:
adjustable from 2.4 – 2.483 GHz
via INM software
Frequency adjustment:
adjustable in 94 steps
via GP SR 3200 and INM software
Transmitting power:
adjustable from 0.1 – 10 mW
via INM software
(USA only - max. permitted power is 1mW)
Radiation pattern:
omni-directional
Input:
8-pin data cable (RJ 45)
Output:
8-pin data cable (RJ 45)
For directional antenna:
SMA socket
0682
FCC-ID:
18-10
DMOAAGPSF
GP ID 3200 identifier
GP ID 3200 identifier
Identifier for controlling the
Events.
Cat. No. 500896:
identifier for indoor use
(GP ID 3200-IN)
Cat. No. 500897:
identifier for outdoor installation or
use in humid environments
(GP ID 3200-OUT)
Dimensions:
GP ID 3200-IN:
140 mm x 106 mm x 38 mm
GP ID 3200-OUT:
130 mm x 130 mm x 52 mm
Weight:
GP ID 3200-IN:
approx. 300 g (without batteries)
GP ID 3200-OUT:
approx. 450 g (without batteries)
Protection class:
GP ID 3200-OUT:
IP65
Temperature range:
0 °C to +55 °C
Power supply:
4 x 1.5 V alkaline manganese battery (AA size)
or via external 7.5 – 15 V DC power supply
Operating time:
≥ 3 months with four AA size 1.5 V batteries
(at 100 % transmitting power, 1 s repetition
rate, with an internal antenna and a
daily operating time of 8 hrs)
Max. current consumption:≤ 10 mA (with an external loop antenna or
during trigger operation)
Interface:
Internal connection terminals:
Infra-red interface:
for communication with a 3ComPalmTop
or Microsoft® Pocket PC
For an external DC power supply
For an external switch (for trigger operation)
For an external loop antenna
Frequency characteristics:
Signal strength:
adjustable via software,
from 100 % to 10 % in steps of 10 %
Frequency:
127 kHz
Frequency adjustment:
fixed frequency preset
Max. transmission range: 3 m (omni-directional) with internal antenna,
with external loop antenna dependent on
location
0682
FCC-ID:
DMOIDGPSF
18-11
GP L 3200 charger
GP L 3200 charger
Charger for the rechargeable batteries of ten GP EK 3200 or EK 3202
receivers.
Cat. No. 500893:
charger for ten receivers (GP L 3200-10)
Dimensions:
503 mm x 134 mm x 82 mm
Weight:
approx. 3880 g
Mounting:
can be mounted vertically when screwed onto
a base (cable connections pointing upwards)
Charging compartments: for ten GP EK 3200 or EK 3202
Units per string:
a string with a max. of 32 chargers can be
connected to one computer
Temperature range:
0 °C to +40 °C
Power supply:
via 3-pin IEC mains connector
100 – 240 V AC
50 – 60 Hz
Internal primary fuse:
1 A F-Link (SMD fuse)
Max. current consumption:with ten GP EK 3200 or EK 3202
in charging mode:
at 230 V approx. 300 mA
at 100 V approx. 700 mA
Interfaces:
Indicators:
DATA IN:
RS 485 interface with RJ 11 plug for
connecting the computer or additional
chargers
DATA OUT:
RS 485 interface with MMJ plug for
connecting additional chargers
Operation indicator:
red LED
Charging indicator:
10 x green LED
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG declare
that these units comply with the applicable
EU standards and regulations.
18-12
Software
Software
Software for managing and controlling a
“SYS” system software:
system.
Cat. No. 004904:
Basic software equipment including manuals,
absolutely necessary for operating a
following modules:
system, consists of the
“Installation Manager” (INM):
for setting up and managing all data, for collecting and structuring all
audio and configuration data, for generating system files which the other
software modules require and for controlling and monitoring data transfer
to the SR 3xxx cell transmitters and EK 3200 receivers in conjunction with
the BSM software
“Base Station Manager” (BSM):
for transferring data to the cell transmitters (controlled by the INM)
“Charger Manager” (CHM):
for monitoring the charging process of the rechargeable batteries, for
programming the receiver presets and for reading statistical data
“Identifier Control” (IDC):
PDA software for configuring the identifiers
“Setup Program” (Setup):
for installing the software modules from the CD-ROM on the PC or PDA
18-13
Accessories
Replacement part:
Communication cable:
for connecting cell transmitters to antennas,
100 MHz Ethernet, category 5,
4 x 2 Twisted Pair with screened RJ 45 plugs,
length: ≤ 100 m
Cat. No. 005288:
Data cable:
for connecting a charger to a computer,
10 m, 9-pin, connectors: sub-D socket and
RJ 11 plug
Cat. No. 005287:
Data cable:
for connecting two chargers, 0.5 m,
9-pin, connectors: MMJ plug and RJ 11 plug
Cat. No. 005290:
RS 485 card:
PCI, (
Cat. No. 500888:
RS 485 card:
PCMCIA (PC-Card), (
Cat. No. 005293:
Terminal connector:
for the “DATA OUT” port of the last charger
of a string
Cat. No. 005224:
Neck strap:
GP 3000 L for the GP EK 3200 receiver
Cat. No. 005286:
Hygiene pads:
HZH 03, self-adhesive, for headphones
Mounting kit:
for the GP AM 3200 active antenna
-compatible)
-compatible)
Cat. No. 077687
External power supply (EU): Plug-in power supply for a single identifier
European version – 230 V
Output: 13 V DC, 0.25 A
Cat. No. 077688
External power supply (UK): Plug-in power supply for a single identifier
UK version – 230 V
Output: 13 V DC, 0.25 A
Cat. No. 077689
External power supply (US): Plug-in power supply for a single identifier
USA version – 110 V
Output: 13 V DC, 0.25 A
Index
Accessories 18-14
RF channels 18-9
Specifications 18-1
active antenna 18-10
cell transmitter 18-6
charger 18-12
headphones 18-5
identifier 18-11
overall system 18-2
portable transmitter 18-7
receiver 18-3
RF channels 18-9
19 Glossary
Important terms and abbreviations
Contents of the chapter
B if A Event...................................................................................... 19-2
Category .......................................................................................... 19-3
Cell .................................................................................................... 19-3
Detail Event..................................................................................... 19-3
Entrance Event “Cell Download”.................................................. 19-3
Event ................................................................................................ 19-3
Guide ................................................................................................ 19-3
Inactive Event ................................................................................. 19-4
Live Event ........................................................................................ 19-4
Location ........................................................................................... 19-4
Mobile download ............................................................................ 19-5
MTS................................................................................................... 19-5
Null Event ........................................................................................ 19-5
Stationary download ..................................................................... 19-5
Storage Event ................................................................................. 19-5
Storage Event with lead in............................................................ 19-6
Streaming method ......................................................................... 19-6
Tour .................................................................................................. 19-6
19-1
Glossary
B if A Event
This Storage Event has two different sets of audio information: audio
information “B1” and audio information “B2”.
The receiver starts reproduction of audio information “B1” when:
! either the receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier at the
corresponding exhibit “B” or
! the three-figure Event number of the corresponding Event “B” is
entered via the 16-key receiver.
! The audio information “B2” is not reproduced.
Audio B1
In the meantime, the receiver reproduces Event “A”.
Audio A
The receiver starts reproduction of audio information “B2” when:
! Event “A” was reproduced beforehand and
! either the receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier at the
corresponding exhibit “B” or
Audio B2
! the three-figure Event number of the corresponding Event “B” is
entered via the 16-key receiver.
The receiver stops reproduction of audio information “B2” or “B1”:
! when the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier,
! when the STOP key is pressed,
! when the information has been reproduced completely once.
Example:
In an exhibition of paintings, there is one room in which exhibits by
Picasso are presented. This room has only one entrance and one exit.
Event “B” is configured as an B if A Event and is triggered at the
entrance whereas Event “A” is triggered in this room.
– Visitors entering this room for the first time hear the audio
information “B1”: “Welcome to the Picasso exhibition...”.
– Visitors who have in the meantime listened to Event “A” in this room
and then leave the room through the same door hear the audio
information “B2”: “You are now leaving the Picasso exhibition...” .
19-2
Glossary
Category
An organizational unit of the
system with regard to content.
The Events for an exhibit can be offered in parallel in different versions, for
example in different languages or in various degrees of detail.
A location can consist of a maximum of 31 categories. For each cell, the
Storage Events belonging to a category can comprise a maximum of 4 MTS
with audio data lasting for approx. 40 min.
Cell
A spatial organizational unit in the
system.
All Events which belong to a self-contained part of the exhibition and are
presented together must be combined to form a cell. In a museum, for
example, all pictures located in the first room are combined to form a cell
and all pictures in the second room are combined to form another cell.
A cell can include a maximum of 127 Events. The total playing time of the
Storage Events belonging to one cell must not exceed approx. 40 min.
Detail Event
Stored, additional in-depth information which belongs to a certain exhibit
and is permanently linked to a Storage Event.
The receiver starts reproduction:
! when the Detail key on the receiver is pressed and the Storage Event to
which the Detail Event is linked has been reproduced completely,
! provided that the Detail Event is linked to a Storage Event with the
feature “on Id range”:
when the visitor presses the Detail key on the receiver and then leaves
the magnetic field of the identifier, the Storage Event with the feature
“on Id range” is faded out and the Detail Event is faded in.
The receiver stops reproduction:
! when the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier,
! when the STOP key is pressed,
! when the information has been reproduced completely once.
Entrance Event “Guided Tour”
An Event which causes the receiver to switch to the RF channel of a
portable transmitter. The identifier which triggers this Event marks the
beginning of a guided tour with a portable transmitter.
Entrance Event “Cell Download”
An Event which triggers the download of an MTS from an antenna to a
receiver. An Entrance Event is not required in location “0”.
Event
The smallest unit of information in the
system.
The information which belongs to a certain exhibit.
Guide
A person who conducts a guided tour using a portable transmitter.
19-3
Glossary
Guided Tour
A tour guide leads a group of visitors through the exhibition. In this case,
the visitors do not hear the Storage and Live Events but the tour guide,
who uses a portable transmitter.
For this purpose it is necessary to set the receivers participating in the guided tour to the RF channel of the portable transmitter. This is done either:
! via the VPR at the receiver counter or
! via a permanent preset using the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode or
! via an identifier which triggers an Entrance Event “Guided Tour”.
The portable transmitter has to be configured with the CHM in “System Setup & Configuration” mode.
If the system administrator allowed it during configuration of the portable
transmitter, the tour guide can interrupt or end the guided tour at any
time in order to allow the visitor to hear the Events at the exhibition.
Guided tours can also be ended via an identifier which triggers the System
Event with the number 93.
Inactive Event
This Storage Event is omitted in certain categories which you can specify
yourself. The audio information is thus only reproduced in certain
categories.
Live Event
Information belonging to a certain exhibit and transmitted live.
The playback source (for example a CD or DVD player, a video recorder or a
microphone) is directly connected to a cell transmitter.
The receivers do not store the Live Event but play it back immediately like
a radio does.
Playback starts:
! when the receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier belonging
to the Live Event.
Playback stops:
! in the case of a normal Live Event:
when the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier or
the STOP key is pressed.
! in the case of a Live Event with the attribute “Restricted to ID area”:
when the receiver leaves the magnetic field of the identifier in question
or the STOP key is pressed.
Location
Management of all Events according to areas. The largest unit of
information in the
system.
All Events in an exhibition (or a part of a very large exhibition) must be
combined in one location. There is a location with fixed Storage Events
(location “0”) and up to 63 locations with variable Storage Events. The
Events in location “0” are always stored in the receivers and are not
deleted. The Events in locations “1” to “63” are interchangeable.
An exhibition can include a maximum of 899 Events. You determine the
maximum number of variable Events yourself.
19-4
Glossary
Mobile download
The audio information is transmitted constantly in small portions via a
large number of cell transmitters and antennas. As soon as a visitor enters
the range of an antenna with his receiver, the receiver can download this
audio information. The receivers store the audio information transmitted
in this way until the next mobile download, i.e. the audio information is
variable.
A mobile download usually only takes a few minutes.
MTS
“Multiplexed Transport Stream”, the most important unit of information in
the
system.
Several Events belonging to a category are combined to form an MTS by a
cell transmitter and transmitted via an antenna. Thus, a special antenna
and a special RF channel are required for each MTS.
Null Event
Storage Event with no information content.
Null Events are used to deliberately fade out the reproduction of Live
Events and/or to obtain statistical information on certain areas of your
exhibition where there are no exhibits (e.g. restaurant or café, shop, park,
playground).
Stationary download
The audio information is transmitted to the receivers via one single cell
transmitter and one single antenna while the receivers are in the charging
compartments of a charger. The receivers store the audio information
transmitted in this way permanently, i.e. the audio information is fixed.
Depending on the volume of the audio information, a stationary download
can take a long time and is usually carried out overnight.
Storage Event
Storage Events are stored audio information belonging to a certain exhibit.
There are two groups of Storage Events:
! fixed Storage Events in location “0”
! variable Storage Events in locations “1” to “63”.
In your
3200 system, you configure both groups of Storage
Events via the INM software and assign a wav audio file to one or several
identifiers of the corresponding exhibit. The file is automatically
compressed during the process.
When you have completed the configuration of all Events, you transmit all
Storage Events to cell transmitters once via a USB cable or a network. Here,
there is a difference between the fixed Storage Events of location “0” and
the variable Storage Events of locations “1” to “63”.
Location “0”
All Storage Events are transmitted to the receivers once via the streaming
method using one single cell transmitter. The receivers store the fixed
Storage Events in location “0” permanently.
Location “1” to “63”
The Storage Events are spread over a large number of cell transmitters and
stored in the cell transmitters. The latter transmit them constantly (mobile
download) via an antenna.
19-5
Glossary
A receiver stores the variable Storage Events of locations “1” to “63”:
! when it enters the magnetic field of the Entrance Event identifier of the
cell in question,
! when it enters the magnetic field of any identifier belonging to the
same cell,
! when the three-figure Event ID of any Event belonging to the same cell
is entered via the 16-key receiver.
All locations
The receiver starts reproduction of a stored Storage Event:
! when the receiver enters the magnetic field of the identifier in the
vicinity of the exhibit in question,
! when the three-figure Event ID of the corresponding identifier is
entered via the 16-key receiver.
All locations
The receiver stops reproduction:
! of a normal Storage Event:
when the receiver enters the magnetic field of any other identifier or
the STOP key is pressed.
! of a “Priority” Event:
when the information has been reproduced completely or the STOP key
is pressed.
! of a Storage Event with the attribute “Restricted to ID area”:
when the receiver leaves the magnetic field of the corresponding
identifier or the STOP key is pressed.
Storage Event with lead in
The introduction (lead in) is triggered by the identifier of another Event.
Example:
You set up a Storage Event with lead in for a Live Event in order that
the Live Event is not activated suddenly and the visitors receive introductory information or an overview. When a receiver enters the magnetic field of an identifier which triggers the Live Event, the Storage
Event with lead in is reproduced first. The visitors hear the words “You
will now see a video report on Picasso's 'Guernica'...” . Not until then
does the Live Event start.
Streaming method
A method for transmitting the audio information during the stationary
download (page 19-5) of all Storage Events of location “0”.
Tour
A visit to an exhibition which can be evaluated for statistical purposes
using the STM software module. A tour begins as soon as a receiver is
taken from the charger and ends when it is replaced in the charger.
! During one and the same tour, various locations can be triggered via
the System Event “Location Entrance”.
! Usually every visitor selects a certain category for his tour. This
category is preset with the VPR or CHM. The receivers are marked
accordingly. However, different categories can be triggered during the
same tour – either via a System Event or by a visitor entering the
category number on his 16-key receiver.
19-6
! Visitors can attend the exhibition in a guided or unguided group
configured with the VPR or CHM before returning their receivers and
leaving the exhibition.
! Visitors can also begin their tour in a group with a guided tour and then
listen to Events afterwards
Redirection
You can take over the RF channel of an Entrance Event “Guided Tour” from
another category. As a result, receivers of several categories are switched
to the RF channel of the same portable transmitter by the same identifier.
Example:
Supposing that you have the two categories “English” and “German”
and would also like to offer guided tours. These guided tours are carried out by a tour guide with a portable transmitter. In order to ensure
that the receivers receive this portable transmitter and do not play
back the Events at the exhibition, you set up an Entrance Event “Guided Tour”. The identifier which triggers this Event switches certain
receivers to the RF channel of the portable transmitter:
– If the same guided tour is suitable for both categories (the tour
guide alternates between speaking English and German), you take
over the Event from the category “German” into the category
“English”. You only require one portable transmitter.
– If you want to set up two different guided tours (one tour guide
speaks English and the other one speaks German), you assign a
different RF channel to this Event in each category. You then require
two portable transmitters which are set to the different RF channels.
Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KG
Am Labor 1
30900 Wedemark, Germany
www.sennheiser.com
Printed in Germany
Publ. 04/08
516567/A05
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