OWNER`S MANUAL

OWNER’S MANUAL

1550-07 GUS

© 2007 Gibson Guitar Corp.

To the new Gibson owner:

Congratulations on the purchase of your new Gibson electric guitar—the world’s most famous electric guitar from the leader of fretted instruments.

Please take a few minutes to acquaint yourself with the information in this booklet regarding materials, electronics, “how to,” care, maintenance, and more about your guitar.

And then begin enjoying a lifetime of music with your new Gibson.

The Components of the Solidbody Electric Guitar

Gibson Innovations

The History of Gibson Electric Guitars

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Body

Neck and Headstock

Pickups

Controls

Bridge

Tailpiece

CARE AND MAINTENANCE

Finish

Your Guitar on the Road

Things to Avoid

Strings

Install Your Strings Correctly

String Gauge

Brand of Strings

NEW TECHNOLOGY

The Gibson Robot Guitar

13

13

14

15

17

18

4

6

8

19

19

20

21

22

23

23

24

Strap

Button

Stopbar

Tailpiece

Tune-o-matic

Bridge Pickups

Three-way

Toggle Switch

12th Fret

Marker/Inlay Neck

Fret Fingerboard Nut Headstock

Input Jack Tone

Controls

Volume

Controls

Binding Body

Single

Cutaway

The Components of the Solidbody

Electric Guitar

Featuring a Les Paul

Standard in Heritage

Cherry Sunburst

Truss

Rod

Cover

Machine

Heads

Tuning

Keys

Strap

Button Body

Stopbar

Tailpiece

Tune-o-matic

Bridge Pickups Neck

12th Fret

Marker/Inlay Fret Fingerboard Nut Headstock

Three-way

Toggle

Switch

Input Jack Tone

Control

Volume

Controls

Pickguard

The Components of the Solidbody

Electric Guitar

Featuring a V-Factor Faded in Worn Cherry

Truss

Rod

Cover

Machine

Heads

Tuning

Keys

Here are just a few of the Gibson innovations that have reshaped the guitar world:

1894 – First archtop guitar

1922 – First ƒ-hole archtop, the L-5

1936 – First professional quality electric guitar, the ES-150

1947 – P-90 single-coil pickup introduced

1948 – First dual-pickup Gibson, the ES-300

1949 – First three-pickup electric, the ES-5

1949 – First hollowbody electric with pointed cutaway, the ES-175

1952 – First Les Paul guitar

1954 – Les Paul Custom and Les Paul Jr. introduced

1955 – Les Paul Special introduced

1957 – First humbucking pickup

1958 – Flying V and Explorer introduced

1958 – First semi-hollowbody guitar, the ES-335

1961 – SG body style introduced in the Les Paul line

1963 – Firebird guitars and Thunderbird basses introduced

1969 – Les Paul Personal and Professional with low-impedance pickups introduced

1979 – L.P. Artist with active electronics introduced

1982 – First solidbody acoustic, the Chet Atkins CE

1983 – Les Paul Studio introduced

1990 – Les Paul Classic introduced

1996 – Les Paul SmartWood introduced

1998 – Double-Cutaway Les Paul Standard introduced

2002 – Gibson Digital Guitar introduced

8

A BRIEF HISTORY OF GIBSON ELECTRIC GUITARS

Gibson’s legendary acoustic engineer, Lloyd Loar, was experimenting with electric instruments in 1924, at the dawn of electronic amplification. However, Gibson’s struggle to dominate the banjo market took precedence through the 1920s, and it wasn’t until the mid-1930s that the company once again turned its attention to electric guitars. In 1935 Gibson’s Walt Fuller designed a pickup that was introduced on the E-150, an aluminum-body lap steel. Early in

1936, the pickup was put in a midline archtop model and named the ES-150—ES for Electric

Spanish, 150 for the retail price of $150 for the guitar and amplifier set.

The original ES-150 bar pickup with its hexagonal housing is now known as the “Charlie

Christian” pickup, because it was installed on the ES-150s and ES-250s that Christian used to establish the new concept of electric jazz guitar.

Gibson made several improvements in pickup design before World War II, although many players still consider the “Christian” pickup to be the best jazz pickup ever made. Immediately after World War II, Gibson introduced the P-90 single-coil, with six adjustable polepieces and a black plastic cover, usually with “dog-ear” mounting extensions. The P-90 is still in production and still sets the industry standard for a single-coil pickup.

The first postwar Gibson electrics followed the prewar concept of an electric guitar as a conventional acoustic archtop with a pickup installed on the top. Gibson added a second pickup to the ES-300 in 1948 and then became the first company to offer a three-pickup model with the introduction of the ES-5 in 1949.

Although the advantages of a solidbody guitar had been known to Hawaiian steel guitarists for almost 20 years, it took the persuasive powers of Les Paul, the world’s most famous guitarist in the early 1950s, to convince Gibson to make a “Spanish style” solidbody. Gibson designed the new model with a carved top, not only to give it the look of a traditional archtop—a style invented by Gibson—but also to make it difficult for other makers to copy. Les, who had been playing a homemade solidbody guitar, nicknamed The Log, since 1941, specified a maple top cap to increase sustain, coupled with a mahogany back to lighten the weight. Les also specified the famous “Goldtop” finish.

The Les Paul Model debuted in 1952. The bridge and tailpiece were upgraded when Gibson introduced the patented tune-o-matic bridge in 1954, and the original single-coil pickups were upgraded with the introduction of Gibson’s patented humbuckers in 1957. Otherwise, the original Les Paul is essentially the same guitar today as it was when it was introduced.

9

10

In 1954 the growing popularity of the Les Paul Model prompted Gibson to expand the line. On the high end, the Les Paul Custom sported an Ebony finish and low frets for fast action, and it immediately gained two nicknames: the Black Beauty and the Fretless Wonder. On the more affordable end, the Les Paul Jr. featured a flat “slab” top and a single pickup, and it became the best-selling Les Paul of the 1950s.

One year after the Les Paul Jr., Gibson offered a two-pickup version of the slab-body model called the Les Paul Special. The Special was further distinguished by its yellow-stained “TV” finish.

The double-coil humbucking pickup, invented by Gibson engineer Seth Lover, debuted in

1957 on the Standard and Custom, introducing the sound that would shape rock 'n' roll music in the 1960s.

In 1958, Gibson introduced more important design innovations than in any other year in the company’s history. Gibson president Ted McCarty combined the look of an ƒ-hole archtop with the performance of a solidbody and came up with a completely new type of guitar—the semi-hollowbody ES-335. McCarty also designed two radically modern solidbody shapes: the Flying V and Explorer.

The body of the Les Paul Jr. received a pair of rounded horns to become Gibson’s first doublecutaway solidbody. And the finish color on the Les Paul Model was changed to Cherry

Sunburst, which let the grain of the maple top show through. The model name was changed to Les Paul Standard, and the sunburst Standards from 1958-60 would become some of the most valuable collectibles in the guitar world. All of this happened in 1958.

The new Les Paul Jr. set in motion a complete redesign of the Les Paul line. In 1959 the

Special went to the rounded-horn double-cutaway shape and was renamed the SG Special (SG for Solid Guitar). In 1960, all four models were revamped and given a new “SG” body shape, featuring a thinner, double-cutaway body with pointed horns. The Custom, Standard, and Jr.

retained the Les Paul designation through 1962, after which they became SG models.

Gibson’s design innovation continued into the 1960s when Ted McCarty hired legendary automotive designer Ray Deitrich to design a Gibson. The result was the Firebird series, and the companion Thunderbird bass series of 1963. The Firebirds “reversed” conventional designs, with their elongated treble-side horn and treble-side tuners. They also introduced neckthrough-body construction and smaller “mini-humbucking” pickups to the Gibson line.

11

12

In response to the rising demand for 1950s-style Les Pauls, the carved-top models were reintroduced in 1968. A new model, the Les Paul Deluxe, featuring mini-humbucking pickups appeared in 1969. The Special was revived in the 1970s and the Jr. reappeared in the 1980s.

The Flying V, Explorer, and Firebird were also brought back into regular production, as musical styles began to catch up with these ahead-of-their-time designs.

While the original four Les Paul models continued as the foundation of the line, Gibson offered new variations, such as the Studio, Classic, and Double-Cut Standard, in order to give musicians all the features they wanted in a Les Paul guitar. In the 50-plus years of the Les Paul,

Gibson has offered more than 100 different variations. In 2003 Gibson honored Les Paul for his achievements as a performer, recording innovator, and guitar designer by presenting him with a special Artist for Eternity Award.

As Gibson celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Les Paul in 2002, the company rocked the guitar world once again by introducing the first digital electric guitar. It represents the biggest advance in electric guitar design since the instrument was invented, and moreover, it serves notice that Gibson electric guitars will continue to epitomize the highest levels of Quality,

Prestige and Innovation.

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Body.

The solidbody guitar was invented to increase sustain, produce a brilliant tone, and eliminate feedback caused by a vibrating top. These qualities are enhanced by wood with high density, such as maple. Les Paul would have preferred for his model to have had a solid maple body, but density translates to weight, and a solid maple Les Paul Model would have been exceedingly heavy. A compromise was reached, with lighter-weight mahogany used for the main part of the body and maple for the top cap. Most of the carved-top Les Pauls have the combination maple/mahogany body, while the “slab” or flat top models have a solid mahogany body. Flying

V’s, Explorers, and Firebirds have a solid mahogany body.

Neck and Headstock.

Mahogany is a time-proven material for guitar necks, and the necks of most

Gibson USA models are constructed of a single piece of mahogany. The Firebird or Thunderbird

IV bass neck is made of nine-ply mahogany and walnut (or all mahogany laminates), and it extends completely through the body. Fingerboards are of ebony or rosewood.

13

14

Neck Specifications. Gibson designs its guitar necks to complement and enhance the unique characteristics of each model. Neck profiles can be “rounded ’50s” or “slim ’60s” (or a slight

V-shape available only on the BluesHawk). Scale length (string length) is 24 3/4" on the Les

Paul, X-Factor and SG models, 25 1/2" on the Chet Atkins, Americana, and Hawk models and

34" on basses.

Pickups.

Humbucking (double-coil): Most Les Pauls have double-coil humbucking pickups, which were designed to do what their name says: “buck” the hum caused by fluorescent lights, rheostats, and other electrical interference. They accomplish this with two coils of wire, wound in opposite directions so that they cancel out interference. Also, they produce a powerful sound that is the foundation of rock 'n' roll music.

Gibson produces humbuckers in a variety of subtle variations, achieved by the use of different magnets and different combinations of winding turns. In addition, some Les Pauls have humbuckers without the metal cover pieces, which results in a hotter signal. For individual model and pickup specs, please refer to Gibson’s website, www.gibson.com.

P-90 (single-coil):

Only a few Gibsons—some Les Paul Juniors, Les Paul Specials, and Melody

Makers—have single-coil P-90 pickups. Some have the original “dog-eared” covers; those

without the “dog ears” are nicknamed “soapbar” because the original cream-colored plastic covers on the 1952 Les Paul Model resembled bars of soap. When the P-90 was introduced in 1946, it was the most powerful pickup of its kind. And it still is. Among the many examples of the P-90 sound are Carlos Santana’s Les Paul Special on Santana’s classic recordings,

Leslie West’s Les Paul Jr. with the group Mountain, and the Who’s Pete Townshend with an SG

Special on Live at Leeds and at Woodstock.

Pickup adjustments.

Although the pickups on each Les Paul are set to Gibson standards at the factory, they can be adjusted. The height of the pickup can be adjusted by the two screws found at either end of the pickup, in the mounting ring. Individual string volume can be adjusted by turning the polepiece screws. Bringing the pickup or pole screw closer to the strings makes the signal stronger or “hotter.”

15

Controls.

The standard Gibson electronic configuration is two pickups, four knobs, and a pickup selector switch. The four knobs provide individual tone and volume control for each pickup. Models with only three knobs provide individual volume and master tone control. Single pickup models have only two knobs—for volume and tone control—and no pickup selector.

16

Volume controls: The two knobs closest to the fingerboard control the volume of the pickups.

The volume knob nearest the bridge controls the “front” or neck pickup; the knob nearest the edge of the guitar controls the “back” or bridge pickup.

Tone controls: The knob or knobs farthest away from the fingerboard control tone. The tone knob nearest the bridge controls the “front” or neck pickup; the knob nearest the edge of the guitar controls the “back” or bridge pickup.

The tone controls are the “treble roll off” or “cut” variety. The tonal quality of the instrument is darkened by the reduction of treble rather than the addition of bass. The tone control turned all the way counterclockwise results in maximum reduction of treble and produces the “darkest” sound. The tone control turned clockwise to its maximum position allows the pickup’s full harmonic frequencies to pass through, producing the guitar’s brightest sound.

Pickup selector switch:

The selector switch has three positions. The up position selects only the “front” or neck pickup. The down position selects only the “back” or bridge pickup. The middle position engages both pickups. The tone and volume controls will only be active when the corresponding pickup is selected. On models with three pickups, the selector switch activates the front pickup (front position), the middle and back pickup together (middle position), and the back pickup (back position).

The Tune-o-matic Bridge.

The Tune-o-matic bridge allows for adjustment in overall bridge height and individual string length. Height is adjustable up and down by means of thumb wheels under the bridge at either end. Each string saddle is adjustable forward and back with a small standard screwdriver. Action adjustment (up and down) is set at the factory to the correct height for playing comfort and for buzz-free action. Raising the bridge will result in stiffer action; lowering the bridge will result in faster action but may also result in fret buzz. Climatic or humidity changes, or changes in string gauge, may necessitate a bridge adjustment.

Any change—in bridge height, string gauge, or climate—can affect the intonation and cause a guitar to play out of tune in some fret positions. When this happens, the string length needs to be adjusted, and this is accomplished by moving the individual saddles forward (toward the neck) or backward (toward the tailpiece). The screw heads are on the pickup side of the bridge, although there are many Gibsons that have the screw heads facing the tailpiece. To check intonation, compare the pitch of a string that is fretted at the 12th fret against the harmonic at the 12th fret (accomplished by touching the string lightly with the left hand, without pressing it all the way to the fret). If the fretted note is higher than the harmonic, the string should be lengthened by moving the saddle toward the tailpiece until the two notes are the same. If the fretted note is lower than the harmonic, the string length should be decreased.

17

18

The tune-o-matic bridge was designed to adjust for string changes (gauge or type) and other physical changes but not for problems with intonation due to string wear. Should a string lose its intonation due to wear, we strongly recommend changing the string and not the bridge setting.

Adjustable Stopbar Tailpiece.

The stopbar tailpiece may be adjusted up or down to change the downward pressure across the bridge. There is usually no need to adjust the stopbar unless the strings are moving out of the saddles, in which case the stopbar should be lowered.

CARE AND MAINTENANCE

Finish.

A Gibson instrument always attracts attention, whether it is on a concert stage before thousands or on a guitar stand in a home studio. After the classic body lines of a Gibson, the finish makes the strongest impression.

Perspiration acids, heavy fingerprinting, dust, and grime from on-the-job usage are unavoidable. However, a minute or two spent with Gibson’s instrument care products—guitar polish, fretboard conditioners, string cleaner/lubricant, and polishing cloth—will restore a finish to like-new condition.

Gibson’s nitrocellulose lacquer finish not only looks great, it is also easily repairable—by a professional. Minor scratches and dings can be fixed without completely refinishing the instrument.

Keeping Your Guitar on the Road.

Your Gibson is a durable instrument. It is likely to outlive you— if you take care of it. In determining whether conditions might be harmful to your guitar, the rule of thumb is, if you are comfortable, then your guitar will be comfortable. Here are some conditions to avoid.

19

20

Heat and cold: Gibson’s nitrocellulose finish can expand or contract to adjust to extreme temperatures and humidities—but not to sudden changes in temperature or humidity. Just as a hot drink will crack a chilled glass, the finish of a Les Paul will crack if a guitar that has been sitting in the trunk of a car in wintertime is suddenly exposed to the warm air of a heated room.

In these conditions, let the guitar warm up gradually inside the case before opening the case.

Rain: Water wipes off the instrument’s finish easily, but if allowed to remain, it can cause ugly water spots in the lacquer.

Sun: Avoid direct rays of the sun on your Gibson. Direct sunlight can blister or discolor the finish.

More Things to Avoid.

When using a shoulder strap for a standing playing position, check that all contact points and strap fasteners are secure.

Guitar stands with rubber supports that contain dye or plasticizers can “eat away” at the lacquer finish or leave a stain on your guitar that goes through the lacquer finish and into the wood. These stains are permanent and this sort of damage is not covered under your warranty. We recommend covering the rubber parts of the stand with a soft cotton cloth (such as a guitar polishing cloth) and using a guitar stand only for temporary “storage” of your instrument.

Avoid sharp blows to any part of your instrument. Be particularly alert to possible blows to the back of the headstock, machine heads (tuners), and in the neck heel area. Many headstock breaks are the result of a guitar being knocked over or dropped while it’s still in the case, so do not stand the case on its end.

Should major adjustments become necessary, contact your local authorized Gibson dealer or service center.

Strings.

Fresh strings are a vital part of that “new instrument” sound. When strings begin to go dead, a guitar loses its edge, and as the strings undergo further wear and tear they go “dead.”

Your Gibson will sound its best with new strings.

How often should you change strings?

That depends on how much you play your guitar, how hard you play, and also on your individual body chemistry. Some professional musicians change strings before every show in order to maintain the brightest edge on their sound. More casual players may only need to change strings every month or two. For some players, even light perspiration shortens the life of their strings. The sound of the strings is the only sure way to judge whether or not they need to be changed. And if one string needs to be changed, the others can’t be far behind. To maintain tonal balance, change the whole set.

21

22

When changing strings, we recommend changing one string at a time in order to maintain tension on the neck and bridge. The pressure of the strings holds the bridge and saddles in place, and removing all the strings could necessitate a new setup.

Use high quality strings.

The most obvious action you can take to maximize the life and performance of your strings is to use high quality strings. Your Gibson comes from the factory with a set of strings made by Gibson and designed exclusively for Gibsons. Although the string set from the Gibson factory is suitable for virtually any style of music, Gibson offers a variety of string styles and gauges for specialized purposes.

Install your strings correctly. Improperly installed strings can slip, which will cause your Gibson to constantly go out of tune. To correctly install strings:

1.

Be certain the first winding of the string around the machine head stem (tuner post) goes over the exposed tip of the new string. The rest of the winding should then go under the exposed tip of the new string. When pressure is applied by tightening the string to pitch, a clamping action keeps the string from slipping around the machine head stem.

2.

Be certain the string is wrapped around the tuner post an adequate number of times. For unwound strings, at least five turns around the machine head stem are necessary. For wound strings, two or three turns are adequate.

What gauge strings should be used?

Your Gibson guitar comes strung with “10s”—which means the high-E string is .010 inches in diameter. The low-E is .046 inches in diameter. The set is designed so that all strings are in proportion to one another, ensuring that the action and the volume will be consistent across the entire fingerboard. Gibson offers “9s,” “11s,” and a variety of other gauges and compositions, all of which are balanced for consistent tension.

What brand of strings should be used?

Gibson has been offering its own strings since 1907, and Gibson has more experience than any other string maker when it comes to matching strings to Gibson guitars. Gibson strings are manufactured to exacting standards to achieve the highest level of quality and performance.

23

24

NOUVELLE TECHNOLOGIE – LA ROBOT GUITAR DE GIBSON

L’impossible est maintenant possible.

Découvrez la Robot Guitar de Gibson, la première guitare au monde équipée d’une technologie robotique.

La Robot Guitar de Gibson est la seule guitare actuellement dotée d’un système d’accordage automatique intégré (décrit dans ce manuel).

Votre Robot Guitar de Gibson sera pré-calibrée pour un jeu de cordes .010-.046 standard.

Si vous changez les diamètres de corde, que vous restaurez les valeurs par défaut définies en usine ou que vous installez le système vous-même, il est possible que vous souhaitiez calibrer les Powerheads une par une à l’aide de la méthode de calibration, décrite dans la section Mode Réglage de ce guide. Toutefois, le système s’ajuste automatiquement après plusieurs accordages étant donné que chaque Powerhead est auto-régulée à l’aide d’un algorithme DRA (Algorithme dynamique en temps réel), ce qui garantit la modification de la durée d’exécution en fonction de chaque corde.

Le logiciel dispose d’un algorithme « eFunction » spécial qui simplifie l’accordage. Nous recommandons son utilisation dans le mode « activé ».

Le but de ce manuel d’utilisation est d’expliquer les fonctions de la Robot Guitar afin que vous puissiez bénéficier au maximum de ses avantages tout en explorant ses possibilités fantastiques. Si vous avez des questions ou que vous souhaitez obtenir des informations techniques plus avancées, n’hésitez pas à nous contacter au +1 800 4GIBSON.

LE BOUTON MCK (MASTER CONTROL KNOB)

Le bouton MCK ne permet pas uniquement de contrôler tous les aspects de cet incroyable système d’auto-accordage, il communique également avec vous au fur et à mesure que vous apprenez son « langage ». Ce bouton est extêmement intuitif et permet de nombreuses utilisations. Ses fonctions deviendront vite une seconde nature une fois que vous aurez effectué quelques essais.

Attention : Ne tentez pas de tourner manuellement les Powerheads à moins qu’elles soient retirées de la manivelle de mécanique et qu’elles se trouvent ainsi en position désengagée ! Dans le cas contraire, les Powerheads pourraient être endommagées.

25

FONCTIONNEMENT DE BASE

Le bouton MCK (Master-Control Knob) de la Robot Guitar est souvent appelé bouton

« va-et-vient ». Lorsqu’il se trouve en position normale, il fonctionne comme un potentiomètre de volume ou de tonalité normal, en fonction de la série dont vous disposez.

Le système est activé lorsque le bouton MCK se trouve en position relevée.

26

Lorsque le système est activé en tirant sur le bouton MCK, il place immédiatement votre instrument en « Mode Accordage standard » en La 440 (A440) (à moins que vous ayez modifié les réglages par défaut de l’accordage, dans ce cas, reportez-vous à la page 46). Six préréglages d’usine sont toutefois mis à votre disposition. Chaque préréglage peut être modifié selon vos préférences et vous pouvez restaurer les réglages par défaut définis en usine, comme décrit ultérieurement dans ce manuel d’utilisation.

Divers symboles et couleurs apparaissent sur l’affichage du bouton MCK. Ceux-ci seront expliqués dans les modes de fonctionnement mis à votre disposition. Lors de l’accordage, ils se comportent de la façon suivante :

Fonctionnement de l’affichage des cordes sur le MCK lors de l’accordage : corde non accordée = rouge fixe fréquence de mesure = rouge clignotant ajustement des Powerheads = jaune clignotant

écrêtage du signal = bleu fixe fréquence de la corde à l’extrémité de la plage = violet fixe une corde accordée = vert fixe toutes les cordes accordées = tous les voyants clignotent 3 fois en bleu

Lors de l’accordage, le son de la guitare est presque entièrement coupé. Le volume est rétabli une fois que le bouton MCK est replacé en position enfoncée.

PRÉCAUTIONS D’EMPLOI :

• Ne tentez jamais de tourner manuellement les mécaniques d’accordage des Powerheads

à moins qu’ils se trouvent en position désengagée (relevées et hors de la manivelle de mécanique).

27

• Ne tentez jamais d’ouvrir le couvercle des dispositifs électroniques de la manivelle de mécanique, des Powerheads ou de l’UC de la caisse car cela annulerait votre garantie.

• Ne « frettez » pas une corde lorsque vous accordez la Robot Guitar. Les cordes doivent

être « à vide » pour que le système fonctionne correctement à moins que vous n’effectuiez la routine d’intonation.

• La détection du diapason et l’accordage précis et rapide des cordes se font sans difficultés. Jouer en douceur les cordes donnera de meilleurs résultats.

30

GUIDE D’UTILISATION DES FONCTIONS ET DES MODES D’AFFICHAGE LORS DES OPÉRATIONS D’ACCORDAGE

Fonction

Accordage automatiquement activé

(L’accordage 440 Hz,

EADGBE est le réglage par défaut défini en usine)

Accordage standard

440 Hz, EADGBE

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton MCK

Bouton MCK relevé et complétement tourné vers la gauche sur « 0 »

(sens anti-horaire)

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Voyants de toutes les cordes allumés en rouge

Voyants b et # allumés en rouge

Remarques

Jouez toutes les cordes en douceur

Lorsque vous jouez, les

Powerheads démarrent l’accordage. Les cordes s’allument en vert lorsqu’elles sont accordées et tous les voyants clignotent 3 fois en bleu une fois que l’accordage est terminé. Remettez le bouton MCK en place après le clignotement des voyants bleus.

Entrez en appuyant une fois sur l’affichage : les voyants de toutes les cordes, ainsi que les voyants b et #, s’allument en rouge

Voir ci-dessus

Voir ci-dessus

Accordage en

Mi majeur

440 Hz, EBEG#BE

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Mi (E)

Le voyant Mi (E) s’allume en bleu

Voir ci-dessus

Fonction

Accordage DADGAD

440 Hz, DADGAD

Accordage en

Drop Ré (D)

440 Hz, DADGBE

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

La (A)

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Le voyant La (A) s’allume en bleu

Entrez en appuyant une fois sur l’affichage : les voyants de toutes les cordes, ainsi que les voyants b et #, s’allument en rouge

Remarques

Lorsque vous jouez, les

Powerheads démarrent l’accordage. Les cordes s’allument en vert lorsqu’elles sont accordées et tous les voyants clignotent 3 fois en bleu une fois que l’accordage est terminé. Remettez le bouton MCK en place après le clignotement des voyants bleus.

Voir ci-dessus Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Ré (D)

Le voyant Ré (D) s’allume en bleu

Voir ci-dessus

31

Accordage Delta Blues

440 Hz, DGDGBD

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Sol (G)

Le voyant Sol (G) s’allume en bleu

Voir ci-dessus Voir ci-dessus

32

Fonction

Accordage en

Mi bémol

440 Hz,

EbAbDbGbBbeb

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Si (B)

Accordage en double

Drop Ré (D)

DADGBD

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant mi (e)

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Le voyant Si (B) s’allume en bleu

#

Le voyant mi (e) s’allume en bleu

Remarques

Entrez en appuyant une fois sur l’affichage—Les voyants de toutes les cordes, ainsi que les voyants b et #, s’allument en rouge

Voir ci-dessus

Lorsque vous jouez, les

Powerheads démarrent l’accordage. Les cordes s’allument en vert lorsqu’elles sont accordées et tous les voyants clignotent 3 fois en bleu une fois que l’accordage est terminé. Remettez le bouton MCK en place après le clignotement des voyants bleus.

Voir ci-dessus

#

Fonction

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton

MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant I

#

Voyants de l’affichage

Accordage de référence

(Accordage sur le diapason de référence sélectionné)

Le voyant I s’allume en rouge

#

Action Remarques

Tirez sur (désengagez) la cheville de la Powerhead que vous avez choisie d’accorder sur un diapason de référence. Accordez maintenant cette corde pour qu’elle corresponde à la référence que vous avez choisie. Remettez la cheville en position engagée. Démarrez l’accordage de votre guitare en appuyant sur l’affichage.

La lettre « I » s’allume en vert et les voyants de

TOUTES les cordes s’allument en rouge.

#

Jouez la MÊME corde que celle que vous venez d’accorder sur le diapason de référence. Lorsque le voyant de cette corde s’allume en vert, sa fréquence a été mesurée et stockée. Jouez maintenant toutes les cordes et le système Powertune va accorder votre guitare selon l’« accordage normal » en fonction de la corde de référence que vous avez sélectionnée.

(Les voyants se comportent de la même manière que lors d’un accordage normal.) Lorsque l’accordage de référence est terminé, le voyant « I » clignote en bleu.

Si vous souhaitez stocker votre nouvel « accordage de référence », tournez simplement le bouton MCK sur l’une des positions préréglées en usine (E, A, D,

G, B ou e) et appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Les voyants de l’affichage clignotent 3 fois en bleu pour indiquer que votre accordage de référence a été stocké sur cette position et qu’il peut être réutilisé de la même manière que les autres préréglages en choisissant cette position.

(Rappelez-vous que vous n’avez pas besoin de

« stocker » votre nouvel accordage de référence.

Remettez le bouton MCK en position normale, vous

êtes prêt à commencer !)

33

34

Fonction

Accordage modifié personnalisé

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant « cheville »

#

Le voyant « cheville » s’allume en rouge

Voyants de l’affichage Action

#

Remarques

Pour créer votre propre

« accordage modifié personnalisé », désengagez la Powerhead de chaque corde requise et accordez-la manuellement sur le diapason souhaité.

Appuyez ensuite sur l’affichage, le voyant

« cheville » s’allume en vert et tous les voyants des cordes en rouge.

Jouez maintenant toutes les cordes une par une

(ne jouez pas trop fort !).

Une fois que toutes les fréquences ont été mesurées et enregistrées, les voyants correspondants s’allument en vert.

Une fois que toutes les cordes de votre accordage modifié personnalisé ont été enregistrées, les voyants des cordes clignotent 3 fois en bleu.

Vous pouvez maintenant enregistrer votre accordage modifié personnalisé sur l’une des positions préréglées en usine. Sélectionnez E, A, D, G, B ou e, puis appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Les voyants de l’affichage clignotent 3 fois en bleu pour indiquer que votre accordage de référence personnalisé a

été enregistré sur cette position et qu’il peut être réutilisé de la même manière que les autres préréglages.

(N’oubliez pas que lorsque vous enregistrez votre accordage modifié personnalisé, vous remplacez la position préréglée que vous sélectionnez.)

MODES AJUSTEMENT ACCORDAGE PAR CORDES.

Fonction Position du MCK Voyants de l’affichage Action

Mode Encordage

Mode Décordage

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Flèche circulaire

Les voyants Flèche circulaire et # s’allument en vert

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez jusqu’au voyant

Flèche circulaire

Les voyants Flèche circulaire et b s’allument en rouge

Remarques

Activez le mode

Encordage en appuyant 3 secondes sur l’affichage.

Les Powerheads commencent à enrouler les cordes pour se rapprocher de l’accordage normal.

Lorsqu’elles arrêtent de tourner, activez le mode

Accordage normal pour terminer l’accordage de votre instrument.

Appuyez une fois sur l’affichage pour basculer en mode

Décordage. La flèche circulaire passe du vert au rouge. Activez maintenant le mode

Décordage en appuyant sur l’affichage pendant

3 secondes.

Les Powerheads commencent à dérouler toutes les cordes.

Lorsqu’elles s’arrêtent de tourner, desserrez chaque sillet de tête bloquant du chevalet afin que vous puissez retirer les anciennes cordes.

35

36

POUR CHANGER LES CORDES DE VOTRE ROBOT GUITAR

Vérifiez tout d’abord que toutes les Powerheads sont désengagées en retirant les chevilles de la manivelle de mécanique. Ceci est très important ! Tournez chaque cheville afin que l’orifice du chevalet soit à peu près aligné avec chaque corde correspondante, lorsqu’elle quitte le sillet de tête de votre guitare.

Guidez chaque corde dans votre cordier, au-dessus du sillet (là où le contact est essentiel), dans la fente du sillet de tête, puis dans l’orifice du chevalet comme vous le feriez avec toute autre guitare. Forcez toutefois légèrement à la main avant de serrer chaque sillet de tête bloquant. Coupez l’extrémité de chaque corde à proximité du chevalet afin que les cordes ne soient pas en contact les unes avec les autres. Cela pourrait entraîner un dysfonctionnement de votre système.

Vous êtes maintenant prêt à passer en mode Encordage. La flèche circulaire du bouton MCK doit être verte, comme décrit à la page précédente. Après avoir appuyé sur l’affichage pendant 3 secondes, toutes les cordes s’enroulent automatiquement jusqu’à ce qu’elles soient à proximité de leur diapason correct. Vous devez alors accorder précisément votre guitare en utilisant le mode Accordage normal. (Lorsque toutes les cordes sont retirées,

empêchez tout mouvement du cordier, car cela pourrait endommager son connecteur !)

POUR ACTIVER LE MODE ENCORDAGE POUR UNE SEULE CORDE

(si vous devez remplacer une corde qui s’est cassée lorsque vous jouiez par exemple)

Installez la corde comme décrit précédemment (n’oubliez pas que le contact avec le sillet est essentiel !). Sélectionnez simplement le voyant de la corde que vous souhaitez remplacer, tournez le bouton sur la flèche circulaire verte et basculez-la de vert à rouge, puis de rouge à vert. Appuyez sur l’affichage pendant trois secondes. La Powerhead de la corde sélectionnée commence à s’enrouler pour se rapprocher de l’accordage normal.

Lorsque l’enroulage est terminé, vous êtes prêt à l’accorder plus précisément en utilisant le mode Accordage normal.

37

38

MODE INTONATION (MODÈLES GIBSON UNIQUEMENT)

Il est recommandé d’effectuer un accordage normal en 440 Hz avant de démarrer le mode Intonation

Fonction

Mode Intonation

Position du MCK

Tirez sur le bouton MCK et tournez-le jusqu’au voyant |

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Le voyant I s’allume en bleu

Activez le mode

Intonation en appuyant

3 secondes sur l’affichage.

Remarques

Jouez une des cordes jusqu’à ce que le voyant correspondant s’allume en vert. Par exemple, le Ré (D).

Au bout de 2 secondes, le voyant b s’éteint et le voyant # s’allume en vert

Appuyez sur la même corde au niveau de la

12ème fret et jouez-la.

Fonction

Mode Intonation

Position du MCK

Le bouton MCK se trouve maintenant dans la position de la corde que vous accordez.

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Le voyant I s’allume en bleu

Pour chaque voyant vert, tournez la vis d’un demi tour dans le sens horaire

Remarques

Un code de clignotement coloré affiche maintenant la correction appropriée pour la vis d’intonation.

Par exemple :

= 5 demi tours dans le sens horaire

Pour chaque voyant rouge, tournez la vis d’un demi tour dans le sens anti-horaire

Par exemple :

= 6 demi tours dans le sens anti-horaire

Répétez le mode Intonation pour chaque corde.

Une corde correctement accordée est indiquée par un voyant bleu.

39

40

Fonction Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Mode Calibration

Position du MCK

Placez le bouton MCK en position relevée et sélectionnez le voyant

Si (B)

Le voyant Do (C) s’allume en rouge

#

Pour passer en mode

Calibration, appuyez sur l’affichage pendant

3 secondes. Le voyant Do (C) s’allume en bleu. Sélectionnez maintenant votre fréquence fondamentale à l’aide du bouton MCK, à partir de la liste suivante.

(Remarque : lors de la sélection votre fréquence fondamentale, le voyant # rouge s’allume ou s’éteint lorsque vous appuyez sur l’affichage ; les autres voyants restent allumés en bleu.)

435 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Mi (E) bleus

436 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Mi (E) bleus, voyant # rouge

437 Hz = voyants Do (C) et La (A) bleus

438 Hz = voyants Do (C) et La (A) bleus, voyant # rouge

439 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Ré (D) bleus

440 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Ré (D) bleus, voyant # rouge

441 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Sol (G) bleus

442 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Sol (G) bleus, voyant # rouge

443 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Si (B) bleus

444 Hz = voyants Do (C) et Si (B) bleus, voyant # rouge

445 Hz = voyants Do (C) et mi (e) bleus

446 Hz = voyants Do (C) et mi (e) bleus, voyant # rouge

#

#

À NOTER :

Une fois que vous avez sélectionné la fréquence fondamentale souhaitée, appuyez sur l’affichage pendant trois secondes. Sélectionnez maintenant un accordage et jouez les cordes. Le décalage global de calibration est appliqué à chaque accordage sélectionné.

Pour vérifier le décalage global de calibration sélectionné, tirez sur le bouton MCK et appuyez sur le voyant Do (C) pendant trois secondes.

Un code de clignotement coloré affiche maintenant la fréquence fondamentale en Hz : rouge = centaines / vert = dizaines / bleu = unités / jaune = 0

Exemple 440 Hz : 4 voyants rouges, pause, 4 voyants verts, pause, 1 voyant jaune

Exemple 436 Hz : 4 voyants rouges, pause, 3 voyants verts, pause, 6 voyants bleus, voyant Flèche circulaire rouge (inférieure au diapason 440 Hz)

Exemple 445 Hz : 4 voyants rouges, pause, 4 voyants verts, pause, 5 voyants bleus, voyant Flèche circulaire vert (supérieure au diapason 440 Hz)

41

42

MODE RÉGLAGE

Les diverses fonctions du mode Réglage peuvent être sélectionnées individuellement une fois que ce mode est activé.

Nous allons maintenant décrire comment entrer et sortir du mode Réglage, puis nous énumérerons ses différentes fonctions.

Fonction Position du MCK Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Passer en mode

Réglage

Placez le bouton MCK en position relevée, puis tournez-le jusqu’à atteindre

« 0 » (sens anti-horaire)

Les voyants b et # s’allument en rouge

Appuyez sur l’affichage pendant

3 secondes. Lorsque l’affichage devient bleu, relachez le bouton. Appuyez maintenant à nouveau sur l’affichage pendant 3 secondes.

Il clignote 3 fois puis s’arrête. Le voyant

« cheville » s’allume maintenant en blanc et les voyants # et b en rouge. Vous êtes

à présent en mode Réglage.

Voici la première

étape pour passer en mode Réglage

Fonction

Sortir du mode

Réglage sans enregistrer les modifications

Position du MCK

Replacez le MCK en position enfoncée

Voyants de l’affichage Action

Le mode Réglage s’éteint

Remarques

Vous pouvez quitter le mode Réglage à tout moment

43

Sortir du mode

Réglage ; enregistrer les modifications

Dépend de la dernière fonction du mode

Réglage utilisée

Tous les voyants extérieurs clignotent en bleu 3 fois

La fonction du mode

Réglage est appliquée

La fonction du mode

Réglage définie est maintenant enregistrée

#

44

FONCTIONS DU MODE RÉGLAGE

Fonction Position du MCK Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Restaurer les préréglages d’usine

Afficher la version du logiciel

Passez en mode Réglage et faites tourner le bouton jusqu’au voyant Ré (D)

Le voyant Ré (D) s’allume en bleu et le voyant

« cheville » en blanc

Passez en mode Réglage, tournez le bouton jusqu’au voyant Mi (E), puis validez

#

La séquence de clignotement du voyant

« cheville » indique l’édition de la version du logiciel

Appuyez une fois sur l’affichage pour restaurer les préréglages d’usine

La restauration des préréglages d’usine implique les

éléments suivants :

Les positions des préréglages sont définies sur les accordages

• par défaut

Les données de correction en temps réel sont définies sur les valeurs par défaut

La correction dynamique en

• temps réel est activée

L’algorithme de correction eFunction est activé

La précision de l’accordage est

• de 4 sur 6

Les données de calibration sont restaurées

Appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Le voyant « cheville » commence à clignoter

Rouge = numéro de version majeure

Vert = numéro de version mineure

Bleu = niveau de révision

Par exemple : la version 2.3.5 du logiciel est indiquée par

2 clignotements rouges, suivis de 3 clignotements verts, puis de 5 clignotements bleus

Fonction Position du MCK

Activation/ désactivation du décalage global de calibration

Passez en mode Réglage, sélectionnez le voyant

Do (C), puis appuyez une fois sur l’affichage

Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Le voyant Do (C) s’allume en bleu et le symbole de cheville en blanc

Tournez le bouton

MCK vers la gauche

(sens anti-horaire) pour désactiver la calibration globale

Lorsqu’un mode

Calibration est en cours, les fréquences fondamentales sélectionnées sont appliquées à tous vos préréglages

Le voyant b rouge indique que cette fonction est désactivée

Tournez le bouton MCK vers la gauche (sens horaire) pour activer la calibration globale, le voyant vert indique que cette fonction est activée

Validez pour enregistrer votre sélection

45

46

FONCTIONS DU MODE RÉGLAGE

Fonction Position du MCK

Dernier accordage activé instantanément

Passez en mode Réglage, sélectionnez le voyant et validez

Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Tournez le bouton MCK jusqu’à I et validez

Le dernier accordage est activé au démarrage

Accordage préréglé activé instantanément

Passez en mode Réglage, sélectionnez le voyant et validez

Sélectionnez un préréglage à l’aide du bouton MCK et validez

La sélection de l’accordage préréglé est activée au démarrage

Fonction Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Réglages de vitesse/précision

Position du MCK

Passez en mode

Réglage et faites tourner le bouton jusqu’au voyant

La (A)

Le voyant « cheville » s’allume en blanc et le voyant La (A) en bleu

#

Appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Le réglage de vitesse/précision actuel est indiqué par des voyants verts clignotants

(comme décrit ci-dessous)

Le système Powertune est ajustable avec une précision de hauteur de son de 0,2 centième. Toutefois, cela rallonge quelque peu la durée des fonctions d’accordage, il est donc conseillé de définir une précision inférieure lors d’une utilisation sur scène. Il existe 6 niveaux de réglage. Le préréglage d’usine affiche 4 voyants clignotants verts, ce qui signifie que vous utilisez un réglage d’une précision d’environ 1 centième, ce qui convient

à la plupart des utilisations. La réduction de ce réglage accélère l’ensemble du processus d’accordage, ce qui peut s’avérer utile lors des utilisations sur scène. En studio, il est préférable d’utiliser la précision maximale mesurable. Dans ce cas, la plage peut être modifiée et ajustée en tournant le bouton MCK. La précision maximale

(0,2 centième) est indiquée par 6 voyants verts. La précision minimale (accordage le plus rapide) est indiquée par un seul voyant vert. Même lorsqu’elle est définie au niveau le plus bas, la précision de hauteusr de son est de 2,5 centièmes. Pour enregistrer vos réglages, appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Vous quittez le mode

Réglage automatiquement.

47

48

FONCTIONS DU MODE RÉGLAGE

Fonction

Activation/ désactivation du contrôle dynamique en temps réel (DRC)

Position du MCK Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Passez en mode Réglage, tournez le MCK jusqu’au voyant Sol (G), puis validez

Le voyant # s’allume en vert, le voyant b en rouge, le voyant Sol (G) en bleu et le voyant « cheville » en blanc

Tournez le bouton

MCK vers la gauche pour désactiver le contrôle dynamique en temps réel (DRC) et vers la droite

(sens horaire) pour l’activer. Validez pour enregistrer votre sélection

Le voyant # s’allume en vert lorsque le DRC est activé et le voyant b s’allume en rouge lorsqu’il est désactivé.

Activation/ désactivation de l’algorithme de correction eFunction

Passez en mode Réglage, tournez le MCK jusqu’au voyant Si (B), puis appuyez sur l’affichage.

Le voyant # s’allume en vert ou le voyant b en rouge, le voyant Si (B) s’allume en bleu et le voyant « cheville » en blanc

Tournez le bouton

MCK vers la gauche pour désactiver l’algorithme eFunction et vers la droite (sens horaire) pour l’activer. Validez pour enregistrer votre sélection.

Le voyant # s’allume en vert lorsque l’algorithme eFunction est activé et le voyant b s’allume en rouge lorsqu’il est désactivé.

CALIBRATION DES POWERHEADS

La Robot Guitar sera pré-calibrée pour un jeu de cordes .010-.046 standard. Si vous changez les diamètres de corde, que vous restaurez les valeurs par défaut définies en usine ou que vous installez le système vous-même, il est possible que vous souhaitiez calibrer les

Powerheads une par une à l’aide du mode Calibration du moteur tel que décrit ci-dessous.

Toutefois, gardez à l’esprit que chaque Powerhead est auto-ajustée à l’aide d’un algorithme dynamiqueen temps réel, ce qui garantit la modification de la durée d’exécution en fonction de chaque corde. Après plusieurs accordages le système s’ajuste automatiquement.

CALIBRATION MANUELLE DES POWERHEADS

Passez en mode Réglage, faites tourner le bouton jusqu’au voyant I, puis appuyez sur l’affichage.

Les voyants « cheville » et I s’allument en blanc. Vous pouvez maintenant calibrer une ou l’ensemble de vos Powerheads.

Tout d’abord, sélectionnez la Powerhead que vous souhaitez calibrer à l’aide du bouton MCK

(les cordes sélectionnées s’allument en bleu) et appuyez une fois sur l’affichage. Jouez la corde et sa lettre commencera à clignoter en alternant une lumière rouge et verte. Attendez quelques secondes, puis jouez-la à nouveau. Répétez cette opération jusqu’à ce que la Powerhead soit ajustée. Lorsque le voyant passe à la corde suivante dans l’ordre, l’ajustement de la Powerhead sélectionnée en premier est terminé. C’est aussi simple que cela.

49

50

CHARGEMENT ET INFORMATIONS RELATIVES À LA BATTERIE

La Robot Guitar est livrée avec un bloc d’alimentation contenant deux batteries rechargeables.

Un chargeur spécial est également fourni avec le système.

Le niveau de charge de la batterie est indiqué chaque fois que vous activez le système, comme décrit ci-dessous. Vous pouvez effectuer plus de 200 accordages entre deux charges.

Vous n’avez pas besoin d’ouvrir votre guitare pour accéder aux fonctions de chargement de la batterie. Lorsque le système est activé mais qu’il n’est pas utilisé pendant plus d’une minute, la batterie s’éteint automatiquement. Un mode de protection spécial est intégré au système de chargement. Lors du processus de chargement, branchez toujours en dernier le cordon de votre guitare au chargeur. Les cordons à correction de coupure sont plus efficaces lors du chargement.

NIVEAU DE LA BATTERIE

À chaque fois que le MCK est activé, il indique immédiatement si la batterie a besoin d’être rechargée en faisant clignoter le symbole correspondant en rouge.

Fonction

Mode Charge

Position du MCK Voyants de l’affichage Action Remarques

Placez le MCK en position relevée et tournez jusqu’au voyant Do (C), puis appuyez sur l’affichage

Votre niveau de charge actuel est affiché pendant environ

3 secondes. Le niveau de charge est indiqué par le nombre de voyants clignotants (entre 1 et 10).

Vous voyez maintenant un symbole de batterie clignotant en rouge sur le MCK, indiquant que le système attend d’être connecté au chargeur.

Branchez le connecteur

CA de votre unité de chargement, le voyant du chargeur commence

également à clignoter en rouge. Connectez l’unité de chargement à la guitare avec un cordon de guitare standard et le système commence la charge. L’unité de chargement clignote en vert et une série de voyants verts indique le niveau de charge sur le

MCK. Le voyant de l’unité de chargement clignote

également en vert.

Pour obtenir des performances optimales, un niveau de charge de 8 à 10 voyants clignotants est recommandé. Lorsque le bloc d’alimentation est complètement rechargé, une lumière bleu s’allume sur l’unité de chargement et l’affichage du MCK s’éteint automatiquement. Lorsque le chargement est terminé, poussez le MCK dans sa position initiale. Un chargement complet ne prend pas plus de 90 minutes.

51

52

MODE ECM (EMERGENCY CHARGE MODE)

La batterie rechargeable interne du système dispose désormais d’un Mode ECM (Emergency

Charge Mode), qui est activé si celle-ci est complètement déchargée ou trop faible pour activer la fonction de charge normale. Positionnez le bouton MCK sur le voyant Do (C).

Branchez le câble à correction de coupure sur l’unité de chargement, connectez le transformateur, puis reliez ce dernier à une prise murale. Un voyant rouge clignote sur le chargeur (en attente d’une guitare). Lorsque le voyant commence à clignoter en jaune, le chargeur est prêt à être connecté à la guitare. Le chargeur fournit une alimentation suffisante pour permettre au système de passer en mode de chargement normal. Le délai de réactivation du mode de chargement dépend du niveau de charge de la batterie (entre 10 secondes et 2 minutes environ). Une fois le mode ECM terminé, le système passe en mode de chargement normal.

MODE EXTINCTION AUTOMATIQUE

Si le bouton MCK reste en position « activée » pendant plus de 120 secondes, le système passe en mode Extinction automatique, indiqué par une lumière verte clignotante. Après 30 minutes, le système passe en mode Veille, indiqué par une lumière jaune clignotant très lentement. Vous pouvez réactiver le système dans l’un ou l’autre état en tournant le bouton MCK.

Remarque : Il est recommandé de ne pas ranger la guitare lorsque le bouton MCK est en position relevée car cela vide complètement la batterie et le mode ECM doit alors être utilisé.

53

AVERTISSEMENT DE COURT CIRCUIT

Si un court circuit se produit sur le pôle négatif relié à la masse (cordes Mi (E) ou La (A) à Ré

(D) ou Sol (G)) le symbole de cheville clignote en blanc. Cela peut se produire si les cordes fixées à la tête entrent en contact. Si le court circuit se produit entre la corde de Si (B) et la corde de Mi (E) haute ou entre la corde de Mi (E) basse et la corde de La (A), le symbole de cheville clignote en jaune. Vérifiez que les cordes ne sont pas en contact.

TOUTE UNE VIE DE MUSIQUE

Votre guitare électrique Gibson est l’investissement d’une vie. Si vous en prenez soin, elle conservera non seulement sa valeur en tant qu’instrument de haute qualité, mais contribuera au patrimoine musical des générations futures.

Votre investissement dans l’une des meilleures guitares électriques au monde est garanti par l’équipe de service clientèle la plus compétente dans l’industrie des instruments de musique. Pour contacter un représentant du serviceclient Gibson, composez le numéro +1 800 4GIBSON ou envoyez-nous un courrier électronique

à l’adresse [email protected]

Pour plus d’informations sur les produits et les accessoires Gibson, visitez le site à l’adresse www.gibson.com ou appelez le +1 800 4GIBSON.

55

56

NOTES

____________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

57

58

NOTES

____________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

NOTES

____________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

59

60

NOTES

____________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

7

6

309 Plus Park Boulevard Nashville, TN 37217 USA 1.800.4GIBSON www.gibson.com

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement