Legrand LMCS-100 Configuration Software User Guide

Legrand LMCS-100 Configuration Software User Guide
Wattstopper
No: 25366 – 10/17 rev. 4
LMCS-100
Digital Lighting Management
Configuration Software
Version 4.6.2
®
CONTENTS
Introduction.........................................................................................................................................7
Description....................................................................................................................................................7
Target Audience......................................................................................................................................................... 7
Applications................................................................................................................................................................ 7
Key Features.................................................................................................................................................8
What’s New In This Version.........................................................................................................................8
Supported Products.....................................................................................................................................9
Room Controllers and Panels.................................................................................................................................... 9
Small Room Controllers ..................................................................................................................................... 9
Fixture Controllers.............................................................................................................................................. 9
Enhanced Room Controllers ............................................................................................................................. 9
Network Room Controllers (LMRCs w/ built in LMBC-300 – obsolete) ............................................................. 9
Plug Load Room Controllers ............................................................................................................................. 9
Panels................................................................................................................................................................. 9
Occupancy Sensors................................................................................................................................................... 9
Switches..................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Switches............................................................................................................................................................. 9
Dimmers............................................................................................................................................................. 9
CCT Enabled...................................................................................................................................................... 9
Wall Switch Sensors................................................................................................................................................ 10
Daylighting............................................................................................................................................................... 10
Interfaces................................................................................................................................................................. 10
Additional Components Displayed in Networks View.............................................................................................. 10
Installing the LMCS-100 Software....................................................................................................11
Operating System Access Rights.............................................................................................................11
Software Packages Needed.......................................................................................................................11
Installation from the Web...........................................................................................................................11
LMCI-100 Device Driver...........................................................................................................................................11
LMCS-100 Application..............................................................................................................................................11
Connecting the LMCS-100 Software to a single Room...........................................................................11
The LMCS-100 User Interface...........................................................................................................12
Home Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 12
Support Tab.............................................................................................................................................................. 13
Help Tab................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Devices View and Networks View Tabs (Navigation Trees).................................................................................... 14
Devices Navigation Tree.......................................................................................................................................... 14
Rick-Click Options in the Navigation Tree........................................................................................................ 14
Networks View......................................................................................................................................................... 15
Device Information................................................................................................................................................... 15
Network Information......................................................................................................................................... 15
Area/Room/Device Information................................................................................................................................ 16
2
Creating a Project..............................................................................................................................18
Creating a Project Off-line.........................................................................................................................18
Naming a Project..................................................................................................................................................... 18
Manually Adding Network Components................................................................................................................... 19
Parent/Child Relationships in the Tree............................................................................................................. 20
Indicating Connection in Parallel Switches....................................................................................................... 20
Manually Adding Areas, Rooms, and Devices......................................................................................................... 21
Adding an Area................................................................................................................................................. 22
Adding a Room................................................................................................................................................. 22
Adding Devices to a Room............................................................................................................................... 23
Copying and Pasting Areas, Rooms, and Devices in the Tree......................................................................... 24
Adding Bridges, Zone Controllers, or Panels................................................................................................... 24
Profile and Partitioning Support for a Room..................................................................................................... 24
Creating and Editing Scenes............................................................................................................................ 24
Importing Rooms From a CAD File.......................................................................................................................... 25
Limitations When Using Templates to Populate Device Parameters............................................................... 27
Creating Tags for a Project...................................................................................................................................... 27
Adding Tags and Assigning Them to Rooms.................................................................................................... 28
Working With Tag Categories........................................................................................................................... 29
Documenting Wiring Diagrams for Rooms.............................................................................................................. 30
Creating Network Groups........................................................................................................................................ 30
Network Group Parameters.............................................................................................................................. 32
Setting Up Holidays For Use With Schedules......................................................................................................... 34
Creating a Project While Connected to the Network...............................................................................34
Discovering Devices on a DLM Network................................................................................................................. 34
Discovering Devices on a BACnet/IP Network........................................................................................................ 35
Discovering Devices When Using a LMBR-600 Wireless Router and LMBC-600 Wireless Bridges...................... 37
Discovering New Rooms or Devices in a Previously Discovered Network.............................................................. 39
Discovering Devices Remotely................................................................................................................................ 39
Transferring Project Data Into Site Devices...................................................................................42
Entering Serial Numbers and Device IDs in LMCS................................................................................................. 42
Manually Entering Serial Numbers................................................................................................................... 42
Automating Serial Number Entry with the Device Pairing Utility...................................................................... 43
Synchronizing a Room............................................................................................................................................. 44
Example of Synchronization Where the Serial Numbers Do Not Match.......................................................... 46
Example of Synchronization Where the Discovered Room is Missing Devices Included in the Project.......... 47
Synchronizing an Area............................................................................................................................................. 47
Sending Project Data to Devices............................................................................................................................. 48
Enabling Logging for a Room.................................................................................................................................. 49
Network Documentation.......................................................................................................................................... 49
Real Time Room Control–The Advanced Tab For Rooms.............................................................50
The Support Tab................................................................................................................................53
Update Firmware..................................................................................................................................................... 53
Upgrading Firmware with an LMCI-100 Connection........................................................................................ 54
Upgrading Firmware via BACnet...................................................................................................................... 55
Difference Tool......................................................................................................................................................... 59
3
DLM Site Time/Location........................................................................................................................................... 60
Panel Settings.................................................................................................................................................. 61
LMTS-101-CCT Settings.................................................................................................................................. 62
Rename Rooms....................................................................................................................................................... 62
Preferences.............................................................................................................................................................. 63
Programming Parameters for Individual Devices..........................................................................64
Parameters Common To All Devices........................................................................................................64
Controllers and Panels...............................................................................................................................64
Basic Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 65
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 65
Parameters on the Advanced Tab Common to All Devices.............................................................................. 66
Parameters Unique to Controllers.................................................................................................................... 66
Technician Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 67
Controllers – Loads and Relays................................................................................................................67
Parameters Appearing On All Tabs.......................................................................................................................... 67
Basic Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 68
Status Section.................................................................................................................................................. 68
Normal Hours/After Hour Section..................................................................................................................... 69
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 70
Normal Hours/After Hour Section..................................................................................................................... 71
Technician Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 72
Normal Hours/After Hour Section..................................................................................................................... 72
Controllers – CCT Loads............................................................................................................................73
Parameters Appearing On All Tabs.......................................................................................................................... 73
Basic Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 73
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 73
Normal Hours/After Hour Section..................................................................................................................... 74
Technician Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 74
Controllers – Parameters Unique to Panels and Zone Controllers.......................................................74
Bridge Tab................................................................................................................................................................ 74
Network Groups Tab................................................................................................................................................ 75
Schedules Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 76
Dark/Light Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 77
Astronomical Dark/Light Switching................................................................................................................... 77
Switching Based on Input From an LMIO-301 and Photocell........................................................................... 78
Occupancy Groups Tab........................................................................................................................................... 79
Open ADR Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 80
Occupancy Sensors...................................................................................................................................81
Basic Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 81
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 81
Network Groups Tab................................................................................................................................................ 82
Sensor Load/Scene Binding.................................................................................................................................... 82
Normal Hours/After Hours Tabs............................................................................................................................... 83
Switches......................................................................................................................................................83
Basic Tab................................................................................................................................................................. 83
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 84
4
Advanced Sensor Tab.............................................................................................................................................. 84
Advanced LMTS Tab................................................................................................................................................ 85
Switches – Button Parameters..................................................................................................................85
Binding to a Load or a CCT Load (LMSW-105-CCT only) – Load Binding Basic Tab............................................. 85
Binding to a Load – Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................... 87
Binding to a Load – Technician Tab......................................................................................................................... 87
Binding to a CCT Load (LMTS-101-CCT Only) – Basic Tab................................................................................... 88
Binding to a CCT Load (LMSW-105-CCT Only) – Advanced Tab............................................................................ 88
Binding to a Scene................................................................................................................................................... 89
Binding to a Network Group..................................................................................................................................... 89
Switches – Rocker Parameters.................................................................................................................90
Rocker Load Binding and Basic Tab........................................................................................................................ 90
Rocker Advanced Tab.............................................................................................................................................. 91
Switches – Sensor Parameters.................................................................................................................91
Switches – Schedule Parameters..............................................................................................................92
Astro Schedules....................................................................................................................................................... 92
Custom Schedules................................................................................................................................................... 92
Daylight Photosensors...............................................................................................................................93
Basic Tab – LMLS-400 and LMLS-500.................................................................................................................... 93
Calibrating the LMLS-400 and LMLS-600........................................................................................................ 93
Basic Tab – LMLS-600............................................................................................................................................. 94
Advanced Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 95
LMLS-600 Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 96
Technician Tab......................................................................................................................................................... 96
Load Binding to Zones............................................................................................................................................. 97
Switched and Dimming Load Binding............................................................................................................... 97
Bi-Level and Tri-level Load Binding.................................................................................................................. 97
Zone Parameter Tabs – Advanced and Basic.......................................................................................................... 98
Zone Basic Tab – Switched/Bi-Level/Tri-Level......................................................................................................... 99
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming for LMLS-400............................................................................................................... 99
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming for LMLS-500 and LMLS-600.................................................................................... 100
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-400.......................................................................................................................... 100
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-500.......................................................................................................................... 101
Interfaces – LMBC-300 and LMBC-600 Bridges.....................................................................................101
LMBC-300 Basic Tab............................................................................................................................................. 101
LMBC-600 Basic Tab............................................................................................................................................. 102
Advanced Tab........................................................................................................................................................ 102
Bottom Section....................................................................................................................................................... 102
Interfaces – LMZC-301 Zone Controller..................................................................................................103
Interfaces – ELCU-100 and ELCU-200....................................................................................................103
Interfaces – LMIO-101...............................................................................................................................103
Interfaces – LMIO-201...............................................................................................................................103
Basic Tab............................................................................................................................................................... 103
Advanced Tab........................................................................................................................................................ 104
Load Binding and Normal/After Hours................................................................................................................... 104
Interfaces – LMIO-301...............................................................................................................................105
5
Interfaces – LMIN-104...............................................................................................................................106
Switch Mode.......................................................................................................................................................... 107
Interfaces - LMOR-102..............................................................................................................................108
Interfaces – LMDI-100, LMIO-102, LMPS-104, WRC-TX.........................................................................108
Using the Device Grid to View and Program Parameters...........................................................109
Copying and Pasting Parameter Values................................................................................................................ 109
Sorting Devices in the Grid.....................................................................................................................................110
Filtering The Device Grid........................................................................................................................................111
Modifying Columns in the Device Grid....................................................................................................................113
Sending and Receiving Data from Devices in the Device Grid..............................................................................114
Renaming Rooms Using the Device Grid...............................................................................................................114
Finding Serial Numbers and Associated Rooms....................................................................................................114
Reports.............................................................................................................................................115
Device List.................................................................................................................................................115
Load Binding.............................................................................................................................................116
BACnet Points...........................................................................................................................................117
Device Pairing Reports............................................................................................................................117
Room Summary........................................................................................................................................119
Simplified Room Summary......................................................................................................................120
LMCT Report.............................................................................................................................................121
Room Controller Report...........................................................................................................................122
Relay Panel Settings................................................................................................................................122
Relay Panel Insert.....................................................................................................................................123
Occupancy Sensor report........................................................................................................................123
Switch Report............................................................................................................................................124
Daylighting Report....................................................................................................................................124
Network Bridge Report.............................................................................................................................125
Simplified Bridge Report..........................................................................................................................126
Scene Report.............................................................................................................................................127
Line Riser Diagram...................................................................................................................................128
Generating a Line Riser Diagram.......................................................................................................................... 128
Using the Line Riser Diagram preview window..................................................................................................... 129
Schedule and Control...............................................................................................................................131
Network Groups Report...........................................................................................................................132
Typical Wiring............................................................................................................................................133
Holiday Report..........................................................................................................................................134
Firmware Version Report.........................................................................................................................134
BACnet Simulator Export.........................................................................................................................135
Bill of Materials Export.............................................................................................................................136
6
INTRODUCTION
DESCRIPTION
The Wattstopper LMCS-100 Configuration Software allows users to read, and modify DLM parameters for easy
computer based configuration. Configurations are stored within an LMCS-100 project file. LMCS communicates
from the computer to the DLM network using the LMCI-100 Interface, which is a USB dongle
that connects a computer’s USB port to the Digital Lighting Management (DLM) local network
through its RJ45 connector, using LMRJ cables. It can also connect to a BACnet network via
the standard network ports on the PC, provided there is a BACnet compatible router or switch
connected to the DLM network.
NOTE: LMRJ cables should never be plugged into an Ethernet port on a computer or wall.
LMCI-100
LMCS-100 provides the capability to view and change DLM device parameters either while
online with the devices on the local network or offline (not connected). The software may be used to configure a
site for later download or directly connect to the local network in a room to read and write directly to the devices.
In offline commissioning, a project (a site file listing every device in every room) is first created and modified
without connection to the actual DLM network. (The DLM network is a collection of Cat-5e wires that connect
together all DLM devices in a room.) In this way, much of the work in setting up device parameters can be done
prior to loading at the commissioning work site.
Online commissioning has the benefit of using the Discovery feature of the LMCS-100 software. Once connected
to the DLM network, the Discovery automatically gathers information about the devices on the network and the
current parameter values for each device. From the discovered devices a room can be instantly created in a
project or area that is an exact model of the current network. Device parameters can be changed while connected
to the network.
LMCS-100 software features intuitive graphics to identify current DLM system settings, allowing users to easily
store or modify settings. With the software, users can also reconfigure DLM devices by changing parameters and/
or setting operational values. LMCS software may also be used to load new firmware with enhanced features into
DLM devices without removing installed products.
This document will guide the user in installing and accessing the features of the LMCS-100 software. It is not
intended to provide detailed information about the function or operation of the DLM room devices nor their
parameters. For detailed information about applying DLM and use of the many available settings and features see
the DLM Design Guide.
In addition to this guide, a series of short training videos are available on Youtube, for the following subjects:
Startup & Connecting, Discovery, The Device Grid, and Rename Rooms Import:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=170GU_Xq9ok&index=1&list=PLQKZ56rib0O57ukrF8xv780Pc9ZxNP9MG
Target Audience
Users of LMCS-100 include:
• Project Managers – who document large projects (pre-commissioning) to help generate submittals and
parameter sets that can be used in later field commissioning
• Field Service/Installers – who configure DLM devices on the job site, perform field firmware updates, and
diagnose issues
• Sales/Sales Support/Sales Representatives – who present DLM features and best practices
• Commissioning Agents – who will document (and modify) the field configuration of devices and generate
reports based on those configurations
• Building Owners/Operators – who want to configure rooms after installation and maintain device
configuration information
Applications
Designers can take advantage of these computer interface tools to simplify project design, startup and
documentation. The LMCS software can be used to set up many advanced features of DLM devices that are
beyond the scope of Plug n’ Go, Push n’ Learn and the LMCT-100 wireless configuration tool. Furthermore, the
LMCI‑100 and LMCS-100 facilitate preparation of commissioning documentation, which is especially helpful for
LEED projects.
7
KEY FEATURES
The key features in LMCS 4.6.2 include:
• Ability to document a ‘project’ made up of multiple virtual ‘areas’, which may in turn contain additional ‘areas’
or ‘rooms’. A room is a container for a set of DLM devices. This documentation may be saved to disk for
later retrieval. Through this process an entire project utilizing DLM devices throughout the facility may be
documented in advance, or post installation via discovery.
• Capability of saving all parameters from all supported DLM devices on a DLM network prior to the boot load,
as well as on user command.
• Capability of performing a firmware update of all supported devices in the room to the latest available
firmware for the given device.
• Capability of restoring all parameters to all supported DLM devices on a DLM network after a firmware
update, as well as on user command.
• Ability to communicate to a ‘Room Network’ of Wattstopper DLM devices via a connection on the USB port of
the computer, utilizing the LMCI-100 Digital Computer to DLM interface.
• Ability to display and control Load status for loads on a Room Controller, as well as current power usage for
Room Controllers which support this data.
• Support for a specific set of DLM devices.
• For each supported device, the baseline of configuration parameters should be at a minimum the parameter
set that is supported by the LMCT-100 device handheld programmer.
• In addition to the standard baseline parameters, there is provisions for additional parameters to be set via
an ‘Advanced’ or ‘Technician’ mode of operation, which will allow further ability to configure devices. (All
parameters are device specific.)
• Ability to generate a number of advanced reports including Room Controller Settings, Occupancy Sensor
Settings, Switch Settings and Load Bindings reports.
• Access to LMBR-600 configuration application from within LMCS
WHAT’S NEW IN THIS VERSION
The new features added in LMCS 4.6.2 include:
Support for New Models
• LMBR-600 wireless router and LMBC-600 wireless network bridge. The LMBC-600 provides a network
connection for a room with DLM)devices. Once connected, the LMBC-600 can communicate to either the
DLM Segment Manager or a third party system using BACnet and exposes the status and parameters of
all room connected devices to the broader network. The wireless border router manages the creation and
configuration of the 6LoWPAN wireless network for up to 50 DLM rooms, and provides network connectivity
via wired Ethernet to a local area network (LAN).
• LMIN-104 digital input interface. The LMIN-104 Digital Input Interface Module allows integration of 3rd party
devices to the DLM Local Network. The LMIN-104 connects to the DLM local network. In addition to On/Off
control of loads, it can dim loads up and down, or send messages such as After Hours, Shed, or Force On to
the DLM local network based on external inputs.
• LMOR-102 low voltage dual relay interface. The LMOR-102 is an accessory interface device with two low
voltage mechanically held relays. Each relay can be assigned to any DLM device that can control an output,
which includes load or network buttons on a switch, occupancy sensors, input accessory device, and/or
a timeclock. This allows the two dry output contacts to control products that provide a 0-24V AC/DC input
signal.
New Features
• Access to LMBR-600 configuration application from within LMCS
Bug Fixes
• Fixed issue that could cause crash when clicking on the ‘Room Log’ filter cell in the BACnet Bootloader form
• Fixed an issue when using the Device List report that could cause a crash if every device in the scope of the
report was not associated with a bridge and every bridge was not associated with a Network.
8
SUPPORTED PRODUCTS
Currently, LMCS supports the following DLM products:
Room Controllers and Panels
Small Room Controllers
• LMRC-101, 102
Fixture Controllers
• LMFC-011 – Integrated Fixture Room Controller w/ 0-10v Dimming
• LMFC-LXI – Integrated CCT Fixture Room Controller
• LMLM-101 – Integrated CCT Fixture Room Controller
• LMPB-100 – DLM Local Network Power Booster
Enhanced Room Controllers
• LMRC-111, LMRC-111M, LMRC-112, LMRC-112M 0-10v Dimming Controllers
• LMRC-211, 212, 213 – 0-10v Dimming Controllers
• LMRC-221, 222 – Universal Dimming Controllers
Network Room Controllers (LMRCs w/ built in LMBC-300 – obsolete)
• LMRC-311, 312, 313 – 0-10v Dimming Controllers w/ built in LMBC-300
Plug Load Room Controllers
• LMPL-101 – Digital Plug Load Room Controller
• LMPL-201 – Digital Plug Load Room Controller w/ Current Monitoring
• LMPL-201DK – Digital Dekko Plug Load Room Controller (obsolete)
Panels
• LMCP-08 – 8 Relay Panel
• LMCP-24 – 24 Relay Panel
• LMCP-48 – 48 Relay Panel
Occupancy Sensors
•
•
•
•
•
LMDC-100 – Digital Dual Technology Ceiling Mount
LMPC-100 – Digital PIR Ceiling Mount
LMUC-100 – Digital Ultrasonic Ceiling Mount
LMDX-100 – Digital Dual Technology Corner Mount
LMPX-100 – Digital PIR Corner Mount
Switches
Switches
• LMSW-101 – 1-Button Digital Wall Switch
• LMSW-102 – 2-Button Digital Wall Switch
• LMSW-103 – 3-Button Digital Wall Switch
• LMSW-104 – 4-Button Digital Wall Switch
• LMSW-108 – 8-Button Digital Wall Switch
Dimmers
• LMDM-101 – Digital Dimming Wall Switch
• LMSW-105 – 5-Button Digital Scene Switch
CCT Enabled
• LMSW-105-CCT – 5-Button Digital CCT Switch
• LMTS-101-CCT – 1-Button CCT Timer Switch
9
Wall Switch Sensors
•
•
•
•
•
LMDW-101 – 1-Button Digital Dual Tech Wall Switch Occupancy Sensor
LMDW-102 – 2-Button Digital Dual Tech Wall Switch Occupancy Sensor
LMPD-102 – 2-Button Dekko Digital PIR Wall Switch Occupancy (obsolete)
LMPW-101 – 1-Button Digital PIR Wall Switch Occupancy Sensor
LMPW-102 – 2-Button Digital PIR Wall Switch Occupancy Sensor
Daylighting
• LMLS-400 – Single Zone Switching & Dimming Closed Loop Digital
• LMLS-500 – Three Zone Switching & Dimming Open Loop Digital
• LMLS-600 – Single Zone Switching & Dimming Dual-Loop Digital
Interfaces
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LMBC-300 – Digital Network Bridge
LMBC-600 – Wireless Digital Network Bridge
LMZC-301 – Zone Controller
ELCU-100 – Emergency Lighting Control Unit (Non-DLM Device for Documentation)
ELCU-200 – Emergency Lighting Control Unit (Non-DLM Device for Documentation)
LMDI-100 – Digital RS-232 Interface
WRC-TX-LM – RF Plug Load Controller
LMIN-104 – Digital Input Interface
LMIO-101 – Digital Input/Output Interface
LMIO-201 – Analog Sensor Interface
LMIO-301 – Digital Photocell Input Module
LMIO-102 – Digital Partition Device
LMOR-102 – Low Voltage Dual Relay Interface
LMPS-104 – Digital Partition Switch
Additional Components Displayed in Networks View
•
•
•
•
•
•
LMSM-3E or LMSM-6E – Segment Manager
LMNC (-3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or, MT) – Enclosures
NBSWITCH, NBSWITCH*, or NBSWITCH16 – Switches
NB-Router
LMBR-600 Wireless Router
Modems
10
INSTALLING THE LMCS-100 SOFTWARE
OPERATING SYSTEM ACCESS RIGHTS
The LMCS-100 software is targeted for the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system platform, suitable for installation
and use on a standard notebook (or desktop) computer.
As with all Microsoft® Windows 7, Windows XP professional and Windows Vista systems, in order to install
the software the installer must have local administrator access rights to the computer. If your computer is
administrated by your company’s IT department, a qualified IT representative may need to perform the installation.
SOFTWARE PACKAGES NEEDED
The following software packages are needed for correct operation of the LMCS-100 application.
• LMCI-100 Device Driver
• Microsoft .NET Framework 4
• LMCS-100 Application
• License Agreement
By installing the LMCS-100 software you are agreeing to the terms in the license agreement which can be found in
the “license.pdf” document in the top level directory of the CD.
INSTALLATION FROM THE WEB
Using any of the common browsers, download the installer by going to “www.legrand.us/wattstopper” and
searching for LMCS, or from the following address:
http://www.legrand.us/wattstopper/digital-lighting-management/configuration-controls/dlm-computer-interfacetools-and-software.aspx
If you will be using the LMCI-100 device then you will need to download both the LMCI-100 Device Driver and
the LMCS-100 installer. The LMCI-100 Device Driver should be installed before inserting the USB device into the
computer and before running LMCS-100.
If LMCS-100 is to be used for documentation purposes only, then you may skip the LMCI-100 installation and
proceed directly to the LMCS-100 installation.
After the download is complete, do the following to install the software:
Follow the instructions on the screen by first installing the LMCI-100 drivers (you can skip this step if they have
been installed previously) and then installing the application. The software will start up automatically once the
installation is complete, a new Icon (called LMCS-100) will appear on the desktop and a new program link will be
created on the Windows Startup menu.
NOTE: Your browser may be configured to warn you upon the installation software that the publisher cannot be
verified. This is expected and you should simply continue by clicking on “Run”.
LMCI-100 Device Driver
Install the device driver by double clicking the downloaded driver file. The software will normally pop up a
temporary command line window and automatically install the driver. No other indication will be given that the
installation has finished. If a command line window is not displayed then the device installer needs to be run again.
LMCS-100 Application
Double click the LMCS-100 MSI file downloaded from the web page above. The installer will automatically
determine the prerequisite software and install necessary packages as needed. LMCS-100 requires the “Microsoft
.NET Framework 4” in order to run. This package will only need to be installed the very first time LMCS-100 is
installed. This process may take a long time to complete. Subsequent updates will be much faster.
NOTE: The installation of this package (should your system need it) will take several minutes to complete.
CONNECTING THE LMCS-100 SOFTWARE TO A SINGLE ROOM
If connecting to an individual room, plug the LMCI-100 into an available USB port on the computer running the
LMCS-100 software. Plug an LMRJ cable from the DLM Local Network into the RJ45 port on the LMCI-100.
NOTE: You can start the software without the LMCI-100 USB dongle connected but the software will be in
OFFLINE mode. In order to communicate with the DLM network and subsequently upload or down-load
commissioning information to the network, the LMCI-100 must be connected to the computer’s USB port
before the software is started.
11
THE LMCS-100 USER INTERFACE
Start the LMCS-100 software by either double clicking on the green LMCS-100 icon on your desktop or by
selecting the program via the Windows Start menu.
The LMCS-100 application will automatically start up on the Home Tab and a ‘New Project’ is automatically
opened. A project consists of the settings for one or more of the devices in the DLM network. Normally, all of the
devices would be included in the project, either by adding them manually when offline, or discovering them when
online. Only a single project can be open at a time.
The ribbon at the top of the window contains three tabs: Home, Support, and Help. Two sections are found
below the ribbon. On the left are two tabs providing a Device View and Network View. On the right is Device
Information. At the bottom of the window is Connection drop-down. If working off-line leave this set to “No
Connection”. Otherwise, select the connection appropriate to the project you are working on.
If you double-click
here, you refresh
the list of all the
currently available
ways to connect to
the DLM system
For applications with multiple rooms networked together using BACnet, the available BACnet networks will show
up in the list. The “Remote Connection” value allows you to remotely connect to a Segment Manager via an
Internet connection for remote discovery, read, and send commands.
Home Tab
Home Tab
The Home tab includes the typical file and editing functions found in most applications. In addition, a number of
specialized functions are found in the Project section:
• Project – Enter details about the project. In addition, you can specify firmware versions for the various
devices used in the project. For details, see “Project Dialog” on page 18.
• Wiring – Document specific DLM Device details as they relate to the project drawings. For details, see
“Documenting Wiring Diagrams for Rooms” on page 30.
• Networks – Document BACnet router information. See “Network Documentation” on page 49.
• Holidays – Specify holidays, used for scheduling normal hours/after hours with the LMCP or LMZC. See
“Setting Up Holidays For Use With Schedules” on page 34.
12
• Discover – Discover devices connected to the network. This option is only enabled if you are connected to a
network. The connection type (LMCI-100, BACnet/IP, or Remote) will determine the Discovery process and
the steps that must be taken. See “Discovering Devices on a DLM Network” on page 34 and “Discovering
Devices on a BACnet/IP Network” on page 35.
• Sync Rooms – Synchronize the project file with the devices in multiple rooms in an area. This option is only
enabled if you are connected to a BACnet network. See “Synchronizing an Area” on page 47. Note that there
is a separate Sync Devices option for synchronizing devices for a single room,via BACnet or the LMCI-100. See
“Synchronizing a Room” on page 44.
• Tags – Create tags and assign rooms to the tags. When an LMCS-100 file is imported into the LMSM-3E and
LMSM-6E Segment Manager, these tags are used to create Custom Groups. Tags are also displayed when
viewing a specific room in LMCS. See “Creating Tags for a Project” on page 27.
• Network Group – In this dialog, you create groups and assign loads (or relays in a panel) to these groups.
Network Group ID’s can be assigned to Switches, Occupancy Sensors, and Schedules for control functions.
This feature is designed to operate in conjunction with the LMCP, LMZC, and LMBC product lines. See
“Creating Network Groups” on page 30.
• Reports – Allows you to select and run a report. See “Reports” on page 115.
• Device Grid – In the device grid, all devices in the project are listed in a grid similar to a spreadsheet. This
provides the ability to quickly view settings for multiple devices, and copy and paste settings from one device
to another. See “Using the Device Grid to View and Program Parameters” on page 109.
Support Tab
The Support tab contains a number of specialized functions, including upgrading firmware, setting user
preferences, and comparing two different project files.
• Update Firmware – Update the firmware of DLM devices in the network. See “Update Firmware” on page 53.
• Diff Tool – This utility provides the ability to compare two different LMCS project files. For example, at a site where
rooms are not functioning as designed anymore, you can discover the entire site into another LMCS file, save it,
and then compare it to the original LMCS file used during start-up. See “Difference Tool” on page 59.
• LMCP Site Time – Set the time and location for any LMCP panels in the project. The location is used to determine
sunrise and set times, for use with scheduling. This function also allows you to define a “Master Panel” Other
panels will then synchronize their clocks to that panel. See “DLM Site Time/Location” on page 60.
• CAD Import – Imports a .CSV file that was generated from AutoCAD drawings. This feature requires the
AutoCAD drawings to be developed utilizing the Wattstopper CAD resources and BIM objects. The imported
rooms can then be associated with a template room to automate setup of device parameters. See “Importing
Rooms From a CAD File” on page 25.
• Rename Rooms – Imports Room Names, Room Sq. Ft., and Load Shed Percent from a .CSV file. This
function makes mass changes to the DLM file and is useful for removing unwanted characters from Room
names or to easily make changes to the names. See “Rename Rooms” on page 62.
• Device Pairing – With this utility, you can scan the label from a specific device (using a USB scanner) and
assign that device’s serial number to a specific device in a specific room. See “Automating Serial Number
Entry with the Device Pairing Utility” on page 43.
• Preferences – Edit LMCS preferences. See “Preferences” on page 63.
Help Tab
• About – Displays the welcome screen, which shows the version number of this installation of LMCS.
• Change History – Opens a browser window displaying information about features and changes in the current
and previous versions.
• Help – Opens a dialog providing a link to the current version of this guide.
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• Skins – You can change the look and feel of the application screens by selecting different skins. Click the left
or right arrows to cycle through the skins. Or, when you hover the mouse over the skins area, a small arrow
appears at the bottom of that area. Click that arrow to open a pop-up dialog which displays all the skins. Click
on a skin to select it.
Click to open pop-up
showing all skins
Devices View and Networks View Tabs (Navigation Trees)
Under the ribbon, on the left side of the window, are two tabs. The Devices tab provides a view of all devices in
the project, in a tree format. The Networks tab provides device counts on the various network related devices.
The section of the window can be resized by dragging the right edge.
Devices Navigation Tree
When a new project is opened, the Devices navigation tree will consist of only a single icon, New Building, as
shown in the screenshot on page 12. Once a project is developed, the tree provides a hierarchical view of all
areas, rooms, and individual devices in the DLM network, as shown below.
NOTE: While the default name for the top level icon is “New Building”, it is possible to have multiple buildings
networked together and configured within a single project.
Click on the arrows next to the icons to expand or contract the tree. Click on an icon or name to select that area/
room/device.
Example of the Navigation Tree for a Completed Project
Rick-Click Options in the Navigation Tree
If you right-click on the description next to an icon in the tree, a number of editing and other functions are
available. The functions are context sensitive, and will vary, depending on the item you select. Two options allow
you to collapse or expand the entire tree. Cut, Copy, Paste, and Delete functions are available along with Refresh,
which updates the Information section for that item back to its initial view.
For rooms, additional functions are available including the Device Grid, Tag Editor, Room Synchronization, and
Reports. For areas, there are further additional functions including adding an area or room, enabling/disbling after
hours support, and running discovery.
NOTE: If you select a Report by right-clicking on a room or area, that report will be run for that room or area only
(as opposed to selecting a Reports in the Home tab, which will be run for the entire project).
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Networks View
The Networks tab provides the ability to document the network components used to communicate with the DLM
network, including modems, switches, routers, and the Wattstopper Segment Manager. Once added on the
Networks tab, they are included in the Line Riser Diagram (see page 128).
When a new project is opened, the Networks navigation tree will display a New Project icon.
Once a project is developed, the tree provides a hierarchical view of all network components, as shown below.
Device Information
To the right of the tree is the Network/Area/Room/Device Information section. This section is context sensitive, and
changes depending on the currently selected tab, and what is highlighted in the navigation tree.
Network Information
On the Networks tab, when selecting the top level project icon, this section consists of a set of parameters that
show the number of each type of device, plus a button to add buildings (a project can consist of multiple building
and multiple networks).
Info Section with Project Highlighted
If you highlight a building icon, the display changes. Buttons appear that allow you to add network components.
See “Manually Adding Network Components” on page 19 for information on adding specific components.
NOTE: You cannot enter numbers in the Network Device Counts section. Instead these increment when you click
the buttons that appear depending on the type of network device highlighted in the tree.
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Info Section with Building Highlighted
Area/Room/Device Information
On the Devices tab, when selecting the top level icon or an area icon, this section consists of a set of buttons for
adding areas and rooms. If the software is connected online to a network, buttons for discovering devices and
sending/receiving information from devices are enabled. The Notes field is also available for adding comments.
Info Section with Area Highlighted
If you select a room, this section consists of buttons allowing you to add devices to the room. Similar to an area,
buttons for discovering devices and sending/receiving data are also available if the software is online with the DLM
network. Additionally, functions specific to rooms are available under the Advanced tab and the Scenes section.
Info Section with Room Highlighted
These fields appear only if a device that supports partitioning has
been added to the room (LMDI-100, LMIO-102, LMPS-104)
If you select an individual device within a room, this section displays the programmable parameters for that device.
For most devices, there are two different sets of tabs. Typically, the top section contains the settings global to the
device, while the bottom part contains separate tabs for the individual parts of the device—for example, buttons in
a switch or loads in a room controller, as shown in the following example. Tabs for Normal Hours and After Hours
are also found here, for devices that can be programmed to respond to normal/after hours commands, provided
the After Hours Enabled checkbox is selected.
Because many devices have a large number of programmable parameters, and to improve readability on the
screen, parameters are normally divided into a Basic tab and Advanced tab, with the most commonly used
parameters found on the Basic tab. Additionally, a Technician tab contains additional parameters intended for
use only by a Wattstopper technician or other expert with LMCS software.
NOTE: The Technician tab is displayed only if the Show Technician Pages option in the Preferences dialog.
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Device Information for a Room Controller
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CREATING A PROJECT
Projects can be created off-line or while connected to the DLM network. Many projects are typically initially
created off-line, then the project is used by the technician to synchronize devices and make final adjustments.
However, it is also possible to create a project by connecting to the network and then discovering the devices.
This might be done with a small installation. Both methods are described in this section.
CREATING A PROJECT OFF-LINE
LMCS can be used to create a Project file prior to the equipment being installed in a building. In this way, device
parameters can be defined before the start up technician arrives at the site.
There are two main methods for creating a project offline:
• Manually add areas and rooms, then assign individual DLM devices to the rooms. Once a room is created and
the devices configured, you can copy and paste that room to create additional rooms. So, if there are multiple
rooms set up in a similar manner, you can quickly configure them. Network components are also added
manually.
• Import a .CSV file that was generated from AutoCAD drawings. This feature requires the AutoCAD drawings
to be developed utilizing the Wattstopper CAD resources and BIM objects. The imported rooms can then be
associated with a template room to automate setup of device parameters. See “Importing Rooms From a CAD
File” on page 25. This feature does not apply to network components.
Naming a Project
When LMCS starts up, it automatically opens a new project. Click the Project icon on the Home tab to open the
Project dialog.
Project Dialog
1. Enter a Name for the project. By default, this name is selected when you save the project file, but it is
possible to change the name of the file to something different from the name defined here.
NOTE: The name you give to the project will appear on various reports. It also appears at the top of the
LMCS window.
2. If desired, enter Project Notes.
3. The Project Firmware section allows you to specify which version of firmware should be used for an
individual DLM device. Use this feature to “lock down” the firmware used for a project. Once you do this, the
Update Firmware utility on the Support tab will be set to the folder you specify here, and can’t be changed.
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Click Import. A folder selection dialog opens. Navigate to the desired folder and click OK. You can only
import files from a single folder, so the folder must contain all the firmware that you want to “lock down”. (If
you import another from another folder, it overwrites the first one.) For any devices that are not included,
LMCS will use the Factory Default versions included with the current version of LMCS when updating
firmware.
Once imported, the firmware is included within the .dlm project file. In this way, you can email the .dlm file to
a technician at a site and do not need to provide any referenced files.
The Export button provides the opposite functionality. If you receive a .dlm file with embedded firmware, you
can export those files to a folder for back-up purposes, or use with another project file.
For more details updating firmware, see “Update Firmware” on page 53.
4. Close the dialog and return to the main window.
Manually Adding Network Components
NOTE: Adding network components is not necessary for LMCS to read from and send information to the various
DLM devices in a project. Its purpose is to provide a more complete view of the project, including the
ability to generate riser diagrams (see page 128).
On the Networks tab, the top level icon in the tree is named “Project”, but it can be changed to something more
meaningful.
Top Level of the Networks Tab
1. Click Add Building. Then highlight the building icon in the tree.
Networks Tab with Building Highlighted
2. At this point you can add Enclosures, Segment Managers, Switches, and Routers to the building. For
Enclosures, Segment Managers, and Switches, a drop-down allows you to select the specific model.
When adding an Enclosure, Switches and Routers are added automatically as children of the enclosure,
based on the model, as shown in the following screenshot. The exception to this is the LMNC-MT which is an
empty cabinet.
NOTE: While the Segment Manager can be installed in an enclosure, it is not automatically added because
it is ordered separately. Additionally, while it is possible to add a Segment manger manually, it you
perform a remote discovery, it will be added automatically, along with any routers it is connected to.
For details on remote connection see “Discovering Devices Remotely” on page 39.
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Parent/Child Relationships in the Tree
Depending on the component highlighted in the tree, different buttons appear allowing you to add certain items as
children of that item in the tree. Once added to the tree, a network device can be dragged to another spot, as long
as it follows the parent/child rules.
• Buildings can be added under the root Project. (Note that the root project is represented with a building icon in
the tree, but is in fact the project itself.)
• Enclosures can only be added under a Building
• Switches can be added under a Building, an Enclosure, or another Switch.
• Segment Managers can be added under a Building, Enclosure, or Switch. Note that while it is possible to add
multiple Segment Managers under a single Enclosure, in practice an Enclosure would normally contain only
one Segment Manager.
• Routers can be added under a Building, Enclosure, Switch, or Segment Manager.
• A single Modem can be added under an Enclosure, Switch, or Segment Manager. Only modem can be added
per building.
• When you add a Segment Manager or Router, a Network icon is automatically added underneath the Segment
Manager or Router. For an LMSM-3E, three Network icons are added since it can communicate with three
separate networks.
• A Bridge Harness can be added under a Network icon.
• A Bridge can be added under a Network icon or Bridge Harness. Up to 6 Bridges can be connected to a single
harness. If Bridges are added within the Devices tab as part of a room, they will show up under a “building”
named Unassigned Devices on the Networks tab, at which point they can be moved to the correct spot on
the tree. A drop-down allows you to choose the model of the bridge. Bridges include the LMBC-300 Bridge
and LMBC-600 Wireless Bridge, along with different panel models and the LMZC-301, all of which include a
bridge.
Indicating Connection in Parallel Switches
Switches that are in different enclosures (or even outside of enclosures), may or may not be directly connected
together. LMCS provides the ability to indicate whether or not these switches are connected. When a switch is
highlighted a box appears on the right hand side title Parallel Switches.
In the following example, There are two enclosures. One enclosure (Enclosure 2) has a single 16 port switch
(Switch 3), while the other (Enclosure 1) has a 16 port switch (Switch 1) with an 8 port switch (Switch 2) as a child.
When Enclosure 1 is selected,the Parallel Switches box shows only Switch 3. Switch 2 is not shown because the
fact that it is a child implies that they are directly connected.
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If you select the checkbox, that indicates that Switch 1 and Switch 3 are connected. If you then view Switch 3, it
will show Switch 1 connected.
As shown in the diagram to the left, below, if you highlight Switch 3, both Switch 1 and Switch 2 are available
options in the Parallel Switches list, since you can physically connect to either one of them. As shown in the
diagram to the right, once you select one of them, the other one will disappear from the list. That is because
since they are already connected due to the parent child relationship, connecting to one of them means you are
connected to both of them.
Manually Adding Areas, Rooms, and Devices
When LMCS starts up, it automatically opens a new project. By default, the top level of the Devices tab is named
“New Building”, but can be changed to something more meaningful.
NOTE: The name entered here is used to label the top level of the tree, but is not used for anything else.
Top Level of the Devices Tab
A single LMCS file can include the information on all rooms and devices in a building. However, in larger projects,
it can be more practical to create a project for each wing or each floor in a building, in which case you would want
to rename the top level. This can speed up performance. Note that it is also possible for multiple buildings to be
part of a single project, if they are connected via BACnet. But it is best practice to use separate project files for
each building, or section of a building.
You should also give a meaningful name to the Project itself.
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Adding an Area
A project can consist simply of a set of rooms and their devices. But for larger spaces, it is often practical to divide
the building into areas such as floors, wings, or sections.
Click Add Area. A new area is added to the tree. (If it is not displayed in the tree, click the arrow to expand the
tree.) Name the area and add any Notes, if desired.
It is possible to create sub-areas within an area. Simply highlight an area in the tree and click Add Area again.
This is no limit to the number of areas or sub-areas you can create.
NOTE: Just like a file/folder tree, you can rearrange the areas and rooms in the tree by highlighting and dragging
them to a different location.
NOTE: If using the LMSM-3E or LMSM-6E Segment Manager, areas are used to create Location Groups.
Adding a Room
1. Highlight an area in the tree and click Add Room.
2. Expand the tree to show the room and click on the room to display the room parameters in the information
section.
Room Parameters
3. Enter a Name for the room. A maximum of 32 characters are allowed.
4. If desired, enter a Tag for the room. Tags are used with the LMSM-3E or LMSM-6E Segment Manager. When
an LMCS file is imported into the Segment Manager, the tags are used to create Custom Groups. All rooms
within a custom group can then be viewed together for power monitoring purposes.
There are two ways to create tags. You can enter any text in the field here and once you tab or click out
of the field, the tag is created. Or you can create tags and assign rooms to them in the Tags editor. See
“Creating Tags for a Project” on page 27 for details. One advantage of using the Tags editor is that an
additional description field is available for each tag.
A room can have more than one tag. If you enter a space between two words in this field, a tag is created
for each word. (A tag cannot include a space.) Or if you click out of the field and back into it, you can enter
another tag. To delete a tag, click the “X” next to it.
Tags should only contain letters, numbers, or the underscore character—no other special characters or
spaces. They should be entered in camelCase—the first letter should be lower case, with the subsequent
first letter of additional words in uppercase. For example, southWing or south_Wing.
5. The Total Watts field is a calculated field that adds the total amount of watts used by each room controller
assigned to the room.
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6. If the After Hours Enabled checkbox is selected, any device which responds to normal hours/after hours
scheduling commands (for example, occupancy sensors) will have both a Normal Hours tab and After
Hours tab. If this checkbox is not selected the After Hours tab will not be visible.
7. Enter any Notes needed for documentation purposes.
NOTE: If the room is created by using the Discovery process instead of manually creating it, information
about the discovery will appear here.
NOTE: The section above describes the parameters on the Basic tab only. The Advanced tab applies once
LMCS is online and communicating with the devices in the room. See “Real Time Room Control–The
Advanced Tab For Rooms” on page 50 for details.
Adding Devices to a Room
The Add Devices menu provides access to all of the available DLM room devices that can be added to a room.
With a room selected in the tree, use the drop-down menus to add the devices to the room.
Add a Device
Once the device is added, it shows up in the Tree. A small icon shows the device type, with the device name next
to it. Some devices such as Room Controllers and Switches have additional elements that can be displayed by
clicking the down-arrow beside the device.
If you enter a Description in the Device Information section, it is included in the tree in brackets, as shown below.
NOTE: By default, when an LMBC bridge is added, the room name is copied into the description field.
Devices added to a Room
Once a device is added to the room, highlight that device in the tree to access the parameters for that device. A
complete description of all device parameters is described in the section “Programming Parameters for Individual
Devices” on page 64.
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NOTE: When working off-line, some fields are not available and will be grayed out. These fields will be active
either while LMCS is connected live to the room or after an installed room has been discovered by LMCS.
Copying and Pasting Areas, Rooms, and Devices in the Tree
If you click on an item in the tree and then copy that item, you can paste the copy to another spot in the tree. If you
copy a room, all associated devices are copied. If you copy an area, all rooms within that area and the associated
devices are copied.
All of the device parameters are copied, with the exception of the serial number (and the device ID in the case of
bridges, panels, and zone controllers). The serial numbers are set to a default value of 0 and the device ID to -1 in
the copy.
NOTE: If you move devices from one room to another by dragging, serial numbers and device IDs are retained.
Also, if you have the Show Technician Pages option selected on the Preferences dialog,then if you
right-click on a new room, you will see a Paste Special menu option in addition to the normal paste
option. This option will also copy serial numbers.
In this way, it is easy to set-up a room’s device parameter, and then copy all of the programming to other rooms
quickly. Be sure to change the Description after pasting the new room to avoid confusion.
Copying and pasting is available using the buttons on the Home tab, right-clicking on an item in the tree, and with
the standard Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V keyboard shortcuts.
Adding Bridges, Zone Controllers, or Panels
When creating a project file that will connect with more than one room via a BACnet based Segment network,
each room will require an LMBC-300 network bridge, LMBC-600 wireless network bridge, or an LMCP panel
or LMZC-301 zone controller, which both have built in network bridges. A room can have only a single bridge.
Therefore, if you add any one of these models to a room, you will not be able to add the other models (they will be
disabled from selection in the drop-down menu).
Profile and Partitioning Support for a Room
If you add a device to the room that supports profiles (currently, the LMDI-100, LMIO-102, and LMPS-104),
additional parameters appear under the Name parameter, as shown below:
Profile and Partitioning Parameters
A profile allows the DLM system to work with up to 4 movable walls. Many DLM devices (but not daylighting
controllers) will keep track of up to 16 different sets of their programmable parameters. Each parameter set is a
profile. An individual profile can then be selected in real time by using the LMPS-104 Partition Switch.
To choose a profile, enter the profile number and then click Set Room Profile. All devices that can store profile
data will display the current profile on the Basic tab for the device. Once you set the parameter values for the
various devices for a profile, you can go back and set a new room profile, then return to the various devices and
set the parameter values for the new profile. When you click Send to send device parameters from LMCS to the
device, all profiles are sent, not just the currently selected profile.
NOTE: If there is no device in the room that support setting the profile, then the Basic tab for the device will not
show a current profile. In that case, all parameter data is stored in profile 1, which is the default.
The Partition Support checkbox is selected and disabled for the LMIO-102 and LMPS-104. For the LMDI-100,
the parameter is enabled and is not selected by default. You must select the check box if you want to use profiles
with the LMDI-100.
Creating and Editing Scenes
Scenes allow you to set multiple loads to different levels and control the transition time to those levels. Scenes
can be triggered from a button, occupancy sensor, scheduled event, or dark/light event. There are sixteen scenes
available per room. However, if the room includes an interface that supports profiles, each profile can have its own
set of sixteen scenes. Scene parameters for each load are stored in the room controller, zone controller, or panel
in which the load exists.
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Scene Selection
Select a scene and click Edit to open the Scene Editor dialog, where you edit the values for each load. The editor
opens with the current scene selected, but you can switch between scenes in the editor, so you can program multiple
scenes without having to return to the room dialog. Changes in the editor are sent in real time to the associated
controllers, if connected to the system. Note that the changes to the scene are not stored unless you click Send.
If you are currently connected to the room, the Activate button will be enabled. If you select a scene and click this
button, the command to call up that scene is sent to the controller.
Scene Editor
Description – Provides a description shown whenever viewing a list of scenes for the room.
Follow – Select the checkbox if you want the load to follow the scene. If a load should not follow the scene
(for example, a light at a whiteboard), leave its checkbox unchecked, and all settings for that row will be
disabled.
Load – The load Description is displayed.
Target Level – The level the load will go to when the scene is selected.
Level – This is the numerical value that matches the position of the Target Level slider.
Fade Time – There are two possible values: “Use Scene” will use the amount of time specified with the
Scene Fade Time slider. “Use Load” will use the amount of time specified with the Fade Time parameter on
the load’s Advanced tab.
Scene Fade Time – The amount of time it will take to go from the load’s current level to the Target Level.
Applies only if “Use Scene” is selected in the Fade Time column.
The Scene and Load columns show the current value of the two different fade times, but only one of them
will be enabled at a time, depending on the value of the Fade Time column.
Importing Rooms From a CAD File
Instead of manually creating rooms and assigning devices, you can import a .CSV file that was generated from
AutoCAD drawings. This feature requires the AutoCAD drawings to be developed utilizing the Wattstopper CAD
resources and BIM objects, and a .csv export created within the program using an AutoCAD list routine.
Normally each floor (or other grouping of rooms) is exported as a separate .CSV file.
Each .CSV file is imported into an area, created during the import process. If you have two .CSV files that you
want to combine into a single area within LMCS, you must import each file into a differently named area, then drag
the rooms from one area to another to combine them.
In addition to importing the rooms and assigned devices, LMCS provides the ability to associate those rooms
with parameter values stored in a template. The template file will contain the various types of rooms, for example,
office, conference room, open office area, and so on.
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CAD Import
1. Click CAD Import on the Support tab to open the CAD Import dialog.
2. Click the top Browse button and select the .CSV file to import. The left side of the window displays a list of
the rooms in the file. If you want to view the devices assigned to that room, click the “+” next to that room.
3. Enter the New Area Name.
4. If not using a template file, click Import. A warning message will appears stating that the rooms are not
associated with a template. Click Yes. The log section of the window reports the status of the import.
5. If using a template file, click the bottom browse button and select the template file. To associate a room
with a room type, click a room in the left side of the window to select it, then select the Room Type from the
corresponding drop-down. Repeat this process for the other rooms, then click Import. If not all of the rooms
in the imported CAD file are matched with a room type, a warning message will appear. If you click Yes,
those rooms will import with default values while the other import the values from the template file. The log
section at the bottom will indicate the number of rooms imported.
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6. Once the import is complete, you can select another file to import and repeat the import process. Once all
files are imported, click Close. The areas you created and associated imported rooms will show up in the
tree on the left.
Limitations When Using Templates to Populate Device Parameters
A template file can contain multiple rooms, and each room can include settings for multiple devices, but you can
only have one instance of a single device. So for example, you can’t have two LMSW-101 switches included in
a room. Therefore, if the room being imported from the CAD file does have two of those switches, both of those
switches will be set to the same parameter values.
When importing the .CSV file, LMCS will check to see if a device in the imported file is also in the selected room
in the template file. If there is, it will copy and paste all the device parameter values into the imported room. If a
device in the imported file does not exist in the template file, LMCS will use the default values for that device and
no error will occur.
NOTE: If the template file happens to include device serial numbers, they are not copied since each device must
have a unique number.
When creating the template file, select “DLM Template file” from the Save as type drop-down in the Save dialog.
Creating Tags for a Project
As mentioned in the section on manually creating a project, you can assign tags to a room for use with Segment
Manager’s Custom Groups. You can enter these tags individually for each room. But a more efficient way of
assigning tags is available. First, manually enter or import all rooms in the project. Then click Tags on the Home
tab to open the Tag Editor dialog.
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Tag Editor
Adding Tags and Assigning Them to Rooms
1. Click Add in the top section of the dialog to add a tag Name. Enter a Description, if desired. Tags should
only contain letters, numbers, or the underscore character—no other special characters or spaces. They
should be entered in camelCase—the first letter should be lower case, with the subsequent first letter of
additional words in uppercase. For example, southWing or south_Wing. There are no restrictions on the
Description.
When an LMCS project is imported into the Segment Manager, the Segment Manager will use the tag
Description to create a Custom Group. If no Description is available, the Segment Manager will user the
tag Name, but will convert it from the camelCase format. So for example, “southWing” will be converted to
“South Wing”.
2. Repeat to add more tags.
3. To assign rooms to a tag, select that tag in the list, then select the rooms in the Available Rooms list to assign
to that tag. Like any typical list, you can Shift+click to select a range or Ctrl+click to select multiple individual
rooms. Then click Add Selected to move those rooms to the Included Rooms list.
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4. Select another tag from the top list and repeat the process. Once tags are assigned, you can click on any
tag in the list and the Included Rooms list will show the assigned rooms. When complete, click Close. Tags
assigned in the tag editor will appear in the Tag field when viewing a room’s parameters.
Working With Tag Categories
Tag Categories provide a set of standardized tags which can be added to the project. This allows for consistency
between projects as well as a quick way to add tags. There are two ways to add categories and tags—you can
enter them within LMCS, or you can import an xml file with previously created categories and tags.
1. To add or edit tags in an existing category, click Edit Categories to open the Tag Category Editor.
Tag Category Editor
2. Click Add Category and type the category name in the pop-up dialog, then click Add to return to the
category editor. The category you created is now shown in the drop-down
3. Click Add to add a tag to the current category and enter the Name and Description. Add more tags to the
category as needed.
Add more categories and associated tags as needed. If you need to change the name or description of a tag
in a category, select that category from the drop-down, highlight the tag and make changes as needed.
4. Click Save Changes to save the categories and associate tags.
NOTE: You can’t change the name of an existing category. Instead you must remove the category, the
create a new category and recreate the associated tags.
5. Once you close the Tag Category Editor, the categories will show up in the drop-down list of the Tag Editor:
6. Select a category from the drop-down and click Add Category. The tags related to that category are added
to the list.
7. The second way to add categories is to import them from a previously created custom file. Click Import
Categories and select the file. The categories and tags will be stored in the ‘TagLibraryDb.xml’ file contained
in the C:\ProgramData\LMCS system folder. Importing data from a new file will append the entries from the
new file into the TagLibraryDb file. Note that if a category or tags within that category already exists in the file,
they can not be in the file you are importing or the import will fail.
If you want to create your own categories/tags file to import, the format is as follows:
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<TagLibraryDb>
<TagCategory>
<Name>Medical</Name>
<Tag>
<Category>Medical</Category>
<Name>DoctorOffice</Name>
<Description>Doctors Office</Description>
</Tag>
<Tag>
<Category>Medical</Category>
<Name>WaitingRoom</Name>
<Description>Waiting Room</Description>
</Tag>
...(more tags)
</TagCategory>
...(more categories)
</TagLibraryDb>
Documenting Wiring Diagrams for Rooms
LMCS provides the ability to document specific DLM Device details as they relate to the project drawings. This
information is printed in the Typical Wiring report. Click Wiring on the Home tab to open the Typical Wiring dialog.
Typical Wiring
All device types currently assigned to rooms in the project will be included in the list. You can also add device types
by selecting them from the drop-down and clicking Add Device Type. Enter the Sheet number and Detail number for
each device type. To delete a device type from the list, highlight the item and click Remove Device Type.
Creating Network Groups
If you have panels, zone controllers, or LMBC-300/LMBC-600 bridges included in your project, you have the
ability to create network groups. If multiple panels/bridges are networked together, all loads from different panels/
bridges that are assigned to the same group will respond to commands sent to that group. So, for example, you
might have panels on three different floors and assign the relays controlling the corridors on each floor to the same
group number. You can then control all corridors on those floors together.
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NOTE: Any reference to panels in the text below also applies to the LMZC-301 zone controller, which has the
same capabilities as a LMCP panel, but without any included relays. Instead it controls multiple connected
LMFC-011 fixture controllers or other load controllers, via the DLM network.
Each group includes parameters that allow control of normal hours/after hours behavior of the load(s). You can use
groups to turn loads on or off control how sensors function. Additionally, you can assign switches or occupancy
sensors to control a network group instead of specific loads, so a single switch could control loads in different
rooms.
Each panel has 99 memory slots and each bridge has 16 memory slots for storing group parameters. However,
there are 65,534 group numbers available. You select any group number and save it (along with values for the
parameters) into the panel or bridge. The group number and associated values are stored in any available slot in
memory. In this way multiple panels/bridges can be networked together and allow both coordinated load behavior
(when the group numbers match between panels/bridges) and independent behavior (when the group numbers
are unique to a panel or bridge). So, for example, if Group 1 includes loads 1, 2, and 3 in Panel A and loads 4, 5,
and 6 in Panel B, then Group 1 parameters will be stored in a memory slot in both Panels A and B. On the other
hand, if Group 1 include only loads in Panel A, then the group will be stored only in a Panel A memory slot.
NOTE: If you are using an LMCT-100 remote controller to do any programming or editing of parameters on site,
be aware that the LMCT-100 can only access group numbers 0-99.
Once you have created enough groups so that the memory locations in a specific panel or bridge have reached
the maximum, then the loads in that panel or bridge cannot be assigned to any more groups.
NOTE: If you want to use network groups to control loads in room controllers, they must be connected to an
LMBC-300 bridge with version 7.xx or later firmware, or to an LMBC-600 wireless bridge. To update
firmware, see “Update Firmware” on page 53.
NOTE: In order to create a network group, you must assign at least one load to that group on the global Network
Group dialog. However, once the group has been created, there are two places where you can assign
loads to the group and set the parameter values. The first is on this dialog. In this dialog, you have the
ability to select loads from different panels or room controllers connected to bridges. There is also a
Network Groups tab in the Information section when viewing an LMCP panel, LMBC-300, LMBC-600, or
LMZC-301. That tab will only display groups associated with that device. It is important to note that if you
create a group on the global Network Group dialog and then go to view the group on a Network Groups
tab that includes loads that are part of the group, the parameter values are not automatically transferred to
the tab unless you have Applied the group, as described in the step 5 below.
NOTE: A maximum of 32 occupancy sensors can be assigned to control a load. This applies whether the sensor
is controlling the load directly or if it is assigned to control a group.
1. To assign loads to groups, click Network Group on the Home tab to open the Network Group dialog.
Network Group
2. By default, the first group is set to Group ID “1” but can be changed to any number.
3. Enter values for all the programmable parameters (described in the next section).
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4. Select one or more of the loads from the Available Loads list and click Add Loads to move those loads
to the Included Loads list. Like any typical list, you can Shift+click to select a range or Ctrl+click to select
multiple individual loads. Or click Add All to assign all the loads to the group.
5. Click the arrow in the Apply column. This will copy the parameter values selected for this group to the
Network Groups tab for any panels or bridges associated with the assigned loads. It will also copy the
parameter values to the Normal Hours/After Hours tabs for the associated relays and room controllers.
6. To add another group, click Add in the top section and repeat the process.
7. Once multiple groups are assigned, you can view the loads assigned to them by clicking in the first column
so that it has a “”. The Included Loads list changes to show the loads for that group. While the group is
selected, you can edit any of the parameter values, or click Remove to delete that group.
NOTE: Once the groups are setup and applied, you must still Send the information to the devices. See “Sending
Project Data to Devices” on page 48 for details.
If you are currently connected to the panel or bridge via BACnet, you will see two additional columns on the right
hand side of the parameters table, labeled On and Off. Click the buttons in those columns to send a Group On or
Group Off message to the panel or bridge. When the group is turned On, all the loads assigned to that group will
respond, based on the programming for that group. This allows you to test group behavior. Note that you must
have first sent the group parameters to the panels or bridges.
NOTE: Keep in mind that values displayed on this window are not necessarily the current values for the individual
loads. Once the group parameters have been sent to the panel or bridge, then if a message to select this
group is sent via BACnet, the panel or bridge will call up those values. But if another device then sends
a value to a load (for example, if a user presses a switch that selects a scene), the new value will be in
effect.
Group On/Off buttons for Network Groups
Network Group Parameters
Group ID – This can be any number between 1 and 65,534.
Description – Enter any meaningful description for the group, if desired. By default, the description lists the
group ID.
Blink Type – Blink is the amount of minutes load stays ON, when a scheduled event occurs that switches the
load OFF when transitioning from Normal Hours to After Hours. Blink provides a warning to the user that load
is going to turn off. The load will turn off and then quickly turn back on, then the Override LED for that load
(on the room controller or panel) will blink continuously for the time period. The LEDs for all switches bound
to loads that are part of that group will also blink continuously. Pressing the button will keep the load ON and
the time delay countdown will start. When the countdown reaches 0, the blink function re-occurs.
The Blink Type has four values:
• None – No blink is used.
• Use Time – Blink is set to the amount entered in the Blink Time column.
• Use Load Time – Blink is set to the value of the Blink Warn Grace Time parameter on the Advanced
tab/Normal Hours tab. Note that if the Use Blink Warn checkbox on that tab is not selected, then no
blink is used.
• Reset to Load Time – This is identical to the “Use Load Time” value.
NOTE: Blink does not apply when transitioning from After Hours to Normal Hours.
Blink Time – Amount of time before the load turns off, if Blink Type is set to “Use Time”.
NH TDelay Mode – If a load is commanded to turn ON when the schedule switches to Normal Hours, the
load will automatically turn OFF after the time delay expires. If the load is turned on manually by a switch
after the schedule switches to Normal Hours, the load will again automatically turn OFF after the time delay
expires.
The Time Delay Mode has four values:
• None – No delay occurs (the load will not time out during normal hours).
• Use Time – Time Delay is set to the amount entered in the NH TDelay column.
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• Use Load Time – Time Delay is set to the amount of time specified in the Override Time Till Off
parameter on the Advanced tab/Normal Hours tab for the load.
• Reset to Load Time – This is identical to the “Use Load Time” value.
NH TDelay – Amount of time delay if NH TDelay Mode is set to “Use Time”. If set to “0”, the load will not time
out during normal hours
AH TDelay Mode – Identical to NH TDelay Mode, but the behavior occurs when the schedule switches to
After Hours. (The “Use Time” value applies to the AH TDelay column and the “Use Load Time” value applies
to the After Hours tab .)
This works in conjunction with Blink.
AH TDelay – Amount of time delay if AH TDelay Mode is set to “Use Time”.
AH to NH – Behavior of the relay when Normal Hours begins. Available values:
• Go To Level – Sets loads to the level specified in the AH to NH Level column
• Last Non-Zero – Returns to load to the last value that was not 0 (completely off)
• Do Nothing – No change occurs
• Last Non-Zero Occupied – Returns to load to the last value that was not 0 (completely off) if the room
has an occupancy sensor and the sensor indicates the room is occupied. If the room is unoccupied or if
there no sensor in the room, there is no change to the load.
• Use Loads – Sets loads to the value of the Preset Level parameter on the Basic tab/Normal Hours
tab. Note that if the Use Last Level checkbox on that tab is not selected, then the last non-zero value is
used.
• Turn Off – Turns load off
AH to NH Level – Level the load goes to if AH to NH is set to “Go To Level”
NH to AH – Identical to AH to NH, but the behavior occurs when the schedule switches to After Hours. (The
“Go To Level” value applies to the NH to AH column and the “Use Loads” value applies to the After Hours
tab.)
NH to AH Level – Level the load goes to if NH to AH is set to “Go To Level”
NH Sensor – Determines how the relay responds to sensor input during Normal Hours. Possible values are:
• Nothing – Load does not respond to occupancy sensor
• Off Only – Responds to sensor input when vacancy is detected but not when occupancy is detected
• On Only – Responds to sensor input when occupancy is detected but not when vacancy is detected
• On/Off – Responds to sensor input for both occupancy and vacancy detection
• Off Only Internal – Responds to vacancy commands only. Instead of using the default value of one
minute for the blink warn feature, the sensor will use the amount of time entered in the Blink Warn Grace
Time parameter. (This is labelled “Follow Off Only With Blink Warn Grace Time” in the Sensor Mode
parameter on the Basic tab/Normal Hours tab for the load or relay. )
• On Only Internal – The load responds only to Occupancy commands and once the load is on, it will
not shut off for the length of time entered in the Override Time Till Off parameter. If the sensor registers
vacancy and then back to occupancy, the time delay period restarts the countdown. (This is labelled
“Follow On Only With Override Time Delay” in the Sensor Mode parameter on the Basic tab/Normal
Hours tab for the load or relay. )
NOTE: The Override Time Till Off parameter has its own functionality related to responding to a switch.
If you select this option the amount of time specified in that parameter will apply both to its own
functionality and to this option.
• On/Off Internal – Responds to both occupancy and vacancy commands. Instead of using the default
value of one minute for the blink warn feature, the sensor will use the amount of time entered in the
Blink Warn Grace Time parameter. (This is labelled “Follow On and Off With Blink Warn Grace Time” in
the Sensor Mode parameter on the Basic tab/Normal Hours tab for the load or relay. )
• Use Loads – Response to sensor is determined by the value of the Sensor Mode parameter on the
Basic tab/Normal Hours tab for the load or relay. There are some values available for the Sensor
Mode parameter that are a not available in this field, so to use those values as part of a group, you must
choose “Use Loads”, and then select the desired value for each load that is part of the group.
NOTE: Keep in mind that this determines whether the loads assigned to the group will respond to sensor
input. It does not determine whether the loads will turn on or off. That is set within the sensor
programming (either on the sensor itself, or by using LMCS or the LMCT-100 remote). In LMCS,
this determined by the Preset Value On and Preset Value Off parameters on the Advanced tab for
sensors.
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AH Sensor – Determines how the relay responds to sensor input during After Hours. Possible values same
as above. If set to “Use Loads”, it follows the value on the After Hours tab.
Setting Up Holidays For Use With Schedules
If you have panels or an LMZC-301 included in your project, you have the ability to create schedules, which can
trigger events, including switching between normal and after hours. The Holiday Editor dialog provides the ability
to specify holidays for use with schedules. In a schedule you can choose “holidays as one of the criteria when the
scheduled event occurs. Every day designated as a holiday will then follow that schedule.
Click Holidays on the Home tab to open the Holiday Editor dialog.
Holiday Editor
Select one or more of the Automatic Holidays to designate it as a holiday. If you select the Use Observed
Dates, LMCS will adjust the day if the holidays falls on a weekend. So for example, if July 4th falls on a Saturday,
July 3rd will be designated as a holiday.
You can also add any specific date (or range of dates) and designate it as a holiday. Click Add, the select a Start
Date and Duration (number of days), and enter a Description.
CREATING A PROJECT WHILE CONNECTED TO THE NETWORK
While projects are typically created off line and then the project data is transferred into the DLM devices at the
site, it is also possible to create a project while directly connected to the devices. This is more likely to be done
in a small installation, especially if the individual rooms are not connected via BACnet. This process involves
connecting to a DLM or BACnet network, discovering the DLM devices on the network, making any needed
programming changes, and sending the data back to the devices.
Supplemental training videos on Connecting to a Network and Discovering Devices is available at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=170GU_Xq9ok&index=1&list=PLQKZ56rib0O57ukrF8xv780Pc9ZxNP9MG
Discovering Devices on a DLM Network
In a small installation without a BACnet network, you will connect using an LMCI-100 via USB.
1. Before opening the LMCS application, connect the LMCI-100 to the PC, and connect an LMRJ cable from the
LMCI-100 to any DLM device in the room.
2. Open LMCS. In the Connection drop-down at the bottom of the window, select the LMCI-100 option. If the
DLM Com connection is not shown (which can occur if the LMCI-100 was connected after LMCS was booted
up), double click where it says “Not Connected” next to the drop down, and try again.
3. Click Discover on either the Home tab or the information section for the New Building. The Discover
Devices dialog opens and discovery starts automatically. A status bar at the bottom shows the progress of
the discovery. A status window displays the number of devices found and a list of each device along with its
serial number. During discovery, LMCS loads all device parameter values (which will be the default values
unless manual changes were made on the devices during installation).
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Discover Devices
4. After discovery is complete, close the Discover Devices dialog. An arrow now appears next to New Building
in the tree section. If you expand the tree, you will see a new room has been created and the devices placed
in that room.
NOTE: If the room does not contain an LMBC-300 or LMBC-600 bridge, the room will have a default name
of “New Room”. If it contains a bridge, the room is named the same as the Description field for the
bridge.
5. If you want to document the list of discovered devices and their serial numbers, click Copy Log. The
information is copied to the clipboard and can be pasted into another application.
6. At this point, you can make any edits to device parameters. Once that is complete, send the parameter data back
to the devices. For details on sending parameter data, see “Sending Project Data to Devices” on page 48.
Once discovery is complete, you can connect to a different room and run through steps 3 - 6 again. Each room
can be saved as a separate project file, or for convenience, they can all be saved in one file. Be sure to label each
room clearly so that the correct room is easy to select if you need to go back to that room and connect to it again.
Discovering Devices on a BACnet/IP Network
In an installation with a BACnet network you will connect using either a wired or wireless connection to one or
more NB Routers (or other BACnet compatible router). To connect to the router, you will need to know the UDP
Port number set on the router. By default, BACnet devices are set to UDP Port 47808.
There is a three step process that happens when running discovery on devices connected via BACnet:
• Discover the Routers
• Discover the Rooms (bridges) connected to the routers
• Discover the devices connected to the bridges
1. Before opening the LMCS application, connect to a BACnet/IP network, either via a network cable or wireless
connection.
2. Open LMCS. In the Connection drop-down at the bottom of the window, select the BACnet network.
3. Click Preferences on the Support tab to open the Preferences dialog. Check the UDP Port to make sure
that matches the number set on the router. You may also need to change the Device ID if the integrator for
the site provides one, for communication with other routers.
Preferences
4. Click Discover on either the Home tab or the information section for the New Building. The Discover
Networks dialog opens and the discovery starts automatically. All routers found on the network are listed.
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Discover Networks
5. Select the routers for which you want to discover devices. If it is a large network, you may want to select
individual routers so that the discovery process is broken up into shorter pieces.
6. As mentioned previously, there is a three step process for discovery. The next step is to discover the rooms
and the final step is to discover the devices in those rooms. If you select the Discover All Rooms checkbox,
then once the room discovery is complete, LMCS will automatically start discovering the devices. But if it is
left unchecked, you will have the chance to select specific rooms before proceeding with device discovery.
If you select the Discover Bridges Only checkbox, then bridge parameters only will be loaded into LMCS
during the device discovery step.
7. Click Discover. The Discover Bridges and Panels dialog opens with all bridges and panels selected.
Discover Bridges and Panels
8. If you selected the Discover All Rooms checkbox, the Discover Devices in Discovered Room ... dialog
automatically opens. Otherwise, choose which rooms you want to discover and click Discover.
Discover Devices in Discovered Room
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9. Discovery starts automatically. A status bar at the bottom shows the progress of the discovery. A status
window displays the number of devices found and a list of each device along with its serial number. During
discovery, LMCS loads all device parameter values (which will be the default values unless manual changes
were made on the devices during installation). After discovery for one room is complete, LMCS begins
discovery for the devices in the next room. This process continues till all devices are discovered. Once all
devices are discovered, click Close to return to the Discover Bridges and Panels dialog.
10. If you want to document the list of discovered devices and their serial numbers, click Copy Log. The
information is saved to the clipboard and can be pasted into another application.
11. At this point, you can make any edits to device parameters. Once that is complete, send the parameter data back
to that devices. For details on sending parameter data, see “Sending Project Data to Devices” on page 48.
Discovering Devices When Using a LMBR-600 Wireless Router and LMBC-600 Wireless Bridges
The process of discovering devices on a wireless network is similar to that of discovering on a wired IP network.
However, there are few extra steps you must take during the initial steps.
While the LMBR-600 and LMBC-600 communicate wirelessly, each LMBR-600 in the network must be connected
to the PC via Ethernet cable (using a switch).
Before device discovery can begin, the LMBR-600 router and all LMBC-600 bridges must be configured to
communicate on a Personal Area Network (PAN), by assigning a PAN Profile to the router and bridges. If the
system uses multiple LMBR-600s, each LMBR-600 must be configured with a different PAN Profile, and the
various bridges are set to use different profiles based on which bridges are located near a specific router.
A configuration application, which can be accessed within LMCS is used to create and assign PAN Profiles to devices.
NOTE: The configuration application can also be accessed by using a web browser, without LMCS. However,
accessing within LMCS has advantages because it is easy to then immediately continue on with discovery
of all the DLM devices connected to the wireless bridge.
The following steps describe how to discover the LMBR-600 and access the configuration application. Details
on using the configuration application are not described in this document. See the Wireless DLM Setup and
Implementation Guide for those details.
1. Select the appropriate network from the Connection drop-down in the lower right corner of the LMCS
window and make sure the display indicates you are connecting to the correct adapter, and that LMCS is
connected. Be sure to select the Base Ethernet Connection as shown in the illustration, and not the “Remote”
option since that is used by technicians when setting their LMCS software to communicate to the system
remotely using a cellular modem included in the optional DLM RACCESS product.
NOTE: This uses a BACnet connection, using a network cable, and cannot be done using the LMCI.
2. Click the Discover icon or button at the top of the window to open the Discover Networks screen. LMCS
will search all available BACnet networks for the LMBR-600 and will display each one it finds. Once network
discovery is complete (the screen will say “Networks Discovered:x”, click Close.
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IMPORTANT: At this point you should only discover the Networks, and not proceed to discover the
bridges and DLM devices.
Once the configuration process is complete for the router and bridges, you will go back and rediscover the
network and then discover all bridges and DLM devices.
3. Click the Networks tab in the tree section. Expand the tree to show the LMBRs, then click one of the LMBR
icons. The login screen for the LMBR configuration application will open in the right side of the window (it
may take up to 30 seconds before the configuration application opens).
NOTE: If there is more than one LMBR-600, you will not be aware of which router you are connecting to until
you have entered the configuration application (unless you already know the IP addresses of the
routers), at which point the router’s Device ID will be shown.
4. To use the configuration application within LMCS, the Bonjour service from Apple must be installed on the
PC. If it is not currently installed, a warning dialog appears, which will open a browser page that will allow you
to download it.
Clicking yes opens the following link: https://support.apple.com/kb/dl999?locale=en_US
Once Bonjour is installed, you can return to LMCS and proceed as before.
5. If this is the first time you have attempted to use the LMBR configuration application on this PC, when you
click the LMBR icon, two warning dialogs will appear which require you to install security certificates for the
LMBR. Click Yes on both dialogs.
6. Once the certificate is installed, click on the LMBR icon to open the Configuration Application. Enter the
Username and Password, then click Submit.
Username: admin
Password: lmbrpass
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7. Once you login in to the LMBR, you can begin the PAN configuration process, described in the Wireless DLM
Setup and Implementation Guide.
Discovering New Rooms or Devices in a Previously Discovered Network
Another application in which online discovery might be used is in a situation where a large project was previously
created off line, but a room has been added at a later point, or extra devices added to an existing room.
If adding a room to an existing BACnet network, run the Discover process and make sure that the Discover
All Rooms checkbox is not selected. Once the Discover Bridges and Panels dialog opens, the dialog will list
all rooms on the BACnet network, and any rooms that were not previously discovered will be selected. Click
Discover to complete the process.
If additional devices have been added to an existing (previously discovered) room, the discovery process should
not be run. Doing so will result in an additional room being added to the project, which will be identical to the
room as it was previously discovered, but with the new device added. Instead, the Synchronize Devices process
should be run. This will find all the devices in the room and indicate which device is not currently in the project.
You can then load the device parameters for that device into the project. For details on synchronizing devices, see
“Synchronizing a Room” on page 44.
Discovering Devices Remotely
You can discover a network remotely, via the internet, provided the network contains at least one Segment Manager
and access is permitted to the IP address of the Segment Manager(s). You can discover devices connected to multiple
Segment Managers in a single process, but each Segment Manager must have a separate IP address. The Segment
Manager must have version 2.2.1 or later installed, and version 2.3.0 or later is preferred.
In a system with multiple LMNC cabinets/Segment Managers, you can discover all of them but each one must
have its own IP address. Each Segment Manager will also be pre-configured with a different UDP port number.
In a typical application for remote connection, the system will include a RACCESS cellular modem. In order to
access the Segment Manager through the modem, you will need the Open VPN application installed on the PC.
1. Using a valid Open VPN cert file (create a new one if needed), connect to the remote system using the LMCS
Remote for TAP connection option.
2. Open a new LMCS file.
3. In a setup with multiple Segment Managers, make sure to set the correct UDP port number in the
Preferences dialog to match the Segment Manager you want to discover.
4. Select the Remote for “TAP-Windows Adapter” connection option in the Connection drop-down.
5. Click Discover. The Discovery dialog opens and discovery begins automatically. The Discovery Status
will display “Searching For Hosts” and the progress bar will show the progress. A drop-down shows the IP
address range that LMCS will search. By default this is set to 192.168.5.0, since the Segment Managers are
normally set in the range of 192.168.5.1 to 192.168.3.254. If you know the Segment manager has been set to
a different number, you can select a different value from the drop-down.
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6. If the Segment manager is found, it will display in the dialog. Select the checkbox and click Discover
7. LMCS will then begin discovery of all DLM devices connected to that Segment Manager
8. Once Discovery is complete, the Discover button changes to say Read. LMCS displays a list of all devices
discovered.
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9. Click Read and LMCS will begin importing all device parameters. Once communication is established,
the Discover Status will display “Read underway” and the progress bar will show the progress. Once the
process is complete, LMCS will display a list of all devices along with the device ID
10.
Click Exit. The Devices tab will populate with all devices.
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TRANSFERRING PROJECT DATA INTO SITE DEVICES
When a project is created offline, the data must be transferred to the rooms after the project has been
programmed. Note that this process can be done connecting to a single room via the DLM network, or connecting
to the site as a whole or an area via BACnet. If connecting via BACnet, you still have the option of working on an
individual room, or can transfer to multiple rooms in one process. The following steps must be taken to transfer the
data from project file into the devices:
1. Enter the serial numbers/device IDs of the installed devices into LMCS. This process is critical because this is
how LMCS distinguishes between one device and another. There are two ways this can be done—manually
enter the numbers into LMCS or use the Device Pairing utility. Both methods are described below. You can
choose to enter only the serial numbers/device IDs for bridges, panels, and zone controllers. In that case,
you must synchronize the rooms, as mentioned in the next step.
2. Synchronize the rooms with the project file. If serial numbers are entered for every DLM device,
synchronization is not required. However, it is still a very good idea to do so, because this ensures that the
serial numbers are correct, and that there are no devices installed in the room that are missing from the
project. If serial numbers have been entered for bridges, panels, and zone controllers only, synchronization is
mandatory.
You can run the synchronization process on the entire project, or an area within the project, or you can
synchronize individual rooms one at a time. In general, if the rooms are simple, with only one room controller
per room and no duplicates of a specific device in a room (for example, two single button switches), you can
synchronize the entire project or an area in one process. But if there is more than one room controller or
duplicate devices in a room, it may be helpful to synchronize on a per room basis so that you can make sure
that each device is correctly paired with the intended device in the project.
NOTE: If connecting to an individual room via the DLM network, it is possible to skip the step of entering the serial
numbers, and just use the synchronization process to get the serial numbers of all devices in the room.
But this is not very practical for any type of large scale installation, and if there are duplicates of the same
device in the room, is also impractical.
Entering Serial Numbers and Device IDs in LMCS
To communicate properly with each DLM device, LMCS must have its serial number. Each device comes with a
serial number on a sticker on the device, plus additional stickers with the same number than can be placed on a
form documenting the devices in each room. These numbers are then entered into the project file.
For bridges, panels and zone controllers connected via BACnet, the Device ID is used to distinguish different
devices on the network. When a unit comes from the factory, the device ID is set to the last six digits from the
serial number. However, the number can be set to any number desired. For example, when working with an
integrator, the integrator may specify a range of numbers reserved for the lighting network. Another example of
a situation in which the numbers might be different is if a bridge needed to be replaced after the network was
configured and it is preferred that the Device ID remain the same. To change the device ID on the panel or bridge,
you must use an LMCT‑100 remote. (This is done on the Network Settings Menu. See the LMCT-100 or LMCP
user manuals for details.)
NOTE: Since the device ID is used only in BACnet communications, it applies only to bridges, panels, and zone
controllers. All other devices communicate using the DLM network. Also, if connecting to the room with an
LMCI‑100 instead of via BACnet, the device ID is not used and a bridge, panel, or zone controller uses the
serial number instead.
At a minimum, you must enter the serial numbers and device IDs for each bridge, panel, or zone controller,
since they are a basis for a “room”. Once they are entered, the synchronization process can get the serial
numbers for all other devices connected to a specific bridge or panel. However, if there is more than one room
controller in a room, or there are duplicates of individual devices, it is best to enter the serial numbers of those
devices to ensure that the device is paired with the correct device entered in the project. This is particularly critical
for room controllers, since they will be controlling different loads. Note that if you do not enter the serial numbers it
is still possible to match the device in the room with the device in the project during the synchronization process.
However, this requires an extra step, as described in step 4 in the section Synchronizing A Room (see page 44).
Manually Entering Serial Numbers
The Serial Number parameter is found in the top area of the information section for each device, and the Device
ID in the Basic tab, as shown in the screenshot from an LMBC-300, below:
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Manually Entering a Serial Number
When you enter the Serial Number of a bridge, panel, or LMZC-301 the first time, the Device ID will automatically
be set to the last six digits (following the factory setting for the device). However, once the number has been
entered and you click or tab out of the field, the Device ID will no longer automatically update. So, for example, if
you type an incorrect Serial Number and click out of that field, then go back and fix it, you must also manually fix
the Device ID.
NOTE: The serial number can also be entered on the Advanced tab for the bridge or panel. If you enter the serial
number there and then change it, a dialog opens asking if you want to change the Device ID. Click Yes
and the Device ID will be automatically updated.
Automating Serial Number Entry with the Device Pairing Utility
The Device Pairing utility provides the ability to quickly enter many serial numbers by connecting a hand-held
USB scanner.
The first step in this process is to print out the Device Pairing report. This prints a report of each device in
the project, by room, with a bar code for each device. When the devices are installed in the room, the installer
attaches the serial number stickers next to the bar code for that device. As an alternative, as mentioned above,
only the bridges, panels and zone controllers can be scanned. A separate Bridge Pairing Report is available for
this purpose. For examples of these reports, see “Device Pairing Reports” on page 117.
To run the utility, click Device Pairing on the Support tab to open the Device Pairing dialog.
Device Pairing
The Device Pairing report has two columns. With a USB scanner connected to the PC, scan the Device Key
column, and then the Serial Number column. When you scan each bar code, the number is entered in the
appropriate field. For the Device Key, the name of the device is displayed in the field to the right of the number.
Once both the device key and serial number are scanned, they are automatically paired and the fields clear to
allow scanning the next device.
Serial numbers for DLM products are assigned in ranges based on the type of device. Therefore, LMCS is able
to determine valid serial numbers for a device. If the serial number on the sticker does not match the type of
device scanned for the device key (for example, if the sticker was pasted on the wrong row on the report), an error
message will display.
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NOTE: While LMCS will return an error if the serial number doesn’t match the device type, if there is more than
one of a device in a room, it is possible to associate the wrong serial number with a specific device in the
project file. While this doesn’t matter much for occupancy sensors, it does make a difference for room
controllers, since the controllers will be connected to specific loads, and for switches, if the switches are
set to control different loads. To help prevent possible errors, Wattstopper strongly recommends clearly
labeling the different devices (using the Description field) in the project to clearly indicate the location of
the device.
Numbers for either field can also be entered by hand if there is a problem scanning a bar code (for example, if
a label becomes torn or illegible). If you enter a number by hand, you must click Apply Pairing to complete the
process and clear the fields for the next device.
Synchronizing a Room
If the project includes only serial numbers/device IDs for the bridges, panels, and zone controllers, synchronization
is required, to input the serial numbers for all other devices into the project. But as mentioned previously, running
the synchronization process is not mandatory. As long as the serial numbers and device IDs match the ones in the
project file, LMCS can communicate with all DLM devices. However, it is still a very good idea to synchronize. If a
device has been installed in a room but is not in the project, that device will be discovered during synchronization.
Additionally, if there are any mismatches of serial numbers, this process makes it easy to troubleshoot the
problem.
The process of synchronizing a room includes the following:
• Discover the devices in a room
• Check to see that the devices in the project file match the devices found in the room. If a device found in the
room is not in the project, a message indicates this.
• The synchronization window includes the ability to “ping” a device, allowing someone located in the room to
verify communication with the device. This can be useful in situations where there is more than one type of
a device, for example if there are two room controllers and you are not certain which controller is controlling
specific loads.
• Finalize the synchronization. If the serial number for a device in the project was not previously entered, the
serial number is copied from the device into the project.
NOTE: With one exception, mentioned in the following steps, the device parameters are not sent to or read from
the devices during the synchronization process. That is done afterwords, using the Send All Devices or
Read All Devices buttons.
1. Highlight the room to be synchronized in the tree to open the room information on the right side of the
window. If the Connection drop-down at the bottom of the window is set so that LMCS is currently connected
to the network, the Sync Devices button will be enabled.
Room Information Section
2. Click Sync Devices to open the Synchronize Devices dialog. The right side of the dialog shows the devices
in the project file that are included in the room. Serial numbers for documented devices that haven’t been
entered or previously synchronized will be displayed as “0000000000”
Under normal circumstances, do not select the Read Parameters checkbox. This will cause LMCS to load
the current device parameters into the project, overwriting any custom programming that has been done for
the project.
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Synchronize Devices
3. Click Discover. LMCS runs a discovery on the room and lists all found devices in the left side of the dialog.
In the following example, an extra device (the LMSW-108) has been discovered which was not documented
in the project.
Synchronize Devices Dialog After Discovery
4. If two instances of the same device exist in the room, LMCS has no way of knowing how to match the
two devices to the two devices in the project, unless the serial numbers of those devices were previously
entered (either manually or using the Device Pairing utility). In this case, a drop-down appears in the Select
Documented Device column, as shown in the example above with two LMRC-102 room controllers. Select
the correct value for each device, as shown in the example below. Notice in the screenshot that a description
shows up square brackets after the device name. This highlights the importance of adding a identifying
description when editing the device parameters.
Selecting a Device Location
If you are unsure which device is which (for example, which controller controls a specific load), while
communicating with someone in the room, click Ping in the row for that device. For a room controller, if a load is
off, it will turn on briefly, then off again. If the load is on, it will turn off briefly then back on again. For other devices,
the blue LEDs will blink for several seconds. On LMCS, that row will flash green and yellow, indicating the ping is
being sent.
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NOTE: This step is not needed if the serial numbers were previously entered. For this reason, Wattstopper
recommends using the Device Pairing utility or manually entering the serial numbers for all devices
instead of just the bridges, when a room has multiple occurrences of the same device.
5. As mentioned in Step 3, in this example, an LMSW-108 was found that does not occur in the project.
Notice that the Select Documented Device column for that device displays “[Select Device]”, but in this
case, nothing can be selected from the drop-down because nothing exists for that device in the project. An
additional button, Add Undocumented also appears at the top of the dialog. If you click that button, the
undocumented device will be added to the project, and the warning in red disappears, as shown below. The
new device will contain default values for all device parameters. If you do not add the device, you can still
complete the synchronization, and that device will be ignored.
Device Discovery After Adding the Undocumented Device
6. To complete the synchronization process, click Finalize. This matches the devices in the room to the devices
in the project. If a serial number does not exist for a device in the project, it is loaded into the project.
WARNING: If the Read Parameters checkbox is selected, all parameters for each device are loaded into the
project, overwriting any custom programming, so be careful not to select the checkbox unless that is desired.
Example of Synchronization Where the Serial Numbers Do Not Match
If a serial number entered in the project does not match the one found during discovery, a warning is displayed at
the bottom of the dialog and the serial number of the actual device is displayed in red, as shown in the example
below. In this case, once you click Finalize, the serial number in the project will be updated to the correct number.
Serial Number Does Not Match
NOTE: While the serial number for a bridge, panel, or zone controller does not have to match for the discovery
process, if connected via BACnet, the device ID must match or there will be an error during discovery.
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Example of Synchronization Where the Discovered Room is Missing Devices Included in the Project
If the discovery process does not find a device included in that room for the project, no warning message is
displayed. However, it is still easy to identifying this issue, because the number of rows on the right side of the
dialog will be greater than the number on the left side. This problem may be caused because that device has not
yet been installed or is not properly communicating in the DLM network, in which case, check that the LMRJ cable
is properly connected.
Device Not Found During Discovery
Even if the device can’t be found in the room, you can still complete the synchronization process—LMCS will
simply ignore the missing device.
Synchronizing an Area
You can synchronize all the rooms in an area or even the entire building in one process. (For larger sites, it is
more practical to limit discoveries to an area rather than the entire building, due to the processing/communication
time involved.)
Synchronizing rooms in an area is only available if connected via BACnet, since the only way to access more than
one room at a time is through BACnet. If connected via the LMCI-100, this option is disabled.
NOTE: As described in the section “Entering Serial Numbers and Device IDs in LMCS” on page 42, at a
minimum you must have previously entered the device ID for all bridges, panels, and zone controllers, so
that LMCS match each room it discovers to the correct one in the project.
NOTE: If a room has more than one of a specific device, then the room will not be able to completely synchronize
unless the serial numbers of those devices are already in the project. If these device do not have serial
numbers, the room will be partially synced and you can then go back and manually select those room to
finish the synchronization, as described below. An exception to this occurs if you select the Auto-Sync
Sensors and Auto-Sync Plug Loads checkboxes, as described below.
1. With an area or the building selected in the tree, click Sync Rooms to open the Synchronizing Rooms
dialog. LMCS proceeds to discover all rooms in that area and lists them.
Synchronizing Rooms in an Area
2. Select the desired options and click Start to begin the synchronization process. Options are as follows:
• Add Undocumented Devices – If any devices are found in the room that are not in the project, they will be
automatically added to the project and the device parameters set to defaults.
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• Overwrite Serial Numbers – If a device is found in the room with a serial number different from the one
in the project, the serial number in the project will be updated to the serial number from the device without
any notification. If this option is not selected and there is a serial number mismatch, the device will not be
synced. You can then go back to the individual room sync dialog to investigate the different numbers.
• Auto-Sync Sensors – If there is more than one of a specific model occupancy sensor in a room, and
the serial numbers have not been entered in the project, selecting this check box will cause LMCS to
automatically assign the serial numbers to the different devices in the project, eliminating the need to
manually match a device into the room to a device in the project. Since occupancy sensors are often
set to the same parameter values when multiple sensors exist in a room, this option can speed up the
synchronization process.
NOTE: Do not select this option if sensors in a room are set to control different loads.
• Auto-Sync Plug Loads – This option functions in the same manner as Auto-Sync Sensors, but for plug
load controllers.
• Auto Save – With this option selected, LMCS automatically saves the project file after each device is
synchronized, instead of saving the file after completion of all synchronization. If synchronizing a large
number of devices, this option will prevent having to restart from the beginning if a communication problem
or other error prevents completion of the synchronization process.
• Include Previously Synced Rooms – If this option is not selected, then if synchronization was previously
run on a room, LMCS will skip the sync process for that room and proceed to the next room. If it is
selected, LMCS will re-run synchronization in the room. This option is useful if any devices in the room
have been replaced or added after synchronization is complete.
3. Once synchronization begins, a status message indicates the progress. As each room completes processing,
the Status column will change from “None Synced” to “Fully Synced”, or if some of the devices were not able
to sync, the status will say “Partially Synced”.
4. Once the process is complete for all rooms, for any rooms that are partially synced, click the Sync button
for that room. This will open the same Synchronizing Devices dialog that opens if you are synchronizing
individual rooms. The dialog will help diagnose the issue, such as a device missing from the project, or a
serial mismatch.
5. Once all rooms have been fully synced, close the Synchronize Rooms dialog. You are now ready to send
project data to the devices.
NOTE: If the Status for a room remains set to “None Synced” after synchronization completes, it is likely that the
Device ID assigned in the project file for the bridge, panel,or zone controller does not match the device
ID in actual device. You can double check the ID in the device by using the LMCT-100. The Device ID is
displayed on the Network Settings menu. See the LMCT-100 or LMCP user manuals for details. It is also
possible to find the ID using LMCS, by running a Discovery on the room. If doing this, make sure that the
Discover All Rooms checkbox is not selected and the Discover Bridges Only checkbox is selected.
Once the Discover Bridges and Panels dialog opens, scroll through the list of rooms to find the bridge
or panel that did not sync (this may require some effort if the list is long) and click Discover. LMCS will
discover the bridge and add it to the project as a new room. Expand that new room in the tree and select
the bridge to view the device ID. Make note of the ID from that bridge and enter it into the original bridge
that did not sync. You must change the Connection drop-down to “Not Connected” in order to manually
enter the device ID. Be sure to delete the newly created room from the project, so you don’t have two
bridges with the same device ID. Then return the Connection drop-down to your network.
Sending Project Data to Devices
Once a room has been synchronized, device parameters that have been programmed in the project can be sent
to the devices in the room. Project parameters can be sent on a per room basis, or per area (or even the entire
building) basis.
1. Click the Area or Room in the tree to select it. In the information section, click Send All Devices.
2. The Send All Devices dialog opens and LMCS immediately begins sending parameter data. A log displays
a list of each device and its serial number as data is sent to it. If there are any errors, the log will indicate
failure in sending to that device. If you click Copy Log, the log is copied to the clipboard and can be pasted
to another application, so you can reference a list of devices that did not receive the parameter data.
NOTE: As with remote discovery, you can send data to devices via a remote connection, provided the
network has a Segment Manager (see “Discovering Devices Remotely” on page 39 for details).
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Send All Devices
NOTE: It is also possible to send parameter data to an individual device by selecting that device in the tree and
clicking Send.
Enabling Logging for a Room
Once the devices in a room have been synced, the Log Messages checkbox (under the Sync Devices checkbox)
is enabled. When logging is enabled, devices in the room will send log messages over the DLM Network. These
are stored temporarily in a buffer while LMCS is running.
The messages are written to an XML document within the same folder that the LMCS file is saved. The file will
be named based on time stamp and can be sent to Technical Support/Engineering for review in the event that
unexpected issues are reported in the room. This XML file will store every DLM Network event in a given room
while logging is enabled. Logging will only stop when you deselect the checkbox or close LMCS.
Network Documentation
Click Networks in the Home tab to open the BACnet Networks dialog. This dialog provides documentation of the
BACnet routers used for connection with the rooms in the project.
BACnet Networks
Initially this dialog is blank. Once you run discovery or sync rooms, the next time you open the dialog, it displays
info on all the routers found, based on the Connection Drop-down and UDP value. The fields are populated based
on info obtained from the routers and the Is Discovered checkbox is selected.
When the project is saved, it saves all of the information on this dialog. That means if the project is opened at a
later time when not connected to BACnet, you will still see the connection information.
Although the fields on this dialog can be edited to reflect changes made to the routers (for example a change to a
device ID), the changes affect internal documentation only - this information is not sent to the routers.
Additionally, you can remove a router from the list by clicking on that row and then clicking Remove Network. You
can also manually input information about a new router by clicking Add Network. Again, these actions only affect
this documentation and not the routers.
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REAL TIME ROOM CONTROL–THE ADVANCED TAB FOR ROOMS
Once a room has been synchronized, highlight that room in the tree and select the Advanced tab to access
several features that provide real time control of the room and its devices. (You must be connected to the network
to utilize these features.)
Room Functions – Advanced Tab
Unlock PnG and PnL – This will unlock PlugnGo (PnG) and PushnLearn (PnL) functionality in all devices
in the room. (PnG is locked once any custom programming is sent to any device in the room by LMCS, or if
PnL is initiated on any device in the room. PnL can only be locked using the Lock PnG and PnL button in
this dialog.) An example of why you might want to use this button is a situation in which there are a number
of switches in a room with a more complex button binding scheme, and it is helpful to have someone in the
room program the bindings so they have immediate visual feedback.
Lock PnG – This will lock the PnG functionality in all devices in a room. Keep in mind that PnG locks
automatically once any custom programming is sent to any device in the room by LMCS, or if PnL is initiated
on any device in the room.
Lock PnG and PnL – This will lock PnG and PnL functionality in all devices in the room. An example of why
you might want to lock PnL is to prevent anyone from reprogramming switch functionality in a public area
such as a classroom or lobby.
NOTE: The three buttons described above affect all devices in the room. In addition, these functions are
available on a per device basis, using the Lock Level drop-down, on the Advanced tab for each
device.
Factory Reset – Click this button to open the Factory Reset dialog. There are two possible options:
• Reboot/Restore – This performs a factory reset and then resends all of the parameter settings from the
project into all devices in the room.
• Reboot/Use Defaults – This performs a factory reset, which sets all devices to their default parameter
values. It then loads those default parameter settings into the project.
Warning—this overwrites all settings for those devices in the project file.
Once you begin the reset, a status bar indicates the progress and the log provides details of reset process.
If you select “Reboot/Restore”, the Send All Devices opens during the send process, providing a status bar
and log of the send status. If you select “Reboot/Use Defaults”, the same process happens, but the Read All
Devices dialog opens instead of the send dialog.
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Factory Reset
Room Reboot – This function causes all device in the room to reset as if power was turned off and then back
on again. Any loads currently on will shut off momentarily and return to their previous level. (This does not
apply for the LMPI plug load controllers, and the LMFC-011, which use latching relays.) The bridge or panel
will also recheck the devices connected on the DLM Network. So if a device was connected to the room while
the DLM Network is powered, and then later disconnected (for example, if a device was installed that was not
supposed to be in that room), you should reboot the room to remove references to that previously connected
device.
Set Normal Hours – For all devices which have separate settings for normal and after hours, this causes
those devices to go to their normal hours settings.
Set After Hours – For all devices which have separate settings for normal and after hours, this causes those
devices to go to their after hours settings. When you click this button, a warning pops up to ensure you want
to do this.
Switch Lock Mode – Click “Locked” to lock all of the buttons, in all of the switches in a room, at their current
status. A warning pops up to ensure that you want to do this. Click “Unlocked” to return the buttons to
their normal function. Note that while this locks the buttons in the room, it is still possible to send On or Off
commands to the loads controlled by the switch.
NOTE: There is a parameter on the Advanced tab for each switch named Key Lock Mode Enabled. If this
is not selected, that switch will not respond to Switch Lock Mode. In this way, you can choose to lock
out only certain switches. For example, in a classroom with multiple switches, you might choose to
lock out the switches where the students sit but not the one closes to the teacher. This command can
also be sent from a switch lock device connected to an LMIO-101, or from the Segment Manager or
other BAS application.
Legacy Support – Click this button to open the Enable Legacy Device Options dialog. This dialog allows
you to enable support for the LMLS-105 photosensor and various non-DLM occupancy sensors equipped
with an RJ45 jack. Although these occupancy sensors are not DLM and therefore cannot be added to project,
a DLM room controller will respond to their input if you enable support on this dialog.
Enable Legacy Device Options
NOTE: In addition to the legacy occupancy sensors, the current WRC-TX-LM wireless plug load controller
utilizes this feature and therefore, you must select the Enable Legacy Occupancy Detection
checkbox when using the WRC-TX-LM.
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Wattstopper recommends that you do not enable these features unless you have these devices connected to
the room.
Select the desired options and click Send to enable the features in LMCS.
NOTE: For legacy occupancy sensors to control a load, you must enable the Legacy Occupancy Sensor
checkbox on the Technician tab of the load parameters section of the window when a room
controller is selected in the tree. If using the WRC-TX-LM, you must enable the same checkbox for
the plug load controller.
Occ Sensor Mode – If you click “Test Mode”, all sensors in the room turn the load(s) off after 5 seconds and
a 10 minute test period begins. During the test period, the time delay is 5 seconds. This short time delay
allows performing a sensor walk test to define the optimum sensitivity settings and product orientation. After
the 10 minute period all sensors return to normal operation mode. Or, click “Normal Mode” to return them
immediately.
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THE SUPPORT TAB
This section provides details on the features available on the support tab, with the exception of the following two
features documented previously:
• CAD Import – see “Importing Rooms From a CAD File” on page 25.
• Device Pairing – see “Automating Serial Number Entry with the Device Pairing Utility” on page 43.
Support Tab
Update Firmware
This utility allows you to update the firmware for one or more device models in the Network. Click Update
Firmware to open the Update Firmware dialog.
By default the Factory Released option is selected. This option accesses a folder included in the LMCS
installation, which contains the most recent firmware for all DLM devices at the time of the release of your version
of LMCS.
You can also choose a Custom Firmware Directory. In this case, you specify a folder that contains firmware for
one or more DLM devices. This might occur in a situation where Wattstopper updates the firmware for one or more
devices and distributes a file with those updates. If you select this option, the Use production firmware if custom
firmware not present checkbox is enabled. If selected, then if firmware for a specific device is not included in the
custom directory, LMCS will display the version of firmware for that device that is included in the default folder.
NOTE: If you specify project firmware on the Project dialog on the Home tab, the Custom Firmware Directory
option will be selected and the pathway to the firmware folder will be preset and disabled so it can’t be
changed. The Use production firmware if custom firmware not present checkbox will also be selected
but disabled. You also will not be able to select the Factory Released option. In this way, the firmware is
“locked down” for the project. The Update button will still work, so you can load those versions into any
devices that don’t currently have them.
By default, the Reset to Factory Defaults following bootloading checkbox is selected. Wattstopper highly
recommends resetting to factory defaults after updating the firmware.
Click Update. One of two possible dialogs will open, depending on the type of connection. There is one dialog
for connecting to a single room via the LMCI-100, and a different dialog if connecting via BACnet. While there are
similar functions in the two different screens, the BACnet version has more options, due to the nature of working
with multiple rooms. Additionally, while the table of devices shows the same information, the columns are laid out
in a different order.
The following sections show the differences between the two.
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Upgrading Firmware with an LMCI-100 Connection
When connected to an LMCI-100, once the dialog opens, the discovery process starts automatically. Once
complete, all devices in the room are displayed in a table. While discovery happens automatically, a Discover
button is included in the dialog for cases where a device is connected after the dialog was opened and you need
to rediscover devices in the network (for example in a case where a device was not initially seen because of an
improper connection).
Update Firmware Dialog When Connected to a Single Room via LMCI-100
The last two columns show the Current version of firmware in each device and the New version found in the
folder chosen in the previous dialog. Note that the “new” version could actually be older, if that device was
previously updated from a custom folder and you are looking at the default firmware. In this case, if you select that
device, the firmware will downgrade to the older version.
If a device currently has an older version, its Status displays “Upgradeable” in orange text. Select the checkbox
for each device you want to update and click Upgrade.
NOTE: You may see one or more devices with a status of “Unsupported” in red text. This is caused by one of two
reasons. The first is that the folder selected in the previous dialog does not contain firmware for that particular
device. Additionally, as shown in the example above, certain devices (the LMBC-300, LMBC-600 and all
panels) cannot upgrade their firmware via the LMCI-100 connection. You must use a BACnet connection to
update the firmware with those devices.
Once the upgrade starts, each selected device will update, one at a time. While the upgrade is in occurring the
Status displays “In Progress” for that device. A status bar at the bottom of the dialog indicates how far the upgrade
has progressed.
Update in Process
Once a device finishes updating, the Status displays “Complete”. If a problem occurs, it will display “Failed”. The
log at the bottom includes details that may be helpful for a technician to diagnose the reason for the failure, so you
should copy that text and paste it into another application for reference.
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Update Complete
During the upgrade process, the device is locked so that it does not respond to any other commands on the DLM
network. If a problem occurs during the updating process (for example power is lost), the device can remain
locked, and therefore cannot respond to communication after power is restored. In this case, click Recover. The
BootLoader Device Recovery dialog opens.
BootLoader Device Recovery
You must select the correct Device Type, and enter the Serial Number and Hardware Version for the locked
device, then click Transfer. The device will be unlocked and you can reattempt the firmware upgrade.
Upgrading Firmware via BACnet
When updating via BACnet, no discovery takes place when the dialog opens. Instead, it lists all rooms that have
been configured in the project. Each room in the list can be expanded to show the devices in that room.
NOTE: While you can view devices in each room individually, it is important to understand that if a room is
selected for upgrade, all devices in that room will be upgraded (provided firmware for that device exists
in the source folder or the Use production firmware if custom firmware not present checkbox was
selected).
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Update Firmware Dialog When Connected to Multiple Rooms in a BACnet Network
Use this section to automatically select rooms for upgrading, based on criteria
Displays number of currently selected rooms
This section allows you to filter which
rooms are displayed in the list (but does
not change which rooms are selected)
The list of rooms contains the following columns:
• Room – Displays the text entered as the Description for the room
• Update – Indicates if the rooms is selected for updating
• Network – Displays the router’s Network ID and description.
• Count – Displays the number of DLM devices in the room
• Device and Room – These two columns contain no data but display progress bars during the update process.
• Room Log – Initially blank, this displays the last message logged during the update process for that room.
This is not saved, so the next time you open the project, it will be blank again.
• Status – If any device in the room currently has an older version, displays “Upgradeable” in orange text. If all
devices are current, displays “Current”. If the selected update folder does not contain firmware for all devices
in the room, displays “Unsupported in red text.
Auto-Selecting Rooms
At the top of the window, the Device Class and Update Type drop-downs, determine which rooms will be selected
for upgrading (provided the Auto-Select checkbox is selected). The Device Class allows you to select the type of
device (occupancy sensor, switch, room controller, etc.). Update Type has the following four values:
• Upgrade – will select rooms if the devices have a firmware version lower than the one in the upgrade folder.
• Force Upgrade – will select rooms if the devices have a firmware version lower than or the same as the one
in the selected upgrade folder.
• Upgrade/Downgrade – will select rooms if the devices have a firmware version lower or higher than (but not
the same as) the one in the selected upgrade folder.
• Force Upgrade/Downgrade – will select rooms no matter what the current version of firmware is.
If Device Class is set to “All Devices”, Update Type will consider the versions of all devices in the room. If a
specific device class is selected, it will look at the versions for those devices only.
Even if you have chosen values for these two drop-downs, if you click Select All Rooms or Select No Rooms, it
will immediately select or deselect all the rooms in the list. (If you then deselect and then reselect the Auto Select
checkbox, it will re-apply the custom selection from the drop-downs.)
The Rooms Selected field provides a running count of the number of rooms currently selected.
NOTE: It is important to understand that the auto-select criteria does not control which rooms will be updated—it
only controls which rooms are selected to be updated. You can also manually select a room by clicking
the Update checkbox in the row for a room and that room will be updated even though it does not fit the
selection criteria. Or, you could deselect the Update checkbox for a room that was auto-selected and that
room would not be updated.
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Filtering and Sorting the List of Rooms
In the table that lists the rooms, the row directly below the column headers is blank. If you enter text in this column,
you can filter which rooms are displayed in the list. For example, you could view only rooms on a specific floor (if
the description includes room numbers), or rooms connected to a specific router. In the example below, the list
displays rooms with numbers beginning with “13”.
Filtering the Rooms displayed in the List
You can search using an asterisk as a wildcard character. So for example, you can view all conference rooms by typing
*Conference in the room column (provided the conference rooms contain the word “Conference” in the description).
You can type filter criteria in more than one column. All filter criteria are displayed at the bottom of the list. To
remove the filter, click the “X” next to the criteria.
Click the Update filter to cycle between viewing all rooms in the list (checkbox filled in with blue), only the rooms
not currently selected, or only the selected rooms.
NOTE: It is important to understand that the filtered list does not affect which rooms are selected—it is intended
only to help find specific rooms from a large list. You must still either manually select the rooms or use the
auto-select feature. In the previous screenshot, notice that 34 rooms are selected, even though the list
displays only 9 of them.
By default, the rooms in the list are sorted by the Room column (which contains the room description). To sort by a
different column, drag that column header to the space above the column headers. If you then click on that column
header, you can toggle between ascending and descending order.
Viewing Devices in a Room
Click the plus sign next to a room in the list to view the devices in that room.
Devices in a Room
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By default the list is sorted by serial number, in descending order, which places room controllers at the beginning
of the list. You can change the sort by clicking on a different column. The Status messages are the same as
at the room level. Note that if at least one device in the room is “Upgradeable”, the room status will also be
upgradable. If the selected update folder does not contain firmware for a specific device, that device will be listed
as “Unsupported”.
If you click the magnifying glass icon that is the column header of the first column, the dialog changes to display
only the devices in that room. The magnifying glass changes to an “X”. Click the “X” to return to the room/devices
view.
Updating the Firmware
Once you have selected the desired rooms, click Start. The dialog changes to display only the rooms that are
being upgraded. A progress bar at the top shows the progress of the entire upgrade. Additionally progress bars are
shown in the Device and Room columns, showing the progress of each individual device update within the room,
and the update of all devices in the room.
The Room Log column displays the most recent log message for the room.
Upgrade in Process
Once the upgrade is complete, if you expand a room in the list, you will see a new tab labelled Message List.
Click that tab if you want to view all of the messages captured by the log. (This can be helpful to a technician for
diagnosing any communication problems.)
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Message List Tab
Difference Tool
This utility allows you to compare two project files. It will provide a list of the difference in parameters values for the
two files.
Click Diff Tool to open the DLM Project Comparison Tool dialog.
DLM Project Comparison Tool
Click the two Browse buttons to select the two project files to compare. Click Compare. A report is generated in
the bottom section of the window. Only the parameters in which there is a difference are displayed.
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Comparison Data
In the example above the two project files contained only a single room. If the project contains multiple rooms, the
list is broken out by room, as shown in the following example.
Comparison Data with More than One Room
DLM Site Time/Location
This utility is used to set and synchronize the clocks in all LMCP Panels and all LMTS-101-CCT Schedule
Switches in the project, for controlling schedule events. Additionally, you set the location, used for calculating
sunrise and sunset times, which can be used to trigger dark/light events and Astro schedules.
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If you have more than one panel networked together, any panel can be set to be the master clock. It will
periodically send out clock information to the other panels so that they remain synchronized. You can set how
often the master sends the clock message. The advantage of having any panel act as a master is that if the
master panel is taken offline for any reason, any other panel can be easily set to be master and all panels will still
remain in sync. (Note that if the original panel is put back online, you will want to revert the replacement master or
the original panel to back to being a slave, so that you don’t have two master clocks on the network.)
NOTE: The LMTS-101-CCT will also respond to clock sync messages sent from a master panel.
Click LMCP Site Time to open the Set Relay Panel Clocks dialog.
Set Relay Panel Clocks
The radio buttons beneath the PC Clock section determine whether you are viewing parameters for a panel or for
a schedule switch (currently only the LMTS-101-CCT).
If you click Read, with “panels” selected, LMCS will import the current settings from the selected Master Panel. If
“switches’ is selected LMCS will import the current settings from the selected LMTS-100-CCT.
Once you have set the parameters as desired, click Send. This will send parameter values either to all panels or
all LMTS-100-CCT switches, depending on which option is selected. If you have both panels and switches in your
project, you need to select each option and click Send, even if using a master panel, because the LMTS-101-CCT
has some parameters not found on a panel.
PC Clock
Current Time and Time Zone – These fields display the current time and time zone set in the PC’s Date and
Time control panel. They cannot be edited.
Panel Settings
Relay Panel Clock
Panel Time and Time Zone – By default, these are set to the PC’s values, but you can edit them if needed.
Update Freq – If you designate a panel as a Master clock, this is the frequency (in minutes) that the master
panel will send a clock message to the other panels.
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Master Panel – If you have multiple panels, you can select the panel to be used as a master. If set to “None”,
each panel will control its own clock unless it receives a clock message from another BACnet enabled device
or software.
NOTE: If you are using a Segment Manager on the project as a scheduler, you should choose “None” since
you want that to be the master time clock for all panels on the network.
Relay Panel Location
Region and City – When you select a region and city, the Coordinates field is automatically set, and is used
to calculate sunrise and sunset.
Latitude and Longitude – If the list of cities does not contain the city you are looking for, and you know
the latitude and longitude of your location, enter the coordinates in this field and click Reverse Lookup to
populate the other fields.
Relay Panel Daylight Saving Time
DST Mode – If you select “Automatic”, Daylight Saving Time is followed based on the current standard rules.
If you select “Manual”, you can enter the specific Month and Day of the Month for spring and fall, to start
and end daylight saving time. Select “Disabled” to ignore daylight saving time.
LMTS-101-CCT Settings
LMTS Clock
This section is different from the panel parameters.
LMTS-101-CCT Clock Settings
LMTS – If there is more than one LMTS in the building, each one will be available from this drop-down. In order
to determine which is which, you will need to edit the Description for each switch
Time Zone, Date, and Time – By default, these are set to the PC’s values, but you can edit them if needed.
Both the Date and Time are shown in the LMTS display.
Date Format – Determines the format the date is shown in the LMTS display
Time Format – Determines whether the time shown in the display is 12 hour or 24 hour format.
LMTS Location and LMTS Daylight Saving Time
These two sections have identical parameters as the panel option.
Rename Rooms
This utility is provided for projects in which initial work was begun on the project using room names based on the
construction specifications, or where rooms were imported from a CAD file. If the rooms are renamed for occupant
usage and you want the project to reflect the new names, this utility provides a simple way to update all the name.
You might also use the this feature to remove unwanted characters in room names that were imported from the
CAD file. Additionally, it can be used to import square footage for each room and load shed percentage amounts.
A supplemental training video on using the rename Rooms utility can be found on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGiOSnLZdp0&index=4&list=PLQKZ56rib0O57ukrF8xv780Pc9ZxNP9MG
This utility requires a .csv file, with the data arranged in the following order: Old Room Name, New Room Name,
Square Footage, Load Shed Percentage.
NOTE: You have the option as to which information you want import, but the .csv file must be set up for all four
columns of information, even if a column is blank. (The Old Room Name must always be included and
must exactly match the name currently in the project.)
Click Rename Rooms to open the Rename Rooms Utility dialog.
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Rename Rooms
Click Browse and select the .csv file to import. By default, Rename Rooms, Update Square Footage, and
Update Percent Load Shed are all selected, but you can deselect any option you do not want to import.
Click Rename to begin the process. The Log shows the status of the import.
NOTE: Wattstopper recommends that you make a backup copy of the project before beginning the renaming
process.
Preferences
This dialog includes BACnet configuration, as well as a few preference settings
Preferences
Show Technician Pages – If you select this check box, a Technician tab will show up in the Device
Information section in many (but not all) of the devices. The fields on these tabs are intended for use by
technicians and product experts and are not normally used.
Poll Room Devices – Deselect this check box to prevent LMCS from trying to poll rooms while other actions
like Area Syncing are being performed. Wattstopper recommends leaving this parameter disabled.
Show Group D Devices – If this checkbox is selected, the following Dekko models will be included within the
drop-downs under the Add Devices section: LMPL-201DK (within Controllers/Plug Load Controllers), and
LMPD-102 Wall Switch Occupancy Sensor (an OEM product). These OEM products are both obsolete.
Show Network Controllers (300 Series) – If this checkbox is selected, An additional menu option, Network
Room Controllers, will appear within the Add Devices Controllers drop-down. Selecting this menu open a
submenu containing the LMRC-311, LMRC-312, and LMRC-313 (legacy products).
Device ID – This is the BACnet device ID for LMCS. This Device ID must be unique on the BACnet/IP
network. No two communicating devices can have the same BACnet Device ID
UDP Port – This is the UDP port used by LMCS for BACnet communications. This Hexadecimal number
must match the UDP Port of the NB-ROUTERs (BAC0 = 47808.)
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PROGRAMMING PARAMETERS FOR INDIVIDUAL DEVICES
This section lists and defines all of the programming parameters for each device category. Click on a device in
the tree to view its parameters in the Device Information section of the window. In general, different models of the
same type of devices will contain the same parameters (for example, the different room controllers or different
switch models). For some devices, different parameters are available on different models (for example, daylighting
photosensors). In those cases, separate sections are included for each model.
For room controllers, which have per load parameters, and switches, which have per button parameters, the load
and button parameters are documented separately.
NOTE: Many devices have a Technician tab. This tab is visible only if the Show Technician Pages option is
selected in the Preferences dialog. The fields on these tabs are intended for use by technicians and
product experts and are not normally used. The technician tab is included in all of the screenshots in this
section.
PARAMETERS COMMON TO ALL DEVICES
The top part of the Device Information section is the same for all devices, containing four parameters and four
buttons.
Device Type – This read only field displays the model of the device.
Serial Number – If working offline, this value can be entered manually. If not, it is entered automatically
during discovery or syncing. Once discovery or syncing occurs, it becomes a read only field (but can be
changed using the Advanced button).
A second Serial Number parameter is found on the Advanced tab for each device. It is identical to this field.
You can manually enter the serial number in either field and the other will update automatically.
Description – Text entered here will appear within square brackets next to the model name for the device, in
the tree in LMCS. It also is used to identify the device in the Devices tab in the Segment Manager application.
Location – Text entered in this field can be used to provide information about the exact location of a device
within the room.
The four buttons are enabled only if LMCS is connected to the room.
Read – Loads all parameters values from the device into LMCS. This will overwrite and custom LMCS
programming.
Send – Sends the all parameters values from LMCS into the device.
Status – This reads the status of certain parameters within various devices and displays that information. For
a room/plug load controllers and panels, for each load/relay it displays information such as load state and
normal/after hours. For occupancy sensors, it displays information such as occupancy state and mode. For
photosensors, it displays the current light level.
Ping – Helps to confirm communication with the device. For a room controller, if a load is off, it will turn on
briefly, then off again. If the load is on, it will turn off briefly then back on again. For other devices, the blue
LEDs will blink for several seconds.
CONTROLLERS AND PANELS
This section documents the tabs for Small Room, Fixture, Enhanced Room, Network Room, Plug Load, and CCT
Fixture Controllers. These parameters also apply to LMPB-100 Power Booster.
LMCP Panels and the LMZC-301 Zone Controller also contain the same parameters, but they contain an extra tab in
the top area for bridge parameters. In addition, panels and zone controllers contain several tabs in the bottom area for
features unique to panels. See “Controllers – Parameters Unique to Panels and Zone Controllers” on page 74.
NOTE: The LMRC-3xx series consists of a room controller combined with a bridge, but they are treated as
separate devices. Therefore, they do not contain the bridge tab. If you discover a room with a LMRC-3xx,
both the LMRC and an LMBC-300 bridge will be added to the room. If adding the LMRC-3xx manually
while offline, you must also manually add an LMBC-300. (These devices are no longer available.)
Directly below the controller tabs, you will see tabs for one or more Loads (depending on the number of loads handled
by the controller). The only exceptions to this, are the LMPB-100 Power Booster and LMZC-301 Zone Controller,
which have no loads. If viewing a panel, the loads are labelled Relays, but they have the same parameters. The load
parameters are documented in the next section, “Controllers – Loads and Relays” on page 67.
The LMLM-101 and LMFC-LXI Fixture Controllers provide control over Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and
therefore have additional parameters in the Loads tab. See “Controllers – CCT Loads” on page 73.
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Basic Tab
Room Controller Basic Tab
Watts, amps, and volts parameters are found on both the Basic and Technician tabs, but the behavior of the volts
and amps fields differs slightly on the two tabs, based on the model
Volts – Volts must be manually entered. Since watts are calculated based on this value, Wattstopper
recommends measuring the voltage at the room controller feed rather than simply entering the expected
amount of volts.
For the 100 series room and plug load controllers, and for the LMFC-011, this field on the Basic tab is read
only and must be entered on the Technician tab. For the 200 and 300 series room and plug load controllers
and for the LMPB-100, this amount can be entered on either tab.
Amps – For the 200 and 300 series, this amount is measured by the controller, and therefore the field is read
only. For the 100 series and LMFC-011, this field on the Basic tab is read only and must be entered on the
Technician tab.
NOTE: The LMRC-111-M and LMRC-112-M room controllers have metering capabilities and therefore follow
the 200 and 300 series rules for both Volts and Amps.
Watts – This amount is calculated: Watts = Volts * Amps * (Power Factor/100). Power Factor is shown on
the Advanced tab. It is read only.
NOTE: For the LMRC-102, which has two loads, the Wattage amount is based on both loads being on.
Individual loads are not calculated separately.
Circuit – This field provides a place to document the specific circuit used for the loads, based on CAD
drawings. Note that for panels, there is also a separate Circuit parameter available for each relay, in the
Relays section.
Power Totalizer – This field functions as a meter, showing the total watt hours consumed by the controller’s
loads. Volts and Amps must have valid values for this field to function.
Room Profile – This read only parameter indicates the current profile selected at the room level. This
parameter is displayed only if the room includes a device that supports profiles (currently, the LMDI-100,
LMIO-102, and LMPS-104). For the LMDI-100, you must also select the Partition Support checkbox before
this parameter is displayed.
Advanced Tab
Room Controller Advanced Tab
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Parameters on the Advanced Tab Common to All Devices
Lock Level – Available values:
• No Lock – This will unlock PlugnGo (PnG) and PushnLearn (PnL) functionality in the device. (PnG is
locked once any custom programming is sent to any device in the room by LMCS, or if PnL is initiated
on any device in the room. PnL can only be locked using the Lock PnG and PnL value here in this
dialog.) This might be used in a situation in which a device was previously in a different room which was
locked, and then was moved to a new room. It would then need to be unlocked, before being locked
with the devices in the new room.
• Lock PnG – This will lock the PnG functionality in the device.
• Lock PnG and PnL – This will lock PnG and PnL functionality in the device. An example of why you
might want to lock PnL is to prevent anyone from reprogramming switch functionality in a public area
such as a classroom or lobby.
NOTE: This drop-down affects only the individual current device. In addition, these messages can be sent to
all devices in a room, on the Advanced tab for the room. One significant difference—these functions
are separate buttons on the room window, so they occur as soon as you click the button, whereas for
an individual device, you must click Send before the change takes effect.
Serial Number – Identical to the same field in the common parameters section.
Firmware Version – If working offline, this is set to the most recent version of firmware, based on the version
of LMCS. Once discovery or syncing occurs, it is updated to the actual version in the device. This field is read
only (but can be changed using the Advanced button).
Hardware Version – If working offline, this is set to 0. Once discovery or syncing occurs, it is updated to the
actual version in the device. This field is read only (but can be changed using the Advanced button).
Date Code – If working offline, this is set to 0. Once discovery or syncing occurs, it is updated to the actual
version in the device. This field is read only (but can be changed using the Advanced button).
If you click the Advanced Button, an additional dialog opens that allows you to change the Serial Number,
Hardware Version, and Date Code. This button is only enabled after the device has been discovered or synced.
WARNING: Changing these fields can cause problems with LMCS communication with the device or other general
network problems, and should only be done under the direction of a Wattstopper technician.
Advanced Device Info
If a change for any of the parameters is required, enter the new values and click the appropriate Send button.
Once the send process is complete, click Reboot Device.
Parameters Unique to Controllers
Power Factor – Used in the calculation of Watts. By default this is 100%. If you know the specific power
factor for the loads connected to this controller, enter that value.
Watt Change for Update – This field applies to 200 series and 300 series controllers only. Controllers send
status messages regarding Watts currently consumed. If there is no change, this message is sent during
a random time frame of between 5 and 10 minutes. If the amount changes, then if the amount of change
equals or exceeds the amount set in this field, the message is sent immediately. If the amount of change is
less than this amount, the message is sent every 30 seconds.
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Technician Tab
Room Controller Technician Tab
Watts, amps, and volts parameters are found on both the Basic and Technician tabs, but the behavior of the volts
and amps fields differs slightly on the two tabs, based on the model
Volts – Volts must be manually entered. Since watts are calculated based on this value, Wattstopper
recommends measuring the voltage at the room controller feed rather than simply entering the expected
amount of volts.
Amps – For the LMRC-111M, LMRC-112M, and the 200 and 300 series, this amount is measured by the
controller, and therefore the field is read only. For the LMRC-101. LMRC-102, LMRC-111, LMRC-112, and
LMFC-011, the amount must be entered here.
Watts – This amount is calculated, based on the values of the Volts and Amps parameters. It is read only.
NOTE: For the LMRC-102, which has two loads, the Wattage amount is based on both loads being on.
Individual loads are not calculated separately.
Lumenetix Version – This parameter is only displayed for the LMLM-101 and LMFC-LXI CCT Fixture
controllers. It shows the version information of the Lumenetix driver within the controller.
CONTROLLERS – LOADS AND RELAYS
Each load in a controller has its own tab in the bottom part of the Information Section. For panels, each relay has
its own sub-tab, in groups of up to 12 under one more grouping tabs. All parameters are identical for both loads
and relays. For each Load or Relay tab, there are Basic, Advanced, and Technician tabs.
Parameters Appearing On All Tabs
These parameters display no matter whether the Basic, Advanced, or Technician tab is selected.
Load ID – This read only field displays the load ID assigned to the load. Note that the ID can be changed on
the Technician tab. Load IDs are sequentially numbered, from 1 to a maximum of 64.
Description – The description entered here is shown in the tree in both LMCS and the Segment Manager
application.
Load Type – Available values:
• Switched – Indicates a switched load. Note that if a load is capable of dimming, selecting this value
will not prevent the load from dimming. However, selecting this value does disable the Trim Level
parameters in the Normal Hours/After Hours section.
• Dimmed (0-10v) – Indicates a dimmed load. If the controller is not capable of dimming this value will not
appear.
• Incandescent – Appears for LMRC-22x controllers only. This should be used with Incandescent,
Magnetic Low Voltage, Cold Cathode, or Neon ballasts. It provides a direct (straight line) reduction of
voltage from 100% to minimum, with a commensurate reduction of light from the fixture.
• Mark X – Appears for LMRC-22x controllers only. This is used for 2 wire dimming ballasts such as the
Phillips Advance X. These ballasts can’t use a straight line voltage reduction because at some point
there isn’t enough voltage to power the electronics in the ballast itself. This value provides a smaller
range of voltage change, resulting in an output from 100% to minimum %.
• HiLume – Appears for LMRC-22x controllers only. This is used for 3 wire dimming ballasts that have
both a dimming hot wire and a switched hot wire, such as the HiLume fixtures.
• HID – No Blink Warn – This turns off the Blink Warn feature. It is intended for use with High Intensity
Discharge loads, since they cannot immediately turn back on after turning off.
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• Pulsed – When this value is selected, and On value for the controller will trigger the load for a specified
amount of time and then turn Off. The length of the pulse is set on the Technician tab. This is useful
for integration with non-DLM devices such as shades For example, if it takes about 5 seconds to raise/
lower the shades you would set to pulse for 5 seconds. Then when a connected button is pressed, the
load turns on for 5 seconds and then turns off automatically.
NOTE: This feature requires firmware versions of 7.82 or later for panels,
6.17 or later for the LMRC-111/112, or 6.29 or later for all other controllers.
• AS-100 – This value is for use with the AS-100 Automatic Control Switch. The AS-100 is a switch that
controls the line voltage (instead of sending a low voltage control message to the room controller).
Instead, the AS-100 responds to timed power interrupt signals coming from the controller, providing
automatic shutoff with a blink warning when transitioning between normal hours and after hours. Other
timed interrupt signals can turn the power on or off.
Circuit – This text field appears only for panels and is available to document the specific circuit for the load.
(This parameter does not appear in the following screenshots since they show a room controller.) Note that
room and plug load controllers do have this parameter available in the Basic tab in the top section.
Basic Tab
Load Basic Tab
Daylighting Circuit – If a daylighting device in the room has been assigned to the load, it will display here.
Status Section
The parameters in this section provide real time control of the loads and also provides summarized information on
the current load status. This is useful for testing purposes.
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There are three parts to this section: Intensity, CCT, and Detailed Status.
Intensity – This applies to dimming level or ON/Off status in switched loads.
Set Level – Enter an amount and tab out of the field, or move the slider, to change the level of the load.
Actual Level – This read only field displays the same value as the set value, unless a Trim Level has been
set which affects the maximum value. So for example, if the Trim Level is set to 85%, then the Actual Level
will not go above 85% even if the Set Level is higher.
Last Non-Zero Value – This read only field display the last non-zero level.
BACnet Priority Level – Sets the priority level at which the real time level change is sent. If some other
device has sent a command at a higher priority level, the loads will not respond to the real time change (the
lowest number, which is 1, has the highest priority). By default, all DLM devices except LMLS photocells are
set to a priority level of 8.
The controller stores the most recent message sent at each priority, and will follow the highest priority until a
relinquish command is sent on that priority, which clears that message. The controller then looks at the next
highest priority to determine what to do.
Relinquish – Click this button to send the relinquish command for the current BACnet Priority Level. If no
other command exists at any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level (0 by default).
CCT – This applies to CCT levels. It is only enabled for the LMLM-101 and LMFC-LXI CCT fixture controllers.
Set Level – Enter an amount and tab out of the field, or move the slider, to change the CCT level of the load.
Actual Level – This read only field displays the same value as the set value, unless a CCT Trim Level (on
the Advanced tab) has been set which affects the maximum value. So for example, if the CCT Trim Level is
set to 4000K, then the Actual Level will not go above 4000K even if the Set Level is higher.
Detailed Status – This shows the current values for various parameters that affect the controller.
Normal Hours/After Hour Section
This section contains two sets of identical parameters, for normal hours and for after hours.
Sensor Mode – Determine how the load will respond to occupancy/vacancy commands. Available values:
• Follow On and Off – Responds to both occupancy and vacancy commands. Also referred to as Auto On.
• Follow Off Only – Responds to both vacancy commands only. Also referred to as Manual On.
NOTE: This parameter also appears on the Advanced tab, but with many more available values.
Use Blink Warn – Flashes the load off and on prior to a load turning off, If a load is commanded to turn
OFF when the schedule switches From Normal Hours to After Hours (or vice versa), or if a load has been
turned on by a switch during the override time and the override time expires. It blinks for the amount of time
specified in the Blink Warn Grace Time parameter (found on the Advanced tab).
The load will also flash if a Blink Warn command is received from a sensor. The blinking will begin one minute
before the sensor turns the load off, unless you select one of the Sensor Mode options that uses the Blink
Warn Grace Time, in which case it blinks for the amount of time specified in that parameter. (These options
are only available on the Advanced tab).
Trim Level – Determines the minimum and maximum levels that the load can go to. For switched loads, this
field is read only, but can be set on the Technician tab. For dimming loads, values can be edited on this tab.
NOTE: For a dimming capable room controller, if the Load Type is set to “Switched”, it will be read only.
Preset Level – The level a load will go to when it receives the Last Non-Zero command. If the Use Last Level
checkbox is selected, the load will return to whatever level it was at before it was turned off. If the checkbox is
not selected, you can set a specific amount for the load. Note that this can be set for both dimmed and switched
loads, but a switched load will simply turn on or off, depending on where the Fade Trip Point is.
Use Last Level – see Preset Level
Partial Off Level – The amount the load goes to when turned off or all priority levels are relinquished (nulled out).
By default, it is 0, but for a dimming load if you set it to a higher amount you can specify a minimum level for the
load. This is helpful when you want to keep the lights from turning completely off when a space is empty.
Fade Trip Point – The level at which a switched load will toggle on. Any value sent below that number will
turn the load off. By assigning different values to a set of switched loads controlled by the same dimming
switch, you can create a “stepped” ramp up/fade down.
NOTE: This field is disabled for a CCT controller.
Level on Transition to Normal Hours/After Hours – The level the load will go to when transitioning
between normal hour and after hours or vice versa. Available values:
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• Nothing – No changes occurs.
• Go To Level – When this value is selected, the slider and text entry field are enabled and you can use
either to select a specific value
• Keep Timer – If a load will is set to turn off when a timer expires and the transition occurs, this value will
retain the timer value. So for example, if during After Hours, a load was turned on manually at 6:00 AM and
the Override Time Till Off parameter on the Advanced tab is set to 2 hours, and during that time period it
transitions to Normal Hours, the load will retain that time amount and will then turn off at 8:00 AM.
• Last Non-Zero – The load goes to the amount specified by the Preset Level and Use Last Level
parameters.
• Turn Off – Relinquishes the load at the level specified by the Occupancy Sensor Priority parameter on
the Technician tab. The controller then looks at the next highest priority to determine what to do. If no
other command exists at any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level (0 by default).
Advanced Tab
Load Advanced Tab
Lamp Burn-in Time – Used for ballasts that require a burn-in period. Enter a time in hours. Once you
click Send, the controller turns the load on and all other control of the load is disconnected so that the load
remains on and can’t be turned off for that time period (other than with a power cycle).
NOTE: Once the burn-in is complete, be sure to come back and set the time back to 0, or the next time you
click send, it start the burn-in again.
Cycle Load – Click this button to toggle between an On state (it will be orange) and an Off State. While
enabled, the load will continue to turn on and off every few seconds.
Reversed Output – This will reverse the levels so that a value of ON will turn the load OFF, and OFF will turn
the load ON. Dimmed level values are also reversed, so for example, a value of 80 will send a value of 20 to
the load.
Calibration Trim – This parameter allows you to specify a minimum and maximum level, which should be
based on the specifications for the lamps being used for the load. These minimum and maximum amounts
scale the response to the regular 0-100 level commands. So for example, if the Low amount here is set to 10
and the High to 92, then a Level value of 0 would actually set the load to 10 and a value of 100 would set it
to 92. If you are also using a Trim Level, that amount is applied after scaling. So, in this example, setting the
trim level to 85 would be equivalent to an actual amount of 69.7, since .85 * (92-10) = 69.7
NOTE: If the load is higher than this level and is shed, it will go to this level. If at or underneath this level, it
will stay there during a shed.
Max Baseline Power – Currently, this parameter applies for panels only.
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Shed To Level – The maximum level the load will go to when it receives a Load Shed command. If the load
is currently at a higher level, it will reduce to this amount. If it is currently at a lower level, it will remain at that
level.
Normal Hours/After Hour Section
Sensor Mode – Determine how the load will respond to occupancy/vacancy commands. Available values:
• No Action – Do not respond to sensor
• Follow Off Only – Responds to vacancy commands only. Also referred to as Manual On.
• Follow On and Off – Responds to both occupancy and vacancy commands. Also referred to as Auto On.
• Follow On Only With Override Time Delay – The load responds only to Occupancy commands and once
the load is on, it will not shut off for the length of time entered in the Override Time Till Off parameter. If
the sensor registers vacancy and then back to occupancy, the time delay period restarts the countdown.
NOTE: The Override Time Till Off parameter has its own functionality related to responding to a switch.
If you select this option the amount of time specified in that parameter will apply both to its own
functionality and to this option.
• Follow Off Only With Blink Warn Grace Time – Responds to vacancy commands only. Instead of using
the default value of one minute for the blink warn feature, the sensor will use the amount of time entered
in the Blink Warn Grace Time parameter.
• Follow On and Off With Blink Warn Grace Time – Responds to both occupancy and vacancy
commands. Instead of using the default value of one minute for the blink warn feature, the sensor will
use the amount of time entered in the Blink Warn Grace Time parameter.
Fade Rate – When the load changes values, the amount specified here will fade down/up using percentage
per second. So if you specify a value of 50, it will take two seconds (50% per second).
Use Fade Time – If this is selected, Fade Time will be used instead of Fade Rate.
Fade Time – When the load changes values, it will fade down/up in the amount of time specified.
Override Time Till Off – If a load is commanded to turn OFF when the schedule switches From Normal
Hours to After Hours (or vice versa), this is the amount of time the load will remain ON after manually being
turned ON from a switch. When the amount of time expires, the load switches back to OFF.
If you want this to occur when switching to Normal Hours, set this value on the Normal Hours tab. If you want
it to occur when switching to After Hours, set it on the After Hours tab.
Use Blink Warn – Flashes the load off and on prior to a load turning off, if a load is commanded to turn
OFF when the schedule switches From Normal Hours to After Hours (or vice versa), or if a load has been
turned on by a switch during the override time and the override time expires. It blinks for the amount of time
specified in the Blink Warn Grace Time parameter.
The load will also flash if a Blink Warn command is received from a sensor. The blinking will begin one minute
before the sensor turns the load off, unless you select one of the Sensor Mode options that uses the Blink
Warn Grace Time, in which case it blinks for the amount of time specified in that parameter.
Blink Warn Grace Time – If Use Blink Warn is selected, this is the amount of time that the load will flash.
Sensor Retrigger Grace Period – If the Sensor Mode is set to “Follow Off Only” (Manual), the load will turn
back ON if the sensor registers occupancy during the amount of time specified here. This enables the sensor
to function in Auto On mode for a temporary period of time. The default is 10 seconds. If set to 0, then this
function is disabled.
Button Mode – Determines whether the load responds to commands from a button. Available values:
• Nothing – Do not respond to button
• Off Only – Respond only when the button is turned off
• On Only – Respond only when the button is turned on
• Off and On – Respond to both on and off messages
Power Up Mode – Determines the level will go to after power is restored following a power loss. Note that
this amount will still be affected by the Calibration Trim and Trim Level settings. Available values:
• Last State – Return to the level the load was at before the power loss.
• Off – Load remains off (value of 0).
• On – Load turn on to full amount (value of 100).
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Technician Tab
Load Technician Tab
Occupancy Sensor Priority – This is the BACnet priority for all commands sent by a sensor.
Pulse Output Duration – This is used when Load Type is set to “Pulsed”. It determines the amount of time a
load will stay On before shutting Iff, once an On command is sent.
Legacy Occupancy Sensor – Select this checkbox if using Legacy sensor models that are not DLM
products but do have a CAT5 connection capable of connection to a DLM system. This checkbox should be
left unchecked unless it is specifically needed.
Is Out Of Service – If this checkbox is selected, all control of the load by the controller is disabled. The load
will remain in its current state and will not change. (You must click Send before this occurs.)
Dim Phase – This is not currently in use. All Wattstopper dimming capable controllers currently use forward
phase dimming.
New Load ID – This allows you to change the load ID of a specific load. When a controller is added to a room
in LMCS, either manually or by discovery, load IDs are assigned to each room consecutively, starting with 1
for load 1, 2 for load 2, and so on. If a second controller is added, the first load is assigned the next available
number, and so on. Once LMCS initiates communication with the room, it locks the room so the IDs can’t be
changed, except by using this parameter.
There is normally no reason to change a load ID, but if a room controller that already has its load IDs locked ends
up being moved to a different room, there could be a conflict with duplicate IDs. In this case, you can change the
number to an unused ID. You must click Set after changing the number to change the ID within the controller.
Normal Hours/After Hour Section
The Fade Rate, Preset Level, Fade Trip Point, Use Blink Warn, and Blink Warn Grace Time parameters are
identical to those on the Basic and Advanced tabs, and are provided here for convenience.
Trim Level – This parameter is the same as the one shown on the Basic tab. However, if the Load Type
is “Switched”, trim level is a read only parameter on the Basic tab and an only be edited on this tab. The
parameter has both a high trim (maximum amount) and low trim (minimum amount).
Daylighting Mode – This parameter is needed for use with the legacy LMLS-105. Available values:
• Ignore LMLS-105 – This value should be used unless an LMLS-105 is connected to the room.
• Follow LMLS-105 – If using an LMLS-105, this will cause the room controller to shut OFF the load if the
LMLS-105 registers light above the defined threshold.
• Follow if not occupied – If using an LMLS-105 along with a legacy occupancy sensor, this will cause the
room controller to shut OFF the load if sensor detects vacancy AND the LMLS-105 registers light above
the defined threshold.
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CONTROLLERS – CCT LOADS
The LMLM-101 and LMFC-LXI Fixture Controllers provide control over Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and
therefore have additional parameters in the Loads tab. These additional parameters and any differences between CCT
loads and regular loads are documented in the following sections. If functionality is identical with regular loads, those
parameters are not included here to avoid duplication. Please refer to the previous section on loads and relays for
definitions of those parameters.
Parameters Appearing On All Tabs
The only difference between a CCT Load and regular load is the available values of the Load Type. CCT loads
have the following values only: Lumenetix, Araya, Blanco 1, Blanco 2-1, Blanco 2-2, and Blanco 2-3. These
correspond to the driver being used by the fixture controller. If the controller has been added to the room through
Discovery, this parameter will be automatically set to the correct value. The “Lumenetix” value is used if the driver
is not one of the standard Araya or Blanco drivers.
The Load Type value determines the settings of the CCT Range and CCT Trim on the Advanced tab, so if you
are manually creating the project, be sure to select the correct driver.
NOTE: It is not possible to send the value you select in LMCS to the fixture controller—the fixture controller
automatically knows what driver is connected to it. But since the CCT range and trim can be edited in
LMCS based on the load type, it is still important that the value in LMCS be correct.
Basic Tab
For a CCT controller, a CCT section is enabled, containing Set Level and Actual Level parameters, These function
similar to the same parameters in the Intensity section, but control the CCT level rather than the dimming level.
Additionally, the Fade Trip Point slider is disabled for CCT controllers.
Advanced Tab
CCT Load Advanced Tab
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Two extra CCT Sections are added to the Advanced tab.
Range – If Load Type is set to anything other than “Lumenentix”, this parameter is read only and the
Minimum and Maximum amounts are set based on the specific load type. If set to “Lumenetix”, the parameter
becomes editable and you can set minimum and maximum values
Trim – Determines the minimum and maximum CCT levels that the load can go to, allowing you to limit the
range of CCT change to an amount less than the range that the CCT driver is capable of. If you set the range
outside of the Range amounts, the trim will have no effect.
Normal Hours/After Hour Section
Fade Rate – When the load changes CCT values, the amount specified here will fade down/up using
percentage per second. So if you specify a value of 50, it will take two seconds (50% per second).
Use Fade Time – If this is selected, Fade Time will be used instead of Fade Rate.
Fade Time – When the load changes CCT values, it will fade down/up in the amount of time specified.
NOTE: These parameters only apply when the controller receives CCT change values from the LMSW-105-CCT.
Fade time in CCT level cause by schedule events in the LMTS-101-CCT is determined by the start and
end times of the schedule event
Technician Tab
The only addition on this tab is that a CCT section is added at the bottom containing the Fade Rate parameter. This
parameter is identical to the one on the Advanced tab is included here for convenience
CONTROLLERS – PARAMETERS UNIQUE TO PANELS AND ZONE CONTROLLERS
Panels and Zone Controllers contain the identical parameters as found on other controllers, but contain an extra
tab for the bridge functionality. (Parameters on the Basic, Advanced, and Technician tabs are described in the
section “Controllers and Panels” on page 64.)
NOTE: The LMBC-300 is a stand alone bridge and as such contains the same bridge parameters documented
here. The LMBC-600 also contains many of these parameters, but several of them do not appear. There
are, however, some differences between panels and the stand alone bridges. See “Interfaces – LMBC-300
and LMBC-600 Bridges” on page 101 for details.
Bridge Tab
The parameters on this tab apply to communication with the bridge functionality, via BACnet.
Panels and Zone Controllers – The Bridge Tab
Device ID – The ID used for BACnet communication. This is set automatically during discovery, or when the
Serial Number is entered if working off-line. (The ID defaults to the last six digits of the serial number.) For
more details on the Device ID, see “Entering Serial Numbers and Device IDs in LMCS” on page 42.
Baud Rate – Set the baud rate for communication. DLM systems use 38400 by default. (Note that the default
“Auto-baud” does not currently function—you must select a baud rate.)
Square Footage – Enter the square footage of the area controlled by all loads in the panel, or by all fixture
controllers connected to the zone controller. This is used to calculate energy usage per square foot when
monitoring using the Segment Manager application.
Network – If there are multiple BACnet networks (in situations with multiple routers), select the correct
network that this device is connected to.
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NOTE: If Network Devices have been added to the tree in the Networks View tab and the bridge has
already been assigned to a network, that network will appear here. Conversely, if you select a
network value here, the bridge will appear under that network in the tree.
Auto MAC Address – If you select this checkbox, the panel or zone controller will automatically select
the MS/TP MAC Address. The MS/TP MAC address is an additional identifier, used by the devices on the
network to communicate with each other. It is a number between 0 and 127. It is important to understand
the difference between the device ID and the MAC Address. The Device ID is, in essence, a number that
identifies “who” the devices is, while the MAC address identifies its “location”.
In a BACnet network, all the devices pass a token to each other to determine which device has control
of communication over the network. The MAC address is used to “locate” other devices. When a device
receives the token, it will take control of the communication and send messages to other devices as needed.
It then passes the token to the device with the next highest MAC address. In order to do this, it sends an “Are
you there?” message on the MAC address one higher than its own. If it receives a response, it passes the
token. If it does not receive a response, it tries again on the next highest number, continuing in this manner
until it receives a response. This “Are you there?” message is referred to as a Poll For Master.
NOTE: In order to send and respond to this Poll For Master message, a device must be designated as
a master device. Other devices (slave devices) on the network will not respond, and cannot take
control of the communication.
While the Device ID is fixed and should not change, the MS/TP MAC address can change as devices come
on or drop off the network. By default, with the Auto MAC Address checkbox selected, the panel or zone
controller will automatically assign a MAC address. When the panel or zone controller is powered up, it will
check the network for other devices to determine if its current MAC address is being used by another device.
If, not it will keep the same address, but if it is, and will assign an unused number between 32 and 127.
You can manually assign an MS/TP MAC address instead of having the panel or zone controller
automatically assign the number. To do this, deselect the checkbox and enter a value. This can be useful,
especially in larger networks where response time is important. Since the Poll For Master message checks
the next highest address number and then increments that number until it finds a device, having devices with
gaps between numbers can increase latency. If you have 10 devices, numbered 0–9, you will have optimal
performance since no time is wasted sending the Poll For Master message to an unused number.
Actual MAC Address – This will display the MAC Address currently being used by the bridge.
Max Master – The Max Master parameter is another parameter that will cut down on latency. The value you
set for this parameter is the highest number the LMCP will check when sending a Poll For Master message,
before returning to 0. So, in the previous example, where there are 10 devices numbered 0–9, if you set the
Max Master to 9, it will never check addresses 10–127.
NOTE: If using the LMCP with a global controller such as a router, BAS or Segment Manager, the global
controller will always default to a MAC address of 0.
Object Name – This is a second identifier, along with the Device ID, and can be used to identify a device
in a BACnet communication. By default this is set to the type of device. You can edit it to make it unique
(for example, by adding a number to the existing text name). But this is not required and does not affect
programming applications with Wattstopper products.
MSTP Health – This will display as “Unhealthy” if LMCS can’t find the BACnet network, or if devices on
network drop off and then reappear while polling the network (indicating connection problems). If devices
show up consistently, or if they disappear and do not show up again (which would indicate the device was
disabled or disconnected), the status will display as “Healthy”.
MSTP Device Count – The number of devices on the BACnet network.
Refresh Minutes – If this is set to a value other than 0 (the default), the device will check the network once
per number of minutes set here, to see if other devices known to be connected are still online.
Network Groups Tab
If any relays (loads) in a panel have been assigned to a network group in the Network Group dialog (or by using
the LMCT-100), each of those groups will display on the Network Groups tab. For a zone controller, if you assign
an LMFC-011 fixture controller (or a room controller) to a network group, and that controller is in the same room as
a specific zone controller, then the groups will display on the tab for that zone controller.
NOTE: You can modify an existing group on this tab, changing parameter values or adding/removing loads. But
you cannot create a group. That must be done on the Network Group dialog.
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Network Groups Tab
The parameters on this tab are identical to those on the Network Group dialog, with a few exceptions, as follows:
• The Group column displays the group number and description. It cannot be edited on this tab.
• If you click the Included Loads field in a specific row, a pop-up opens which allows you to add or remove
loads in the panel or bridge.
NOTE: If you remove all loads from the group, it will be removed from the tab. (If that group includes loads
from another panel or bridge, it will still display when viewing that other panel or bridge.) Removing
all loads does not delete the group—it will still exist on the Network Group dialog, but with no loads
assigned to it.
• Clicking Apply functions the same as it does on the Network Group dialog, but in this case only sends the
parameter values to the tabs for the included loads within this panel or bridge only. So if the group includes
loads from more than one panel or bridge, changing parameter values on this tab and clicking Apply will not
affect those other panels or bridges.
For details on all other parameters, see “Network Group Parameters” on page 32.
Schedules Tab
You can schedule up to 254 date and time based events per panel or zone controller. Each event is assigned to a
group or scene, and determines one action for that group or scene. For each event, you specify the time the event
occurs. You also specify the days of the week in which the event will occur. Additionally, you specify whether the
event will occur on any day designated as a holiday.
If panels are networked and multiple panels/zone controllers use the same group number to control relays/fixture
controllers, then any events scheduled in one panel will affect the other panels (since events are always assigned
to a group number). By using different group numbers in different panels, you can limit which panels will respond
to those scheduled events.
Timing for the events is controlled by the clock in the panel or zone controller where the events are stored. You
can also designate a single panel/zone controller to function as a master clock for the entire network. See “DLM
Site Time/Location” on page 60 for details.
Click Add to add an event to the table. To remove an existing event, click the arrow in the left column to highlight
that row and click Remove.
To edit an event click in a field in the row for that event.
NOTE: If using a Segment Manager, it is recommended that all scheduling be done in the Segment Manager
application, to avoid possible conflicts.
Schedules Tab
Event – This designates the event number and can’t be edited.
Description – This field is provided for documentation purposes.
Type – This determines whether the scheduled event controls a Network Group or a Scene.
Group/Scene – The number of the Group or Scene that the event controls. For a group, the drop-down
displays all groups that include loads for this panel/zone controller. For scenes, the drop-down displays 16
scenes. Both the number and the description of the group/scene is displayed.
NOTE: While group commands can affect any networked panel, scene commands affect only the panel’s
“Room”.
Action – Determines the action triggered by the event. Actions will affect all loads that are part of the
selected Network Group or Scene. The available values change depending on whether the event controls a
scene or group:
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For Scenes, you have the choice of “Scene On” or Scene Off”. For “Scene” On”, all loads go to the levels set
for the scene. For “Scene Off”, all loads (that are part of the scene) are turned OFF.
For Groups:
• Go To Level – Set the load to the value of the Level parameter.
• Last Non-Zero – Set the load to the last non-zero level.
• Do Nothing – No change to the load.
• Normal Hours Override – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings for Normal Hours within the group
(programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• After Hours Override – Set the load to After Hours. All settings for After Hours within the group
(programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• Normal Hours – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings found on the Normal Hours tab for loads and
sensors will be applied.
• After Hours – Set the load to After Hours. All settings found on the After Hours tab for loads and sensors
will be applied.
• Turn Off – This relinquishes the load—it doesn’t actually “turn off” the load. If the Partial Off Level
for the load is a value other than 0. The load will go to that level. Or, if sensors are in the room, the
loads will still wait for the sensor delay timers to expire before turning off. (The only exception is if the
Reversed Output checkbox on the load’s Advanced tab is selected, in which case the load would turn
ON.)
If you require that the load turn off completely no matter the settings of other parameters and devices, use
the “Go To Level” option and then set the Level parameter to “0”.
NOTE: It is important to remember the difference between NH/AH values and the NH/AH Override values.
If you select the Override options, the load will go to the values specified for the group, while the
regular options will use the values specified for the loads and sensors. Also, be aware that the
Override values are not available when programming from an LMCT-100.
Level – Value the load will go to, if Action is set to “Go To Level”. This field is disabled for all other actions.
Time – Time the event occurs.
Active Days – Days the event occurs. In addition to selecting individual days of the week, you can also
select “Holidays”. Holidays are assigned in the Holidays dialog. See “Setting Up Holidays For Use With
Schedules” on page 34 for details.
Priority – Assigns the BACnet priority for the action. If a command at a higher priority (lower number)
currently exists for the load, then this action will be ignored until all higher priority commands are
relinquished. The default value is “8”.
Dark/Light Tab
Similar to Schedules, the Dark/Light tab allows you to create events that will trigger actions. But these events are based
on when it becomes dark outside (night) or light (day). You can program up to 32 separate dark/light events, and each
event is assigned to a group or scene. For each event, you can select whether to base the change from dark to light
and light to dark on either an astronomical calculation of sunrise and sunset, or from a photocell connected to an LMIO301. You can have multiple LMIO-301s connected to the network and assign different groups to different LMIO-301s, or
you can have a singe LMIO-301 but assign different light thresholds to different groups.
Each Dark/Light event has a Dark Action parameter and Light Action parameter. For each action you have the
same choices as for scheduled events. While a typical application would be to turn lights on when it gets dark
outside, you could also choose to have a specific group of lights turn off when it gets dark.
Astronomical Dark/Light Switching
When you use astronomical control, of dark/light events, Dark is triggered by sunset and Light is triggered by
sunrise, based on your location. Additionally, you have the ability to select an Offset. This parameter determines
when the event will be triggered in relation to the actual sunrise and sunset time. A positive offset acts as if the
time between sunrise and sunset was longer (more daytime), and a negative offset acts as if there were less time
between sunrise and sunset (less daytime). So if you select -20 minutes, the Dark event will trigger 10 minutes
before sunset and the Light event will trigger 10 minutes after sunrise. The diagram below shows the exact time
the events will be triggered based on different offset values.
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Dark/Light Event Triggering
18:07
Amount of Daytime
Time
07:15
17:57
~Noon
18:22
-10
Min
Offset
15
Min
Offset
07:00
~Midnight
15
Min
Offset
Dark
-10
Min
Offset
~Noon
Light
aka Sunset
aka Dusk
Less Offset
07:25
aka Sunrise
aka Dawn
More Offset
More Offset Less Offset
Daytime / Nighttime
Nighttime / Daytime
Example: Dallas Astro on 2/9/15
With Offset at 30 minutes
Dark ON – Lights turned on at 18:22
Light OFF – Lights turned off at 07:00
Sunset = 18:07
Sunrise = 07:15
With Offset at -20 minutes
Dark ON – Lights turned on at 17:57
Light OFF – Lights turned off at 07:25
Switching Based on Input From an LMIO-301 and Photocell
If you control dark/light events from an LMIO-301, you can select the amount of light, in footcandles that will trigger
the events. If the light rises above the footcandle amount, a light event will trigger, and if it drops to the exact
footcandle amount, a dark event will trigger.
A Delay parameter allows you to set the number of minutes after the specified footcandle amount is reached
before triggering the event. This helps prevent unwanted event triggering, for example, when the light temporarily
gets darker because of a cloud passing over the sun.
Dark/Light Tab
Astro/LMIO-301 – Determines whether the event is controlled by Astro or an LMIO-301. If no LMIO-301 is
added to the “room” in LMCS, the option is not displayed. If there is more than one LMIO-301 in the “room”,
each one will be available in the drop-down separately. If a Description is added for an LMIO-301 ( it will
show up in the drop-down with square brackets, to help identify each LMIO-301.
NOTE: Although dark/light events are typically associated with outside lighting control, the panel plus any
other loads connected to the panel via the DLM network is considered a “room” for the purposes of
LMCS.
Event – This designates the event number and can’t be edited.
Type – This determines whether the scheduled event controls a Network Group or a Scene.
Group/Scene – The number of the Group or Scene that the event controls. For a group, the drop-down
displays all groups that include loads for this panel/zone controller. For scenes, the drop-down displays 16
scenes. Both the number and the description of the group/scene is displayed.
Dark Action – Determines the action triggered by a Dark event. Actions will affect all loads that are part of
the selected Network Group or Scene. The available values change depending on whether the event controls
a scene or group:
For Scenes, you have the choice of “Scene On” or Scene Off”. For “Scene” On”, all loads go to the levels set
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for the scene. For “Scene Off”, all loads (that are part of the scene) are turned OFF.
For Groups:
• Go To Level – Set the load to the value of the “Level” parameter.
• Last Non-Zero – Set the load to the last non-zero level.
• Do Nothing – No change to the load.
• Normal Hours Override – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings for Normal Hours within the group
programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• After Hours Override – Set the load to After Hours. All settings for After Hours within the group
programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• Normal Hours – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings found on the Normal Hours tab for loads and
sensors will be applied.
• After Hours – Set the load to After Hours. All settings found on the After Hours tab for loads and sensors
will be applied.
• Turn Off – Set the load to a value of 0. This turns the load OFF. (The only exception is if the Reversed
Output checkbox on the load’s Advanced tab is selected, in which case the load would turn ON.)
Dark Load Level – Value the load will go to, if Dark Action is set to “Go To Level”. This field is disabled for
all other actions.
Light Action – Determines the action triggered by a Light event. Available values are the same as for Dark
Action.
Light Load Level – Value the load will go to, if Light Action is set to “Go To Level”. This field is disabled for
all other actions.
Active Days – Days the event occurs. In addition to selecting individual days of the week, you can also
select “Holidays”. Holidays are assigned in the Holidays dialog. See “Setting Up Holidays For Use With
Schedules” on page 34 for details.
Setpoint – The amount of foot candles that will determine when the Dark and Light events are triggered.
(When the light becomes brighter than the Setpoint, it triggers the Light event, and when it becomes darker, it
triggers the Dark event.) Enabled only for an LMIO-301 event.
Delay – Determines the amount of time after the Setpoint is reached that the event is actually triggered. This
helps prevent unwanted event triggering, for example, when the light temporarily gets darker because of a
cloud passing over the sun. Enabled only for an LMIO-301 event.
Offset – Determines when the event will be triggered in relation to the actual sunrise and sunset time. See the
previous section on Astronomical Dark/Light Switching for more details. Enabled only for an Astro event.
Priority – Assigns the BACnet priority for the action. If a command at a higher priority (lower number)
currently exists for the load, then this action will be ignored until all higher priority commands are
relinquished. The default value is “8”.
Occupancy Groups Tab
Similar to Schedules, the Occupancy Groups tab allows you to create events that will trigger actions. But these
events are based on when the sensor registers a status of occupancy or vacancy. You can program up to 99
separate occupancy group events, and each event is assigned to a group or scene.
Occupancy Groups Tab
Sensor – Determines which sensor controls the group
Event – This designates the event number and can’t be edited.
Type – The is determines whether the scheduled event controls a Network Group or a Scene.
Group/Scene – The number of the Group or Scene that the event controls. For a group, the drop-down
displays all groups that include loads for this panel/zone controller. For scenes, the drop-down displays 16
scenes. Both the number and the description of the group/scene is displayed.
Occupied Action – Determines the action triggered when the sensor registers occupancy. Actions will affect
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all loads that are part of the selected Network Group or Scene. The available values change depending on
whether the event controls a scene or group:
For Scenes, you have the choice of “Scene On” or Scene Off”. For “Scene” On”, all loads go to the levels set
for the scene. For “Scene Off”, all loads (that are part of the scene) are turned OFF.
For Groups:
• Go To Level – Set the load to the value of the “Level” parameter.
• Last Non-Zero – Set the load to the last non-zero level.
• Do Nothing – No change to the load.
• Normal Hours Override – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings for Normal Hours within the group
programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• After Hours Override – Set the load to After Hours. All settings for After Hours within the group
programmed in the group editor) will be applied.
• Normal Hours – Set the load to Normal Hours. All settings found on the Normal Hours tab for loads and
sensors will be applied.
• After Hours – Set the load to After Hours. All settings found on the After Hours tab for loads and sensors
will be applied.
• Turn Off – Set the load to a value of 0. This turns the load OFF. (The only exception is if the Reversed
Output checkbox on the load’s Advanced tab is selected, in which case the load would turn ON.)
Occupied Level – Value the load will go to, if Occupied Action is set to “Go To Level”. This field is disabled
for all other actions.
Vacant Action – Determines the action triggered when the sensor registers vacancy. Available values are the
same as for Occupied Action.
Vacant Level – Value the load will go to, if Vacant Action is set to “Go To Level”. This field is disabled for all
other actions.
Active Days – Days the event occurs. In addition to selecting individual days of the week, you can also
select “Holidays”. Holidays are assigned in the Holidays dialog. See “Setting Up Holidays For Use With
Schedules” on page 34 for details.
Priority – Assigns the BACnet priority for the action. If a command at a higher priority (lower number)
currently exists for the load, then this action will be ignored until all higher priority commands are
relinquished. The default value is “8”.
Open ADR Tab
The parameters on this tab are used with the Segment Manager (or other BACnet application) to support Open
Automated Demand Response.
Open ADR Tab
Open ADR Status – Indicates the current Open ADR status in the room. This will always be “Idle” unless it
receives a command from the Segment Manager.
Medium Wattage Target – The target wattage for a medium response command.
High Wattage Target – The target wattage for a high response command.
Special Wattage Target – The target wattage for a special response command.
Wattage Threshold – The amount of wattage (plus or minus) that the loads in the room must meet the
target. If the wattage exceeds the target, the bridge will dim or turn loads ON/OFF to meet the target.
Cycle Interval – The amount of time, in seconds, that the bridge will check the wattage
Shed Mode – Available Values: None, Override Allowed, Override Forbidden.
“None” means the bridge is not in a ADR state. The other two values mean the bridge is in an ADR state, and
determine whether occupants can or cannot override the shed via local switches/dimmers.
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OCCUPANCY SENSORS
This section documents the tabs for all occupancy sensor models. Depending on the type of sensor (PIR only,
Ultrasonic only, or Dual technology), the parameters on the Normal Hours and After Hours tabs will change, as
noted in the field descriptions. Additionally, the Network Groups tab only appears under certain circumstances, as
described below.
NOTE: A maximum of 32 occupancy sensors can be assigned to control a load. This applies whether the sensor
is controlling the load directly or if it is assigned to control a group.
Basic Tab
Sensor Basic Tab
Follows After Hours – This is selected by default. If it is not selected, the sensor will ignore the settings on
the After Hours tab and use the Normal Hours settings all the time.
NOTE: If the After Hours Enabled checkbox on the Basic tab for a Room is not selected, then this
parameter will not be visible, since the after hours feature is not being used for the room.
Detection LEDs – Enables or Disables the visible LED indicators on the face of the occupancy sensor. Note
that disabling the LEDs will not affect the operation of the sensor.
Control Type – Determines whether the sensor controls individual loads or scenes. The Load/Scene Binding
section of the window changes depending on the value selected here.
NOTE: Sensors can also control a group, but that is assigned in the Occupancy Groups tab for a panel or
LMZC-301.
Occupancy State – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays the current
state of the sensor. An “Occupied” state does not necessarily mean that the lights in the space are on since
the loads might be set to Manual On.
Occupancy Mode – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays whether the
Sensor is set to Normal Hours or After Hours.
Room Profile – This read only parameter indicates the current profile selected at the room level. This
parameter is displayed only if the room includes a device that supports profiles (currently, the LMDI-100,
LMIO-102, and LMPS-104). For the LMDI-100, you must also select the Partition Support checkbox before
this parameter is displayed.
Advanced Tab
Sensor Advanced Tab
Parameters from Lock Level to Date Code are common to all devices. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters.
Preset Value On – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when the sensor
registers occupancy. This parameter is disabled if Use Last Level is selected.
Use Last Level – If this is selected, each load bound to this sensor will return to its previous non-zero level
when the sensor registers occupancy.
Preset Value Off – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when it registers
vacancy. This parameter is disabled if Relinquish is selected.
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Relinquish – If this is selected, the Relinquish command will be sent to each load bound to this sensor, at
the priority specified by the Occupancy Sensor Priority parameter on the Technician tab for the load. The
load’s controller then looks at the next highest priority to determine what to do. If no other command exists at
any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level, set on the Basic tab for the load (0 by default).
Load Tracking Enabled – If the sensor is bound to a room controller, this checkbox should always be
selected. This allows for the sensor to understand which loads are ON/OFF in order to properly manage
presentation mode, and create error messages in the event that the sensor is not bound to any loads.
If the sensor is bound to a panel, this checkbox should not be selected. For panels, the Load IDs are not
handled the same way. Instead of the sensor telling the panel which loads should turn on and when, the
panels listen for certain MAC addresses from the sensors in order to determine if that sensor should control
it’s loads.
Network Groups Tab
The Network Groups tab is only visible if the sensor has been selected and assigned to a network group, on
the Occupancy Groups tab for bridges, panels, and zone controllers. This tab is read only and simply lists the
network groups assigned to the sensor.
Sensor Network Groups Tab
Sensor Load/Scene Binding
This section changes to select loads or scenes, depending on the value of the Control Type parameter in the
Basic tab.
Sensor Load Binding
Sensor Scene Binding
If the sensor is set to control loads, select one or more of the Controlled Loads to bind to the sensors. If a
Description has been entered for each load on the Load/Relay tab for the room controller/panel, it is displayed
here to help in identifying the loads. This is especially useful in situations where a room contains more than one
controller.
If the sensor is set to control a scene, select the scene number from the drop-down. Click Edit to open the Scene
Editor, if needed. This is identical to the editor accessible when view the Room parameters. For details on this
editor, see “Creating and Editing Scenes” on page 24.
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Normal Hours/After Hours Tabs
These tabs contain sets of identical parameters, for normal hours and for after hours.
Normal Hours/After Hours Tabs
Override the Sensor – Selecting this checkbox turns off sensor control over the loads the sensor is bound
to. This parameter allows the sensor to control the loads only during Normal Hours (or only during After
Hours). If it is selected for both Normal Hours and After Hours, then the sensor will have no effect on the
loads.
Time Delay – The amount of time the load remains ON after no motion is detected.
PIR Sensitivity – Sensitivity for the PIR detection. Setting the sensitivity to zero (0) will disable PIR detection
in the sensor. This parameter is displayed only if the selected sensor model has PIR technology.
Ultrasonic Sensitivity – Sensitivity for the ultrasonic detection. Setting the sensitivity to zero (0) will disable
ultrasonic detection in the sensor. This parameter displayed only if the selected sensor model has ultrasonic
technology.
Detection Scheme Trigger – Indicates whether to use PIR, Ultrasonic, Either, or Both technologies for initial
detection of occupancy. This parameter is displayed only if the sensor model is dual technology. For “Either”,
the sensor will register occupancy if either of the two technologies senses movement, whereas for “Both”,
both technologies must detect movement.
Detection Scheme Retrigger – Indicates whether to use PIR, Ultrasonic, Either, or Both technologies will
be used to keep the lights on once the sensor has initially been triggered. This parameter is displayed only
if the sensor model is dual technology. For “Either”, the sensor will register occupancy if either of the two
technologies senses movement, whereas for “Both”, both technologies must detect movement.
Use Walk Through Mode – Walk Through mode shortens the time delay to reduce the amount of time the
load is ON after a brief moment of occupancy, such as returning to an office to pick up a forgotten item then
immediately exiting. When enabled, the load turns OFF three minutes after the area is initially occupied if no
motion is detected after the first 30 seconds. If motion continues beyond the first 30 seconds, the selected
time delay applies.
SWITCHES
This section documents tabs for all switch models. Switches are divided into five categories: Standard Switches,
Dimming Switches, CCT Switches, Wall Switch Sensors, and Timer Switches. All switches contain identical
parameters on the Advanced tab. Parameters on the Basic tab apply for Wall Switch Sensors only. Wall Switch
Sensors also contain an additional tab, Advanced Sensor. The LMTS-101-CCT also contains an additional tab,
Advanced LMTS.
The bottom section of the window changes, depending on the type of switch. There are tabs for Button, Rocker,
Sensor, and Schedule parameters.
Basic Tab
Parameters on this tab appear only for Wall Switch Sensors and relate to sensor functionality. For other switches,
the tab is empty, unless an interface that supports profiles has been added to the room. In that case, the tab will
contain a single parameter, Room Profile.
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Switch Basic Tab
Follows After Hours – This is selected by default. If it is not selected, the sensor will ignore the settings on
the After Hours tab and use the Normal Hours settings all the time.
Detection LEDs – Enables or Disables the visible LED indicators on the face of the occupancy sensor. Note
that disabling the LEDs will not affect the operation of the sensor. This parameter does not affect the LEDs
built into the buttons—only those used by the sensor.
Occupancy State – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays the current
state of the sensor. An “Occupied” state does not necessarily mean that the lights in the space are on since
the loads might be set to Manual On.
Occupancy Mode – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays whether the
Sensor is set to Normal Hours or After Hours.
Room Profile – This read only parameter indicates the current profile selected at the room level. This
parameter is displayed only if the room includes a device that supports profiles (currently, the LMDI-100,
LMIO-102, and LMPS-104). For the LMDI-100, you must also select the Partition Support checkbox before
this parameter is displayed.
Advanced Tab
Switch Advanced Tab
Parameters from Lock Level to Date Code are common to all devices. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters.
On LED Brightness – Sets the brightness level of the LEDs on each button. Available values: “Dim”,
“Medium”, “High”, “Full”.
Off LED Illuminated – If this is selected, the LEDs will be illuminated at a very low level when the load is off.
This allows the user to see the individual buttons at night, if all lights are off.
Key Lock Mode Enabled – If this is selected, the switch will respond to a switch lock command. This
command can be sent from a switch lock device connected to an LMIO-101, or from the Segment Manager
or other BAS application. If a switch is locked, then pressing any of the buttons on the switch has no effect. If
the checkbox is not selected, the switch will ignore the lock message.
Advanced Sensor Tab
This tab only appears for Wall Switch Sensors.
Switch Advanced Sensor Tab
Preset Value On – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when the sensor
registers occupancy. This parameter is disabled if Use Last Level is selected.
Use Last Level – If this is selected, each load bound to this sensor will return to its previous non-zero level
when the sensor registers occupancy.
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Preset Value Off – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when it registers
vacancy. This parameter is disabled if Relinquish is selected.
Relinquish – If this is selected, the Relinquish command will be sent to each load bound to this sensor, at
the priority specified by the Occupancy Sensor Priority parameter on the Technician tab for the load. The
load’s controller then looks at the next highest priority to determine what to do. If no other command exists at
any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level, set on the Basic tab for the load (0 by default).
Load Tracking Enabled – If the sensor is bound to a room controller, this checkbox should always be
selected. This allows for the sensor to understand which loads are ON/OFF in order to properly manage
presentation mode, and create error messages in the event that the sensor is not bound to any loads.
If the sensor is bound to a panel, this checkbox should not be selected. For panels, the Load IDs are not handled
the same way. Instead of the sensor telling the panel which loads should turn on and when, the panels listen for
certain MAC addresses from the sensors in order to determine if that sensor should control it’s loads.
Advanced LMTS Tab
This tab appears only for the LMTS-101-CCT.
Switch Advanced LMTS Tab
OLED Brightness – Controls the brightness of the display on the LMTS-101-CCT. Values are 0-10, which
equates with 0%-100%.
OLED Timeout – This determines whether the display will shut off after a period of time during which no button
on the LMTS-100-CCT has been pressed. Available values: 10 seconds, 20 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds,
50 seconds, 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, or Forever (never turns off).
Local Lock Mode Enabled – If selected, the button will never switch the load On/Off, and instead only the
schedules within the LMTS-101-CCT will function.
Override Duration – This parameter determines how long a schedule event is overridden, after the On/Off
button is pressed (when the Button Function is set to Override or Override/Resume). Available values: 1,2, 3, or
4 hours, All Day (ends when Event 1 occurs the next day), or Next Schedule (ends when the next event occurs)
SWITCHES – BUTTON PARAMETERS
The Button tabs appear for all models except the LMDM-101, which only has a rocker. Each button on the switch
has its own tab of identical parameters.
This section changes depending on whether the button is bound to a load, a Correlated Color Temperature (CCT)
load, a scene, or a network group, using the Button Type drop-down. A Description parameter is provided
for documentation purposes. The description also appears when viewing the button in the Segment Manager
application.
NOTE: CCT appears only for the LMSW-105-CCT and LMTS-101-CCT, and is the only possible value for these
models, which is used to control Correlated Color Temperature. For this to function, the switch must be bound
to a controller capable of CCT, such as the LMLM-101 or LMFC-LXI.
For the LSW-105-CCT, the editable parameters on the Basic Tab are identical to those when the button is
bound to a load, but affect change in color temperature instead of the dimming or On/Off value. The
Advanced Tab is unique for CCT loads.
For the LMTS-101-CCT, the Basic Tab is different from a button bound to a regular load, and there is no
Advanced Tab.
Binding to a Load or a CCT Load (LMSW-105-CCT only) – Load Binding Basic Tab
If you select “Load” for the Button Type, select one or more of the Controlled Loads to bind to the button. If a
Description has been entered for each load on the Load/Relay tab for the room controller/panel, it is displayed here to
help in identifying the loads. This is especially useful in situations where a room contains more than one controller.
Include Plug Loads – If this checkbox is enabled, any loads from plug load controllers included in the room
will be included in the list of loads. This field is not available for a CCT button type.
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Load Binding Basic Tab
Mode – Indicates how the button functions. Available values: “Toggle”, “On Only”, “Off Only”, “Toggle
Nontracking”.
NOTE: For the LMSW-105-CCT, Mode is always set to “On Only”.
In “Toggle” mode, if there are multiple loads bound to a button and any load is ON, the LED will be lit.
Pressing the button turns OFF all loads and the LED on the button turns OFF. Pressing the button again turns
ON all loads bound to the button. Additionally, if the button was pressed to turn a load OFF, and then later the
load is turned ON from another source such as a sensor, the button will track that the load is ON and the LED
will be lit. Therefore, pressing the button at that point will turn the load OFF.
If set to “On Only” or “Off Only”, pressing the button will always perform that function. However, the LED will
always reflect the current status of the load. So if a button is set to “Off Only” and a sensor turns the load ON,
the LED will be lit, but will go OFF when the button is pressed.
If set to “Toggle Nontracking”, the button will toggle, but the LED will not light. Additionally, the button will
not track if another source such as a sensor turns the load ON. Although it is an available value here, it has
limited application when the button is assigned to a load. This is normally the value to choose if the button is
assigned to a Network Group, since the button can’t track the status of all loads in the group.
Fade Mode – Determines the amount of time it will take to change from the current value to the newly
selected value (either ON or OFF), once the button is pressed. Note that the on and off levels that the load
goes to are set on the Advanced tab. Available values:
• Immediate – Changes to the new value immediately
• Use Fade Rate – Uses the value determined by the Button Fade Rate parameter
• Use Fade Time – Uses the value determined by the Button Fade Time On and Button Fade Time Off
parameters.
• Use Load Fade Rate – Uses the value determined by the Fade Rate parameter on the Advanced tab
for the load. Note that there are two separate values—for Normal Hours and After Hours.
Button Fade Rate – The amount specified here will fade down/up using percentage per second. So if you
specify a value of 50, it will take two seconds (50% per second).
Button Fade Time On – The amount of time it will take to fade to the new value when the button is turned
ON.
Button Fade Time Off – The amount of time it will take to fade to the new value when the button is turned
OFF.
Use Load Fade Time – There are two checkboxes - one for the ON time and one for the OFF time. When
selected, uses the value determined by the Fade Time parameter on the Advanced tab for the load (instead
of the values selected in the Button Fade Time On/Off parameters). Note that there are two separate
values—for Normal Hours and After Hours.
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Binding to a Load – Advanced Tab
Load Binding Advanced Tab
Button Preset Value On – The level the load will go to when the button turns the load ON. Disabled if Use
Last Level is selected.
Use Last Level – If selected, the load will return to the most recent non-zero level .
Button Preset Value Off – The level the load will go to when the button turns the load OFF. Disabled if
Relinquish is selected.
Relinquish – If selected, relinquishes the load at the level specified by the Event Priority parameter on the
Technician tab. The room controller for the load then looks at the next highest priority to determine what to
do. If no other command exists at any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level set in the Basic
tab for the load (0 by default).
Button Override Time Till Off – If a load is commanded to turn OFF when the schedule switches from
Normal Hours to After Hours (or vice versa), this is the amount of time the load will remain ON after manually
being turned ON from a switch. When the amount of time expires, the load switches back to OFF. Disabled if
Use Load Override Time Till Off is selected.
Use Load Override Time Till Off – This functions the same as Button Override Time Till Off, but uses the
amount of time specified with the Override Time Till Off parameter in the Advanced tab for the load. Note
that for the load there are two sperate values—one for Normal Hours and one for After Hours, whereas if you
use the time set on this tab, there is only a single value.
Binding to a Load – Technician Tab
Load Binding Technician Tab
Event Priority – Sets the BACnet priority at which the button commands are sent.
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Binding to a CCT Load (LMTS-101-CCT Only) – Basic Tab
CCT Load Binding Basic Tab
Mode – This determines how the button will affect the load.
• Toggle Load – Turns all bound loads in the DLM network ON or OFF.
• Override – Will override all schedule events for a period of time based on the Override Duration
parameter (on the next Preferences screen). Once the button is pressed, the override can’t be turned off
until the duration is ended.
• Override/Resume – Similar to Override, but in this case, pressing the button a second time will turn off
the override.
Binding to a CCT Load (LMSW-105-CCT Only) – Advanced Tab
As mentioned previously, the Basic Tab for a CCT Load is identical to a regular load. But the Advanced tab
provides the ability to determine the CCT level the load will go to when the button is pressed.
CCT Load Binding Advanced Tab
CCT Level Type – This drop-down determines whether you will set a specific Kelvin value, or a level that is a
percentage based on the range of minimum to maximum Kelvin values that the controller is capable of.
CCT Level – If CCT Level Type is set to “Kelvin”, select the specific Kelvin amount. If CCT Level Type is set to
“DLM”, select the percentage.
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Binding to a Scene
Scene Binding
Scene Number – Select the scene assigned to the button. Click Edit to open the Scene Editor, if needed.
This is identical to the editor accessible when view the Room parameters. For details on this editor, see
“Creating and Editing Scenes” on page 24.
Scene Mode – Determines what happens when the button is pressed. Available values:
• Recall/Off – Pressing the button toggles between selecting the scene and turning it OFF. When the
scene is selected, all loads go to the levels set for the scene. When turned off, all loads (that are part of
the scene) are turned OFF.
• Recall Scene – Sends the scene command each time the button is pressed.
• Scene Off – Send the OFF command each time the button is pressed.
Lock Scene Button – If this is not selected, a user can record a new scene by pressing and holding a scene
button for 7 seconds. If you select this feature the button still can select or turn off the scene, but it can’t
manually record a new scene.
Fade Time On – Amount of time for each load to transition between its current level and the Scene ON level.
Note that while each load has its own level, the amount of time set here will apply to all levels.
Fade Time Off – Amount of time for each load to transition between its current level and the Scene OFF
level. Note that while each load has its own level, the amount of time set here will apply to all levels.
Use Scene Fade Time – There are two checkboxes - one for the ON time and one for the OFF time.
If selected, LMCS checks the Fade Time parameter for the selected scene in the Scene Editor. If that
parameter is set to a value of “Use Scene”, it will use the Scene Fade Time in the scene editor. If that
parameter is set to a value of “Use Load”, it will use the Fade Time parameter on the Advanced tab for the
load. Remember that there are two separate values for loads—for Normal Hours and After Hours.
If the checkbox is not selected, the Fade Time On (and/or Fade Time Off) values set in this screen are used.
Binding to a Network Group
If you select “Network” for the Button Type, the button will send on and off commands to all loads that are
members of the network group. This allows a switch to control loads in multiple rooms or areas, for example, one
switch that controls lights for all corridors. For details on creating network groups, see “Creating Network Groups”
on page 30.
Network Group Binding
Group ID – Select the group number the button is assigned to control. The group Description is also shown
for reference.
Momentary Mode – Indicates how the button functions. Available values: “Toggle”, “On Only”, “Off Only”,
“Toggle Non-Tracking”
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The value most useful when a button controls a group is “Toggle Non-Tracking”. With this value, the button
will toggle, but the LED will not light. Additionally, the button will not track if another source such as a sensor
turns the loads ON. Since the button is used in this situation to issue group commands, and not directly
control the loads, it makes little sense to track the loads in the button.
The rest of the values are available but less likely to be used when the button is assigned to a group.
In “Toggle” mode, if there are multiple loads bound to a button and any load is ON, the LED will be lit.
Pressing the button turns OFF all loads and the LED on the button turns OFF. Pressing the button again turns
ON all loads bound to the button. Additionally, if the button was pressed to turn a load OFF, and then later the
load is turned ON from another source such as a sensor, the button will track that the load is ON and the LED
will be lit. Therefore, pressing the button at that point will turn the load OFF.
If set to “On Only” or “Off Only”, pressing the button will always perform that function. However, the LED will
always reflect the current status of the load. So if a button is set to “Off Only” and a sensor turns the load ON,
the LED will be lit, but will go OFF when the button is pressed.
NOTE: It will take a minute or two for this to start working properly as the bridge or panel needs to discover
that the button was set up this way and this takes time.
SWITCHES – ROCKER PARAMETERS
Switches that contain a rocker (the LMDM-101, LMSW-105, and LMSW-105-CCT) contain a tab for the rocker.
The majority of parameters on this tab are identical to those for a regular button assigned to a load, so the
following sections only define the differences found on the rocker tab. For definitions of all other parameters, see
the previous sections on Binding to a Load, starting on page 85. Note that the Technician tab for rockers is
identical and so is not shown in the following sections.
Rockers function in two different ways. If you press and hold the paddle, the load value will ramp up or fade
down, depending on which end of the rocker you press. But if you press and release, the button acts like a
regular switch, turning the load ON or OFF, again depending on which end of the button you press. For this
reason, the Rocker Advanced tab contain the same parameters found for a button, which apply to the switch
function, and also two additional parameters which apply to the rocker function.
Rocker Load Binding and Basic Tab
NOTE: None of the parameters on the Basic tab apply to the LMSW-105-CCT, so this tab does not appear when
viewing this model.
Rocker Load Binding and Basic Tab
Rocker parameters on the Basic tab are identical to those for a button, with the exception that a rocker is always
assigned to a “Load” for the Button Type and the Mode is always set to “Toggle”.
NOTE: The Button Fade Rate parameter applies only when the button is pressed and released, and the
button is acting like a regular switch. When using the button as a rocker, the Button Ramp Rate on the
Advanced tab is used.
NOTE: If no loads are assigned to a rocker, it will raise and lower all loads in the room, but can’t be used to turn
them on or off (by tapping the top/bottom).
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Rocker Advanced Tab
Rocker Advanced Tab
The first six parameters on the Advanced tab are identical to those for a button, and function when the rocker is
used as a switch. See “Binding to a Load – Advanced Tab” on page 87 for details.
NOTE: None of these six parameters are displayed for an LMSW-105-CCT because they do not apply for CCT
control.
Two additional parameters are added for rocker functionality.
Button Ramp Rate – Determines the speed (or rate) at which the light level of bound loads increases or
decreases when the top or bottom of the rocker is pressed and held. The default value is 17%/second which
means that it takes approximately 6 seconds to ramp from 0-100%.
Use Load Fade Rate – If this checkbox is selected, the value of the Fade Rate parameter on the Advanced
Tab for the load will be used for the Button Ramp Rate. Note that there are two separate values—for Normal
Hours and After Hours.
SWITCHES – SENSOR PARAMETERS
Switches that contain a sensor (the LMDW and LMPW series) contain a tab for the sensor functionality
Sensor Controlling a Load
Sensor Controlling a Scene
All parameters on this tab are identical to those in the Load/Scene Binding section for a sensor. See “Sensor Load/
Scene Binding” on page 82 for details.
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SWITCHES – SCHEDULE PARAMETERS
This tab is found only on the LMTS-101-CCT and controls the schedule for change Color Correlated Temperature
values on the loads. The schedule parameters change depending on whether you select an Astro or a Custom
schedule. Astro events are based on the current sunrise and sunset times, which is based on the date and
location. You specify the time and location and send this information to the LMTS-101-CCT on the Set Site Time
window. See “DLM Site Time/Location” on page 60.
When the Start time of the event occurs, the CCT value of the load will begin gradually changing from the Target
CCT value of the previous event to the value of the current event. It will reach the new value at the End time.
Therefore, the longer the amount of time between start and finish, the more gradual the change. Events cannot
overlap. However, you can have a gap in time between events. If there is a gap of time between the finish of one
event and the start of the next event, the CCT level will remain the same during that period of time.
Event Type – This drop-down will switch between “Astro” and “Custom” schedules. Note that if you change
any values away in one type of schedule and then switch to the other type of schedule, all the edited values
will be lost and will switch back to defaults if you revert to the original schedule type.
Astro Schedules
Schedule Tab for the LMTS-101-CCT – Astro Schedule
Astro Schedules have 6 predefined events. There are always 6 events, therefore the Add and Remove buttons
are disabled. The six events are pre-programmed to specific general categories of the day for the Start and End
of the event. These categories can’t be changed. However, for the Events that occur around Sunrise or Sunset,
you can modify the number of minutes plus or minus the sunrise/sunset time for that event to begin or end. Each
event can be set independently to use a specific Kelvin amount or a percentage that is based on the minimum and
maximum capabilities of the load.
Description – If desired, you can enter a description for the event.
Start Offset and End Offset – As mentioned above, if the Start or Finish is set “Sunrise” or “Sunset”, you can
select an offset amount, which is the number of minutes before or after
Target CCT Type – Determines whether to use the exact Kelvin amount or the DLM level, which translates to a
percentage.
Target CCT Level – Enabled if Target CCT Type is set to Kelvin. This is the specific Kelvin amount the load will
end up at the End time.
Target DLM Level – Enabled if Target CCT Type is set to DLM. This is the percentage amount the load will end
up at the End time.
Custom Schedules
Schedule Tab for the LMTS-101-CCT – Custom Schedule
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Custom Schedules start with a default of 5 events. You can add up to 3 more for a total of 8. The Start Time and
End Time parameters replace the Astro Start and Finish parameters and all times can be edited. Changing the
end time of one event will automatically change the start time of the next event if they would overlap. Times are
selectable in 5 minute increments (with the exception of 11:59 PM) and if you enter a value in between, it will
automatically round up or down, depending on the number you enter.
All events must occur in a time frame between 12:00 AM and 11:59 PM. However, you do not have to start event 1 at
12:00AM and end the last event at 11:59 PM. There can be a gap of time between the end of one day and the start
of the next. The other parameters are the same as for Astro schedules, but there are no offset parameters.
You can only add events to the end of the schedule. Therefore, the last event must have a value of less than 11:59
PM before the Add button is enabled. To remove an event, click on the row in the schedule so the first column
shows an arrow, then click Remove.
DAYLIGHT PHOTOSENSORS
This section documents the tabs for all daylight photosensor models. There are three different models, and each
has a slightly different set of parameters, as described in the following sub-sections. The LMLS-600 has an extra
tab in the top section, and one less tab in the zone section.
Basic Tab – LMLS-400 and LMLS-500
The Basic tab for the LMLS-400 and LMLS-500 similar, but there are a couple of differences, described below.
Daylighting Basic Tab – LMLS-400 and LMLS-500
Number of Zones – This parameter applies to the LMLS-500 only. (It is visible but disabled for the LMLS400). You can select up to 3 zones, each of which has separate programmable parameters. Each zone is
assigned to different loads. Additional Zone tabs are added to the bottom of the window if you add zones.
Light Level – This read-only parameter displays the current amount of light (in foot candles) read by the
sensor.
Auto Calibrate – This button is displayed for the LMLS-400. Click to start the Auto Calibration process. This
is only enabled when connected to the network.
Calibrating the LMLS-400 and LMLS-600
There are two ways to calibrate the LMLS-400 and LMLS-600—manually and automatically. (The LMLS-500 can
only be calibrated manually). Calibrating manually involves setting the parameters on the Basic tab within the
Zone tab.
To calibrate automatically:
1. Remove any objects that may affect the LMLS-400 light level reading (ladder or temporary objects).
2. Click Auto Calibrate. Then click Yes in the pop-up dialog.
3. The Blue LED will start flashing once every 4 sec.
4. Daylighting controlled loads will automatically turn ON for 2 minutes to allow controlled lamps to warm up and
reach a stable full output.
5. Lights will cycle eight times for automatic setpoint selection.
6. The photosensor is in Test Mode when the blue LED starts flashing once per second. For the next 5 minutes
the sensor will be in Test Mode.
7. Verify the setpoints automatically selected by the photo sensor with the LMCT-100. If the automatic selected
setpoints are not acceptable, proceed to manual calibration.
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Basic Tab – LMLS-600
Daylighting Basic Tab – LMLS-600
Number of Zones – This parameter is disabled and set at 1, since the LMLS-600 only allows one zone.
Down Light Level – Displays the current amount of light (in foot candles) read by the sensor looking down
towards the room.
Up Light Level – Displays the current amount of light (in foot candles) read by the sensor looking up towards
the skylight.
Internal Status – This value indicates the current status of the sensor. The value is shown as two numbers
with a colon between them. The number to the left of the “:” is the only number that provides useful
information for a user. Note that if the sensor is bound to a load and is functioning normally, this should
display a value of “3” or “4”.
• 0 – Sensor is not controlling loads because no successful calibration has yet been done.
• 1 – Sensor is presently in the midst of an automatic calibration sequence.
• 2 – Sensor is presently in the midst of a manual calibration sequence.
• 3 – Normal operation—loads are being controlled based on closed-loop (down-looking) light levels.
• 4 – Loads are being temporarily controlled on the basis of open-loop (up-looking) light levels, due to
some changes in the space below the sensor.
• 5 – Sensor is presently performing a nightly automatic recommissioning process, and will automatically
return to normal operation afterwards.
• 6 – Load control is temporarily disabled by a configuration option.
Maximum Electric Light (A+B) – Displays the maximum output of all of the controlled electric lights, as seen
in the closed-loop (down-looking) sensor.
Maximum Electric Light B Percent – Displays the measured percentage of the total electric light
contributed by Circuit B loads; for on/off or dimming this is 0; ideally, for bi-level it is 50, and for tri-level it is
67. This value is set by the auto calibration process.
Daylight Ratio – Displays the latest average ratio between the daylight contribution seen in the closed-loop
(down-looking) sensor and that measured by the open-loop (up-looking) sensor.
Auto Calibrate – Click to start the Auto Calibration process. This is only enabled when connected to the
network. See the previous section for information on auto calibration.
Recommission – Click to manually start the Recommissioning process. During Recommissioning, the
sensor will turn all of the configured loads on, to full output, until they reach their maximum intensity
(typically, about 2-3 minutes), then make some measurements and return the loads to their state prior to
recommissioning.
NOTE: The sensor performs an automatic recommissioning, typically once per day, to adjust to changes in
electric light output and to alterations in décor. This process starts when the daylight (as measured
by the open-loop sensor) drops below the Recommissioning Threshold and stays there for at least
the Recommissioning Delay. These two parameters are set on the LMLS-600 tab.
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Advanced Tab
This tab is identical for all three photosensor models.
Daylighting Advanced Tab
Parameters from Lock Level to Date Code are common to all devices. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters.
Control Mode – Determines the control status of the photosensor”
• Normal – Allows the photosensor to take control of the daylighting loads. The sensor should be operated
in this mode at all times, except when Test, Demo, or Disable function is explicitly needed.
• Test – Shortens timeouts for switching operation, and speeds ramp rates for dimming operation, to allow
quick verification. Test Mode cancels automatically after 5 minutes.
• Demo – Operates identically to Test mode in the LMLS-600 except that it does not time out after 5
minutes.
• Disable – Allows you to temporarily prevent the LMLS-600 from controlling its assigned loads. While
in this mode, the sensor will continue to report light levels, but will not adjust any loads. This value is
mostly used for troubleshooting purposes.
Override Timeout – The amount of time delay before daylighting control resumes, after daylighting control
has been disabled due to a manual action such as a button press. Applies only if the Override Allowed
checkbox is selected.
Minimum Time to Update – The minimum period of time before the photosensor sends the current light
level to the bridge. A smaller number will give you more accurate readings, but will increase the amount of
messages sent on the DLM network.
Minimum Change of Value to Update – The minimum change of light level (in foot candles) before the
photosensor sends the current light level to the bridge. A smaller number will give you more accurate
readings, but will increase the amount of messages sent on the DLM network.
Hold Off – Determines the behavior of daylighting loads when they are turned ON, by a switch or occupancy
sensor:
• If not selected, the loads can always be turned on to their previous level, and then will begin to adjust
based upon daylight.
• If selected, the sensor will limit the loads to the level presently allowed by daylight contribution. This
means that the loads may not initially turn ON (if the ambient light level is high - above the ON or
Dimming Setpoint), but will become active for daylighting control, and will turn ON or dim up as daylight
contribution drops.
Override Allowed – If selected, the Override Timeout parameter will be in effect.
Scenes Disable Daylighting – If selected, daylighting control is disabled for any loads on which a scene is
recalled until a change is manually made to the level of the load (including turning off the scene), or until the
next cycle of occupancy.
Follow After Hours – If selected, the loads that are set to After Hours are removed from daylighting control
for the duration of the After Hours period. If not selected, the photosensor will ignore After Hours and will
continue to operate as normal.
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LMLS-600 Tab
This tab appears only for the LMLS-600
Daylighting LMLS-600 Tab
Secondary Sensor Minimum Time to Update – The minimum period of time before the open loop (up
looking) photosensor sends the current light level to the bridge. A smaller number will give you more accurate
readings, but will increase the amount of messages sent on the DLM network.
Secondary Sensor Minimum Change of Value to Update – The minimum change of light level (in foot
candles) before the open loop photosensor sends the current light level to the bridge. A smaller number will
give you more accurate readings, but will increase the amount of messages sent on the DLM network.
Dimming Setpoint Electric Light Percent Adder – Percentage of maximum electric light to be added to
that value, to create the Dimming Setpoint, after auto calibration.
On Setpoint Electric Light – Percentage of maximum electric light to be added to that value, to create the
ON Setpoint, after auto calibration.
Recommissioning Threshold – The open-loop light level below which the LMLS-600 enters
recommissioning mode. If this parameter is set to 0, automatic daily recommissioning is disabled.
Recommissioning Time Delay – The time that must elapse, with the open-loop light level remaining below
the Recommissioning Threshold, before Recommissioning starts.
Diagnostic Error Flags – Controls reporting of diagnostic information, visually and over the DLM network.
This should be left at a value of 0 unless instructed by a Wattstopper technician.
Force Open-Loop Control – When selected, this parameter causes the sensor to always reference the
Open-Loop sensor during control operations, and use the Closed-Loop sensor only for Automatic Calibration
process. For true dual-loop control, this parameter must not be selected.
Technician Tab
There are two sections on this tab. The LMLS-600 section is displayed only for the LMLS-600.
Daylighting Technician Tab
Factory Light Sensor Calibration
WARNING: These parameters are used to calibrate the sensor at the factory. They should never be
changed, except by a technician (for circumstances where the sensor was incorrectly calibrated at the
factory).
LMLS-600
Parameter Alarm Threshold – This parameter is not currently in use.
Absolute Correlation Threshold – Determines how closely, on an absolute basis, the closed-loop and
open-loop daylight level changes must track, for the closed-loop sensor to be selected for control.
WARNING: This field should not be adjusted unless directed by Wattstopper.
Relative Loop Correlation Threshold – Determines how closely, on a relative basis, the closed-loop and
open-loop daylight level changes must track, for the closed-loop sensor to be selected for control.
WARNING: This field should not be adjusted unless directed by Wattstopper.
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Load Binding to Zones
In this section, you choose which loads will be bound to the photosensor. In large room situations with many
separate loads, such as an atrium, cafeteria, etc., you may have multiple photosensors. If using an LMLS-500, it
may be configured for up to three separate zones. Each load can be bound to only a single sensor and zone.
There are two parts to this section. The operation of the two parts changes, depending on value of the Operation
Mode (on the Zone Basic tab). For “Switched” and “Dimming” operation, it works one way and “Bi-Level” or “TriLevel” operation, it works another.
Switched and Dimming Load Binding
For Switched operation, the load will simply turn ON or OFF as the amount of daylight decreases or increases
past the trip point. For Dimming operation, the load will continuously increase or decrease based on the amount of
daylight and the expected target amount.
For Switched and Dimming operation, the two parts are labeled “Controlled Loads” and “Unused”. Both sections
show all loads in the room. All load selection is done in the top part. When you click the checkbox next to a load
in the Controller Loads part, the same load in the Unused part is grayed out, providing a visual indication of which
loads are not yet controlled by a photosensor. You cannot click in the Unused section, it is provided as a reference
only.
If you have multiple sensors or zones, if a load is already bound to a different sensor or zone, that load will be
grayed out, as shown in the example below on the right. You can click on a grayed out load in the Controlled
Loads section. This will bind that load to the current sensor/zone. Since a load can only be bound to a single
sensor/zone, that load will be unbound from the previously assigned sensor/zone.
Switched/Dimming Load Binding
Switched/Dimming with Loads Selected on Another Sensor
Bi-Level and Tri-level Load Binding
Bi-level mode provides three light levels within the daylighting zone controlled by the photosensor by using 2 load
circuits.
Bi-Level Operation
Off = 0%
Med = 50%
Max = 100%
Load 1 - OFF
Load 2 - OFF
Load 1 - ON
Load 2 - OFF
Load 1 - ON
Load 2 - ON
Tri-level mode provides four light levels within the daylighting zone controlled by the photosensor by using 3 load circuits.
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Tri-Level Operation
Off = 0%
Low = 33%
High = 66%
Max = 100%
Load 1 - OFF
Load 2 - OFF
Load 1 - OFF
Load 2 - ON
Load 1 - ON
Load 2 - OFF
Load 1 - ON
Load 2 - ON
For Bi-Level and Tri-Level, the two parts allow you to select the load that are combined to create the different
levels. Selecting a load in one part grays out that load in the other part. You can click on a grayed out load. This
will bind that load to the current part and gray it out in the other part. As with Switched or Dimming operation, loads
bound to other sensors or zones are also grayed out, but can be selected.
For Bi-Level operation, any loads selected in the top section will turn ON when set to the Medium value and
remain ON when set to the Maximum value. Loads in the bottom section will turn ON only when set to the
Maximum value.
For Tri-Level Operation, loads selected in the top section will turn ON when set to the Medium value, turn OFF for
the High value, then back ON for the Maximum value. Loads selected in the bottom section will turn ON for the
High value and remain ON for the Maximum value.
Bi-Level
Tri-Level
Zone Parameter Tabs – Advanced and Basic
The parameters on the Zone Basic tab change depending the value of the Operation Mode drop-down and
the model of the photosensor. For “Switched”, “Bi-Level”, or “Tri-Level” operation, all models, have the same
parameters. For “Dimming” operation, the LMLS-400 has one set of parameters, and the LMLS-500 and LMLS600 have a slightly different set of parameters.
The parameters on the Zone Advanced tab change depending on the model.
NOTE: There is no Advanced tab for the LMLS-600.
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Zone Basic Tab – Switched/Bi-Level/Tri-Level
Zone Basic Tab Switched Load
On Setpoint – The target illuminance level below which the sensor turns the lights ON.
Off Setpoint – The target illuminance level above which the sensor turns the lights OFF.
On Time Delay – The time interval that must elapse, with the measured level below the ON Setpoint, before
the controlled lights turn ON.
Off Time Delay – The time interval that must elapse, with the measured level above the OFF Setpoint,
before the controlled lights turn OFF.
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming for LMLS-400
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming Load – LMLS-400
To determine the correct dimming level for any given photocell reading, the LMLS-400 calculates the level based
on the slope between the day setpoint and night setpoint.
Day Setpoint – The desired light level at the sensor during daytime.
Night Setpoint – The desired light level at the sensor during nighttime. This takes into account that when no
light is coming in from a window, the amount of light registered at the sensor (mounted in a ceiling) is lower
than the amount of light in the working area because it reads only the light reflected from the floor/furniture
surfaces back up to the sensor.
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Ramp Up Rate – Determines the speed (or rate) at which the light level of bound loads increases.
Ramp Down Rate – Determines the speed (or rate) at which the light level of bound loads decreases.
Cut Off Delay – The time that the controlled lighting will remain at a minimum dimmed level, even with high
daylight contribution, before the lights will be switched OFF.
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming for LMLS-500 and LMLS-600
Zone Basic Tab – Dimming Load – LMLS-500 and LMLS-600
Dimming Setpoint – For the LMLS-500, this is the desired light level to be maintained by daylighting control,
as measured at the workplane.
For the LMLS-600, this is the desired light level to be maintained by daylighting control, as measured at the
closed loop (down looking) sensor.
For both models, when the present measured light level differs significantly from this setpoint, the sensor will
attempt to adjust the electric lighting to compensate.
Ramp Up Rate – Determines the speed (or rate) at which the light level of bound loads increases.
Ramp Down Rate – Determines the speed (or rate) at which the light level of bound loads decreases.
Cut Off Delay – The time that the controlled lighting will remain at a minimum dimmed level, even with high
daylight contribution, before the lights will be switched OFF.
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-400
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-400
Electric Light – The calculated maximum electric light contribution, as seen at the sensor.
Electric Light Ratio – This parameter is currently not used.
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Day Setpoint Multiplier – This parameter affects how the day setpoint is calculated during automatic
commissioning. The higher the multiplier, the higher the light level must occur before loads are dimmed to
minimum.
Electric Light Setpoint Multiplier – Determines how the ON Setpoint (for On/Off, Bi-Level, or Tri-Level
operation only) is derived, after auto calibration. It defaults to 5.0, so by default, the ON Setpoint will be
initialized to 5 times the Electric Light value computed in calibration.
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-500
Zone Advanced Tab – LMLS-500
Electric Light – The maximum electric light contribution at the workplane for this zone. This amount is set
during commissioning, but can be adjusted here. At night, with no daylight contribution, this is the maximum
of electric light.
Workplane Reading and Sensor Reading – These two amounts are used to calculate the Daylight Ratio,
which is then used to calculate how much daylight is in the zone, based on the sensor reading.
• Daylight Ratio = Workplane Reading / Sensor Reading (at time of Workplane reading)
• Daylight (amount calculated at Zone) = Daylight Ratio x Sensor Reading
Workplane Reading – Daylight contribution measured at the workplane with a light meter during the
commissioning process.
Sensor Reading – The level of daylight detected by the sensor (looking out the window) at the time the work
plane measurement was made.
Electric Light Setpoint Multiplier – Determines how the ON Setpoint (for On/Off, Bi-Level, or Tri-Level
operation only) is derived, after manual calibration. It defaults to 5.0, so by default, the ON Setpoint will be
initialized to 5 times the Electric Light value computed in calibration.
INTERFACES – LMBC-300 AND LMBC-600 BRIDGES
This section documents the tabs for the LMBC-300 and LMBC-600. The LMBC-300 and LMBC-600 have very
similar functionality as a Panel, which has a bridge built in. To avoid duplication, identical parameters are not
described here, and only unique parameters are defined. Differences between the bridge and panels is described
below
LMBC-300 Basic Tab
This tab is nearly identical to the Bridge tab for panels, with one exception—the Refresh Minutes parameter from
the Bridge tab is not on this tab and is instead on the Advanced tab. For details on these parameters, see “Bridge
Tab” on page 74.
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LMBC-300 Basic Tab
LMBC-600 Basic Tab
The LMBC-600 Basic tab is similar but several of the parameters are not included.
LMBC-600 Basic Tab
Advanced Tab
Parameters from Lock Level to Date Code are common to all devices. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters. The only remaining parameter on this tab
is Refresh Minutes.
LMBC-300/LMBC-600 Advanced Tab
Refresh Minutes – If this is set to a value other than 0 (the default), the device will check the network once
per number of minutes set here, to see if other devices known to be connected are still online.
Bottom Section
The bottom section of the window for the LMBC-300/LMBC-600 is similar to a panel but with the following
differences:
• The LMBC-300 has no loads of its own, so, of course there are no Relay tabs.
• There is no Schedule tab since the LMBC-300 and LMBC-600 have no internal clock and so can’t initiate
clock based events
• You can only store 16 Network Groups in the LMBC-300/LMBC-600, as opposed to 99 in a panel.
• The Dark/Light, and Occupancy Groups tabs are similar to a panel, but they do not include the Active Days
column, again because there is no clock.
For details on the parameters in this section, see “Network Groups Tab” on page 75, “Dark/Light Tab” on page
77, “Occupancy Groups Tab” on page 79 and “Open ADR Tab” on page 80.
NOTE: You must have firmware 7.xx or later installed in the LMBC-300 in order for the Network Groups, Dark/
Light, and Occupancy Groups tabs to appear.
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LMBC-300/LMBC-600 Bottom Section
INTERFACES – LMZC-301 ZONE CONTROLLER
The LMZC-301 Zone Controller has identical features as a panel, but without any internal relays/loads. For details on
all LMZC-301 parameters, see “Controllers – Parameters Unique to Panels and Zone Controllers” on page 74.
INTERFACES – ELCU-100 AND ELCU-200
Both the ELCU-100 and ELCU-200 have only two sets of parameters, which are used for documentation
purposes.
ELCU-100 Basic Tab
Attribute – The text in this parameter is imported from the CAD drawings, for both Normal and Emergency
conditions.
Description – This parameter is available to provide further detail for both Normal and Emergency
conditions, if needed.
INTERFACES – LMIO-101
The LMIO-101 allows integration with third party devices to provide additional control over loads in a DLM system.
It provides the same switch functionality as DLM switches. Therefore, the parameters are identical to those found
for switches. See “Switches” on page 83 for details. The LMIO-101 provides for 2 inputs, similar to a two button
switch.
INTERFACES – LMIO-201
The LMIO-201 provides a DLM interface for analog occupancy sensors. Available parameters are similar to those
for standard DLM sensors.
Basic Tab
This tab is identical to that for a regular DLM sensors, with two exceptions—A Toggle Relay button has been
added, and the Detection LEDs parameter does not apply for analog sensors.
LMIO-201 Basic Tab
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Follows After Hours – This is selected by default. If it is not selected, the sensor will ignore the settings on
the After Hours tab and use the Normal Hours settings all the time.
Control Type – Determines whether the sensor controls individual loads or scenes. The Load/Scene Binding
section of the window changes depending on the value selected here.
Occupancy State – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays the current
state of the sensor. An “Occupied” state does not necessarily mean that the lights in the space are on since
the loads might be set to Manual On.
Occupancy Mode – If LMCS is connected to the room and you click Read, this field displays whether the
Sensor is set to Normal Hours or After Hours.
Room Profile – This read only parameter indicates the current profile selected at the room level. This
parameter is displayed only if the room includes a device that supports profiles (currently, the LMDI-100,
LMIO-102, and LMPS-104). For the LMDI-100, you must also select the Partition Support checkbox before
this parameter is displayed.
Toggle Relay – Clicking this button is the same as clicking the Ping button in the top section.
Advanced Tab
This tab is identical to that for regular DLM sensors.
LMIO-201 Advanced Tab
Parameters from Lock Level to Date Code are common to all devices. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters.
Preset Value On – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when the sensor
registers occupancy. This parameter is disabled if Use Last Level is selected.
Use Last Level – If this is selected, each load bound to this sensor will return to its previous non-zero level
when the sensor registers occupancy.
Preset Value Off – If this is enabled, this is the level all loads bound to the sensor will go to when it registers
vacancy. This parameter is disabled if Relinquish is selected.
Relinquish – If this is selected, the Relinquish command will be sent to each load bound to this sensor, at
the priority specified by the Occupancy Sensor Priority parameter on the Technician tab for the load. The
load’s controller then looks at the next highest priority to determine what to do. If no other command exists at
any priority level, the load will go to the Partial Off Level, set on the Basic tab for the load (0 by default).
Load Tracking Enabled – If the sensor is bound to a room controller, this checkbox should always be
selected. This allows for the sensor to understand which loads are ON/OFF in order to properly manage
presentation mode, and create error messages in the event that the sensor is not bound to any loads.
If the sensor is bound to a panel, this checkbox should not be selected. For panels, the Load IDs are not
handled the same way. Instead of the sensor telling the panel which loads should turn on and when, the
panels listen for certain MAC addresses from the sensors in order to determine if that sensor should control
its loads.
Load Binding and Normal/After Hours
Load binding is identical for analog sensors as for DLM sensors. For details on load binding, see “Sensor Load/
Scene Binding” on page 82.
The Normal/After Hours tabs are very different for analog sensors, because analog sensors don’t have the
detailed control available in DLM sensors. Consequently, there are only two programmable parameters.
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LMIO-201 Bottom Section
Override the Sensor – Selecting this checkbox turns off sensor control over the loads the sensor is bound
to. This parameter allows the sensor to control the loads only during Normal Hours (or only during After
Hours). If it is selected for both Normal Hours and After Hours, then the sensor will have no effect on the
loads.
Time Delay – The amount of time the load remains ON after no motion is detected.
NOTE: Set the analog occupancy sensor to minimum time delay. The LMIO-201 digital time delay will be
added to the minimum sensor time delay. So for example, if a sensor has a minimum time delay of
15 seconds and the LMIO-201 is set to 20 minutes, as in the screenshot above, the total delay time
will be 20 minutes and 15 seconds.
INTERFACES – LMIO-301
The LMIO-301 provides an interface for analog photocells.
LMIO-301 Basic Tab
Light Level – This displays the current light level (in foot candles) read by the photosensor.
Footcandle Range – This displays the maximum range of the analog photosensor. This value is based on
the dip switch settings in the LMIO-301.
Active Input – This displays which input wiring slots on the LMIO-301 are being used to connect to the
photosensor. This value is based on the dip switch settings in the LMIO-301.
Group ID – This determines which network group will receive input from the photosensor.
Minimum Time to Update – The minimum period of time before the LMIO-301 sends the current light
level to the bridge. A smaller number will give you more accurate readings, but will increase the amount of
messages sent on the DLM network.
Minimum Change of Value to Update – The minimum change of light level (in foot candles) before the
LMIO-301 sends the current light level to the bridge. A smaller number will give you more accurate readings,
but will increase the amount of messages sent on the DLM network.
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INTERFACES – LMIN-104
LMIN-104 is a digital input interface that provides the same input functionality as the LMIO-101, LMIO-102, LMIO-201,
and LMIO-301. An Operating Mode parameter allows you to choose which of the functions it will perform.
LMIN-104 Basic Tab
Operating Mode – This drop-down selects the functionality of the LMIN-104.
• If set to “Normal”, the LMIN-104 functions similarly to an LMIO-101 or LMIO-201 (depending on whether
the input is from a switch or occupancy sensor) and therefore provides the same functionality as DLM
switches or sensors. The parameters are identical to those found for switches or sensors, with the addition
of a few more described below.
• If set to “Partition”, the LMIN-104 functions identically to the LMIO-102. Like the LMIO-102, there are no
other parameters on the Basic tab and the standard parameters are found on the Advanced tab.
• If set to “Photocell, the LMIN-104 functions identically to LMIO-301. The basic tab will have the same
parameters described in the section on the LMIO-301.
Load State – This parameter appears only when Operating Mode is set to “Normal”. It is a read only value
that is tied to the currently selected input if that input is a switch. It will show “Inactive” if the switch’s level if 0
(Off), “Active” if between 0-100 (On), and “Unknown” if LMCS can’t determine the state.
Bottom Input Section When Mode is “Normal”
As mentioned above, when set to “Normal” mode, the LMIN-104 provides inputs for non-DLM switches or sensors
and the parameters are identical to those found for switches or sensors. This section changes depending on
whether you select a switch or a sensor in the Wiring Type drop-down. See “Switches” on page 83 and
“Sensor Load/Scene Binding” on page 82 for details on parameters. However, a few additional parameters are
found here, specific to the LMIN-104.
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Wiring Type – This parameter indicates the wiring used by the input device, which indicates which input
terminals are being used and the type of functionality. Wiring diagrams for the various input types are
included in the LMIN-104 Installation Instructions. Available values as follows:
• Switches: 2 Wire Maintained, 2 Wire Momentary, 3 Wire Rocker Dimmer (The 3 Wire Rocker Dimmer is
only available on Inputs 1 and 3)
• Occupancy Sensor: 2 Wire Occupancy Sensor
Switch Mode – Displayed only when the Wiring Type is set to one of the switch values. See the section
below for details.
Control Type – Displayed only when the Wiring Type is set to “2 Wire Occupancy Sensor”. Determines
whether the sensor controls individual loads or scenes. The Load/Scene Binding section of the window
changes depending on the value selected here.
NOTE: The Operating Mode is global to the LMIN-104. In other words, if set to “Partition” or “Photocell”, it will
perform only that function. However, when set to “Normal”, each input is independent and can be set
to a different value. For example, you could use inputs 1 and 2 for momentary switches, input 3 for a
maintained switch, and input 4 for an occupancy sensor. However, since a 3 Wire Rocker Dimmer switch
uses two input wires, it requires use of either inputs 1 and 2, or 3 and 4. Therefore, when selecting that
value for input 1 or 3, the corresponding input 2 or 4 will be disabled.
Switch Mode
By default, Switch Mode is set to “Load Control”. When set this way, a non-DLM low voltage switch can turn any
loads bound to that switch ON and OFF. However, there are several other specialized commands that can be
triggered from a switch input.
The commands sent out are basic ON/OFF commands with different priorities. The higher priority command
overrides lower priority commands given by the system. Below is the list of priorities for these commands. For
example: a Force-On (highest priority) command overrides any OFF command given by any device in the system
making sure that the lights remain on. When the Force-ON command is released, the next highest priority
command is followed.
 Highest Priority
• Force-On – Turns all bound loads ON.
NOTE: Turning Off the Force On command is not that same as sending a Force Off command. Instead it
relinquishes the Force On command so that a lower priority command from a different device can
turn a load off. If the device was off before the Force On command was initiate, it will turn back Off
unless another switch or an occupancy sensor has been used to turn the load On.
• Force-Off – Turns all bound loads OFF. As with the Force On command, turning this command OFF
relinquishes the command, and whether it turns back on or not is determined by the previous state of that load
along with commands from other devices.
• Shed – The Shed command is broadcast to all loads in a room, causing them to reduce their level to the value
specified by each load’s “Shed Level” parameter. By default, the “Shed Level” is set to 65% because for most
driver/ballast combinations this will result in at least a 15% power reduction. However, you can set the amount
of shed on a per load basis in LMCS.
• Load Control –Turns Loads On/Off.
• Clean – Load(s) ON. This is intended for use by cleaning crews. A switch assigned to cleaners can be used to
turn all bound loads ON regardless of occupancy, but since it has a low priority, an On or OFF command with
a higher priority will override this command.
 Lowest Priority
The following two additional actions are used for functionality outside of the priority hierarchy.
• Normal/After Hours – Turning this function ON puts all bound loads into After Hours mode where individual
load parameters switch to the assigned After Hours parameters of that load. These parameters can be
different than the normal hours mode parameters. For example, Blink warning may be active in After Hours
for the load but not active in normal hours. After Hours parameters are programmed via the LMCS‑100
application or through network systems where a Segment Manager or BACnet BAS is used to set After Hours
schedules for a load or device. When the function is turned OFF, the bound devices revert to Normal Hours.
• Key-Switch – The Key-switch command puts the entire local DLM network into Key-switch mode, where
no DLM wall switches can control any loads. When the command is released, the system returns to normal
operation so that DLM switches again control loads. Individual switch stations can be set to ignore this
message using LMCS, enabling a subset of switches in a room to stay active. A typical use for this is to keep
switches in secure locations active while disabling other publicly accessible switches.
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INTERFACES - LMOR-102
The LMOR-102 provides DLM control over 3rd party devices via low voltage contact closures. Its two isolated
relays can be bound to and controlled by DLM occupancy sensors, push button switches, photocells, or other DLM
devices that can control loads in a space. While most DLM loads are line voltage, this unit allows the use of “dry”
(unpowered) low voltage contacts.
Therefore, the LMOR-102 functions similarly to a room controller, and the available parameters are identical to that
of a room controller. See “Controllers – Loads and Relays” on page 67 for details.
INTERFACES – LMDI-100, LMIO-102, LMPS-104, WRC-TX
These devices have no unique parameters. There are no parameters on the Basic tab. The LMDI-100, LMIO102, and LMPS-104 have the standard parameters on the Advanced tab. See “Parameters on the Advanced Tab
Common to All Devices” on page 66 for details on these parameters. The WRC-TX has no parameters on the
Advanced tab. This device is included for documentation purposes when added to a room.
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USING THE DEVICE GRID TO VIEW AND PROGRAM PARAMETERS
The Device Grid displays programming parameters for various device types in a spreadsheet format, providing
the ability to easily view parameter values for multiple rooms, and to quickly make changes to multiple devices.
A supplemental training video on using the Device Grid can be found on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WeLFWvOus4w&index=3&list=PLQKZ56rib0O57ukrF8xv780Pc9ZxNP9MG
Click Device Grid on the Home tab to open the grid.
Device Grid
The grid has separate tabs for Controller, Occupancy Sensor, Switch, Daylighting, and Network Bridge. All
of these tabs, with the exception of the bridge tab have sub-tabs. In general the sub-tabs are organized similar to
the different tabs when viewing individual devices in LMCS. For example, the parameters found on the Operating
Mode tab for controllers and occupancy sensors will contain the same parameters found on the Normal Hours/
After Hours tabs when viewing an individual device.
Just about all programmable parameters are available in the device grid. However, due to space limitations, all are
not shown by default. You have the ability to show or hide parameters in the grid, as described later in this section.
NOTE: This section does not define the parameters, since they are defined in the section “Programming
Parameters for Individual Devices”. Instead, this section covers use of the device grid along with some
practical applications.
The device grid has the ability to send parameter values to all devices on the grid or read values from those
devices, if LMCS is connected to the network via BACnet. (You can’t read or send from the device grid if
connected via the LMCI-100.)
NOTE: You can only read parameter values if the Show Technician Pages option on the Preferences dialog is
enabled.
Copying and Pasting Parameter Values
The most common application for the device grid is to easily change a parameter value for multiple devices.
Like any typical spreadsheet application, you can edit the value of a parameter in a single row, copy that value,
highlight the other rows in the same column, and then paste that new value.
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Unlike a typical spreadsheet application, you can’t click in a cell and then drag down to highlight multiple cells in
that column. Instead you must click the first row you want to change, then scroll down to the last row and
shift-click to highlight all the rows between the first and last selected rows. Or you can ctrl-click to select
multiple non-consecutive rows. When you shift-click to select consecutive rows, any rows that contain sort headers
will appear to be selected but no data is pasted into that row.
Selecting Multiple Rows to Paste a New Value
Sorting Devices in the Grid
Directly below the tabs is the sorting structure for the devices in the grid. LMCS automatically adds or subtracts
sorting parameters based on the tab selection, to provide a default logical sort. For example, selecting the
Controller sub-tab sorts first by Area, then by Room. But if you select the Load tab, a third sort by Controller is
added.
Sort by Area and Room
Sort by Area, Room and Controller
You can switch between ascending and descending sort by clicking on the box for the sorting category. You can
also alter the sort by grabbing the sort parameter box and dragging it to a different spot.
Additionally, you can sort by any other parameter by simply grabbing the column header for that parameter and
dragging into the sort area. You can also remove a parameter from sort and drag it back into the columns.
In the following example, the Preset Level for a load is added to the sort. The Controller and Load parameters
are removed from the sort and placed in the two left most columns.
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Changing the Sort
You can now easily identify different values for the preset level.
Newly Sorted Data
You can also sort the rows, within the sorting structure, by the values in any column. Click the column header
to switch between ascending or descending order for that column. The rows will sort within the final level of the
sorting structure above the column header, but will not resort outside of that structure.
Filtering The Device Grid
The empty row below the column headers is the Auto Filter row. Type a value in a cell in that row and the rows will
immediately filter by that value. You can enter values in more than one column.
Once the filter is applied you can then change the values of any parameter in the filtered list.
NOTE: If you change the value of the filtered parameter for a specific device, that device will vanish from the list,
since it no longer fits the filtering criteria.
Using the Auto Filter Row
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The “%” or “*”character is used as a wild card for searching. So, for example, in a project where all rooms on the
first floor have a description field that ends with “-1st”, you could enter %-1st to display all rooms on that floor.
For more filtering options, right-click on the column header and select the Filter Editor from the pop-up menu.
Column Header Menu Options
The Filter Editor opens with that parameter selected.
Filter Editor
Enter the value you want to filter on.
NOTE: If you typed values into the Auto Filter row, the Filter Editor opens with those values already selected.
If you click on the green comparison operator, you can change the conditional operator for the filter, as shown
below. If you click on the blue parameter text, all parameters currently displayed in the spreadsheet appear in a
menu and you can change the selected parameter. If a value already exists for the parameter, you can highlight it
and enter a new value.
Filter Conditional Operators
Filter Parameter List
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If you click the “+” next to the red text, an additional filter statement is added. You can then edit that second
statement. This allows you to filter on more than one parameter. Additionally, if you click the red text, you can
change the logical operator.
Filter Logical Operator
Modifying Columns in the Device Grid
By default, the device grid displays most of the commonly edited parameters. However, almost all editable
parameters are available to be included in the grid. To add a parameter to the grid, right-click on any column
header and select the Column Chooser.
Column Header Menu Options
The Customization window opens in the lower right hand corner of the device grid. Click and hold a parameter,
and drag it to the column header row. You can place the new parameter between any two columns.
Customization Window
Dragging a Parameter to the Grid
To remove a column from the grid, right-click on the column header for that parameter and select Remove Column.
You can also rearrange the column order by dragging a column header to the left or right.
NOTE: Changes to the columns in the device grid are not saved. If you close the device grid and reopen it, the
order and display of columns will revert to the defaults.
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Sending and Receiving Data from Devices in the Device Grid
If you are connected via BACnet, you can send and receive data from/to the device grid. One advantage of
sending data to devices from the device grid is that only the devices currently shown in the grid will have data sent
to them. So if you have filtered the list to show only a sub set of devices, data is sent to only that subset. This can
greatly reduce the amount of time needed to send data.
WARNING: You should be careful when reading from the Device Grid. (Reading is disabled unless the Show
Technician Pages option on the Preferences dialog is enabled.) If you read rooms and devices at a global level
when they are at their default states (which would occur when they are connected and automatically set to PnG
after being powered up), the LMCS project data is overwritten with the PnG data from the devices. So you should
be sure that only the desired devices are selected if you select the Read function. The most common use for the
Read function is to read Daylighting configurations and Setpoints from LMLS sensors that were commissioned in
the field with the LMCT-100
When viewing the first sub-tab for one of the main tabs in the grid (for example, the Sensors sub-tab under the
Occupancy Sensors tab), the last column is labeled Last Transfer Time. This notes the last time that data was
sent to the device from LMCS (or received by LMCS from the device). This can be useful in determining whether
changes have been made to some devices but not others.
NOTE: The Last Transfer Time is not stored in the device itself, only in LMCS. Therefore, you must save the
project file after sending/receiving data in order for this field to be accurate the next time the project file
is opened. Additionally, the date of any changes made by the LMCT would not be recorded, unless the
device parameters were read by LMCS after the LMCT editing.
Renaming Rooms Using the Device Grid
One very useful application for LMCS is to quickly rename rooms. Often when creating a project with many similar
rooms, the fastest way to build the project is to create a single room with all assigned devices, edit the values as
needed, then copy and paste that room multiple times in the tree.
By going to the device grid and dragging the room from the sorting structure into the columns, you have quick and
easy access to all the rooms names without having open rooms in the tree one at a time.
Renaming Rooms in the Device Grid
Finding Serial Numbers and Associated Rooms
Another useful application for the device grid is to find serial numbers associated with specific rooms. This can be
very helpful in troubleshooting situations where devices are not functioning as intended. This is particularly helpful
with room controllers. Often room controllers might be grouped together and placed in a common physical space,
such as above the ceiling in a hallway, with cables leading from each controller to a separate room. If a room is not
functioning as intended, you can use the device grid to find that room and view the serial number of all controllers
for that room, so that a technician can easily determine which controller to examine.
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REPORTS
LMCS provides a suite of reports designed to help document the project, for planning and maintenance purposes.
Additionally the Device Pairing reports are used to aid in entering serial numbers for all DLM devices in the
network. Click the Reports button on the Home tab and select the desired report from the menu.
All reports can be printed. In addition, they can be exported or sent via email in any of the following formats, by
selecting the appropriate option under the File menu in the report window:
• PDF
• HTML – This option not available for sending via email
• MHT
• RTF
• XLS
• XLSX
• CSV
• Text
• Image File – You can choose BMP, EMF, WMF, GIF, JPEG, PNG, or TIFF
Once you select the export type, a pop-up opens that allows you to customize that option. For many of the options,
you can choose to save the entire report as a single file or save each page as a separate file. Once you select the
desired options, a standard file save dialog opens.
Some of the reports are intended to print on 8.5” x 11” paper, either in portrait or landscape. But many of the
reports require 11” x 17” paper, and are identified as such in the reports menu.
If you right-click on an area or room in the device tree, there will be a Reports option in the pop-up menu. Select
that to open a list of reports. When you choose a report this way, the report will run only for the selected area or
room.
DEVICE LIST
This report lists all devices included in the project, sorted by Area, Room, and Device Type. Also included is the
IP address for the network, the Device ID of the bridge or panel for the room, the BACnet MAC address for the
bridge, and the Max Master parameter. See the section on Bridge parameters for details on these fields.
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LOAD BINDING
This report lists each room controller, plug load controller, fixture controller, and panel, by room. Descriptions are
included, so if the loads and controllers have descriptions, the loads will be easy to identify.
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BACNET POINTS
This report provides a list of all exposed BACnet points for the projects that require integration but do not have
a Segment Manager. It is designed to be sent to an integrator, for the purposes of integrating the DLM network
into a BAS. Since it includes serial numbers and network IDs, this is not normally run until all devices have been
discovered and configured.
DEVICE PAIRING REPORTS
The Device Pairing Reports are intended for use with the Device Pairing Utility, to simplify entry of device serial
numbers into LMCS. The report prints out a list of all devices in each room, along with a bar code that identifies
that device and the specific room it is in. A column on the report is used to place stickers with the bar code of the
serial number for each installed unit. By scanning the serial number along with the bar code of the device in the
project, you can import the serial numbers of each device into the proper place in LMCS.
A standard hand-held USB bar code reader is used to scan the bar codes.
Each room is printed on a separate page in the report, to make it easier for contractors to work with the report
while installing devices. The CAD symbol is included as an aide to matching devices with drawings. If Description
and Location are entered for individual devices and loads, they are displayed on the report to help in matching
the correct serial number sticker with the device on the report. This is especially useful when more than one of the
same device exists in a room.
For more details on the Device Pairing utility, see “Automating Serial Number Entry with the Device Pairing Utility”
on page 43.
There are two reports. The Device Pairing Report includes all devices in the room.
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The Bridge Pairing Report includes only bridges, panels, and zone controllers. Once the bridges are correctly
matched with serial numbers, running the Sync Devices utility will discover all other devices in the room and allow
you to import the serial numbers.
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ROOM SUMMARY
The Room Summary report provides a comprehensive overview of each room and all devices in that room.
The report is broken out by room. The first section, “Schedule and Control”, displays a list of all loads, by room
controller, fixture controller, and panel, with a summary of all devices and schedules bound to each load.
After the first section, each device type (with at least one occurrence of that device type) is listed in separate
tables. For each device, settings for most of the common programming parameters are listed. Parameters are
broken out by Normal Hours and After Hours, if After Hours is enabled .
Device Types are listed in the following order: Controllers (with details per load), Occupancy Sensors, Switches
(with details per button), Daylighting, Scene parameters, Emergency Control Lighting (ELCU).
NOTE: The LMIO-201 is included in the Occupancy Sensors section. The LMIO-101 is included in the Switches
section. Devices with no programmable parameters (the LMDI-100, LMIO-102, LMPS-104, and WRC-TX)
are not included on the report.
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SIMPLIFIED ROOM SUMMARY
The Simplified Room Summary is similar to the Room Summary report but does not provide details on the values
of most parameters. For each device, it does indicate which loads the device is bound to. A small number of key
parameters, such as Time Delay for occupancy sensors, and Operation Mode for buttons is included.
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LMCT REPORT
The LMCT report is similar to the Room Summary report, but it includes only parameters that can be programmed
using an LMCT-100.
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ROOM CONTROLLER REPORT
This provides a list of all room controllers, fixture controllers, and panels on a per room basis. Each controller is
broken out by load, and the values of most of the programmable parameters on the Normal Hours and After Hours
tabs are shown.
RELAY PANEL SETTINGS
This report provides basic details about each panel in the project, including location and click settings.
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RELAY PANEL INSERT
The Relay Panel Insert is intended to be placed in the panel, as a reference for technicians regarding circuit and
load assignments. If information was entered in the Circuit field on each Load tab, it will appear on this sheet.
OCCUPANCY SENSOR REPORT
This provides a list of all occupancy sensors on a per room basis. The values of most of the programmable
parameters on the Normal Hours and After Hours tabs are shown.
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SWITCH REPORT
This provides a list of all switches on a per room basis. Each switch is broken out by button, and the values of
most of the programmable parameters on the Normal Hours and After hours tabs are shown.
DAYLIGHTING REPORT
This provides a list of all daylighting sensors on a per room basis. The report is broken out first by sensor model,
then by room. The values of most of the programmable parameters are shown.
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NETWORK BRIDGE REPORT
This report lists each panel, bridge, and zone controller which is assigned to a network group. In addition to basic
information about the bridge, a second section displays the network group parameters.
NOTE: Panels and zone controllers are also included on this report because they have a bridge built into them.
Only bridge related parameters for these devices are found on this report.
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SIMPLIFIED BRIDGE REPORT
This report lists each panel, bridge, and zone controller in the project, along with the values for most of the
programmable parameters for the bridge.
NOTE: Panels and zone controllers are also included on this report because they have a bridge built into them.
Only bridge related parameters for these devices are found on this report.
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SCENE REPORT
This report lists the Scene Editor settings on a per room basis.
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LINE RISER DIAGRAM
The Line Riser diagram generator provides a quick way to generate network diagrams of the project, based on
the setup of their networks in the Networks View tab. Line Riser diagrams show how devices in rooms can be
wired up, and also how those rooms are networked relative to one another. The diagrams display one network per
page, or pages if the network is too large for a single page. The items on the diagrams are color coded in order to
distinguish between the types of items. These diagrams can be exported to either PDF or DXF.
Generating a Line Riser Diagram
When this report is selected from the Reports menu, the Line Riser Diagram Settings dialog will pop up.
1. Enter the appropriate text in various text fields within the table.
• Leave the Auto Sheet # selected to have LMCS automatically enter the Name and Page number for that
particular page. If you deselect the box, you can enter this information manually.
• Leave the Auto Date checkbox selected to auto fill the current date, or deselect it if you need to enter a
different date.
• You can choose between two page sizes in the Page Size drop-down: 48” x 36” or 34” x 22”.
2. Once the information is entered, click Generate. If there is only a single network in the project, the diagram
will immediately generate. If there is more than one network, a pop-up dialog appears. Select an individual
network from the drop-down or leave the default of “All Networks” to generate diagrams for all networks in the
project. Then click Generate.
NOTE: If you select “All networks” and the combined number of devices in all of the networks is more than
300, a red error icon displays. Hovering over the icon displays the following message: “This project
is too large to export All Networks to one PDF. If you need to export as PDF generate the networks
individually.“ You will then have to generate diagrams for networks individually, if you need to export
to a PDF.
3. Depending on the size of the project and how many networks were selected in the previous step, it can take
from a few seconds up to few minutes to generate the diagram. When it is finished a new preview window will
appear and will display the first page of the first network.
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Line Riser Diagram Preview
Using the Line Riser Diagram preview window
Along the top of the window is a toolbar.
• The Network drop-down allows you to specify the network to view.
• If the selected network is too large to fit on one page, it will span multiple pages. If this is the case, the Next
and Previous page buttons, will be enabled and you can use those to navigate between the pages.
• You can zoom in and out and scroll in order to see the details of the diagrams.
• The Export PDF button is enabled, provided the generated diagram fits within the memory limits for pdf
export. Click to open a “Save As” dialog.
• The Export DXF button will always be enabled as there is no memory limitations on DXF exports. DXF
file can be opened by in a CAD program and edited for any custom changes, such as altering the default
connection layout.
The diagrams are all generated with a Wattstopper template border, which is filled with the information entered in
the Line Riser Diagram Settings dialog.
The network diagram begins in the top left of the page stemming from which ever network device was specified in
the Network View tab. Devices such as routers and Segment Managers and are colored red on the diagram.
The MS/TP network cable is then drawn connecting the network device to all of the rooms’ bridges which are a
part of this particular network. These rooms are ordered by their Network Position which is a property that is set on
the bridges. The network cable and the bridges are colored blue on the diagram.
Inside each room, which can be distinguished by the dotted gray line surrounding it, is a suggested wiring layout
for each device inside the room. There is a note on each page of a diagram along the right side which states:
“Devices in each room operate with open topography and can be rearranged”. This is a feature of the DLM
devices, but the diagram suggests a viable option for the wiring, based on open ports and device types. These “in
room networks” are different from the MS/TP network and to distinguish between them these network cables are
colored green on the diagram.
The MS/TP network will continue drawing rooms until it reaches the side of the page and then it will “zig-zag” down
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the page drawing rooms as it goes. If it reaches the bottom of the page and still has additional rooms to draw then
it will show a note saying that it continues on the next page. The network diagram will then resume drawing on the
next page in the same fashion.
Example of a pdf export of a single network
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SCHEDULE AND CONTROL
This report lists each device, on a per room basis. Included, for reference is the Typical Wiring Sheet and Detail
numbers, from the submittal for the project. These numbers are imported when the CAD Import utility is run.
For each controller, a list of all devices and schedule controlling loads in that controller is listed. For devices that
send control signals such as switches and sensors, each load controlled by that device is listed.
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NETWORK GROUPS REPORT
This report lists each Network Group along with the loads assigned to it.
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TYPICAL WIRING
For each device model in the project, this report displays the Typical Wiring Sheet and Detail numbers, from the
submittal for the project. These numbers are imported when the CAD Import utility is run. The CAD symbol for
that device is also included.
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HOLIDAY REPORT
This report lists all selected standard holidays plus any custom entered holidays in the Holiday Editor. Holidays are
listed in calendar order, starting with the one closest to the date the report is run.
FIRMWARE VERSION REPORT
This report lists the firmware version of each device in each room.
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BACNET SIMULATOR EXPORT
This export is used for internal Wattstopper purposes.
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BILL OF MATERIALS EXPORT
This utility will export a list of the total number of each device in the project, in XML format.
No. 25366 – 10/17 rev. 4
© Copyright 2017 Legrand All Rights Reserved.
© Copyright 2017 Tous droits réservés Legrand.
© Copyright 2017 Legrand Todos los derechos reservados.
800.879.8585
www.legrand.us/wattstopper
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