Silicon Labs Z-Wave Node Type Overview and Network Installation User's Guide

Silicon Labs Z-Wave Node Type Overview and Network Installation User's Guide
Instruction
Z-Wave Node Type Overview and Network Installation
Guide
Document No.:
INS10244
Version:
9
Description:
This document describes how to setup a network with regard to inclusion of nodes
in the network, operation and exclusion of nodes from the network.
Written By:
ABR;JFR;MVO;PSH;BBR
Date:
2018-03-02
Reviewed By:
JFR;JBU;JSI;BBR
Restrictions:
Public
Approved by:
Date
CET
Initials Name
Justification
2018-03-02
15:53:23
JFR
on behalf of NTJ
Jørgen Franck
This document is the property of Silicon Labs. The data contained herein, in whole
or in part, may not be duplicated, used or disclosed outside the recipient for any
purpose. This restriction does not limit the recipient's right to use information
contained in the data if it is obtained from another source without restriction.
INS10244-9
Z-Wave Node Type Overview and Network Installation Guide
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REVISION RECORD
Doc. Rev Date
By
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MVO All
JFR All
ABR All
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Brief description of changes
Revised document.
Added SUC and SIS.
Primary Controller does not use Node ID 0xEF anymore.
New 1st page/header/footer contents. New Doc No
Fixed page number problem
Fixed various small typos
Added clarifying comments
Added silent ack description to section on routing
Added new sections on Zensor Net basics and Zensor Net features
Updated doc after review – minor typos and clarifications
Added features of Dev. Kit 4.50:
Random home ID after exclusion/reset
Explorer route resolution and Network-Wide Inclusion
Revised sections on Zensor Net and FLiRS nodes.
Replaced first section and updated headers/footers
Updated document to devkit 6.50
Removed confidential
Removed Zensor Net description
Added Silicon Labs template
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Table of Contents
1
ABBREVIATIONS .................................................................................................................................1
2
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................2
2.1
2.2
2.3
3
Purpose ..............................................................................................................................................2
Backward compatibility .......................................................................................................................2
Audience and prerequisites ................................................................................................................2
Z-WAVE BASICS ..................................................................................................................................3
3.1 Network Nodes ...................................................................................................................................3
3.1.1
Controller Nodes ......................................................................................................................3
3.1.1.1
Portable Controller ...........................................................................................................3
3.1.1.2
Installation Controller ........................................................................................................3
3.1.1.3
Static Controller ................................................................................................................4
3.1.1.4
Bridge Controller...............................................................................................................4
3.1.2
Slave Nodes .............................................................................................................................4
3.1.2.1
Slave .................................................................................................................................5
3.1.2.2
Routing Slave ...................................................................................................................5
3.1.2.3
Frequently Listening Routing Slave (FLiRS) ....................................................................5
3.1.2.4
Enhanced Slave ...............................................................................................................5
3.1.2.5
Enhanced Slave 232 ........................................................................................................5
3.2 Home ID .............................................................................................................................................6
3.3 Node ID ..............................................................................................................................................6
3.4 Routing ...............................................................................................................................................8
3.5 Initiators ..............................................................................................................................................9
3.5.1
Slave Initiators ..........................................................................................................................9
3.5.2
Controller Initiators .................................................................................................................10
3.6 Node Information Frame ..................................................................................................................10
4
Z-WAVE NETWORK FEATURES ......................................................................................................11
4.1 Include/exclude Process ..................................................................................................................11
4.1.1
Including Nodes .....................................................................................................................11
4.1.1.1
Including slaves ..............................................................................................................11
4.1.1.2
Including controllers .......................................................................................................11
4.1.2
Exclude Nodes .......................................................................................................................11
4.2 Association of nodes ........................................................................................................................12
4.2.1
Associating a Slave with a Controller .....................................................................................12
4.2.2
Associating a (Routing) Slave with a Routing Slave ..............................................................12
4.2.3
Associating a Static Controller with a Routing Slave .............................................................12
5
EXPLORER FEATURES ....................................................................................................................13
5.1 On-demand Route Resolution ..........................................................................................................13
5.2 Network-Wide Inclusion ....................................................................................................................13
5.3 Network migration ............................................................................................................................13
5.3.1
Compatibility ...........................................................................................................................13
5.3.2
Route resolution strategy .......................................................................................................13
5.3.3
SIS functionality for improved plug and play experience .......................................................14
6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
BASIC INSTALLATION EXAMPLE ...................................................................................................15
Initial Setup .......................................................................................................................................15
Associating Nodes ............................................................................................................................15
Adding Slave Nodes .........................................................................................................................16
Adding Controllers ............................................................................................................................17
Removing Slaves..............................................................................................................................18
Removing Secondary Controllers.....................................................................................................18
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6.7
7
7.1
7.2
8
8.1
9
9.1
9.2
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Recover from Controller Node Error.................................................................................................18
STATIC CONTROLLER AND ROUTING SLAVE EXAMPLE ...........................................................20
Including Routing Slaves ..................................................................................................................20
Including Static Controllers ...............................................................................................................21
STATIC UPDATE CONTROLLER (SUC) EXAMPLE ........................................................................24
Including a SUC to the network ........................................................................................................24
SUC ID SERVER (SIS) EXAMPLE .....................................................................................................25
Including a SIS to the network ..........................................................................................................25
Adding inclusion controllers to the network ......................................................................................26
10 NETWORK-WIDE INCLUSION EXAMPLE ........................................................................................27
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
Initial Setup .......................................................................................................................................27
Adding additional nodes ...................................................................................................................27
Removing Nodes ..............................................................................................................................28
Recover from Controller Node Error.................................................................................................28
11 REFERENCES ....................................................................................................................................29
Table of Figures
Figure 1. Assigning Home ID and Node ID ................................................................................................. 7
Figure 2. Unique Home ID for two adjacent homes .................................................................................... 7
Figure 3. Routed frame flow ........................................................................................................................ 8
Figure 4. Routed frame flow w. silent ack.................................................................................................... 9
Figure 5. Including a Slave node. .............................................................................................................. 15
Figure 6. Associating a Slave Node with a Controller. .............................................................................. 15
Figure 7. Including Slave node 2. .............................................................................................................. 16
Figure 8. Associating Slave Node 2 with the Controller. ........................................................................... 16
Figure 9. Including a second Controller. .................................................................................................... 17
Figure 10. Including and associating additional Slave nodes. .................................................................. 18
Figure 11. Including a Routing Slave. ........................................................................................................ 20
Figure 12. Associating a “Simple” Slave with a Routing Slave. ................................................................ 21
Figure 13. Controller with three associated Routing Slaves...................................................................... 21
Figure 14. Including a Static Controller. .................................................................................................... 22
Figure 15. Associating a Static Controller with a Routing Slave. .............................................................. 23
Figure 16. Including a SUC to the network. ............................................................................................... 24
Figure 17. Including a SIS to the network.................................................................................................. 25
Figure 18. After SIS is included to the network. ........................................................................................ 25
Figure 19. Including an Inclusion Controller to the network. ..................................................................... 26
Figure 20. Including a Slave node. ............................................................................................................ 27
Figure 21. Including additional nodes. ....................................................................................................... 28
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1 ABBREVIATIONS
Abbreviation
ACK
FLiRS
GUI
RTC
SIS
SUC
WUT
SDK
Explanation
Acknowledge
Frequently Listening Routing Slave
Graphical User Interface
Real Time Clock
SUC ID Server
Static Update Controller
Wake-up timer
Z-Wave Software Developer’s Kit
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2 INTRODUCTION
2.1
Purpose
The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for installation, maintenance and operation of a
Z-Wave network consisting of controller and slave nodes. Refer to [1] regarding how the functionality is
implemented in the described devices.
2.2
Backward compatibility
The latest SDK’s contain new features to improve installation flexibility and network topology distribution
of a Z-Wave network. Therefore is it important to understand these features in detail to ensure backward
compatibility with Z-Wave enabled products built on older Developer’s Kit releases.
From SDK v3.3x the Static Update Controller (SUC) was introduced to allow slave and controller nodes
to request network topology updates.
From SDK v3.4x the SUC can in addition also function as a node ID server (SIS) to allow other
controllers to include/exclude nodes to/from the network. Furthermore, the unique node ID 0xEF for
primary controllers was discontinued.
From SDK Kit v4.2x the silent acknowledge mechanism was introduced to reduce routing latency. Refer
to section 3.4 for details.
From SDK v5.0x Zensor Net and FLiRS technology was introduced. Supports both 200/300 Series SoCs
and discontinued 100 Series SoCs.
From SDK v4.5x (v4.50 came after v5.02) explorer frames were introduced to improve network resilience
and inclusion flexibility. Refer to section 5 for details. Zensor Net technology was obsoleted.
From SDK v6.0x the 400 series chip is supported as the only hardware platform and 100kbps baud rate
is introduced. The SDK 6.0x has all the same functionality as the 4.5x kit and all node types now
supports FLiRS. All 6.0x based nodes are compatible with nodes based on older kits.
From SDK v6.5x the 500 series chip is supported as the only hardware platform. The SDK 6.5x has the
same features as version 6.02.00 but includes also functionality from 6.11.01, 5.03.00 and 4.55.00. All
6.5x based nodes are compatible with nodes based on older kits.
2.3
Audience and prerequisites
The audience is considered to be OEM’s implementing the Z-Wave technology into their products.
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3 Z-WAVE BASICS
This chapter describes the basic building blocks of the Z-Wave technology.
3.1
Network Nodes
The Z-Wave network consists of two different types of network nodes; controllers and slaves. The
controller nodes are able to calculate routes (and alternative routes). The second node type is the slave
node, which generally acts as input and output units. Both types exist in different versions as described
below. The Z-Wave protocol supports networks of up to 232 nodes, which can be freely shared between
controller and slave nodes.
3.1.1
Controller Nodes
A controller in the Z-Wave terminology is defined as a unit that has the ability to host a routing table of
the entire network and calculate routes on the basis thereof. Moreover, the controller has the ability to
pass on routes to slave units, in order to enable them to transmit routed signals.
Z-Wave networks are established around a controller. The controller used to include the first node is by
default configured to act as Primary Controller with the capability to include/exclude nodes. The Primary
Controller is used to include all subsequent nodes in the network.
Being primary is just a role. Any controller can be primary but only one controller can be primary at a
time. The primary controller manages the allocation of node IDs and gathers information about which
nodes can reach each other via direct RF links. More Portable Controllers as well as Static Controllers
can be added as needed as the network grows and are denominated as secondary controllers. The
secondary controllers can get copies of the network information gathered by the primary controller.
A Static Controller can be enabled to become a Static Update Controller (SUC), which adds advanced
self-organization functionalities to the network. A SUC can furthermore be enabled to become a SUC Id
Server (SIS), which adds more flexibility to the installation process. At the same time, the SUC improves
the self-healing properties of the network, as the SUC introduces a redundant representation of the
network topology. Thus, a lost or crashed controller may have its topology awareness restored from the
information stored in the SUC. The SIS is by default a Primary Controller because it can include/exclude
nodes. Furthermore it enables other controllers to include/exclude nodes on behalf of the SIS.
The controller exists in a number of fundamentally different versions, which are described in the following
sections.
3.1.1.1
Portable Controller
The Portable Controller has the ability to discover its own position in the network, when it needs
to communicate with other nodes. An example of a device using this type could be a remote
control unit, e.g. for controlling light or HVAC systems. Because the Portable Controller can be
carried around in the network, it is also typically used to include/exclude nodes and maintaining
the Z-Wave network. Portable controllers are typically battery powered.
3.1.1.2
Installation Controller
The Installation Controller is essentially a Portable Controller node, which incorporates extra
functionality that can be used to implement professional installer tools, which need extended
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network diagnostics. Like the Portable Controller, An installation Controller is typically also
battery powered.
NOTE: The installation controller is not available on the SDK 6.5x kit the Portable Controller
should be used instead.
3.1.1.3
Static Controller
The Static Controller is required to remain in a fixed position in the network, meaning that it
should not be physically moved when it has been included in the network. Moreover it is required
that the Static Controller is always in “listening mode” and it must therefore be mains powered.
Other alternatives include mains-powered with battery backup as well as running from a large
battery which regularly recharged or replaced.
The “always listening” advantage of the Static Controller allows other nodes to transmit frames to
it whenever needed, both for uploading purposes as well as for consulting purposes.
The Static Controller also exists in two variants used for more advanced installations. Both
variants are described more thoroughly in the installation example chapters (4, 5):
Static Update Controller (SUC):
When a Static Controller is configured as a SUC, the primary controller automatically sends
network updates to the SUC, e.g. when a new node is included to the network. The node will
therefore automatically appear in the SUC’s topology map. Other controllers in the network may
individually request the SUC for network updates. If no SUC is present the Primary Controller is
responsible of updating all controllers in the network, which will typically be a manual process for
the end-user. The SUC is capable of creating a new Primary Controller in case the original
Primary Controller is lost or malfunctioning. There can only be one SUC in each individual
network.
SUC ID Server (SIS):
When a SUC is also configured as a node ID server (SIS) it enables all other controllers to
include/exclude nodes. The SIS automatically becomes the Primary Controller in the network
when enabled. There can only be one SIS in each individual network. To avoid inconsistency, all
node ID allocations are maintained by the SIS.
3.1.1.4
Bridge Controller
The Bridge Controller is essentially a Static Controller node, which has the additional capability
of representing devices from other network types like X10 or TCP/IP as virtual nodes in a
Z-Wave network. This enables control of Z-Wave nodes from e.g. an X10 controller or vice
versa.
3.1.2
Slave Nodes
Slave nodes are devices that do not contain routing tables.
Any slave node can act as repeater for frames going to other nodes. The only requirement for being able
to act as repeater is that the node is in listening state. This requires that the node is permanently
powered, and in order to limit battery consumption, this means that only mains-powered nodes will act as
repeaters in most practical installations.
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Battery operated slaves that do not listen continually are disregarded by controllers when calculating
routes.
There are several types of slave nodes.
3.1.2.1
Slave
The Slave node type is able to receive frames and reply if necessary. The slave node cannot
host pre-configured routes to other nodes. The slave node is typically used for devices that only
require input (and report status if polled) and do not generate frames unsolicited. An example of
a device using this type could be a power outlet.
NOTE: This node type is not available in SDK 6.5x
3.1.2.2
Routing Slave
The Routing Slave can host a number of routes for reaching other nodes. Such routes are called
1
“Return Routes” . The Routing Slave can either be A/C powered or battery powered. If the
Routing Slave is mains powered it is used as a repeater in the Z-Wave network. The Routing
Slave functionality is used for devices that need to report unsolicited status or alarms.
An example of a routing slave node could be a thermostat or a Passive Infra Red (PIR)
movement sensor. A wall switch might also be a routing slave and could then be used to control
small lighting scenes, or to establish a kind of “virtual” 3-way switching.
3.1.2.3
Frequently Listening Routing Slave (FLiRS)
A special case of a battery powered routing slave is the Frequently Listening Routing Slave
(FLiRS). This is a routing slave configured to periodically listen for a wakeup beam in every
wake-up interval. This enables other nodes to wake up the FLiRS node and send a message to
it.
One example of a FLiRS node is as chime node in a wireless doorbell system.
3.1.2.4
Enhanced Slave
The Enhanced Slave has the same basic functionality as a routing slave node, but more
software components are available because of more features on the hardware. Enhanced slave
nodes have software support for External EEPROM. An example of a device using this type of
Slave nodes could be a Thermostat.
NOTE: This node type is not available in SDK 6.5x
3.1.2.5
Enhanced Slave 232
The Enhanced Slave 232 has the same basic functionality as a enhanced slave node, but this
node type supports storing return routes of up to 231 destinations.
1
”Return Route” is a controller-centric term that was originally referring to a route going back to the controller. Seen from the
routing slave, “Controller Assigned Route” might be a better term. However, “Return Route” is the established term in all Z-Wave
documentation.
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3.2
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Home ID
The Z-Wave protocol uses a unique identifier called the Home ID to separate networks from each other.
A 32 bits unique identifier may be pre-programmed in all controller nodes at manufacturing. This unique
32 bits identifier is automatically used as Home ID during the installation of the Z-Wave network..
Additional nodes will be assigned that same Home ID when included into the network. This is an
automatic process that leaves the initial controller as the Primary Controller and the other controller(s) as
Secondary Controller(s). In case a SIS is present in the network will it be allocated the Primary Controller
role leaving the remaining controllers as Inclusion Controllers.
All slave nodes in the network will initially have a Home ID that is set to zero. In order to communicate in
the network the Primary Controller needs to assign its Home ID. It is only a Primary Controller or an
Inclusion Controller that can assign Home ID’s to a node.
With the introduction of SDK 4.50, the home ID may still be programmed. However, when excluding or
resetting a controller it generates a new random home ID.
The generation of a random home ID not only simplifies production, but also eliminates the risk of
creating node ID duplicates because a new home ID is used when creating the network.
With SDK’s before v4.50. This would happen when resetting a Primary Controller without first removing
all nodes from the network, then the home ID would be reused by the controller and that would lead to
nodes with dublicated home ID/node ID.
With the introduction of SDK 4.50, slave nodes also generate a new random home ID after each reset.
During Network-Wide Inclusion, the home ID is used to identify the node. Once included, the node takes
on the home ID of the primary controller and the slave's random home ID is never used again.
3.3
Node ID
Node ID’s are used to address individual nodes in a network. A Node ID is an 8 bit value and it is
assigned to slave and controller nodes by a Primary Controller or an Inclusion Controller. The Node ID
assigned to a device is only unique within a network defined by the unique Home ID. The application
must not assume a default Node ID allocation when a network is created because the Node ID allocation
algorithm depends on a number of factors.
See Figure 1 for a graphical representation of the Home ID and Node ID of four different nodes before
and after installation. The original Home ID (0x00002222) is preserved when the Portable Controller gets
the secondary controller role but not used as long it is a part of the network with Home ID 0x00001111.
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Light Control System (Before Installation)
2018-03-02
Light Control System (After Installation)
Portable Controller
Primary Controller
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x01
Portable Controller
Secondary Ctrl.
Home ID: 0x00002222
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x02
Slave
Slave
Home ID: 0x00000000
Node ID: 0x00
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x03
Slave
Slave
Home ID: 0x00000000
Node ID: 0x00
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x04
Figure 1. Assigning Home ID and Node ID
See Figure 2 for an illustration of how two adjoining networks will have different Home ID’s because
different controllers, with each their own unique Home ID’s, were used to do the installation.
Light Control System (Home A)
Light Control System (Home B)
Primary Controller
Primary Controller
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00003333
Node ID: 0x01
Secondary Ctrl.
Secondary Ctrl.
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x02
Home ID: 0x00003333
Node ID: 0x02
Slave
Slave
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x03
Home ID: 0x00003333
Node ID: 0x03
Slave
Slave
Home ID: 0x00001111
Node ID: 0x04
Home ID: 0x00003333
Node ID: 0x04
Figure 2. Unique Home ID for two adjacent homes
While the inclusion process is different when performing network-wide inclusion via explorer frames, the
end result is the same. All nodes assume the home ID of the primary controller and individual, unique
node IDs.
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3.4
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Routing
All controllers maintains a routing table, which enables the controller to calculate routes in the Z-Wave
network. Slave nodes can not initiate transmission of routed frames, unless the controller has provided
one or more return routes to the Routing Slave or Enhanced Routing Slave.
The forwarding mechanism for routed frames changed significantly from version 4.2x. Before that
version, every frame transmission was acknowledged before the frame was forwarded to the next node
in the path.
Version 4.2x makes use of the fact that the frame forwarded to the next node in the path is just as easy
to hear from the originator as an acknowledgement frame would be. This trick is nicknamed “Silent Ack”.
By using silent ack, airtime is freed up and protocol latency is reduced.
Before version 4.2x: Full acknowledgement
The figure below shows an example of the frame flow when a frame is sent from a controller, repeated by
slave 1 to slave 2.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The controller sends a frame for slave 2 routed via slave 1
Slave 1 confirms the reception of the frame by sending out an ack.
Slave 1 repeats the frame.
Slave 2 confirms the reception of the frame by sending out an ack.
Slave 2 sends out a routed ack for end-to-end confirmation
Slave 1 confirms the reception of the frame by sending out an ack.
Slave 1 repeats the routed ack.
The controller confirms the reception of the frame by sending out an ack.
Frame (1)
Controller
Frame (3)
Slave 1
Ack (2)
Slave 2
Ack (4)
Routed Ack (7)
Routed Ack (5)
Ack (8)
Ack (6)
Figure 3. Routed frame flow
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From version 4.2x: Silent ack
The figure below shows an example of the frame flow when a frame is sent from a controller, repeated by
slave 1 to slave 2.
1. The controller sends a frame for slave 2 routed via slave 1
2. Slave 1 repeats the frame.
The controller receives the frame and interprets this as an acknowledgement
3. Slave 2 sends out a routed ack for end-to-end confirmation
Slave 1 receives the routed ack and interprets this as an acknowledgement
4. Slave 1 repeats the routed ack.
Slave 2 receives the routed ack and interprets this as an acknowledgement
The controller confirms the reception of the frame by sending out an ack frame
Frame (1)
Controller
Frame (2)
Slave 1
Routed Ack (4)
Slave 2
Routed Ack (3)
Ack (5)
Figure 4. Routed frame flow w. silent ack
3.5
Initiators
The Z-Wave system is relying on the ability to include, exclude and operate nodes in the network, as
described below. This requires that each node has a number of “Initiators”. In the rest of this document
an initiator does not necessarily mean a physical button. An Initiator can either be a physical button, a
special activation of a button (e.g. activating a button for 2 seconds), a combination of buttons (e.g.
activating two buttons simultaneously) or an item in a menu system.
3.5.1
Slave Initiators
The slave nodes only need one Initiator since all the intelligence is placed in the controller nodes. The
slave initiator will be used for inclusion/exclusion, association/disassociation and operation depending on
whether the initiators on the controller are activated or not. If additional features need to be supported,
additional initiators may be required.
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3.5.2
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Controller Initiators
The controller nodes need at least the following initiators:
Include Initiator:
The include initiator is used when Primary and Inclusion Controllers include nodes in the
network. When both the include initiator on the Primary/Inclusion Controller and a slave initiator
have been activated simultaneously, the new node will be included to the network if the node
was not included previously.
Exclude Initiator:
The exclude initiator is used by Primary Controllers to exclude nodes from the network. When
the exclude initiator and a slave initiator are activated simultaneously, it will result in the slave
being excluded from the network (and reset to Home ID zero). Even if the slave was not part of
the network it will still be reset by this action.
Associate Initiator:
The associate initiator is used to associate nodes when both initiators on two nodes have been
activated, the two nodes will be associated. This has the effect that when activating the operate
initiator, all devices associated with this node is being operated.
Operate Initiator:
The operate initiator is used for controlling the functionality of the associated devices (e.g. a
portable controller turning light on/off).
Return Route Initiator:
The controller assigned route initiator is only needed in systems where the Primary Controller is
required to generate return routes for Routing Slaves. The initiator is used to associate a Routing
Slave with Static Controllers and other slaves.
Static Route Initiator:
The static route initiator is used when creating associations between slaves and static controllers
out of direct reach. Using a portable controller, a two-step process is used to create an
association. Refer to Figure 15, page 23, for details.
If additional features need to be supported, additional initiators may be required.
3.6
Node Information Frame
When the Include Initiator in a node is activated the node will issue a node information frame. This frame
is part of the Z-Wave protocol, and advertises the capabilities of the node. These capabilities announced
include the node type, whether the node is able to repeat frames, and other protocol relevant issues. The
node information frame also contains the Home ID and the Node ID.
It is possible for the application to ask for the Node Information Frame from all nodes in the network and
hence enabling any node to acquire information regarding any other nodes features in the network at any
given time.
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4 Z-WAVE NETWORK FEATURES
This chapter contains information about functionalities in a Z-Wave Network.
4.1
Include/exclude Process
All nodes are required to take part in the include/exclude process. Only the Primary Controller and
Inclusion Controllers in the network are able to include and exclude nodes. This strategy is chosen to
ensure that the network stays consistent with respect to the Node ID’s allocated.
From the Installer viewpoint all Z-Wave nodes (regardless of their node type) will use the same
installation process.
4.1.1
Including Nodes
When a node is to be included in the network, the Primary Controller or Inclusion Controller will grant the
request if there is Node ID’s available. The network can consist of maximum 232 nodes, including the
primary controller.
4.1.1.1
Including slaves
The Include process is initiated by activating both the include initiator on the controller and the slave
initiator. This causes the slave node to send out its node information frame. When the node information
frame is received from an un-initialized node the controller will assign Home ID and Node ID to the slave.
If a slave has already been assigned a Home ID and Node ID in atother network, it will not accept the
inclusion. The Node will have to be excluded (or reset) before the node can be included again.
4.1.1.2
Including controllers
The inclusion process is initiated by activating the include initiator on the Primary Controller or Inclusion
Controller and the include initiator on the new controller that should be included into the network. The
Primary Controller or Inclusion Controller will assign Home ID and Node ID to the new controller, which
will then automatically become a Secondary or Inclusion Controller.
As part of the inclusion of additional controllers into the network, a replication of the routing tables and
optionally other information will automatically take place. This ensures that the new controller have the
newest information available. At later stages, when the Primary Controller has been updated with new
nodes (or nodes have been deleted), a new replication can be initiated by activating the include initiators
on both controllers as desired above. This network information updating can also be done automatically
using the Static Update Controller functionality.
4.1.2
Exclude Nodes
The exclusion of Slave nodes happens when the exclude initiator on the Primary Controller and the slave
initiator are activated. When nodes are excluded it will result in the node being reset and the topology
information in the Primary Controller or Inclusion Controller being updated to reflect the change. This
information is then passed on to the SUC if one is present.
When a slave node is reset, it will assume Home ID zero again. When a controller is reset, it will assume
the Home ID it was originally programmed with during the manufacturing process. This applies for SDK’s
prior to v4.5x.
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For SDK from version 4.5x and onwards, a reset results in a new random Home ID in both slaves and
controllers respectively.
4.2
Association of nodes
When two nodes have been included into the network it is possible to associate these with each other.
The following describes the different possibilities for associating nodes.
Convention: “A is associated with B” means that A is under the control of B.
4.2.1
Associating a Slave with a Controller
A slave node may be associated with a controller by activating both the associate initiator on the
controller to make it go into receive mode and the slave initiator on the slave to make it transmit its node
information frame. The controller will receive the node information from the slave node and add the slave
node to its internal associated nodes list maintained by the application layer.
Example: The slave is an outlet dimmer module and the controller is a remote control
4.2.2
Associating a (Routing) Slave with a Routing Slave
A (Routing) Slave may be associated with a Routing Slave by using a Controller. The association of the
nodes takes place by first activating the return route initiator on the Controller and the initiator on the
destination Node (node that should be controlled). Secondly the controller assigned route initiator on the
Controller and the initiator on the source node (node that should be controlling) are activated. The
Controller will then generate one or more routes and transmit these to the source node. This functionality
can typically be supported by a GUI wherefrom the source and destination can be selected in a list and
finally push out routes to the source via RF.
Example: The slave is an outlet switch module and the routing slave is a movement sensor.
The controller used for association might be a portable controller.
4.2.3
Associating a Static Controller with a Routing Slave
A Static Controller may associated with a Routing Slave by use of a Controller. The association of the
nodes takes place by first activating the controller assigned route initiator on the Controller and the
associate initiator on the destination Static Controller (node that should be controlled or informed about
events). Secondly the controller assigned route initiator on the Controller followed by the initiator on the
source node (Routing Slave node that should be controlling or sending event information) are activated.
The Controller will then generate one or more routes and send them to the source node.
Example: The static controller is a wireless wall switch and the routing slave is a wall mounted.
scene controller. The controller used for association might be a portable controller.
Note: The static controller could set up this association by itself if it is somehow possible to communicate
to it who the source node is (it is assumed that they are not within direct range in which case the situation
would be similar to the “Associate a Slave with a Controller” example above). By using a controller for
this job, the same procedure can be followed whether a routing slave is to control a slave, a routing slave
or a static controller. Even more important, this procedure makes it possible for an end-user to set up his
wall mounted scene controller without having to bother with whether this product is based on the
controller or the routing slave libraries.
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5 EXPLORER FEATURES
With the introduction of SDK 4.50, a new class of services was added to the Z-Wave protocol layer. All
these services make use of Explorer frames. Explorer frames are broadcasted Z-Wave frames, which
carries a special explorer header and optionally an embedded Z-Wave command to be executed by a
target addressed inside the explorer header.
Special rules specify how explorer-supporting nodes should forward copies of explorer frames.
5.1
On-demand Route Resolution
If failing classic routing, a node may issue an explorer SearchRequest frame.
All nodes supporting explorer frames may forward the request in accordance with the forwarding rules.
Once the explorer frame reaches the target of the search, the target looks for an embedded command to
execute and returns an explorer SearchResult to the requester.
The SearchResult frame carries a Stop flag to prevent all neighbor nodes from sending more explorer
frame copies.
The flag is copied from the SearchRequest, which carries the flag from the requester to the target.
5.2
Network-Wide Inclusion
Explorer-supporting nodes may issue an explorer InclusionRequest frame. The InclusionRequest may be
forwarded by all other Explorer-supporting nodes and the frame is used as a trigger for including out-ofdirect range nodes.
5.3
Network migration
Implementers may choose to create products that benefit from new explore features while maintaining
full compatibility with existing designs.
5.3.1
Compatibility
Explore-supporting products are backwards compatible with earlier versions. This means that a exploresupporting slave may be included with a classic Z-Wave controller and a classic Z-Wave slave may be
included with a explore-supporting controller. In both cases, classic inclusion will be used.
With classic inclusion, a controller asks the included slave to perform a neighbor discovery. A exploresupporting controller also asks the included slave to perform a neighbor discovery. This allows a classic
Z-Wave secondary controller included subsequently to calculate routes to explore-supporting slaves.
5.3.2
Route resolution strategy
In order to support classic Z-Wave nodes, a explore-supporting controller always uses the following
strategy:
1. Try last working route
2. Try a number of routes calculated from the routing table
3. Issue an explorer search request
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Thus, in a predominantly static infrastructure, explorer frames may only be used during network-wide
inclusion, as the route table stays valid.
Now, if the nodes are moved around, earlier versions may fail calculating alternative routes.
Explore-supporting nodes will also fail trying the last working route and calculation of alternative routes. If
this happens, explore-supporting node may send out an explorer SearchRequest frame.
For an explorer frame to reach its target, a number of repeater nodes must be present. The sufficient
number depends on the actual network topology and the amount of RF noise in the environment. This
observation applies to route resolution as well as network-wide inclusion.
In short, explore-supporting provides the same level of network robustness as previous versions plus
improved discovery features if a sufficient number of explore-supporting nodes are present.
5.3.3
SIS functionality for improved plug and play experience
Network-wide inclusion via explorer InclusionRequest makes use of a central primary controller. The
primary controller assigns a unique node ID to each new node included.
explore-supporting nodes may be included from anywhere in the network; also when out of direct reach.
By implementing SIS functionality in a central controller based on explore-supporting SDK, one may get
the best of both worlds. Classic Z-Wave Nodes may be included via any inclusion controller in the
network.
Explore-supporting nodes may also be included via any inclusion controller in the network. In addition,
the user may activate network-wide inclusion in the primary controller, e.g. via a web page. In this mode,
explore-supporting nodes may be included from anywhere in the network.
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6 BASIC INSTALLATION EXAMPLE
This chapter contains some examples of how to install elements of a Z-Wave system in a sequential
order. It also describes how nodes are associated.
6.1
Initial Setup
The most basic setup is one controller node and one slave node, as depicted in Figure 5.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Portable
Controller
Slave
Figure 5. Including a Slave node.
Initially both the controller and the slave node are reset. The controller will have a predefined Home ID =
0x00000020) and a Node ID =0x01. The slave have a predefined Home ID = 0x00000000 and Node ID =
0x00. Being the first controller in the system and therefore determining the Home ID, the controller
defaults to become the Primary Controller and takes node ID = 0x01.
When the include initiator on the controller and the slave Initiator is activated simultaneously, the include
procedure is initiated. The controller assigns the Home ID = 0x00000020 and the Node ID = 0x02 to the
slave node. The slave is now part of the Z-Wave network, but no specific association has been made
between the two nodes (the inclusion and the association process can be done as one interlinked action
from the end-user’s perspective).
6.2
Associating Nodes
The two nodes in Figure 6 are included in the same Z-Wave network, but have not yet been associated.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Portable
Controller
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Slave
Figure 6. Associating a Slave Node with a Controller.
If the two nodes should be associated, this can happen by activating the associate initiator on the
controller and the slave initiator simultaneously. This will cause the controller to listen for a node to
associate. When the slave sends a node info frame (specified by the Z-Wave protocol and prompted by
activating the slave initiator), the controller will include the slave in the associated slaves list.
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Every time the operate initiator on the controller is activated, the controller will send a message to the
slave node, which will cause the slave node to perform the specified action.
6.3
Adding Slave Nodes
New slave nodes can be included in the Z-Wave network as the network is gradually expanded. In Figure
7, the example is extended to include another slave node. The inclusion happens the exact same way as
for the first slave node. The second slave node will be assigned the Home ID = 0x00000020 and the
Node ID = 0x03. The second slave node can also be associated with the controller by activating the
associate initiator on the controller and the slave initiator simultaneously. The result is depicted in Figure
7.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Portable
Controller
Slave 1
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x03
Slave 2
Figure 7. Including Slave node 2.
The second slave node can also be associated with the controller by activating the associate initiator on
the controller and the slave initiator simultaneously as shown on Figure 8.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Portable
Controller
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Slave 1
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x03
Slave 2
Figure 8. Associating Slave Node 2 with the Controller.
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Adding Controllers
The Z-Wave network can also be extended to include multiple controllers. Figure 9 shows a system with
2 controllers.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Portable
Controller
1
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Slave 1
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x03
Slave 2
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x04
Portable
Controller
2
Figure 9. Including a second Controller.
The second controller to be added comes with another unique default Home ID, for example 0x00000030
and Node ID = 0x01. When the Include initiator is activated on both controllers, the include process is
initiated. The first controller, which acts as Primary Controller for the Z-Wave network, will assign the
Home ID = 0x00000020 and the Node ID = 0x04 to the second controller, which now assumes the
position as a Secondary Controller.
Following the exchange of network identifiers a replication will take place. During the replication process,
all routing information will be transferred from the Primary Controller to the Secondary Controller. The
Secondary Controller is now able to perform all the same functionalities as the Primary Controller except
from including/excluding nodes in the Z-Wave network.
Additional slave nodes can be assigned to the Z-Wave network by the Primary Controller and associated
with either controller 1, controller 2 or both. In Figure 10 below two slave nodes has been included with
the Primary Controller and associated with controller 2.
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Slave 1
Portable
Controller 1
(Primary)
Slave 2
Slave 3
Portable
Controller 2
Slave 4
Figure 10. Including and associating additional Slave nodes.
The Portable Controller 2 can be associated with slave 3 and slave 4. The routing table of Portable
Controller 2 will not be updated before Portable Controller 1 performs a controller replication.
6.5
Removing Slaves
A slave node can be removed from the Z-Wave network by activating the exclude initiator on the Primary
Controller and the slave initiator. This action will cause the controller to send Home ID = 0x00000000 and
Node ID = 0x00 to the slave, thereby resetting the slave. The controller will also remove the routing
information from the routing table.
6.6
Removing Secondary Controllers
A Secondary Controller can be removed by activating the exclusion initiator on both the Primary
Controller and the Secondary Controller.
6.7
Recover from Controller Node Error
If a controller fails, recovery depends on whether it is a Primary Controller or a Secondary Controller. If it
is a Secondary Controller it can just be removed, a new can be included and the routing information can
be replicated.
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If the failed controller is the Primary Controller the situation is different. Basically the entire network can
be reset and then reconfigured with a new controller. This controller will then become the new Primary
Controller. The unique 32 bits identifier of the new Primary Controller will now be the new Home ID for
the entire Z-Wave network.
A more advanced method is to use the Network management features of the Z-Wave Network.
If a Static Controller is configured as a Static Update Controller (SUC), it will keep an updated version of
the routing table. All controllers in the system may request updates from the SUC. The primary controller
is required to send updates to the SUC when new nodes have been included or old nodes have been
reset. If the Primary Controller malfunctions, a secondary controller can be requested to be primary by
making replication from the SUC.
A SUC basically implements a mirror service for the primary controller, allowing the user to reconstruct all
topology settings and inclusion data in a new primary controller; should the primary controller break
down.
Note that associations and other application-level data is not stored in the SUC. The SUC only holds
protocol-level data. Thus, the SUC increases the network robustness but it is not a general backup
service.
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7 STATIC CONTROLLER AND ROUTING SLAVE EXAMPLE
This chapter extends the previous example to also include Static Controllers and Routing Slaves. The
starting point for this example is a network with a Portable Controller and two slave nodes.
7.1
Including Routing Slaves
The first step in this scenario is to include a Routing Slave, see Figure 11.
Slave 1
Portable
Controller
Slave 2
Routing
Slave
Figure 11. Including a Routing Slave.
The Routing Slave is included in the network in the exact same way as any other slave node. When the
include initiator on the controller and the initiator on the Routing Slave are activated, the controller will
assign Home ID and Node ID to the Routing Slave.
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The Routing Slave can now be associated with a controller or another slave. The controller is an
important part of facilitating the association process although it is not part of the final association.
Slave 1
Portable
Controller
1
Slave 2
2
Routing
Slave
3
Figure 12. Associating a “Simple” Slave with a Routing Slave.
The controller needs an extra initiator compared to the previous example. This initiator is called a
controller assigned route initiator. The controller assigned route initiator on the controller and the initiator
on slave 2 (the device to be controlled) are activated. The procedure is repeated for the Routing Slave.
Upon doing the second part of the association, the controller will calculate one or more routes between
the Routing Slave and Slave 2. These routes will be sent to the Routing Slave, which will use the routes
when communicating with Slave 2.
7.2
Including Static Controllers
This part of the example describes a situation where the network initially consists of one controller and
three Routing Slaves. This network is depicted in Figure 13.
Routing
Slave 1
Portable
Controller
Routing
Slave 3
Routing
Slave 2
Figure 13. Controller with three associated Routing Slaves.
The following figure shows the previous example extended with a Static Controller. A Static Controller is
included in the same way as a Portable Controller. The Static Controller will be assigned a Home ID and
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a Node ID, and the topology information is transferred. The main difference in the inclusion procedure is
that the Static Controller automatically investigates which neighbours it is able to see during the include
process. Figure 14 illustrates the network after the Static Controller has been included.
Routing
Slave 1
Portable
Controller
Routing
Slave 3
Routing
Slave 2
Static
Controller
Figure 14. Including a Static Controller.
The Portable Controller now contains the full routing information, including the knowledge of which nodes
that can be reached directly from the Static Controller.
In this scenario it is now possible to create an association that allows a Routing Slave to communicate
with the Static Controller.
In the following example we want to associate the Static Controller with the Routing Slave 3. In the
example it is assumed that the Static Controller can only reach Routing Slave 1 and Routing Slave 2
directly. Also for the Routing Slave 3 it is assumed that it is able to reach Routing Slave 1 and Routing
Slave 2 directly, but not the Static Controller.
The Association is done as described in the previous example, by first moving the Portable Controller
within range of the Static Controller, and then activating the static route initiator on the Portable
Controller and the associate initiator on the Static Controller. Secondly the Portable Controller is moved
closer to Routing Slave 3. When the associate initiator on the Portable Controller and the initiator on
slave 3 have been activated, the Portable Controller will calculate routes from Routing Slave 3 to the
Static Controller. In this example the Portable Controller will come up with two alternative routes. The first
route is to reach the Static Controller through Routing Slave 1. The second route is to reach the Static
Controller through Routing Slave 2.
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Figure 15 shows the Z-Wave network after the Static Controller has been associated with Routing Slave
3.
Routing
Slave 1
Portable
Controller
Routing
Slave 3
1
2
3
Static
Controller
Routing
Slave 2
Figure 15. Associating a Static Controller with a Routing Slave.
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8 STATIC UPDATE CONTROLLER (SUC) EXAMPLE
When a Static Controller is configured as a Static Update Controller (SUC) then it will automatically
receive all changes in the network topology from the Primary Controller. Other nodes in the network can
acquire this information.
Note that only one SUC can be present in each individual network.
8.1
Including a SUC to the network
The following step describes the process of including a SUC to the network:
1
Portable
Controller
Primary
Static
Controller
SUC
3
2
Portable
Controller
Secondary
Figure 16. Including a SUC to the network.
1) Include the Static Controller as described in the previous chapter by replicating the information
from the Primary Controller to the Static Controller. The Static Controller is now included to the
network and is secondary. Afterwards will the application on the Primary Controller assign the
Secondary Static Controller to become the SUC.
2) The Primary Controller includes an additional Portable Controller node to the network in same
way as described in previous chapters.
3) The Primary Controller will automatically send the updated network topology for the included
Secondary Portable Controller to the SUC. From now on every time a new node (controller or
slave) is included to the network the SUC will get the updates automatically.
Association is done exactly as described in previous chapters.
It is recommended to include the SUC as the first node in the network because new nodes can then be
advised about its presence when included.
Adding a SUC to an existing network will cause battery-operated nodes, such as portable controllers, to
be unaware of the SUC. Such nodes will never be able to request topology updates from the SUC.
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9 SUC ID SERVER (SIS) EXAMPLE
The SUC may be further configured with node ID server (SIS) functionality to enhance installation
flexibility. The SIS enables other controllers to include/exclude nodes to/from the network. When SIS
functionality is enabled the controller also takes the role as the Primary Controller because it has both
latest network topology and allocated node IDs. All the other controllers are called Inclusion Controllers
because they can include/exclude nodes to/from the network. Until the SIS is included to the network the
installation process is as described in the previous installation chapters.
Note that only one SIS can be present in each individual network.
9.1
Including a SIS to the network
The following step describes the process of including a SIS to the network.
Portable
Controller
Primary
1
Static
Controller
SIS
Figure 17. Including a SIS to the network.
Portable
Inclusion
Controller 1
Static
Controller
Primary
SIS
Figure 18. After SIS is included to the network.
1. Include the Static Controller as described in the previous chapter by replicating the information from
the Primary Controller to the Static Controller. The Static Controller is now included to the network
and is secondary. Afterwards will the application on the Primary Controller assign the Secondary
Static Controller to become the SIS. The SIS becomes the Primary Controller after inclusion and the
old Primary Controller becomes an Inclusion Controller.
It is recommended to include the SIS as the first node in the network because new nodes can then be
advised about its presence when included.
Adding a SIS to an existing network will cause battery-operated nodes, such as portable controllers, to
be unaware of the SIS. Such nodes will never be able to request topology updates from the SIS.
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Adding inclusion controllers to the network
1
Portable
Inclusion
Controller 1
3
2
5
Static
Controller
Primary
SIS
4
Static
Inclusion
Controller 2
Figure 19. Including an Inclusion Controller to the network.
1. Inclusion Controller 1 requests an available node ID for the new Static Inclusion Controller 2 and the
latest network topology from the SIS
2. The SIS provides a node ID and the latest network topology to the Inclusion Controller 1.
3. Inclusion Controller 1 now assigns the allocated node ID to Static Inclusion Controller 2. Based on
the latest network topology the Static Inclusion Controller 2 check for neighbors within direct range.
(Check for neighbors within direct range is not done in case the Inclusion Controller 2 is portable)
4. The Inclusion Controller 2 returns neighbor information to Inclusion Controller 1.
In case Controller 2 is a static controller based on an old library without Inclusion Controller capability
then it becomes a Secondary Static Controller.
5. The Inclusion Controller 1 updates the SIS with the latest network topology discovered during the
inclusion of Inclusion Controller 2.
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10 NETWORK-WIDE INCLUSION EXAMPLE
This chapter discusses inclusion of nodes using network-wide inclusion via explorer frames.
10.1 Initial Setup
Inclusion mode is enabled in the primary controller. Typically this is done via a web page or other sort of
GUI.
When in inclusion mode, the controller accepts one inclusion requests, if multiple nodes . Inclusion mode
must time out after a period of time when no new inclusion requests have been received.
The most basic setup is one controller node and one slave node, as depicted in Figure 20.
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Portable
Controller
Slave
Figure 20. Including a Slave node.
Initially both the controller and the slave node are reset. The controller may have a predefined Home ID
(e.g. 0x00000020) and a Node ID =0x01. The slave may have a predefined (non-zero) Home ID and
Node ID = 0x00. Being the first controller in the system and therefore determining the Home ID, the
controller defaults to become the Primary Controller and takes node ID = 0x01.
Inclusion mode is enabled in the controller. Auto-inclusion is enabled in the slave. This may be done by
activating a special key sequence in the slave or simply resetting the slave. The slave chooses a new
random home ID after each reset.
The controller assigns the Home ID = 0x00000020 and the Node ID = 0x02 to the slave node. The slave
is now part of the Z-Wave network, but no specific association has been made between the two nodes.
10.2 Adding additional nodes
New slave nodes can be included in the Z-Wave network as the network is gradually expanded. In Figure
21, the example is extended to include another slave node.
If the new node is within direct range of the controller, the inclusion happens the exact same way as for
the first slave node. If out of range, the new node cannot reach the controller. Then, an explore frame is
issued.
The explorer frame carrying the InclusionRequest is forwarded by the already included slave node. The
following inclusion process resembles classic Z-Wave inclusion with the minor difference that the new
node uses a non-zero home ID and the controller AssignId message may be routed rather than direct
range.
The second slave node will be assigned the Home ID = 0x00000020 and the Node ID = 0x03.
The result is depicted in Figure 21.
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Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x01
Portable
Controller
2018-03-02
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x02
Slave 1
Home ID: 0x00000020
Node ID: 0x03
Slave 2
Figure 21. Including additional nodes.
10.3 Removing Nodes
A node can be removed from the Z-Wave network by activating the exclude initiator on the Primary
Controller and the node initiator. This action will cause the controller to send Home ID = 0x00000000 and
Node ID = 0x00 to the node, thereby resetting the node. The controller will also remove the routing
information from the routing table.
10.4 Recover from Controller Node Error
If operating a mixed network containing non-explorer Z-Wave nodes, refer to section 6.7.
If all nodes support explorer route resolution, reconstruction of the route map is not important. Any node
may send out an explorer SearchRequest frame to locate the destination node in question.
However, since the distribution of node IDs are managed by the primary controller, the loss of the
primary controller still means that the network has to be re-built.
Every explorer-supporting controller reset operation causes the controller to choose a new homeID every
time. This means that there is no risk of duplicate nodeIDs; even if the controller is just reset and used
again.
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INS10244-9
Z-Wave Node Type Overview and Network Installation Guide
2018-03-02
11 REFERENCES
[1]
Silicon Labs, INS12308, Instruction, Z-Wave 500 Series Appl. Prg. Guide v6.51.0x
silabs.com | Building a more connected world.
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Smart.
Connected.
Energy-Friendly.
Products
Quality
www.silabs.com/products
www.silabs.com/quality
Support and Community
community.silabs.com
Disclaimer
Silicon Labs intends to provide customers with the latest, accurate, and in-depth documentation of all peripherals and modules available for system and software implementers using or
intending to use the Silicon Labs products. Characterization data, available modules and peripherals, memory sizes and memory addresses refer to each specific device, and "Typical"
parameters provided can and do vary in different applications. Application examples described herein are for illustrative purposes only. Silicon Labs reserves the right to make changes
without further notice and limitation to product information, specifications, and descriptions herein, and does not give warranties as to the accuracy or completeness of the included
information. Silicon Labs shall have no liability for the consequences of use of the information supplied herein. This document does not imply or express copyright licenses granted
hereunder to design or fabricate any integrated circuits. The products are not designed or authorized to be used within any Life Support System without the specific written consent of
Silicon Labs. A "Life Support System" is any product or system intended to support or sustain life and/or health, which, if it fails, can be reasonably expected to result in significant
personal injury or death. Silicon Labs products are not designed or authorized for military applications. Silicon Labs products shall under no circumstances be used in weapons of mass
destruction including (but not limited to) nuclear, biological or chemical weapons, or missiles capable of delivering such weapons.
Trademark Information
Silicon Laboratories Inc.® , Silicon Laboratories®, Silicon Labs®, SiLabs® and the Silicon Labs logo®, Bluegiga®, Bluegiga Logo®, Clockbuilder®, CMEMS®, DSPLL®, EFM®,
EFM32®, EFR, Ember®, Energy Micro, Energy Micro logo and combinations thereof, "the world’s most energy friendly microcontrollers", Ember®, EZLink®, EZRadio®, EZRadioPRO®,
Gecko®, ISOmodem®, Micrium, Precision32®, ProSLIC®, Simplicity Studio®, SiPHY®, Telegesis, the Telegesis Logo®, USBXpress®, Zentri, Z-Wave and others are trademarks or
registered trademarks of Silicon Labs. ARM, CORTEX, Cortex-M3 and THUMB are trademarks or registered trademarks of ARM Holdings. Keil is a registered trademark of ARM Limited.
All other products or brand names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective holders.
Silicon Laboratories Inc.
400 West Cesar Chavez
Austin, TX 78701
USA
http://www.silabs.com
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