Bull Power 5 User manual

Bull Power 5 User manual
Managing the Hardware
Management Console
(HMC)
REFERENCE
86 A1 09EW 00
ESCALA POWER5
Hardware
Information
BLANK
ESCALA POWER5
Hardware Information
Managing the Hardware Management
Console (HMC)
Hardware
July 2006
BULL CEDOC
357 AVENUE PATTON
B.P.20845
49008 ANGERS CEDEX 01
FRANCE
REFERENCE
86 A1 09EW 00
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limited to, copying, distributing, modifying, and making derivative works.
Copyright
Bull SAS 1992, 2006
Printed in France
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We acknowledge the right of proprietors of trademarks mentioned in this book.
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The information in this document is subject to change without notice. Bull will not be liable for errors contained
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Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Table of Contents
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)..................................................................................1
Printable PDF.........................................................................................................................................1
Downloading Adobe Reader............................................................................................................1
HMC concepts........................................................................................................................................1
Implementations of HMCs................................................................................................................2
HMC user interface..........................................................................................................................3
Tasks and roles................................................................................................................................6
Predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs.....................................................................10
HMC network connections.............................................................................................................10
Web-based System Manager Remote Client.................................................................................14
When should I back up the HMC?.................................................................................................16
Setting up the HMC..............................................................................................................................17
Cabling the HMC............................................................................................................................17
Gathering information for configuration settings............................................................................33
Configuring the HMC......................................................................................................................36
Replacing an HMC.........................................................................................................................51
Installing and securing the remote client..............................................................................................52
Configuring one HMC as a certificate authority..............................................................................53
Generating private key ring files for the servers.............................................................................53
Installing private key ring files on the servers................................................................................54
Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote
Client for Java Web Start........................................................................................................56
Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote
Client.......................................................................................................................................56
Viewing configuration properties....................................................................................................57
Configuring HMC object manager security....................................................................................57
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client............................................................58
Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.......................................................59
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start.............................60
Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start.........................61
Working with the HMC..........................................................................................................................61
Basic operations.............................................................................................................................61
Working with partition profile information.......................................................................................65
Collecting and viewing resource utilization data............................................................................67
Backing up and restoring the HMC................................................................................................69
Working with users, roles, and passwords.....................................................................................78
Using the HMC remote command line...........................................................................................82
Troubleshooting HMC setup.................................................................................................................84
Related information...............................................................................................................................88
Web site.........................................................................................................................................88
i
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
ii
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Understand how to manage your Hardware Management Console.
You can manage your servers, logical partitions, and Power On Demand with the Hardware Management
Console (HMC). The HMC communicates with systems using service applications to detect, consolidate, and
send information to your service provider for analysis.
Attention: To avoid potential problems, if you plan to install an earlier version of your server or the HMC, from
one release to an earlier release, contact your service provider before you perform any installation procedures
of this type.
• Printable PDF
Use this to view and print a PDF of this information.
• HMC concepts
Learn about the different types of HMCs, predefined passwords, installation methods for the remote
client, installation requirements for the remote client, and System Manager Security.
• Setting up the HMC
This section describes how to cable and configure the HMC. This includes installing the HMC into a
rack and configuring network connections, security, and service applications.
• Installing and securing the remote client
Install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client or install the Web-based System Manager
Remote Client for Java Web Start.
• Working with the HMC
Describes how to perform actions that pertain to the HMC itself.
• Troubleshooting HMC setup
Troubleshoot common HMC setup problems.
• Related information
View and print information related to the Adding the HMC topic collection.
Printable PDF
Use this to view and print a PDF of this information.
To view or download the PDF version of this document, select Managing the Hardware Management
Console(about 1628 KB).
Saving PDF files
To save a PDF on your workstation for viewing or printing:
1. Right-click the PDF in your browser (right-click the link above).
2. Click the option that saves the PDF locally.
3. Navigate to the directory in which you want to save the PDF.
4. Click Save.
Downloading Adobe Reader
You need Adobe Reader installed on your system to view or print these PDFs. You can download a free copy
from the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html).
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
HMC concepts
Learn about the different types of HMCs, predefined passwords, installation methods for the remote client,
installation requirements for the remote client, and System Manager Security.
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
1
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
The following topics provide essential supporting information to the tasks of setting up the Hardware
Management Console (HMC) and installing the remote client:
• Implementations of HMCs
Learn about the local HMC, the remote HMC, and the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
• HMC user interface
Learn about the HMC graphical user interface.
• Tasks and roles
Understand the user roles that can be assigned to each HMC user. Learn about the tasks that each
HMC user role can perform and the commands associated with each task.
• Predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs
Learn about the user IDs and passwords included with the HMC.
• HMC network connections
This section describes how the HMC can be used in a network.
• Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Learn about the prerequisites needed for installing the remote client, differences between remote
clients, and ways to secure the remote client in your environment.
• When should I back up the HMC?
Back up the HMC at regular intervals so that the HMC can be restored in the event of an HMC
hardware malfunction.
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Implementations of HMCs
Learn about the local HMC, the remote HMC, and the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
The Hardware Management Console (HMC) is a system that controls managed systems, including hardware,
logical partitions, and Power On Demand. To provide flexibility and availability, there are different ways to
implement HMCs, including the local HMC, remote HMC, redundant HMC, and the Web-based System
Manager Remote Client. Figure 1 illustrates how HMCs might be implemented in your network.
Local HMC
A local HMC is one that is physically located close to the system it manages and is connected by
either a private or public network. An HMC in a private network is a DHCP server for the service
processors of the systems it manages. An HMC may also manage a system over an open network,
where the managed system s service processor IP address has been assigned manually using the
Advanced System Management Interface (ASMI). For convenience of service personnel, an HMC
should be close in proximity to the servers it manages.
Remote HMC
A remote HMC is one that is network-connected to a distant managed server or HMC.
Redundant HMC
A redundant HMC manages a system that is already managed by another HMC. When two HMCs
manage one system, they are peers, and each can be used to control the managed system. One
HMC can manage multiple managed systems, and each managed system can have two HMCs. If
both HMCs are connected to the server using private networks, each HMC must be a DHCP server
set up to provide IP addresses on two unique, nonroutable IP ranges.
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
The Web-based System Manager Remote Client is an application that is usually installed on a PC.
You can then use this PC to access other HMCs remotely. Web-based System Manager Remote
Clients can be present in private and open networks. You can perform most management tasks using
the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
The remote HMC and the Web-based System Manager Remote Client allow you the flexibility to access your
managed systems (including HMCs) from multiple locations.
Figure 1. Implementations of HMCs
2
HMC concepts
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: HMC concepts
HMC user interface
Learn about the HMC graphical user interface.
The HMC provides a menu (also called the context menu) for quick access to menu choices. The menu lists
the actions found in the Selected and Object menus for the current object or objects.
The following components make up the HMC graphical user interface (GUI):
• Navigation area
Learn about the navigation area of the HMC GUI.
• Contents area
Learn about the contents area of the HMC GUI.
• Menu bar
Understand the menu bar on the HMC GUI.
• Toolbar
Learn about the toolbar on the HMC interface.
• Status bar
Learn about the status bar on the HMC GUI.
• HMC applications
Understand the HMC folders and applications.
Parent topic: HMC concepts
Navigation area
Learn about the navigation area of the HMC GUI.
The left side of the HMC GUI is the Navigation area. It displays a hierarchy of items ordered in a tree
structure. The root of the tree is the Management Environment, which contains the name of the HMC into
which you are currently logged. This name is the same as the host name that you have given the HMC.
The Management Environment is a set of host systems that can be managed from the HMC. The host
systems can be the HMC into which you are currently logged and other remote HMCs.
Each folder in the Navigation area contains different HMC applications used in the specific management task,
such as the Server and Partition folder. If you select one of these HMC applications, it provides appropriate
submenus and objects in the Contents area.
Parent topic: HMC user interface
Implementations of HMCs
3
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Contents area
Learn about the contents area of the HMC GUI.
The right side of the HMC GUI is called the Contents area. It displays managed objects and related tasks. You
can select different views in the Contents area: large icons, small icons, or details in the form of a list.
Parent topic: HMC user interface
Menu bar
Understand the menu bar on the HMC GUI.
The following menu items are provided in the menu bar of the HMC GUI:
Console
The Console menu contains choices that control the console. It enables you to add and remove
managed systems, other HMCs, or other systems from the management environment. It also enables
you to change themes on the desktop, change font sizes, open an outbound Telnet terminal session
using an IP address or a host name, and exit the console.
Object
The title of the Object menu changes to indicate the type of resource managed by the current HMC
application. For example, when the Server Management application is selected, the Object menu title
becomes Server Management. The Object menu contains general choices and actions for an HMC
application that do not require the selection of specific objects to act on. The find function is also
located in the Object menu. The contents of the Object menu are updated when a new HMC
application is selected.
Selected
The Selected menu contains the set of actions that are applicable to the object selected in the
Contents pane. The contents of the Selected menu are updated based on which object you select.
The Selected menu is disabled when Overview and Launch applications are loaded. The open tab in
the Selected menu expands the view of a managed system in the Navigation area.
View
The View menu contains choices for navigating. It also includes choices for customizing the console
in the Show submenu. For example, you can select to show or hide the toolbar and status bar. This
menu also includes options that control how objects are presented. For example, if the Contents area
content provides a choice of views, such as Large Icon, Small Icon, Details, and Tree, these choices
are listed here. If the content has only a single view, no view choices are listed. When the content
displays an icon or details view, the View menu includes choices for sorting and filtering the container.
Window
The Window menu contains actions for managing subpanels in the console workspace. The new
virtual terminal creates a new console subpanel in the workspace. Other choices control how all
console subpanels are presented.
Help
The Help menu lists user assistance choices. Different options enable you to view help contents,
search for help on a particular topic, and view help information about shortcut keys.
Parent topic: HMC user interface
Toolbar
Learn about the toolbar on the HMC interface.
The toolbar of the HMC GUI lists commonly used actions that are available when the current plug-in
application is loaded. It includes navigation controls, Find and View choices (if available), and a refresh option
of the HMC GUI. The toolbar also provides tool tip help when the pointer remains over a toolbar icon for a few
seconds.
4
HMC user interface
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: HMC user interface
Status bar
Learn about the status bar on the HMC GUI.
The status bar of the HMC GUI displays at the lower edge of a console panel. It can be hidden or shown by
clearing or checking the Status Bar option in the Show submenu under View. The status bar has the following
fields ordered from left to right for displaying status information:
Padlock icon
The padlock icon is open when secure communications are not active.
Application loading status
When an HMC application is loaded, the text Ready displays. When an application is in the process
of loading, a graphical bar is displayed.
Number of objects visible in the Contents area
Objects can be present on the managed system but hidden from the view by the view filter.
Number of objects selected in the Contents area
This field displays the number of objects that you have selected in the Contents area.
Security context
This field displays the administrator user name and the HMC host name for the currently active HMC.
Parent topic: HMC user interface
HMC applications
Understand the HMC folders and applications.
Application folders and application icons are provided in the Navigation area in the HMC GUI. The folders and
icons contain several applications to be used for different system management tasks on the HMC and
managed systems.
Server and Partition
The Server and Partition folder contains the Server and Frame Management applications. The Server
Management application provides all logical partition-related tasks. It is used to create, maintain,
activate, and delete logical partitions. This application also provides a focal point for all
managed-system related tasks, such as powering the managed system on and off. The Frame
Management application provides frame Bulk Power Assembly (BPA)-related tasks. It can be used to
update managed frame passwords. This application can also be used to add, initialize, reset, remove,
and view properties of managed frames. For more information about logical partitions, see Partitioning
the server. For more information about working with the managed system and frame, see Working
with managed systems and frames.
System Plans
This folder contains the system plan applications. A system plan is a specification of the logical
partition configuration of a single managed system. Use the System plans applications to import,
deploy, and manage system plans.
For more information about system plans, see Creating partitions from a system plan.
Licensed Internal Code Maintenance
The Licensed Internal Code Maintenance application folder contains the HMC Code Update and
Licensed Internal Code Updates applications. For more information about using these applications to
maintain the code on your systems, see Getting fixes.
HMC Management
This folder contains the HMC configuration and HMC Users applications. Use the HMC configuration
application to do the following:
◊ Set the HMC date and time. For more information about setting the HMC date and time, see
Setting the date and time.
◊ Configure and test network settingsFor more information about configuring network settings,
see Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist.
◊ View console eventsFor more information about viewing console events, see Viewing recent
HMC activity.
HMC user interface
5
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
◊ Schedule routine backupsFor more information about scheduling backups, see Backing up
and restoring the HMC.
◊ Enable and disable remote commands and virtual terminals.
Use the HMC Users application to manage HMC users. For more information about managing users,
see Basic operations.
Service Applications
This folder contains several applications to be used for service-related tasks. For more information
about using these applications, see Customer service and support.
ESCALA Power5 Hardware Information and Setup Wizard
The ESCALA Power5 Hardware Information and Setup Wizard application allows you to open the
technical documentation for your server. The Setup Wizard helps you configure the HMC to work with
the managed system. For more information about configuring the HMC using the Setup Wizard, see
Configuring the HMC using the Guided Setup wizard.
Switch Management
The Switch Management folder contains applications used to manage switches in cluster
environment.
Parent topic: HMC user interface
Tasks and roles
Understand the user roles that can be assigned to each HMC user. Learn about the tasks that each HMC user
role can perform and the commands associated with each task.
The following topics provide essential information regarding HMC roles and various configuration and user
management tasks that can be performed:
• Definitions of HMC roles
This section describes the HMC roles that can perform various tasks.
• HMC configuration tasks
Describes HMC configuration tasks and the roles that can perform them.
• HMC user management tasks
Describes HMC user management tasks and the roles that can perform them.
Parent topic: HMC concepts
Definitions of HMC roles
This section describes the HMC roles that can perform various tasks.
Each HMC user can be a member of a different role. Each of these roles allows the user to access different
parts of the HMC and perform different tasks on the managed system. HMC roles are either predefined or
customized.
The roles discussed in this section refer to HMC users; operating systems running on logical partitions have
their own set of users and roles.
When you create an HMC user, you must assign that user a task role. Each task role allows the user varying
levels of access to tasks available on the HMC interface.
For more information about the tasks each HMC user role can perform and the commands associated with
each task, see Overview of HMC tasks.
You can assign managed systems and logical partitions to individual HMC users. This allows you to create a
user that has access to managed system A but not to managed system B. Each grouping of managed
resource access is called a managed resource role.
To learn more about managed resource roles and how to create them, refer to the HMC interface help.
Predefined HMC roles
6
Tasks and roles
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
The predefined HMC roles, which are the default on the HMC, are as follows:
super administrator
The super administrator acts as the root user, or manager, of the HMC system. The super
administrator has unrestricted authority to access and modify most of the HMC system.
service representative
A service representative is an employee who is at your location to install, configure, or repair the
system.
operator
An operator is responsible for daily system operation.
product engineer
A product engineer assists in support situations, but cannot access HMC user management functions.
To provide support access for your system, you must create and administer user IDs with the product
engineer role.
viewer
A viewer can view HMC information, but cannot change any configuration information.
Customized HMC roles
You can create customized HMC roles by modifying predefined HMC roles. Creating customized HMC roles is
useful for restricting or granting specific task privileges to a certain user.
For more information about creating customized HMC roles, see Creating a customized HMC role.
Parent topic: Tasks and roles
HMC configuration tasks
Describes HMC configuration tasks and the roles that can perform them.
Use the following table for descriptions of the HMC configuration tasks, the associated commands, and the
user roles necessary to perform them.
Table 1. HMC configuration tasks, commands, and user roles
Task
Add or
remove an
entry in the
HMC syslog
configuration
file
Associated
command
Roles
super
service
administrator representative
operator
product
engineer
chhmc
X
X
X
X
Add or
chhmc
remove an
entry in the
HMC network
time protocol
configuration
file
X
X
X
X
Back up
critical
console data
bkconsdata
X
X
X
X
Configure
whether
keyboard
mapping
configuration
will occur
chhmc
X
X
X
X
Tasks and roles
viewer
7
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
during the
next HMC
reboot
Display HMC lshmc
locale
information
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
HMC BIOS
level
lshmc
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
HMC
configuration
lshmc
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
lshmc
HMC network
settings
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
HMC remote
access
settings
lshmc
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
HMC VPD
information
lshmc
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
HMC version
information
lshmc
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
lsusrtca
status of
prompting for
the Terms
and
Conditions
agreement at
user login
X
X
X
X
X
Display the
lsmediadev
storage media
devices on
the HMC
X
X
X
X
X
Enable or
chusrtca
disable
displaying the
Terms and
Conditions
agreement at
user login
X
Enable or
chhmc
disable HMC
boot from the
alternate hard
disk partition
X
X
X
X
Enable or
disable HMC
network boot
chhmc
X
X
X
X
Get HMC
upgrade files
getupgfiles
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Install
updhmc
corrective
service on the
HMC
Modify the
HMC
configuration
8
chhmc
X
X
X
Tasks and roles
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Modify the
HMC locale
chhmc
X
X
X
X
Modify the
chhmc
HMC network
settings
X
X
X
X
Modify the
HMC remote
access
settings
chhmc
X
X
X
X
Reboot the
HMC
hmcshutdown
X
X
X
X
Save upgrade saveupgdata
data
X
X
X
X
Shut down the hmcshutdown
HMC
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Update code
on the HMC
updhmc
View console lssvcevents
events logged
by the HMC
X
X
X
X
For more information about how to perform HMC configuration tasks, see Working with the HMC. For more
information on using commands, see Using the HMC remote command line.
Parent topic: Tasks and roles
HMC user management tasks
Describes HMC user management tasks and the roles that can perform them.
Use the following table for descriptions of the HMC user management tasks, the associated commands, and
the user roles necessary to perform them.
Task
Create a user for the
HMC
Associated
command
mkhmcusr
Roles
super
administrator
service
representative
operator
product
engineer
viewer
X
Create an access control mkaccfg
roles
X
Display a user's access
control resource
instances
lshmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Display a user's access
control roles
lshmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Display a user's
properties
lshmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Modify a user's access
control resource
instances
chhmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Modify a user's access
control roles
chhmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Modify a user's
password
chhmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Tasks and roles
9
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Modify a user's
properties
chhmcusr
X
X
X
X
X
Modify an access control chaccfg
role
X
Remove an access
control role.
rmaccfg
X
Remove inactive access rmaccfg
control resource
instances assigned to a
user
X
Remove a user from the rmhmcusr
HMC
X
View an access control
resource instance
lsaccfg
X
X
X
X
X
View an access control
role
lsaccfg
X
X
X
X
X
Parent topic: Tasks and roles
Predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs
Learn about the user IDs and passwords included with the HMC.
Predefined user IDs and passwords are included with the HMC. It is imperative to your system's security that
you change all predefined passwords immediately.
The following predefined user IDs and passwords are included with the HMC:
User ID
Password
Purpose
hscroot
abc123
The hscroot user ID and password are used to log in to the HMC for the
first time. They are case-sensitive and can only be used by a member of
the super administrator role.
root
passw0rd
The root user ID and password are used by the service provider to
perform maintenance procedures. They cannot be used to log in to the
HMC.
Parent topic: HMC concepts
HMC network connections
This section describes how the HMC can be used in a network.
You can use different types of network connections to connect your HMC to managed systems.
For more information about configuring the HMC to connect to a network, see Configuring the HMC using the
HMC configuration checklist.
For more information about using the HMC on a network, see the following:
• Types of HMC network connections
Describes how to utilize HMC remote management and service functions using your network.
• Private and open networks in the HMC environment
Explains how a private and open network are used in relation to the HMC.
10
Predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
• HMC as a DHCP server
Explains the basics of DHCP and how to use the HMC as a DHCP server.
Parent topic: HMC concepts
Types of HMC network connections
Describes how to utilize HMC remote management and service functions using your network.
The HMC supports the following types of logical communications:
• HMC to managed system: This type of communications is used to perform most of the hardware
management functions, in which HMC issues control function requests through the service processor
of the managed system.
• HMC to logical partition: This type of communications is used to collect platform-related information
(hardware error events, hardware inventory) from the operating systems running in the logical
partitions, as well as to coordinate certain platform activities (dynamic LPAR, concurrent repair) with
those operating systems. If you want to use service and error notification features, it is important that
you make this connection.
• HMC to remote users: This type of communications provides remote users with access to HMC
functionality. Remote users can access the HMC in the following ways:
♦ By using the remote client to access all the HMC GUI functions remotely
♦ By using SSH to access the HMC command line functions remotely
♦ By using a virtual terminal server for remote access to virtual logical partition consoles
• HMC to service provider: This type of communications is used to transmit data, such as hardware
error reports, inventory data, and microcode updates, to and from your service provider. You can use
this communications path to make automatic service calls.
The HMC supports up to three separate physical Ethernet interfaces. In the desktop version of the HMC, this
consists of one integrated Ethernet and up to two plug-in adapters. In the rack-mounted version, this consists
of two integrated Ethernet adapters and up to one plug-in adapter. Use each of these interfaces in the
following ways:
• One network interface can be used exclusively for HMC-to-managed system communications, which
means that only the HMC and service processors of the managed systems would be on that network.
Even though the network interfaces into the service processors are encrypted for the Secure Sockets
Layer (SSL) protocol and password-protected, having a separate dedicated network can provide a
higher level of security for these interfaces.
• Another network interface would typically be used for the network connection between the HMC and
the logical partitions on the managed systems, for the HMC-to-logical partition communications. For
more information about configuring the HMC to connect to a network, see Configuring the HMC using
the HMC configuration checklist. For more information about the communications options you have
for logical partitions, see Communications options for logical partitions.
• The third interface is an optional additional Ethernet connection that can be used for remote
management of the HMC. This third interface can also be used to have a separate HMC connection
to different groups of logical partitions. For example, you might want to have an administrative LAN
that is separate from the LAN on which all the usual business transactions are running. Remote
administrators could access HMCs and other managed units using this method. Sometimes the
logical partitions are in different network security domains, perhaps behind a firewall, and you might
want to have different HMC network connections into each of those two domains.
For more information about physically cabling the HMC to the managed system, see Cabling your server.
Parent topic: HMC network connections
Private and open networks in the HMC environment
Explains how a private and open network are used in relation to the HMC.
This topic describes when you might want to use a private network, and when you might want to use an open
network.
HMC network connections
11
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Note: If you are connecting the HMC to the model 185/75 server or the ESCALA PL 3250R or 05/95 managed
servers, you must configure the HMC in a private DHCP network.
The connection between the HMC and its managed systems can be implemented either as a private or open
network. The term open refers to any general, public network that contains elements other than HMCs and
service processors that is not isolated behind an HMC. The other network connections on the HMC are
considered open, which means that they are configured in a way that you would expect when attaching any
standard network device to an open network.
In a private service network, however, the only elements on the physical network are the HMC and the service
processors of the managed systems. In addition, the HMC provides Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP) services on that network, which allow it to automatically discover and assign IP configuration
parameters to those service processors. You can configure the HMC to select one of several different address
ranges to use for this DHCP service, so that the addresses provided to the service processors do not conflict
with addresses used on the other networks to which the HMC is connected. The DHCP services allow the
elements on the private service network to be automatically configured and detected by the HMC, while at the
same time preventing address conflicts on the network.
On a private network, therefore, all of the elements are controlled and managed by the HMC. The HMC also
acts as a functional firewall, isolating that private network from any of the open networks to which the HMC is
also attached. The HMC does not allow any IP forwarding; clients on one network interface of the HMC
cannot directly access elements on any other network interface.
To take advantage of the additional security and ease of setup, implement service network communications
through a private network. However, in some environments, this is not feasible because of physical wiring,
floor planning, or control center considerations. In this case, the service network communications can be
implemented through an open network. The same functionality is available on both types of networks,
although the initial setup and configuration on an open network require more manual steps.
The following figures show representations of private and open networks:
Figure 1. Private network: direct connection
Figure 2. Private network: indirect connection
12
HMC network connections
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Figure 3. Open network
Choosing a private network
Designate the first HMC network interface as private if any of the following is true:
• Only the HMC and service processors will be endpoints on that network.
• All elements will be connected in a single subnet, and you will not be routing or switching.
• You want the HMC to automatically configure and detect the managed systems associated with those
service processors.
• You want to keep the service network isolated behind the HMC.
Choosing an open network
Designate the first network interface as open if you want to run the communications between the HMC and
the service processors across an open network that crosses multiple subnets or has other devices on the
network.
For more information about choosing a network type, see Selecting the network type.
Parent topic: HMC network connections
HMC as a DHCP server
Explains the basics of DHCP and how to use the HMC as a DHCP server.
If you want to configure the first network interface as a private network, you can select from a range of IP
addresses for the DHCP server to assign to its clients. The selectable address ranges include segments from
the standard nonroutable IP address ranges.
In addition to these standard ranges, a special range of IP addresses is reserved for IP addresses. This
special range can be used to avoid conflicts in cases where the HMC-attached open networks are using one
of the nonroutable address ranges. Based on the range selected, the HMC network interface on the private
network will be automatically assigned the first IP address of that range, and the service processors will then
be assigned addresses from the rest of the range.
The DHCP server in the HMC uses automatic allocation, which means that each unique service processor
Ethernet interface will be reassigned exactly the same IP address each time it is started. Each Ethernet
interface has a unique identifier based upon a built-in Media Access Control (MAC) address, which allows the
DHCP server to reassign the same IP parameters.
Figure 1. Private network with one HMC as a DHCP server
HMC network connections
13
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
For more information about how to configure the HMC as a DHCP server, see Configuring the HMC as a
DHCP server.
Parent topic: HMC network connections
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Learn about the prerequisites needed for installing the remote client, differences between remote clients, and
ways to secure the remote client in your environment.
The following topics provide essential information regarding installing and securing the remote client:
• Installation requirements for the remote client
Ensure that your PC is compatible with the remote client.
• Remote client comparison
Determine whether to install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client or the Web-based
System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start on your PC.
• System Manager Security
Understand how to secure the HMCs in your environment.
Parent topic: HMC concepts
Installation requirements for the remote client
Ensure that your PC is compatible with the remote client.
To install the remote client on a PC, your computer must meet the following requirements:
• Either Microsoft Windows (supported versions include Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows
Server 2003) or the Linux operating systems (supported versions include Red Hat Enterprise Linux
version 3, (SLES) 8, SLES9, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9.)
• 150 MB of free disk space on the default drive for temporary use during the installation procedure
• 150 MB of free disk space on the drive that you plan to use to install the remote client
• Minimum PC processor speed of 1 GHz
• Minimum of 512 MB of memory (1 GB of memory is recommended for optimum performance)
Parent topic: Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Remote client comparison
Determine whether to install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client or the Web-based System
Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start on your PC.
You can access your HMC remotely by installing the Web-based System Manager remote client on your PC.
The remote client provides great flexibility by allowing you to manage your system from virtually anywhere you
14
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
have a PC. You can use either one of these clients: the Web-based System Manager Remote Client and the
Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start. After you start the remote client, there is no
difference between the two.
The following table lists the similarities and differences between the remote clients:
Table 1. Comparisons between the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start and the
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java
Web Start
• Available for Linux and Windows platforms
• Checks for updates every time it opens, and if
updates are available, downloads them
automatically
• Launches from the Java Web Start console
• Automatic update downloads might impact
performance if you are using a cable modem or
DSL connection
• Requires an HTTP server
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
• Available for Linux and Windows
platforms
• Updates require that you uninstall the
previous version and install the current
version
• Installs through an InstallShield wizard
• You can select the installation location
Parent topic: Web-based System Manager Remote Client
System Manager Security
Understand how to secure the HMCs in your environment.
System Manager Security ensures that the HMC can operate securely in client/server mode. Servers and
clients communicate over the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, which provides server authentication,
data encryption, and data integrity. Each System Manager server has its own private key and a certificate of
its public key signed by a certificate authority (CA) that is trusted by the System Manager clients. The private
key and the server certificate are stored in the server's private key ring file. Each client must have a public key
that contains the certificate of the trusted CA.
A Certificate Authority (CA) is a trusted central administrative entity (a local HMC in this situation) that can
issue digital certificates to clients and servers (HMC4 in Figure 1). The trust in the CA is the foundation of trust
in the certificate as a valid credential. A CA uses its private key to create a digital signature on the certificate
that it issues to validate the certificate's origin. Others, such as System Manager clients, can use the CA
certificate's public key to verify the authenticity of the certificates that the CA issues and signs.
Every digital certificate has a pair of associated cryptographic keys. This pair of keys consists of a public key
and a private key. A public key is part of the owner's digital certificate and is available for anyone to use. A
private key, however, is protected by and available only to the owner of the key. This limited access ensures
that communications that use the key are kept secure. The owner of a certificate can use these keys to take
advantage of the cryptographic security features that the keys provide. For example, the certificate owner can
use a certificate's private key to "sign" and encrypt data sent between clients and servers, such as messages,
documents, and code objects. The recipient of the signed object can then use the public key contained in the
signer's certificate to decrypt the signature. Such digital signatures ensure the reliability of an object's origin
and provide a means of checking the integrity of the object.
A server is a an HMC you want to access remotely. In Figure 1, HMCs 1, 3, and 4 are servers. A client is a
system from which you want to access other HMCs remotely. In Figure 1, Web-based System Manager
Remote Clients A, B, and C, and HMCs 1, 2, and 5 are clients. As shown in Figure 1, you can configure
multiple servers and clients in your private and open networks.
An HMC can be multiple roles simultaneously. For example, an HMC can be a client and a server such as
HMC1 in Figure 1. An HMC can also be a CA, server, and client at the same time.
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
15
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Figure 1. System Manager Security servers and clients
Each server must have a unique private key and a certificate of its public key signed by a CA that is trusted by
the clients. Each client must have a copy of the CA's public key.
The following is an overview of tasks involved in Installing and securing the remote client:
1. Configure one HMC as a Certificate Authority (CA).
2. Use this HMC to generate private keys for the servers.
3. Install the private keys on the servers.
4. Configure the servers as secure System Manager servers.
5. Distribute the CA's public key to the servers or clients.
Note: Tasks 3 and 5 are completed by copying the keys to diskette and installing them on the servers or
clients.
Parent topic: Web-based System Manager Remote Client
When should I back up the HMC?
Back up the HMC at regular intervals so that the HMC can be restored in the event of an HMC hardware
malfunction.
The backup saves important HMC configuration information, including the following:
• User IDs and roles
• Network configuration information
• Security configuration settings
• Updates Licensed Machine Code components
• Partition profile definitions and snapshots
For more information about backing up the HMC, see Backing up critical HMC data.
The HMC keeps a default backup file of the partition data locally, and also on the managed system. The
backup file on the managed system is updated each time the HMC partition configuration changes.
If the managed system is in the recovery operating state, the HMC has determined that the partition data
stored on the managed system is corrupted, or possibly lost due to a parts replacement service action. The
HMC provides the option of overwriting the partition profile data on the managed system with the current
16
When should I back up the HMC?
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
partition profile information stored on the HMC. This is why it is important for you to also keep a backup copy
of the HMC, with the partition profile data. It is especially important that back up your HMC data in the
following instances:
• After you change partition profile information on a managed system
• Before you update managed system Licensed Internal Code
• After you reinstall the HMC machine code or apply corrective service to the HMC
• After you upgrade the HMC machine version to a new level
Parent topic: HMC concepts
Setting up the HMC
This section describes how to cable and configure the HMC. This includes installing the HMC into a rack and
configuring network connections, security, and service applications.
To set up the Hardware Management Console (HMC), you must complete the following groups of tasks:
cabling the HMC to the managed server, gathering configuration settings for your installation, and configuring
the HMC. The HMC can be a stand-alone HMC or an HMC you plan to install in a rack. Use the following
topics to complete these tasks.
Note: When you have completed the HMC setup, do not power off or disconnect the HMC from the managed
system. If the HMC is powered off or disconnected from a nonpartitioned managed system for a period of 14
days, the managed system will no longer recognize the HMC. If this situation occurs and the managed system
fails to recognize the HMC, return to this topic and set up the HMC again.
If your system is partitioned, the 14-day time limit does not apply. See the Postconfiguration steps for the
HMC topic.
If you are setting up the HMC along with the setup of a new server, you must perform these tasks in
conjunction with other tasks related to your server setup. See Initial server setup for detailed instructions.
To learn more about how to cluster your systems using InfiniBand (IB), see Clustering systems using
InfiniBand (IB) hardware.
• Cabling the HMC
Connect the HMC cables, connect the Ethernet cable, and connect the HMC to a power source.
• Gathering information for configuration settings
Use the table provided in this topic to gather required configuration settings that you need to know
before you begin the configuration steps.
• Configuring the HMC
Configure network connections, security, service applications, and some user preferences.
• Replacing an HMC
Learn about the tasks you must perform when replacing an HMC.
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Cabling the HMC
Connect the HMC cables, connect the Ethernet cable, and connect the HMC to a power source.
DANGERElectrical voltage and current from power, telephone, and communication
cables are hazardous.
Setting up the HMC
17
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
To avoid a shock hazard:
• Do not connect or disconnect any cables or perform installation, maintenance, or reconfiguration of
this product during an electrical storm.
• Connect all power cords to a properly wired and grounded electrical outlet. Ensure outlet supplies
proper voltage and phase rotation according to the system rating plate.
• Connect any equipment that will be attached to this product to properly wired outlets.
• When possible, use one hand only to connect or disconnect signal cables.
• Never turn on any equipment when there is evidence of fire, water, or structural damage.
• Disconnect the attached power cords, telecommunications systems, networks, and modems before
you open the device covers, unless instructed otherwise in the installation and configuration
procedures.
• Connect and disconnect cables as described below when installing, moving, or opening covers on this
product or attached devices.
To Disconnect:
1. Turn everything OFF (unless instructed otherwise).
2. Remove power cords from the outlet.
3. Remove signal cables from connectors.
4. Remove all cables from devices.
To Connect:
1. Turn everything OFF (unless instructed otherwise)
2. Attach all cables to devices.
3. Attach signal cables to connectors.
4. Attach power cords to outlet.
5. Turn device ON.
(D005)
Use the following instructions to help you cable your rack-mounted or stand-alone HMC.
Attention: Do not plug the power cords into the electrical outlet until you are instructed to do so.
1. Use the Specifications for HMC to help ensure that you position the HMC in the correct location.
2. If you are installing a rack-mounted HMC, perform the following steps:
a. Use the following illustrations to identify the location of the connectors described in these
instructions:
Figure 1. Back view of a rack-mounted HMC
(10C/R3)
18
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Figure 2. Back view of a rack-mounted HMC
(10C/R2)
b. Install the HMC into a rack.
c. Connect the monitor, keyboard, and mouse:
For connection to a model 10C/R2 HMC, connect the keyboard and display to the
C2T-to-KVM (keyboard, video, mouse) adapter breakout cable that you have previously
attached to the HMC. The mouse is integrated with the keyboard.
If you are using a stand-alone monitor, keyboard, and mouse, read the following:
◊ For connection to a model 10C/R2 HMC, connect the keyboard and display to the
C2T-to-KVM (keyboard, video, mouse) adapter breakout cable that you have
previously attached to the HMC. If your keyboard and mouse use USB connections,
you can also connect them to the USB ports on the front panel of the HMC.
◊ For connection to a model 10C/R3 HMC, connect the keyboard, display, and mouse
using the USB conversion option cable.
d. Continue with step 4.
3. If you are installing a stand-alone HMC, perform the following steps:
a. Use the following illustrations to identify the location of the connectors described in these
instructions:
Figure 3. Back view of a deskside 7310-C05
Figure 4. Back view of a stand-alone HMC (10C/04)
Cabling the HMC
19
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
1 PCI connectors (slot 1 to left)
9 Diagnostic LEDs
2 PCI Express (x1) connector
10 Power connector
3 PCI Express (x16) graphics connector
11 Audio line-out connector
4 Ethernet connector
12 Audio line-in connector
5 USB connectors
13 VGA monitor connector
6 Mouse connector
14 System connector
7 Parallel connector
15 Keyboard connector
8 System connector
16 USB connectors
Figure 5. Back view of a stand-alone HMC (10C/03)
20
1 Power connector
8 AGP slot
2 Mouse connector
9 Audio line-out connector
3 Parallel connector
10 Microphone connector
4 USB connectors
11 USB connectors
5 Ethernet connector
12 VGA monitor connector
6 Audio line in connector
13 System connector
7 PCI slots (slot 1 to right)
14 Keyboard connector
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
b. Attach the monitor cable to the monitor connector, and tighten the screws.
c. Attach the power cord to the monitor.
d. Ensure that the voltage selection switch on the HMC is set to the voltage used in your world
region. The voltage selection switch is red and is located near the power connector. Move the
switch so that the voltage used in your world region is displayed.
e. Plug the power cord into the HMC.
f. Connect the keyboard and mouse:
◊ USB connections: Connect the keyboard and mouse to Universal Serial Bus (USB)
ports on the HMC. You can connect the keyboard and mouse to the USB ports on the
front or back panels.
◊ PS/2-type connections: Connect the mouse and keyboard to their connectors on the
back panel of the HMC.
4. Connect the modem:
Note: During the installation and configuration of the HMC, the modem might automatically dial out as
the HMC follows routine call-out procedures. This is usual behavior.
If you are connecting an external modem, do the following:
a. Optional: Install the external modem into a rack.
b. If you have not already done so, connect the modem data cable to the external HMC modem.
c. Connect the modem data cable to the system port on the HMC labeled with the following
symbol:
d. Use the telephone cable to connect the line port of the external modem to the analog
telephone jack on your wall.
If you are connecting to an integrated modem, use the data cable to connect the integrated HMC
modem to the appropriate data source. For example, use the telephone cable to connect the HMC
modem line port to the analog jack on your wall.
5. Connect the Ethernet (or crossover) cable from the HMC to the managed server:
Note:
♦ In general, your HMC should be connected to the managed server in a private service DHCP
network; specifically, your HMC connection to the 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL 3250R
and ESCALA PL 6450R servers must be made in a private service DHCP network.
◊ If you have not installed any additional Ethernet adapters in the PCI slots on your
HMC, use the primary integrated Ethernet port to complete the following instructions.
To find the location of these ports, refer to the illustrations.
◊ If you have installed additional Ethernet adapters in the PCI slots, see Identifying the
Ethernet port defined as eth0 to determine which Ethernet port you must use.
♦ You can verify that the Ethernet cable connection is active by observing the green status
lights at both the HMC and managed system Ethernet ports as your installation progresses.
♦ Connect the Ethernet port on the HMC to the Ethernet port that is labeled HMC1 on the
managed server. On the model 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL 3250R and ESCALA PL
6450R servers, use the port labeled J00A on the front bulk power control assembly.
If you are connecting a second HMC to your managed server, connect to the Ethernet port
that is labeled HMC2 on the managed server; on the 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL
3250R and ESCALA PL 6450R servers, use the port labeled J00A on the rear bulk power
control assembly.
6. If you use an external modem, plug the modem power supply cord into the HMC modem.
Cabling the HMC
21
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
7. Plug the power cords for the monitor, HMC, and HMC external modem into electrical outlets.
Note: Do not connect the managed system to a power source at this time.
8. If you are setting up the HMC to manage a new server, go to Cabling your server. Click Select by
model and choose the model server you want to cable. Next, select the console you are using, and
complete the remaining steps in that checklist.
9. If you are setting up the HMC to manage an existing server, continue with Gathering information for
configuration settings.
• Installing the HMC into a rack
Use the table provided in this topic to gather required configuration settings that you need to know
before you begin the configuration steps.
• Installing the external modem into a rack
The modem tray supports the MultiTech Systems MultiModem II Model MT5600BA Series modem.
• Identifying the Ethernet port defined as eth0
Your Ethernet connection to the managed server must be made using the Ethernet port that is defined
as eth0 on your HMC.
Parent topic: Setting up the HMC
Installing the HMC into a rack
Use the table provided in this topic to gather required configuration settings that you need to know before you
begin the configuration steps.
The following steps are required to install the HMC into a rack:
Note: You can grip any part of the hardware that is blue in color to remove it from or install it in the managed
system, open or close a latch, and so on.
DANGER
• Always lower the leveling pads on the rack cabinet.
• Always install stabilizer brackets on the rack cabinet.
• To avoid hazardous conditions due to uneven mechnical loading, always install the heaviest devices
in the bottom of the rack cabinet. Always install servers and optional devices starting from the bottom
of the rack cabinet.
• Rack-mounted devices are not to be used as a shelf or work space. Do not place any object on top of
rack-mounted devices.
• Each rack cabinet might have more than one power cord. Be sure to disconnect all power cords in the
rack cabinet before servicing any device in the rack cabinet.
• Connect all devices installed in a rack cabinet to power devices installed in the same rack cabinet. Do
not plug a power cord from a device installed in one rack cabinet into a power device installed in a
different rack cabinet.
• An electical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage on the metal parts of the
system or the devices that attach to the system. It is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that
the outlet is correctly wired and grounded to prevent an electical shock.
22
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
CAUTION:
• Do not install a unit in a rack where the internal rack ambient temperatures will exceed the
manufacturer's recommended ambient temperature for all your rack-mounted devices.
• Do not install a unit in a rack where the air flow is compromised. Ensure that air flow is not blocked or
reduced on any side, front, or back of a unit used for air flow through the unit.
• Consideration should be given to the connection of the equipment to the supply circuit so that
overloading of the circuits does not compromise the supply wiring or overcurrent protection. To
provide the correct power connection to a rack, refer to the rating labels located on the equipment in
the rack to determine the total power requirement of the supply circuit.
• (For sliding drawers.) Do not pull out or install any drawer or feature if the rack stabilizer brackets
are not attached to the rack. Do not pull out more than one drawer at a time. The rack may become
unstable if you pull out more than one drawer at a time.
• (For fixed drawers.) This drawer is a fixed drawer and should not be moved for servicing unless
specified by manufacturer. Attempting to move the drawer partially or completely out of the rack may
cause the rack to become unstable or cause the drawer to fall out of the rack.
(R001)
1. Use the following illustration to ensure that you have all the items that you need to install the HMC in
your rack enclosure. If any items are missing or damaged, contact your place of purchase. For further
information about the rack hardware, refer to the documentation that was provided with the rack
enclosure.
Attention: Do not place any object weighing more than 50 kg (110 lbs) on top of devices mounted on
the rack.
2. Starting with the slide rail that is marked LEFT/FRONT, complete the following tasks to prepare the
slide rail for installation in the rack.
a. To prevent the rail-adjustment bracket from moving during the next step, press and hold the
back of the rail-adjustment bracket 3.
b. On the back end of the rail, while holding the blue tab 1 open, press the blue tab 2 to slide the
back rail-locking carrier toward the front end until the carrier clicks into the open position.
c. On the front end of the rail, while holding the blue tab 1 open, press the blue tab 2 to slide the
front rail-locking carrier toward the back end until the carrier clicks into the open position.
Cabling the HMC
23
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
3. Position the rail so that the pins on the back rail-locking carrier align with the holes on the back
rail-mounting flange. Press the blue tab 1 to release the rail-locking carrier and secure the back of the
slide rail onto the back rack-mounting flange.
Attention: Ensure that the pins are fully extended through the mounting flange and slide rail 2.
If you need to adjust the slide-rail length, lift the tab 3 and extend the rail-adjustment bracket from the
back of the slide rail until it is the appropriate length.
4. Making sure that the rail is level, align the pins 3 on the front rail-locking carrier to the front
rack-mounting flange 2. If you adjusted the rail length, push the front rail flange back.
Press the blue tab 1 to release the rail-locking carrier and secure the front of the slide rail onto the
front rack-mounting flange.
24
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Attention: Ensure that the pins 3 are fully extended through the mounting flange and the slide rail 4.
5. Repeat steps1 through 4 for the slide rail marked RIGHT/FRONT.
6. Align the HMC on the slide rails and push the HMC fully into the rack enclosure.
7. Secure the HMC to the front mounting flanges with the two thumbscrews 1.
8. If the shipping brackets impede the HMC from fully setting into the rack enclosure, remove the
shipping brackets by pressing on the tab 1 as indicated on the shipping bracket, and slide the
shipping bracket off the slide rail. Repeat this step for the other shipping bracket. Store the shipping
bracket for future use. The following figure shows a side view of the side rail and the shipping bracket
tab:
Cabling the HMC
25
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Note: You must reinstall the shipping brackets on the slide rails before you transport the rack
enclosure to another location with the HMC installed. To reinstall the shipping bracket, reverse this
step.
9. If you are installing a 10C/R2 HMC, connect the breakout cable (the C2T-to-KVM adapter cable for
the keyboard, monitor, and mouse that comes with your HMC) to the port labeled OUT on the back of
the HMC, and connect the power cable to the back of the HMC. If you are installing a 10C/R3 HMC,
connect the USB conversion option cable to a USB connector. Route the cables to the lower-left
corner of the HMC (as viewed from the back), and use the cable straps 1 to secure the cables to the
slide rails.
10. If you plan to transport the rack enclosure to another location with the HMC installed, complete the
following tasks to secure the HMC to the rack:
Note: To remove the HMC from the rack, reverse these instructions.
a. Disconnect the cables from the back of the HMC.
b. Slide the HMC out of the rack about 150 mm (6 inches), and insert the M6 screws in the front
of each slide rail 2.
c. At the back of the rack, secure the HMC to the rack enclosure with M6 screws 1 and
reconnect the cables.
d. Reinstall the shipping brackets on the slide rails. To reinstall the shipping brackets, reverse
the procedure in step 6.
e. Push the HMC back into the rack and secure it to the rack using the thumbscrews on the front
of the rack.
f. Reconnect any cables that were disconnected.
11. Continue with step 2.c.
26
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: Cabling the HMC
Installing the external modem into a rack
The modem tray supports the MultiTech Systems MultiModem II Model MT5600BA Series modem.
The modem tray attaches to the system rack and holds one or two standalone modems, gateways, or other
networking equipment. The modem tray occupies 1 Electronics Industries Association (EIA) location in the
rack. If only one modem or other networking unit is installed in the modem tray, a blank filler is used in the
empty mounting location to ensure that proper airflow is maintained in the rack. The blank filler also ensures
that electromagnetic interference is confined within the rack.
Parent topic: Cabling the HMC
Check the power source on the rack
Ensure that the correct power source is available on the rack. The MultiTech Systems MultiModem II Model
MT5600BA Series modems are equipped to operate on 120 V ac, 60 Hz, 16 W, or 230 V/50 Hz (international).
Racks have power distribution buses (PDB) 2 that supply the correct alternating current and power to operate
the modems installed in the modem tray. The main power source plug on the rack is indicated by 1. The PDBs
are located at the back and bottom of the rack as shown in the following illustration:
Install the modem into the modem tray
1. Remove the screw 5 securing the retaining bracket 6 at the back of the modem tray 1. The retaining
bracket can now be removed from the modem tray. See the following illustration.
Cabling the HMC
27
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
2. Position the modem in the tray 4 or 7 with the front of the modem facing the front of the tray. Slide the
front of the modem under the two retainer tabs 8.
3. Position the retaining bracket that was removed in step 1 over the back corner of the modem.
4. Align the screw hole in the retaining bracket to the hole at the back of the modem tray.
5. Reattach the retaining bracket 2 to the back of the modem tray by tightening the retaining bracket
screw 3. The installed modems 1 are shown in the following illustration:
6. If you are installing a second modem, do the following:
a. Loosen the two screws in the blank filler 2 to detach the filler from the modem tray 2.
b. Remove the blank filler 2 from the front of the empty mounting location 4. See the following
illustration.
c. Repeat steps 1 through 5 to install a second modem.
Install the modem tray into the rack
1. Open the rack front and back doors.
2. Determine the EIA location for mounting the modem tray into the rack. The modem tray must be
mounted at an EIA location adjacent to a horizontal cable-routing support rail on the rack. This
mounting location enables the modem data cables and power cables to be correctly routed and
secured. The horizontal cable-routing support rails can be identified by their pattern of holes along the
rails. The following illustration shows the top horizontal 1, middle horizontal 2, and bottom horizontal 3
cable routing support rails. It then indicates suitable locations for the modem tray 4. The modem tray
occupies 1 EIA location in the system rack.
28
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
3. Install nut clips 1 on each of the front vertical rails of the rack at the selected EIA installation location 2
as shown in the following illustration.
4. Position the modem tray at the selected installation location, and slide the modem tray into the rack.
Ensure that the mounting screw holes on the modem tray align with the nut clips installed on the rack
front vertical rails.
5. Insert and tighten the mounting screws.
6. Connect the data cables to the modem by completing the following steps:
Note: For detailed information about data cable connections, refer to the documentation from the
modem manufacturer.
a. Attach the RS232 cable to the back of the modem. The RS232 cable's pin configuration can
be 25-pin to 25-pin, or 9-pin to 25-pin.
b. Determine the type of additional data cables that will be attached. The modem can operate
with either of the following cables:
◊ Leased line. Pin configuration can be two-wire or four-wire.
◊ Telephone line.
c. Attach the data cables to the back of the modem. Follow the manufacturer's documentation to
ensure that the pin configuration is correct.
Note: To gain adequate access to the back of the modem, it might be necessary to slide the
system drawer that is located above or below the modem tray out of the rack.
7. Peel off the adhesive covering 2 located on the bottom of each cable clamp 3. Position two cable
clamps 3 to each side of the modem tray as shown in the following illustration. Press firmly to adhere
the cable clamps 3 to the modem tray. The cable clamps 3 will be used to route cables to the
horizontal rack rail.
Cabling the HMC
29
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
8. Connect the modem power supply cord to the power connector located on the back of the modem.
9. To avoid cables and the power cord getting pinched between units, route the cables and power cord
through the cable clamps located on the side of the modem tray.
10. Route the power cord and data cables from the modem to the appropriate horizontal rail adjacent to
the modem tray installation location on the rack.
Note: Route the cables and power cord to the closest horizontal support rail. To avoid damage to the
cables when other units are slid in or out, ensure the cables and power cord are routed within the EIA
space for the modem tray.
The horizontal support rails are located on both sides of the rack. The following illustration shows the
bottom 1, middle 2, and top 3 horizontal support rails. It also shows an example of a cable and power
cord route at the top of the rack 4 and on the horizontal rails 5.
11. Secure the power cord and data cables 3 to the horizontal rail using the hook-and-loop cable ties 2.
The modem is indicated by 1 and the cable clamps are indicated by 4. For more detail, see the
following illustration:
30
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Note: Before securing the cables and cord, ensure that the connector on each cable or cord is
accessible to its destination (such as the data cable reaching the HMC and the power cord from the
power supply reaching the PDB).
12. Attach one strip of double-sided adhesive tape to the bottom of the power supply.
Note: The bottom of the power supply is the clear surface located opposite the side with the label
attached.
13. Position the power supply at the mounting location on the inside of the rack side panel, and press it
firmly to adhere the power supply to the rack.
14. Attach a strip of hook-and-loop cable ties to the back vertical rail of the rack. Do not connect the
power during the following step.
15. Route the power cord from the power supply to the PDB located at the back of the rack.
Complete the installation
1. Connect the power cord from the modem to the PDB 2 located inside and at the back of the rack. The
main power source plug on the rack is indicated by 1. See the following illustration for the location of
the PDB.
2. Connect the modem to an HMC:
♦ If you are connecting the modem to an HMC installed in a rack, plug the RS232 cable into the
serial port located below the following symbol:
♦ If you are connecting the RS232 data cable to a stand-alone HMC, plug the cable into serial
port 2 (S2). Serial port 2 is the 9-Pin D-Shell socket noted by either of the following symbols:
Cabling the HMC
31
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
3. If you are connecting the RS232 data cable to equipment other than an HMC, follow the equipment
manufacturer's instructions for connecting the cables.
4. Close the front and back doors of the rack.
5. Continue with step 4.b.
Identifying the Ethernet port defined as eth0
Your Ethernet connection to the managed server must be made using the Ethernet port that is defined as
eth0 on your HMC.
If you have not installed any additional Ethernet adapters in the PCI slots on your HMC, the primary integrated
Ethernet port is always defined as eth0.
If you have installed additional Ethernet adapters in the PCI slots, the port that is defined as eth0 depends on
the location and type of Ethernet adapters you have installed:
Table 1. HMC types and associated rules for Ethernet placement
HMC type
Rack-mounted
Rules for Ethernet placement
The HMC supports only one additional Ethernet adapter.
• If an additional Ethernet adapter is installed, that port is defined as eth0.
In this case, the primary integrated Ethernet port is then defined as eth1,
and the secondary integrated Ethernet port is defined as eth2.
• If no adapters are installed, the primary integrated Ethernet port is
defined as eth0.
Stand-alone model
10C/04
The definitions depend upon the type of Ethernet adapter you have installed:
• If only one Ethernet adapter is installed, whether it is a 1 Gigabit Ethernet
adapter or a 10/100 Ethernet adapter, that adapter is defined as eth0.
• If both a 10/100 Ethernet adapter and a 1 Gigabit Ethernet adapter are
installed, the 1 gigabit adapter is always defined as eth0.
• If two 10/100 Ethernet adapters are installed, the adapter in slot 1 is
defined as eth0.
• If two 1 Gigabit Ethernet adapters are installed, the adapter in slot 1 is
defined as eth0.
Stand-alone model
10C/03
The definitions are dependent upon the type of Ethernet adapter you have
installed:
• The 1 Gigabit Ethernet adapter, when present, is generally defined as the
eth0 location. The exception to this rule is when it is placed in slot 1 (the
rightmost PCI slot when viewing the HMC from the back); however, this
placement is not recommended.
• If multiple 1 Gigabit Ethernet adapters are installed, the configuration is
defined in the following order: slot 2 is eth0, slot 3 is eth1, and the
integrated Ethernet port is eth2.
• If adapters other than the 1 Gigabit Ethernet adapter are installed, the
integrated Ethernet port is always defined as eth0.
Parent topic: Cabling the HMC
32
Cabling the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Gathering information for configuration settings
Use the table provided in this topic to gather required configuration settings that you need to know before you
begin the configuration steps.
To successfully configure the HMC, you must understand related concepts, make decisions, and prepare
information. Use the following table to identify and gather the information you will need when you configure
the HMC.
When you have completed this preparation step, go to Configuring the HMC.
This topic describes planning information for how you want to connect your HMC to your server, to your
company network, and to your service provider. Review the related information in the following table to learn
more about the decisions you need to make. You might choose to print this page to write down your
decisions, requirements, and settings for easy access during the configuration steps.
Table 1. Preparing for configuration
Preparation task
If this is a second (redundant) HMC, ensure that the HMC code level of this
HMC matches the one you already have.
Where to find related
information
Determining your HMC
machine code version and
release
Getting HMC machine code
fixes and upgrades
Optional: If you plan to create additional users, identify the following
information:
Overview of roles
• How many user IDs you want to create
• The user ID and password for each additional user you plan to create
• What role you plan to assign each user
Determine whether you want to specify the media speed for each Ethernet
adapter or let the HMC automatically detect the speed.
For initial setup, use automatic detection. However, in some situations, you
might want to reduce the speed of the adapter. If you plan to specify the
media speed for each Ethernet adapter, identify the media speed and duplex
mode for each Ethernet adapter. For example, 100 Mbps full duplex.
Prepare the following contact information:
• Company name
• Administrator's name
• E-mail address
• Telephone numbers
• Fax numbers
• Street address and telephone number for the location of the HMC
Determine what type of connection you want to configure to contact your
service provider:
Choosing your connection
method to your service
provider
• Dial-up from the local HMC: Determine what telephone numbers you
will use to call your service provider.
• Virtual private network (VPN) through the Internet
• Connecting through other systems or partitions: Determine the IP
addresses or host names of the systems or logical partitions that the
HMC passes through when connecting to your service provider.
Identify the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) server and e-mail
addresses that will receive notification when problem events occur on the
system.
Determine the following passwords needed to access the managed system.
These will be used later when the managed system is powered on.
Gathering information for configuration settings
Overview of the managed
system passwords
33
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
• Determine the password you want to use to allow the HMC to access
the managed system.
• Determine the password you want to assign the Advanced System
Management Interface (ASMI) general user ID.
• Determine the password you want to assign to the ASMI administrator
user ID.
To add managed systems, identify what systems you plan to add and refer to
Figures 3, 4, and 5 to determine how they fit into your network.
Determine whether you plan to connect the HMC to a private or open network. Private and open networks
in the HMC environment
A private service network provides greater security and is easier to set up. A
private service network allows the HMC to automatically detect the managed
system. Therefore, it is recommended that you connect the HMC to a private
service network.
Note: If you are connecting the HMC to the model 185/75 server or the
ESCALA PL 3250R or ESCALA PL 6450R managed servers, you must
configure the HMC in a private DHCP network.
To connect the HMC to a private service network, complete the following
preparation tasks:
HMC as a DHCP server
1. Determine the HMC host name and domain name. Optionally, you
can also enter a phrase in the description field. These settings are
used to identify your HMC.
Note: This step is necessary only if you plan to connect the HMC to
an open network after connecting the HMC to a private service
network.
2. Determine whether to configure the HMC as the Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. If this is the first or only HMC
in your private service network, you must configure the HMC as a
DHCP server (see Figure 1). If this is an additional local HMC on the
private service network, configure it as a DHCP client (see Figure 2).
3. Select one of the following standard nonroutable IP address ranges
for your private service network:
192.168.0.2
192.168.255.254
172.16.0.3
172.16.255.254
172.17.0.3
172.17.255.254
10.0.0.2
10.0.0.254
10.0.128.2
10.0.143.254
10.0.255.2
10.0.255.254
10.1.0.2
10.1.15.254
10.1.255.2
10.1.255.254
10.127.0.2
10.127.15.254
10.127.255.2
10.127.255.254
10.128.0.2
10.128.15.254
10.128.128.2
10.128.128.254
10.128.240.2
10.128.255.254
10.254.0.2
10.254.0.254
10.254.240.2
10.254.255.254
10.255.0.2
10.255.0.254
10.255.128.2
10.255.143.254
10.255.255.2
10.255.255.254
9.6.24.2
9.6.24.254
9.6.25.2
9.6.25.254
Note: If you decide to connect your private service network to an
open network in the future, using standard nonroutable IP addresses
now will allow your DHCP servers to co-exist on the open network.
4. If you plan to configure the HMC as a DHCP client, an IP address is
generated by the HMC already in the private service network (see
Figure 2). If you choose to use static IP addresses, select an address
that is within the range used by the other systems in the network.
34
Gathering information for configuration settings
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
To configure an open network, first configure a private service network, and
then connect a different adapter on the HMC to your company network. If you
plan to connect the HMC to an open network, complete the following
preparation tasks:
1. Complete the preparation tasks for configuring a private service
network, and then continue with the following steps.
2. Complete the following preparation tasks to connect your private
service network to an open network:
a. If you plan to enable Domain Name System (DNS), complete
the following tasks:
i. Identify the DNS server IP addresses.
ii. Determine the order in which the addresses will be
searched.
iii. Determine the order in which the domain suffixes will
be searched.
b. Select the adapter to use as the default gateway for the open
network.
c. Identify the gateway address.
d. If you plan to control the HMC remotely or give remote access
to others, you must change the firewall settings to the HMC.
Identify the applications or IP addresses you want to allow
through the HMC's firewall (see Figure 3).
Figure 1. Private service network: Example 1
Figure 2. Private service network: Example 2
Figure 3. Open network
Gathering information for configuration settings
35
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: Setting up the HMC
Configuring the HMC
Configure network connections, security, service applications, and some user preferences.
Depending on the level of customization you intend to apply to your HMC configuration, you have several
options for setting up your HMC to suit your needs. The Guided Setup wizard is a tool on the HMC designed
to make the setup of the HMC quick and easy. You can choose a fast path through the wizard to quickly
create the recommended HMC environment, or you can choose to fully explore the available settings that the
wizard guides you through. You can also perform the configuration steps without the aid of the wizard using
the HMC configuration checklist.
Before you start, gather the required configuration information that you will need to complete the steps
successfully. See Gathering information for configuration settings for a list of the required information.
• Configuring the HMC using the fast path through the Guided Setup wizard
In most cases, the HMC can be set up to operate effectively using many of the default settings. Use
this fast path checklist to prepare the HMC for service quickly and efficiently. When you have
completed the steps in this checklist, your HMC will be configured as a Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) server in a private (directly connected) network.
• Configuring the HMC using the Guided Setup wizard
The Guided Setup wizard guides you through numerous configuration settings that you might choose
to use in your environment.
• Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
The HMC configuration checklist provides a complete list of all HMC configuration tasks, guiding you
through the process of successfully configuring your HMC. Choose this option if you prefer not to use
the Guided Setup wizard.
Parent topic: Setting up the HMC
Configuring the HMC using the fast path through the Guided Setup
wizard
In most cases, the HMC can be set up to operate effectively using many of the default settings. Use this fast
path checklist to prepare the HMC for service quickly and efficiently. When you have completed the steps in
this checklist, your HMC will be configured as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server in a
private (directly connected) network.
36
Configuring the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
The Guided Setup wizard guides you through a wide range of configuration options that you might need to
consider when you set up your HMC. Often, however, the HMC can be set up to operate effectively using
many of the default settings. Use this checklist to prepare the HMC for service. When you have completed the
steps in this checklist, your HMC will be configured as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server
in a private (directly connected) network.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC
Prerequisites
To complete the Guided Setup wizard using the fast path, you need to have the following information
available:
• New passwords for the predefined hscroot and root user IDs. These passwords must be at least 7
characters in length.
• Details about your company:
♦ Administrator name
♦ Telephone and fax numbers
• Details about the geographic location of your HMC
• Optional: SMTP server and e-mail addresses for problem notification.
• New passwords for the managed system, the Advanced System Management general user ID, and
the Advanced System Management administrator user ID.
Start the fast path through the Guided Setup Wizard
To use the fast path to configure your HMC, follow these steps:
Starting the HMC and passwords
1. Ensure that the managed system is not connected to a power source. For rack-mounted HMCs, this
means that the only device plugged into the power distribution bus (PDB) before you plug in the main
power supply is the HMC. (See the Cabling the HMC topic if you are not sure.)
2. Turn on the HMC by pressing the power button.
3. Wait for the HMC to automatically select the default language and locale preference after 30 seconds.
4. Log in to the HMC:
♦ ID: hscroot
♦ Password: abc123
5. Click OK on the Guided Setup entry window.
6. Click Next on the Welcome window.
7. Verify and change, if necessary, the time, date, and time zone settings. Click Next.
8. Change the hscroot password:
a. Enter the new password twice. The password must be at least 7 characters in length.
b. Click Next.
9. Change the root password:
a. Enter the new password twice. The password must be at least 7 characters in length.
b. Click Next.
c. Click Next again.
10. Click Next on the Next Steps summary window.
Configuring network settings
1. On the second Configure Network Settings window, select the LAN adapter labeled eth0. Click Next.
Configuring the HMC
37
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
2. On the LAN adapter speed window, click Next.
3. On the Configure (LAN adapter name) window, click Next.
4. On the second Configure (LAN adapter name) window, select private service network. Click Next.
5. On the third Configure (LAN adapter name) window, select Yes, enable the HMC as a DHCP server.
Click Next.
6. On the Configure Network Settings window, select No. (You can configure any remaining LAN
adapters later.) Click Next.
7. Click Next on the Next Steps summary window.
Configuring connectivity to your service provider
1. On the Specify Contact Information window, type the contact information for the administrator of your
HMC. Click Next.
2. On the Specify Contact Information window, type the contact address information for the location of
your HMC. Click Next.
3. On the Specify Contact Information window, select the Use the administrator mailing address box, or
clear it to enter a different address for the HMC, as required. Click Next.
4. On the Configure Connectivity to Your Service Provider window, click Next.
5. Click Accept on the Agreement for Service Programs window.
6. On the Configure Dial-up from the Local HMC window:
a. Click Modem Configuration. To make an off-site telephone call at your company, type the
number in the Dial prefix field. Click OK.
b. To add a telephone number to your service provider, click Add.
i. Select the appropriate country or region.
ii. Select the appropriate state or province.
iii. Select the appropriate telephone number from the list.
iv. In the Phone number field, edit the selected telephone number, if necessary. For
instance, if the selected telephone number is a local call from your site, you might
need to remove the area code.
v. Click OK.
c. Click Next.
7. On the Notification of Problem Events window, specify the SMTP server and port. Click Add to specify
one or more e-mail addresses for notification of problem events. Click Next.
8. On the Summary window, click Finish.
Monitoring your configuration
1. On the Status window, monitor the progress of the different configuration settings you selected. This
window might show a status of Pending for some tasks for several minutes. Click View Log to see
status messages relating to each task. Click OK on the status message window to close it. Click
Close at any time to close the Guided Setup wizard. Tasks that are still running will continue to run.
Complete the configuration steps listed under After you have completed the Guided Setup wizard in the
Configuring the HMC using the Guided Setup wizard topic.
Configuring the HMC using the Guided Setup wizard
The Guided Setup wizard guides you through numerous configuration settings that you might choose to use in
your environment.
38
Configuring the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
To perform a customized configuration of your HMC, use these instructions.
Note: Use the fast path through the Guided Setup wizard to complete configuration of your HMC quickly and
easily with minimal customization. See Configuring the HMC using the fast path through the Guided Setup
wizard for instructions.
• Accessing the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface
If the Guided Setup wizard did not display when you started the HMC for the first time, complete the
following steps to access the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface:
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC
Prerequisites
Complete the configuration preparation activity described in the Gathering information for configuration
settings topic.
Run the Guided Setup Wizard
Use the following instructions to configure your HMC using the Guided Setup wizard.
Note: If you are connecting the HMC to the model 185/75 server or the ESCALA PL 3250R or ESCALA PL
6450R managed servers, you must configure the HMC in a private DHCP network using the eth0 Ethernet
connection.
1. Ensure that the managed system is not connected to a power source.
2. Start the Guided Setup wizard:
a. Turn on the HMC by pressing the power button.
b. If English is your language preference, continue with step 2.e.
c. If your language preference is a language other than English, type the number 2 when you
are prompted to change the locale.
Note:
i. This prompt times out in 30 seconds if you do not act.
ii. If your numeric keypad does not work, use the numeric keys instead.
d. Select the locale you want to display from the list in the Locale Selection window, and click
OK. The locale identifies the language that the HMC interface displays.
e. Log in to the HMC using the following default user ID and password:
◊ ID: hscroot
◊ Password: abc123
You will be prompted later to provide a new 7-character password for this ID.
f. When the Guided Setup wizard is displayed, complete the wizard to configure the HMC. If the
Guided Setup wizard is not displayed, you can access it manually from the HMC interface.
See Accessing the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface.
Configuring the HMC
39
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
After you have completed the Guided Setup Wizard
1. After you have completed the Guided Setup wizard, complete the following tasks:
a. Connect the managed system to a power source. The managed system will then power on its
service processor. After the service processor is powered on, proceed to the next step. This
process will take 3 to 5 minutes. The following sequence of events signals that power has
been applied to the service processor (with the exception of the model 185/75 server and the
ESCALA PL 3250R and ESCALA PL 6450R servers):
i. Progress indicators, also referred to as checkpoints, appear on the control panel
display while the system is being started. The display might appear blank for a few
moments during this sequence.
ii. When the service processor has completed its power-on sequence, the green
power-on light blinks slowly and the output on the control panel is similar to the
following:
01
N
V=F
T
b. Click Server and Partitions > Server management to view the status of your managed system.
(For the model 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL 3250R and ESCALA PL 6450R servers,
also click Server and Partitions > Frame management to view the status of the frame.) It may
take a few minutes for the status to display.
c. If the status shows Pending Authentication, then go to step 1.d. If you receive the
message Authentication Failed, or if you do not receive a message, see
Troubleshooting HMC setup.
Note: If you did not configure your HMC as a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
server, the HMC will not automatically detect the managed system. To detect the managed
system, see Add another managed system and enter the IP address that you assigned to the
managed server when it is requested.
d. Set passwords for the managed system. (For the model 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL
3250R and ESCALA PL 6450R servers, set passwords for the managed system and the
frame.) Did you receive the message Pending Authentication?
◊ Yes: The HMC will prompt you to set the passwords for the managed system. If you
are not prompted by the HMC to set these passwords after several minutes,
right-click the server entry on the console. The window for setting passwords opens.
Set the password for each as directed.
◊ No: Set the managed system passwords using the HMC interface:
i. Set the managed system password. For instructions, see Update your
platform password in the HMC online help. You can find this topic in the
online help index under Update and Platform password.
ii. Set the password for the Advanced System Management general user ID.
For instructions, see Update your Advanced System Management (ASM)
general password in the HMC online help.
iii. Set the password for the Advanced System Management administration user
ID. For instructions, see Update your Advanced System Management (ASM)
administrator password in the HMC online help.
e. Access the ASMI to set the time of day on the system:
i. Access the ASMI using the HMC.
ii. Set the time of day on the system.
f. Start the managed system
g. Ensure that you have one logical partition on the managed system. For instructions, see
Creating logical partitions from the manufacturing default configuration.
h. Optional: Add another managed system
2. When you are finished configuring the HMC, complete the setup steps that apply to your situation:
♦ If you are installing a new server with your HMC, return to your initial server setup checklist
and configure logical partitions or install one or more operating systems.
♦ If you are not installing a new server at this time, complete the optional tasks described in
Postconfiguration steps for the HMC to further customize your configuration.
40
Configuring the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Configuring the HMC
41
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Accessing the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface
If the Guided Setup wizard did not display when you started the HMC for the first time, complete the following
steps to access the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC you want to work with. HMCs are listed by host name or IP
address.
2. Click ESCALA Power5 Hardware Information and Setup Wizard.
3. In the contents pane, click Launch the Guided Setup wizard.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the Guided Setup wizard
Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
The HMC configuration checklist provides a complete list of all HMC configuration tasks, guiding you through
the process of successfully configuring your HMC. Choose this option if you prefer not to use the Guided
Setup wizard.
Complete the following checklist to successfully set up your HMC. You will have to restart your HMC for the
configuration settings to take effect, so you might want to print this checklist and keep it with you as you
configure your HMC. The first section of the checklist, called HMC configuration checklist, contains all the
tasks necessary to set up your HMC. The last step directs you to a topic that contains optional setup tasks to
further configure your system.
Prerequisites
Before you begin this checklist, be sure to complete the configuration preparation activity described in
Gathering information for configuration settings.
HMC configuration checklist
__ Start the HMC.
__ If you have not yet done so, get HMC fixes to ensure that your HMC has the latest updates. Return to this
checklist when you have completed this step.
__ Set the date and time.
__ Change predefined passwords.
__ Optional: Create additional users and return to this checklist when you have completed this step.
__ Configure network connections:
__ To configure LAN adapters, follow these steps (perform each task for each LAN adapter).
Note: If you are connecting the HMC to the model 185/75 server or the ESCALA PL 3250R or
ESCALA PL 6450R managed servers, you must configure the HMC in a private DHCP network using
the eth0 Ethernet connection.
__ Set the media speed.
__ Select the network type.
__ Unless the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a
remote HMC in your private or open network, configure the HMC as a Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) server.
__ If the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a
remote HMC in your private or open network, set the IP address.
__ If you selected the open network, change HMC firewall settings.
__ If you are using an open network and a fixed IP address, set identification information.
__
42
Configuring the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
If you are using an open network and a fixed IP address, configure a routing entry as the default
gateway.
__ If are using an open network and a fixed IP address, configure domain name services.
__ If are using a fixed IP address and have DNS enabled, configure domain suffixes.
__ Test the connection from the HMC to the managed system.
__ Set up your server to connect to service and support and return to this checklist when you have
completed this step.
__ Connect the managed system to a power source. If you receive the message Authentication
Pending, continue with the next step in this checklist.
If you receive the message Authentication Failed, or you do not receive a message, see
Troubleshooting HMC setup.
__ Set passwords for the managed system:
__ If you received the message Authentication Pending, the HMC will prompt you to set the
passwords for the managed system.
__ If you did not receive the message Authentication Pending, complete the following steps to set
the passwords for the managed system. (For the model 185/75 server and the ESCALA PL 3250R
and ESCALA PL 6450R servers, set passwords for the managed system and the frame.)
__ Set the managed system password. For instructions, see Update your platform password in the
HMC online help.
__ Set the password for the Advanced System Management general user ID. For instructions, see
Update your Advanced System Management (ASM) general password in the HMC online help.
__ Set the password for the Advanced System Management administration user ID. For instructions,
see Update your Advanced System Management (ASM) administrator password in the HMC
online help.
__ Access the ASMI to set the time of day on the system:
__ Access the ASMI using the HMC.
__ Set the time of day on the system.
__ Start the managed system and return to this checklist when you have completed this step.
__ Ensure that you have one logical partition on the managed system. For instructions, see Creating logical
partitions from the manufacturing default configuration.
__ Optional: Add another managed system and return to this checklist when you have completed this step.
__ If you are installing a new server with your HMC, return to your initial server setup checklist and configure
logical partitions or install one or more operating systems.
__ If you are not installing a new server at this time, complete the optional tasks described in
Postconfiguration steps for the HMC to further customize your configuration.
• Changing the predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs
Learn how to change your predefined passwords.
• Configuring network connections
Configure network connections to allow the HMC to talk to managed systems or logical partitions. Set
the identification information, configure domain name services, and configure the LAN adapters.
• Setting identification information
Identification information includes the HMC's hostname, the domain name, and the HMC's
description.
• Configuring a routing entry as the default gateway
To configure a routing entry as the default gateway, use the following steps:
• Configuring domain name services
If you plan to set up an open network, configure domain name services.
• Configuring domain suffixes
The list of domain suffixes is used to resolve an IP address starting with the first entry in the list.
• Testing the connection between the HMC and the managed system
This option enables you to verify that you are properly connected to the network.
• Postconfiguration steps for the HMC
After you have installed and successfully configured the HMC, you can perform these optional tasks
as necessary.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC
Configuring the HMC
43
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Changing the predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs
Learn how to change your predefined passwords.
It is essential to your system's security that you change all predefined passwords immediately. For more
information about changing the predefined passwords for hscroot and root user IDs, do the following:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by host name or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Users.
4. In the contents pane, click Manage HMC users, roles, and access.
5. Click the User icon.
6. Right-click the hscroot icon to change the hscroot password or the root icon to change the root
password.
7. Select Change Password.
8. Type the new password in the first field. The password must be a minimum of 7 characters in length.
9. Confirm the new password by typing it again in the Retype new password field.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Configuring network connections
Configure network connections to allow the HMC to talk to managed systems or logical partitions. Set the
identification information, configure domain name services, and configure the LAN adapters.
Note: If you are using both a virtual Ethernet and network address translation (NAT) in your network setup,
the partition and the HMC might experience communications problems.
To configure LAN adapters, complete the following tasks for each LAN adapter:
1. Setting the media speed.
2. Selecting the network type.
3. Unless the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a
remote HMC in your private or open network, see Configuring the HMC as a DHCP server.
4. If you have configured your HMC as a DHCP server, see Verifying that your HMC DHCP private
network is configured correctly.
5. If the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a remote
HMC in your private or open network, see Setting the IP address.
6. If you selected the open network, see Configuring a routing entry as the default gateway.
7. If you selected the open network, see Changing HMC firewall settings.
• Configuring LAN adapters
Understand how to configure your LAN adapters.
• Setting the media speed
Specify the media speed and duplex mode of the Ethernet adapter:
• Selecting the network type
You can connect your HMC to a private or open network.
• Configuring the HMC as a DHCP server
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) provides an automated method for dynamic client
configuration.
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Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
• Verifying that your HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly
This section applies to all DHCP-managed managed systems. Read this article to learn how to verify
that your HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly.
• Setting the IP address
To set your IP address, use the following steps:
• Changing HMC firewall settings
In an open network, a firewall usually controls outside access to your company network. The HMC
also has a firewall on each of its Ethernet adapters. If you want to control the HMC remotely or give
remote access to others, modify the firewall settings of the Ethernet adapter on the HMC that is
connected to your open network.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Configuring LAN adapters
Understand how to configure your LAN adapters.
To configure LAN adapters, complete the following tasks for each LAN adapter:
1. Set the media speed.
2. Select the network type.
3. Unless the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a
remote HMC in your private or open network, see Configuring the HMC as a DHCP server.
4. If the HMC you are setting up is an additional local HMC in your private service network or a remote
HMC in your private or open network, see Setting the IP address.
5. If you selected the open network, see Configuring a routing entry as the default gateway.
6. If you selected the open network, see Changing HMC firewall settings.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Setting the media speed
Specify the media speed and duplex mode of the Ethernet adapter:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the LAN Adapters tab.
6. Select the LAN adapter you want to work with and click Details.
7. Click the Lan Adapter tab.
8. In the Local area network information section, select the media speed.
9. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Selecting the network type
You can connect your HMC to a private or open network.
A private service network consists of the HMC and the managed systems. A private service network is
restricted to consoles and the systems they manage, and is separate from your company network. An open
Configuring the HMC
45
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
network consists of your private service network and your company network. An open network might contain
network endpoints in addition to consoles and managed systems, and might span across multiple subnets and
network devices.
To select the network type, complete the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the LAN Adapters tab.
6. Select the LAN adapter that you want to work with and click Details.
7. Click the Lan Adapter tab.
8. In the Local area network information page, select Private or Open.
9. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Configuring the HMC as a DHCP server
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) provides an automated method for dynamic client configuration.
Clients that are DHCP enabled automatically obtain their own IP address and configuration parameters from
the server. In a private service network, configure your first or only HMC as a DHCP server. The HMC then
provides nonroutable IP addresses to its managed systems. This allows the HMC to co-exist with other DHCP
servers in your company network when you connect your private service network to an open network. For
more information, see HMC as a DHCP server.
To configure the HMC as a DHCP server, complete the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the LAN Adapters tab.
6. Select the LAN adapter that you want to work with and click Details.
7. Click the Lan Adapter tab.
8. In the DHCP Server section, check Enable DHCP Server to enable the HMC as a DHCP server.
9. Enter the address range of the DHCP server.
10. Click OK.
If you configured your HMC to be a DHCP server on a private network, you must verify that your HMC DHCP
private network is configured correctly. For information about connecting your HMC to a private network, see
Selecting the network type. To verify that your HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly, see
Verifying that your HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Verifying that your HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly
This section applies to all DHCP-managed managed systems. Read this article to learn how to verify that your
HMC DHCP private network is configured correctly.
The following systems require that the HMC is configured as a DHCP server on a private network:
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Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
If your HMC is configured as a DHCP server on a private network and is not communicating correctly with the
managed system, or you have recently modified your network configuration (moved a managed system,
replaced an HMC, or added a second HMC), use the following instructions to determine if your
DHCP-managed private network is configured correctly.
Note: If your HMC is set up as a DHCP server on a private network, do not use the static IP commands
mksysconn and rmsysconn to change HMC connection settings. These commands are intended for use on
a public network only, where the HMC is not set up as DHCP server and managed servers use static IP
addresses.
If a system administrator previously assigned an IP address to the system through a manually executed static
IP command, Support must remove the manual connection and establish a DHCP connection between the
HMC and the server. This section describes how to identify any manually assigned IP addresses so that an
authorized service provider can remove them.
To identify a manually assigned IP address so that your HMC can communicate correctly with your managed
systems, you must perform the following high-level tasks. Detailed step-by-step task descriptions of how to
perform these tasks are specified below.
1. Identify the configured HMC IP connection addresses and compare them to the list of IP addresses
assigned by the DHCP server.
2. Identify the HMC IP connection addresses that have been correctly assigned through the DHCP
server, for which no further action is required.
3. Identify any manually configured HMC IP connection addresses that DHCP did not assign and that
need to be corrected by support.
To identify manually assigned IP addresses when the HMC is configured as a DHCP server, do the following
1. Create a list of all of the configured HMC IP connections. On the HMC command line, type the
following command:
lssysconn -r all
This command displays the following information for service processors and Bulk Power Cards
(BPCs) on the network for which the HMC has configured IP connection:
element type, MTMS, IP address(es), connection state
2. Make a note of all IP addresses that are displayed. You will need these addresses later.
3. Display a list of the DHCP IP addresses that have been assigned. To do this, type the following HMC
command:
lshmc -n -F clients
The output of this command lists all IP addresses that have been assigned by the HMC s DHCP
server.
4. Make a note of all IP addresses that are listed in the output.
5. Compare the lssysconn and lshmc lists. If an IP address is displayed in the output for both the
lshmc -n -F clients and lssysconn -r all commands, the IP address was assigned by the HMC
DHCP server and the connection is being managed by the HMC DHCP server.
6. Remove from the list any address that is displayed in the output of the lshmc -n -F clients command
but not displayed in the output of the lssysconn -r all command, and is not in the list of servers that
use static IP addresses.
Note: If an IP address is displayed in the lshmc -n output and not in the lssysconn -r all output, that
IP address was assigned by the HMC DHCP server. However, it is not a current connection on the
HMC. The DHCP server keeps a history of all IP address assignments in the event that the
connection is re-established. The DHCP server might also have assigned an IP address if an
unknown device on the private network requested a DHCP IP address from the HMC.
Configuring the HMC
47
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
7. If the HMC is managing servers on both a private and a public network, any connections to the
service processor on the public network (not in the private network address range) must also be
identified and removed from this list. If there are no IP adresses remaining in the list that contains the
lssyconn -r all output, the HMC DHCP server has assigned all of the system IP addresses, and the
network configuration is working correctly.
8. If there are any IP addresses not removed from the list taken from the lssysconn -r all command,
this address was not assigned by the HMC s DHCP server. These IP address assignments must be
corrected, so that they can be automatically reassigned by the HMC DHCP server. Contact an
authorized service provider and request that someone correct the manually assigned IP addresses
that you have identified.
If you have followed this procedure and not all of your connections appear to be active, call an authorized
service provider for additional support.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Setting the IP address
To set your IP address, use the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the LAN Adapters tab.
6. Select the LAN adapter that you want to work with and click Details.
7. Click the Lan Adapter tab.
8. Select Obtain an IP address automatically or Specify an IP address.
9. If you selected to specify an IP address, enter the TCP/IP interface address and the TCP/IP interface
network mask.
10. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Changing HMC firewall settings
In an open network, a firewall usually controls outside access to your company network. The HMC also has a
firewall on each of its Ethernet adapters. If you want to control the HMC remotely or give remote access to
others, modify the firewall settings of the Ethernet adapter on the HMC that is connected to your open
network.
To configure a firewall, use the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the LAN Adapters tab.
6. Select the LAN adapter that you want to work with and click Details.
7. Click the Firewall tab.
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Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
8. Using one of the following methods, you can allow any IP address using a particular applications
through the firewall, or you can specify one or more IP addresses:
♦ Allow any IP address using a particular application through the firewall:
a. From the top box, highlight the application.
b. Click Allow Incoming. The application displays in the bottom box to signify that it has
been selected.
♦ Specify which IP addresses to allow through the firewall:
a. From the top box, highlight an application.
b. Click Allow Incoming by IP Address.
c. On the Hosts Allowed window, enter the IP address and the network mask.
d. Click Add and click OK.
9. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring network connections
Setting identification information
Identification information includes the HMC's hostname, the domain name, and the HMC's description.
To identify your system to the network, complete the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or IP
address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the Identification tab.
6. In the Console name field, enter the HMC's hostname.
7. Enter the domain name.
8. In the Computer description field, enter the HMC's description.
9. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Configuring a routing entry as the default gateway
To configure a routing entry as the default gateway, use the following steps:
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or IP
address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the Routing tab.
6. In the Default gateway information section:
a. Enter the gateway address of the routing entry you want to set as the default gateway.
b. Enter the gateway device of the routing entry you want to set as the default gateway.
7. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Configuring domain name services
If you plan to set up an open network, configure domain name services.
Configuring the HMC
49
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Domain Name System (DNS) is a distributed database system for managing host names and their associated
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. Configuring domain name services includes enabling DNS and specifying
the domain suffix search order.
1. In the navigation area, expand the HMC that you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or
IP address.
2. Expand HMC Management.
3. Click HMC Configuration.
4. In the contents pane, click Customize network settings.
5. Click the Name Services tab.
6. Check DNS enabled to enable DNS.
7. If you enabled DNS, specify the DNS server search order and the domain suffix search order.
8. Click OK.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Configuring domain suffixes
The list of domain suffixes is used to resolve an IP address starting with the first entry in the list.
The domain suffix is a string appended to a hostname that is used to help resolve its IP address. For example,
a hostname of myname might not be resolved. However, if the string myloc.mycompany.com is an element
in the domain suffix table, then there will be an attempt to also resolve myname.mloc.mycompany.com.
To configure a domain suffix entry, use these steps:
1. Enter a string to be used as a domain suffix entry.
2. Click Add to add it to the list.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Testing the connection between the HMC and the managed system
This option enables you to verify that you are properly connected to the network.
To test network connectivity, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
To test network connectivity, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, click the HMC Management icon.
2. In the Contents area, click the HMC Configuration icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Test Network Connectivity.
4. Type the host name or IP address of any system to which you want to connect.
5. Click OK.
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Configuring the HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
To understand how the HMC can be used in a network, see HMC network connections.
For more information about configuring the HMC to connect to a network, see Configuring the HMC using the
HMC configuration checklist.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Postconfiguration steps for the HMC
After you have installed and successfully configured the HMC, you can perform these optional tasks as
necessary.
Optional: Postconfiguration tasks
__ Back up the HMC.
__ Configure logical partitions.
__ Install the operating systems.
__ Access the operating systems using the HMC.
__ Configure Power On Demand.
Parent topic: Configuring the HMC using the HMC configuration checklist
Replacing an HMC
Learn about the tasks you must perform when replacing an HMC.
If you are replacing an HMC that is set up as a DHCP server, you must first reinstall the HMC code base by
using one of the following:
• The recovery media that was provided with your HMC
• The recovery media that you last used to upgrade your HMC
You must also reinstall your customized HMC configuration data by using backup media.
Procedures for replacing an HMC differ, depending on which HMC version you have installed. To determine
your HMC version, see Determining your HMC machine code version and release and then return here.
These instructions assume that you have created a backup of your HMC configuration data from the HMC
being replaced. For more information about backing up important HMC data, see Backing up critical HMC
data. If you do not have a backup of the HMC, these procedures are the same as those described in Setting
up the HMC.
For HMC V4.5 or earlier
1. Insert the HMC recovery media, then power on or reboot the HMC. The HMC powers on and
loads from the media.
2. Press F8 to select Install/Recovery.
3. Press F1 to continue. After the installation is complete, the HMC prompts you to insert the
backup media.
4. Insert the backup media. When you are finished, the HMC is restored to the state that it was
in at the time that the backup was created.
5. After the HMC interface has been restored, verify that your HMC DHCP private network is
configured correctly. For more information, see Verifying that your HMC DHCP private
network is configured correctly.
Configuring the HMC
51
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
For HMC V5.0 or later
1. Insert the HMC recovery media, then power on or reboot the HMC. The HMC powers on from
the media and displays the Backup/Upgrade/Restore/Install panel.
2. Select Install and click Next. Wait for the installation to complete.
3. Select 1 - Install additional software from media from the menu displayed to install the second
HMC recovery media.
4. Remove the recovery media and insert the second media.
5. Press Enter to start the installation of the second recovery media.
6. After the installation is complete, remove the second recovery media, insert the backup
media, and select 1 - Restore Critical Console Data from the menu to restore data from the
backup media. When you are finished, the HMC is restored to the state that it was in at the
time that the backup was created.
7. After the HMC interface has been restored, verify that your HMC DHCP private network is
configured correctly. For more information, see Verifying that your HMC DHCP private
network is configured correctly.
Parent topic: Setting up the HMC
Installing and securing the remote client
Install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client or install the Web-based System Manager Remote
Client for Java Web Start.
You can access your Hardware Management Console (HMC) remotely by installing the remote client on your
PC. The remote client provides flexibility by allowing you to manage your system from virtually anywhere you
have a PC. Up to five remote clients can be logged in simultaneously. There are some tasks you cannot
perform using the remote client. These tasks include determining the level of HMC code, restarting the HMC
interface, and configuring System Manager Security for certificate authority or viewing overview and status
information. System Manager Security ensures that the HMC can operate securely in client/server mode.
Servers and clients communicate over the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, which provides server
authentication, data encryption, and data integrity.
To set up the remote client and secure the HMCs in your network, perform the following procedures for
Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start or the Web-based System Manager.
Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
1. Configuring one HMC as a certificate authority
2. Generating private key ring files for the servers
3. Installing private key ring files on the servers
4. Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote Client for
Java Web Start
5. Viewing configuration properties
6. Configuring HMC object manager security
7. Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
8. Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
Web-based System Manager Remote Client
1. Configuring one HMC as a certificate authority
2. Generating private key ring files for the servers
3. Installing private key ring files on the servers
4. Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
5. Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote Client
6. Viewing configuration properties
7. Configuring HMC object manager security
8. Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
To install Web-based System Manager on AIX, see the Web-based System Manager Administration Guide.
• Configuring one HMC as a certificate authority
This procedure defines a system as an internal certificate authority (CA) for HMC security and creates
52
Replacing an HMC
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
a public key ring file for the CA that you can distribute to all of the clients that access the servers.
• Generating private key ring files for the servers
Use the certificate authority (CA) to generate private key ring files for the servers. The private key ring
file consists of the private key and the server certificate.
• Installing private key ring files on the servers
Follow these steps to correctly install private key ring files.
• Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote
Client for Java Web Start
If you are using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start, use the following
instructions to copy the certificate authority (CA) public key ring file (SMpubkr.zip) to each server that
you will use to download the remote client.
• Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote
Client
If you are using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client, follow these instructions to copy the
CA's public key ring file (SM.pubkr) to the Web-based System Manager directory of each client:
• Viewing configuration properties
You can view the properties of the certificate authority (CA) and of any server. The property windows
provide read-only information for the CA and the servers.
• Configuring HMC object manager security
Learn about how to configure object manager security.
• Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Follow these steps to successfully install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
• Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
To install the latest version of the Web-based System Manager Remote Client, you must uninstall any
previous versions from your Linux or Windows PC.
• Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
Complete the following steps to install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web
Start.
• Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
To uninstall the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start from your PC,
complete the following steps:
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Configuring one HMC as a certificate authority
This procedure defines a system as an internal certificate authority (CA) for HMC security and creates a public
key ring file for the CA that you can distribute to all of the clients that access the servers.
1. Verify that you are using a local HMC and not the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
2. Ensure that you are logged in as the hscroot user at the HMC that is being configured as the internal
CA.
3. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
4. Expand System Manager Security.
5. Click Certificate Authority.
6. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Configure this system as a System
Manager Certificate Authority. You can also select Configure from the Certificate Authority menu.
7. Use the online help to guide you through completing the task.
Note: Remember the password you set for the CA private key file. You will need this password when
you generate private key ring files for the servers.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Generating private key ring files for the servers
Installing and securing the remote client
53
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Use the certificate authority (CA) to generate private key ring files for the servers. The private key ring file
consists of the private key and the server certificate.
Note: If the system defined as a CA will also be used in server mode, you must complete the steps for
generating and installing private key ring files on that system.
1. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
2. Expand System Manager Security.
3. Click Certificate Authority.
4. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Generate Servers' Private Key Ring Files.
You can also select Generate Keys from the Certificate Authority menu.
5. In the Password window, type the CA private key file password. This password was created when the
HMC was configured as the CA.
6. Click OK.
7. In the Generate Server's Private Key Ring Files window, use the help information to guide you
through completing the task.
8. Click OK when you are finished.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Installing private key ring files on the servers
Follow these steps to correctly install private key ring files.
1. Copy the server private key ring files to removable media:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Certificate Authority.
d. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Copy Servers' Private Key Ring
Files to removable media. You can also select Copy Servers' Keys from the Certificate
Authority menu.
e. When the Copy Server's Private Key to removable media dialog displays, insert the media.
f. Click OK to copy the servers' private key ring files to removable media.
2. Install the private key ring file on each server. Repeat the following steps for each server for which
you generated a private key ring file:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Server Security.
d. In the System Manager Server Security window, click Install the private key ring file for this
server. You can also select Install Key from the Server menu.
e. In the Install Private Key Ring File window, select removable media as the source for the
server private key ring file. Insert the removable media containing the server's key into the
removable media drive.
f. Click OK.
3. Configure the server as a secure System Manager server. Repeat the following steps for each server
on which you installed a private key ring file:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list. HMCs are listed by
hostname or IP address.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Server Security.
d. In the System Manager Server Security window, click Configure this system as a Secure
System Manager server. You can also select Configure from the Server menu.
e. Use the help to guide you through completing the task.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
54
Generating private key ring files for the servers
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Installing private key ring files on the servers
55
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based
System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
If you are using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start, use the following
instructions to copy the certificate authority (CA) public key ring file (SMpubkr.zip) to each server that you will
use to download the remote client.
If the system defined as a CA will also be used in server mode, you must complete the steps for distributing
the CA's public key for that system. Although the CA public key was created on this system, it is not in the
correct location for the system to be used as a server.
1. On the CA system, perform the following steps to copy the CA's public key to removable media:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Certificate Authority.
d. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Copy this Certificate Authority's
Public Key Ring File to removable media. You can also select Copy out CA Public Key from
the Certificate Authority menu.
e. When the Copy CA Public Key to Removable Media window opens, insert a diskette.
f. Select HMC or AIX client to write the file to a tar diskette.
g. Click OK to copy the public key ring file.
2. Copy a CA's public key from diskette to each server. Repeat the following steps for each client or
server:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Certificate Authority.
d. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Copy another Certificate Authority's
Public Key Ring File from removable media. You can also select Copy in CA Public Key from
the Certificate Authority menu.
e. When the Copy CA Public Key from removable media window opens, insert the removable
media that contains the copied CA's public key ring file.
f. Click OK to copy the public key ring file.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based
System Manager Remote Client
If you are using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client, follow these instructions to copy the CA's
public key ring file (SM.pubkr) to the Web-based System Manager directory of each client:
1. The Web-based System Manager Remote Client must be installed on the client before proceeding. If
you have not yet installed the Web-basd System Manager Remote Client, perform the steps in
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client, and then return to these instructions.
2. On the CA system, perform the following steps to copy the CA's public key to removable media:
a. If you plan to distribute the CA's public key to an HMC or AIX client, ensure that the disk is a
tar media.
If you plan to distribute the CA's public key to a PC client, ensure that the media is formatted
for DOS.
b. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
c. Expand System Manager Security.
d. Click Certificate Authority.
e. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Copy this Certificate Authority's
Public Key Ring File to removable media.
f. When the Copy CA Public Key to Removable Media window opens, insert the media.
g. Select the type of client or server to which you want the public key ring file to be copied:
◊ Select HMC or AIX client to write the file to a tar media.
◊ Select PC client to write the file to media in DOS file format.
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Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
h. Click OK to copy the public key ring file.
3. To copy a CA's public key from removable media to each HMC client:
Repeat the following steps for each client or server:
a. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
b. Expand System Manager Security.
c. Click Certificate Authority.
d. In the System Manager Certificate Authority window, click Copy another Certificate Authority's
Public Key Ring File from removable media.
e. When the Copy CA Public Key from Removable Media window opens, insert the diskette that
contains the copied CA's public key ring file.
f. Click OK to copy the public key ring file.
4. Distribute the CA's public key to your Windows, Linux, or AIX remote clients using the following steps:
Use command line or stand-alone tools to copy the CA's public key from removable media to the
codebase directory of the remote client. The CA's public key file must be copied in binary format. The
codebase directory locations are:
♦ On a Windows client: Program files\websm\codebase
♦ On an AIX client: /usr/websm/codebase
♦ On a Linux client: /opt/websm/codebase
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Viewing configuration properties
You can view the properties of the certificate authority (CA) and of any server. The property windows provide
read-only information for the CA and the servers.
View CA properties
1. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
2. Expand System Manager Security.
3. Click Certificate Authority.
4. Select Properties.
5. Type the password.
View server properties
1. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
2. Expand System Manager Security.
3. Click Server Security.
4. Select View properties for this server from the task list.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Configuring HMC object manager security
Learn about how to configure object manager security.
1. In the navigation area, expand the local HMC. It is the first HMC in the list.
2. Expand System Manager Security.
Distributing the certificate authority's public key with Web-basedSystem Manager Remote Client
57
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
3. Click Object Manager Security.
4. Click Configure Object Manager Security.
5. Select a socket mode.
6. Click OK.
If you are using the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start, install this product now.
See Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Follow these steps to successfully install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
1. Uninstall the previous version of the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
2. Type the following address in your machine's Web browser:
http://system name/remote_client.html
The system name is the name of the HMC you plan to access remotely.
3. Enter your HMC user ID and password.
4. Click InstallShield.
5. Click Windows to download the setup.exe file or click Linux to download the wsmlinuxclient.exe file.
6. If you are using a Linux system, run the following command to make the wsmlinuxclient.exe file
executable:
chmod 755 wsmlinuxclient.exe
7. Run the wsmlinuxclient.exe file or the setup.exe file to begin the installation process. If you encounter
problems with this step, see Troubleshooting for help.
8. When the Remote Client Installer window displays, click Next to continue.
9. To install using the default location, click Next. Otherwise, browse or type the desired location and
click Next. A confirmation window displays, showing you the installation location, the package being
installed, and the approximate size of the installation package. If any of the information shown is
incorrect, click Back to make corrections.
10. Click Next to start the installation. A status window displays a message indicating the installation
completed successfully or error messages if errors occurred during the installation.
11. Click Finish to close the window.
12. Type the following address in your machine's Web browser:
http://system name/remote_client_security.html
The system name is the name of the HMC you plan to access remotely.
13. Click Windows to download the setupsec.exe file or click Linux to download the setupsecl.exe file.
14. Run the setupsecl.exe file or the setupsec.exe file to begin the installation process. If you encounter
problems with this step, see Troubleshooting for help.
15. When the Remote Client Security Installer window displays, click Next to continue.
16. To install using the default location, click Next. Otherwise, browse or type the desired location and
click Next. A confirmation window displays, showing you the installation location, the package being
installed, and the approximate size of the installation package.
Note: Be sure the location you select in this step is the same location that you selected when
installing the remote client.
17. If any of the information shown is incorrect, click Back to make corrections. Click Next to start the
installation. A status window displays a message indicating the installation completed successfully, or
error messages if an error occurred during the installation.
18. Click Finish to close the window.
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Configuring HMC object manager security
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Note: To make a secure connection from the Remote Client, you must configure security on the HMC and
copy the CA's public key to the client. See Web-based System Manager Remote Client tasks.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
To install the latest version of the Web-based System Manager Remote Client, you must uninstall any
previous versions from your Linux or Windows PC.
Linux
1. Run the following command:
installdir/_uninst/uninstall
The installdir is the name of the directory where the remote client is located.
2. Run the following command:
installdir/_uninstssl/uninstallssl
The installdir is the name of the directory where your remote client is located.
Windows
Complete the following steps once to uninstall the Web-based System Manager Remote Client and again to
uninstall remote client security:
1. From the task bar, select Start > Settings > Control panel.
2. In the Control window, double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
3. From the list of programs on the Install/Uninstall tab, select Web-Based System Manager Remote
Client to uninstall the remote client and Remote Client Security to uninstall remote HMC client
security.
Note: Earlier versions of the remote client might display as Web-based System Manager PC Client
and the remote client security as Web-based System Manager PC Client Security.
4. Click Change/Remove to start the Uninstall wizard.
5. Click Next in the initial window.
6. Click Next in the Confirmation window. A status window displays a message indicating that the
uninstallation completed successfully or error messages if errors occurred during the uninstallation.
7. Click Finish to close the window.
8. Repeat steps 1 through 7 to uninstall remote client security.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
59
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web
Start
Complete the following steps to install the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start.
1. Type the following address in your PC's Web browser:
http://system name/remote_client.html
The system name is the name of the HMC you plan to access remotely.
2. Enter your HMC user ID and password.
3. From the Web-based System Manager Remote Client Selection page, click Java Web Start.
4. If you currently do not have it installed, download Java Web Start.
If you do not have Java Web Start currently installed on your client, click Java Web Start for Windows
for a Windows client or Java Web Start for Linux for a Linux client on the Web-based System
Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start Installation page to download the installation image.
Download the most recent compatible version. Click on each version to see system requirements.
♦ To install on a Windows client, double-click the downloaded image to launch the installation
wizard.
♦ To install on a Linux client, use the following command:
rpm -i ibm-linux-jre.i386.rpm
export PATH=$PATH:/opt/IBMJava2-142/jre/bin
cd /
/opt/IBMJava2-142/jre/javaws/updateSettings.sh
Note: Run the last line (/opt/IBMJava2-142/jre/javaws/updateSettings.sh) from the root
directory.
5. Go back to the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start Installation page, and
click Remote Client to download the remote client to your PC.
6. Launch the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start using the Web-based
System Manager icon.
Note: If you installed the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start on a Linux
system, launch Web-based System Manager one of the following ways:
♦ Use a virtual terminal session to launch the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for
Java Web Start:
a. Open a virtual terminal session and navigate to the directory in which you installed
Java Web Start. This is usually the javaws directory.
b. Launch Java Web Start by executing the javaws command.
c. From the Java Web Start Application Manager, select View > Downloaded
Applications.
d. Select Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
e. Select Application > Start Web-based System Manager to launch the remote client.
♦ Use the browser to launch the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web
Start:
a. Type the following address in your machine's Web browser:
http://system name/remote_client.html
where system name is the name of the HMC you plan to access remotely.
b. Click Java Web Start.
c. Click Remote Client.
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Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Uninstalling the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java
Web Start
To uninstall the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java Web Start from your PC, complete the
following steps:
1. From the View menu in the Java Web Start Application Manager, select Downloaded Applications.
2. Click the Web-based System Manager Remote Client icon.
3. Click Application > Remove Application.
Parent topic: Installing and securing the remote client
Working with the HMC
Describes how to perform actions that pertain to the HMC itself.
To learn more about the commands you can use to operate the HMC remotely, see Overview of HMC tasks.
To learn more about how to cluster your systems using InfiniBand (IB), see Clustering systems using
InfiniBand (IB) hardware.
• Basic operations
Describes the basic operations that you can perform on your HMC, such as starting the HMC,
changing the language HMC language, and logging off the HMC.
• Working with partition profile information
Back up, restore, initialize, and remove profile information for the logical partitions.
• Collecting and viewing resource utilization data
This section describes how to gather and view resource utilization information.
• Backing up and restoring the HMC
This section describes how to back up HMC data.
• Working with users, roles, and passwords
Learn how to perform HMC user administration tasks.
• Using the HMC remote command line
Provides information about using the command-line interface on the HMC.
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Basic operations
Describes the basic operations that you can perform on your HMC, such as starting the HMC, changing the
language HMC language, and logging off the HMC.
This topic provides information on how to perform basic operations on your HMC:
• Starting the HMC
Explains how to start the HMC interface.
• Shutting down, rebooting, and logging off the HMC
Explains how to shut down, reboot, and log off the HMC interface
• Setting the date and time
Describes how to change the date and time for the HMC
• Changing the HMC interface language
Describes how to change the interface language that you see on the HMC interface, as well as the
locale
• Configuring the HMC keyboard layout
Describes how to configure the keyboard layout.
Installing the Web-based System Manager Remote Client for Java WebStart
61
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
• Viewing recent HMC activity
Explains how to view recent HMC activity.
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
Starting the HMC
Explains how to start the HMC interface.
To start the HMC, do the following:
1. Turn on the HMC by pressing the power button.
2. If English is your language preference, continue with step 5.
3. If your language preference is a language other than English, type the number 2 when you are
prompted to change the locale.
Note: This prompt times out in 30 seconds if you do not act.
4. Select the locale that you want to display from the list in the Locale Selection window, and click OK.
The locale identifies the language that the HMC interface displays.
5. Log in to the HMC using the following default user ID and password:
♦ ID: hscroot
♦ Password: abc123
6. Press Enter.
Parent topic: Basic operations
Shutting down, rebooting, and logging off the HMC
Explains how to shut down, reboot, and log off the HMC interface
This task allows you to shut down, reboot, and log off the HMC interface.
Attention: Use the white button on the HMC to perform a manual shutdown only if the server does not
respond to any tasks performed from the console, such as shutting down the HMC.
If an operating system is open and running on a partition, and you decide to shut down, reboot, or log off the
HMC interface, the operating system continues to run without interruption.
To log off the HMC interface, do the following:
1. In the main menu, click Console > Exit. At this point, you can select to save the state of the console
for the next session by selecting the check box next to the option.
2. Click Exit Now.
Parent topic: Basic operations
62
Basic operations
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Setting the date and time
Describes how to change the date and time for the HMC
The battery-operated clock keeps the date and time for the HMC. You might need to reset the console date
and time if the battery is replaced, or if you physically move your system to a different time zone. If you
change the date and time information, the change does not affect the systems and logical partitions that the
HMC manages.
To change the date and time for the HMC, do the following:
1. Ensure that you are a member of one of the following roles:
♦ Super administrator
♦ Service representative
♦ Operator
♦ Viewer
2. In the navigation area, expand the HMC you want to work with. HMCs are listed by hostname or IP
address.
3. Expand HMC Management.
4. Click HMC Configuration.
5. In the contents pane, click Customize Console Date and Time.
6. Enter the date, time, and time zone, and click OK.
Note: The time setting will adjust automatically for daylight saving time in the time zone you select.
Parent topic: Basic operations
Changing the HMC interface language
Describes how to change the interface language that you see on the HMC interface, as well as the locale
When you power on the HMC, the HMC prompts you to change the interface language and locale. The locale
is the language in which you want the HMC to display. Changes made using this procedure affect the
language and locale for the HMC server. If you are using the remote client to connect to the HMC, the
language and locale settings on your Windows operating system determine the settings that the remote client
uses to display the HMC on your PC.
Any user role can change the HMC interface language.
To change the HMC interface language and locale when you power on the HMC, do the following:
1. Power on the HMC.
2. When you are prompted to change the language and locale, select the language and locale you want
to display. If nothing is selected within 20 seconds, the dialog exits. By default, the Exit now and
Basic operations
63
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
prompt again for locale change option is selected. The boot continues.
3. Click OK. When the HMC completes the power-on process, the language and locale that you selected
are displayed.
To change the HMC interface language and locale using the HMC Configuration application, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, click the HMC Management icon.
2. In the Contents area, double-click the HMC Configuration icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Change Current Language and Locale.
4. In the window, select the language and locale you want to display.
5. Click OK.
6. Log off the HMC interface and then log in.
Parent topic: Basic operations
Configuring the HMC keyboard layout
Describes how to configure the keyboard layout.
When you power on the HMC, the HMC prompts you to configure the keyboard layout. If you do not respond,
the HMC continues to power on, using the previous keyboard configuration. English is the default setting.
Any user role can change the keyboard layout.
Note: If you previously selected the Do not run this program to change keyboard layout on the next system
boot option and you want to change the keyboard layout again, open a restricted shell (rshterm) and use the
following chhmc command:
chhmc -c kbdcfg -s enable
To configure the keyboard layout when you power on the HMC, do the following:
1. Power on the HMC.
2. When the Keyboard Layout Configuration Screen displays, select the Change to a new keyboard
layout option. If nothing is selected within 20 seconds, the dialog exits. By default, the Do not change
keyboard layout and run this program again on the next system boot option is selected. The boot
continues.
3. Select the desired keyboard layout from the list.
4. Select the appropriate option if you want to run this program on the next system boot and press Enter.
Parent topic: Basic operations
Viewing recent HMC activity
Explains how to view recent HMC activity.
To see a log of recent HMC activity, you can view console events. Each event has an associated time stamp.
64
Basic operations
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
The following is a sample of the events recorded:
• When a logical partition was activated
• When a system was powered on
• When a logical partition was shut down
• Results of a scheduled operation
To view console events, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
• operator
• product engineer
To view console events, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, click the HMC Management icon.
2. In the Contents area, click the HMC Configuration icon.
3. In the Contents area, select View Console Events.
Parent topic: Basic operations
Working with partition profile information
Back up, restore, initialize, and remove profile information for the logical partitions.
You can back up, restore, initialize, and remove profiles that you have created. This topic describes each of
these options.
For more information about creating profiles, see Creating new logical partitions and partition profiles.
• Backing up partition profile data
Describes how to back up profile data on the HMC.
• Initializing profile data
Explains how to initialize the profile data.
• Restoring profile data
Explains how to read the profile data from the previously backed-up file on the HMC and load this
data to the managed system.
• Removing profile data
Explains how to remove the previously backed-up file on the HMC.
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
Backing up partition profile data
Describes how to back up profile data on the HMC.
This topic describes how to back up logical partition profile data.
To back up partition profile data, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
To back up partition profile data, do the following:
Working with partition profile information
65
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
1. In the Contents area, select the managed system.
2. From the menu, click Selected > Profile Data > Backup.
3. Type the name you want to use for this backup file.
4. Click OK.
Parent topic: Working with partition profile information
Initializing profile data
Explains how to initialize the profile data.
When you initialize profile data, you return the managed system to a state that does not have any logical
partitions or profiles. You can perform this task in order to stabilize your managed system if the profile data
becomes corrupt.
Important: After you perform this task, any profiles that you created prior to initialization are erased. Use this
procedure only under the direction of your service provider.
To initialize profile data, your authority level must be a super administrator.
Note: You can initialize profile data only when the managed system is in the Operating or Standby state and
all the partitions are in the Not Activated state.
To initialize profile data, do the following:
1. In the Contents area, select the managed system.
2. From the menu, select Selected > Profile Data > Initialize.
3. Click Yes.
Parent topic: Working with partition profile information
Restoring profile data
Explains how to read the profile data from the previously backed-up file on the HMC and load this data to the
managed system.
Selecting this menu item restores profile data to the HMC from a backup file stored on the HMC hard drive.
Note: This is not a concurrent procedure. When the data is restored, the managed system powers on to
Partition Standby. For more information about power-on modes, see Managed system power-on modes.
To restore stored profile data on the HMC hard drive, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
To restore profile data, do the following:
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Working with partition profile information
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
1. In the Contents area, select the managed system.
2. From the menu, select Selected > Profile Data > Restore.
3. Select the profile information that you want to restore from the list of backup files.
4. Select a restore option.
5. Click OK.
Parent topic: Working with partition profile information
Removing profile data
Explains how to remove the previously backed-up file on the HMC.
To remove stored profile data from the HMC hard disk drive, you must be a member of one of the following
roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
To remove stored profile data, do the following:
1. In the Contents area, select the managed system.
2. From the menu, select Selected > Profile Data > Remove.
3. Select the profile data that you want to remove.
4. Click OK.
Parent topic: Working with partition profile information
Collecting and viewing resource utilization data
This section describes how to gather and view resource utilization information.
You can use your HMC to collect and view the types of system activities that affect partition performance and
capacity. The following are the types of events that the HMC records:
• Shared processor utilization data
• Any managed system change that affects data collection
• Any partition change that affects data collection
You can use this data to analyze trends and make resource adjustments.
These topics are intended for HMC users who want to collect and view resource utilization data. For more
information, click on the associated topic link:
• Setting the HMC to collect resource utilization data for managed systems
Use this procedure to set the Hardware Management Console (HMC) to collect resource utilization
data for any of the managed systems that it manages.
• Viewing resource utilization data for a managed system
Use this procedure to view the resource utilization data for a managed system using the Hardware
Management Console (HMC).
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
Working with partition profile information
67
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Setting the HMC to collect resource utilization data for managed
systems
Use this procedure to set the Hardware Management Console (HMC) to collect resource utilization data for
any of the managed systems that it manages.
To set the HMC to collect resource utilization data, you must be a super administrator or operator. For more
information about user roles, refer to Tasks and roles.
When you set the HMC to collect resource utilization data for a managed system, the HMC collects utilization
data for memory and processor resources . The HMC collects utilization data into records called events.
Events are created at the following times:
• At periodic intervals (hourly, daily, and monthly)
• When you make system-level and partition-level state and configuration changes that affect resource
utilization
• When you start up, shut down, and change the local time on the HMC
To set the HMC to collect resource utilization data, follow these steps:
1. In the navigation area, open the object with the same name as your HMC.
2. Open Server and Partition.
3. Select Utilization Data Management.
4. In the contents area, click Change Settings for Utilization Data Collection.
5. Specify the managed systems for which you want to collect utilization data.
For which managed systems do you
want to collect utilization data?
Complete the following:
All managed systems that are managed
by the HMC
a. Select All Managed Systems.
b. Select Enable underAll Managed Systems and
click OK.
Specific managed systems
a. Select Select from the following.
b. Select Enable beside each managed system for
which you want to collect utilization data and
click OK.
Parent topic: Collecting and viewing resource utilization data
Viewing resource utilization data for a managed system
Use this procedure to view the resource utilization data for a managed system using the Hardware
Management Console (HMC).
Before you can view resource utilization data for a managed system, you must set the HMC to collect
utilization data. For more information on how to set the HMC to collect utilization data, see Setting the HMC to
collect resource utilization data for managed systems.
Users with any user role can view resource utilization data for managed systems. For more information about
user roles, refer to Tasks and roles.
The HMC collects utilization data for memory and processor resources . The HMC collects utilization data into
records called events. Events are created at the following times:
• At periodic intervals (hourly, daily, and monthly)
• When you make system-level and partition-level state and configuration changes that affect resource
utilization
• When you start, shut down, and change the local time on the HMC
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Collecting and viewing resource utilization data
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
To view the resource utilization data for a managed system, follow these steps:
1. In the navigation area, open Server and Partition.
2. Select Utilization Data Management.
3. In the contents area, click View Utilization Data.
4. Specify the managed system whose resource utilization data you want to view in the Managed
System field.
5. Select whether you want to view the data that was collected hourly, daily, or monthly.
6. Specify the date and time range whose resource utilization events you want to view. The date and
time information that you specify here are based on the local time on the HMC and not necessarily the
time on the managed systems.
7. Specify the maximum number of resource utilization events that you want to view and click OK. A
window displays with a list of the resource utilization events that match the given criteria.
8. To view more detailed information about a resource utilization event, select an event and then click
OK. To view more information about the selected utilization event, select the View menu option.
Parent topic: Collecting and viewing resource utilization data
Backing up and restoring the HMC
This section describes how to back up HMC data.
The HMC provides the tools you need to back up and restore important HMC data.
Backing up the HMC does not back up the data on the server. For more information about backing up data on
a logical partition, select the topic that matches your logical partition's configuration:
• Backing up and recovering AIX logical partitionsThese topics provide instructions for backing up and
restoring AIX installations.
• Backing up and recovering Linux installationsThese topics provide instructions for backing up and
restoring Linux installations.
• Setting up the network interface as a startup device
This section describes how to enable the F12 function key to set up the network interface as a startup
device.
• Setting up a remote system for HMC installation, backup, or restoration over the network
Describes the steps you take to prepare your server to allow an HMC to connect to a network and
perform an installation, backup, or restore operation over the network.
• Backing up the entire HMC hard drive to a remote system
Describes how to use the network to back up the entire HMC hard drive.
• Backing up critical HMC data
Describes how to back up important console information to DVD, a remote system mounted to the
HMC file system (such as NFS), or a remote site through FTP.
• Restoring the entire HMC hard drive using the network
Describes how to use the network to restore the entire HMC hard drive using a previously saved
network file.
• Restoring critical HMC data
Describes how to restore critical HMC data.
• Scheduling and reviewing HMC backups
Explains how to schedule backups of important console information.
• Saving HMC upgrade data
Explains how to save upgrade data so that you can reinstall it if the HMC must be recovered.
• Reinstalling the HMC machine code
Explains how to reinstall the HMC machine code prior to restoring critical backup data and it
describes how to reinstall the HMC interface onto the HMC PC and install backup information.
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
Backing up and restoring the HMC
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Setting up the network interface as a startup device
This section describes how to enable the F12 function key to set up the network interface as a startup device.
On some HMC models, the F12 function key is not enabled for use when the HMC is powered on. These
steps enable the F12 function key so that you can specify the network interface as a startup device.
To set up the network interface as a startup device, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To set up the network interface as a startup device, do the following:
1. Shut down and power off the HMC. For more information, see Shutting down, rebooting, and logging
off the HMC.
2. Power on the HMC console.
3. Press F1 to start the BIOS Setup utility.
4. Find and select Startup or Start Options.
5. Select Startup Sequence to view the list of startup devices.
6. Depending on the type of HMC (desktop or rack-mounted), use the +/- key or arrow key to make the
network interface an entry in the startup list, after the hard disk.
7. If the HMC is a desktop, find and enable the Start up Device Menu prompt. This enables the F12
function key when the HMC powers on, so that you can select the network device in your startup list.
For CR2 and CR3 machine types, the Planar Ethernet PXE/DHCP entry should have Planar Ethernet
1 and Planar Ethernet 2.
On desktop HMC machines, do the following:
a. Press Esc.
b. Select Devices -> Network Setup.
c. Ensure that PXE Boot Agent and PXE Base code are set to Enabled. If these settings are
not enabled, networking will not occur.
8. When you have finished, save the settings and exit the BIOS setup utility to restart the boot process.
You can now press F12 to select the network device as the startup device. If a DHCP server can accept PXE
requests from the HMC, and has the required files, the HMC will boot from it, then the
Backup/Upgrade/Restore/Install window opens.
Beginning with HMC Version 5 Release 2.0, the chhmc command can be used on some HMC machine types
to set the network interface as a startup device. To enable network boot on the HMC, use the following
command:
chhmc -c netboot -s enable
When the command completes, you can the following command to verify that network boot has been enabled:
lshmc -r
The command then displays the following:
ssh=enable,xntp=disable,websm=enable,http=enable,netboot=enable
To disable network boot, use the chhmc command:
chhmc -c netboot -s disable
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Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Setting up a remote system for HMC installation, backup, or
restoration over the network
Describes the steps you take to prepare your server to allow an HMC to connect to a network and perform an
installation, backup, or restore operation over the network.
To perform a network boot of the HMC, you must have the following:
• You must have a system that has DHCP, NFS, and TFTP servers installed and running. To perform a
backup or restore in secure mode, you need an ssh server running on the system.
• The system must be accessible to the HMC over a network.
• The syslinux package must be installed on the system; this package gives you access to the
pxelinux.0 boot loader file.
• You must have obtained the following required HMC images and stored them in the location specified
in the steps following the table.
Table 1. Required images
File name
File content
bzImage
Kernel image
initrd.gz
RAM Disk file system
disk1.img Base image
disk2.img Base HMC image
disk3.img ESCALA Power5 Hardware Information image
To set up your server to allow an HMC to contact the network and perform an installation, backup, or restore
operation over the network, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To set up your server to allow an HMC to contact and perform an installation, backup, or restore operation
over the network, do the following:
1. Log in as root.
2. Check the /etc/xinetd.d/tftp configuration file and look up the server_args. The default setting is
usually /var/tftp.
3. Create the directory /var/tftp. Run the following command:
mkdir -p /var/tftp
4. Edit the /etc/dhcpd.conf file and add the two lines that are highlighted in the following sample
dhcpd.conf file, if they are not already in the file.
allow bootp;
allow booting;
ddns-update-style none;
default-lease-time 14400;
max-lease-time 172800;
subnet 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 192.168.1.100 192.168.1.200;
option routers 192.168.1.1;
option domain-name
somecompany.com ;
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option domain-name-servers 192.168.1.1;
filename
pxelinux.0 ;
}
This sample file specifies the range of IP addresses to be served by the DHCP server. One of the IP
addresses in this range will be assigned to the HMC when it broadcasts a request to obtain an IP
address. The bootloader that will be used is pxlinux.0 in the /var/tftp directory. This file is part
of the syslinux package and is usually located in the /usr/lib/syslinux directory.
5. Copy the pxelinux.0 file to the /var/tftp directory. Run the following command:
cp /usr/lib/syslinux/pxelinux.0 /var/tftp/
6. Create the /var/tftp/hmc and /var/tftp/pxelinux.cfg directories by running the following commands: :
mkdir -p /var/tftp/hmc
mkdir -p /var/tftp/pxelinux.cfg
7. Copy the bzImage and initrd.gz files that you previously downloaded from your provider to the
/var/tftp/hmc directory.
8. Create a directory (for example, /home/hmc) and use NFS to export this directory. If you want to use
this directory to back up the HMC over the network, you must allow write access to it.
a. Run the following command to create the directory:
mkdir -p /home/hmc
b. Edit the /etc/exports file, and add the following line:
/home/hmc
*(ro)
To export the directory with write access, replace *(ro) with *(rw).
c. Run the following command to export the directory:
exportfs -va
9. Copy the disk1.img, disk2.img and disk3.img files that you previously downloaded from your provider
to the /home/hmc directory.
10. Create a file, named default, in the /var/tftp/pxelinux.cfg directory. This file must contain
the following data:
default hmc
label hmc
kernel hmc/bzimage
append initrd=hmc/initrd.gz media=network
server=192.168.1.1 dir=/home/hmc
mode=manual vga=0x317
This default configuration file indicates that the kernel file bzImge will be installed from the
/var/tftp/hmc directory. The HMC uses file initrd.gz in the /var/tftp/hmc directory as the
RAM disk, records the server s IP address (192.168.1.1), and confirms that the /home/hmc/
directory on the server contains the necessary images.
The server is now ready to accept requests from the HMC.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Backing up the entire HMC hard drive to a remote system
Describes how to use the network to back up the entire HMC hard drive.
You can use your HMC to back up the entire hard disk of your HMC to a remote system. Your remote system
must have Network File System (NFS) or Secure Shell (ssh) configured and this network must be accessible
from the HMC. To complete this task, you must shut down and reboot the HMC. Do not use the remote
commands or the remote client to perform these tasks. Use an HMC hardware console.
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To back up the HMC hard drive to a remote system, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To back up the HMC hard drive to a remote system, do the following:
1. Shut down and power off the HMC. For more information, see Shutting down, rebooting, and logging
off the HMC.
2. Power on the HMC console with the HMC recovery media (V5R1.0 or later) in the DVD drive. If you
want to start the HMC interface from a configured network boot server, make sure the network
interface is one of the devices in your startup sequence. To view the list of startup devices, press F12
when the HMC powers on, and select the network interface from which you want to boot. If the F12
function key is not enabled, see Setting up the network interface as a startup device to enable it.
3. Select the backup option and click Next.
4. Select the network interface to use for communicating with the remote server. If you are starting the
HMC by contacting a network boot server, and this server is also the remote server to which you want
to back up the data, then select the default settings. Then click Next and go to 6. If you do not select
the default settings, continue with the next step.
5. If you do not select the Default settings, you must select the network protocol to use with the selected
interface. You can choose to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server in your network or assign a
static IP address to the selected network interface. Make your selection and click Next.
6. If you did not select the default settings, type the IP address or host name of your remote server. The
backup file will be created using the gzip compression utility and the tar command. Therefore, it is
recommended that you specify a file with the .tgz extension in the File on remote host field. If you
have selected the default network settings, you must use the directory setup in your network boot
configuration. This information is displayed in the File on remote host field. After you have
completed all the required information, click Next.
7. Select the method you want to use to transfer the data from your HMC to the remote server. If you
choose to encrypt the data, your remote host must have secure shell server (SSH) running. If you
choose to transfer the data without encryption, your remote host must have Network File Server
(NFS) running, and the directory to which you want to back up data must be exported for write
access. Make your selection and click Next.
8. If you select to transfer the data using encryption, you must type the remote server's user ID and
password.
9. Verify the information you entered is correct and click Finish. When the backup completes, the HMC
interface displays.
If you have modified the startup sequence by pressing F1 when you powered on the HMC, you must reboot
the HMC and change the settings again. When you change the startup sequence, ensure that your hard disk
is listed before the network interface in the startup sequence.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Backing up critical HMC data
Describes how to back up important console information to DVD, a remote system mounted to the HMC file
system (such as NFS), or a remote site through FTP.
Using the HMC, you can back up all important data, such as the following:
• User-preference files
• User information
• HMC platform-configuration files
• HMC log files
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• HMC updates through Install Corrective Service
Note: Use the archived data only in conjunction with a reinstallation of the HMC from the product CDs. For
information about how to reinstall the HMC, see Reinstalling the HMC machine code.
The Backup function saves the HMC data stored on the HMC hard disk to DVD, a remote system mounted to
the HMC file system (such as NFS), or a remote site through FTP. Back up the HMC after you have made
changes to the HMC or to the information associated with logical partitions.
Note: The DVD must be formatted in the DVD-RAM format before data can be saved to the DVD.
To back up the HMC, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To back up the HMC, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, click the Licensed Internal Code Maintenance icon.
2. In the Contents area, click the HMC Code Update icon.
3. Select Back up Critical Console Data.
4. Select an archive option. You can back up to DVD on the HMC, back up to a remote system mounted
to the HMC file system, or a remote site through FTP.
5. Follow the instructions on the window to back up the data.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Restoring the entire HMC hard drive using the network
Describes how to use the network to restore the entire HMC hard drive using a previously saved network file.
You can use your HMC to restore your HMC hard disk from a remote system. To complete this task, you must
first have a backup copy available on your network. To learn more about backing up the entire HMC hard
drive to a remote system, see Backing up the entire HMC hard drive to a remote system. Your remote system
must have Network File System (NFS) or Secure Shell (ssh) configured and this network must be accessible
from the HMC. To complete this task, you must shut down and reboot the HMC. Do not use the remote
commands or the remote client to perform these tasks. Use an HMC hardware console.
To restore the HMC hard drive from a remote system, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To restore the HMC hard drive to a remote system, do the following:
1. Shut down and power off the HMC. For more information, see Shutting down, rebooting, and logging
off the HMC.
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2. Power on the HMC console with the HMC Recovery media (V5R1.0 or later) in the DVD drive. If you
want to start from a configured network boot server, make sure the network interface is one of the
devices in your startup sequence. To view the list of startup devices, press F12 when the HMC
powers on, and select the network interface from which you want to boot. If the F12 function key is not
enabled, see Setting up the network interface as a startup device to enable it.
3. Select the restore option and click Next.
4. Select the network interface to use for communicating with the remote server. If you are restoring the
HMC by contacting a network boot server, and this server is also the remote server to which you want
to restore the data, then select the default settings. Press Next and go to 7.
5. If you do not select the Default settings, you must select the network protocol to use with the selected
interface. You can choose to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server in your network, or assign a
static IP address to the selected network interface. Make your selection and click Next.
6. If you did not select the Default setting, enter the IP address or host name of your remote server and
type the backup file name in the File on remote host field. If you have selected the default network
settings, you must use the directory setup in your network boot configuration. This information is
displayed in the File on remote host field. After you have completed all the required information, click
Next.
7. Select the method you want to use to transfer the data from your remote server to your HMC. If you
choose to encrypt the data, your remote host must have secure shell server (SSH) running. If you
choose to transfer the data without encryption, your remote host must have Network File Server
(NFS) running, and the directory to which you want to back up data must be exported for write
access. Make your selection and click Next.
8. If you want to transfer the data using encryption, type a user ID and password on the remote server
when you are prompted for them, and click Next.
9. Verify the information you entered is correct and click Finish. When the restore operation completes,
the HMC interface displays.
If you have modified the startup sequence by pressing F1 when you powered on the HMC, you must reboot
the HMC and change the settings again. When you change the startup sequence, ensure that your hard disk
is listed before the network interface in the startup sequence.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Restoring critical HMC data
Describes how to restore critical HMC data.
Backing up critical console data includes both backup data and corrective service data.
Restore HMC backup data only in conjunction with a reinstallation of the HMC. For information about how to
reinstall the HMC, see Reinstalling the HMC machine code.
Note: For this operation, you must have one of the following:
• The backup DVD media
• Access to the remote server where the archive was created by using the procedure in Backing up
critical HMC data
To restore the HMC data, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
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Select the data-restoration procedure based on the data archiving method used:
• Restoring from DVD
Restore data that was archived to DVD.
• Restoring from a remote server
Restore data that was archived to a remote FTP or NFS sever.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Restoring from DVD
Restore data that was archived to DVD.
If the critical console data has been archived on a DVD, do the following:
1. Select 1 - Restore Critical Console Data from the menu displayed at the end of the HMC
reinstallation.
2. Insert the DVD containing the archived console data. On the first boot of the newly installed HMC, the
data is automatically restored.
Parent topic: Restoring critical HMC data
Restoring from a remote server
Restore data that was archived to a remote FTP or NFS sever.
If the critical console data has been archived remotely, do the following:
1. Manually reconfigure network settings to enable access to the remote server after the HMC is newly
installed. For information about configuring network settings, see Configuring the HMC.
2. In the Navigation area, click the Licensed Internal Code Maintenance icon.
3. In the Contents area, click the HMC Code Update icon.
4. Select Restore Remote Console Data.
5. Select the type of remote restoration.
6. Follow the directions on the window to restore the critical console data. The data automatically
restores from the remote server when the system is rebooted.
Parent topic: Restoring critical HMC data
Scheduling and reviewing HMC backups
Explains how to schedule backups of important console information.
You can schedule a backup to DVD to occur once, or you can set up a repeating schedule. You must provide
the time and date that you want the operation to occur. If the operation is scheduled to repeat, you must select
how often you want this backup to run (hourly, daily, weekly, or monthly).
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Note: Only the most-recent backup image is stored at any time on the DVD.
To schedule a backup operation, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. In the Navigation area, click the HMC Configuration icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Schedule Operations.
4. From the list, select the HMC you want to back up and click OK.
5. Select Options > New.
6. In the Add a Scheduled Operation window, select Backup Critical Console Data and click OK.
7. In the appropriate fields, enter the time and date that you want this backup to occur.
8. If you want this scheduled operation to repeat, click the Repeat tab and select the intervals at which
you want the backup to repeat and press Enter.
9. When you have set the backup time and date, click Save. When the Action Completed window opens,
click OK. A description of the operation displays in the Scheduled Operations window.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Saving HMC upgrade data
Explains how to save upgrade data so that you can reinstall it if the HMC must be recovered.
You can save the current HMC configuration in a special disk partition on the HMC. Save upgrade data before
you upgrade your HMC software to a new version or release. This action allows you to restore HMC
configuration settings after upgrading.
Note: The special disk partition can hold only one level of backup data. Every time you perform this task,
previous backup data is overwritten by the latest backup. To proceed with the upgrade after saving upgrade
data, you can must place the new HMC recovery CD in the DVD drive and immediately reboot the HMC. Any
configuration changes made on the HMC after you saved the upgrade data will not be saved.
To save upgrade data, do the following:
1. Expand the Licensed Internal Code Maintenance folder, then select the HMC application in the
Navigation area.
2. Select the Save Upgrade Data task in the content area. An information window opens that prompts
you to select the media (hard drive or DVD).
3. Select the appropriate media.
4. Click Continue.
5. Click OK to confirm and close the information window.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Reinstalling the HMC machine code
Explains how to reinstall the HMC machine code prior to restoring critical backup data and it describes how to
reinstall the HMC interface onto the HMC PC and install backup information.
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If the HMC is not responding, you can use the recovery CD to reinstall the HMC onto the HMC PC. After you
reinstall the HMC machine code, you can restore the backup data that you created to recover your critical
console information. For information about how to restore the HMC backup data, see Restoring critical HMC
data.
To reinstall the HMC machine code, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• operator
• service representative
To reinstall the HMC machine code, do the following:
1. Shut down and power off the HMC. For more information, see Shutting down, rebooting, and logging
off the HMC.
2. Power on the HMC console and insert the HMC recovery media if you want to install from it. The HMC
powers on from the media and displays the Backup/Upgrade/Restore/Install window. If you want to
install from the network and have a network boot server configured, make sure the network interface
is one of the devices in your startup sequence. To view the list of startup devices, press F12 when the
HMC powers on, and select the network interface from which you want to boot. If the F12 function key
is not enabled, see Setting up the network interface as a startup device to enable it.
3. Select the Install option, and click Next.
4. Select Install from media if you are using media. If you are not installing from media, select Install
from network. Click Next.
5. If you install from media, you are prompted to install the next media. Select 1 - Install additional
software from media to install the subsequent media. If you install from a network, you must complete
the next step.
6. After the installation is complete, select 1 - Install additional software from media from the menu
displayed to install the subsequent media.
7. Select 1 - Restore Critical Console Data from the menu to restore data from a DVD. To restore from a
remote server, select 2 - Finish the Installation.
Parent topic: Backing up and restoring the HMC
Working with users, roles, and passwords
Learn how to perform HMC user administration tasks.
The following topics provide information about HMC user administration tasks:
• Creating an HMC user
Describes how to create HMC users.
• Viewing an HMC user description
Describes how to view HMC user definitions.
• Copying HMC user information
Describes how to copy existing user information.
• Deleting an HMC user
Describes how to delete an HMC user.
• Creating a customized HMC role
Describes how to create a customized HMC role
• Editing HMC user information and roles
Describes how to change HMC user description.
• Changing HMC user passwords
Describes how to change an existing HMC user's password.
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
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Creating an HMC user
Describes how to create HMC users.
You can create various users using the HMC. The hscroot, root, and hscpe user IDs are special, or reserved.
The hscpe user is created for use by your service provider when performing problem determination.
To create a user, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Click User > Add. Fill in the appropriate fields and click OK.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Viewing an HMC user description
Describes how to view HMC user definitions.
To view a user description, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Click User > Modify. The current user description is displayed.
To read about the tasks each HMC user role can perform and the commands associated with each task, see
Overview of HMC tasks.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Copying HMC user information
Describes how to copy existing user information.
To copy HMC user information, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Click User > Copy. Fill in the appropriate fields and click OK.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Working with users, roles, and passwords
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Deleting an HMC user
Describes how to delete an HMC user.
To delete a user, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Select the user that you want to remove.
5. Click User > Remove. The Delete Item Verification window opens.
6. Click Yes.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Creating a customized HMC role
Describes how to create a customized HMC role
To create a customized HMC role, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage Access Task Roles and Managed Resource Roles. The
Customized User Controls window opens.
4. Click Task Roles.
5. Click File > Add. The Add Role window opens.
6. Fill in the appropriate fields and click OK.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Editing HMC user information and roles
Describes how to change HMC user description.
To edit HMC user information and roles, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Click User > Modify. Fill in the appropriate fields and click OK.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Working with users, roles, and passwords
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Changing HMC user passwords
Describes how to change an existing HMC user's password.
To change HMC user passwords, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, expand the HMC Management folder.
2. Click the HMC users icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Manage HMC Users and Access. The User Profiles window opens.
4. Click User > Modify. Type the new password and click OK.
Parent topic: Working with users, roles, and passwords
Using the HMC remote command line
Provides information about using the command-line interface on the HMC.
The command-line interface is useful in the following situations:
• When consistent results are required. If you have to administer several managed systems, you can
achieve consistent results by using the command-line interface. The command sequence can be
stored in scripts and run remotely.
• When automated operations are required. After you have developed a consistent way to manage the
managed systems, you can automate the operations by invoking the scripts from batch-processing
applications, such as the cron daemon, from other systems.
This topic provides information about using the command line interface on the HMC.
For HMC command descriptions, see the HMC commands topic.
• Viewing HMC remote command information
Describes the remote command line.
• Setting up secure script execution between SSH clients and the HMC
Describes how to ensure that the script executions between SSH clients and the HMC are secure.
• Enabling and disabling HMC remote commands
Explains how to enable or disable the remote command-line interface access to the HMC using the
SSH facility.
Parent topic: Working with the HMC
Viewing HMC remote command information
Describes the remote command line.
To view command information, type man and then the command name. For example, to learn more about the
"Create a user for the HMC" (mkhmcusr) command, type the following at the command line:
man mkhmcusr
For HMC command descriptions, see the HMC commands topic.
Parent topic: Using the HMC remote command line
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Setting up secure script execution between SSH clients and the HMC
Describes how to ensure that the script executions between SSH clients and the HMC are secure.
Note: To enable scripts to run unattended between an SSH client and an HMC, the SSH protocol must
already be installed on the client's operating system.
HMCs typically are placed inside the machine room where managed systems are located, so you might not
have physical access to the HMC. In this case, you can remotely access it using either the remote client or the
remote command-line interface. This topic describes how to ensure that your script executions between SSH
clients and the HMC are secure.
To enable scripts to run unattended between an SSH client and an HMC, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, select HMC Management.
2. In the Navigation area, click HMC Configuration.
3. In the Contents area, click Enable/Disable Remote Command Execution.
4. When the window opens, select the box to enable SSH.
5. Create an HMC user with one of the following roles:
♦ super administrator
♦ service representative
6. On the client's operating system, run the SSH protocol key generator. To run the SSH protocol key
generator, do the following:
a. To store the keys, create a directory named $HOME/.ssh (either RSA or DSA keys can be
used).
b. To generate public and private keys, run the following command:
ssh-keygen -t
rsa
The following files are created in the $HOME/.ssh directory:
private key: id_rsa
public key: id_rsa.pub
The write bits for both group and other are turned off. Ensure that the private key has a
permission of 600.
7. On the client's operating system, use ssh and run the mkauthkeys command to update the HMC
user's authorized_keys2 file on the HMC by using the following command:
ssh [email protected] "mkauthkeys --add '<the key string from $HOME/.ssh/id_dsa.pub>'"
Deleting the key from the HMC
To delete the key from the HMC, select one of the following procedures:
You can use this procedure to delete the key from the HMC by modifying various files:
1. On the logical partition, use the scp command to copy the authorized_keys2 file from the HMC to the
logical partition, as follows:
scp [email protected]_name :.ssh/authorized_keys2 /tmp/mykeyfile
2. In the /tmp/mykeyfile file, remove the line that contains the key and host name of the system that you
want to be able to run HMC commands remotely.
3. On a logical partition, use the scp command to copy the new file to the HMC:
Using the HMC remote command line
83
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
scp /tmp/mykeyfile [email protected]_name ".ssh/authorized_keys2"
4. If you want to enable password prompting for all hosts that access the HMC through ssh, use the ssh
command to remove the key file from the HMC:
scp [email protected]:.ssh/authorized_keys2 authorized_keys2
5. Edit the authorized_keys2 file and remove all lines in this file, then copy it back to the HMC. For
example:
scp authorized_keys [email protected]:.ssh/authorized_keys2
OR
You can use the command line to delete the key from the HMC by using the mkauthkeys command. For
example:
ssh [email protected] "mkauthkeys --remove '[email protected]'"
Parent topic: Using the HMC remote command line
Enabling and disabling HMC remote commands
Explains how to enable or disable the remote command-line interface access to the HMC using the SSH
facility.
You can enable or disable the remote command-line interface access to the HMC using the SSH facility.
To enable or disable remote commands, you must be a member of one of the following roles:
• super administrator
• service representative
To enable or disable remote commands, do the following:
1. In the Navigation area, click the HMC Management icon.
2. In the Contents area, double-click the HMC Configuration icon.
3. In the Contents area, click Enable/Disable Remote Command Execution.
4. Select the appropriate check box.
5. Click OK.
To disable the firewall that is enabled by default, you must access the network settings on the HMC.
To disable the HMC firewall, see Changing HMC firewall settings.
Parent topic: Using the HMC remote command line
Troubleshooting HMC setup
Troubleshoot common HMC setup problems.
The following topics contain information about common problems that might occur during the setup of the
Hardware Management Console (HMC). The topics also contain common resolutions to those problems. The
first topic applies to the HMC in general. The second topic applies to the remote client.
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Using the HMC remote command line
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Setting up the HMC
Problem: You configured the HMC as a DHCP server, but the HMC did not automatically discover the
managed system.
Resolution: This usually indicates that the managed system was connected to a power source before
the HMC was configured as the DHCP server. This situation caused the managed system to initialize
to its IP address to the default values (HMC1 as 192.168.2.147 and HMC2 as 192.168.3.147) instead
of waiting for an address from the HMC.
To correct the configuration on the model 185/75 server or the ESCALA PL 3250R or ESCALA PL
6450R managed servers, contact your service provider.
To correct the configuration for the model ESCALA PL 250T/R, ESCALA PL 450T/R, and ESCALA PL
850R/PL 1650R/R+ managed servers, complete the following tasks:
1. Shut down the managed system by pressing and holding the power button.
2. Remove the connection between the managed system and its power source.
3. Reconnect the managed system to its power source. The HMC automatically discovers the
managed system.
If you had changed the IP address of the service processor using the ASM interface, use the
appropriate procedure for your model:
Model ESCALA PL 250T/R
1. Shut down the managed system by pressing and holding the power button.
2. Remove the connection between the managed system and its power source.
3. Remove the connection between the HMC and its power source.
4. Remove the service processor assembly as instructed in the Remove the model ESCALA PL
250T/R service processor assembly topic. Begin with the step following "Disconnect the
power source...". When you have removed the service processor, proceed to the next step.
5. To reset the service processor assembly, move both service processor reset toggle switches
A from their current position to the opposite position. See Figure 1.
Figure 1. Model ESCALA PL 250T/R service processor switch
6. Reinsert the service processor into the managed system. For instructions, see Replace the
model ESCALA PL 250T/R service processor assembly.
7. Reconnect the HMC to its power source and start the HMC.
8. Log in to the HMC.
9. Reconnect the managed system to its power source. The HMC automatically discovers the
managed system.
Model 5/50:
1. Shut down the managed system by pressing and holding the power button.
2. Remove the connection between the managed system and its power source.
3. Remove the connection between the HMC and its power source.
4. The service processor switch is located beneath the second power supply. To access the
service processor switch, you must remove the second power supply. For instructions, see
Remove the model ESCALA PL 450T/R power supply .
5. To reset the service processor, move the service processor reset toggle switch A from its
current position to the opposite position. See Figure 2.
Troubleshooting HMC setup
85
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Figure 2. Model ESCALA PL 450T/R service processor switch
6. Reinsert the power supply into the managed system. For instructions, see Replace the model
ESCALA PL 450T/R power supply.
7. Reconnect the HMC to its power source and start the HMC.
8. Log in to the HMC.
9. Reconnect the managed system to its power source. The HMC automatically discovers the
managed system.
Model 5/70:
1. Shut down the managed system by pressing and holding the power button.
2. Remove the connection between the managed system and its power source.
3. Remove the connection between the HMC and its power source.
4. To remove the service processor assembly, follow the instructions in the Remove the model
ESCALA PL 850R/PL 1650R/R+ service processor assembly topic. Begin with the step
following "Disconnect the power source..." in the instructions. When you have removed the
service processor, proceed to the next step.
5. Reset the service processor by moving both service processor reset jumpers A from their
current position to the opposite position. See Figure 3.
Figure 3. Model ESCALA PL 850R/PL 1650R/R+ service processor switch
6. Reinsert the service processor into the managed system. See Replace the model ESCALA
PL 850R/PL 1650R/R+ service processor assembly.
7. Reconnect the HMC to its power source and start the HMC.
8. Log on to the HMC.
9. Reconnect the managed system to its power source. The HMC automatically discovers the
managed system.
Problem: Obtaining Bulk Power Controller (BPC) or Flexible Service Processor (FSP) IP addresses in a
private switched network using DHCP.
Resolution: Perform one the following tasks:
86
Troubleshooting HMC setup
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
◊ If spanning tree is enabled on the switch and you want it to remain enabled, the portfast
option must also be enabled. This setting will allow the switch to forward all packets from the
port onto the LAN immediately and not check the spanning tree first.
◊ Disable the spanning tree on the switch for the BPC or FSP ports.
Note: Different manufacturers might use different terminology regarding these settings. The switch
must be modified using portfast or other commands to accommodate connectivity delays. After
validating the exact ports on the switch that the FSP or BPC is using, a network administrator must
log in to the switch to make the changes to the specific ports.
Problem: After setting up the HMC, the managed system's status is Authentication Failed.
Resolution: This usually indicates that the managed system password was set prior to HMC
configuration. In this situation, the HMC does not recognize the managed system password and
cannot access the managed system. To correct this situation, update the password on the managed
system.
Installing the remote client
Problem: The wsmlinuxclient.exe or the setupsec1.exe file does not run.
Resolution: Modify the permissions on the file so that you have execute permissions. To modify the
permissions, type the following command at the command prompt:
chmod 755 filename
Problem: Changes do not take effect immediately after installing the Web-based System Manager Remote
Client or the remote client security on a Linux system
Resolution: Perform one of the following tasks:
◊ Log off your current session and log in again.
◊ Source your . /etc/profile file.
Problem: You receive an error message that you cannot complete a connection
Resolution: You may receive a message that looks similar to the following:
Cannot complete connection to hostname myhmc.
Possible problems are:
1. Host myhmc is not a valid hostname.
2. Host myhmc is not currently operating or is not connected to
the network.
3. Host myhmc is not running an operating system with a version of
Web-based System Manager that is compatible with your client version of Web-based
System Manager.
4. The time to connect could have exceeded the time limit set in the websm.cfg file
(remote_timeout).
5. The inetd subsystem on host myhmc may not have been initialized
on the 9090 port to start the WServer.
Additional information might be in the file /var/websm/data/wserver.log on host myhmc.
Possible solutions include the following tasks:
◊ The following reasons are most common for this message:
⋅ You might have exceeded the limit of remote connections allowed to the HMC you
are trying to access remotely.
⋅ By default, the HMC uses a connect port of 9090 to handle the initial login
communication. If you cannot enter your user ID and password, it means that you
cannot connect to the 9090 port. Often this is because too many sessions were
canceled incorrectly and the 9090 port is overloaded. Restart the HMC you are trying
to access remotely to cancel remote sessions that were incorrectly disconnected.
◊ Log on to the HMC you are trying to access remotely and verify that myhmc is the host name
of that HMC.
◊ Locate the HMC that you are trying to access remotely and verify that it is operating and
connected to the network.
◊ Ensure that the version of the Web-based System Manager of the HMC you are trying to
access remotely is the same version as the Web-based System Manager Remote Client.
◊ The time it takes for your remote client to connect to the HMC you want to manage remotely
has exceeded the time limit. To solve this problem, improve your connection speed. To do
this, you might have to change the way in which the remote client and the HMC you want to
manage remotely are connected.
Troubleshooting HMC setup
87
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Performing a File System Check on HMC Reboot
Problem: Failed file system check (fsck) displays the following error message, "Enter the root password or hit
Control-D to reboot."
Resolution: Perform the following task:
1. Type the root password.
2. Run a file-system check by entering fsck file system where file system is the name of the file
system that fails the file system check. When the checking is done, a prompt window opens.
3. Type reboot or press Control-D.
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Related information
View and print information related to the Adding the HMC topic collection.
Listed below are Web sites and ESCALA Power5 Hardware Information topics that relate to the Managing the
Hardware Management Console topic collection.
Web site
The Web-based System Manager Remote Client can be installed on AIX, Linux, or the HMC. For more
information about installing and using Web-based System Manager on AIX, see the Web-based System
Manager Administration Guide .
Other information
• Managing your server using the HMC
• Initial server setup
• Customer service and support
• HMC commands
Saving PDF files
To save a PDF on your workstation for viewing or printing:
1. Right-click the PDF in your browser (right-click the link above).
2. Click Save Target As... if you are using Internet Explorer. Click Save Link As... if you are using
Netscape Communicator.
3. Navigate to the directory in which you would like to save the PDF.
4. Click Save.
Downloading Adobe Reader
You need Acrobat Reader to view or print these PDFs. You can download a copy from the Adobe Web site
(www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html).
88
Related information
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Parent topic: Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Web site
89
Managing the Hardware Management Console (HMC)
90
Web site
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