Waldorf Kyra Owner's manual

Waldorf Kyra Owner's manual
USER MANUAL
Firmware 1.78
Table Of Contents
Table Of Contents
Foreword ........................................................................... 3
Parts and Multis ............................................................. 79
Control Features & Connections ..................................... 6
System Configuration .................................................... 86
Front Panel ............................................................................................... 6
Rear Panel Connections ...................................................................... 7
Kyra Sound Programming ........................................... 96
Troubleshooting ........................................................... 126
Specifications .................................................................... 8
Kyra USB Interface ...................................................... 131
Introduction ..................................................................... 10
Kyra Firmware Update ................................................ 131
Setup and Connections .................................................. 13
Technical Data .............................................................. 136
System Overview ............................................................ 18
Glossary ........................................................................ 137
Basic Controls ................................................................. 20
Product Support ........................................................... 156
The Control Panel Sections ........................................... 29
MIDI Implementation Chart ........................................ 157
Oscillator Groups .................................................................................33
Sub Oscillator 1 & 2 Controls .........................................................39
Filter Controls .......................................................................................45
Envelope Generator Controls.........................................................49
Amplifier Controls ..............................................................................52
LFO Controls ..........................................................................................54
Mod Matrix Controls ..........................................................................58
Effects Controls ....................................................................................62
Arpeggiator Controls .........................................................................62
2
Kyra Manual
Foreword
Foreword
compose for all 8 Parts making Kyra a true composer’s
workstation. Ultra-fast MIDI processing ensures timing
remains tight even with dense multi-part compositions.
Thank you for purchasing the Waldorf Kyra. You are the
owner of one of the most powerful music synthesizers ever
built. We designed Kyra as a tool to craft with, it is highly
capable instrument ready and waiting for you to experiment and create new sounds. Kyra comes with over a
thousand factory sounds that are ready to use in your
productions and performances as well as to provide a
great template for your own sound creations. The factory
sounds are just the starting point that merely scratch the
surface of what the instrument is capable of. Dive in and
experiment, your efforts will be rewarded with new and
exciting sounds, many of which would be very difficult to
create on other instruments. Kyra can cover a very wide
range of sounds from acoustic and electric pianos, lush
pads and strings as well as a wide range of synthetic
sounds.
Kyra is a true hardware synthesizer. It is not a software
application running on generic DSP (digital signal processor) devices but a complete custom-designed FPGA hardware engine built specifically for sound synthesis.
What to read?
The biggest problem with any manual is to find a way to
address the needs of absolute beginners and experts alike.
Some people read a manual cover to cover while others
don’t even touch it. Opting for the latter is a poor choice,
especially when the manual describes a Waldorf instrument!
Anyone reading this manual is in for a lot of fun while
learning about and working with the Waldorf Kyra.
Kyra is perfect for both performance and studio work. For
live performance, Kyra's superior capabilities, reliability,
interactivity and fast response make it eminently preferable to software synthesizers. For studio musicians, Kyra
offers 8 fully functional and independent multitimbral
Parts with the horsepower to back it up relieving your
DAW of fickle CPU-intensive plugins. With a generous and
transparent voice allocation algorithm it is realistic to
Your Waldorf Team.
3
Waldorf Kyra
Foreword
Notice
Waldorf Music is not liable for any erroneous information
contained in this manual. The contents of this manual may
be updated at any time without prior notice and firmware
updates may add, remove or change features. We made
every effort to ensure the information herein is accurate
and that the manual contains no contradictory information. Waldorf Music extends no liabilities regarding this
manual other than those required by local law.
This manual or any portion of it may not be reproduced in
any form without the manufacturer's written consent.
Please note that all elements of Kyra, its software, user
interface design, synthesis, filtering and effects algorithms
are proprietary © 2019 Waldorf Music GmbH.
Waldorf Music GmbH, Lilienthalstraße 7, 53424 Remagen,
Germany.
4
Kyra Manual
Foreword
Kyra Development Team
We would like to thank
Software + FPGA:
Manuel Caballero
Hardware/Housing:
Manuel Caballero, Frank
Schneider
Design:
Axel Hartmann
Manual:
Manuel Caballero, Holger
Steinbrink
Thomas Brenner, Karsten Dubsch, Willie Eckl, Joachim
Flor, Roger Keller, Jonathan Miller, Pierre Nozet, Miroslav
Pindus, Oliver Rockstedt, Vladimir Salnikov, Winfried
Schuld, Lukas Schütte, Michael von Garnier, Kurt ‘Lu’
Wangard, Rolf Wöhrmann, Haibin Wu and anyone we have
forgotten.
Sounddesign:
Manuel Caballero, Jürgen
Driessen, Siggi Müller, Luke
Terry
Revision:
Firmware 1.78, May 2020
Kyra's waves comprise almost the entire set of cycled
waves from the AKWF Waveforms set, kindly placed into
the public domain by Kristoffer Ekstrand / Adventure Kid.
The entire AKWF sample set can be downloaded from
https://www.adventurekid.se
5
Waldorf Kyra
Control Features & Connections
Control Features & Connections
Front Panel
1) OLED Display
4) Oscillator Groups
7) LFO Section
2) Patch/Multi Navigation
5) Filters Section
8) Arpeggiator Section
3) Transpose & Power
6) Envelopes Section
9) Effects Section
6
10) Modulation Matrix
Kyra Manual
Control Features & Connections
Rear Panel Connections
1)
Power Supply Jack
2)
Headphones Output
3)
Audio Line Outputs A-D
4)
MIDI Thru, MIDI Out, MIDI In
5)
USB 2.0 Connection
6)
Kensington® Compatible Receptacle
7
Waldorf Kyra
Specifications
Specifications
•
Processing: 32x oversampled 32-bit hardware
sound generation. 96kHz floating point sound
processing.
•
Line outputs: 4 balanced stereo pairs using 32bit DAC running at 96kHz sample rate.
•
USB audio: USB Audio Class 2.0 - 8 stereo 24-bit
streams at 96kHz with 48kHz downsample mode
available. Soundcard mode supporting the return
of a single 24-bit stereo audio stream from host
DAW.
•
MIDI: USB 2.0 and DIN (5-pin DIN connector)
•
Display: High resolution 256x64 pixel graphic
OLED
•
Polyphony: Guaranteed contention-free 128
voice channels. A Dual Mode or Dual Filter Patch
uses two voice channels per note played. Up to 32
notes (single or dual) per multitimbral part.
•
Multitimbrality: 8 independent Parts each with
dedicated 9 module multi effects with dedicated
audio stream via USB. Each Part can be mixed to
one of the four analogue stereo line outputs.
8
•
Microtuning: Full key microtuning capability
with MIDI Tuning Standard (MTS) support.
•
Oscillators: Two primary virtually aliasing-free
Oscillator Groups per voice each with sawtooth,
pulse, waves and noise available simultaneously.
Each Oscillator Group also has an independent
detunable oscillator with four selectable shapes
and two selectable pitches. Real Hard Sync, Ring
Modulation and FM (frequency modulation) is
available between the Oscillator Groups.
•
Hypersaw: Six real oscillator hypersaw with adjustable geometric detuning and intensity algorithm. In Dual Mode, the hypersaw has twelve real oscillator sources with an additional adjustable
stereo spread.
•
Cycled Waves: 4096 18-bit linear PCM singlecycle waves covering a huge range of synthetic
and emulated sound sources. Two independent
wave sources per voice. Hard sync, Ring Modulation and FM is possible on waves. Actual wave
shape is shown in the wave navigator.
•
Filters: Accurate emulations of classic analogue
ladder filters with low pass, band pass and high
pass configurations. 2-pole (12dB/octave) and 4pole (24dB/octave) responses are available for
Kyra Manual
Specifications
all three filter types. 128 Filters configurable for
single or dual parallel (true stereo) operation.
•
Envelope Generators: Three fast-response
ADSR envelope generators with slope setting.
One is assigned to the VCA, another to the filter
and the third can be freely assigned. All are
available in the Mod Matrix.
•
LFOs: 3 LFOs with 128 wave shapes. Monophonic, polyphonic, random, antiphase and quadrature stereo phase settings. MIDI clock sync
source. All LFOs available in the Mod Matrix. FM
between LFOs is possible.
•
Modulation Matrix: 6 channels with up to 3 destinations per channel giving a maximum 18 routings.
•
Effects: Nine module stereo effects unit per Part
with a 3-band shelving EQ, a Formant Filter, 5mode Distortion module, dual Limiters, stereo
Delay module, 6-stage Phaser with dedicated stereo multishape LFO, Chorus/Flanger module
supporting comb and doubling effects and a Reverb module. All 72 effects modules can be used
simultaneously without affecting polyphony.
•
Arpeggiator: 128 preset patterns, chord mode
and the ability to synchronise to MIDI clock.
•
9
Patch storage: 3,328 in total all of which are user programmable. Any Patch can be recalled via
MIDI program changes and bank select commands.
Waldorf Kyra
Introduction
Introduction
About this Manual
Highlighted Control Features and Parameters
This manual was written to help you to become familiar
with the Waldorf Kyra synthesizer. It will also help experienced users discover exciting new features.
All of the Kyra’s buttons, controls and parameters are
highlighted in bold letters throughout the manual.
Examples:
To avoid confusion, the terminology in this manual is based on the Kyra parameter names. You will find a glossary
at the end of this manual; it explains the various terms
used.
•
Press the System Edit button.
•
Turn the Filter Frequency control.
Kyra’s different modes and pages are illustrated by a depiction of the display.
We also use a uniform set of symbols to show you topics of
particular interest or significance. Important terms are
highlighted in bold letters.
Symbols
s
Caution – The information that follows this symbol
will help you avoid errors, data loss or malfunctions.
r
Info – Additional Information on a given topic.
g
Example – Hints for how to get the best results
from Kyra and real-world examples to try out.
10
Kyra Manual
Introduction
General Safety Guidelines
s
Power Supply
Please read the following safety tips carefully! They
include several precautions you should always observe when dealing with electronic equipment. Read
all of the instructions before operating your device.
Recommended Operating Conditions
•
Use the device indoors only.
•
Never use the device in damp conditions such as
bathrooms, washrooms, or around indoor swimming pools.
•
Only use the power cable that came with the Kyra.
•
Unplug the device when you are not using it for
longer periods.
•
Never touch the plug with wet hands.
•
Always pull the plug when unplugging the device
- never the cable.
Operation
•
Never place objects containing liquids on or near
the device.
•
Do not use the device in dusty or dirty environments.
•
Place the device on a stable base only. Use a suitable platform.
•
Make sure that adequate ventilation is available
on all sides of the device.
•
•
Do not place the device near heat sources such as
radiators.
Make sure no foreign objects find their way into
the chassis. If for some reason this occurs, switch
the power off, unplug the device, and consult a
Waldorf authorised service centre.
•
Do not expose the device to direct sunlight.
•
•
Do not expose the device to extreme vibrations.
This device can generate volume levels that may
do irreparable damage to your hearing when
used with amplifiers, speakers, or headphones.
For this reason, you should keep the volume at
safe levels.
11
Waldorf Kyra
Introduction
Maintenance
•
Do not open the device or remove the cover. Refer all service and repair tasks to Waldorf approved service personnel. Kyra contains no user
maintainable parts.
•
Use only a dry, soft cloth or brush to clean the device. Never use cleaning solutions or similar
chemicals. They will damage the surface of the
chassis.
Proper Use
This device is designed exclusively for musical performance. Any other use is prohibited and voids the warranty
extended by Waldorf Music. Waldorf Music is not liable for
damages due to incorrect use.
s
Do not place your Kyra anywhere near children,
mothers-in-law or pets. This could lead to critical interaction.
12
Kyra Manual
Setup and Connections
Setup and Connections
To connect Kyra to your system:
1.
Turn all units off.
The Waldorf Kyra package comes complete with:
2.
Connect Kyra’s Out A audio output pair to your mixing console or your computer audio interface. Optionally, connect stereo headphones to the Headphone
Output on Kyra or your mixing console.
3.
If you are using a computer, connect the Kyra’s USB
2.0 port with a USB cable to your computer (Windows
or macOS). Windows users will need to install the Kyra USB driver first. Once connected, Kyra becomes
available as a MIDI and audio device.
4.
Optionally, you can connect the Kyra’s MIDI ports to a
computer MIDI interface or to other MIDI devices. You
can also use the computer or a sequencer to make use
of Kyra’s MIDI features. Connect a MIDI master keyboard to Kyra or use the connection to your computer
to play Kyra via MIDI.
•
the Waldorf Kyra synthesizer
•
an external power supply 12V DC/2A
•
a printed Quickstart manual
Please ensure all the above items were included. If something is missing, contact your dealer.
We recommend that you keep the original packing material for future transport.
Installation
Unpack and place Kyra on a clean, even surface.
Connections
5.
In order to get started with your Kyra you will need an AC
power outlet, a mixing console (optional), an amplifier, an
audio interface and/or an audio monitor such as active
speakers or headphones.
Connect the power supply that came with the Kyra to
a suitable AC power outlet.
6.
Once all the connections are made, press both the
Transpose buttons to power up Kyra. After a few seconds, Kyra will be ready to use.
You can also use a computer or sequencer to make use of
Kyra’s MIDI features.
7.
Then switch on your computer (if connected), the
mixing console and finally the amplifier or active monitor speakers.
13
Waldorf Kyra
Setup and Connections
USB Setup
r
Kyra's USB implementation supports Windows 7 onwards
as well as macOS. macOS users do not need to install a
driver but until Windows fully supports USB Audio Class
2.0 (UAC2), Windows users must install the provided driver before using the USB connection; install the driver
before connecting the USB port for the first time. It is important to ensure your computer operating system is updated with the latest service packs and updates before
installing the driver.
If you are not using a mixing console, you can
connect Kyra’s line outputs directly to an a stereo
amplifier or an audio interface. Please use line-level
inputs (not a guitar, phono or microphone level input).
r
Kyra’s line outputs deliver balanced line levels. For
best results, always use balanced inputs on your
amplifier, mixer or audio interface. Use good quality
balanced (TRS) cables. You can use unbalanced
cables and inputs but the connection will be much
more prone to interference, especially for longer
cables.
r
For Windows driver download please go to:
waldorfmusic.com/kyra
r
Being class compliant, Kyra is Linux friendly but we
didn’t test Kyra with Linux as there’s so many possible Linux configurations.
s
Important Notes
r
Kyra takes just a few seconds to start up after which
it is ready to play.
r
The overall volume of Kyra (line outputs and
headphones) can be controlled with the Master Volume control.
14
Before connecting and disconnecting Kyra to power
and switching on or off, turn your amplifier’s volume
control all the way down to avoid any damage due to
on/off transient noise. Please take care to ensure the
connected device (mixer, amplifier) is compatible
with the high level of an electronic instrument. Do no
use a microphone, guitar or phono input on your
amplifier.
Kyra Manual
Setup and Connections
Rear Panel Connections
Headphone Output
Kyra is a stereo instrument. For best results, use a stereo
input on your mixer. If your mixer does not have stereo
inputs, use two channels and pan them hard left and right
to achieve stereo operation.
Kyra offers a convenient stereo headphone jack. As Kyra
has 8 Parts complete with effects and an onboard mixer, it
is possible to compose a complete song without any outboard audio equipment (e.g. a mixer or amplifier) purely
by using the headphone output. In a typical setup though, a
mixer (either analogue or digital in the form of a DAW)
would be useful for most projects. For recording, please
use the line out connectors and avoid recording from the
headphone output or using it as a line out. Also note that
only Parts assigned to Output A will be heard on the
headphone output - the headphone output is a mirror of
analogue Output A. Use the Master Volume control to set
the level of the headphone output (as well as the stereo
line outs).
Power Control
To switch Kyra on:
Press both the Transpose buttons to power up
Kyra. After a few seconds,
Kyra will be ready to use.
To place Kyra into standby:
r
Press and hold both Transpose buttons. The Transpose
LEDs will show a sequence to indicate the progress and
Kyra will go into standby once the sequence completes.
You can release the buttons at any time during the sequence to cancel. The standby sequence ensures you don't
inadvertently power down Kyra.
15
We recommend you use good quality stereo
headphones with a nominal impedance of 32 ohms
with Kyra.
Waldorf Kyra
Setup and Connections
The line outputs use components often found in high end
hi-fi including audiophile grade Japanese capacitors and
ultra-low noise operational amplifiers. As a result, the
outputs are of exceptionally high quality and have a high
dynamic range.
Line Outputs
Kyra offers four balanced, stereo outputs which are
connected to four internal stereo busses A to D. Each of
Kyra's 8 Parts can be assigned to one of these outputs. By
default, all Parts are assigned to Bus A (and hence Output
A and the headphone jack). Multiple outputs allow you to
process the audio with a mixer and outboard equipment
(e.g. effect units) with total freedom to assign the Parts as
desired.
USB Port
Kyra offers a USB 2.0 device connector to
allow connection to a computer. Kyra’s USB
can exchange MIDI information, send the
audio from each of its 8 stereo Parts to a
computer and receive one stereo audio
return from the computer. Note that a USB
2.0 connection (or above) is required; Kyra
will not connect to a legacy USB 1.x port
(also known as 'low speed' or 'full speed').
Connect both connectors of each output pair used to ensure the complete stereo signal is available. If your mixer
only has mono inputs, use two inputs and pan them hard
left and right to ensure the stereo signal is maintained.
Kyra does not detect a missing connector and mix down to
mono and connecting just one side of a stereo pair may
result in some sounds being lost.
When using an external mixer, set Kyra's Master Volume
control to its maximum level and use the mixer's trim and
fader controls to obtain the correct levels. This, along with
the use of good quality balanced cabling, will ensure the
best quality signal.
16
r
Until Windows provides full support for USB Audio
Class 2.0, Windows users will need to install the Kyra driver before being able to use Kyra's USB port.
Only versions of Windows 7 onwards are supported.
Apple macOS users do not need to install a driver.
r
For driver download please go to:
waldorfmusic.com/kyra
Kyra Manual
Setup and Connections
provides full support for DIN MIDI if your setup requires it.
One good use for DIN MIDI is for simple ‘at the keyboard’
playing (i.e. no computer). As keyboards and sound modules (including Kyra) only have Type B USB connectors,
you can’t connect a keyboard directly to Kyra using USB
but you can with DIN MIDI. Any USB-based configuration
requires the use of a computer with a suitable MIDIcapable application installed on it.
Kyra has a robust USB port designed to be resistant to
accidental disconnection. Be sure to unplug the cable by
holding the connector body rather than the cable itself.
r
Please ensure you user a USB 2.0 (or above) port on
your computer as well as a USB 2.0 certified cable to
avoid problems with data transmission (MIDI and
audio).
MIDI Jacks
Physical Security
Kyra offers a full MIDI implementation using 5 pin DIN
MIDI connectors. Connect these to your MIDI-equipped
devices such as a master keyboard, DAW/sequencer or
other instruments.
Users operating Kyra in areas with public or
shared access such as live gigs, public studios or
educational establishments can attach a Kensington® compatible security lock to the slot on the
rear panel of Kyra.
For best performance in a studio environment, we recommended you operate Kyra using USB MIDI. USB on Kyra
operates over 30 times faster than DIN MIDI. This allows
you to perform complex compositions with embedded
MIDI Systems Exclusive messages that would be beyond
the capability of DIN MIDI without loss of timing. Kyra
17
Waldorf Kyra
System Overview
System Overview
Audio Outputs
The diagram below shows how Kyra’s 8 Parts map to USB
for audio and MIDI as well as to the four stereo line outputs. For simplicity, only two Parts are shown in full. Note
how Kyra’s audio path is completely stereo. You’ll learn
more about this in the Sound Programming section.
Introduction
Kyra features 8 independent 'Parts'. Each Part is effectively
a complete synthesizer with sound sources, filters, modulators, multi effects unit and USB audio output. The only
resource they share are the line outputs and the pool of
128 hardware voices. Each Part has its own configuration
and hosts a Patch from the pool of Patches available to the
system. Kyra is truly multitimbral.
MIDI
Each Part has an assigned MIDI channel and will only
respond to channel messages on its assigned channel. A
Part can have the same MIDI channel as another Part. In
this case, the Parts are 'layered' and will sound together in
response to channel messages. You can use Part note ranges ('splits') such that Parts can be restricted to ranges of
MIDI notes. Kyra supports MIDI via DIN MIDI connectors
and USB.
r
Kyra features four stereo outputs labelled from A-D. By
default, Kyra’s audio for all Parts is routed to Output A but
you can change a Part‘s routing to any one of the four
outputs, regardless of how many other Parts are using that
same output (so if more than one Part is sent to the same
output, they are mixed together). Multiple outputs offer
the ability to connect Kyra to a mixer and/or outboard
You can use USB and DIN MIDI at the same time but it
is important not to send MIDI data on the same channel to both ports – doing so is likely to cause stuck or
missing notes.
18
Kyra Manual
System Overview
resolution than the Master Volume control is able to
achieve.
effects units to further extend possibilities. The headphone
output mirrors Output A. Bear in mind that any Part configured to use an Output other than A will not be heard on
the headphone output.
Patch Banks
Kyra has a generous Patch storage capacity of 26 banks (AZ) each containing 128 Patches. That's a total of 3328.
Finally, notice that Output A can be selected to produce
audio from Kyra or from your DAW (Soundcard Mode).
You can learn more about this in the section on USB Audio.
The first 7 banks (A-G) are 'User' Patches stored in RAM
(Random Access Memory) which means you can change
them quickly and individually using the Store sequence.
The remaining 19 banks (H-Z) are ROM (Read-only Memory) Patches which you can recall and use just like RAM
Patches, but you can't replace using the Store sequence.
You can freely copy whole banks between RAM and ROM.
Master Volume
The Master Volume control is used to adjust the levels of
the line outputs. The control has two purposes:
•
To set a comfortable listening level when using
Kyra's headphone output
•
To provide adjustment in live scenarios when the
outputs are connected to an amplifier that is not
within easy reach or to an unattended mixer.
You can use any of the Patches in your live performances
by selecting the Bank and Patch using the dedicated Bank
and Patch buttons. Similarly, you can select any of the
Patches from your master keyboard or DAW by using MIDI
Bank Select messages to select the Bank and MIDI Program
Change messages to select the Patch. Consult the manual
for your master keyboard/DAW for help with Bank select
messages
In all other cases, the Master Volume control should be
set at or near its maximum setting.
The setting is automatically stored. Use the Patch Level
setting to provide level matching between Patches as well
as to provide modulation effects that target the Patch level.
Use Part levels to mix the relative volumes of the Parts.
These can both be modulated smoothly at a much higher
s
19
Here at Waldorf we know how much time it takes to
craft Patches. Please remember to back up your
Patch banks.
Waldorf Kyra
Basic Controls
Basic Controls
Use the Part buttons to select the current Part - the display
will change to show the status of the selected Part.
r
Power Control
You can return to the home page at any time using
the Exit button.
To power Kyra up, press both the Transpose buttons
simultaneously.
Kyra will power up and be ready for use in a few seconds.
It might take a few extra seconds to start if there has been
a software update or a Patch bank copy instruction.
To place Kyra into standby mode, press and hold both the
Transpose buttons simultaneously.
Use the Page Up/Down and Cursor Up/Down buttons to
navigate the pages for each of the three Edit Modes Kyra
can operate in, namely Patch, Multi and System Edit. To
return to the Home page, press the Exit button.
To prevent inadvertent shutdown, you'll need to hold the
buttons down for about five seconds; the transpose LEDs
will indicate the progress of the shutdown. You can release
the buttons at any time before the shutdown occurs to
cancel the process.
If Follow Mode is engaged (Follow button lit), the display
will switch to show the parameter being edited when a
control is used (i.e. a control or a button). If Follow mode is
not engaged, the display will stay as it is (unless the parameter being edited happens to be on the display).
Display Screen
The display is the primary user interface for Kyra. The
display is updated in real time to show the status of the
synthesizer.
Note that if a parameter is changed by MIDI and it is being
displayed, the value shown will change to reflect the change made by MIDI. MIDI updates will not cause the display
to switch though, regardless of the Follow Mode.
When Kyra starts, the home page is shown. This page
shows the status of the currently selected Part.
20
Kyra Manual
Basic Controls
Rotary Controls
System Controls
Kyra‘s rotary controls provide real time
control over many of the instrument‘s
parameters. Most controls carry two parameters, a primary and a secondary parameter. The primary parameter is controlled when Shift Lock mode is off (Shift
Lock button LED off) and the parameter
controlled is that described under the
control. The secondary parameter is controlled when Shift
Lock is on (Shift Lock button LED on) and the parameter
controlled is that described above the control. Some controls have no secondary function and controls in the
Effects section have up to six different controlled parameters depending on the Effects Select mode selected with
the Effects button.
The System control buttons are located at the centre of the
control panel beside the display. These buttons provide
access to the core control features of Kyra.
Page Buttons
The two Page buttons are used to navigate
the pages in the Edit Path of the current
Edit Mode. Note that Kyra does not hide any
pages, so some pages appear that may not
be relevant to the current configuration
(e.g. wave parameters when the Patch is in
Hypersaw Mode). The Edit Path will cycle
round if the first or last page are navigated
past. The Page buttons only operate in Edit Mode and are
not used otherwise.
A few controls have an additional secondary function only
when the Oscillator Groups are in Hypersaw Mode. These
controls have bold blue labels.
Cursor Up/Down Buttons
The Cursor buttons fulfil a
similar purpose to the Page
buttons but move the cursor
one parameter at a time
rather than one page at a
time. Scrolling the cursor off the top or bottom of the page
will move to the previous or next page, respectively. You
It is possible to set values accurately with the rotary controls but if you want a precise value, a good strategy is to
set the approximate value with the rotary control and then
use the Value buttons to nudge the value to exactly the
right number. The two sets of controls work well with each
other.
21
Waldorf Kyra
Basic Controls
otherwise any changes you made will be lost if you change
the Patch or Multi.
can use the Cursor Down button as a shortcut to enter
Patch Edit Mode.
Value Buttons
The Value buttons adjust the
value highlighted by the
cursor when in Edit Mode.
You can adjust most Patch
values using the controls and
buttons but all parameters, including those not related to
Patches, can also be adjusted using the Value buttons.
Note that the Value buttons are useful for making small
adjustments to Patch values leaving the rotary controls for
larger changes and then nudging the last one or two value
changes with the Value buttons. The Value buttons select
the character under the cursor in Text Edit mode. The
Value buttons support auto-repeat to allow fast changes to
parameters. Simply press and hold the button for a second
or so to engage auto-repeat.
Exit Button
The Exit button ends the current edit session and returns to the home page. Exit
itself does not discard any changes but you
will need to save your Patch (or Multi)
22
Kyra Manual
Basic Controls
for this. When switched off, changing a parameter will not
cause the page to switch. Finally, you can move more than
one control at the same time but if the parameters are on
different pages, having Follow Mode on will cause the
display to flip between the pages. In this situation, switch
off Follow Mode.
Edit Buttons
The Edit buttons engage one of the three
Edit Modes by changing to the first page
in the relevant Edit Path. An Edit Path is a
sequence of pages used to control one of
the three core settings groups within Kyra,
namely, Patch, Multi and the System configuration. Sequential presses on an Edit
button will step through the key pages of
the Edit path. Note that changing any
parameter will enter Patch or Multi Edit
mode automatically. Use the Exit button to
return to the home page.
Almost all Follow Mode page changes will engage Patch
Edit Mode as most controls relate to Patch parameters but
there are some exceptions. For example, Transpose is a
Part parameter so using the Transpose buttons whilst in
Follow Mode will engage Multi Edit Mode and switch to the
Multi Edit page. You can always use the Exit button to
return to the Home page.
Follow Button
Undo Button
The Follow button toggles Follow Mode
on and off. The button lights to indicate
Follow Mode is engaged.
Undo reverts the last made Patch edit.
Undo is single level only, so if you press
Undo again it will 'redo' and change the
value back to the edited value. So, you can
use Undo to compare the effects of a parameter change by
repeatedly pressing Undo.
When in Follow Mode, changing any control will engage
Edit Mode and cause the display to switch to the page
hosting the parameter so you can see the change you are
making. In most cases this is useful but if you are editing
one group of parameters using the Value buttons and
want to make a quick change to another parameter without losing your context, switching off Follow Mode allows
Note that the base value (the value Undo will revert to) is
the value of the parameter as it was when it was first
changed. So, if you change a parameter and then change it
again, Undo will revert to the original value. Undo only
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Waldorf Kyra
Basic Controls
works for Patch parameters, it does not apply to Multi or
Configuration changes. Undo is useful for inspecting Patch
parameter values. If you want to check the value of a parameter, check you're in Follow mode and press the button
or turn the control that controls the parameter you want
to inspect. Then press Undo. This will ensure the display
shows the original, effective value of the parameter. Undo
still works if you're not in Follow Mode, the only difference
is the display won't change to show the parameter.
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A final use of Undo is to reverse an inadvertent or unexpected change in a parameter.
Store Button
You can press Exit at any time in the process to
cancel without storing (the changes made are still in
the Edit Buffer up until the time you change the
Patch/Multi or power Kyra down).
The Store button also lights during a firmware update. It is important not to power Kyra down at this
time.
As Kyra uses a proportional font, it is possible for
some characters in a Patch name to be truncated. If
this happens, please consider using a shorter name
for the Patch.
You can use the Cursor Up/Down buttons to back up in
the store sequence so that you can change which Patch (or
Multi) you're going to overwrite. In the second step, the
location and name of the Patch/Multi you're going to
overwrite is displayed so you can check you're not
overwriting something you want to keep.
The Store button starts the sequence to
write the current Patch of the current
Part (if in Patch Edit or no edit mode)
or the current Multi (if in Multi Edit
mode) to memory. The Store button
will light when the store sequence is in progress. The display will guide you through the steps involved including
the last stage, Text Editor Mode, which allows you to give a
Patch (or Multi) a name.
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Kyra Manual
Basic Controls
(for Parts and Multis) are lost when Kyra is powered
down.
If you've made an edit to a RAM Patch and want to quickly
save your change over the existing Patch, simply press the
Store button four times in a row to update the Patch and
return to the Home page. Be careful when editing ROM
patches (banks H-Z) as it is not possible to store Patches
back in these banks and the Store sequence will default to
A-0. Be sure to select the correct destination Patch in one
of the RAM banks (A-G) during the Store sequence.
If you edit a Patch that is loaded into more than one Part,
the changes will be reflected in the Edit buffer of all Parts
hosting the Patch. If you want the Patches to be independent on each Part, make a copy of the Patch and select it in
to the relevant Part.
Front panel controls are always responsive and any changes made to a Patch right up until the last stage of the Store
sequence is done will be stored along with the Patch; you
can still make changes (including inadvertent ones) during
the Store Sequence. As Follow Mode is disabled during the
Store sequence, you may not realise you changed something inadvertently so be careful not to accidentally nudge
any controls. If you do, exit the Store sequence and use
Undo to back out the change before storing the Patch.
Even though you can't store a Patch directly to ROM you
can copy whole Banks of Patches to (and from) ROM using
the Copy Patch Bank function.
Each Part maintains a Patch Edit buffer and Kyra maintains a single Multi Edit buffer. As front panel controls are
manipulated, these changes are reflected in the Edit buffer
of the current Part (as shown on the bottom row of the
display). As there is an Edit Buffer per Part, changing the
current Part does not discard the edits you made to the
Part that was selected before but note that changes are not
stored until the store sequence is completed for the specific Part that was changed.
Finally, note that it can take a few seconds for Kyra to
commit a Patch or Multi to memory. You can keep playing
and editing other Patches during this time but don't power
Kyra down during this time otherwise you may lose your
changes. This includes changes made by MIDI such as
received SysEx Patch dumps.
Storing a Multi does not result in the Patch Edit buffers
being stored; even though you can have all eight Parts with
pending changes it makes sense to store them (or discard
them by recalling the Patch) before you move to the next
Part. If you don't do this, it is easy to lose track of which
Parts you changed and forget to store them. Edit Buffers
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Waldorf Kyra
Basic Controls
Changing the Multi will, therefore, instantly reconfigure all
8 Parts. The current Multi is shown on the bottom line of
the home page. If Shift Mode is enabled, the Multi buttons
skip by ten rather than by one.
Shift Lock Button
The Shift Lock button toggles Shift Mode
and allows access to the second function
that most controls have. To ease singlehanded operation, the Shift Lock button
latches (push on, push off) and has an LED to indicate its
status. It is worth getting into the habit of knowing what
state Shift Lock is in to avoid inadvertently changing a
parameter although the change won't be stored unless you
go through the Store sequence and you can always undo
the change. Shift Mode can be in either state for controls
that only have one function.
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Part Buttons
The Part buttons allow you to
select which Part is the current
Edit Target. In other words,
which Part will be 'connected'
to the Front Panel. You can
move freely between the Parts
using the Part buttons and
make changes as required to
each Part although remember to use the Store sequence on
each Part changed if you want to keep the changes. A Store
sequence will only save the changes made to the Patch in
the current Part. The current Part is shown on the bottom
line of the home page. Be sure to check it is as expected
when working on more than one Part at a time. If what you
hear doesn't seem to match what you are editing, check
that the current Part is the one you are working with.
Shift Mode is automatically disengaged when you
use the Exit button to revert to the home page.
Navigation Controls
Multi Buttons
The Multi buttons allow you to
select the current Multi. A Multi
is a stored configuration of all 8
Parts including references to (as
opposed to copies of) the Patches loaded into the Parts at the
time the Multi was stored.
The Part buttons also fulfil a third function of selecting
capital 'A' (left Part button) or lower case 'a' (right Part
button) when in Text Editor Mode.
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Kyra Manual
Basic Controls
of the Home page. The Patch buttons support auto-repeat
and wrap round the 128 Patches in a Bank. Note that
changing Patch (using the Patch buttons or via MIDI) will
discard any changes that were made to the current Patch
unless you had stored them using the Store sequence beforehand. If Shift Mode is enabled, the Patch buttons will
move through the Bank in steps of ten but will not wrap
round. You can only change Patches (including the Bank)
when the Home page is displayed. Press Exit at any time to
return to the home page.
Bank Buttons
The Bank buttons allow
you to select the Bank
from which Patches are
selected. Changing the
Bank will change to the
Bank selected by selecting the current Patch
number (0-127) in the
new Bank. To differentiate them from Patch numbers,
Banks are assigned a letter A-Z and the current Bank is
shown on the top line of the Home page. The Bank buttons
do not operate when the Category Filter is active.
The Patch name is shown in the centre part of the home
page.
When the Category Filter is enabled, the Patch buttons
select the next or previous Patch and Bank of the category
selected in the category filter (regardless of which Bank it
is in). The category selection on the Home page flashes to
indicate that the category filter is active. Note that if the
Category Filter is set to a category for which no Patches
exist, the Patch select buttons revert to their standard
function of selecting the next or previous Patch regardless
of category.
In Text Editor Mode, the left Bank button will Insert a
space at the cursor position and the right Bank button will
delete the character at the cursor position and close the
gap. These controls are very useful for rapid creation and
editing of Patch names.
Patch Buttons
The Patch buttons allow
you to select the Patch to
be loaded into the current
Part. The current Part is
displayed on the top line
In Text Editor Mode, the left Patch button moves the cursor left and the right Patch button moves the cursor right
to allow rapid navigation to any part of the Patch name.
27
Waldorf Kyra
Basic Controls
function. A benefit to having a transpose for each Part is
that you can easily configure Parts to play in different keys
(or octaves), even if they are on the same MIDI channel (i.e.
layered).
Transpose Buttons
The Transpose buttons
allow the current Part to
be transposed - either in
octave or semitone steps.
Finally, note that transposing shifts the pitch notes play at.
You may have to adjust the filter tracking key of your Patch
relies on the pitch of the oscillators and filters tracking
accurately. Transposing has an immediate effect and does
not stop any current notes playing so you can use it during
a performance. The LEDs indicate the octave range of the
current transposition. The centre LED, when lit at full
brightness, indicates no transpose is in effect for the current Part. It lights at reduced brightness, along with one of
the octave range LEDs to indicate that a key change is in
effect (i.e. a transposition by a value other than a complete
octave). An LED lit without the centre LED indicates an
octave transpose is in effect but there is no key change.
This means that when transposing in semitone steps, the
LEDs might not change as the octave could be unchanged.
If Shift Mode is not engaged, these buttons will
transpose the currently
selected Part in one octave steps. If Shift Mode is engaged, the Transpose buttons
will transpose in semitone steps instead. The maximum
amount of transposition is two octaves (24 semitones)
either side of the base note key.
Note that transpose is not a Patch parameter. It is a Part
parameter and by transposing, you are modifying the Part.
This value will only be stored if you store the current Multi. Otherwise, the change will be lost when the Multi is
changed or the unit is powered down (although it is retained when a Patch is changed as it is not a Patch parameter). Recall that because each Part has its own transpose
settings, if you want to transpose all Parts to a new key (or
octave) you'll need to change the transpose setting in all
active Parts - you may wish to do this on your master keyboard or in your DAW instead as the front panel transpose
feature is intended more as a single Part performance
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28
The Transpose buttons are also used to start Kyra
up and put it into standby.
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
The Control Panel Sections
Mode. Two filters are used in Dual Mode Hypersaw but the
second filter is managed automatically.
The Voice Controls
Master Volume
Dual Mode
The Master Volume control sets the overall volume of the line outputs (including
the headphones output). Note that Master
Volume is a System Configuration parameter and the value set is used next time Kyra
is powered up. Use the Master Volume
control to set a comfortable listening volume on your headphones. Set Master Volume at its maximum setting when using an external mixer. The Master Volume control has a relatively coarse
0.5dB granularity. A slight stepping may be heard on very
deep pads if the Master Volume is changed.
The Dual Mode button configures the
voice for Dual Mode that uses two hardware voices for additional depth, stereo
width and presence. Dual Mode can
apply to a Wave or Hypersaw Patch. Please refer to the
section on Sound Programming for more information.
Changes to Dual Mode take effect when new notes are
played. When Dual Mode is selected, you can detune the
two voices using the Dual Detune function.
Dual Filter
Portamento
The Dual Filter button configures the
voice for Dual Filter Mode that uses two
parallel filters to provide a true stereo
signal path. Selecting Dual Filter Mode
will also select Dual Mode as Dual Filter mode similarly
uses two hardware voices per note. Please refer to the
section on Sound Programming for more information.
Setting Dual Filter Mode will switch Voice Mode to Wave
Sets the portamento time of the Patch. The portamento
time is the time taken for a note to glide to its target pitch
(i.e. the note played). The time is independent of the interval that needs to be spanned (so larger intervals will move
faster to achieve the configured time). Turn this control to
zero to switch off portamento. In Mono Play Mode, portamento only occurs if notes are played legato. Staccato
notes suspend any selected portamento.
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Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
Voice Control Pages and Parameters
Dual Mode
The Voice Control Pages can be accessed by pressing the
Patch Edit button. The first of the three Voice Control
pages is shown below:
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Panorama
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You can adjust the Patch Volume setting using the
Master Volume control with Shift Mode engaged.
Use Patch Volume to match the relative levels of patches.
You can automate the Patch Final Level parameter using
MIDI CC messages or the Mod Matrix for smooth fade
ins/fade outs.
Voice Mode
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You can adjust Panorama using the Portamento
control with Shift Mode engaged.
The Panorama setting controls how far from centre the
two voices of a Dual Mode Patch are spread apart. In Dual
Mode, the two voices will be panned apart around the
point configured in by the Patch Pan control. The width of
that panning is set by the Panorama control. At zero, the
Dual Mode sound will be based around a single point in the
stereo stage. At maximum setting (the default) the two
voices will be panned in opposing positions to achieve
maximum stereo width. Keep this at a high setting unless
you need to specifically limit the width of a Dual Mode
Patch. If you need to limit it significantly it might be worth
reviewing if the Patch needs to be in Dual Mode at all. At
zero setting, there is no stereo imaging and the rich stereo
width, which is the primary benefit of Dual Mode, will be
absent. Note that the Panorama control is applied before
any effects so narrowing the width does not narrow the
stereo effects subsequently applied to the Patch. When
Patch Volume
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Please see the description of the Dual Mode button.
Please see the descriptions of the voice mode buttons (Wave Mode and Hypersaw Mode).
30
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
configured for Dual Mode, Kyra provides a complete stereo
signal path.
Hard Sync
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The second of the three Voice Control pages is shown
below:
Please see the description of the Hard Sycn function.
Key Mode
Key Mode has no physical control and is only available on
the Voice Control page. Key Mode limits the Part to only
play a single note at a time (monophonic). This is useful for
specific sounds such as basses. If the Patch has any portamento, it will only glide for notes played legato - staccato
notes will suspend the portamento effect.
Portamento
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For normal polyphonic play, ensure this is set to Polyphonic. Enabling the Arpeggiator will switch off monophonic
key mode.
Please see the description of the Portamento control.
The third and final Voice Control page is shown below:
Bend Range
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You can adjust the Bend Range using the EG1/3
Attack control with Shift Mode engaged.
This control sets the range (in semitones) applied by the
channel Pitch Bend controller for the Part. The bend range
can be between 0 and 12 semitones. The zero setting is
provided so that the Pitch Bend control can be used for
alternative purposes via the Mod Matrix.
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Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
The Aux Oscillator is in fact two oscillators, one located in
each of the Oscillator Groups. The Aux Oscillator can be
configured to produce white noise or a ring modulated
product of the waves in each Oscillator Group. As a result,
a Patch can have white noise or ring modulation but not
both.
Filter Configuration
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Please see the description of the Dual Filter button.
Filter 1 / 2 Balance
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You can adjust the Filter 1 / 2 Balance using the
filter Resonance control with Shift Mode engaged.
Dual Mode Detune
Sets the balance between the two filters. This only has any
effect if Dual Filter Mode is engaged. If it is, negative values
will mix Oscillator Group 1's signal path higher, positive
values will mix Oscillator Group 2's signal path higher. The
default value of zero, which is the centre point of the control's range, balances the two signal paths equally. At either extreme, only one of the Oscillator Groups will be
heard. Filter Balance is a Mod Matrix destination.
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You can adjust Dual Detune using the EG1/3 Release control with Shift Mode engaged.
This control sets the amount of Dual Mode Detune applied
to a Dual Mode configuration. This allows you to detune
the two voices in a Dual Mode configuration by up to half
semitone (50 cents) in each direction relative to the basic
pitch of the note. One of the voices is flattened and the
other is sharpened by the same interval configured by Dual
Mode Detune.
Modulating Filter 1 / 2 Balance via the Mod Matrix
is a very creative technique.
This adds considerable depth and movement to Dual Mode
Wave Patches. Dual Mode Detune is a polyphonic Mod
Matrix destination. It’s a good idea to add at least a small
amount of detuning to all Dual Mode Wave Patches to
avoid them sounding hollow and ‘phasey’.
Aux Oscillator Mode
This function has no physical control. A fast way to navigate to this parameter is to press the Patch Edit button and
then the Cursor Down button twice.
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32
With a Dual Mode Patch, Try routing channel pressure (aftertouch) or Velocity to Dual Detune.
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
Oscillator Groups
tely to two filters. If Dual Filter Mode is not selected, two
filters are still used for stereo operation but they are controlled by the settings for Filter 1 so there is one Filter to
configure but a true stereo signal path. Stereo LFOs can
still modulate the two filters independently in Dual Mode.
Kyra has several sound sources that are grouped into two
independent Oscillator Groups. Within in each Oscillator
Group there are several sound sources (oscillators) which
can be used to craft sounds. All the oscillators in an Oscillator Group have the same frequency (pitch) except the Sub
Oscillator which can be one octave lower and can be
detuned as well. It is possible to detune the pitch between
the two Oscillator Groups.
If Dual Filter Mode is selected, the signal routing is the
same but the two filters can be controlled individually
using the Filter 1 and Filter 2 controls in the Filter section.
Between them, these settings allow for a lot of flexibility in
signal routing.
The Voice Oscillator Mode Buttons
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The Wave Mode and Hypersaw Mode
buttons select how Kyra’s oscillators are
configured.
Hypersaw Mode
Please refer to the Sound Programming section for
more information on Wave Mode.
Use the Hypersaw Button to configure the voice for Hypersaw Mode. Kyra's hypersaw uses a special algorithm
comprising six real oscillators to create lush soundscapes
quickly. Hypersaw Mode replaces Wave Mode's two Oscillator Groups with a single source whose tonal content is
constructed with just two controls, Intensity and Spread.
Built entirely out of multiple, harmonically-rich sawtooth
waves (referred to as 'partials') each adjusted according to
a special algorithm, the Hypersaw provides characteristic
soundscapes ideal for a range of uses from high impact
lead sounds through to lush, animated pads.
Wave Mode
Use the Wave Mode button to configure
the voice for Wave mode. Kyra adopts a
virtual analogue synthesis model which has the advantage
that it is easy to construct sounds using intuitive subtractive synthesis.
By default, the two Oscillator Groups in the voice are
mixed together and routed to a single filter, Filter 1. If Dual
Mode is selected, the Oscillator Groups are routed separa33
Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
When Dual Mode is selected, the hypersaw algorithm is
doubled to use twelve oscillators and two filters are used
for a true stereo signal path.
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Oscillator Group 1 Controls
The Panorama control allows you to configure
the width of the stereo hypersaw.
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Please refer to the Sound Programming section for
more information on Hypersaw Mode.
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You can’t activate Dual Filters Mode for a Dual Mode
Hypersaw. In Dual Mode Hypersaw, the two filters
are controlled together as Filter 1.
Select
The Oscillator Group Select button allows quick access to
the Oscillator Group 1 parameters for inspection or modification. Each press of the button will scroll through the
page groups that display the Oscillator Group's parameters. Use the Cursor Up/Down buttons to access intermediate pages.
Tune
The Tune control sets the pitch of Oscillator Group 1 in
semitone steps from minus two to plus two octaves (relative to the pitch the note should be for the MIDI note play34
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
ed). Note that there is no detune control (or parameter) for
Oscillator Group 1 as it is the root pitch although detune
does exist for Oscillator Group 1 as a Mod Matrix destination.
In Wave Mode, the Pulse Width control sets the pulse
width of the pulse component of the Oscillator Group.
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Saw Level
Pulse Width
Using the Mod Matrix for routing the Random per
Note source to Detune is a great way to make
tracks sound more varied and ‘humanised‘. Remember to apply it to both Oscillator Groups in
Wave Mode voices.
In Wave mode, the Saw Level control sets the basic level of
the sawtooth component of the Oscillator Group.
Wave Level
In Wave mode, the Wave Level control sets the level of the
wave component of the Oscillator Group.
Hard Sync
The Hard Sync button selects hard sync (hard synchronisation) between the two Oscillator Groups. Note that Aux
and Sub Oscillators are not synchronised when hard sync
is enabled; the sub Oscillator can always be tuned independently. Selecting Hard Sync when FM is in use (nonzero amount) is not recommended as the two algorithms
are contradictory and do not produce a useful result (usually out of tune) when used together. Hard Sync applies
only in Wave Mode.
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Pulse Level
In Wave Mode, the Pulse Level control sets the level of the
pulse component of the Oscillator Group.
There’s more information about Hard Sync in the
Sound Programming section of this manual.
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Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
Oscillator Group 1 & Hypersaw Pages
LFO1 to Pitch
You can navigate to the Oscillator Group 1 Control page
using the Oscillator Group 1 Select button or by changing a
control in the group with Follow Mode engaged. All parameters shown have physical controls.
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This control sets the amount of hard-wired modulation
from LFO1 to Pitch. It is only effective in Wave Mode. Please use the LFO1 to Pitch control in Oscillator Group 1 to
apply modulation to the hypersaw.
Remember that the Oscillator Groups modulations are
independent so if you apply a modulation, such as LFO1 to
Pitch, to Oscillator Group 1, it does not affect Oscillator
Group 2. If you want both groups to be modulated in the
same way (e.g. the same pitch modulation using LFO1 to
Pitch) you must set the modulation in both Oscillator
Groups. This gives you maximum flexibility as you can
modulate the two groups by different amounts to get all
sorts of useful effects.
Oscillator 1 Coarse Tune
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 1
Tune control.
Oscillator 1 Wave2 FM
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This controls sets the amount of FM (frequency modulation) of the three core Oscillator Group 1 source (sawtooth,
pulse and wave) from Oscillator Group 2's wave.
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You can adjust amount of LFO1 to Pitch using the
Saw Level control with Shift Mode engaged.
Applying stereo LFOs and different modulating
shapes to Oscillator Pitch can produce some amazing effects.
There’s more information about FM on Kyra in the
Sound Programming section of this manual.
36
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
Sets the level of the Auxiliary (Aux) Oscillator. The Aux
Oscillator produces noise (an unpitched sound) or the
output of the Ring Modulator depending on the Aux Oscillator function selected on the Voice Control page.
Sawtooth Level
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 1
Saw Level control.
Oscillator 1 Pulse Width
Wave Level
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 1
Wave Level control.
LFO2 to Pulse Width
Pulse Level
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 1
Pulse Level control.
You can adjust amount of LFO2 to Pulse Width
using Pulse Width control with Shift Mode engaged.
Sets the amount of Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) from
LFO2.
Aux (Noise or Ring Mod) Level
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Please see Oscillator Group 1 controls.
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You can adjust Aux Level using the Pulse Level
control with Shift Mode engaged.
37
Modulating the Pulse Width using a modulator
(such as an LFO) is an all-time classic synthesizer
technique. Kyra provides a hard-wired routing
from LFO 2 or a flexible routing via the Mod Matrix.
Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
Wave Group & Wave Number
Hypersaw Intensity
The Hypersaw Intensity control sets the intensity of the
Hypersaw. The algorithm operates by rolling off the hypersaw partials as they deviate from the root frequency. The
intensity control sets the rate of that rolloff. Higher settings result in a stronger presence of more partials yielding a more intense hypersaw.
The Wave Navigator for the Oscillator Group can be accessed by pressing the Oscillator Group 1 Select button until
the navigator is shown (three times from the Home page).
Use the Wave Navigator to select the wave required for
Oscillator Group 1. The 4096 cycled waves are grouped by
genre to make selection easier. For your reference, the
page also shows the waveform of the cycled wave selected.
Hypersaw Spread
The Hypersaw Spread control sets the spread of the Hypersaw. The algorithm operates by deviating (detuning)
the frequency of the hypersaw partials from the fundamental note. The spread control sets the amount of deviation between the partials. Note that Hypersaw Spread is a
Mod Matrix destination and can therefore be modified by
any modulation source. This is a very effective technique.
Hypersaw Sub Oscillator
When switched on, the two partials furthest from the fundamental are played one octave lower. This gives the hypersaw sound extra bass presence. There is no physical
control for the Hypersaw Sub Oscillator.
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Hypersaw controls are effective only if the voice is
configured for Hypersaw Mode.
38
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
Sub Oscillator 1 & 2 Controls
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As the Subs can be detuned from their parent Oscillator Group, they offer great potential for ‘phattening‘ sounds. Please be sure to make use of them.
Note that the Subs and their controls are only used
when the voice is configured for Wave Mode (they
are not related to the Hypersaw sub-oscillator).
Sub Shape
Selects one of the four distinctive waveshape options for
the Oscillator Group's Sub Oscillator. The shapes available
are sawtooth, square, pulse and triangle.
Sub Level
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Sets the level of the Oscillator Group's Sub Oscillator.
The two Oscillator Groups each have an independent
Sub Oscillator (‘Subs‘). As the parameters and controls for the two Subs are identical, they’re only
described once here; just remember there are two of
them.
Sub Octave
Selects whether the oscillator plays at the same pitch as
the host Oscillator Group (‘root’) or one octave below
(‘sub’).
39
Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
Sub Oscillator Page
Sub Oscillator Detune
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The fastest way to navigate to the Sub Oscillator
page is to select the Sub shape already set (lit) by
pressing the relevant Sub Shape button.
You can adjust the Sub Oscillator Detune using the
relevant Sub Level control with Shift Mode enabled.
The Sub Oscillator Detune control sets the amount of
detuning (relative to the parent Oscillator Group) of the
Sub Oscillator. The amount of detuning can be up to half a
semitone either side. Negative values will flatten the Sub
Oscillator and positive values will sharpen it.
The page shown is for the Oscillator Group 1 Sub Oscillator
but the page for the Oscillator Group 2 Sub Oscillator is
similar.
Sub Oscillator Level
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Please see the description of the relevant Sub Level
control.
Sub Oscillator Shape
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Please see the description of the relevant Sub Shape
buttons.
40
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
ters. Use the Cursor Up/Down buttons to access intermediate pages.
Oscillator Group 2 Controls
Tune
The Tune control sets the pitch of Oscillator Group 2 in
semitone steps from minus two to plus two octaves (relative to the pitch the note should be for the MIDI note played).
Detune
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The Detune control sets the pitch of Oscillator Group 2
from -50 cents (flatten by one semitone) to +50 cents
(sharpen by one semitone).
The operation and controls of Oscillator Group 2 are
similar but not identical to that of Oscillator Group 1.
For certain functions such as Hard Sync, FM and
Ring Modulation, Oscillator Group 2 has a different
role to Oscillator Group 1. The basic architecture of
the two Groups is the same though.
Pulse Width
In Wave Mode, the Pulse Width controls sets the pulse
width of the pulse component of the Oscillator Group.
Select
Saw Level
The Oscillator Group Select button allows quick access to
the Oscillator Group 2 parameters for inspection or modification. Each press of the button will scroll through the
page groups that display the Oscillator Group's parame-
In Wave mode, the Saw Level control sets the basic level of
the sawtooth component of the Oscillator Group.
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Wave Level
Oscillator 2 Detune
In Wave mode, the Wave Level control sets the level of the
wave component of the Oscillator Group.
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Pulse Level
LFO1 to Pitch
In Wave Mode, the Pulse Level control sets the level of the
pulse component of the Oscillator Group.
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Oscillator Group 2 Control Pages
You can adjust amount of LFO1 to Pitch using the
Saw Level control with Shift Mode engaged.
This control sets the amount of hard-wired modulation
from LFO1 to Pitch. Unlike most of the controls in the
Oscillator Group, this parameter applies to Wave and Hypersaw Mode configurations,
You can navigate to the Oscillator Group 2 Control page
using the Oscillator Group 2 Select button or by changing a
control in the group with Follow Mode engaged. All parameters shown have physical controls.
Remember that the Oscillator Groups modulations are
independent so if you apply a modulation, such as LFO1 to
Pitch, to Oscillator Group 2, it does not affect Oscillator
Group 1. If you want both groups to be modulated in the
same way (e.g. the same pitch modulation using LFO1 to
Pitch) you must set the modulation in both Oscillator
Groups. This gives you maximum flexibility as you can
modulate the two groups by different amounts to get all
sorts of useful effects.
Oscillator 2 Coarse Tune
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 2
Detune control.
Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 2
Tune control.
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gApplying
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stereo LFOs and different modulating
shapes to Oscillator Pitch can produce some amazing effects.
Modulating the Pulse Width of a pulse wave using a
modulator (such as an LFO) is an all-time classic
synthesizer technique. Kyra provides a hard-wired
routing from LFO 1 or a flexible routing via the Mod
Matrix.
Oscillator 2 Pulse Width
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Sawtooth Level
Please see Oscillator Group 2 controls.
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LFO2 to Pulse Width
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You can adjust amount of LFO2 to Pulse Width using
the Pulse Width control with Shift Mode engaged.
Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 2
Saw Level control.
Wave Level
Sets the amount of Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) from
LFO2.
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 2
Wave Level control.
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The Control Panel Sections
Pulse Level
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Please see the description of the Oscillator Group 2
Pulse Level control.
The Wave Navigator for the Oscillator Group can be accessed by pressing the Oscillator Group 2 Select button until
the navigator is shown (three times from the Home page).
Use the Wave Navigator to select the wave required for
Oscillator Group 2. The 4096 waves are grouped by type to
make selection easier. For your reference, the page also
shows the waveform of the cycled wave selected.
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Filter Controls
Filter Type
The six Filter Type buttons set the current filter response
type. The options are: low pass 2 pole (12dB LP), low pass
4 pole (24dB LP), band pass 2 pole (12dB BP), band pass 4
pole (24dB BP), high pass 2 pole (12dB HP) and high pass
4 pole (24dB HP).
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Filter Frequency
This section describes the function of Kyra’s filters.
The Filter Frequency control sets the cutoff frequency for
the low pass and high pass filter types and the centre frequency for the band pass filter types.
Filter Select 1 & 2
The two Filter Select buttons select which filter the Filter
Group rotary controls apply to. Filter 2 controls only apply
when Dual Filter mode is selected. The Filter Select buttons are also useful for accessing the Filter parameters
quickly; repeated presses of the Filter Select buttons will
scroll through the pages related to the Filter selected.
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Please refer to the section on Sound Programming
for more information on the filter types.
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The Filter Frequency can be controlled using fixed
routings of MIDI CC #85 for Filter 1 and MIDI CC
#86 for Filter 2.
Filter Resonance
Press the relevant Filter Select button repeatedly to
inspect the settings for a filter.
The Filter Resonance control sets the resonance of the
filter. Higher values boost the harmonics around the cutoff
frequency of the filter. Note that higher values can cause
large resonant peaks and ultimately, self-oscillation within
the filter. You will need to account for this when setting
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levels to avoid distortion in the Limiters although such
distortion can be useful at times.
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The Filter Resonance can be controlled using fixed
routings of MIDI CC #87 for Filter 1 and MIDI CC
#88 for Filter 2.
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EG2 to Frequency
Kyra’s filters come to life when they are modulated.
A wide range of hardwired modulations are provided and you can always add more possibilities using the Mod Matrix.
EG2 is designed for filter modulation and has hardwired routes for that purpose. You can of course use
the EG for other purposes via the Mod Matrix. The
description of the Filter EG controls can be found in
the EG section.
Filters 1 & 2 Pages
This control sets the amount that Envelope Generator 2
(EG2) modulates the current filter's cutoff frequency. For
positive settings, the filter cutoff frequency is increased by
the modulation of the envelope, for negative settings, the
cutoff frequency is decreased. Use this parameter to change the filter frequency over time. Sounds with a hard attack usually have a positive envelope amount that makes
the start phase bright and then closes the filter to get a
darker sustain phase. String sounds, on the other hand,
usually use a negative envelope amount that gives a slow
and dark attack before the cutoff rises in the sustain phase.
The pages and descriptions below describe Filter 1.
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46
The parameters, controls and pages for Filter 1 and
Filter 2 are identical so only Filter 1 is described here.
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
Filter Type
LFO2 to Cutoff Frequency
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Please see the description of the Filter Type buttons.
Filter Cutoff Frequency
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The LFO2 to Cutoff Frequency setting determines the
amount that LFO2 modulates the current filter cutoff frequency. LFO modulation is positive bipolar only. If negative LFO modulation is required, use an anti-phase LFO or
Mod Matrix routing. If unipolar modulation is required, use
a Mod Matrix routing.
Please see the description of the Filter Frequency
control.
Filter Resonance
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Please see the description of the Filter Resonance
control.
LFO3 to Cutoff Frequency
This parameter has no physical control and is only available in the corresponding Filter page. This control is identical
to the LFO2 to Cutoff Frequency control (which does
have a physical control) but uses LFO3 as the modulation
source rather than LFO2.
EG1 to Cutoff Frequency
This parameter has no physical control and is only available in the corresponding Filter page. This control is identical
to the EG2 to Cutoff Frequency control (which does have
a physical control) but uses EG1 as the modulation source
rather than EG2.
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EG2 to Cutoff Frequency
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You can adjust the LFO2 to Cutoff Frequency setting using the EG2 to Frequency control with Shift
Mode engaged.
With so many hardwired filter modulations available, you won’t need to use valuable Mod Matrix slots
for the majority of routine filter modulation tasks.
Please see the description of the EG2 to Frequency
control.
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Cutoff Frequency Key Follow
This parameter is only available in the Filter pages, it does
not have a physical control. It controls the tracking amount
of the filter. Filter tracking is a mechanism to match the
filter to the frequency of the note being played so that the
harmonic content of notes similar regardless of the note
played.
Key Follow Root Key
This parameter is only available in the Filter page, it does
not have a physical control. Use the Root Key to assign the
MIDI note that the filter frequency is tied to and the Key
Follow Amount to adjust the slope (adjustment to the
frequency by MIDI key) around that.
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In most cases, you can leave these controls at their
default settings so that the filters track the MIDI key
with a standard slope.
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Kyra Manual
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Envelope Generator Controls
Attack
The Attack setting determines the attack rate for the
selected EG. This is amount of time it takes for the EG
output to go from zero to maximum level.
Decay
Overview
•
EG1 is dedicated to modulating the Amplifier.
The Decay setting determines the decay rate for the
selected envelope generator. This is the amount of time it
takes for the EG output to drop from maximum level to
reach the Sustain level.
•
EG2 is dedicated to modulating the Filter
Sustain
•
EG3 is available for general modulation
The Sustain setting determines the sustain level of the
selected EG. This level is held so long as the note is held.
Kyra provides three Envelope Generators (EGs).
All the Envelope Generator pages are part of the EG page
sequence which is described in this section.
Release
The Release setting determines the release rate for the
selected EG. This is the amount of time it takes for the EG
output to go from the sustain level to zero after the note is
released.
Amp & Aux EG Select Buttons
The Amp and Aux EG Select buttons select which EG is
configured by the four controls to the right of the buttons.
The buttons are also useful for navigating to all three EG
pages to inspect the parameter values.
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Use the EG Amp and EG Aux buttons to navigate to
all three EGs easily. To select EG2 just press EG Amp
select button twice.
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EG Controls in the Filters Section
Sustain
EG2 is designed to provide filter modulation and has a
dedicated set of controls. Despite being intended for filter
modulation, you can use EG2 as a general purpose modulation source just like the other EGs.
The Sustain setting determines the sustain level of EG2.
This level is held so long as the note is held, unless a nonzero slope value is set.
Release
The Release setting determines the release rate for EG2.
This is the amount of time it takes for the EG output to go
from the sustain level to zero after the note is released.
Envelope Generator Pages
You can navigate to the page for any of the three EGs using
the EG Select buttons, as described above. If Follow Mode
is engaged, changing any EG control will switch to the
relevant EG page.
Attack
The Attack setting determines the attack rate for EG2. This
is amount of time it takes for the EG output to go from zero
to maximum level.
Decay
The Decay setting determines the decay rate for the EG2.
This is the amount of time it takes for the EG output to
drop from maximum level to reach the sustain level.
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Kyra Manual
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parameter. This parameter adjusts the rate of change
during the sustain period of an EG. Unlike the attack, decay
and release transitions, the slope is linear. The default
value of zero switches off the slope such that the EG outputs a constant sustain level so long as the note is held.
Positive values will cause the EG sustain output to gradually increase and negative values will cause the sustain output to gradually decrease. Larger values, either positive or
negative, cause an increase in the rate of the slope. At
lower settings, the slope transition can be as long as 60
seconds.
Attack
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Please see the description of the Attack control.
Decay
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Please see the description of the Decay control.
Sustain
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Please see the description of the Sustain control.
Release
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Please see the description of the Release control.
Slope
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You can adjust the Slope setting using the Sustain
control with Shift Mode engaged.
This parameter controls the slope of the EG. Kyra’s EGs
build on the basic ADSR envelope format to include a Slope
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Amplifier Controls
LFO1 to Amplifier
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The quickest way to navigate to the Amplifier Control page is to press the EG1 Select button and then
the Cursor Up button twice.
You can adjust the LFO1 to Amplifier setting using
the filter EG2 Decay control in the Filter section
with Shift Mode engaged.
Limiter Curve
This setting determines the amount of modulation of the
amplifier (tremolo) by LFO1.
The Input Limiter has three selectable curves offering
increasing levels of compression. Please refer to the section on Sound Programming for more information about
Limiters and compression in general on Kyra.
LFO2 to Pan
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For most Patches, you can leave compression its
default setting of Medium.
This setting determines the amount of modulation of the
pan position by LFO2.
Stereo Pan
This setting determines the Patch Pan position.
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You can adjust the LFO2 to Pan setting using the
filter EG2 Release control in the Filter section with
Shift Mode engaged.
Velocity Scaling
You can adjust the Stereo Pan setting using the
filter EG2 Attack control in the Filter section with
Shift Mode engaged.
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You can adjust the Velocity Scaling setting using the
filter EG1 Decay control in the Amplifier section
with Shift Mode engaged.
This setting determines the amount of velocity scaling
applied to the amplifier. A setting of zero means no velocity scaling is applied and all notes play at full level. A maxi-
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mum value of 127 allows for a full range of note levels
depending on key velocity. The graphs below illustrate the
effect of increasing velocity scaling:
Amplifier Pages
Limiter Curve
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Please see the description of the Limiter Curve
control.
Stereo Pan
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Please see the description of the Stereo Pan control.
LFO1 to Amplifier
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Please see the description of the LFO1 to Amplifier
control.
Waldorf Kyra
The Control Panel Sections
LFO Controls
LFO2 to Pan
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Please see the description of the LFO2 to Pan control.
Kyra offers three Low-Frequency Oscillators (LFOs). Each
LFO can be used for modulation purposes and generates a
periodic waveform with adjustable rate and shape.
Velocity Scaling
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The following sections briefly describe the function of the
controls.
Velocity ScalingPlease see the description of the
Velocity Scaling control.
LFO Select Buttons
Use the LFO Select buttons to select which LFO the Shape
and Rate/Delay controls affect. You can also use the LFO
Select buttons to navigate to the relevant LFO page for
inspection of the parameters, the buttons light to indicate
the LFO is selected. The LEDs above the buttons blink to
indicate the rate of the LFO.
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Kyra Manual
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Shape
LFO Pages
The Shape control selects the basic LFO shape of the selected LFO. 128 shapes are available including basic sine,
square, triangle and sample & hold (random) and other
more complex shapes. A useful waveform diagram shows
the LFO wave shape. With 128 shapes available, there’s a
lot of potential for creative modulation.
You can navigate to the LFO pages using the LFO Select
buttons as described above. Additional LFO pages can then
be reached by using the Cursor navigation buttons. If
Follow Mode is engaged, changing an LFO control will
switch the display to the relevant LFO page.
The main page for LFO1 is shown below. The pages and
parameters for the other LFOs are similar (LFO3 has fewer
parameters).
You can go beyond the 128 shapes available and achieve
complex, evolving LFO waveforms by configuring frequency modulation (FM) on the LFOs by routing the output of one LFO to the LFO rate of any LFO including itself
using the Mod Matrix.
Rate
The Rate control sets the rate (frequency) of the selected
LFO. If the LFO is configured for external sync via MIDI
clock, this control does not have any effect (unless the
MIDI clock is missing).
Shape
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LFO Rate can be varied from 0.1 Hz to 12.8 Hz in 0.1 Hz
steps or, for LFO 1 and LFO 2, from 0.4 Hz to 51.2 Hz in 0.4
Hz steps. Kyra’s LFOs can be accurately synchronised to
MIDI clock. As mentioned above, the LEDs above the LFO
Select buttons flash to indicate the LFO rate.
Please see the description of the Shape control.
Rate
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Please see the description of the Rate control.
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The Control Panel Sections
(antiphase, 180 degrees out of phase) on the second voice.
The Patch must be in Dual Mode for this setting to work,
otherwise it will operate as per Monophonic. This option is
not available for LFO3.
Mode
The Mode setting controls how the LFO operates. These
modes add considerable flexibility to the use of the LFOs
so take some time to understand the options:
Monophonic - the LFO runs freely and with no regard to
note events. This is the default and suitable for modulations that should always be in phase and apply to all notes
on the Part.
Dual Quadrature – As with Dual antiphase but the LFO
outputs run in quadrature (90 degrees out of phase). The
Patch must be in Dual Mode for this setting to work,
otherwise it will operate as per Monophonic. This option is
not available for LFO3.
Polyphonic - the LFO phase applied to a new note is reset
to the value configured by the LFO Phase setting when the
note starts and thus the LFO phase can be different for
each note played. This, in effect, turns the LFO into a repeating mini-EG.
As Dual Mode configurations are inherently stereo, the
dual LFO settings can produce stunning stereo effects
when applied to destinations such as pitch, pulse width,
hypersaw spread, pan or the filters (even if Dual Filter
Mode is not enabled).
Random Phase - the LFO phase is set to a random value
when the note starts so that the LFO phase will be different
for each note played. This is useful for adding movement to
pads and string ensembles when applied to parameters
such as pitch, pulse width, amplitude (tremolo) or pan.
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g
g
A small amount of delay on the LFO will remove
any attack clicks that can occur when an LFO starts
at non-zero phase.
Dual Mode must be selected for the Dual (stereo)
LFO modes to be effective.
Be sure to make good use of Kyra’s stereo LFOs.
You can achieve some wonderful animated stereo
effects with Kyra’s advanced LFO modes.
Delay
This setting determines the ramp-up delay period of the
LFO. A value of zero means there is no delay, higher values
Dual Antiphase - The LFO runs freely (Monophonic) but
when Kyra is in Dual Mode, the LFO output is inverted
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will result in a longer ramp-up time. This parameter is not
available for LFO3.
not detect a valid MIDI clock when it is configured to use
MIDI clock, the LFO will run at its configured rate instead.
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Range
You can adjust the Delay setting using the LFO Rate
control with Shift Mode engaged.
The Range setting, available for LFO 1 and LFO 2, selects
the rate range for these LFOs. The Standard setting configures the LFO to operate in the range of 0.1 Hz to 12.8 Hz
in 0.1 Hz steps. The Extended setting configures the LFO to
operate in the range 0.4 Hz to 51.2 Hz in 0.4 Hz steps.
Clock
The Clock setting configures the timebase for the LFO.
When set to Internal, the LFO operates using the rate configured with the LFO’s Rate control. The MIDI settings
synchronise the LFO to an incoming MIDI Clock signal with
the configured beat division. MIDI clock must be enabled
on your master device (typically a sequencer/DAW) for
this to work. Check the settings for your sequencer – MIDI
clock is usually off by default.
Phase
The Phase control allows the starting phase of the selected
LFO (LFO 1 or LFO 2, LFO 3 does not have phase adjustment). The LFO must be in Polyphonic mode for the Phase
setting to have any effect.
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You can adjust the Delay setting using the LFO Rate
control with Shift Mode engaged.
Before selecting a MIDI clock option for an LFO, ensure
MIDI clock is configured in the MIDI Configuration pages
by selecting the correct MIDI port (USB or MIDI) to match
the source of the MIDI clock. If for any reason the LFO does
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Mod Matrix Controls
To use the Mod Matrix effectively, you should be aware of
the distinction between monophonic (channel or per
Part) and polyphonic (per note) agents.
Overview
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The Mod Matrix Select button provides
quick access Kyra‘s Mod Matrix (Modulation Matrix) functions. Each press on the
Mod Matrix Select button moves to the
next Mod Matrix channel (there are six
channels available). The LEDs above the
Select button indicate which of the six
Mod Matrix channels are in use in the
current Patch.
An agent is any of the sources or destinations that
participate in the Mod Matrix.
In the case of sources, a monophonic source is a source
that is generated at the channel level. Typical examples of
a monophonic source would be channel aftertouch or the
mod wheel. There is only one and you would expect it to
apply to all notes on the channel.
On the other hand, a polyphonic source is one that is specific to a note. The most obvious examples of this are velocity and polyphonic pressure. Each note has its own
velocity and you would reasonably expect that velocity to
only apply to that specific note.
Kyra offers a wide range of modulation
sources and destinations. The connection
between a modulator and a destination is
called a route. Kyra offers many preset modulation routes
(called hardwired routes) and these are typically the most
used ones. As an example, the Oscillator Groups offer a
LFO1 to Pitch as a hardwired modulation route. Use the
hard modulators if they serve the purpose you require. If
you need more flexibility, look to the Mod Matrix. You can
use the hardwired routes and Mod Matrix in any combination you wish, the permutations are virtually limitless.
A source is either monophonic or polyphonic. The exception is the three LFOs - LFOs are both monophonic and
polyphonic - when applied to a polyphonic destination,
they provide polyphonic modulation. When applied to a
monophonic destination, they provide monophonic modulation (specifically, per-note phasing is not applied).
The same concept applies to destinations. There are monophonic destinations such as the effects module parame-
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would route three different modulation values to the single effects module which would not do anything useful and
probably cause a glitch. Note that LFOs are also classified
as monophonic destinations - they can have a different
phase for each note but all the other parameters such as
rate and shape are common for all notes on the Part.
ters. There is only one Effects Unit per Part and therefore it
to applies to all notes on that Part, not specific notes.
On the other hand, a polyphonic destination is one that is
specific to a note. An obvious example would be filter
cutoff frequency. As would be expected of any polyphonic
synthesizer, Kyra has a filter for each voice and it is
reasonable to assume modulation would be per note.
For this reason, Kyra does not support routing polyphonic
sources to monophonic destinations but it does support
routing monophonic sources to monophonic and polyphonic destinations. Remember that LFOs can be applied as
monophonic and polyphonic sources, simultaneously, and
they will adapt to the destination selected.
At first glance, only a monophonic source should modulate
a monophonic destination and only a polyphonic source
should modify a polyphonic destination. But that would be
overly and unnecessarily restrictive. Consider a situation
where you would route channel pressure (aftertouch) AND
an envelope generator to filter cutoff. It is a common configuration and it is reasonable to expect it to work. Each
note would have a 'twang' from the envelope generator
modulation but all notes would take a basic cutoff frequency from the channel pressure - so as you push down
on the keybed, all the notes twang brighter. In this situation you have both a monophonic (channel level) modulator
and a polyphonic (per note) modulator routed to a polyphonic destination.
If you configure any of these unsupported combinations,
they will have no effect.
To assist you in making valid routings, small icons are
displayed on the Mod Matrix pages (the pages where you
select the sources and destinations). These remind you
what the type of each agent is. For sources, a 'P' badge
indicates a polyphonic source. All destinations are polyphonic except those related to LFOs and Part effects.
This makes sense and Kyra supports it. What would not
make sense is to route a polyphonic source to a monophonic destination. For example, consider the example of
routing velocity to the wet/dry mix of an effects module.
What would it do if you played a three-note chord? It
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MIDI Note Number Source
This source is a value that represents the MIDI note played. Use it to modulate parameters over the range of the
keyboard. One particularly useful application is to route it
to Pan. With the right settings and configuration of the Pan
control itself, it allows you to spread an instrument out
over the stereo field depending on the note played. Consider a stereo miked grand piano - on certain recordings it is
possible, owing to the size of the instrument, to hear the
notes move across the stereo field depending on the note
played. This routing allows you to emulate that. Other uses
would include reducing decay and release times for higher
notes on a piano and reducing the level of higher notes to
balance out resonant effects. The source can also be used
to achieve unusual key tunings (including fixing pitch
across the keyboard), although microtuning is the best
way to achieve accurate key tuning variations.
The Random per Note Source
Random per note is a useful source that generates a random value on each note event on the Part. It is very useful
for 'humanizing' sounds as it allows you to apply a slight,
random per-note detuning and other variations per note as
would be typical with traditional musical instruments.
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Generic MIDI Controller Sources
In the modulation sources, you'll see generic MIDI controller sources marked as 'MIDI controller #n'. These are
sources available for you to use as you wish. Most DAWs
allow you to 'paint' in controllers and many master keyboards allow you to assign MIDI controllers to its front
panel controls. Use these sources to take advantage of this.
Random per Note is useful for making tracks sound
less mechanical.
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The number following the hash/pound is the actual MIDI
controller value to use in your DAW or master keyboard.
Most DAWs will allow you to paint in other MIDI modulators such as polyphonic pressure so you can use these
resources even if your keyboard doesn't support them
directly.
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Use the MIDI CC# inputs to the Mod Matrix to enable your DAW or master keyboard to modulate just
about any parameter on Kyra.
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Effects Controls
Effects Controls
The controls cover most, but not all, of the parameters for
each of the Effects Modules. A few additional parameters
are available in the effects pages and can be adjusted using
the Value buttons when selected. To locate these parameters, use the Effects Select buttons to select the effect and
then locate the parameter with the Parameter Up/Down
buttons. You can then use the Value buttons to change the
parameter.
Kyra has comprehensive Effects (FX) Unit on each of its
eight Parts. The Effects Unit comprises nine stereo effects
modules. The function of the five controls in the Effects
group depend on which of the Effects Modules is selected
(some modules share a selection).
The Effects Unit provides considerable opportunity to
shape and process the final sound coming from each Part
ready for final output. Live musicians can use the effects to
provide ready-to-play, straight into the amp/board sounds
without the need for outboard and studio musicians can
similarly use the effects to achieve live-feel, mix-ready
sounds without outboard effects or tying up their DAW
with effects plug-ins. The USB audio streams and multiple
outputs allow the best of both worlds in that you can freely
choose between internal and outboard effects as you wish.
Effects Select Buttons
The Effects Select buttons selects each of the Effects Modules in turn. The function of the five rotary controls in the
Effects section are determined by which Effects Module is
selected. The selection wraps round so you’re never more
than four button pushes away from the effect you want to
inspect or change.
Effects are an integral part of a Patch. Therefore, each
Patch can have its own effects configuration and will always sound the same regardless of which Part the Patch is
loaded into. With 9 effect modules on each of the 8 Parts,
you have no less than 72 modules available simultaneously.
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Most of the parameters for the effects can be controlled via
the Mod Matrix. This opens a wide range of possibilities.
effects is fixed and can't be changed. Many effect parameters are available as destinations in the Modulation Matrix.
Top class outboard effects and plug ins will have more
options than the built-in effects so on occasion it can make
sense to use a combination of internal and outboard units.
Kyra's comprehensive Effects Unit allows the synthesizer
to produce mixes ready for final mastering straight from
the output jacks or a mixing desk. This saves time and
valuable processor load on your DAW and/or the need for
outboard hardware effects. However, should you wish to
use outboard or plug-in effects for one or more Parts, Kyra
offers total flexibility either via by using the line outputs
connections as effects sends or via USB direct to your DAW
with selectable per-Part effects defeats provided.
To help with setups like this, you can selectively defeat
(bypass) the internal effects on a per-Part basis, so you can
apply outboard effects without having to modify Patches.
For example, you could dedicate one or more of Kyra's
stereo outputs to be effects sends and route any Parts due
for outboard effects to those outputs. Then you disable the
effects you're going to do outboard in the Part configuration (e.g. defeat the reverb but retain the DDL) of the Parts
routed to the output. Once a Part is configured as described, any Patch loaded into that Part will have its DDL
enabled (if enabled in the Patch) but any reverb in the
Patch will be defeated and sent out of the effects send
outputs 'dry'. This configuration can then be saved as a
Multi, so you can instantly recall it and have variations you
can switch between quickly.
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Advanced users can use the Part Effects defeats and
multiple outputs (line or USB) to configure outboard effects supplement or replace Kyra’s effects
as required.
Performance
With Kyra you don't have to worry about 'Processor Load'.
Effects on Kyra are performed by dedicated resources and
will never affect the performance of the synthesizer regardless of the number of effects you select or the settings of
those effects. So, if you want a subtle chorus on a Part
along with a ten second reverb and some EQ adjustments,
just go ahead. You can use all 72 of the effects modules
Configuration
Each of Kyra's effects modules can be individually configured and defeated (bypassed). However, the ordering of the
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across all eight Parts and there will never be any impact on
performance, polyphony or sound quality.
Shelving EQ Module
As Kyra's effects have no impact on performance, you’ll
find there's novel ways you can use some of the effects. A
very short ping-pong delay with some feedback on the
DDL can give extra space and dimension to a sound without tying up the chorus/flanger module as a doubler. The
phaser can be used to generate artificial colouration and
faux stereo effects and the chorus/flanger effect can serve
up a very wide range of sounds from subtle chorus and
slap-back delay to wild flangers.
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With effects, sometimes, less is more !
The first effect in the Kyra’s Effects Unit is the EQ. The
module provides a 3-band shelving EQ with sweepable
mid. Use the EQ to shape the sound by boosting or attenuating (cutting) certain frequency ranges. The EQ provides a useful supplement to the Filter whereby, for example, the latter can leave a sound with a little less bass
(e.g. in the 4-pole 24dB configurations) or too much top
end, you can use the EQ to correct that. The sweepable mid
is ideal for reducing unwanted peaks from a sound.
The EQ module offers up to 16dB of cut or boost on each of
the three bands but note if you find yourself needing much
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setting - higher values make the cut or boost more selective (narrower).
more than 3 or 4dB of cut or boost, it might be worth revisiting the settings of the Patch itself. It is better to cut
unwanted frequencies rather than to boost the rest. Plan
your use of the EQ carefully so you know what you’re
looking to achieve from the settings. One example is to not
add high frequency boost to a sound with little high frequency content (e.g. a deep pad). This will only serve to
add unwanted noise to the sound – it might be a better
plan to open the filter slightly instead.
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To bypass individual EQ bands, simply set the relevant
gain control to zero. Setting all three bands to have zero
gain effectively bypasses the effect completely.
Some of the EQ parameters can be modulated from the
Mod Matrix but note that they are intended to be static (i.e.
set from a MIDI CC at various points during a song or modulated very gradually). Unfortunately, the EQ parameters
do not have enough resolution to be modulated continuously and you may hear stepping if you attempt it.
Avoid unnecessary boosting of frequencies that are
missing by design in the signal.
Bear in mind that excessive boosting can easily result in
distortion in the Limiters. Keep a close eye on the boost
levels in use as well as the overall levels of the Patch; if you
do use significant boost in the EQ module, remember to
reduce the level of the Patch so that there is headroom for
the peaks otherwise there is a risk of limiter compression this may or may not be desirable depending on the sounds
you're trying to achieve.
Formant Filter
The lower and upper shelves can be adjusted over several
octaves of the lower and upper parts of the audio range
and the mid can be swept over the full audio range, including an overlap of the shelves. The Mid also has a Q-factor
The Formant Filter offers a similar range of gain for the
formant pair configured by the formant Tune control.
There is no cut option for the Formant Filter and the Q
factor is preset to a relatively high (selective) amount to
clearly emphasise the vocal formants. The two frequencies
are chosen to model the human voice and are adjusted
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Crusher II and Gnasher. Each has a very distinctive effect.
The 'hard' variants are more severe versions of the 'soft'
variants. The rectifiers add traditional harmonic distortion, the bit crushers add a gritty lo-fi effect to the sound and
the Gnasher is a band-limited tube limiter/compressor
model. Gnasher is unique amongst Kyra's distortion algorithms in leaving low level signals undistorted, so it is very
useful for longer pad-type sounds.
according to an algorithm controlled using the Tune control. Increase the formant level to boost the intensity of the
formant effect. Many sounds will take on distinctive vocal
characteristics as the formant gain control is increased.
The Formant Filter is particularly effective for choral pad
sounds but can also be used for short percussive sounds.
For convenience, the Formant Filter has a dedicated LFO
for basic formant modulation effects. If more advanced
modulation is required, consider LFO or MIDI CC automation via the Mod Matrix. The Formant Filter LFO controls
can only be adjusted using the Value buttons, no physical
control is available for the LFO parameters.
To apply Distortion, increase the Distortion Effect Mix
control. This will increase the amount of distorted signal in
the signal chain. At the lowest setting, the Distortion module is effectively bypassed. At the maximum setting, the
signal is sourced entirely from the Distortion module. Use
intermediate settings to blend between the two.
Distortion Module
The Drive parameter adjusts the signal level going into
the Distortion module itself - at lower settings, the input
signal is attenuated, at higher settings the signal is
boosted. As the Distortion module will add significant gain
and compression to the overall signal, the Final Level
control should be used to equalize the overall Part level so
that it is comparable to other Parts. The Final Level control has the same effect as the Part Level control but is
stored as part of the Patch itself. Both level settings are
accounted for when setting the overall level of the Part
relative to all the other Parts. The Final Level control
should be left at its default maximum setting (minimum
The Distortion module can add effects to the Part's sound
ranging from a subtle harmonic edge to almost complete
destruction of the signal.
The Distortion module currently has five distortion algorithms: Soft Rectifier, Hard Rectifier, Bit Crusher I, Bit
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the end of the effects chain just before the Output Mixer.
Both Limiters work together to manage the potentially
massive dynamic range of signals coming from Kyra’s
sound sources and effects unit.
attenuation) unless the Patch is too loud relative to other
Patches and you don't want to reduce the pre-effects Patch
Level. If that is the case, reduce the Final Level control to
equalize the Patch level without affecting the timbre (recall that the Final Level control, unlike the Patch Level, is
post-effects). If a Patch is causing excessive Limiter compression even without the Distortion module active, adjust
the Patch Level (pre-effects) to address this, not the Final
Level.
The Rolloff Corner setting adjusts the frequency of a lowpass filter located after the Distortion Module (on the wet
path only). This single pole (6dB/octave) filter is ideal for
taking the bright edge off the distortion which might
otherwise be overpowering, depending on the sound being
generated. Use lower settings (lower cutoff frequencies) to
attenuate the higher frequency components from the distortion. Note that the Distortion Module filter only filters
the wet signal, not the overall mixed signal. As a result, if
the Distortion Module is bypassed (the mix is set to completely dry), the filter will have no effect.
Both Limiters model classic valve (tube) amplifiers such
that increasing signal levels result in compression and
additional harmonics. If you want a clean signal with no
obvious saturation effects, be sure to keep the Patch level
low enough so that there is plenty of headroom for the
loudest passages (typically those with the most notes
played at the highest velocities) and use lighter limiter
curves (e.g. light or medium). There are no hard and fast
rules here but as you get used to how Kyra works, you'll
get a feel for it. Remember it's not just the overall perceived loudness of the signal, a sound that doesn’t sound
‘loud' can have peaky harmonics that cause limiting to
occur. The key is to keep Patch levels under control and
keep a special eye on features that can inadvertently cause
large increases in levels such as resonant filters, EQ boosts,
high Formant Filter gains and feedback in effects modules.
Limiter Modules
Kyra has two limiters on each Part. The Limiters provide
dynamics control for the Part. The first limiter, the Input
Limiter, is located after the Distortion module in the effects
chain. The second limiter, the Output Limiter, is located at
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Dual Mode and Hypersaw Mode configurations also result
in significantly higher overall levels.
Patch. The Output Limiter has a fixed configuration and
manages any gain that occurs in the effects chain.
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If you find that the sound is over-saturating, look to reduce
the Patch level and restore the overall level using the Patch
Final Volume. Heavy use of the Distortion module will
result in saturation when the signal is louder (e.g. several
notes are played).
Advanced users may wish to keep compression
levels at a minimum and apply it in their DAW
during the mastering phase of their project. With a
32-bit signal path and DACs, Kyra allows operation
with low levels and compression without a significant loss of quality.
Digital Delay Module
In some cases, the effect of the Limiters is desirable and
you may wish to deliberately boost the Patch level to induce significant saturation and compression. You can
achieve wonderful, raucous tube amplifier effects of
electric piano and guitar-style Patches this way, especially
when combined with the Distortion module. Use higher
levels and Limiter intensity settings to emphasise the
effect. As always, the key is to experiment and let your ears
guide you. You can use the Part level to re-balance the
overall Part level after the Patch level has been set to the
level that achieves the distortion (or lack of distortion)
required.
The Input Limiter has three selectable curves offering
increasing levels of compression but note compression is
not the same as a volume control; the Input Limiter curve
setting should not be used to adjust the volume of the
Kyra‘s Digital Delay module fulfils the role of the classic
Digital Delay Line (DDL). Kyra has a stereo Delay module
on each Part, each offering a generous delay time of up to
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useful range is around 10-30 which offers a natural balance between the initial sound and the echoes.
2.7 seconds. The Delay module can be used to provide
effects ranging from simple doubling all the way up to
stereo phrase-based delay effects.
The Delay module can be synchronised to the tempo of
your song by means of MIDI clock synchronisation. When
the Delay module is configured to synchronise to MIDI
clock, a beat setting is available to adjust the ratio of the
delay value to MIDI clock. The Delay module can also be
locked to the timing of LFO3 (even if LFO3 is itself set to
external clock), again, the beat setting is available to adjust
the ratio of the LFO timing to the beat. When the DDL is set
to MIDI clock and a MIDI clock is present on the MIDI port
configured for MIDI clock, the Delay Time control will
have no effect until the clock is stopped or the clock source
is set to Internal. As the Delay Time control is quite coarse
so that it can cover a wide range of delays, if you need
precise tempo matching, use MIDI clock synchronisation to
achieve accurate sync.
The Delay module allows feedback varying from zero (no
repeats) up to unity (infinite repeats).
The Delay module can be configured for regular stereo
delay or ping-pong mode. In ping-pong mode, the repeats
will alternate between the right and left outputs as the
feedback paths are swapped. Ping pong delay is particularly useful if the original sound is panned to the left as the
echoes are then balanced. It can also be useful for choral
strings and pads as it can generate multiple 'surround'
echoes to add depth to the sound and supplement the early
reflections of the Reverb module. Another use for pingpong mode is to add a faux stereo effect - select a very
short delay setting of 2 or 3 and moderate amounts of
feedback. Increase the dry/wet mix and feedback amount
until a pleasing stereo effect is heard. This is a great way to
add stereo width to a sound without resorting to Dual
Mode configurations.
The Delay Time control will cause considerable pitch
distortion if it is changed (whether it is changed manually,
by Mod Matrix modulation or by a MIDI clock change)
whilst there is audio in the delay module. The resulting
sound is very much like the scratch effects made popular
in early rap music and with long or infinite feedback can be
a useful standalone effect - try modulating the delay time
with an LFO routing. If this effect is not desired, it is best
not to change the delay time setting when audio is playing
The dry/wet Mix control allows the intensity of the delay
to be adjusted from completely dry (effect bypassed) to
equal dry/wet mix (50% wet). Note that unlike the other
effects, the Mix control on the delay module ranges
between 0 and 50% wet rather than 100%. The most
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no modulation to provide sound colouring to emulate
instrument resonances. Several of the Kyra presets use the
Phaser in this configuration to provide a colouration and
boxy faux stereo effect. In this configuration use the Phaser's frequency control to choose the colouration required.
The Phaser is also very useful for vocal effects and works
well with the Formant Filter. Check out some of the vocal
preset Patches - many have the Phaser frequency wired up
to the modulation wheel to adjust the timbre of the effect.
on the Part. The Delay module does not offer direct modulated delay effects, use the separate Chorus/Flanger module to achieve modulated delay effects such as vibrato, chorus and flanging.
Phaser Module
The Feedback control determines the intensity of the
effect. The feedback can be positive or negative and the
effect is very different in each case. With positive feedback
the sound has distinctly less bass as there is attenuation at
low frequencies but the effect is more intense and very
distinct from negative feedback.
The Mix control allows the effect to be mixed in from 0%
(i.e. no effect) to 100% wet.
Kyra features a hand-crafted 6-stage stereo Phaser on each
part and the effect includes a dedicated dual-output (quadrature) super low frequency LFO with the same waveshapes available in the main LFOs. Further modulation possibilities exist with the Mod Matrix.
Kyra’s Phaser has a dedicated super-low frequency stereo
quadrature LFO. In contrast to the main LFOs, this LFO
runs at one tenth of the speed to allow for Phaser sweeps
that can span over several bars. By default, the modulation
waveform is a sine wave but the Phaser LFO allows any of
the main LFO shapes to be selected as an alternative.
Use the Phaser to provide the classic swirling phaser
sound. Alternatively, you can use the Phaser with little or
Note that the built-in LFO is always applied as a stereo
quadrature pair whereas any modulation of the Phaser
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frequency via the Mod Matrix will always be in-phase
mono. Both have a distinctly different sound and you can
use both together to get some very interesting effects.
Note that the built-in Phaser LFO does not have a MIDI
sync feature – if you need Phaser modulation that is in
sync to your song, modulate the Phaser frequency with one
of the main LFOs via the Mod Matrix.
Kyra’s Chorus/Flanger module is very versatile. It is able
to deliver a range of effects including those associated with
comb filters, chorus units, flangers, doublers and slap-back
delays. As with all the effects modules, Kyra has a Chorus/Flanger module on each Part and each module has a
dedicated dual output (quadrature) LFO to provide modulation effects.
Keep a close eye on levels when using large amounts of
feedback, especially when combined with resonant filter
settings otherwise the Output Limiter will kick in to constrain the peaks. If you are getting resonant peaks (the
overall Patch level is too low), you may wish to reduce the
feedback or filter resonance to regain control of the peaks.
Experience and your ears will soon guide you with the best
configuration for the Chorus/Flanger module but be sure
to check out the preset Patches for some examples. As a
programming note, be aware that as a delay effect, high
levels of Chorus/Flanger settings can slightly round the
percussive start to fast attack sounds. If you want the
utmost in fast attack sounds, keep the mix levels and delay
times used in the module low or consider using the Phaser
instead as Phasers are not delay-based effects. Similarly, if
you want to avoid pitch variation on very pure sounds
such as pianos, consider reducing or removing Chorus/Flanger modulation (speed and intensity) as well as
reducing the feedback and delay time.
Chorus/Flanger Module
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Keep an eye on levels when using large amounts of Chorus/Flanger feedback (e.g. over 80) when configured for
flanger or comb type effects, especially when combined
with resonant filter settings. Large peaks will cause the
Output Limiter to kick in. If this effect is undesirable, reduce Patch level or alternatively, reduce the feedback level.
module does not have presets like many standalone units
do but many of the classic reverb parameters are supported such that the sound of many classic reverbs can be
configured.
The Reverb module features a pre-delay unit providing up
to one second of delay. Pre-delay extends the delay
between the initial sound (early reflections) and the main
reverb tail and is useful to give the sound some space. The
pre-delay can also achieve sounds like a gated reverb.
The Mix control allows the effect to be mixed in from 0%
(i.e. no effect) to 100% wet.
Reverberation Module
The two coloration controls, Darkness and Damping have
similar but subtly different effects. Darkness is implemented as a low pass filter on the wet-path input to the reverb.
Increasing the Darkness value removes higher frequencies
giving the reverb a deeper, darker tone. On the other hand,
Damping is a similar low pass filter but is in the reverb's
feedback loop. As such the reverb tail will be ‘damped’
(lose high frequencies over time) according to the setting
of the Damping control. Note that at extremely high
Darkness settings the reverb sound may disappear completely as the filter removes almost all the signal and just a
rumble may remain, assuming there was any low frequency present in the original signal to start with.
As with any effect, the key to achieving a clean sound is
correct configuration and in the case of reverb, too much is
rarely a good thing. If you find the reverb is dominating the
sound or the Part appears slushy or muddy in the mix, look
Kyra features a Reverb module on each Part offering reverberation times up to about 20 seconds. The Reverb
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to reduce the dry/wet mix and reverb time and/or increase the Damping and Darkness, especially if the domination is in the higher frequency ranges.
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Remember, sometimes, less is more !
The pre-delay feature can be used to give percussive
sounds some space.
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Advanced users may wish to use the Part reverb
defeats and apply reverb in their DAW during the
mastering phase of their project. The defeats allow
removal of onboard effects without having to modify Patches.
The Mix control allows the reverberation effect to be
mixed in from 0% (i.e. no effect) to 100% wet.
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Arpeggiator Controls
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Kyra features an Arpeggiator on each of its 8 Parts.
Arpeggiators process notes
from your keyboard and
play them in a sequence
with a configurable rhythm
and beat.
Keyboard velocity is not used by the Arpeggiator - the
accent given to each beat played is defined by the selected
arpeggio pattern.
Arpeggiators are primarily
for live performance but
can be used in the studio,
too.
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Kyra’s Arpeggiator is an
integral part of the patch.
Settings for the Arpeggiator
are stored within the patch,
even if the Arpeggiator is disabled. Therefore, it is not
necessary to manually configure the Arpeggiator when a
Patch is selected.
Arpeggiators work best with sharp, percussive
sounds. Review some of Kyra’s preset sounds that
feature the Arpeggiator (the Category Filter is
useful for finding them) and experiment with different sounds to understand its abilities.
The sustain (hold) pedal is exceptionally useful for
playing live arpeggios. Its function changes when
the Arpeggiator is enabled in Sustain Pedal mode it serves to hold the arpeggiated notes rather than
the individual notes the arpeggiator produces.
This allows you to move easily between block
chords without affecting the arpeggio timing (the
Arpeggiator is reset when all keys are lifted).
Enable Button
The Enable button activates or deactivates the Arpeggiator for the current Part. Once the Arpeggiator is activated,
any notes (typically chords) played will play as an arpeggio. Once playing, notes will play depending on the Latch
Mode setting. Please see the section on Latch Mode for
more information.
It is possible (but unusual) to have multiple arpeggiators
as each Part has its own arpeggiator - synchronisation
(either by manually matching the tempos or using MIDI
clock) is needed for this to be useful though.
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The Arpeggiator Enable button blinks in time to the beat
when the arpeggiator is activated. Note that the LED indicates the actual beat rather than just the basic tempo - only
beats that are present will be indicated, if there is a rest,
the LED will remain off for that beat.
The Mode button selects between the five operating modes of the Arpeggiator:
Any notes playing when the Arpeggiator is activated will
be released. Play new chords once the Arpeggiator is activated to start the sequence.
Up+Down: Notes are played in order from lowest to highest and then back to the lowest. The LEDs indicate
Up+Down by the Up and Down LED being on.
Note that if the Arpeggiator time source is set to MIDI, a
MIDI clock must be present for the Arpeggiator to start, it
will not 'free run' like an LFO does. Kyra will respond to
MIDI start, stop and continue messages to ensure the beat
is synchronised to your DAW even if you stop and restart
playback mid song (even mid bar). When using the MIDI
time source, ensure your controller or DAW is configured
to send MIDI clock along with song start, stop and continue
messages and that MIDI clock is configured correctly in the
MIDI configuration page.
Chord: All the notes are played at the same time (as if the
chord was played repeatedly)
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Up: Notes are played in order from lowest to highest
Down: Notes are played in order from highest to lowest
Random: Notes are played in a random order
Range
The Range button selects the range over which the Arpeggiator operates. When in the default one octave range, only
the notes played appear in the sequence. When a higher
range is selected, notes from one or two octaves above the
notes played will also appear in the sequence. The operation of the range control depends on the arpeggiator mode:
If the Arpeggiator is configured for MIDI clock sync,
it will not start until it receives a MIDI start or continue command. If the Arpeggiator is not starting,
check the MIDI sync setting is as expected.
Up: Notes are played in sequence plus one or two additional octaves above the notes played on the keyboard. The
sequence starts at the lowest note played.
Mode
Down: Notes are played in sequence plus one or two additional octaves above the notes played on the keyboard. The
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sequence starts at the highest note played plus zero, one or
two octaves.
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Up+Down: The sequence plays as per the Up sequence
followed by the Down sequence. The notes at each end are
only played once per sequence.
If you need more accurate control of the Arpeggiator
tempo, use MIDI clock sync from your DAW, drum
machine or master keyboard.
Arpeggiator Pages
Chord: When the octave range is 2 or 3 octaves, the Arpeggiator will choose the octave of each note (not the
whole chord) at random from the base octave played and
one or two octaves above, depending on the setting of the
Range control. This results in some very interesting
sounds and is worth a try.
The Arpeggiator page is presented when Follow mode is
activated and any Arpeggiator control is moved. Keep in
mind that most of the parameters that are shown on the
arpeggiator pages are also available as physical controls.
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Random: Notes are played in a random order and a random octave (one or two octaves above the played notes
depending on the setting of the Range control). Adding a
range to a random arpeggiation results in a very interesting effect as notes played are selected randomly from the
entire range.
The fastest way to navigate to the Arpeggiator page
is to press the Arpeggiator Enable button twice.
Tempo
The Tempo control adjusts the rate of the Arpeggiator
BPM (beats per minute) from 58 to 185. It has no effect if
the Arpeggiator time source is set to MIDI. If you require
tempos outside this range, please adjust the Beat parameter.
Active
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Please see the description of the Arpeggiator Enable
button.
Kyra Manual
The Control Panel Sections
Mode
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Please see the description of the Arpeggiator Mode
button.
Range
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Please see the description of the Arpeggiator Range
button.
Gate Length
This setting configures the length of the notes the arpeggiator plays and is relative to the configured tempo. At
lower settings, the gate length (the time the “key” is active)
is very short (staccato). At higher settings, the gate length
approaches the length of one beat at the configured tempo
(so notes without any rest will play legato). The value is
shown as a percentage (of the beat time).
Pattern
The Pattern setting select the preset pattern the Arpeggiator will use. Pattern zero is a basic pattern with no accents
or rests but other patterns will have different beats and
accents. Pattern 127 is a special pattern that applies a
random velocity to each beat (the random values are calculated in real time, so the pattern does not repeat).
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The effect of Gate Length is very much dependent on the
envelope settings of the Patch. Depending on the settings,
there may be little or no sound or Gate Length will have no
obvious effect.
Kyra’s arpeggiator patterns are preset and intended for live performances. Whilst there’s a lot of
them, advanced users may prefer to use their
DAW/sequencer for more complex arpeggio programming tasks such as those using unusual time
signatures.
Tempo
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Please see the description of the Arpeggiator Tempo
control.
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The Control Panel Sections
Time Source
Latch Mode
This setting configures where the Arpeggiator gets its
timebase from. If set to Internal, the Arpeggiator uses the
value set for the Tempo parameter. If set to MIDI, the Arpeggiator uses an incoming MIDI Clock signal for synchronisation. Remember that Kyra requires a MIDI
start/continue command to start the Arp when it is configured to use MIDI clock.
The Latch Mode setting determines how the Arpeggiator
notes are held.
If Latch Mode is set to Sustain Pedal, which is the default
mode, the notes will play as long as the keys are held down
or the sustain pedal is held. Timing will be maintained
until all notes are released at which point the arpeggiator
is reset and new notes played will cause a downbeat.
Beat
In Latch Mode is set to Key Latch, the notes will play continuously and the sustain pedal is not used. Releasing all
notes and playing a new chord will update the notes being
played but timing is always maintained. The only way to
stop notes playing in Key Latch mode is to switch off the
Arpeggiator.
The Beat setting determines the time division for the Arpeggiator tempo when using MIDI clock as a timebase.
Use Beat to select the ratio between the MIDI clock and the
actual Arpeggiator beat as you require. This effectively
configures the number of beats per bar whilst ensuring the
Arpeggiator is always synchronized to the song tempo.
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Parts and Multis
Parts and Multis
reconfigures the eight Parts simultaneously thus completely reconfiguring the synthesizer ready for performance
(whether live or from a DAW). The diagram below should
help you understand the relationship between Patches,
Parts and Multis:
Overview
A Part is one of the eight fundamental resource units on
Kyra. A simple way of thinking of a Part is that it is a complete synthesizer in itself; it has a MIDI channel, a sound
configuration (a Patch), effects and an output. In that
respect, Parts are completely independent and can be
considered self-contained synthesizers. Instruments with
multiple Parts are referred to as being multitimbral as they
can play different sounds at the same time.
At its most basic level, a Part is simply a loaded Patch.
Without any additional features that would be useful but
impractical as to play more than one Patch at a time, you
would most likely want to adjust a few things to get them
to sound right together. For example, you may want to
adjust the levels, stereo positioning etc. You could do that
by editing the Patches but that would be tedious. The solution to that is the provision of another set of parameters
outside of the Patch and they are the Part Parameters.
On Kyra, a Part does not exist in isolation, it always has
seven siblings giving a total of eight. Together, the family of
eight Parts is referred to as a Multi and represent the complete performance configuration of the synthesizer. Kyra
supports the storage of 128 Multis. Changing the Multi
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Parts and Multis
the same regardless of which Part hosts it. So, as you assemble a Multi, you need not worry that a Patch will sound
different as you configure Patches in other Parts as there
are no bus effects shared between the Parts.
So, think of a Part as a Patch combined with some additional Parameters that together, make a playable configuration. It's worth remembering a Part has a reference to a
Patch but does not contain it (i.e. it does not take a copy of
it). So when using Patches in various Multis, it makes sense
to make a note of where the Patches are used so that if you
change the Patches later, you are not making unintentional
changes to another Multi; you can always copy a Patch if
you think you may need to share it across Multis with later
variations.
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Kyra does not use bussed effects – all effects are an
integral part of the Patch so they’ll sound the same
regardless of which Part hosts them.
Part Configuration
Multis are useful for both live and studio applications. For
live performance, Multis are useful for layers and splits.
Layering is the technique of placing two or more Patches
together on the same MIDI channel to achieve truly wonderful sounds. Splitting is the technique of placing two or
more Patches split such that one Patch sounds for a given
range of keys on the keyboard, for example, a bass sound
for the left hand and a lead sound for the right hand.
Part Parameters
To inspect and modify the Part parameters, enter Multi
Edit mode using the Multi Edit button. You can select
which Part to edit at any time, before or after entering
Multi Edit mode, by using the Part Select buttons. It's
worth remembering this as it's common to configure Parts
together and being able to flip through the Parts and compare/set values without having to exit Multi Edit mode
each time is a definite time-saver. Once in Multi Edit Mode,
you can edit the Part parameters in the same way as you
edit Patch parameters.
For studio applications, Multis are useful for grouping
Patches together for instant recall for a song. A song can
consist of just one Multi with different Parts sounding in
various passages of the song or it can consist of more than
one Multi which can be recalled with a single MIDI program change message.
If you make any changes to one or more Parts, be sure to
store the updated Multi otherwise the changes will be lost
when you change the Multi or switch off the synthesizer.
Press the Store button at any point in the Multi Edit pro-
As Kyra has dedicated resources for each Part and effects
are an integral part of the Patch, a Patch will always sound
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Parts and Multis
set up one Part unless you're setting up layered/split configurations. As Multi 0 is loaded when Kyra starts, all your
settings and the Patch you configure for Part 1 in Multi 0
will be recalled at power up, so you can just switch on and
play.
cess (i.e. when the Multi Edit button is lit) to store the
Multi. You can either overwrite the current Multi or write
to a different one as part of the Store process.
Like Patches, Multis also have names. The name of the
current Multi is shown on the Home Screen. When you
store a Multi, you can give it a name using the same procedure you’d use for naming a Patch. If you don’t give your
Multi a name, it will default to “Default Multi”. It is worth
giving your Multis useful names so you can remember why
you created it, especially for live sets: as an example, you
could have a Multi for each song in your live set. By giving
the Multi the name of the song you’d use it in, you can see
at a glance that Kyra is set up perfectly for the upcoming
song.
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Parts are numbered from 1 but Multis and Patches
are numbered from 0 to match MIDI numbering.
Use the other Multis to save your performance configurations - either for live or studio usage. This gives you the
best of both worlds: the simplicity to just switch on and
play as well as the advanced configuration of all the Parts
with a simple button push. Use the Multi Program change
feature to allow your DAW or master keyboard to select
the Multi. A good strategy is to use one Multi for each song.
Your DAW can recall this Multi at the start of this song and
Kyra will be instantly configured and ready to play the
song. The DAW can then simply use the Multi throughout
the song or it can change Patches within the Multi using
program change messages or it can select another Multi to
reconfigure all the Parts.
No 'Single Mode’?
Kyra does not have a 'Single mode' as some other synthesizers have. It is by design a multitimbral system and
therefore has no need for the additional complexity of a
'Single mode'. Kyra is always in Multi mode. This is a much
simpler design where you don't need to think about any
distinction between single and Multi mode.
A good practice is to adopt Multi 0 as the 'home' Multi
where you set up the Parts for general purpose playing. In
fact, for simple at-the-keyboard playing, you only need to
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Parts and Multis
USB audio is not affected by the Part output setting as each
Part has its own individual virtual stream over USB and
the Output Mixer is not used.
Multi Parameters
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Press the Multi Edit button to access the Multi pages. There’s only four pages and each press on the
Multi Edit button steps to the next one so you don’t
have to (but can if you prefer) use the Cursor
Up/Down buttons.
The Output of the current Part is displayed (as 'Out') on
the bottom line of the Home page.
MIDI Channel
Remember you can use the Part Up/Down buttons
to switch Parts even when you’re in Multi Edit Mode.
This makes comparing setting across Parts very
easy.
The MIDI Channel setting selects the MIDI channel a Part
will respond to.
Select 'Off' to configure the Part not respond to any MIDI
channel. This is useful if other instruments are connected
via the MIDI Thru port.
The MIDI channel of the current Part is displayed (as
'MIDI') on the bottom line of the home page. The ‘MIDI’
label flashes to indicate Kyra is receiving MIDI (on any
channel, not just the channel of the current Part).
Part Output
Volume
The Part Output setting selects which of the four stereo
line outputs a Part is sent to. If more than one Part is sent
to an output, they are mixed together by the Output Mixer.
Remember that the headphone output is connected to
Output A so any Part sent to a different output will not be
heard on the headphones.
The Volume setting determines the volume (level) of the
selected Part. This is displayed as “Level” on the bottom
row of the Home page.
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Stereo Pan
Patch Number
The Stereo Pan setting positions the Part in the stereo
field and is added to any Pan setting in the Patch itself. The
Part Pan can be set by MIDI Pan continuous controller
messages.
Patch Number configures which Patch is loaded into the
Part.
Transpose
The Transpose setting configures transposition (key
shifting) of the Patch in the range -24 to +24 semitones
relative to the MIDI note played. This parameter reflects
(and is the same as) the use of the Transpose buttons.
Remember each Part has its own transpose value. If you
want to transpose the whole Multi (all the Parts), you'll
need to transpose all the Parts individually. Whole arrangement transposition will be easier in your DAW. Separate
transpose is useful for layering Patches to play in different
octaves or keys.
Patch Bank
Patch Bank configures the bank of the Patch currently
loaded into the Part. Changing the Bank (and hence the
Patch) will stop any notes currently playing on the Part.
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Detune
You can select the bank using a MIDI Bank Select
message (CC#32) but remember it won’t take effect
until a MIDI Program message is sent. If you’re
sending Bank and Program Change messages from
your DAW or master keyboard, please ensure both
the Bank and Program Change are being sent.
The Detune setting allows fine detuning of the Part up to
plus or minus one semitone. This is useful for layering (a
technique where two or more Parts are set to the same
MIDI channel) but also for 'humanising' songs whereby
instruments being played are not precisely in tune. It
makes the sound more interesting and less mechanical.
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Parts and Multis
Receive Volume
The Receive Volume setting is a per-part setting to allow or
disallow the reception of MIDI volume commands (CC #7).
Receive Volume in the MIDI Configuration page must also
be configured for MIDI volume to work on a given Part.
Note that the level that MIDI Volume configures is the
same as the Part Level, it isn't an additional level control.
Therefore, you can use your DAW to automate the mixing
of all the Parts using MIDI Volume messages and the value
stored in the Part would be the default level for the Part.
You can of course use the multiple line outputs or the USB
audio streams and mix the audio directly on your mixer or
DAW, respectively.
Lower Key Range
The Lower Key Range sets key below which the Part will
ignore MIDI notes sent to it. Useful for split keyboard
setups in live play situations. Note the key shown (and the
filtering done) is the original MIDI note and does not account for any transposition added using the Transpose
feature. The setting can't be higher than the Upper key
range.
Receive Program
The Receive Program setting is per-Part setting to allow or
disallow the reception of MIDI Program Change commands. Receive Program Change in the MIDI Configuration
page must also be configured for MIDI Program Change to
work on a given Part.
Upper Key Range
The Upper Key Range sets the key above which the Part
will ignore MIDI notes sent to it. Useful for split keyboard
setups in live play situations. Note the key shown (and the
filtering done) is the original MIDI note and does not account for any transposition added using the Transpose
feature. The setting can't be lower than the Lower key
range.
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Parts and Multis
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Advanced users may wish to use these defeats to
apply some or all effects in their DAW during the
mastering phase of their project. The defeats allow
selective removal of onboard effects without having to modify Patches.
Enable Delays
Enables or disables (defeats) the Digital Delay module for
the Part.
Enable Chorus
Enables or disables (defeats) the Chorus module for the
Part.
Enable EQ & Formant
Enables or disables (defeats) the EQ and Formant Filter
module for the Part.
Enable Reverbs
Enables or disables (defeats) the Reverberation module for
the Part.
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System Configuration
System Configuration
Master Volume
The Master Volume setting configures the level of Kyra’s
line outputs. This is applied at the final digital to analogue
conversion and is used to match the output of the system
to your amplifier, mixer or headphones. It does not affect
the USB audio streams. If you're using an external mixer or
amplifier, set the Master Volume control to its maximum
value and trim the levels on your mixer or amplifier. Master Volume can also be set by a MIDI Universal SysEx Device Control message. In both cases, the value set takes
effect immediately and is stored.
Overview
Kyra’s System Configuration is the set of parameters that
allow you to configure Kyra to your requirements. To
access the System Configuration pages, press the System
Edit button in the Edit section.
Except for the Category Filter setting, all System Configuration settings are stored automatically and retained when
the system is powered down. The Category Filter always
defaults to disabled (off) when Kyra is powered up.
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Each of the System Configuration settings is described
below.
Remember that Master Volume control does not
affect the USB audio streams.
Soundcard Mode
System Edit Pages
Kyra’s Soundcard Mode allows you to route stereo audio
from your DAW to Kyra. The audio will be sent to Output A
(and correspondingly the headphone output). This allows
you to use Kyra as a ‘soundcard’ to render the audio from
your DAW (which could include sound from Kyra as well
as virtual instruments on your DAW). As ASIO (currently)
only allows on driver to be loaded at a time, you can’t have
Kyra and a separate soundcard active under ASIO on your
computer although there are workarounds such as asio4all
for Windows if you really want to use a separate sound86
Kyra Manual
System Configuration
duce this to 16 bit if required for legacy DAWs. For best
quality results, configure your DAW to stream at 96kHz 24
bit. This will give you the best quality possible for any
signal processing performed subsequently in your DAW.
card to render your DAW’s audio. Note that Kyra’s Soundcard Mode is of professional quality and renders 24-bit
digital audio at 48kHz or 96kHz (it must be the same
sample rate as audio from Kyra) so you’re unlikely to notice any quality loss compared to using a separate sound
card (in fact, it will probably be better).
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Use Kyra’s Soundcard Mode to use Kyra’s line outputs to render the audio from your DAW. This will
simplify the configuration and wiring in many studio
environment setups.
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Enabling Soundcard mode prevents Kyra outputting
any of its own audio on Output A, the default output.
The Soundcard mode setting is retained when
you switch off Kyra. If you change your setup so
that it expects synthesizer audio on Output A remember to switch off Soundcard mode otherwise
you won’t get any sound from Kyra on Output A.
OLED Screensaver
The OLED Screensaver setting configures Kyra‘s screen
saver to activate after 10, 30 (default) or 1 hour of inactivity of the front panel. There is also an option to disable the
screensaver. When the screensaver is activated, the OLED
display will be set to a reduced contrast level to extend its
lifetime and reduce the chance of any image 'burn in'. The
OLED display will revert to its standard level if any front
panel control is used.
USB Audio Status
This is a status rather than an adjustable parameter. It
shows the rate at which Kyra has been asked to stream
audio to and/or from the host (your computer). If Kyra
isn't streaming, the status will be 'Inactive'. Kyra allows
the host to select streaming at 48kHz or 96kHz. Kyra always streams 24 bit audio but most host drivers can re-
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If Kyra’s screensaver or standby mode has activated,
just press Exit to restore the display and continue
your work.
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System Configuration
MIDI Configuration Display Pages
OLED Contrast
Sets the contrast level of the OLED display. The 'Standard'
setting is recommended for general use.
OLED Standby
Configures the length of time before the OLED display is
switched off. Options are available for 2 hours, 4 hours and
8 hours. Standby mode can also be disabled. When Standby
is activated, the OLED display will be switched off to extend its lifetime and reduce the chance of any image 'burn
in'. The OLED display will revert to its standard configured
level if any front panel control is used (use Exit to restore
the display). Disabling standby mode or leaving the display
on for extended periods is not recommended. Note that
even when standby is disabled, the display will be put into
standby mode (switched off) after 24 hours of inactivity.
MIDI SysEx Device ID
The MIDI SysEx Device ID used for MIDI Systems Exclusive (SysEx) communications, either between two Kyras or a
Kyra synthesizer and a DAW/MIDI Editor/librarian. Unless
the transmitting device sends on the ‘all devices’ ID, the
Device ID setting on both units must be the same for communications to occur. Having a Device ID means you can
have two or more Kyra units on the same DIN MIDI interface and address them individually with SysEx messages.
In this setup, you’d need multiple MIDI Ins or a MIDI merge box to receive the return data from both units. If you
use a generic MIDI utility, the Device ID setting on the
synthesizer must match the Device ID used at the time the
dump was saved. If you only have one Kyra on a given
MIDI port or are using USB, leave this value at its default
setting of 17. The Device ID applies to USB and DIN MIDI
but is only useful for DIN MIDI setups with more than one
Kyra in it.
LED Brightness
Sets the brightness of the front panel LEDs. You may wish
to select lower values to reduce glare in low-light studio or
stage settings or higher settings in brightly lit outdoor
areas.
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There’s no disable option as MIDI Clock can be used by
several modules with Kyra, each of which has an individual
MIDI clock configuration.
Don’t change the Device ID from its default value
unless you have more than one Kyra on a single DIN
MIDI interface. There is never a reason to change it if
you use USB for MIDI.
Receive MIDI Volume
The Receive MIDI Volume setting enables or disables the
reception of MIDI volume (CC#7) messages. This is a global setting that applies to all Parts. If MIDI volume reception is disabled with this setting, the setting in the individual
Parts is ignored. You can select whether the messages will
be received via DIN MIDI, USB or both.
Multi Program Change
The Multi Program Change setting enables or disables the
use of a MIDI Program Change to select the current Multi.
When enabled, a MIDI Program Change on the configured
MIDI channel will recall the Multi specified by the Program
Change instead of any action it would have taken (i.e. a
Patch change on a given Part). Disabling Multi program
change ensures MIDI Program Changes will perform their
intended action. Multi Program Change is a great feature to
allow instant recall of all 8 Parts, their effects and their
Part configurations using just a single MIDI Program Change command. Thisis particularly useful for live performances.
Receive MIDI Program
The Receive MIDI Program setting enables or disables the
reception of MIDI program change messages. This is a
global setting that applies to all Parts. If MIDI program
change reception is disabled with this setting, the setting
in the individual Parts is ignored. You can select whether
the messages will be received via DIN MIDI, USB or both.
MIDI Clock Source
The MIDI Clock Source setting determines whether MIDI
Clock messages will be received via DIN MIDI or USB MIDI.
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System Configuration
Multi Program Channel
The Multi Program Channel parameter selects the MIDI
channel used by the Multi Program Change feature. The
value is ignored if Multi program change is disabled. As
Kyra has 8 Parts (and hence up to 8 MIDI channels) it
makes sense to use a MIDI channel not used by any Part.
That way, MIDI Program Changes on Part channels operate
exactly as intended and the additional feature of Multi
Program Change uses its own channel. See also Multi program change.
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Transmit Arp Clock
The Transmit Arp Clock setting enables or disables the
transmission of MIDI Clock for the Arpeggiator on Part 1.
To save MIDI bandwidth, switch this off if it isn't required.
The option allows Kyra to send the MIDI clock via DIN
MIDI, USB or both.
If you use Kyra’s Multi Program Change feature in a
live setting with a master keyboard, using the same
MIDI channel as your performance allows you to
change the current Multi instantly from your master
keyboard.
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Send Manual Dumps To
The Send Manual Dumps To option configures which MIDI
port manual Patch and Multi dumps will be sent to.
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As MIDI can only support one clock, only the clock
for the arpeggiator on Part 1 can be sent. This isn’t
really a limitation as it’d be very unusual to have
asynchronous arpeggiators on multiple Parts.
Transmit Arp Notes
The Transmit Arp Notes setting enables transmission of
each note played by the arpeggiators (there can be one on
each Part) to be sent as MIDI note events. This allows you
to send and/or record the notes played by the Arpeggiator
so they can be edited and played back as individual notes
on Kyra or another synthesizer. This feature can use a lot
Advanced users can use manual dumps to record
Patches and Multis in their DAW or custom MIDI
applications.
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System Configuration
of MIDI bandwidth, especially when the Arpeggiator is in
Chord Mode. The options allow you to configure Kyra to
send the notes via DIN MIDI or USB (but not both).
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You can overwhelm DIN MIDI quite easily with Arp
note transmissions, especially in Chord Mode. This
will result in poor timing and/or lost notes.
Bulk Send/Receive Bank
Transmit Automation
The Bulk Send/Receive Bank option configures which of
Kyra‘s Patch banks will be sent and received by manual
MIDI SysEx messages. Be sure to have this set correctly
when sending bulk Patch dumps to Kyra; an incorrect
setting could result in a whole bank of valuable Patches
being overwritten. It is also good practice to set this value
to OFF when not in use. This ensures any generic manual
SysEx banks sent to the system will be ignored (although a
specific bank SysEx dump can still be done - but they can
only come from an Editor/Librarian application and not
another Kyra). This value is not stored when system is
powered down and will default to OFF each time the system starts.
The Transmit Automation setting configures the front
panel controls related to Patch parameters to transmit
MIDI SysEx messages when they are changed. These messages can control another Kyra, or more usefully, they can
be recorded by a DAW for control automation. To save
MIDI bandwidth, switch this off if it isn't used. The option
allows Kyra to send the automation messages via DIN MIDI
or USB.
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The best way to perform automation is to use MIDI
CC (Continuous Controller) messages routed via the
Mod Matrix. These CCs can come from your DAW or
master keyboard’s assignable controls.
You can send ROM Banks. If a Bank is received via MIDI
when a ROM Bank is selected in Bulk send/receive bank, it
will be ignored. To copy a Bank to ROM, send it to a RAM
Bank first and then copy it to the required ROM Bank using
the Copy Patch Bank page.
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Waldorf Kyra
System Configuration
These options are intended for sending individual and
whole Banks of Patches from one Kyra to another without
a computer (by wiring the MIDI out of the first system to
MIDI in of the second system). Ensure SysEx is enabled on
the receiving system and the Device IDs are the same on
both.
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Send Selected Bulk Bank
When Send Selected Bulk Bank is activated (using the
Value Up button), Kyra will immediately send the whole
bank selected by the Bulk send/receive bank option as a
series of SysEx messages. Owing to the amount of data
involved it takes about ten seconds to complete if DIN
MIDI is being used - it is instantaneous if USB MIDI is selected. Use this feature to back up your Patches to another
Kyra, a DAW, a generic or custom librarian or a MIDI utility
with SysEx capability. If backing up directly to another
Kyra via DIN MIDI, ensure its Bulk send/receive bank is set
correctly so that you don't overwrite Patches you wish to
retain.
The main use of manual dumps is for advanced
users with custom MIDI setups and to send Patch
Banks and Multis from one Kyra to another one without using a computer.
Send Current Edit Buffer
When Send Current Edit Buffer is activated (using the
Value Up button), Kyra will immediately send the Edit
Buffer of the current Part as a SysEx message. Providing it
was configured correctly, a Kyra synthesizer attached via
DIN MIDI would place this in its current Part’s Edit Buffer.
The data is sent via the port (DIN MIDI or USB) configured
in the Send Manual Dumps To option in the MIDI Configuration page.
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The data is sent via the MIDI port (DIN MIDI or USB) configured in the Send Manual Dumps To option in the MIDI
configuration page.
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Send Current Edit Buffer will never overwrite a
stored Patch in the receiving Kyra.
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Any Kyra that receives these messages will overwrite the whole Bank it has selected in Bulk
send/receive bank without warning. If you have
multiple Kyra units connected, ensure everything is
configured correctly and your Patch Banks are
backed up.
Kyra Manual
System Configuration
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Patch Storage - Copy Patch Bank
Bulk send/receive bank defaults to Off so no Patches will be overwritten unless you changed this setting since you last powered up Kyra.
Send All Multis
When Send All Multis is activated (using the Value Up
button), Kyra will immediately send all the Multis as a
SysEx message. Use this feature to back up your Multis to
another Kyra system, a DAW, a generic or custom librarian
or MIDI utility. Note that Multis rely on the Patches they
reference - if the required Patches are not present at the
referenced locations the Multi will not sound as intended.
The Copy Patch Bank feature allows you to copy whole
banks of Patches between any of Kyra’s 26 memory banks.
Recall each Bank comprises 128 Patches. You can copy
between any two banks regardless of whether they are
RAM Banks or ROM Banks.
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Any Kyra that receives these messages will overwrite all its Multis without warning. If you have multiple Kyra units connected, ensure everything is configured correctly and your Multis are backed up. Unlike Patch Dumps, there’s no Bank setting (as there’s
only one bank of Multis) so the overwrite will always
occur.
Ensure the selected Copy to Bank does not have any
Patches you want to keep (or is backed up) before activating the copy as the entire Bank will be overwritten.
The procedure to copy Patch Banks is:
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1.
Locate the Copy Patch Bank page in the System
Edit pages.
2.
Set the Bank you wish to copy from in "Copy from
Bank". Any Bank can be selected.
3.
Set the Bank you wish to copy to in the "Copy to
Bank". Again, it can be any of the Banks from
Waldorf Kyra
System Configuration
A to Z. It should be different to the Bank you are
copying from otherwise no changes will be made.
4.
Patch Control
Set the Activate Copy option to 'Enabled'.
The copy operation will be performed when you next
power up Kyra (e.g. from Standby). You can do this straight
away by pressing and holding both the Transpose buttons
to place Kyra into standby and then powering up again or
you can do it any time later and any changes you make to
the Bank to be copied will be included. The settings in the
Patch Bank Copy page are set back to their defaults with
Activate Copy set to Disabled when the system is powered
on again to prevent any inadvertent copies; it is not necessary to set Activate Copy back to Disabled after a Bank
copy. You can change it back to Disabled if you want to
cancel a copy instruction before you power down Kyra.
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Initialise Patch
Initialise Patch reverts all the settings in the current
Part’s Edit Buffer back to their default values. This is useful
for creating a 'clean canvas' Patch from scratch without
any unexpected settings from an existing Patch. Note that
only the Edit Buffer is initialised, no stored Patches are
changed unless you store Patch using the Store sequence.
Once the Patch is initialised, the page switches to the Home
page ready for you to start work. A default patch has the
name "Default Patch Name" and plays a simple sawtooth
waveform.
Kyra automatically de-activates Copy after it has
completed the copy operation.
The Copy Patch Bank feature is the only way you can write
Patch Banks to ROM Banks (i.e. banks in the range H-Z) –
you’ll need to configure it to transfer to a RAM Bank first
and then use the Copy Patch Bank feature to copy the
Bank to ROM subsequently.
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There’s a handy shortcut to generate an Init Patch:
simply press and hold Shift and then press Exit.
Kyra Manual
System Configuration
Category Filter
System Build
The Category Filter allows you to browse Patches of a
specific category. At power up, the Category Filter is off
('no filter') and browsing Patches using the Patch (and
Bank) buttons simply steps through each Patch in sequence. When the filter is enabled, the Patch buttons will
step through the Patches of the specified category, regardless of Bank. The Bank buttons have no function when
the Category Filter is active.
This page shows the software version, hardware version
and serial number of the system.
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The Category on the Home Page flashes to indicate a
Category Filter is active.
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The selected Category will appear as soon as you use the
Patch buttons (the current Patch won’t be changed if it is
not in the selected Category). If there are no Patches of the
filtered category, the Patch buttons step through all the
Patches in the Bank and the Bank buttons can be used. To
disable the Category Filter, change it back to 'no filter' in
the Patch Control page.
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Use the Software version number to determine if
there’s an updated version of firmware available for
your Kyra.
The Bank buttons do not have a function when a
Category Filter is active.
The Category Filter does not affect MIDI Program changes,
they operate as before and are able select a Patch regard
less of category.
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Kyra Sound Programming
Kyra Sound Programming
Don't worry if they seem daunting in the first instance, it
will become clearer as you read and experiment. A good
understanding of the architecture is important for getting
the best sounds from Kyra.
Introduction
As you saw in earlier sections, Kyra’s sound generators
operate in Wave or Hypersaw mode. It isn’t possible to
configure both at the same time but with Kyra’s massive
polyphony, you can achieve this by layering a Wave mode
Patch with a Hypersaw mode Patch.
In this section we take a closer look at Kyra’s capabilities.
To move beyond using preset Patches and making simple
edits to them, you’ll need a deep understanding of Kyra’s
architecture.
Once you have mastered Kyra’s architecture, we’re confident you’ll be able to create amazing new sounds.
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Once you’ve worked through Kyra’s factory presets,
you’ll want to create your own new, exciting
sounds for Kyra. You’ve come to the right place to
learn how to do that ! Here at Waldorf, we always
encourage users of our synthesizers to dive in and
explore.
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User layering if you want Wave and Hypersaw
sounds together.
By layering eight dual hypersaw sounds (and
detuning them) you can achieve as many 96 oscillators on a single note and still play 8 notes. Please
don’t underestimate the power of layering to create
massive sounds on Kyra.
Sound Generation
Overview
We start by reviewing the sound generation architecture
of Kyra. The diagrams in this section detail the configuration and signal routing of sound generation modules in Kyra.
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In Wave Mode, when Dual Mode is off, two independent
Oscillator Groups are mixed together and are routed to the
Filter as shown in the diagram.
Wave Mode Architecture – Single Filter
When Dual Mode is selected, everything is doubled up (not
shown in the diagram) so there are two Oscillator Group
pairs (a total of 20 oscillator sources!) and each pair is
routed to a separate filter with a true stereo signal path.
However, the filters can't be adjusted individually other
than using stereo LFOs. If individual filter control is required, select Dual Filter Mode. In either case, you can detune
the two Oscillator Group pairs.
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Remember in Dual Mode, you can detune the two
voices using the Dual Mode Detune setting.
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Kyra Sound Programming
exists (unlike Dual Mode, Single Filter mode). However,
they are individually mixed and routed to separate Filters
which can be configured and modulated individually. Note
that the Aux Oscillator is present in both groups but has a
common Mode and Level setting. As a result, the output of
the Aux Oscillator will always be presented to both Filters.
This is not the case for the other oscillators which allow
individual control per Oscillator Group.
Wave Mode Architecture - Dual Filter
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Dual Filter Wave Mode offers the maximum flexibility in designing advanced Patches. Rememer the
two filters can be configured completely independently (including being of different types).
With all that power comes the need to plan your
Patch design. Unlike simpler configurations, it’s not
easy to ‘stumble‘ across a killer sound in Dual Filter
Mode.
When Dual Filter mode is selected, the signal routing
changes as shown in the diagram. Even though Dual Filter
mode uses two voices, only one Oscillator Group pair
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In Hypersaw Mode, Kyra dedicates and manages six oscillators in the hypersaw algorithm. When Dual Mode is
selected, the hypersaw algorithm is extended twelve oscillators and two filters are used for a true stereo signal path.
The diagram shows the signal flow for Hypersaw Mode (in
single and Dual Mode configuration). Remember Kyra
manages the two filters for you in Dual Mode Hypersaw –
Dual Filters Mode isn’t available in Hypersaw Mode.
Hypersaw Mode Architecture
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In Hypersaw Dual Mode, Kyra interleaves the partials and spreads them across the stereo stage resulting in some very phat sounds. You can use the
Panorama control to adjust the stereo spread of
Kyra’s hypersaw.
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Programming Tips – Wave Mode
Wave Mode Sound Sources
Overview
Within each oscillator group, you'll find the following
independent sound sources:
Kyra adopts a virtual analogue synthesis model which has
the advantage that it is easy to construct sounds using
intuitive subtractive synthesis. It adds its own twists
though, with the massive cycled waves being notable. But
don't be fooled, Kyra is not a ‘rompler’ (sample player)
that plays canned samples, the perfectly-looped, singlecycle waves are designed for crafting new and exciting
sounds far beyond that possible with a rompler.
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Sawtooth: A harmonically-rich tone ideal for modeling
with subtractive synthesis.
Pulse: A basic tone that can be adjusted from a square
wave (manually or via a modulator) to a very thin pulse
wave. Pulse width modulation (PWM) results in a very
distinctive classic synthesizer sound.
Sub Oscillator: An oscillator that can play at the root pitch
of the Oscillator Group or one octave below. The waveform
can be one of four preset waveshapes, sawtooth, square,
pulse or triangle. Each of the two Oscillator Groups has its
own Sub Oscillator. The Sub Oscillator can be detuned (up
to one semitone each way) relative to its parent group. You
can use the Subs as bass-enhancing sound sources or as
generic, detunable components to add thickness to the
sound. Sub Oscillators in root pitch mode are especially
useful for adding detuning effects to the Oscillator Group
when Hard Sync is enabled as they are not involved in
Hard Sync, FM or Ring Mod effects. In that respect, they
can be viewed as completely independent oscillators.
Kyra’s cycled waves are an important part of the
sonic capabilities of Kyra. Even though they’re static you can ‘slice and dice‘ them with the Ring Modulator, Hard Sync and FM as well as cross-fade
between them with any modulator you wish.
When Kyra is in Dual Mode and Dual Filter mode is also
enabled, each of the Oscillator Groups is routed through its
own, independent filter. If Kyra is in Dual Mode but Dual
Filter mode is off, the two Oscillator Groups will still pass
through two independent filters, but the filters will both be
controlled by a single set of controls and the only difference between the two groups will be when stereo LFOs
are used. This is to permit a true stereo signal path.
Noise: A special, unpitched tone used to model wind and
rushing effects produced by the Aux Oscillator. Note that
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even though each Oscillator Group does in fact have its
own Aux Oscillator, there is only a single level control for
both which is the Aux Level control in Oscillator Group 1's
control page. As a result, in Dual Filters mode, noise will be
presented to both filters if the Aux level is above zero.
Noise is produced by the same source as the Ring Mod
output, so you can have on or other depending on the Aux
Oscillator Mode setting in Voice Control.
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Wave: A large palette of 4096 mathematically generated,
perfectly looped single-cycle wave shapes covering a large
range of timbres.
Another use for noise is to ‘grunge up‘ a sound.
Adding some noise and filtering it correctly can give sounds a distinctive lo-fi quality as if they were
recorded using and old tape recorder.
The Ring Modulator has a separate level control so
you can use a modulator to adjust the amount of
Ring Modulation in a sound as it evolves. This can
result in some very creative possibilities. Try using
this technique to give a sound a sharp, dissonant attack and then evolve into a purer sound with fewer
harmonics.
Ring Modulator: The Ring Modulator (Ring Mod) is a
special effect and a sound source itself (the Aux Oscillator).
It operates on the waves of both Oscillator Groups to produce its output. Note that even though each Oscillator
Group does in fact have its own Aux Oscillator, there is
only a single level control for both which is the Aux Level
control in Oscillator Group 1's control page. As a result, in
Dual Filters Mode, Ring Mod audio will be presented to
both filters if the Aux Level is above zero. Ring Mod is
produced by the same source as the Noise output, so you
can have one or other depending on the Aux Oscillator
Mode setting in Voice Control.
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effects are achieved when the frequency ratio between the
Oscillator Groups is up to one octave either way.
Wave Mode Hard Sync
Hard Sync is a technique that mathematically links two
oscillators to generate further sound possibilities. On Kyra,
this occurs between the two Oscillator Groups and is either
on or off, there is no level or intensity setting.
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It is worth noting that Sub oscillators are not part of Hard
Sync and they operate independently of Hard Sync. As
Hard Sync tends to produce very tonally pure sounds, you
may want to switch the subs to Root Pitch mode or turn
them off as their wide tonality can be a distraction from
the pure Hard Sync sound. On the other hand, they offer
the ability to provide additional detuning effects that may
otherwise be missing from a Hard Sync sound (as detuning
is, by definition, not possible between two hard sync'd
oscillators). As always, experimentation is key.
Take some time to experiment with Hard Sync. It
can generate sounds that are not possible to achieve any other way. On Kyra, it excels at obtaining
evolving harmonic textures from the two Waves.
Simply stated, Hard Sync uses the cycling of one oscillator
(in this case the root frequency of Oscillator Group 1) to
trigger (reset) the cycle of another (in this case, Oscillator
Group 2). In this configuration, Oscillator Group 2 behaves
somewhat differently in that its fundamental frequency is
locked (synchronised) to that of Oscillator Group 1. However, adjusting the tuning interval between the two oscillators (typically by applying a pitch modulation, static or
dynamic, to Oscillator Group 1) results in timbre changes
in Oscillator Group 2 rather than the detuning effect it
would normally have. This timbral change offers a wide
spectrum of sounds that could otherwise not be achieved
and work particularly well with the wave sounds. Unlike
FM (frequency modulation) almost all Hard Sync configurations are harmonic and getting to a useful sound does
not take nearly as much effort as it does with FM. The best
There are two distinct uses for Hard Sync. The first is to
use it in a static configuration simply to obtain new timbres, usually from the waves in the two Oscillator Groups.
By adjusting the relative tuning between the Oscillator
Groups using the Oscillator Group 2 Tune and Detune
controls, you will hear distinct timbral variation. So long as
the ratio of tuning remains constant (as it will unless you
are using exotic modulation matrix configurations) the
timbre will be consistent across notes.
The second and more interesting use is a dynamic configuration whereby the ratio of frequencies between the two
oscillator groups is varied by a modulator (e.g. an envelope
generator or LFO). When this is done, rather than hearing
a pitch change, you will hear a timbre change and when set
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correctly, the sound can be very rich and animated. Check
out 'The Imperator Piano' preset. The rich, evolving timbre
variation during the decay period of the piano is achieved
using a dynamic hard sync of waves. It would not be possible to achieve that effect using a filter as filters only remove harmonics - Hard Sync is creating new and shifting
harmonics as the note evolves. It is most useful for creating
intense, evolving, tonally pure sounds but also great for
techno basses with that signature sync sound. Hard Sync
can add evolving tonal variation and grain index-like
effects to otherwise flat wave sounds with very little programming effort. Also, check out the preset 'The Synchrotron' where extreme Hard Sync is used with velocity
mapping to achieve a very distinctive techno effect.
Wave Mode Frequency Modulation
In summary, be sure to make good use of Hard Sync. Note
that at least one sound source in Oscillator Group 2 must
be audible for hard sync to have any effect. You can use
hard sync on the basic virtual analogue sounds (pulse,
sawtooth) but it is by far most effective for use on wave
sources. Hard Sync is not available in Hypersaw Mode and
has no effect on the Aux and Sub Oscillators.
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Frequency Modulation (referred to as 'FM') is a technique
to make one oscillator (the modulator) to modulate the
frequency of another (the carrier). Just as you can use an
LFO to modulate the pitch of an oscillator, FM is the same
as that just at audio frequencies.
FM traditionally has a characteristic metallic bell-like
sound but as with hard sync, think of it as having more
applications than that. Compared to Hard Sync, FM takes
more time to achieve useful sounds but like Hard Sync, it
can achieve sounds that are very difficult to achieve in
other ways.
You’ll need to experiment much more to get useful
sounds with FM. It’s worth the effort though.
On Kyra, FM operates by using the wave output of Oscillator Group 2 to modulate the frequency of Oscillator Group
1. As with hard sync, noise the sub oscillators are not affected and can be used independently as before. As Oscillator
Group 1 is the destination of FM, at least one sound source
(saw, pulse or wave) in Oscillator Group 1 must be present
for FM to be heard.
Avoid using Hard Sync with FM, they are contradictory and the result is rarely musical.
The idea behind FM is that the frequency ratio between the
two oscillators, as well as the shape and degree (intensity)
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tor Groups), recall that the carrier can be any of the VA
waves or any wave and the modulator can be any wave.
FM on these complex waveforms can result in some very
interesting tones but as mentioned, you'll need to experiment extensively to get great sounds. Some wave groups
are more useful than others for FM purposes - tonally
simple waveforms such as those in the FM and Overtone
groups are most useful. A modulating waveform that has a
non-zero bias (i.e. is positive more than it is negative or
vice versa) will cause a pitch shift of the note so it's best to
use symmetric waves for the FM modulator. Many (but not
all) waves in the FM group are symmetric. The carrier
wave does not need to be symmetric.
of the modulation creates additional harmonics (usually
quite a lot of them!). Those harmonics will be pleasing at
certain ratios or highly dissonant otherwise. Depending on
the sound you're looking to achieve you may want to turn
off all the sound sources in Oscillator Group 2 if you are
using a swept frequency ratio or dissonant ratio as that
will likely be a distraction. Note that the tap for the Oscillator Group 2 wave for FM is before the level control for that
sound source so you can mute it (set its level to zero) along
with any and all of the other sources in Oscillator Group 2
and still achieve the FM effect from Oscillator Group 1
sources. This may be useful if the frequency of Oscillator
Group 2 is set to be a varying inharmonic to Oscillator
Group 1. If the ratio is harmonic, you may wish to leave
some of Oscillator Group 2's sources present in the mix.
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You can mix the two sources (carrier and modulator) and the FM amount as you wish using modulators. It’s very flexible.
Kyra uses FM rather than phase modulation. That’s
why the modulator needs to have zero bias to avoid
a pitch shift.
As FM and Hard Sync are contradictory processes, it does
not make sense to use FM when Hard Sync is enabled. It
won't be useful and, in most cases, will force the oscillators
out of tune. On the other hand, FM works very well with
the Ring Modulator.
As mentioned, you'll need to experiment far more to get
useful sounds from FM and just like classic FM synthesizers. In mentioning classic FM keyboards, they had multiple (typically 4 or 6) FM components (often called 'operators') but they typically only generated very simple waveforms such as sine waves. On Kyra, even though there are
only two components participating in FM (the two Oscilla-
In summary, FM needs a lot of experimentation to yield
good results but when it does, the sound can be very distinctive and hard to achieve without FM. It's good for
crunchy basses as well as percussive metallic effects and
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other hand, Ring Mod works exceptionally well with FM
and can add considerable grit to the sound.
adding a sharp edge to electric piano sounds FM synthesizers became famous for. On Kyra, as the waves cover many
of these sounds directly, FM more useful for achieving
controlled distortion. Remember that FM has an intensity
control and it can be the destination of a modulator in the
Mod Matrix, so you can vary the intensity of the FM effect
using a modulator (e.g. only apply it during the initial part
of a sound or increase the FM with aftertouch).
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As with FM, you'll need to experiment to get great sounds
and Ring Mod. Experiment with the wave shapes and the
semitone intervals between the two Oscillator Groups to
obtain the best effects. Unlike FM, Ring Mod does not affect
the operation of any of the existing oscillators, it takes the
output of the two waves and produces a new sound source.
On Kyra, the Ring Mod operates on the two wave oscillators, one of which is present in each of the Oscillator
Groups. The two signals are taken before the wave level
controls, so you can choose whether to hear one or both
original wave sources with the ring modulated output or
just the ring modulated combination and anywhere in
between. As there are three level controls in total for the
Ring Mod, the two wave levels as well as the Aux Oscillator
level, you can mix the three however you wish, either
manually or via the Mod Matrix.
Be sure to use Kyra’s Mod Matrix to control the FM
variables (the frequencies and shape of the carrier
and modulator as well as the FM output level).
Wave Mode Ring Modulator
Ring Modulation (referred to as 'Ring Mod') is a technique
where two signals are mathematically multiplied. The
result of this is the production of a massive number of
additional harmonics, the sound of which vary hugely on
the waveforms (and hence harmonic content) of the two
source sounds as well as the ratio of their frequencies even a tiny amount of fine tuning can produce dramatic
results. Ring Mod is an all-time classical effect and has
been used in countless productions for decades.
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Like FM, Ring Mod is contradictory to Hard Sync and using
Ring Mod with Hard Sync is unlikely to be useful. On the
Be sure to use Kyra’s Mod Matrix to control the
Ring Mod variables (the frequency ratio as well as
the three levels – the two inputs and the Ring Modulator output).
As Ring Mod is performed by the Aux Oscillators, you'll
need to choose the Ring Mod as the Aux Oscillator function
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in the Voice Control page before it can be used. Once enabled, the Aux Level control in Oscillator Group 1 will set the
level of the Ring Mod output. You can modulate this in the
Mod Matrix as required.
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Routing velocity to Ring Mod EG modulation
amount using the Mod Matrix is a great technique
to bring up additional harmonics during the attack
phase of a note as notes are played harder. Several
of the factory presets use this technique.
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(one in each oscillator group) you can use modulators to
smoothly cross-fade between the two waves to generate
interesting, evolving timbres.
Bringing It All Together
Each one of the Wave Mode oscillator sources are independent and can be used simultaneously. Use the level
controls for each source to mix them together to get
exactly the sound you want.
Remember to make use of the Subs for additional bass
(sub mode) or detunable thickness (root mode).
As a final step in your path to wave mastery, learn how to
use FM, Hard Sync and Ring Modulation to get dramatic
evolution of wave sounds. By applying modulators to these
techniques, you can achieve extremely dynamic sounds.
It's important to note that the level control for each source
is available as a destination in the modulation matrix so
can be controlled by many modulation sources, e.g. envelope generators and LFOs. This provides many opportunities for advanced synthesis including the ability to crossfade (morph) between any two waves using any modulator
including EGs, LFOs, performance controls as well as pernote modulation such as velocity.
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A good technique to learn is to use a wave sound at the
beginning (the attack portion) of a sound. For musicians
who have used classic Roland LA (linear arithmetic) synthesizers this should be very familiar. It’s a great way to
get that extra ‘snap’ or ‘punch’ at the beginning of a sound.
Several factory presets use this technique and most use
EG3 for the attack (very fast attack, short decay) modulator leaving EG2 free for modulation throughout the rest of
the note.
All the source Level controls can be controlled via
the Mod Matrix. There’s a lot of possibilities!
Kyra’s waves offer almost limitless possibilities. There are
a few useful tips to bear in mind when using the waves:
With such a large set of available wave shapes in the
waves, once combined with these methods to combine and
modulate the two waves in a Patch, the possibilities are
endless. It can take some time to find the right waveshape
and combining effect, but you’ll get more adept at it as you
work with Kyra and get to know your way around the
wave groups.
In their most basic form, you can use the waves to generate static timbres beyond those offered by the basic oscillators. You can mix these in using the Wave level controls
and then select the wave itself.
Beyond static waves, you can apply modulators to the
waves so adjust their relative levels; as there’s two waves
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particularly effective routing and is used in many of the
factory hypersaw patches.
We recommend you study the factory presets as
part of your journey to becoming Kyra sound programming guru. Experiment, experiment, experiment!
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Hypersaw Mode
Overview
Even though you have far fewer parameters to play
with in Hypersaw Mode, you can and should use
them effectively. Modulating the Spread parameter
results is extremely effective. Try modulating
Spread with velocity, LFOs, EGs or aftertouch!
The Hypersaw Sub oscillator option drops the pitch of the
two most extreme partials of the hypersaw by one octave
and can give certain hypersaw sounds a distinct bass
boost. The effect is more pronounced with higher levels of
Hypersaw Intensity.
Kyra's Hypersaw uses a special algorithm to create lush
soundscapes quickly. Hypersaw Mode replaces Wave Mode's two Oscillator Groups with a single source whose
tonal content is constructed with just two controls, Intensity and Spread. Built entirely out of multiple, harmonically-rich sawtooth waves (referred to as 'partials') each
adjusted according to a special algorithm, the Hypersaw
provides characteristic soundscapes ideal for a range of
uses from high impact lead sounds through to lush, animated pads.
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The Hypersaw sub is not always beneficial to a
sound as it can detract from the purity of certain
sounds such as pads. On the other hand, for huge
sounds, it can help a lot. Flip the sub on and off and
pick the setting that sounds best.
Other than Intensity and Spread, the only other controls
that are used in Hypersaw Mode are the pitch modulation
controls (Tune, LFO1 to Pitch) in Oscillator Group 1. This
applies to Mod Matrix routings as well.
Bringing It All Together
The two Hypersaw parameters are available as destinations in the Mod Matrix for some truly wonderful modulation possibilities. Mappings of channel pressure (aftertouch) or envelope generators to Hypersaw Spread is
Remember to consider the overall Patch Level when increasing the Hypersaw intensity as increasing the intensity
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adds significant energy to the signal. If Hypersaw Patches
get too loud, the limiters will kick in. This may or may not
be desirable depending on the sound you're trying to
achieve.
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As hypersaws are so harmonically rich, they provide a great source for Kyra’s filters. Try feeding the
Hypersaw into Kyra‘s 24dB (4-pole filters) with a
good amount of resonance and modulate the filter.
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uses square or pulse waves. You can mix and match to
combine the two, the possibilities are endless.
Comparing Wave and Hypersaw Mode
When creating sounds bear in mind that Hypersaw is
useful for a relatively narrow (but highly pleasing and
popular) range of sounds. It lacks much of the flexibility of
Wave Mode and relies almost entirely on the filters to
achieve significant evolution of timbre as the note sounds.
Even though Kyra doesn’t allow Hypersaw and Wave Mode
to be used at the same time, you can achieve very similar
effects by using the techniques described above. As mentioned, layering a Hypersaw and Wave Mode Patch is
another way to achieve this without compromising the
number of oscillator sources. Kyra is powerful enough to
do this even when playing big chords with long release
times.
In Wave Mode you have a vast palette of waves to draw on
as well as the ability to modulate parameters like Pulse
width, FM, ring mod and the ability to cross-fade the various sound sources using the Modulation Matrix to achieve
very complex, evolving timbres. As always, experimentation is the key to getting the right sound.
Using Dual Mode
Dual Mode doubles up two Kyra voices to build on both
Wave Mode and Hypersaw Mode configurations. Dual
Mode is not simply a unison of two voices.
You can re-create most of the functionality of Hypersaw
Mode in Wave Mode; you get the same number of oscillator sources (by setting the Wave to a sawtooth and operating the Sub Oscillators at root pitch) and they need not be
sawtooth waves either. You don’t get as much detuning
control (four pitches rather than six) but you can choose
alternative tunings and modulations that Hypersaw Mode
can’t achieve. You also get the advantage of having two
independent filters to process the sound. It takes some
time to configure but the results can be outstanding.
Designed for sounds that need extra impact and stereo
width, Dual Mode doubles up Kyra's oscillators and filters
to provide a true stereo signal path. Additionally, in Hypersaw Mode, Dual Mode doubles the resources available to
the hypersaw as well as providing true stereo imaging to
provide an amazing twelve partial stereo hypersaw sound.
In Dual Mode, alternate hypersaw partials are sent to each
side of the stereo bus via its own filter.
By setting the Wave to a square wave (or similar) and the
Sub Oscillator to a root pitch square or pulse, you can
configure a ‘Hypersquare’ – a variation of a hypersaw that
Dual Mode features a Panorama control to allow you to
adjust the stereo spread of the voice. By default, this is at
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its maximum setting to provide the widest stereo field for
Dual Mode patches but you may wish to restrict the stereo
width the sound occupies in a mix by reducing the Panorama value. The sweet spot for most Dual Mode sounds is
in the range 64 to 96.
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Note that Dual Mode (including Dual Filter Mode) is the
only option that reduces Kyra's polyphony. Dual Mode
uses two voices for each note sounding. It's unlikely to be a
problem as Kyra has 128 dedicated contention-free hardware voices but it's worth restricting Dual Mode to use on
just two or three Parts in dense compositions. Note that
when Dual Filter mode is engaged, Dual Mode is also switched on. This still only uses two hardware voices, not four.
We recommend you always add some Dual Mode
Detune for Dual Mode wave Patches to avoid a sterile, mechanical sound. Add a little Dual Mode
Detune even for a non-Dual Mode Patch so if you
choose to switch on Dual Mode later, the Patch is
‘Dual Mode Ready‘.
Dual Mode can have a significant improving effect on many
types of sound. If you're looking to simply add stereo
width or movement to a sound, consider using the Chorus/Flanger module in the Part's Effects Unit with increased Effect Mix and feedback values to achieve this. On the
other hand, Dual Mode will often add substantial depth
and presence that can't be achieved purely with effects.
When Kyra is configured for Wave Mode and Dual Mode,
the Dual Mode Detune control in Voice Control allows the
two stacked voices to be detuned to add extra depth. Dual
Mode Detune isn’t used in Hypersaw mode as the Hypersaw algorithm manages the detuning of all the partials. In
Wave Mode, be sure to apply at least some Dual Mode
Detune as it will improve the sound considerably. With no
detuning at all, Dual Mode Patches can sound synthetic and
mechanical – even a slight amount will be effective, even
for Patches where you don’t want an obvious detuning
effect.
A particularly interesting use of Dual Mode is combining it
with stereo LFOs. When modulated by a stereo LFO, each
of the two voices in a Dual Mode configuration will have
different phases (either random, antiphase or quadrature
depending on the LFO mode). This can produce some
incredibly animated stereo effects as the phasing will be
different for each side of the stereo image.
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Remember to reduce the Patch Level when you
switch on Dual Mode as you’ve effectively added
3dB (doubled) the signal level. Failing to account
for the increased level will make the Patch sound
louder than other Patches and can cause the limiters to kick in.
No Unison Mode?
Kyra’s Dual Mode uses special algorithms to provide more
flexibility than simple unison.
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Unison is simply playing the a sound stacked up with
an exact copy of itself, perhaps with some detuning.
Kyra doesn't offer a polyphony-robbing unison mode as
there's really no need for it with up to 20 sound sources
per note in Dual Mode combined with extensive detuning
capabilities. If you feel the need to stack more sounds up,
layer Paches in a Multi. Layering is far more flexible than
unison as the Patches loaded into the component Parts of
the layer need not be the same. They can also have separate levels, effects, detuning and stereo positioning. In a live
gig setting, you can recall layered Patches just as easily as
regular Patches by using a Multi. Check out some of the
factory Multis to see what can be achieved by layering on
Kyra.
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There is also an additional per-Part Formant Filter in the
EQ module to impart vocal effects onto Patches. You can
also use the EQ module in the Part effects to further shape
the sound. These filters are detailed in the Effects section.
Filters
Once the sound sources in the two Oscillator Groups (or
the Hypersaw) are mixed together, they are passed to the
Kyra’s Filter section. Kyra has one filter per voice by
default but when Dual Mode is enabled, two independent
filters, configured in parallel (one per Oscillator Group or
Partial Group in Hypersaw Mode), become available.
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Kyra‘s Filters are accurate emulations of the classic ladder
designs found on many vintage analogue synthesizers. The
Filters have six configurations offering low pass, band
pass, high pass each with 2-pole (12dB/octave) and 4-pole
(24dB/octave) responses. Each configuration sounds radically different and will impart distinctive sonic characteristics on the sound from the Oscillator Groups.
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Experiment to discover ways of combining Kyra’s
Filters with the Effects Units. The EQ, Formant Filter and Phaser are particularly good companions to
the Filters.
Take the time to get familiar with the six different
filter types offered by Kyra. They each offer distinctly different sounds. Once you’ve mastered that,
learn how to use the various modulation possibilities to create dynamic filter effects.
The type and configuration of a synthesizer's filters very
much determine its 'signature'. Kyra‘s Filters have a distinctive sound best characterised as full and rich for the
two pole filters, sharp and acidic for the four pole filters.
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As a result, each note can be panned anywhere in the stereo field by means of a modulator.
Mixers
Kyra has four hardware mixer units. Each of them serves a
different purpose and having a good knowledge of their
location and purpose is important for effective programming. All the mixers except the Output Mixer can be modulated.
Part Mixer
The Part Mixer allows you to set the relative levels of the
8 Parts. Note that its design and location give it a different
purpose to the level parameter in a Patch. The Part volume
parameter sets the level for the Part post-effects. This
means that changing the Part volume does not change the
level of the signal going into the effects chain so the timbre
of the sound does not change as it does when the Patch
level is adjusted:
Source Mixers
The Source Mixers mix the oscillator sources for each of
the two Oscillator Groups as required - whether manually
as level controls or by means of a modulator. The mixer is
applied per note, so the relative balance of each oscillator
can be different on a per-note basis, e.g. in response to
note velocity. The mixers shown in the voice architecture
diagrams are the Source Mixers.
As its name implies, the Part Mixer is a component of the
Part settings. Less obviously, it is also available as a Patch
parameter - the Final Level parameter which is located in
the Effects pages (Dynamics). Use Final Level to equalize
the levels of Patches without affecting the timbre itself (as
is the case with the Patch Level). The key is to remember
that Patch Level and Patch Pan are pre-effects and Part
Level (a Part parameter), Final Level (a Patch parameter)
are post-effects.
Input Mixer
The Input Mixer fulfils the role of the VCA (voltage controlled amplifier) in a traditional synthesizer. It controls
the level of each note in response to a modulator such as
an envelope generator or LFO. The Input Mixer takes the
mixed output from the Oscillator Groups (or two groups if
Dual Voice is configured) and mixes the resulting output
onto one of the stereo busses that represent Kyra‘s 8 Parts.
Output Mixer
The Output Mixer allocates each of Kyra‘s 8 Parts to one
of the four stereo line outputs. Any number of Parts can be
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assigned to each output but a given Part can only be assigned to one output. If more than one Part is assigned to an
output, they are mixed together. Note that the Output
Mixer does not affect USB audio which is presented to the
USB host as the original 8 stereo Parts from the Part Mixer.
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Microtuning
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Overview
By default, Kyra plays notes according to the equal temperament tuning scale. This tuning is widely used in modern
Western music and allows music to be played in any key.
However, there are many alternative tunings and in other
parts of the world and with music styles other than modern Western, these other tunings are used extensively.
Kyra supports all tuning schemes by means of full keyboard tunability using the MIDI Tuning Standard (MTS).
With MTS, Kyra can tune any key to any frequency to single cent resolution. This allows tuning schemes with octaves containing other than the 12 notes per octave of equal
temperament tuning. Kyra supports fixed and dynamic retuning.
Kyra will ignore a request to play MIDI note zero but
it can (and must) be present in the MTS bulk dump
message.
Realtime Per-Key: These messages tune individual keys
in real time, as the song plays. This offers the most flexibility as the tunings can be changed during the song. Hermode Tuning is an example of a tuning that uses this. Your
sequencer must support the tuning scheme for it to work.
Kyra maintains a single, global tuning scheme at any given
time and does not store tuning information in non-volatile
memory. Being global, the tuning configured applies to all
notes on all Parts. Kyra defaults to equal temperament
when the system is restarted. Some DAWs can handle the
tuning messages automatically, others will require manual
insertion of MIDI Tuning Standard messages in the song
preroll in the form of a Non-Realtime Bulk Dump.
MIDI Tuning Standard
The only way to change the tuning is to replace it with
another one. Restart Kyra to restore it to equal temperament tuning (or send it a bulk MTS of equal temperament).
Kyra supports two forms of MTS messages:
Non-Realtime Bulk Dump: These tune every key MIDI
can play in a single message. This message is usually sent
at the beginning of a song. As most tunings will only sound
correct if played in a specific key (equal temperament's
advantage is that it doesn't have this constraint), the song
must be in the specified key to be correctly tuned.
Other Tuning Parameters
Kyra's master tuning can be set using the System Configuration page to be in the range 430Hz to 450Hz in 1Hz
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steps. This is a persistent global parameter that affects all
parts and tunings.
Kyra also supports per-Part tuning. The Part Parameters
allow cent-level tuning of a Part. Kyra recognises MIDI
RPNs 0 and 1 so tuning can be configured by your DAW at
the start of a song or in real time during the song.
Further References
Microtuning is an advanced topic and support for real time
tuning varies widely amongst the various DAW applications. Check the user manual of your DAW for microtuning
and MTS support. Bulk tuning can be achieved with any
software capable of sending MIDI SysEx messages. Check
the user manual and FAQs for your DAW for more information. Microtuning is a fascinating topic; it opens up new
possibilities for your compositions and is an essential tool
for composers of classical and non-Western music. If you’re new to alternative tunings, there is a wealth of information on the topic online to help you explore the topic
further.
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The first is that using Mod Matrix to do what the hardwired modulators can do simply wastes Mod Matrix slots.
There are six slots, but you can run out if you use slots on
routings that can be had 'for free' using the hardwired
mods.
Modulation Matrix
Overview
As mentioned earlier, Kyra has a comprehensive set of
hardwired modulation routes that take care of the bulk of
routine modulation programming needs. However, there
are a lot of possible modulation routes in the system and to
address each one with a dedicated route would require
hundreds, if not thousands, of options.
The second, more interesting reason is that many of the
hardwired modulators are themselves destinations for the
Mod Matrix. For example, you could configure channel
pressure (aftertouch) to adjust the amount of LFO1 routed
to the oscillator pitch. You wouldn't be able to do that in
the Mod Matrix alone as either the number of options
would become overwhelming or the concept of feeding
back into the Mod Matrix would be necessary and that
makes life complicated. So, take the time to learn the fixed
mods so you can use them for the basic tasks and learn
how to use them as Mod Matrix Destinations. The sky
really is the limit in terms of the modulation possibilities
available with the Mod Matrix.
To simplify this Kyra offers the Modulation Matrix (Mod
Matrix), a concept from vintage synthesizers where physical pins were inserted into arrays (the matrix) to wire
modules together. On Kyra, these pins become menu options, but the concept is similar.
Use the Mod Matrix Select button to navigate the Mod
Matrix features. Each press on the Mod Matrix Select button will display each of the six Mod Matrix channel pages
in turn. There’s two pages for each channel, one for the
sources and another for the levels applied to each destination.
g
Understanding that hardwired modulators can be
Mod Matrix destinations is key to mastering the
Mod Matrix (and modulation in general) on Kyra.
When looking at the Mod Matrix options, don't think that
the hardwired modulators (also known as ‘fixed mods’)
can be forgotten about as everything they can do Mod
Matrix can do better. There are two problems with that.
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channel). In that case, the total modulation value is determined by adding up all the routes, accounting for the fact
some modulations can be negative. This can be useful if a
single Mod Matrix route does not provide the range you
want: simply add another identical route (by adding a
second identical destination to the same source) and they
will ‘stack’.
Structure
A Mod Matrix route consists of a modulation source a
modulation destination (the sources and destinations are
collectively referred to as agents in the user interface).
Each Mod Matrix channel can have one source and up to 3
destinations. Each of these 18 routes has an amount value
that can be positive or negative. For each destination, the
final amount (positive or negative) is added to the currently configured value of the destination control. Note
that it is added, it does not replace the destination value.
For example, if you have a Patch where the filter is set to
its maximum setting, adding more with the Mod Matrix
will have no effect (but adding a negative value will). When
configuring the Mod Matrix, you must be aware of the
‘base’ setting of a destination control in the Patch as the
Mod Matrix output will be an offset from that value.
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Modulation Sources
Kyra offers an extensive list of sources for the Mod Matrix.
Most are MIDI controllers; the rest of the line-up is internal
modulation sources such as LFOs and EGs. Note that some
of the MIDI sources, such as pitch bend and pan, also have
hardwired routes (e.g. to both Oscillator Group pitch for
pitch bend and Part pan for the Pan control). Adding a Mod
Matrix route does not affect or remove the hardwired
route but it means you can 'overload' the controller to do
other things.
The output of the Mod Matrix is added to the configured value of a parameter along with any other
modulations being applied. Once all these are added together, the final value is applied to the destination parameter.
The ordering of destinations in each channel is not relevant. A source can appear in more than one channel (e.g. if
you want to use it for more than three routes) and a destination can appear in more than one route (even within a
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Source
Description
Pitch bend
Channel pressure
Modulation wheel
Breath controller
MIDI CC 3
see Source name
Keyboard Channel Pressure Data
see Source name (MIDI CC#1)
see Source name (MIDI CC#2)
see Source name
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Foot controller
Data entry
Balance
MIDI CC 9
Pan
Expression
MIDI CC 12
MIDI CC 13
MIDI CC 14
MIDI CC 15
MIDI CC 16
MIDI CC 17
MIDI CC 18
MIDI CC 19
Sustain pedal
EG1
EG2
EG3
LFO1 unipolar
LFO1 bipolar
LFO2 unipolar
LFO2 bipolar
LFO3 unipolar
see Source name (MIDI CC#4)
see Source name (MIDI CC#6)
see Source name (MIDI CC#8)
see Source name
see Source name (MIDI CC#10)
see Source name (MIDI CC#11)
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
MIDI Sustain pedal (CC# 64)
Amp Envelope Generator 1
Filter Envelope Generator 2
Aux Envelope Generator 3
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
see Source name
LFO3 bipolar
On velocity
Random per note
MIDI note
Polyphonic Press.
Off Velocity
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see Source name
Velocity value
Random value per note
MIDI Note number
Polyphonic Keyboard Pressure Data
Release velocity value
Remember you don’t have to use modulation
sources for their original purposes. With Kyra, if
you want to wire the Pitch Bend wheel to the Sub
Oscillator level, go ahead and do it. This is why there’s an option to defeat the standard operation of
the Pitch Bend controller by setting Pitch Bend
amount to zero.
All sources are unipolar; they only cause positive or negative (not both) modulation on a destination. The only
exception is the LFO sources which each appear twice as
Mod Matrix sources – once as a unipolar source and once
as a bipolar source.
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g
OSC1 sawtooth level
OSC1 wave level
OSC1 pulse level
OSC1 aux oscillator level
OSC1 sub level
OSC1 sub detune
OSC1 pulse width
OSC2 tune
OSC2 detune
OSC2 LFO1 to pitch
OSC2 LFO2 to pulse width
OSC2 sawtooth level
OSC2 wave level
OSC2 pulse level
OSC2 sub level
OSC2 sub detune
OSC2 pulse width
Hypersaw intensity
Hypersaw spread
Filter 1/2 balance
Filter 1 cutoff frequency
Filter 1 resonance
Filter 1 EG1 to cutoff
Take the time to learn when to use a unipolar and
when to use a bipolar LFO routing. As an example,
if you are modulating the pitch of an oscillator with
an LFO, you’d want the average pitch to be that the
oscillator to be configured for. The LFO would then
apply modulation in both directions (sharp and
flat). You’d use a bipolar routing for that. Note that
hardwired LFO routings are always bipolar.
If a modulation route is set to be negative the effect of the
modulation is inverted. For a unipolar source, the modulation will be completely negative. This is especially useful
for EG sources.
Modulation Destinations
Almost all Kyra’s parameters are available as Mod Mat
destinations.
Destination
OSC1 tune
OSC1 detune
OSC1 wave OSC2 FM
OSC1 LFO1 to pitch
OSC1 LFO2 to pulse width
Description
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
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<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
Waldorf Kyra
Kyra Sound Programming
Filter 1 EG2 to cutoff
Filter 1 LFO2 to cutoff
Filter 2 cutoff frequency
Filter 2 resonance
Filter 2 EG1 to cutoff
Filter 2 EG2 to cutoff
Filter 2 LFO2 to cutoff
VCA level (pre-effects)
VCA pan
VCA stereo width
VCA LFO1 to amplifier
VCA LFO2 to pan
EG1 attack
EG1 decay
EG1 sustain
EG1 release
EG2 attack
EG2 decay
EG2 sustain
EG2 release
EG3 attack
EG3 decay
EG3 sustain
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
EG3 release
LFO1 speed
LFO1 delay
LFO2 speed
LFO2 delay
LFO3 speed
DDL mix
DDL delay
DDL feedback
Phaser mix
Phaser feedback
Phaser modulation rate
Phaser modulation depth
Phaser frequency
Chorus mix
Chorus delay
Chorus feedback
Chorus modulation rate
Chorus modulation depth
Reverb mix
Reverb time
Reverb damping
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<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
Kyra Manual
Kyra Sound Programming
Reverb darkness
EQ mid gain
EQ mid frequency
Formant filter gain
Formant filter tune
Distortion mix
Distortion drive
Final level (post-effects)
Dual Detune amount
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
<- see destination name
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these and they will be editable in the DAW as they are
standard MIDI messages rather than system exclusive
messages. MIDI CCs use considerably less MIDI bandwidth
than SysEx-based automation messages and can be used to
update more than one Part at the same time. The use of
MIDI CCs is recommended where possible. Kyra supports a
wide range of fixed CCs (MIDI defined and extensions) and
allows virtually limitless extensions via the Modulation
Matrix.
Control Automation
All of Kyra‘s controls (rotary controls and buttons) that
relate to Patch parameters can be automated. This allows
your DAW to record any changes made to Patch parameters during a performance. When the sequence is played
back, the controls will be updated exactly as they were
during the original performance.
To enable control automation recording, enable Send Automation in the MIDI Configuration page. When enabled,
any control related to a Patch parameter will send MIDI
SysEx messages that can be recorded by your DAW (or
control another connected Kyra).
Only Patch parameters can send automation. Part and
System Configuration controls do not send automation
messages - remember this includes transpose (a Part parameter) and Master Volume (a System Configuration
parameter). Part parameters can be controlled via SysEx
messages but do not send automation messages themselves.
Switch off Send Automation if you're not using it (it is off
by default). The messages generated can occupy a significant amount of DIN MIDI bandwidth and memory in your
DAW, especially for rotary controls. If you have recorded
automation you no longer require (or it is incorrect), delete it in your DAW.
Follow this checklist to ensure automation works correctly:
For automation recording:
As automation uses MIDI SysEx messages, it is not possible
to edit it in a DAW (other than the position of events). If
you want editable automation, the best solution is to use
MIDI Continuous Controllers (CCs). You can use the fixed
CCs or for more flexibility, use the Mod Matrix to map CCs
to the parameters you want to automate and then configure these on your master keyboard. The DAW can record
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•
Enable Send Automation in the MIDI Configuration
page and ensure the automation messages are configured to use the required MIDI port (DIN MIDI or USB).
•
Select the Part you wish to automate.
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Kyra Sound Programming
•
Adjust controls intended for automation to their
default positions.
•
Move the controls as required as the DAW records the
messages (ideally, onto a separate automation track).
•
Overdub with automation from any other Parts as
required.
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Control Automation can be useful for certain types
of improvised music. Even so, we’d recommend using MIDI CCs and recording them from your master
keyboard rather than from Kyra’s controls using
Control Automation.
For automation playback, check that the Device ID in the
MIDI Configuration page is the same as it was when the
automation was recorded. There is no reason to change
the Device ID unless you have more than one Kyra on a
single DIN MIDI cable.
Use a Program Change message in the song preroll to set
the automated parameters to their default values. If the
Patch doesn't contain the correct defaults, edit the Patch or
send automation messages in the song preroll (only the
final message is required, the others can be deleted).
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We recommend the use of MIDI Continuous Controller and the Mod Matrix to solve your modulation requirements. Only resort to Control Automation if
there is a specific need that can’t be solved with
MIDI CC and Mod Matrix automation.
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Hum
A background hum indicates the likely presence of a
ground loop in your overall system. Use headphones
connected directly to Kyra to confirm the hum is not
present at that output. Solving ground loops is very much
dependent on the set up of your studio and is beyond the
scope of this manual although removing connections in
your setup (not just on Kyra) one at a time in your system
is a good way to find out what is causing the hum. DIN
MIDI can't form a ground loop but USB can, as can the line
outputs if you have them connected to more than one
piece of equipment (e.g. two amplifiers or mixers).
Low Levels or Noise
As Kyra has such a large dynamic range, single Part playing
will result in relatively low levels. These lower levels are
necessary to ensure Kyra can output up to 128 notes over
8 Parts without using excessive compression. When
playing single Part sounds, you might need to boost the
input gain on your mixer or amplifier, this is normal. Check
that the Master Volume control is at its maximum setting;
this will ensure noise is minimised. Kyra has very highquality components in its line outputs and significant noise
(hiss) should not be evident if everything is set up correctly. If you find the need to turn the Master Volume
control much below 100, consider turning down the trim
on your mixer or the volume of your amplifier and turning
up the Master Volume control to get similar levels.
Interference
The presence of digital static, interference or crackling on
the line outputs is likely to be caused by faulty connections. Check that jack plugs are fully inserted and are in
good condition. Try replacement leads and ensure they are
balanced TRS types - balanced connections considerably
increase tolerance of interference. Ensure Kyra is connected to balanced line inputs. Don't use microphone, phono
or guitar inputs on your amplifier, mixer or soundcard.
Some mixers and soundcards have switchable inputs ensure the switch is in the balanced line level input setting.
Check nothing near Kyra or the leads to your mixer is
For USB recordings, as the audio bit depth is 24 bits,
boosting the level recorded is unlikely to result in significant degradation of the sound quality when normalising
the recorded audio.
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causing interference; mobile phones are a possible source
of interference and have no place in a studio.
•
If you're recording via a sound card, check it is of good
quality. Built in (on motherboard), old and/or low cost
soundcard interfaces won't have quality balanced inputs
and are unlikely to yield good results.
Soundcard mode is disabled so that instrument audio
is routed to Output A rather than USB audio.
Distortion
No Output
If the sound is distorted, first check if this is a feature of the
selected Patch. It is possible to add intentional distortion
to a Patch by a variety of means so be sure to check this
first.
There are a few reasons why there might be no output. A
good check is to insert headphones directly into Kyra's
headphone jack. If audio is present there, the problem is
likely to be with the line output leads or your mixer/soundcard. If audio isn't present, check:
Next, check that the level of the Patch isn’t too high. If a
Patch level is too high, the limiters will kick in and cause
saturation and compression of the sound, especially when
loud block chords are played. If this is not what you want,
reduce the level of the Patch.
•
The Main Volume control is turned up
•
Your master keyboard is configured correctly and
transmitting on the correct channel. Check MIDI is
being received by looking at the MIDI indicator on Kyra’s Home page.
•
The Part Output is set to the outputs you have connected and that the Part Volume is correct. Remember that
if you're listening on headphones plugged directly into
Kyra’s headphones output, you will only hear Parts assigned to Output A.
It is unusual but possible to get distortion on the line outputs (including the headphone output which is simply a
mirror of Output A) if more than one Part is sent to a single
output and the Parts themselves are very loud. This would
be heard as crackling or clipping. If this is happening, reduce the Part Volumes (in the Multi Edit page). As you add
more Parts to your composition, it is good practice to review and remix the Part volumes and reduce them to rebalance the overall volume rather than reducing the volume
on your mixer (or Kyra's headphones output) to compensate. This will avoid the risk of any distortion.
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Using more than one of line outputs reduces the risk too as
fewer Parts are being mixed onto a single output. As the
USB output streams are not mixed, this risk does not exist
for the USB streams.
you use a step editor to create a sequence of the same
note and quantize the notes back to back, sequencers
occasionally will send the MIDI note on event of one
note before the note off event of the previous one. As
Kyra can only play one instance of a note on a given
Part, this will result in the note not being heard. To fix
this, shorten the event so there is a definite gap
between the end of the note and the start of the next
‘hit’ of the same note.
This small risk of distortion is a design compromise to
ensure a good dynamic range is available but without
individual Parts having excessively low levels. On the other
hand, Kyra seeks to avoid excessive compression. As a
result, it is essential to manage levels as described above
to avoid distortion occurring.
•
Two notes are playing with opposite or near-opposite
phase. If two notes play such that their phases are opposite, they will sound much quieter or not sound at
all. This can happen when identical notes are played
(on different Parts) with hard quantization. To fix this,
add slight randomization to the start times. Detuning
or using a different sound is another strategy. This
problem can also occur with Dual Mode sounds.
•
Kyra is running out of voices on a Part. Kyra can sound
up to 32 notes per Part – if this is exceeded, the oldest
note sounding will be cut off to play the latest one requested. There’s also an overall limit of 128 for all the
Parts; if this is exceeded, new note requests will be ignored. You’re unlikely to hit these limits but be aware
of it. Remember that Dual Mode and Dual Filter Patches use two voice channels per note played.
Missing Notes
There are several reasons why notes may appear to be
missing when you play back a song:
•
The envelope of the sound is such that the note is released before it can be heard. In other words, the note
is too short to be heard for the configured envelope.
•
The note is cut off by a repeat of the same note at a
lower velocity. This is the most common cause of perceived missing notes.
•
A modulator is modifying some parameter that reduces
the level of the note.
•
The note off event was received before the note on
event. This can happen unexpectedly – in particular, if
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•
either simplify your composition or to use USB MIDI which
operates considerably faster than DIN MIDI on Kyra. Note
that sending SysEx messages during a song is not recommended, especially if using DIN MIDI.
MIDI events are getting lost. Check the quality and
length of the cables (USB or DIN MIDI). Try alternative
cables. Reboot your computer to check if that resolves
the problem.
If you’re feeding Kyra’s audio back into your DAW and
have other tracks using VST instruments or other instruments, you will need to adjust the settings on your DAW to
match these. This is referred to Delay Compensation.
Kyra is extremely responsive to MIDI but you must account for the delay between the MIDI note play being sent
by your DAW and the audio being received back at your
DAW. The audio itself, whether via the stereo line outs or
via USB, must be received by your computer and this also
takes time. With a fast computer, USB MIDI and USB audio,
you should be able to achieve a ‘round-trip’ latency of 5-20
ms. If it’s more than that, check the settings and performance of your computer. If it’s less than that, you can
either ignore it or use your DAW’s Delay Compensation
settings to eliminate it completely (it isn’t actually eliminated, the MIDI events are just sent by your DAW slightly
earlier so that the audio is received back at the correct
time but the result is the audio is spot on the beat). The
impact of the latency depends on the type of music and
your tolerance of timing latency but the important fact us
that providing your system is configured correctly, you can
eliminate it completely. Please refer to the manual of your
DAW on how to configure Delay Compensation. Once con-
Stuck Notes
Notes that seem to be ‘stuck’ is almost certainly a sign that
MIDI data is being lost or corrupted. Check your cables and
MIDI drivers. Check that your controllers are not sending
contradictory MIDI data on the USB and DIN MIDI ports.
Stuck notes can be stopped by changing the Patch on the
front panel.
Timing Problems
There are several reasons why your compositions might
have individual notes, sequences of notes or whole
tracks/songs that appear to be playing out of time. This
would usually manifest itself as the audio from Kyra being
‘behind the beat’.
Your composition is too complex for MIDI. This primarily
relates to the DIN MIDI interface. MIDI was developed in
the early 80s and is a low speed interface. It is not capable
of complex, highly quantized compositions with lots of
real-time controller updates. The result of this is timing
problems or lost events in your tracks. The solution is to
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figured, you should be able to forget about it. Delay Compensation does not apply to live play (when you are listening to audio via the DAW as you play it) but if your system
is configured correctly and performing well, the latency
will be so low as to be not noticeable).
If you are using USB MIDI and/or audio, connect Kyra
directly to your computer. Do not use hubs. They are often
non-compliant and will introduce additional latency and
other problems. Use good quality cables.
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The line outputs are still active when you use USB
audio but we recommend you don’t use the line outputs when you’re using USB audio, except in the case
of Soundcard audio from Output A. This is due to the
fact there may be a slight delay between the USB audio and the line outputs.
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Kyra USB Interface
kHz or better still, 96kHz and resample to 44.1 kHz when
you produce your final master.
USB Audio
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In addition to the stereo line outputs, Kyra streams each of
its 8 stereo Parts over USB as 'virtual' connections to the
host DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). The Output Mixer
is not used for USB audio (but remains functional for the
line outputs) and each Part is streamed independently
directly from its Part without any further mixing or processing.
We recommend you stream Kyra’s USB audio at
96kHz 24 bit and only resample when you produce
your final mixdown for mastering. Consider 48kHz
only if your DAW is not fast enough to accommodate 96 kHz audio.
As Kyra has a USB 2.0 port with a capacity of 480
Mbits/sec, there are no inherent constraints on audio
streaming as was often the case on synthesizers using the
older USB 1.x specifications (referred to as 'low speed' and
'full speed'). Check that your computer has the specifications necessary to support the high data rates involved.
Note that Kyra does not support legacy USB 1.1 (for audio
or MIDI); a USB 2.0 or above compatible USB port is required.
Any mixing required can be done in your DAW. Like the
line outputs, Kyra's USB audio runs at the native 96 kHz
audio format to ensure the highest possible quality audio
is available to your DAW. You can also select 48 kHz audio
by configuring your DAW for 48 kHz operation. Note that
the 48 kHz downsampling only affects USB audio. Kyra's
internal processing and the line outputs always run at 96
kHz. At either sample rate, the bit depth of the audio is 24
bits.
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Kyra will not connect to a low speed or full speed
USB 1.x port.
Remember that the Master Volume control does not affect
USB audio. Use Part Levels or controls on your DAW to do
any necessary mixing and levels management.
You can of course resample the audio in your DAW as part
of the final mixdown of your song, e.g. if you are mixing
down for mastering a CD at 44.1 kHz. Note that Kyra can't
stream at 44.1 kHz, only 48 kHz and 96 kHz are available.
If you have to master at 44.1 kHz, run your project at 48
You can check the sample rate Kyra is running at in the
System Configuration pages.
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Kyra USB Interface
source channel 1 is the right channel of Part 1, source
channel 2 is the left channel of Part 1, etc.
USB MIDI
MIDI commands and data can be sent and received via USB
MIDI as well as the DIN MIDI connectors.
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We recommend you use USB MIDI rather than DIN
MIDI. It’s much faster and requires fewer cables.
USB Installation
You should only need to configure the USB audio
mappings once in your DAW. Please refer to the manual for your DAW on how to do this mapping. Remember to include mappings for the return (Soundcard) channel.
In addition to the audio sources, a Kyra MIDI In and a Kyra
MIDI Out port should also appear on your computer’s MIDI
device list.
Kyra's USB implementation supports Windows 7 onwards
as well as macOS onwards. MacOS users do not need to
install a driver but until Windows fully supports USB Audio Class 2.0 (UAC2), Windows users must install the provided driver before using the USB connection; install the
driver before connecting the USB port for the first time. It
is important to ensure your computer operating system is
updated with the latest service packs and updates before
installing the driver.
Avoid inserting or removing the USB cable whilst the synthesizer is operating. Reconfigure cables when your computer and Kyra are all switched off. Note that most DAWs
will not resume MIDI transfers if the USB cable is replaced;
you might need to restart the application if the cable is replugged or Kyra is restarted.
Please plug Kyra directly into a USB socket on your computer – do not use USB hubs. The worst hubs are those built
into monitors. These are designed for low-performance
peripherals such as mice and keyboards. Many stand-alone
hubs do not implement USB correctly.
Once installed, Kyra should appear as a single device with
16 audio channels - configure the routings in your DAW to
route the channels to 8 stereo sources - refer to the user
manual of your DAW for directions on how to achieve this
as it will depend on which DAW you are using. The channel
allocations are for 8 stereo pairs in order, left then right;
for example, source channel 0 is the left channel of Part 1,
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Plug Kyra directly into a USB 2.0 or above port on
your computer. Avoid using hubs.
Kyra Manual
Kyra USB Interface
playback. SSDs (solid state drives) are an ideal solution for
the 'scratch disk' for your DAW’s audio.
USB Troubleshooting
Kyra implements USB Audio Class 2.0 (UAC2) with ASIO
support to achieve extremely low latency. Low latency (the
time between key presses and sound) is important to most
musicians. Most DAW applications have settings to configure the audio, usually in the form of buffer sizes. Smaller
buffers mean lower latencies but increase the demands on
your computer's performance. You’ll need to experiment
to get the right setting but it is a given that you should be
using a powerful computer with fast disks and plenty
memory if you want the absolute lowest latencies. Remember that Kyra is streaming 16 channels (8 stereo
pairs) of 24-bit audio at up to 96kHz to your computer that is a lot of data and puts significant demands on your
computer.
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When using USB audio with Kyra, avoid running other
applications on your computer whilst you are using your
DAW. Seemingly innocuous applications such as browsers,
instant messaging tools and office applications can tie up
CPU cycles and the hard disk to the point of interrupting
audio. It is good practice to dedicate your DAW computer
entirely to audio and use a different computer for everything else. Within the DAW itself, check that your plug-ins
are not soaking up excessive CPU load (most DAWs have a
load indicator).
Laptop computers tend to have slower CPUs, hard disks
and memory than desktop computers, especially when
running on battery power. Low latency multi track recording in a DAW on a laptop will need a very high specification
model. Laptop users should have their computer connected to mains power. On the plus side, having Kyra in your
setup removes a considerable amount of loading from your
computer as you’ll have far less need to run CPU-heavy
software synthesizers and effects.
Kyra always streams all 8 stereo pairs regardless of
how many streams you’re actually using.
If your computer isn't fast enough for the audio configuration you are using, you may hear clicks, pops or delays on
the USB audio. If this occurs, review your DAW buffer
settings. Other factors can cause audio defects including
buggy USB drivers, low quality cables, low quality USB
hubs and the hard disk in your computer being too slow to
keep up, especially once you start multi-track record and
If your computer is not sufficiently powerful to handle
Kyra's USB audio stream (which is likely to be the case if
you can't get perfect audio with satisfactory latency),
consider using the line outputs instead of USB audio. With
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a good quality mixer, Kyra’s four stereo outputs will sound
just as good as USB audio.
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ASIO
ASIO is only relevant to Windows users. Kyra is
compatible with macOS CoreAudio without the need
to install any additional drivers.
Kyra's USB driver is ASIO compliant. ASIO provides for
ultra-low latency capability allowing you to route studio
quality audio via USB and not get any discernible latency
between playing notes and hearing them (subject to the
performance of your computer).
Note that it is a limitation of ASIO that an application (e.g. a
DAW) can only load one ASIO driver at any given time. To
solve this, Kyra has a ‘Soundcard’ mode which will accept a
single stereo audio feed from your DAW and route it out
via Output A (and correspondingly, the headphone output). ASIO will not allow you to load a second driver for a
soundcard on your computer although there are workaround solutions such as asio4all for Windows users. You
can find the Soundcard Mode option in the first System
Edit page – switch this to Enabled to route audio from your
DAW to Output A. This will replace the synthesizer audio
currently assigned to Output A.
The use of non-ASIO compliant sound interfaces and applications for analogue input or playback (e.g. most on-board
sound cards) is not recommended. They are highly unlikely to support low latency, high quality audio playback.
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Kyra Firmware Update
Kyra Firmware Update
To update Kyra’s firmware software:
•
Kyra has a user-friendly feature that makes it possible to
update the firmware software easily.
Firmware updates can be easily done with our free Kyra
Manager application. The fastest way to get this application is by downloading it from our website at:
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waldorfmusic.com/kyra
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Download the Kyra Manager software for your
operation system (Windows or macOS).
Keep in mind to install the Windows USB driver
before using Kyra’s USB port with a Windows operating system.
•
Make sure that your computer has an active internet
connection.
•
Start the Kyra Manager application. On the left side of
the application window the checklist guides you
through the firmware update process.
•
Start with Step 1 and confirm every step. Make sure to
set up the correct MIDI connection within the software.
This is important in case you use more than one Kyra
within your setup.
•
With the last step, the firmware update finally starts.
•
The application shows a progress bar. Kyra will either
restart or shutdown after the update.
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Connect Kyra to your computer. You can use DIN MIDI
(please connect MIDI In and Out to your computer
MIDI interface) or USB MIDI. We stronly recommend to
use USB MIDI. Do not use a USB hub for connection.
Do not under any circumstances turn off Kyra
while the update step is in progress.
Waldorf Kyra
Technical Data
Technical Data
ROM (and between ROM and RAM) with the "Copy Patchbank" option.
Power Supply
Supply Voltage Power:
Supply Voltage Kyra:
Maximum power consumption:
Bank Name
A RAM
B RAM
C RAM
D RAM
E RAM
F RAM
G RAM
H ROM
I ROM
J ROM
K ROM
L ROM
M ROM
N ROM
O ROM
P ROM
Q ROM
R-Z ROM
100 – 240 V AC
12 V DC
9.5 W
Dimensions and Weight
Width:
Depth:
Height (including knobs):
Total weight:
440 mm
305 mm
85 mm
5.7 kg
Kyra Factory Bank List
Kyra comes with a wide range of sounds from experienced
sound designers to assist you on your journey into sound
programming. The RAM banks A-F are filled with patches,
copies of which can be found also in the ROM banks H-M so
that you can return to the original factory patches, if necessary. If you do not need these ROM banks, you can
replace them with your own patches at any time. Bank A
and B contain the highlights of the other banks, so you can
hear what the Kyra is capable of. RAM Bank G is empty so
you can create your own sounds. Same is for ROM banks RZ. Remember that you can copy banks between RAM and
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Description
Selection 1 Best of Factory
Selection 2 Best of Factory
Factory 1
Factory 2
Factory 3
Factory 4
Empty bank for storing own patches
Selection 1 Best of Factory (copy of A)
Selection 2 Best of Factory (copy of B)
Factory 1 (copy of C)
Factory 2 (copy of D)
Factory 3 (copy of E)
Factory 4 (copy of F)
Factory 5
Factory 6
Factory 7
Factory 8
Empty banks for storing own patches
Kyra Manual
Glossary
Glossary
ASIO
Audio Stream Input/Output. An audio interface driver
protocol for Windows audio specified by Steinberg. Allows
low-latency direct access to audio hardware.
Aliasing
A type of distortion specific to digital audio systems when
a sound contains components that exceed half the sample
rate (also known as the 'Nyquist Rate'). The result is a
nasty, metallic noise that varies unpleasantly with pitch.
Regardless of any marketing claims otherwise, it is not
possible to remove aliasing once it has occurred. Kyra uses
several techniques to mitigate aliasing, the main one being
the use of oversampling.
Attack
The first of the four segments in an ADSR-style envelope
generator. Faster attacks are associated with more percussive sounds and slower attacks with gentler pads and
string type sounds. The attack segment starts when a key
is pressed. If a note is retriggered, the attack phase will
start at the existing level of the note rather than at zero.
Antiphase LFO
Automation
A special setting for a Kyra LFO such that the LFO's output
is inverted (180 degrees out of phase) before it is applied
to the specified modulation target of the second voice of a
Dual Mode note.
The technique of controlling parameters using an external
controller, typically a sequencer. On Kyra, this can be done
with continuous controllers via the Mod Matrix or by recording Systems Exclusive messages sent by the physical
controls.
Arpeggiator
A phrase-playing unit that allows sequential playing of
notes played as a block chord on a keyboard.
Balanced
A balanced cable carries a single signal along two conductors each with opposite polarity. This allows the receiver
to remove most of the noise induced by the cable by subtracting the signal from one conductor from the other.
Kyra features balanced line outputs and you should use
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Glossary
balanced cables and a balanced input on your mixer or
sound card to obtain the best results, especially if the
cables are long. You can use unbalanced connectors and
inputs but you will lose the noise immunity offered by
balanced connections.
Battery
Kyra has a internal rechargeable battery that maintains
Patch, Multi and Configuration data when the system is
switched off at the mains. The battery is charged up
whenever mains is applied. A full charge, which is achieved
after a few hours of mains being connected, should last
many months but note that the system will lose settings
(including RAM patches) of the battery goes flat. To avoid
this, ensure you plug the synthesizer into the mains at
least for a few hours each month; ideally leave it plugged
in all the time and in standby mode. If you're planning to
store the synthesizer for an extended period without
power, it makes sense to back up all your Patches and
Multis before doing so.
Bank
A collection of 128 Patches. Patches are usually organised
into Banks of 128 to match the MIDI specification that
originally supported just 128 Patches. As synthesizers
became able to store more than 128 Patches, Patches were
grouped into Banks. Kyra supports 26 Banks of Patches
labelled A to Z. The instrument supports MIDI Bank Select
messages to allow the DAW/Sequencer to select Patches
from any of the 26 Banks. The current Bank can also be set
on the front panel using the Bank select buttons.
BPM
Bank Select
Beats per Minute. Kyra's arpeggiator is calibrated in BPM
to allow it to be manually matched to the tempo of a song
(typically in a live set). In a studio environment, if the
arpeggiator is used, it would normally be set to synchronise to a MIDI clock. In that way, the arpeggiator will always be in sync with the song even if the song tempo
changes.
A MIDI message to allow MIDI selection beyond 128 patches (or 'programs' in MIDI-speak). Using Bank Select is a
two-step process whereby the Bank Select message is sent
first and then Program Changes after that will select from
the Bank previously selected. Note that per MIDI specifications, a Bank Select message does not cause the Patch to
change, only the subsequent MIDI Program Change message does that and when it does, it uses the Bank selected
from the previous Bank Select message.
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result is an unpleasant clicking, buzzing or cracking sound.
Clipping is rare but possible on Kyra. Typically, it can only
occur if excessively loud Parts are mixed together onto the
same analogue output.
Cent
A very fine pitch interval representing 100th of a semitone.
A cent is the finest interval Kyra can tune its oscillators to
and is generally regarded as being finer than a human can
discern.
Coarse Tune
The ability to tune an oscillator over a wide range, typically at least one octave. Kyra offers coarse tuning in semitone steps (in addition to detuning in single cent steps) up to
two octaves above and below the root note.
Channel Pressure
Also referred to as Aftertouch. Channel pressure is a MIDI
feature to allow MIDI keyboards to respond to pressure.
Unlike Polyphonic Pressure, the pressure is per channel
rather than per note. Most MIDI keyboards can generate
channel pressure information. Kyra can receive channel
pressure information and routes it into the Mod Matrix
where it can be used to modulate any destination. Channel
pressure can also be added in most DAWs.
Contention
Contention is the situation that occurs when there are
shared resources in a system and a request is made that
exceeds the availability of those resources. Different systems handle this in different ways but in many synthesizers, it manifests itself as loss of polyphony or gaps in
sounds. Kyra was designed to be completely contention
free as all sound generation is done by dedicated hardware
rather than best-effort software running on a generic processor. As a result, Kyra has no contention and the system
will operate 100% accurately right up until it reaches its
maximum capacity of 128 notes (or 32 notes in each Part).
At that point, further notes will either displace older notes
(Part) or not play at all (128 notes reached).
Chorus
A modulated delay-based effect that gives the impression
multiple instruments are playing at once. When used in
moderation, it can give an otherwise flat sound a wonderful, airy feel. The Chorus/Flanger module on each Part can
be configured to provide this.
Clipping
A type of distortion that occurs when a signal reaches its
maximum excursion and is hard limited (clipped). The
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Glossary
Continuous Controller
DAC
A feature of MIDI to allow channel-based continuous parameters to be adjusted. Kyra responds to a defined set of
standard MIDI continuous controllers (CCs). In addition to
these standard CCs, Kyra offers additional fixed routings
(specifically, for Filter settings) as well as several additional controllers into the Mod Matrix to allow custom configurations.
Digital-to-Analogue Converter. The DAC convers the digital
audio into analogue audio such that it can be mixed using
an analogue mixer and rendered by an amplifier. Kyra
features a high-quality 32-bit stereo DAC running at 96kHz
for studio quality sound.
Comb Filter
A feature of DIN MIDI where you can connect devices in
series using the MIDI Thru connector. As Kyra responds to
up to 8 MIDI Channels, you can daisy chain two Kyras on a
single DIN MIDI port and have individual control over all
16 Parts. You can also daisy chain a different unit such as a
drum machine or a MIDI mixer. Please avoid chaining
more than two devices on a single MIDI connector otherwise timing can be affected. Daisy chaining does not apply
to USB MIDI.
Daisy Chain
A delay-based effect that uses very short delay times (as
little a few samples) and feedback combined with modulation to provide a characteristic hollow tube-like sound
particularly for percussive sounds. Even though this is a
delay effect the delay times are far too short for distinct
echoes to be discerned. The Chorus/Flanger module on
each Part can be configured to provide this effect and
includes a dedicated LFO to provide modulation of the
effect.
Damping
The use of a low-pass filter in the feedback chain of an
effect so that the residual sound loses high frequency content over time.
Cutoff Frequency
The frequency at which a filter transitions from its passband to its stopband. The Cutoff Frequency is often modulated and combined with resonance to provide dynamic
sounds.
Digital Delay Line (DDL)
An emulation of the classic delay line that adds echoes
(repeats) of the original sound that decays over time.
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Glossary
you find audio from Kyra is out of sync with your software
instruments, find out how to adjust the delay compensation on your DAW.
Kyra’s DDL can be used to achieve special effects or complex rhythmic effects on percussive sounds. Kyra provides
a delay module on each Part capable of providing delays
up to 2.7 seconds and the delay time can be synchronised
to a MIDI clock so it follows the tempo of your song accurately.
Detune
The technique of varying the pitch interval between two
oscillators by a relatively small amount (typically just a
few cents). Two oscillators playing the same pitch will
sound flat and hollow (and in fact may cancel out completely). Just a few cents of detune will provide a rich, animated effect. Synonymous with Fine Tuning.
DAW
Digital Audio Workstation. A Sequencer that can record,
process and replay digital audio as well as MIDI information. Kyra offers a USB 2.0 connection for complete DAW
integration.
Distortion
Decay
A modification, desired or undesired, of a sound. Many
things can cause undesired distortion but excessive levels
are usually the culprit. Closely related to dynamic range
and resolution. On the other hand, desired distortion can
add character to a sound making it sound ‘grittier’.
The second of the four segments in an ADSR-style envelope generator. The decay segment starts when the attack
segment completes (reaches full amplitude) and ends
when the sustain level is reached.
A term used to describe an effect that has been bypassed.
Kyra offers a dedicated distortion module on each Part
that uses waveshapers and filters to add considerable
extra harmonics to a sound.
Delay Compensation
Doubling
A feature of most DAWs that ensures the audio from
hardware instruments, including Kyra, and software (virtual) instruments are in perfect time synchronisation. If
A delay-type effect that uses delays in the order of 80150mS to provide a thickening effect whereby the echo can
just be discerned as distinct. The Chorus/Flanger module
Defeat
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Glossary
distortion or clipping. A larger dynamic range provides for
a larger range of levels without sacrificing audio quality
due to excessive compression.
on each Part can be configured to do this without tying up
the main Digital Delay module.
Dry
Effects
The component of a signal that has not been processed by
an effect. The component of a signal that has been processed by an effect is referred to as the 'wet' signal.
Often shorted to 'FX'. These are algorithms used to alter
and shape sounds, usually towards the end of the signal
chain. Kyra offers Limiters, EQ, Digital Delay, Distortion,
Phaser, Chorus/Flanger) and Reverberation modules in its
effects chain. Each Part has its own independent FX unit
which means a Patch will always sound the same regardless of which Part it is loaded into (assuming no outboard
processing).
DSP
Digital Signal Processing or Digital Signal Processor. The
use of discrete time signal processing to provide audio
synthesis and effects. Kyra uses Digital Signal Processing
but not traditional Digital Signal Processors as they are not
able to provide the contention-free performance required.
EG
Dual Mode
Short for Envelope Generator. A modulator used to achieve
evolving modulation effects, most commonly using an
amplifier to give a sound its own amplitude contour.
A feature on Kyra that allows two hardware voices to be
used to generate a stereo note. This can be applied to
Wave and Hypersaw Mode Patches. Dual Mode is the only
feature of Kyra that reduces its polyphony.
EQ
Short for Equalization or Equalizer. A process used to
shape the sound by cutting or boosting selected ranges of
frequencies. Kyra supports a 3-band shelving EQ with a full
range sweepable mid with adjustable Q on each of its 8
Parts.
Dynamic Range
The ability of an audio system to represent and handle a
range of sounds from the quietest to the loudest without
undesired distortion. A limited dynamic range will mean
quieter sounds can be noisy and louder sounds suffer
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has fallen out of favour in recent years but it still has its
uses; certain sounds are very hard to achieve using other
techniques. Kyra supports FM between its two Oscillator
Groups. Kyra also has a large wave bank of pre-made FM
shapes that can achieve many of the sounds true FM can
deliver without the complexity of configuring it.
Equal Temperament
A tuning method whereby the ratio between any two adjacent notes is the twelfth root of two. By default, Kyra
plays Equal Temperament tuning but it can be configured
to play any tuning by means of MIDI Tuning Standard
messages.
Follow Mode
Filter
A feature of Kyra that causes the OLED display to represent (follow) the control being manipulated by the
user. Engaging follow mode provides useful feedback as to
the current setting of a parameter. However, at times, it's
distracting to have the display switch when a control is
changed so Kyra allows follow mode to be switched off
using the Follow Mode button.
A sound processor that attenuates certain frequencies to
achieve a certain effect. Depending on the filter settings,
filters can boost frequencies around the cutoff point.
Flanger
An effect that uses relatively short delays and large
amounts of feedback to generate a characteristic whooshing sound. The delay period can be modulated to obtain
the whooshing effect. The Chorus/Flanger module in the
Effects Unit on each Part can be configured to provide this.
A grouping of harmonics (tonal components) that characterises a sound.
FM
Formant Filter
Frequency Modulation. A technique of using one oscillator
to modulate the frequency of another to provide distinctive extra harmonics. A useful technique but it can be very
difficult to predict what the sound will be in advance and
good settings are often more a matter of trial and error
rather than by design. For this reason, pure FM synthesis
A filter intended to impart vocal characteristics on a sound.
Kyra features a Formant Filter within each of the Part
Effect units.
Formant
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Glossary
loudness of notes and beats. Kyra provides Mod Matrix
agents (particularly the 'Random per Note' source) to help
with this and most DAWs offer timing variation features.
FPGA
Field-Programmable Gate Array. A type of integrated circuit that can be dynamically configured to perform specialist operations, usually with massive parallelism. Kyra is
based on an FPGA.
Hypersaw
A sound generation technique using banks of oscillators
generating harmonically-rich sawtooth waves (referred to
as 'partials') tuned and balanced according to a configurable algorithm. The result is a very rich, animated and
powerful sound useful for a wide range of uses. The beauty
of the hypersaw, in addition to its wonderful sound, is that
it is very simple to configure as there's only two parameters, Intensity and Spread. The algorithm used, and the
quality and number of the oscillators determines the quality of the hypersaw. Kyra’s hypersaw consists of six partials
by standard but this can be doubled to twelve by using
Dual Mode.
FX
Shorthand for 'effects'.
Gate Length
The interval over which a note is held by an Arpeggiator,
specified as a percentage of the configured beat length.
Hard Sync
An effect whereby one oscillator is phase locked to
another. It is very useful to achieve tonal variation on
wave-based sounds.
Latency
Hot
A delay, always undesired, between an action and its corresponding effect. Low latency in audio systems is especially critical when live playing by a human is involved as
any significant latency between keyboard action and hearing the sound is highly detrimental to the whole experience.
An unusually large audio signal that has the potential to
cause distortion.
Humanising
The practice of making music sound like it is being performed by human musicians rather than computers. This
usually involves subtle randomization of timing, pitch and
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Many factors contribute towards the total latency. Kyra
features exceptionally low latency due to the custom
hardware it has for MIDI processing and sound generation
but poor configuration of your computer or the software
running on it, or poor performance of the computer itself,
can result in the overall latency being unsatisfactory.
Master Tuning
The reference pitch to which instruments playing together
are tuned. Kyra allows its pitch to be set such that the A
above middle C is in the range 430 to 450Hz. This is the
instrument's root tuning to which all other pitch offsets
are relative to, even if microtuning is used. The default
setting is 440Hz.
Legato
A style of playing whereby the next note is played before
the previous one is released. On Kyra, only notes played
legato whilst in Mono key mode will sound with portamento.
Microtuning
Microtuning is the ability of a synthesizer to individually
tune each note to a frequency other than that defined by
the default equal temperament tuning. This allows the
instrument to play in tuning schemes other than equal
temperament. Kyra supports global (all Parts) full keyboard microtuning by means of the MIDI Tuning Standard
(MTS) for real time and non-realtime (bulk) updates.
Limiter
A process to limit the dynamic range of a signal in a musical way. Kyra hosts two Limiters on each Part. The first is
located after the EQ module and before the Distortion
module in the effects chain and has three programmable
settings. The second is located at the final Part output and
has a fixed configuration.
MIDI
Musical Instrument Digital Interface. A long-established
standard and protocol developed specifically for musical
instruments and related equipment to allow exchange of
data between instruments and controllers (DAW, Sequencer). Kyra supports MIDI via DIN MIDI connectors
(the traditional 5 pin jacks) as well as via high speed USB.
LFO
Low frequency oscillator. An oscillator with sub-sonic
frequency (typically below 20Hz) used to provide modulation effects. Kyra has a total of 6 distinct LFOs, three for
general synthesis and three in the effects section.
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MIDI Clock
Mono Play
A feature of MIDI to allow time-synchronised playback of
event sequences on connected systems. MIDI clock does
not relay positional information though and must be used
with other messages to ensure play occurs at the right
place as well as the right tempo. Kyra is able to lock its
arpeggiator, DDL and LFOs to MIDI clock. You must ensure
your master device (a sequencer, drum machine etc.) is
configured to transmit MIDI clock before this can work; it
is usually off by default as it uses valuable MIDI bandwidth.
Restricting a Part to only play one note at a time. Useful for
legato effects such as bass playing.
Multi
A stored configuration of all 8 Parts. A Multi allows instant
recall of the configuration of all 8 Parts - either from the
front panel or via MIDI (using the Multi program change
feature).
Multitimbral
Modulator
The ability of a synthesizer to play multiple sounds (specifically, multiple Patches) at the same time. Kyra is multitimbral as it has 8 completely independent Parts. The term
‘polytimbral’ is also used to mean the same thing.
A signal capable of affecting another in some way.
Modulation Matrix
Often shorted to Mod Matrix. The facility provided by
synthesizers to allow flexible routing of modulation
sources to modulation destinations. Originally, most synthesizers had fixed modulation paths which limited possibilities. The Mod Matrix offer almost unlimited modulation
possibilities (although not all of them are useful). In addition to a range of fixed modulators, Kyra offers six modulation matrix channels, each channel offering up to three
destinations thus providing a total maximum of 18 routings.
Octave
A musical interval corresponding to a doubling or halving
of pitch.
OLED
Organic Light Emitting Diode. A relatively new display
technology that offers many improvements over traditional LCDs (Liquid Crystal Displays). Typical advantages
include faster response times as well as dramatically im-
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Glossary
proved contrast and viewing angles. Kyra features an
OLED display.
there is a small possibility of aliasing on the USB audio
streams.
Oscillator Group
Pan
A grouping of oscillators within the sound source section
of Kyra. Kyra supports two independent Oscillator Groups
providing a total of ten sound sources per voice.
The location of a sound in the stereo field. 'Panning' implies changing the pan value so that the sound 'moves'
within the stereo field.
Outboard
Part
Signal processing units in the Kyra signal chain that are
applied externally, i.e. beyond its own internal effects
units.
The configuration of one of the 8 independent submodules of Kyra. It is reasonable to view a Part as a complete synthesizer. Each Part can play a configurable sound
(as determined by the Patch loaded into it) and has its own
set of configurable parameters.
Oversampling
The technique of operating a digital audio system at a
multiple of the fundamental sample rate (of 48kHz in the
case of Kyra) to avoid aliasing. Kyra's oscillators operate at
32x the fundamental rate and use other techniques as well
to all but eliminate aliasing. The filters and effects units are
two times oversampled. The result is a system with a clean,
bright top end that can support techniques particularly
prone to aliasing such as hard sync, FM, ring modulation
and wave playback. Systems that are not oversampled
often suffer from aliasing and/or have muddy or noisy top
end performance where they must use intrusive filtering
to attempt to avoid aliasing or attempt to conceal it when it
has already happened. When configured for 48kHz output
Passband
The range of filters passed (not attenuated) by a filter.
Patch
The settings that determine the sound a Part will play
when note requests are made via MIDI. Each Part hosts
one Patch from the pool of Patches stored by the system.
Kyra can store up to 3,328 Patches. Any Patch can be recalled instantly from the front panel or by means of a MIDI
commands (Program Change and Bank Select).
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Phaser
Portamento
An effect based on banks of modulated all-pass filters (as
opposed to delay lines). Provides an airy effect somewhat
like a flanger but subtler and more delicate in nature. Kyra
has a six-stage Phaser available on each Part. Phasers are
very useful for simulating vocal formants and adding other
resonant tonalities to sounds.
A technique whereby notes glide from one to the next.
Kyra implements real polyphonic portamento whereby the
base pitch for a new note is the pitch of the last note played on the channel and all notes take the same, configurable
time to reach their final pitch regardless of the size of the
interval. In Mono key mode, Kyra implements monophonic
portamento which only occurs for notes played legato.
Polyphonic Pressure
Pulse
Often shortened to Poly Pressure. A MIDI feature to allow
modulation of notes by pressing down on individual keybed keys. Very few keyboards support the generation of
polyphonic pressure information but it is possible to add it
in many DAWs. Kyra can receive poly pressure information; the data is fed into the Mod Matrix and can be used to
modulate any polyphonic destination. Poly pressure can
generate a lot of MIDI information so use it sparingly when
using DIN MIDI.
A basic waveform with a characteristic hollow, boxy sound.
The timbre is very much dependent on the width of the
pulses and modulation of the pulse width (PWM) provides
a distinctive sound. Available as a basic waveform in both
Oscillator Groups and their sub-oscillators.
PWM
Pulse Width Modulation. The technique of modulating
(varying) the width of a pulse wave to change its timbre.
When modulated by an LFO, PWM provides a very pleasing, chorus-style sound.
Polyphony
The maximum number of simultaneous notes supported
by an instrument. Kyra supports 128 notes of single voice
polyphony with up to 32 notes per Part.
Q
Q or Q-Factor is a parameter of the mid band of Kyra's EQ
module. Higher Q values will make the band more selective
Polytimbrality
See Multitimbral.
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Kyra Manual
Glossary
(for boost or cut). Lower Q values will make the band
wider. Filter resonance is also referred to as ‘Q’.
the level reaches zero. At that point, the note no longer
exists and the voice can be re-allocated.
Quadrature LFO
Resonance
A special setting for a Kyra LFO such that the LFO's output
is phase shifted 90 degrees before it is applied to the specified modulation target of the second voice of a Dual Mode
note. Compare this to the 180-degree shift when antiphase
mode is selected. The Phaser and Formant modules in the
Effects Unit also have their own quadrature LFOs.
An attribute of a filter, typically an audio filter, whereby
feedback is used to emphasise the frequencies around the
cutoff point (and consequently, increase the roll-off rate of
the cutoff itself). Resonance adds considerable character to
a sound, especially when the cutoff frequency is modulated.
RAM
Retrigger
Random Access Memory. In the context of Patch and Multi
storage, RAM allows you to store Patches and Multis quickly. The RAM in Kyra is backed up with a rechargeable battery so that the contents of the RAM are maintained when
the system is switched off (either in standby or completely
powered down). RAM is, however, limited in size and Kyra
supports 7 Banks of Patch storage, each containing 128
Patches along with 128 locations for Multi storage. ROM
storage can be used to extend the capacity, please see
ROM.
If a note is played that is already playing (e.g. playing the
same note twice in quick succession) the note is retriggered rather than another note at the same pitch being played more than once. In this context retriggering means the
replacement note will play from the level the previous one
was at the time of the retrigger. In most cases this works
smoothly but if the note velocity of the retriggering note is
significantly different there may be a perceived jump in
volume resulting in, depending on the sound itself, an
unwanted click; skillful playing and/or careful editing in a
DAW will avoid this if it is a problem.
Release
Reverberation
The fourth and final of the segments in an ADSR-style
envelope generator. The release segment starts when a
key is released or the sustain pedal is lifted and ends when
Often shortened to Reverb or just rev, an effect that simulates the acoustics of an enclosed space. Adds space and
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Waldorf Kyra
Glossary
'air' to sounds that would otherwise sound artificial, dry
and flat.
generous 26 banks of storage which is a total of 3,328
Patches.
Ring Modulator
Rompler
A sound processing effect which multiplies two waveforms
together to produce a third. This results in the addition of a
lot of extra harmonics and a very distinctive sound as the
ratio of the frequency of the two source sounds is changed.
Kyra implements a ring modulator between the two Oscillator Group waves.
Short for 'Read only Memory Player' a type of synthesizer
popular in the 90s and 00s that had a fixed set of sounds
stored as sampled audio in memory with very little ability
to edit or process them. Whilst being cheap to make and
easy to use, these synthesizers usually had a limited ability
to create new sounds.
Rolloff
RPN
The rate at which a filter attenuates harmonics as they
beyond the cutoff frequency. Kyra offers two pole filters
with a relatively gentle 12dB/octave rolloff and four pole
filters with a more aggressive 24dB/octave rolloff.
Registered Parameter Number. This is a set of MIDI- defined parameters. Kyra responds to RPN 0 for bend range,
RPN 1 for fine tuning and RPN 2 for coarse tuning of a Part.
Sample Rate
ROM
The frequency of the intervals used to represent sound in a
digital audio system. Higher sample rates allow the representation of higher frequency sounds as well as allowing the system to be more tolerant of out of band signals
that can cause aliasing. Kyra has a native sample rate of
32x (1536kHz) for all sound generation and 2x (96kHz) for
filtering, effects and final audio output.
Read Only Memory. In the context of Patch storage, ROM
allows you to store several Patch banks which are stored
indefinitely without the need for the battery that is used to
maintain RAM. On the other hand, you can't store Patches
individually in ROM and must use the Copy Patch Bank to
write whole Banks of Patches to ROM. You can, however,
recall Patches individually just as if they were in RAM.
When combined with the RAM Patch storage, Kyra offers a
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Kyra Manual
Glossary
Sawtooth
Sequencer
A harmonically-rich waveform that has a trumpet-like
sound. An ideal source for subtractive synthesis owing to
its rich harmonic content which includes odd and even
harmonics. Available as a basic VA waveform in both Oscillator Groups and their Sub Oscillators. Technically, Kyra
produces a ramp waveform but the harmonic content is
identical.
A computer program (or occasionally a standalone hardware device) that allows the recording, arrangement and
replay of MIDI data. A sequencer with the ability to record
and process digital audio is usually referred to as a DAW
(Digital Audio Workstation).
Screen Saver
The 'distance' between the signal (the bit you want to hear,
the music) and the 'noise' (the bit you don't want to hear).
Signal to noise ratio
A timer that reduces the contrast and eventually switches
off the display in order to reduce the risk of image burn or
shortened display lifetime. By leaving the screen saver on
its default settings, there's less chance of damage to the
OLED display if you forget to switch off your instrument as
the screensaver will protect it. The instrument remains
fully functional even if the display has switched off. Manipulating any front panel control will restore the display.
Disabling the screensaver is not recommended as leaving
it on for very long periods may shorten its lifetime. Note
that the screensaver will activate after 24 hours even if it is
disabled.
As the noise level in many systems is largely fixed, higher
(and hence better) signal to noise ratios are obtained by
having the signal as loud ('hot') as possible. That is true on
Kyra and you should ensure levels are as high as they can
be without risking distortion. Excessively low signal levels
combined with high subsequent amplification will reduce
the signal to noise ratio. In the unlikely situation you hear
noise (hissing) from Kyra, check that volumes are at the
right level. If you find the Master volume is much below
75% of its full level, look to turn that up and reduce the
level of your monitor amplifiers. Finding the right levels is
always a tradeoff and getting it right is a matter using your
ears and experience.
Semitone
A musical interval representing 100 cents or one twelfth of
an octave. The interval between two keys on a keyboard.
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Waldorf Kyra
Glossary
Slope
SSD
A setting in Kyra’s envelope generators that allows the
sustain portion of the envelope to take on a downward or
upward bias. This effectively makes the sustain portion
into another decay slope but with the additional feature of
being able to increase as well as decay.
Solid State Disk. A type of hard disk using Flash memory
rather than magnetic disks. When recording multiple
96kHz 24-bit streams from Kyra, your DAW will perform
better if it has an SSD.
Staccato
Software (or Firmware) Update
The ability of Kyra to receive updated software versions
via USB. Software Updates can contain new features and
bug fixes.
Notes that are played such that the previous note is released before the next is played, the opposite of legato. In
Mono key mode, Kyra will suspend portamento for notes
played staccato.
Song Position Pointer
Stopband
A feature of MIDI used by DAWs to specify where a song is
being played from. Kyra uses this information to start and
synchronise its arpeggiator. Often shortened to 'SPP'.
The range of frequencies attenuated by a filter.
Sostenuto
An oscillator that is tuned to a frequency below that of a
main oscillator, typically one octave below. Used to provide extra bass and body to a sound. Kyra features an independently tunable Sub Oscillator in each of its two Oscillator Groups. The hypersaw also has a sub oscillator feature.
Sub Oscillator
A variation of note sustain whereby only notes played
whilst the sostenuto pedal is down are sustained. Not as
common as the sustain pedal but often used by classically
trained pianists. Useful for holding block chords in lower
registers whilst playing a melody in higher registers. Kyra
supports MIDI sostenuto.
Sustain
The third of the four segments in an ADSR-style envelope
generator. The sustain segment starts when the decay
reaches the configured sustain level and ends when the
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Kyra Manual
Glossary
key is released. The sustain pedal effectively holds the
sustain period of a note until the sustain pedal is released,
regardless of when the keys themselves are released.
TRS
Tip, ring, sleeve. A type of audio cable that carries a single
channel of balanced audio. On Kyra, two cables are required for stereo operation. Kyra's line outputs are balanced
TRS-type jacks. Kyra will operate with non-balanced cables
and mixers but you will lose the benefits of balanced audio
(primarily, increased tolerance of interference and noise).
This loss of quality will be more evident with longer
cables.
Sustain Pedal
Sometimes shortened to sus or hold pedal. A pedal (and
corresponding MIDI command) to sustain notes regardless
of the lifting of fingers from keys until the sustain pedal is
released.
System Exclusive
UAC2
Often shortened to 'SysEx'. A part of the MIDI specification
that allows proprietary (non-standard) information to be
exchanged between MIDI devices. Kyra uses System Exclusive messages to allow the saving, configuration and restoring of Patch, Multi and System configuration data. Kyra
also supports certain universal SysEx messages, these are
detailed in the MIDI implementation chart.
USB Audio Class 2.0. A specification for USB that supports
multichannel, low latency, high quality audio over USB.
macOS supports UAC2 natively but Windows, as at
Windows 10, requires a driver to be installed to handle
UAC2.
Unison
Timbre
A feature of some synthesizers to sound two or more
voices for each note possibly with a slight detuning
between them. Kyra offers Dual Mode as an alternative to
Unison. It sounds less mechanical and uses fewer resources than plain unison.
The tonal quality of a sound.
Tremolo
Amplitude (level) modulation by a periodic source, typically an LFO
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Waldorf Kyra
Glossary
USB
Virtual Analogue
Universal Serial Bus. A serial computer bus able to communicate commands (like MIDI) and stream low-latency
audio between systems. Various standards of USB are
defined with increasing speeds and features available to
later versions of the standard. Kyra requires support for at
least USB 2.0 ('high speed') to use USB.
Often shortened to 'VA'. The process of using discrete time
signal processing to emulate classic analogue synthesis.
Voice Stealing
The algorithm used to decide how to deal with a request to
play more notes (voices) than supported by a synthesizer.
The algorithm used by Kyra within a Part is to steal (reassign) the oldest (longest-playing) note from a Part when a
request to play a 33rd note arrives (each Part can support
up to 32 notes, subject to a system total of 128). There is
no voice stealing between Parts and if the overall limit of
128 is exceeded, further note play requests are ignored.
VCA
Voltage Controlled Amplifier. The part of an analogue
synthesizer that controls the level of the sound, usually
under the control of a modulator such as an envelope
generator. In digital instruments such as Kyra, the VCA is
implemented digitally but the concept is identical so
there's no reason not to use the existing terminology.
Wave
A type of synthesis where fragments (single cycle) waveforms are played back as a loop. Kyra offers two waves on
each note (there's one in each Oscillator Group). The
waves are a large portion of the sonic palette of Kyra as
there's an unusually large number of them available
(4096) covering a very large range of sounds, especially
when combined with hard sync and the traditional virtual
analogue waveforms available in each Oscillator Group.
Often shorted to just 'wave'.
Velocity Scaling
The amount of modulation depth of key on velocity on
Kyra’s amplifier. By default, Kyra routes key on velocity to
the amplifier but you can reduce it or eliminate it completely by adjusting the Velocity Scaling parameter. This is
useful for certain sounds where a constant level is required between notes.
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Kyra Manual
Glossary
Wet
The component of a signal that has been processed by an
effect. The component of a signal that has not been processed by an effect is referred to as the 'dry' signal.
155
Waldorf Kyra
Product Support
Product Support
Service & Repair
Kyra does not contain any user-serviceable parts. If your
Kyra develops a fault or needs servicing, please refer to a
Waldorf authorised service center. For more information,
please ask your musicians dealer or your local Waldorf
distributor.
Any Questions?
If you have any questions about your Waldorf product, feel
free to contact us using one of the three options listed
below. We’re here to help.
b Send us a letter. It will take a bit longer, but it is just as
dependable as the support form.
Waldorf Music GmbH
Lilienthalstr. 7
53424 Remagen, Germany
a Use the support form at our website. This is the most
efficient and fastest way to contact us. Your questions will
be forwarded immediately to the resident expert and you
will quickly receive an answer.
c Visit our support forum at waldorfmusic.com
support.waldorfmusic.com
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Kyra Manual
MIDI Implementation Chart
MIDI Implementation Chart
Transmit/
Export
Recognize/
Import
MIDI channels
16
16
Note numbers
1-127
1-127
-
0-127
Program change
Bank Select response? (Yes/No)
Remarks
Via USB or MIDI
Yes
0-25
No
Always Omni-Off, Poly
Arpeggiator can transmit note events
If yes, list banks utilized in remarks column
Modes supported:
Mode 1: Omni-On, Poly (Yes/No)
Mode 2: Omni-On, Mono (Yes/No)
Mode 3: Omni-Off, Poly (Yes/No)
Mode 4: Omni-Off, Mono (Yes/No)
Multi Mode (Yes/No)
Note-On Velocity (Yes/No)
Yes
Yes
Note-Off Velocity (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Channel Aftertouch (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Poly (Key) Aftertouch (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Pitch Bend (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Active Sensing (Yes/No)
No
Yes
System Reset (Yes/No)
No
No
Tune Request (Yes/No)
No
No
157
Waldorf Kyra
MIDI Implementation Chart
Universal System Exclusive: Sample Dump
Standard (Yes/No)
Device Inquiry (Yes/No)
File Dump (Yes/No)
MIDI Tuning (Yes/No)
Master Volume (Yes/No)
Master Balance (Yes/No)
Notation Information (Yes/No)
Turn GM1 System On (Yes/No)
Turn GM2 System On (Yes/No)
Turn GM System Off (Yes/No)
DLS-1 (Yes/No)
File Reference (Yes/No)
Controller Destination (Yes/No)
Key-based Instrument Ctrl (Yes/No)
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Setting is persistent
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Manufacturer or Non-Commercial System
Exclusive
Yes
Yes
NRPNs (Yes/No)
No
No
RPN 00 (Pitch Bend Sensitivity) (Yes/No)
No
Yes
1-12 semitones
RPN 01 (Channel Fine Tune) (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Plus or minus one semitone, 64 is base
RPN 02 (Channel Coarse Tune) (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Two octaves either way, 64 is base
Master Fine/Coarse Tune (Yes/No)
Other Universal System Exclusive
158
Fine only, 430 to 450Hz in 1Hz steps, persistent
Kyra Manual
MIDI Implementation Chart
RPN 03 (Tuning Program Select) (Yes/No)
No
No
RPN 04 (Tuning Bank Select) (Yes/No)
No
No
RPN 05 (Modulation Depth Range) (Yes/No)
No
No
MIDI Clock (Yes/No)
Yes
Yes
Song Position Pointer (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Song Select (Yes/No)
No
No
Start (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Continue (Yes/No)
No
Yes
Stop (Yes/No)
No
Yes
MIDI Time Code (Yes/No)
No
No
MIDI Machine Control (Yes/No)
No
No
If yes, MSC Level supported
No
No
General MIDI compatible? (Level(s)/No)
No
No
No
No
Standard MIDI Files (Type(s)/No)
No
No
XMF Files (Type(s)/No)
No
No
SP-MIDI compatible? (Yes/No)
No
No
MIDI Show Control (Yes/No)
Is GM default power-up mode? (Level/No)
DLS compatible? (Levels(s)/No)
(DLS File Type(s)/No)
159
Waldorf Kyra
MIDI Implementation Chart
Function
Transmitted (Y/N)
0
Bank Select (MSB)
No
No
1
Modulation Wheel (MSB)
No
Yes
2
Breath Controller (MSB)
No
Yes
No
Yes
Control
3
Recognized
(Y/N)
4
Foot Controller (MSB)
No
Yes
5
Portamento Time (MSB)
No
Yes
6
Data Entry (MSB)
No
Yes
7
Channel Volume (MSB)
No
Yes
8
Balance (MSB)
No
Yes
9
No
Yes
10
Pan (MSB)
No
Yes
11
Expression (MSB)
No
Yes
12
Effect Control 1 (MSB)
No
Yes
13
Effect Control 2 (MSB)
No
Yes
14
No
Yes
15
No
Yes
16
General Purpose Controller 1 (MSB)
No
Yes
17
General Purpose Controller 2 (MSB)
No
Yes
18
General Purpose Controller 3 (MSB)
No
Yes
19
General Purpose Controller 4 (MSB)
No
Yes
No
Yes
20
160
Remarks
Configures Part level
Configures Part Pan
Kyra Manual
MIDI Implementation Chart
Transmitted (Y/N)
Recognized
(Y/N)
21
No
No
22
No
No
23
No
No
24
No
No
25
No
No
26
No
No
27
No
No
28
No
No
29
No
No
30
No
No
31
No
No
Control
Function
32
Bank Select (LSB)
No
Yes
33
Modulation Wheel (LSB)
No
No
34
Breath Controller (LSB)
No
No
No
No
Foot Controller (LSB)
No
No
37
Portamento Time (LSB)
No
No
38
Data Entry (LSB)
No
No
39
Channel Volume (LSB)
No
No
40
Balance (LSB)
No
No
No
No
35
36
41
161
Remarks
Waldorf Kyra
MIDI Implementation Chart
Function
Transmitted (Y/N)
Recognized
(Y/N)
42
Pan (LSB)
No
No
43
Expression (LSB)
No
No
44
Effect Control 1 (LSB)
No
No
Effect Control 2 (LSB)
No
No
46
No
No
47
No
No
General Purpose Controller 1 (LSB)
No
No
49
General Purpose Controller 2 (LSB)
No
No
50
General Purpose Controller 3 (LSB)
No
No
51
General Purpose Controller 4 (LSB)
No
No
52
No
No
53
No
No
54
No
No
55
No
No
56
No
No
57
No
No
58
No
No
59
No
No
60
No
No
61
No
No
62
No
No
Control
45
48
162
Remarks
Kyra Manual
MIDI Implementation Chart
Control
Function
Transmitted (Y/N)
Recognized
(Y/N)
No
No
64
Sustain Pedal
No
Yes
65
Portamento On/Off
No
Yes
66
Sostenuto
No
Yes
67
Soft Pedal
No
Yes
68
Legato Footswitch
No
No
69
Hold 2
No
No
70
Sound Controller 1 (default: Sound Variation)
No
No
71
Sound Ctrl 2 (default: Timbre/Harmonic Quality)
No
No
72
Sound Controller 3 (default: Release Time)
No
No
73
Sound Controller 4 (default: Attack Time)
No
No
74
Sound Controller 5 (default: Brightness)
No
Yes
75
Sound Controller 6 (GM2 default: Decay Time)
No
No
76
Sound Controller 7 (GM2 default: Vibrato Rate)
No
No
77
Sound Controller 8 (GM2 default: Vibrato Depth)
No
No
78
Sound Controller 9 (GM2 default: Vibrato Delay)
No
No
79
Sound Controller 10 (GM2 default: Undefined)
No
No
80
General Purpose Controller 5
No
No
81
General Purpose Controller 6
No
No
82
General Purpose Controller 7
No
No
83
General Purpose Controller 8
No
No
63
163
Remarks
Maps to Filter 1 Cutoff Frequency
Waldorf Kyra
MIDI Implementation Chart
Function
Transmitted (Y/N)
84
Portamento Control
No
No
85
(custom) Filter 1 Cutoff Frequency
No
Yes
86
(custom) Filter 2 Cutoff Frequency
No
Yes
87
(custom) Filter 1 Resonance
No
Yes
88
(custom) Filter 2 Resonance
No
Yes
89
No
No
90
No
No
91
Effects 1 Depth (default: Reverb Send)
No
No
92
Effects 2 Depth (default: Tremolo Depth)
No
No
93
Effects 3 Depth (default: Chorus Send)
No
No
94
Effects 4 Depth (default: Celeste [Detune] Depth)
No
No
95
Effects 5 Depth (default: Phaser Depth)
No
No
96
Data Increment
No
No
97
Data Decrement
No
No
98
Non-Registered Parameter Number (LSB)
No
No
99
Non-Registered Parameter Number(MSB)
No
No
100
Registered Parameter Number (LSB)
No
No
101
Registered Parameter Number(MSB)
No
No
102
No
No
103
No
No
104
No
No
Control
164
Recognized
(Y/N)
Remarks
Kyra Manual
MIDI Implementation Chart
Transmitted (Y/N)
Recognized
(Y/N)
105
No
No
106
No
No
107
No
No
108
No
No
109
No
No
110
No
No
111
No
No
112
No
No
113
No
No
114
No
No
115
No
No
116
No
No
117
No
No
118
No
No
119
No
No
Control
Function
120
All Sound Off
No
Yes
121
Reset All Controllers
No
Yes
122
Local Control On/Off
No
No
123
All Notes Off
No
Yes
124
Omni Mode Off
No
No
125
Omni Mode On
No
No
165
Remarks
Waldorf Kyra
MIDI Implementation Chart
Control
Function
Transmitted (Y/N)
Recognized
(Y/N)
126
Poly Mode Off
No
No
127
Poly Mode On
No
No
166
Remarks
Kyra Manual
Waldorf Music GmbH • Lilienthal Straße 7 • D-53424 Remagen
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www.waldorfmusic.com
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