Berkeley 6TSP Series Submersible Turbine Pumps Owner's manual

Berkeley 6TSP Series Submersible Turbine Pumps Owner's manual
OWNER’S MANUAL
Submersible Turbine Pumps
293 Wright Street, Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: 888-237-5353
Fax: 800-321-8793
Web Site: berkeleypumps.com
6TSP Series
Radial Flow
Installation/Operation/Parts
For further operating, installation, or maintenance assistance:
Call 1-888-237-5353
© 2012
BE959 (05/10/12)
Safety
Important Safety Instructions
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS - This manual contains
important instructions that should be followed during
installation, operation, and maintenance of the product.
Save this manual for future reference.
This is the safety alert symbol. When you see this
symbol on your pump or in this manual, look for one of
the following signal words and be alert to the potential
for personal injury!
indicates a hazard which, if not avoided, will
result in death or serious injury.
indicates a hazard which, if not avoided, could
result in death or serious injury.
indicates a hazard which, if not avoided, could
result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTICE addresses practices not related to
personal injury.
Keep safety labels in good condition. Replace missing or
damaged safety labels.
2
System controls and pump must match. Do not
interchange controls with other models. Serious damage
can result to the unit if pump and controls do not match.
Average number of starts per day will influence motor
and control component life (starters, relays, capacitors,
etc). Select pump size, tank size and control components
for lowest practical number of starts per day. Excessive
cycling accelerates bearing, spline, and pump wear and
control contact erosion.
Specifications
Table I: Frequency of Starts
Average Number of Starts per Hour
HP Rating
Single Phase
Three Phase
1 to 50
15
15
Table II: Weight of Pipe (Column)
Weight per Foot (Lbs)
Pipe Size (In)
General Considerations
Before installing your submersible turbine pump, review
the following checklist.
Be sure the well is clear of sand and abrasive material
before installing pump. Abrasive materials in the water
cause component wear and reduce pump capacity and
discharge pressure. Never use the pump to develop or
clean the well. Permanent pump damage can result
within the first few hours of operation.
If the well casing is suspected of being crooked, check
it with a gauge of identical length and diameter as the
pump and motor with two lengths of pipe attached.
Serious damage can result if the pump becomes lodged
in a crooked casing.
Be sure the well can supply a high-capacity turbine
pump. The well should be deep enough to cover the
pump unit with water, even at extreme pumping rates.
Typically, the pump should be submerged 10 to 20 feet
below the lowest water level and at least 5 feet above the
bottom of the well.
Air entrained in the water reduces performance and will
damage the pump.
Your pump is designed to provide maximum efficiency
under specific capacity and head conditions. Do not
operate it beyond specified limits.
Full
Empty
2-1/2
7.9
5.8
3
10.8
7.6
4
16.3
10.8
5
23.3
14.62
6
31.5
18.97
Table III: Weight of Cable per 1000 Ft. (lbs.)
3-Phase
1-phase
AWG
Size
Nom. Dia.
Weight
Nom. Dia.
Weight
12-3
.500
140
.487
130
10-3
.545
186
.517
161
8-3
.771
328
.750
293
6-3
.965
525
.826
400
4-3
1.071
717
2-3
1.243
1066
Table IV: Cable Wire Resistance
AWG Wire Size
Resist (Ohms/Ft)
14
.0050
12
.0032
10
.0020
8
.0013
6
.0008
4
.0005
Specifications • Warranty
3
Table V: Cooling Flow Rates Past Submersible Motors In Feet Per Second (FPS),
6” Nominal Motor (5.38” OD)
GPM
Casing
Size
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
6” ID
1.2
2.3
3.5
4.6
5.8
7.0
8.1
9.3
10.4 11.6 12.7 13.9
8” ID
–
0.5
0.7
0.9
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.9
2.1
2.3
2.6
2.8
10” ID
–
–
0.3
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
1.1
1.3
1.4
200
220
240
Formula to find flow rate:
FPS = GPM x .409
D1² – D2²
D1 = Casing inside
diameter
D2 = Motor outside
diameter
NOTICE If flow rate past motor is expected to be less than rate shown in Table V, install a shroud around motor to
force cooling flow past shell. To minimize erosion to shell if flow rate is expected to be more than 10 FPS (especially if
sand is present), reduce flow through pump to reduce flow past shell.
Limited Warranty
BERKELEY warrants to the original consumer purchaser (“Purchaser” or “You”) of the products listed below, that they will be free
from defects in material and workmanship for the Warranty Period shown below.
Product
Warranty Period
Water Systems:
Water Systems Products — jet pumps, small centrifugal pumps, submersible pumps and
related accessories
whichever occurs first:
12 months from date of original installation, or
18 months from date of manufacture
Pro-Source™ Composite Tanks
5 years from date of original installation
Pro-Source™ Steel Pressure Tanks
5 years from date of original installation
Pro-Source™ Epoxy-Lined Tanks
3 years from date of original installation
Sump/Sewage/Effluent Products
12 months from date of original installation, or
18 months from date of manufacture
Agricultural/Commercial:
Centrifugals – close-coupled motor drive, frame mount, SAE mount, engine drive, VMS,
SSCX, SSHM, solids handling, submersible solids handling
12 months from date of original installation, or
24 months from date of manufacture
Submersible Turbines, 6” diameter and larger
12 months from date of original installation, or
24 months from date of manufacture
Our limited warranty will not apply to any product that, in our sole judgement, has been subject to negligence, misapplication,
improper installation, or improper maintenance. Without limiting the foregoing, operating a three phase motor with single phase
power through a phase converter will void the warranty. Note also that three phase motors must be protected by three-leg,
ambient compensated, extra-quick trip overload relays of the recommended size or the warranty is void.
Your only remedy, and BERKELEY’s only duty, is that BERKELEY repair or replace defective products (at BERKELEY’s choice). You
must pay all labor and shipping charges associated with this warranty and must request warranty service through the installing
dealer as soon as a problem is discovered. No request for service will be accepted if received after the Warranty Period has
expired. This warranty is not transferable.
BERKELEY SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONTINGENT DAMAGES WHATSOEVER.
THE FOREGOING LIMITED WARRANTIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER EXPRESS AND IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE FOREGOING LIMITED WARRANTIES SHALL NOT EXTEND BEYOND THE DURATION
PROVIDED HEREIN.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages or limitations on the duration of an
implied warranty, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to You. This warranty gives You specific legal rights and
You may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
This Limited Warranty is effective June 1, 2011 and replaces all undated warranties and warranties dated before June 1, 2011.
In the U.S.: BERKELEY, 293 Wright St., Delavan, WI 53115
In Canada: 269 Trillium Dr., Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4W5
Installation
Preinstallation Procedures And
Checks
Grounding
Risk of electric shock. Can shock, burn or
kill. Permanently ground pump, motor and control box
before connecting power supply to motor.
Ground pump and motor in accordance with local codes
and ordinances. Use a copper ground wire at least as
large as wires carrying current to motor.
Motor is supplied with a copper ground wire. Splice this
ground wire to a copper conductor that matches motor
wire size per local codes. Also see Electrical Splices
and Connections.
Risk of explosion. Do not ground to a gas
supply line. Permanently ground pump, motor and
control box before connecting power cable to power
supply. Connect ground wire to approved ground first
and then co­nnect to equipment being installed.
Risk of fire and electric shock. Can cause
severe injury, property damage or death. If using a
drop cable larger than AWG 10 (5.5mm²) [for example,
AWG 8 (8.4mm²) wire] between pump and control box,
run drop cable to a separate junction box. Connect
junction box to control box with AWG 10 (5.5mm²) wire.
For more information, contact your local code authority.
4
Taped splice - For wire sizes AWG 8 (8.4mm²)
and larger:
1. Cut off motor leads. Stagger lead and wire length so
that 2nd lead is 2” (50mm) longer than 1st lead and
3rd lead is 2” (50mm) longer than second.
2. Cut off cable ends. Be sure to match colors and
lengths of wires in drop cable to colors and lengths
of motor leads.
3. Trim insulation back 1/2” (13mm) from cable ends
and motor lead ends.
4. Insert motor lead ends and cable ends into butt
connectors (see Figure 1). Be sure to match wire
colors between drop cable and motor leads.
Figure 1
5. Using crimping pliers (Figure 4), indent butt
connector lugs (see Figure 2) to secure wires.
Figure 2
Figure 3
Wiring
Installation must meet United States National Electrical
Code, Canadian Electrical Code and local codes for all
wiring (as applicable).
Use only copper wire when making connections to
pump and control box.
To avoid over-heating wire and excessive voltage drop
at motor, be sure that wire size is at least as large as size
listed in cable sizing tables for your horsepower pump
and length of wire run.
NOTICE When built-in overheating protection is not
provided, install an approved overload equipped motor
control that matches motor input in full load amps.
Select or adjust overload element(s) in accordance with
control instructions. When built-in overheating protection
is provided, use an approved motor control that matches
motor input in full load amperes.
Electrical Splices and Connections
Splice cable to motor leads. Use one of the three
methods outlined below. Use only copper wire for
connections to pump motor and control box. Use only
UL®-approved water-submersion-grade electrical tape.
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
6. Cut electrical insulation putty into 3 equal parts
and form tightly around butt connectors. Be sure
electrical insulation putty overlaps insulated part
of wire.
Installation / Electrical
7. Wrap each joint tightly with electrical tape - cover
wire for about 1-1/2” (4cm) on each side of joint.
Make four passes with the tape - when finished
you should have four layers of tape tightly wrapped
around the wire. Press edges of tape firmly down
against the wire (see Figure 4).
NOTICE Since the tightly wound tape is the only
means of keeping water out of the splice, the
efficiency of the splice will depend on the care used
in wrapping the tape.
NOTICE For wire sizes larger than AWG 8 (8.4mm²),
use a soldered joint rather than a butt connector (see
Figure 3).
Heat-shrink splice - For wire sizes AWG 14, 12 and 10
(2, 3, and 5.5mm²):
1. Remove 3/8” (10mm) insulation from ends of motor
leads and drop cable wires.
2. Put plastic heat shrink tubing over motor leads.
3. Match wire colors and lengths in drop cable to wire
colors and lengths of motor leads.
4. Insert cable and motor wire ends into butt
connectors and crimp (See Figure 2). BE SURE to
match wire colors between drop cable and motor
leads. Pull leads to check connections.
5. Center tubing over butt connector and apply heat
evenly with a torch (a match or lighter will not
supply enough heat).
NOTICE Keep torch moving. Too much concentrated
heat may damage tubing (see Figure 6).
Butt Connectors with plastic insulators - For wire sizes
AWG 14, 12 and 10 (2, 3, and 5.5mm²):
1. Cut off motor leads. Stagger lead and wire length so
that 2nd lead is 4” (100mm) longer than 1st lead and
3rd lead is 4” (100mm) longer than second.
2. Cut off cable ends. Be sure to match colors and
lengths of wires in drop cable to colors and lengths
of motor leads.
3. Trim insulation back 1/2” (13mm) from cable ends
and motor lead ends.
4. Unscrew plastic caps from insulators. Place a cap
and a neoprene gasket sleeve on each wire end to be
spliced (see Figure 7).
5
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
5. Slide insulator body onto one wire end (Figure 7).
6. Insert wire end into butt connector and crimp
(see Figure 8). Be sure to match cable and motor
wire colors.
7. Center insulator body over splice and slide neoprene
sleeves into body as far as they will go. Screw caps
onto insulator body (Figure 9) and tighten by hand
for a strong, waterproof splice.
Splice and Cable Continuity Test
Before installing pump, check cable and splices as
follows (see Figure 10):
Ohmmeter set at
Rx100K or
Voltmeter set at
H1 Ohms
Attach lead to
metal tank or
immerse in water
Figure 10 - Splice and Cable continuity
Installation
1. Submerge cable and splice in steel barrel filled with
water. Make sure both ends of cable are out of water.
2. Clip one ohmmeter lead to barrel. Test each lead
in cable successively by connecting the other
ohmmeter lead to the three cable leads, one after
the other.
3. If resistance reading goes to zero on any cable lead,
a leak to ground is present. Pull splice out of water.
If meter reading changes to “infinity” (no reading) the
leak is in the splice.
4. If leak is not in splice, slowly pull cable out of water
until reading changes to “infinity”. Reading will
change to “infinity” when leak comes out of water.
5. Repair cable by splicing as explained under Electrical
Splices and Connections.
Rotation Check (3-Phase Only)
After satisfactorily completing continuity test, connect
cable to motor controller and then wire controller to
disconnect switch. Connect temporary jumper wire
between proper terminals in controller to temporarily
energize magnetic coil.
Momentarily engage disconnect switch. Observe the
rotation of pump as motor starts. If connections are
properly made, pump will “jerk” clockwise when looking
into the pump discharge when started. If the “jerk” is
counter-clockwise, the motor is running in the wrong
direction. Interchange any two cable leads where they
connect to the “lead” terminals in the magnetic starter.
Mark wires to correspond with the controller terminal
numbers.
NOTICE Pump is water lubricated. Do not operate the
pump for more than 5 seconds while it is out of water.
6
Installation
General
After completing all connections and tests so far, connect
a 5-foot length of pipe to pump.
Lower pump into well with pipe clamps attached to the
5-foot pipe. Attach a standard length of pipe to 5-foot
length and lower pump CAREFULLY into well.
NOTICE Do not use a pipe longer than 5 feet for the
first connection. Hoisting pump upright with a long
length of pipe can cause pump misalignment from
excessive leverage.
Risk of electric shock. Can shock, burn or
kill. Use extreme care when lowering pump and cable to
avoid damage to cable insulation.
Anchor power cable to pipe every 20 feet with adjustable
steel band clamps. Protect insulation from clamps with
pieces of split rubber hose inserted between clamps and
cable. Attach cable to pipe halfway between clamps with
UL®-approved water-submersion-grade electrical tape.
Submergence
Be sure the pump is always submerged, even at extreme
pumping rates. Install pump at least 10 to 20 feet below
the lowest “drawdown” water level and at least 5 feet
above bottom of well.
Check Valves
Pump back spin and hydraulic shock can cause severe
damage to the pump and motor. Install at least one
check valve in the discharge pipe (riser pipe) to help
prevent this.
Install the first check valve in the pump discharge or in
the discharge pipe it self, not more than 25’ above the
pump. Install another check valve not more than 200 feet
above the first one. Repeat, all the way up the riser pipe.
The last check valve on the riser pipe should be not more
than 200’ below the surface. Finally, install a check valve
near the well head in the horizontal pipe at the surface
(see Figure 11).
NOTICE: To avoid water hammer and pipe breakage, do
not put a check valve exactly half-way up the riser pipe
(that is, with equal distance down to the pump and up
to the surface), especially if it is the only check valve in
the riser pipe after the pump discharge check. The ‘equal
distance’ in both legs of the pipe can allow resonations
from water hammer which can blow the pump off the
riser pipe.
Installation
7
Electrical Tests
Check Valve at surface
To Service
200' Max
Top Check
To Surface
Riser Pipe
1st. Check Valve
not more than
25 Ft. above pump
OR
1st. Check Valve
mounted directly
on pump
Submersible
Pump
Not
to
Scale
Install Check
Valves Every 200'
For Full Length
of Riser Pipe
25' Max
To avoid water hammer and
pipe or pump damage,
DO NOT install a check valve
half-way between the pump
and ground level.
Figure 11 - Check Valve Location
Well and Pump Test
Check and record static water level of well before
starting tests. Before making final piping connections, test
flow rate, capacity, and condition of well.
NOTICE Do not operate pump with discharge
valve closed. Operate pump only within pressure
and flow limits of operating range established by
performance curve.
NOTICE: If sand is present in discharge, allow pump
to run with discharge completely open until water is
clear. If loud rattling noises develop, pump is probably
cavitating. Gradually close discharge valve until
rattling stops.
Risk of electric shock. Can shock, burn or
kill. Only qualified electricians should perform these
tests. When testing, use all normal precautions for the
voltages involved.
Electrical Test Of Motor, Cable, Connections
The cable and splices can be damaged as the pump is
lowered into the well. To electrically test them, attach
one lead of ohmmeter to pipe. Attach other lead to
each cable lead in turn. See motor owner’s manual
for required resistance in a good motor. A low reading
indicates that cable or splice has developed a leak to
ground. Remove pump from well and correct problem
before proceeding with installation.
Measure electrical resistance between motor leads and
well casing when motor is cold.
Voltage Test
Low or high voltages can cause motor failure. While
pump is operating, check voltage across each pair
of leads at motor controller. Readings more than
10% above or below rated nameplate voltage can
damage pump; correct before placing pump in service.
Test as follows:
1. Disconnect main power supply and open controller.
2. Connect power and start pump (Figure 12). For
3-phase motors, read voltage across three pairs of
leads (L1 – L3, L3 – L2, L2 – L1) while pump is
operating. For single phase motors, read voltage
across L1 and L2 while pump is operating. Voltage
should be within ±10% of motor nameplate rated
voltage. If not, consult power company.
Controller
G
L3
Incoming
L2
Power
L1
Ground
To Pump
Figure 12 - Voltage Test
Installation • Test
8
Load Current Test
Load current should be obtained on each motor lead at
the controller. Partially close pump discharge valve (keep
pressure and flow within specified operating range) until
maximum amp reading has been obtained (Figure 13).
Compare reading with motor nameplate rating. If reading
is 15% or more over rated load, check for incorrect
voltage in supply line or overload due to abrasives in
pump. Find and correct problem before putting pump
in service.
Controller
G
L3
Incoming
L2
Power
L1
Ground
Ohmmeter
Set at Rx1 or
Voltmeter
Set on LO
Ohms
Controller
To Pump
G
L3
Incoming
L2
Power
L1
Figure 14 - Circuit (Winding) Resistance Test
Ground
To Pump
Figure 13 - Load Current Test
3. If reading is considerably higher than chart, an
open circuit (broken wire) is indicated; if reading is
considerably lower, a short circuit is indicated. In
either case, remove pump from well and repair unit.
NOTICE Be sure to include cable and winding
resistance. Multiply cable length by the per-foot cable
resistance (see Table IV) and add winding resistance from
motor chart to get total.
Ground Check
1. Shut off main power supply and disconnect
motor wires.
2. Attach one ohmmeter lead to pipe or METAL well
casing and the other lead, in turn, to each individual
motor wire (Figure 15).
Electrical Test
The following electrical checks can be made with
pump installed.
Risk of electric shock. Can shock, burn or
kill. Only qualified electricians should perform these
tests.When testing, use all normal precautions for the
voltages present.
Circuit (Winding) Resistance Test
1. Shut off main power supply and disconnect
motor wires.
2. Attach two ohmmeter leads to pairs of cable wires in
turn (black and red wires on three wire single phase
units). Compare readings with data provided in
motor manual (Figure 14).
Controller
G
L3
Incoming
L2
Power
L1
Ground
Ohmmeter
Set at Rx100K
or Voltmeter
Set on H1
Ohms
To Pump
Figure 15 - Ground Check
Test
3. If resistance reading goes to zero after touching any
of the wires, the pump should be raised to determine
location of ground fault (cable, motor, or splice).
4. Raise pump, watching resistance reading. When
resistance goes to infinity, fault has come out of the
water. If ground fault is located in cable or splice,
repair it.
5. If ground fault appears to be located in motor,
remove pump from well. Cut cable at motor side
of splice and determine whether or not motor is
grounded. If motor indicates complete ground
(resistance reading goes to zero) replace unit.
If motor is not grounded, re-check splice and cable.
Current Unbalance Test (3 Phase only)
Determine current unbalance by measuring current in
each power lead. Measure current for all three possible
hookups. Use example and worksheet to calculate
current unbalance on a three phase supply system and
retain for future reference.
NOTICE Current unbalance should not exceed 5%. If
unbalance cannot be corrected by rolling leads, locate
and correct source of unbalance.
If, on all three possible hookups, the reading furthest
from average stays on the same power lead, most of the
unbalance is coming from the power source.
However, if the reading furthest from average changes
leads as the hookup changes (that is, stays with a
particular motor lead), most of the unbalance is on
the “motor side” of the starter. In this case, consider
a damaged cable, leaking splice, poor connection, or
faulty motor winding.
3-Phase Current Unbalance and Example
Here is an example of current readings at maximum
pump loads on each leg of a three wire hookup. Make
calculations for all three possible hookups.
9
A. For each hookup, add the readings for the three legs:
Ex.: Hookup #1
Hookup #2:
Hookup #3
L1 = 51Amps
L1 = 50 Amps
L1 = 50 Amps
L2 = 46 Amps
L2 = 48 Amps
L2 = 49 Amps
L3 = 53 Amps
L3 = 52 Amps
L3 = 51 Amps
Total 150 Amps
Total 150 Amps
Total 150 Amps
B. Divide each total by three to get average amps:
Example: 150/3 = 50
Example: 150/3 = 50
Example: 150/3 = 50
C. For each hookup, find current value farthest from
average (Calculate the greatest current difference
from the average).
Ex. #1
Ex. #2
Ex. #3
50 Amps
50 Amps
50 Amps
–46 Amps
–48 Amps
–49 Amps
= 4 Amps
= 2 Amps
= 1 Amps
D. Divide this difference by the average and multiply
by 100 to obtain the percentage of unbalance.
Example 1: 4/50 = .08 x 100 = 8%
Example 2: 2/50 = .04 x 100 = 4%
Example 3: 1/50 = .02 x 100 = 2%
Use smallest percentage unbalance, in this case Ex. 3.
3-Phase Current Unbalance - Worksheet
Use this worksheet to calculate curent unbalance for
your installation.
A. Add the readings for the three legs:
Ex.: Hookup #1
Hookup #2:
Hookup #3
L1 =
Amps L1 =
Amps L1 =
Amps
L2 =
Amps L2 =
Amps L2 =
Amps
L3 =
Amps L3 =
Amps L3 =
Amps
Total
Amps Total
Amps Total
Amps
B. Divide each total by three to get average amps:
Hookup #1:
/3 =
Hookup #2:
/3 =
Hookup #3:
/3 =
C. For each hookup, find current value farthest from
average (Calculate the greatest current difference
from the average).
Hookup #1
Hookup #2
Hookup #3
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
Amps
D. Divide this difference by the average to obtain the
percentage of unbalance:
Hookup #1:
/
=
x100 =
%
Hookup #2:
/
=
x100 =
%
Hookup #3:
/
=
x100 =
%
Use hookup with smallest percentage unbalance.
Maintenance
10
General
When installed in a clear well and operated under
normal conditions, the submersible turbine pump
requires no special maintenance. The hermetically sealed
motor is pre-filled and self-lubricating. Completely
tested at the factory, it should provide many years of
dependable service. The motor is a continuous duty type
and can operate continuously for long periods.
Removing Pump From Well
Most pump problems are caused by above-ground
electrical problems. Minor control box components or
outside electrical difficulties (such as low voltage) can
cause a malfunction. Before removing pump from well,
check motor windings for damage (see Electrical Tests).
Eliminate all above-ground trouble causes before pulling
pump. Pull the pump only as a last resort.
Sandlocked Pump:
NOTICE Before pulling pump, make all possible above
ground electrical tests. Most submersible pump problems
are above ground, not in the pump itself.
NOTICE Motor failure can result from starting a
sandlocked pump. Do not bypass overload circuit
or exceed electrical rating when trying to start a
siezed pump.
Remove a sandlocked pump from well for cleaning. To
prevent pump from locking again when reinstalled, clean
the well thoroughly before reinstalling the pump.
Cleaning Sandlocked Pump:
1. Insert a reducing bushing in discharge adapter cap to
receive a hose coupling.
2. Use a hose to flush pump backwards (discharge to
suction). Oscillate shaft backwards and forwards
with a pump pliers and backwash pump for
several minutes.
Checking Pump Performance:
Water containing abrasives can cause impeller wear
and reduce impeller efficiency, resulting in overload
conditions. In such cases, it is necessary to remove
the pump from the well and replace the impellers
to maintain capacity and pressure. To assure quality
and integrity of the unit, have your pump serviced by
authorized Berkeley personnel.
Preventive Maintenance
To avoid major repairs, make the checks listed below every 4 to 6 months.
Test
Result Should Be
Possible Indications
Measure and record the standing
water level (from top of well casing).
Reference number.
To aid in monitoring pump
performance.
Measure electrical resistance between
motor leads and well casing with
See motor manual.
motor cold.
See motor manual.
Check pump flow capacity (gallons
per minute).
At least 90% of readings at
installation.
Lower readings may indicate pump
needs repair.
Check pump discharge pressure (PSI)
at operating conditions.
At least 90% of readings at
installation.
Lower reading indicates pump wear,
increased friction losses, or change in
standing water level in well.
Check drawdown level (in feet) from
standing water level.
High enough so that pump does not
break suction.
Cavitation can damage pump;
increased drawdown may indicate
reduced well flow.
Measure voltage across motor leads
while pump is operating.
Within ±10% of rated voltage.
If voltage is more than 110% or less
than 90% of rated voltage, consult
power company.
Troubleshooting
11
Risk of electric shock. Can shock, burn or kill. When troubleshooting or servicing pump, use all normal
precautions for the voltages involved.
1. Disconnect power unless required for testing.
2. Have electrical testing done by a qualified electrician.
3. Most problems occur above ground. Remove pump from well only as a last resort.
Problem
Possible Cause
Remedy
a) C
heck motor winding resistance - see Circuit (Winding)
Resistance Test.
Pump sandlocked.
Fuses blow or
overload circuit
breaker trips
when motor
starts.
Fuses blow or
overload trips
while motor is
running.
Motor does not
start but does
not blow fuses
or trip circuit
breaker.
Pump does not
shut off.
b) If motor is not shorted, turn on current and rap discharge
pipe sharply to loosen sand.
c) Pull pump and clean.
Low or high voltage.
Check line voltage (see Page 4). If high or low, contact power
company.
Cable damaged or shorted.
Check pump cable for ground (see Page 6).
Pump forced into crooked well.
Forcing pump into a crooked hole will cause misalignment of
pump and motor. Consult well driller.
Low or high voltage.
Check voltage on service lines (see Page 4).
Water contains abrasives.
If water contains excessive sand, remove pump and clean sand
out of well.
Motor or cable shorted and/or
grounded.
See Circuit (Winding) Resistance Test and Ground Check.
Fuses blown or circuit breaker tripped.
Reset circuit breakers or replace fuses.
Voltage does not reach terminals.
3-Phase: Check voltage at controller between wire pairs:
L1 – L3, L3 – L2, L2 – L1.
Single Phase: Check voltage between L1 and L2 on box
terminal strip.
Loose wire in control box.
Check and tighten all wires.
Defective magnetic controller coil.
Check starter and coil.
Cable leads improperly connected.
Check wiring diagram on box cover for correct connections.
Horizontal line check valve installed
backwards.
Reinstall correctly.
Motor running backwards (3-Phase
only).
Reconnect motor for proper rotation (see Rotation).
Pump gaslocked.
Start and stop pump several times allowing one minute
between stops and starts.
a) Restrict pump flow to equal well production.
Water level in well has dropped.
Motor runs, but
delivers little or
no water.
b) Install liquid level control.
c) Reset pump lower in well.
Leak in discharge pipe.
Raise pipe until leak is found.
Coupling between motor shaft and
pump shaft broken.
Remove pump from well and check coupling. If broken, call
Berkeley Pumps.
Pump parts worn from abrasives.
a) C
heck pump shut-off pressure. Pressure should be at least
90% of pressure at installation.
b) Call Berkeley Pumps.
Intake screen clogged.
Pump set below recommended depth.
Remove pump from well and clean screen.
a) Reduce pressure switch setting until pump will shut off.
b) Install pump producing higher pressure.
Discharge pipe friction reduces output. Install larger pipe or pump producing higher pressure.
Notes
12
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