TRIUMPH Tiger 750, Bonneville 750 User manual

TRIUMPH Tiger 750, Bonneville 750 User manual
Kim The CD Man © 2002
© Heidelberg DTP, 2002 © Kim The CD Man 2002
WORKSHOP
MANUAL
FOR
BONNEVILLE 730
AND
TIGER 750
(TR7V)
- UNIT CONSTRUCTION TWINS
FROM ENGINE No. KH 17124 (UP TO AND INCLUDING 1978 MODELS)
O Copyright by
TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLES (MERIDEN) LTD.
MERIDEN WORKS - ALLESLEY - COVENTRY CVS YAU -» ENGLAND
TELEPHONE: (0676) 223316 TELEX : “TRUSTY” GB 311762
TELEGRAMS: “TRUSTY” GB COVENTRY
Published MAY 1973 R Publication Part Мо. 99.0983
Kim The CD Man © 2002
IMPORTANT NOTE
Any modifications to any Triumph motorcycle made by you or to be made
by you in the future shall be held by our company to have been modified
at your own risk and responsibility and without either the explicit or
implied consent of Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. or Triumph Motorcycle
America Inc. We will assume no liability, obligation or responsibility for
any defective or modified parts or for the modified motorcycle itself, or for
any claims, demands or legal action for property damage or personal
injuries which may result from the modification of any Triumph
motorcycle.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
INTRODUCTION
THIS manual has been compiled and prepared to provide the necessary service information for workshop,
fitter, technical staff and individual owner, wishing to carry out basic maintenance and repair work on the
TRIUMPH 750 twin cylinder models.
GENERAL DATA for all models within the above range is provided in ready reference form, and a separate
section covering Service Tools is fully illustrated at the end of this manual.
The manual is divided into sections dealing with major assemblies, throughout the machine, each section sub-
divided into sequence order corresponding to normal operations of strip down, examination and rebuilding
procedure.
NOTE: All references to the L.H. or R.H. side of the machine relate to a rider sitting astride the machine and facing
forwards.
ENGINE AND FRAME NUMBERS
Note: The engine number is located on the left side of the engine, immediately below the cylinder barrel flange. The
number 1s stamped onto a raised pad.
The first letter indicates the month of
manufacture as follows: —
X VD ZX OT OOUPDP
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
The third Section is a numerical block of five figures
which commence with engine number 00100.
The fourth Section indicates the model.
Example
GUARANTEE
Month
N
Mode!
T140V
Year Number
C 00100
The second letter indicates the season
year of manufacture as follows: —
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
КЮ > хо с ^^ со ПО с
The frame number is stamped on the L.H. front frame
down tube near the steering head lug.
The engine number is stamped on the L.H. crankcase
half immediately below the cylinder barrel flange.
Both the Engine and Frame No. coincide.
Please refer to your local dealer or distributor where required for the latest terms of guarantee,
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FACTORY SERVICE ARRANGEMENTS
UNITED KINGDOM ONLY
CORRESPONDENCE
Technical Advice and Guarantee Claims
Communications dealing with any of these subjects should be addressed to the TECHNICAL/WARRANTY DEPT.
In all communications the full engine number complete with all prefix letters and
figures should be stated. This number will be found on the L.H. side of the crankcase
just below the cylinder flange.
TECHNICAL ADVICE
It wiil be appreciated how very difficult it is to diagnose trouble by correspondence and this is made impossible
in many cases because the information sent to us is so scanty. Every possible point which may have some bearing
on the matter should be stated so that we can send a useful and detailed reply.
REPLACEMENT PARTS
Replacement parts are no longer supplied direct from the factory to the individual owner. They should be obtained
trom the nearest local Triumph dealer.
There is a World-Wide network of stockists, a list of which is available from the factory on request.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONTENTS
SECTION
GENERAL DATA GD
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE RM
LUBRICATION SYSTEM A
ENGINE B
TRANSMISSION C
GEARBOX D
FRAME & ATTACHMENT DETAILS E
BRAKES, WHEELS & TYRES F
TELESCOPIC FORK G
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SERVICE TOOLS J
CONVERSION CHARTS CT
Kim The CD Man © 2002
(Aluo ‘v's Nn) 082 31I1AINNOS 30911
Kim The CD Man © 2002
T140V BONNEVILLE 750 (HOME & GENERAL EXPORT)
Kim The CD Man © 2002
(LHOdX3 IWUHINI9 Y IWOH) 052 YIDIL AZHL
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GENERAL DATA
T140E Bonneville 750
T140V Bonneville 750
TR7V Tiger 750
Note: Throughout this Section. read for All Models unless otherwise detailed as a
particuar Model.
GD1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GD
GENERAL DATA
GENERAL DATA
Read for T140Y unless otherwise stated.
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
OJL PUMP
Body material
Bore diameter: Feed...
Scavenge Ш Ш a VL
Plunger diameter: Feed
Scavenge ...
Vaive spring length |. _ NT
Bali diameter
Aluminium crosshead width .
Working clearance in plunger heads
Oil PRESSURE RELEASE VALVE
Piston diameter ..
Working clearance _
Pressure release operates ...
Soring length ...
Loadat 17:e1n.
Rate …
No. of coils
OIL PRESSURE
Normal running
idling
OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
Operating pressure...
BASIC DETAILS
Bore and stroke
Cubic capacity
Compression ratio
CRANKSHAFT
Crankshaft Type ...
Main bearing (drive side) size and type
Main bearing, (timing side) size and type
Main bearing journal diameter (timing side) …
Main bearing journal dia (Drive side) ...
Main bearing journal dia. ;
Main bearing housing dia.
Big end journal dia.
Min. regrind dia.
Crankshaft end float
CONNECTINS RODS
Length (centres) i.
Big end bearings—type ...
Bearing side clearance
Bearing diametral clearance
GD?
ENGINE
Brass
-40675/-40625 in. (10-33/10-317 mm.)
-4877/-4872 in, (12-388/12-375 mm.)
-40615/-40585 in. (10-315/10-307 mm.)
-4872/-4869 in. (12-375/12-377 mm.)
y in. (12-70 mm.)
in, (5-556 mm.)
4971-498 in. (12-624/12-649 mm.)
-0015/-0045 in. (-038/-124 mm.)
-5605/656 10in. (14-237/14-243 MM.)
-0017-002 in. (-0254/-0508 mm.)
601b./sq.in. (4-22kg./sq.cm.)
1361ns. (3S5MM.)
Blbs. (3-6 kg.)
42-31b./in.7 (3kg./cm.*)
13
65/801b./sq.in. (4-57/5-62kg./sq. cm.)
20/251b./sg.in. (1-406/1-76kg./sg. cm.)
3/51b./sq.in. (-2/0-35kg./sq. em.)
76x 82 mm. (2-992in. x 3-228 in.)
747 сс. (45 си. т.)
79
Forged two throw crank with boit-on flywheel.
Located by the timing side main bearing
243 15x H in. Single lipped roller bearing (71-3X
28-6 х 20:6 тт.)
72 mm. x 30 mm. x 19 mm. Ball race,
1-1812/1-1808 (30/29-99 mm.)
1:1247(1-1250 in. (28-576(28 .575 mm.)
1-1247/1-1250 in. (28-567/28-575 mm.)
2-8095/2-8110 in. (71-361/71-399 mm.)
1-6235/1-6240 in. (41-237/41-25 mm.)
1-6035/1-6040 in. (40-73/40-742 mm.)
-003/-017 in. (-0762/-432 mm.)
6-001/5-999 in (152-4254/152-3746 mm.)
Steel backed white metal
012/-016 in, (-305/-406 mm.)
0005/-0020 in. (-0127/-0508 mm.)
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GENERAL DATA GD
GENERAL DATA—(contd)
CYLINDER BLOCK
Material Cast iron
Bore size
Maximum oversize _ »
Tappet guide block housing diameter
VALYES
Stem diameter: Inlet
Exhaust
Head diameter: Inlet
Exhaust
VALVE GUIDES
Material D, _ e
Bore diameter (Inlet and exhaust)
Qutside diameter (Inler and exhaust) ...
Length: inlet e. ce on
Exhaust .,,
VALVE SPRINGS (RED SPOT INNER)
(GREEN SPOT OUTER)
Free length (when new)
Total number of coils
VALVE TIMING
Checked at nil tappet clearance. Valve lift
ROCKERS
Material
Bore diameter e.
Rocker spindle diameter
Tappet clearance (cold): Inlet
Exhaust
CAMSHAFTS
Journal diameter: Left ...
Right
Diametral clearance: Left
Right
End float e
TAPPETS
Material
Tip radius ...
Tappet diameter ... ‘es
Clearance in guide block
See Engine Section
~-020in. {-508 mm }
-9990/-9985I1n. (25-37/25-362 mm)
3095-3100 in. (7-86;7-874 mm)
-3090:-3095 in. (7-849.7 861 mm.)
1-592:1-596 1n. (40-437 40-538 mm.)
1-434.1-440 in. (36-388mm 36-576 mm.)
Aluminium-— Bronze
3127-8037 tn, (7-943:7-958 mm.)
5005-5310 in. (12-713/12-725 mm.)
14 in. (509 mm.)
244 in. (552 mm.)
Cuter Inner
Ten, ¡41-2mm.) 44 in. (38:9 mm.)
>; 73
Inlet opens 0-190 ins. (4-85 mm.) at T.D.C.
Exhaust closes 0130 ins. (3:27 mm.) at T.D.C.
High tensile steel forging
5002-5012 in. (12-705,12-731 mm.)
4990-4995 in. (12-675 172-687 mm.)
008 in, (0-203 mm.)
"006 in, (0-15 mm.)
-8100:-8105 in. (20-564;20-577 mm)
8730-8735 in, (22-174;22-187 mm)
"0010-0025 in. (0254:-0635 mm)
0005/0020 in. (-0127:-0508 mm.)
013-020 in. (331;-508 mm.)
High tensile steel body—Stellite tip
75 in. (191 mm) inlet. and 1-125 in, (28:56 mm.)
Exhaust
-3110/-3115 in. (7-9.7-913 mm)
-0005/-0015 in. (-0127,-267 mm.)
GD3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GD
GENERAL DATA—(contd)
TAPPET GUIDE BLOCK
Diameter of bores
Outside diameter
Interference fit in cylinder block
CAMSHAFT BEARING BUSHES
Material
Bore diameter (fitted): Lek!
Right
Ourside diameter‘ Left .
Fight
Length: Left inler
Left exhaust
Right inlet and exhaust
Interference fit in crankcase: Left
Right
TIMING GEARS
inlet and exhaust camshaft pinions:
No. of teeth ...
Interference fit on camshaft
Intermediate timing gear:
No of teeth ...
Bore diameter
Intermediate timing gear bush:
Material _…
Outside diameter
Bore diameter
Length
Working clearance on n spindle
Intermediate wheel spindie:
Diameter …
Interference fit in crankcase
Crankshaft pinion:
No of teeth ...
Fit on crankshaft
IGNITION TIMING
Crankshaft position В. T.D.C. 3
Fully advanced .
Piston position (B.T.D.C.).
Fully advanced
Advance range;
Contact breaker
Crankshaft
CONTACT BREAKER
Gap setting
Fully advanced at
SPARKING PLUG
Туре...
Gap setting
Thread size
PISTONS
Material
Clearance: Top of skirt
Bottom of skirt ...
Gudgeon pin hole dia.
GD4
GENERAL DATA
-3120/-3125 in. (7-925/7-938 mm.)
1.0000/-9995 in. (25-4/25-387 mm.)
-0005/-0015 in. (-0127/-267 mm.)
High density sintered bronze
-8125/-8135 in. (20-648/20-663 mm.)
874/-875 in. (22-:1/22-1 mm.)
1-0010/1-0015 in, (25-425/25-438 mm.)
1:126/1-127 in, (28-601/28-628 mm.)
1104/1114 in. (28-042/28-296 mm.)
-932/-942 in. (23-637/23-927 mm.)
1-010/1-020 in, (25-025/25-508 mm.)
-001/-002 in. {-025/-051 mm.)
-0010/-0025 in. (-025/-064 mm.)
50
-000/-001 in. (-0254 mm.)
47
-5618/-5625 in. (14-27/14-288 mm.)
Phosphor bronze
5635/-5640 in. (14-313/14-326 mm.)
-4990/-4995 in. (12-675/12-687 mm.)
-6775/-6825 in. (17-209/17-336 mm.)
-0005/-0015 in. (-0127/-267 mm.)
-4980/-4985 in. (12-649/12-662 mm.)
-0005/-0015 in. (-0127/-267 mm.)
25
+ -0003/—-0005 in. (-0076/-0127 mm.)
38°
41516. (10 4mm:
12°
24°
-014—-016in. (-35--40mm.}
2,000 r.p.m.
Champion N3 (or equivalent)
-025in. (-635mm.)
14mm. x ain. reach
Aluminium Alloy — diecasting
See Engine Section
-7502/-7504in. (19-011/19-162mm.)
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GENERAL DATA
GD
GENERAL DATA—(contd
PISTON RINGS
Compression rings (tapered):
Width В
Thickness
Fitted gap
Clearance in groove
Oil control ring:
Thickness
Width
Fittea gap
Clearance groove
FUEL SYSTEM
Amal type МК!
Main jet -
Needle jet size...
Needie type
Needle position …
Throttle valve:
Cuttaway ..
Carburetter nominal bore size
Аи cleaner type . В
T140E Models:
Amal type Mk II
Main jet
Needle jet
Needle type
Needle position ...
Throttle valve cuttaway
Starter iet |
CLUTCH DETAILS
Type . ces . ...
No. of plates: Driving (bonded)
Driven (plain)
Pressure springs:
Number
Free length ..
No. of working coils
Spring rate ..
Approximate fi fitted load
Bearing rollers:
Number
Diameter
Length
Clutch hub bearing diameter
Clutch sprocket bore diameter
Thrust washer thickness
Engine sprocket teeth
Clutch sprocket teeth
Chain details
CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
Conical spring:
Number of working coils
Free length
Diameter of balls
Clutch operating rod:
Diameter of rod
Length of rod
121/-113in. (3-073/2-896 ;mM)
-0625/-0165in. (1-589/1-563mm.)
-008/0-13in. (-203/-330mm.)
-0035/-0015in. (-089/-038 mm )
-125in. 43 18mm.)
12tin. (3-073mm)
0107-0401. (254/1-01+6mm)
-0015/-0025in. {(-038/-0635 mm)
Twin
Carburettors
1930/92 R930/93
190
-106
STD
1
3
30mm.
Surgical gauze
and metal gauze
R2930/1 1293072
200
105 (2928/030)
2C3
2
3
50
TRANSMISSION
Single
Carburettors
R930/94
270
106
STO
2
31
30mm.
Surgical gauze
and metal gauze
Muitiplate with integral shock absorber
6
3
1-75 ın, (43-5 mm.)
75
169 tbs. ins,
83 !bs. (37-65 kg.)
20
:2495,-2500 in. ¢ 337/6:35 mm.)
31/5-958 mm.)
231/-236 in. (5-
1.3733/1-3743 in. (33-882/34-907 mm.)
1-8745 1-8755 in. (47-612/47-638 mm.)
-052:-054 in. (1-312/1-372 mm.)
29
58
Triplex endless— 3 in. pitch x 84 links
2
43 in, (10-3 mm.)
% in. (9-525 mm.)
n. (5-6 mm.)
5 822/11. -812 in. (300-279/300-025 mm.)
GD5
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GD GENERAL DATA
GENERAL DATA—(conta)
KICKSTART OPERATING MECHANISM
Bush bore diameter … . _ |. В и „5 #514752). (19:08571 9-11 гит.)
Spindle working clearance in bush _ |. “ |. … -003/-005in. {-076/-127mm.)
Ratchet spring free length … В |. .. _ |. Vain {12-7 mm }
GEARCHANGE MECHANISM
Plungers:
Outer diameter … … |. _. a |. i. … 4315/-4320in. (10-92/10-937 mm.)
Working clearance in bore |. Ш _ _ … -005/-0015in. {-0127/-038mm;)
Plunger springs:
No. of working coils. | i» Ш Ш Ш 5 12
Free length _ _ |. | _ ... Vin. (31-75mm.)
Quter quadrant bush bore diameter _ _ _ |. … -6245/-6255in. (15-86/15-888mm.)
Clearance on shaft _ | | u |. … -0007/-0032in. (-0178/-081 mm.)
Inner quadrant bush bore diameter |. _ . |. … -7505/-7510in. (19-063/19-075n.m.}
Clearance on shaft | _ _ _ |. … 0005/-0025in. (-0127/-064mm.)
Gearchange shaft bushes: (After engine no. HN62501)
Timing side tnner bush bore diameter —... “ | _ … -7505/-7510 (19-063/19-075mm.)
Timing side Outer bush bore diameter ... |. . … 7527-7525 (19-1/19-11mm)
Quadrant return springs |. . _ в Ш … 9?
Free length _ _… _. В _ 2. Vain, (44-5mm.)
GEARBOX (5 SPEED)
RATIOS
Internal ratios: Sth (Top) 1:00 : 1
4th 1-19 : 1
3rd 1-40 : 1
2nd 1-837 : 1
15¢ (Bottom) |. _… |. … 2585 : 1
Overall ratios: Sth (Top) _… _ _ e _… ... 470
4th i" | _ … Cs os ... 559
3rd _. _ 5 г __ у, ... 6:58
2nd o 0 » |, у, e .. 863
1st (Bortom) —.. .. _ ... … 1225
Engine R.P.M. «+ 10 M.P.H, in Sth h (Top) gear …. ... ne. … 627
Gearbox sprocket teeth г. ... |. ... 20
GEAR DETAILS
Mainshaft high gear:
Bearing, type |. _ e _ _ ... ... Needle roller (torringron 31314)
Bearing length 2 ВЕ = i. on ... :875;-865 in. (22-23/21-97 mm.)
GEARSOX SHAFTS
Mainshaft
Left end diameter —... | |. _ _ _ ... -8103;-8098 in. (20-58/20-57 mm.)
Right end diameter... CL e _ _ _ ... 7494-7498 in. (19-044/19-054 mm.)
Length _. nn о д, |. ... 11-23 in. (2852 mm.)
Layshafc:
Left end diameter... .. os cs |. e ... 6875:-6870 in, (17-46/17:404 mm.)
Right end diameter ... |. _ _ |. _ …. -6875:-6870 in. (17-46/17-404 mm.)
Length Е у ВЕ о ВЕ e В … 6:47 in. (16433 mm.)
BEARINGS
1x3 in, Roller bearing (381 x63-5X 159 mm.)
7% in, Ball Journal (19 x 47-5 х 14-3 тт.)
Tin. Needle roller (17-5 x 22-23 x 19 mm.)
in, Needle roller (17:5 x 22-23 x 19 mm.)
Mainshaft bearing (left) $»
Mainshaft bearing (right) . = _ ... ... 1
Layshaft bearing (left) ... |. .. .. e р. TEN
Layshaft bearing (right) _ В _ e _… TEN
Layshaft 1st gear bush:
Dd Did fs =
x x о
Bore diameter = ... ... … _ _ … -800/-795 in. (20-32/20-203 mm.)
Shaft diameter e. Co о ... |. _ … 8075-8070 in. (20-511/20-498 mm.)
Layshaft 2nd gear bush:
Bore diameter _ ВЕ Е _ _ |. ... 800/795 in. (20-32/20-203 mm.)
Shaft diameter .. _ .. .. e e. … 8075/8070 in. (20-511/20-498: mm.)
GD6
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GENERAL DATA GD
GENERAL DATA—(contd)
FRAME AND ATTACHMENT DETAILS
HEAD BEARINGS
Type
Bore size
Outer diameter
SWINGING FORK
Bush type ... …
Bush bore, diamete
Sleeve diameter _
Distance between fork ends
REAR SUSPENSION
Type
Spring details:
Fitted length
Free length
Spring note
REAR SUSPENSION (EARLY MODELS)
Type
Spring details:
Fitted length
Free length
Spring rate
Mean coil diameter
Timken Taper Roller Bearing
7508 7500 in. (19-08/19-06 mm.)
1:7820.1:7810 in. (45-27 45-24 mm.)
Pre-sized phosphor bronze
1 in. nominal (25-4 mm)
-97984,-9972 in. (25-35, 25-32 mm)
8-018 in. (203-653 mm.)
Swinging tark controlled by gas-filled telescopic
cu! spring camper units
7-B4in [199-2mm.] at mid position
9-5in, (241.3mm.)
100ibs/in.
Swinging fork controlled by combined coil spring
hydraulic damper units
Bn. (2032... at Md position
9-Sin. (241-3mm.)
88105 in.
ЭВ 156-20mm)
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
WHEELS
Rim size: Front
Rear |. _ ... “e
Spoke details: Front: Spoke (Inner) R.H. & L.
Spoke (outer) R.H. & L.
Rear: Left side (outer)
Left side (inner)
Right side
H.
H
REAR WHEEL DRIVE
Rear wheel spocket (teeth) ...
Chain details: No. of links
Pitch
Width . _ |. Ш
Speedometer drive gearbox ratio ...
Speedometer cable length (outer)
Speedometer cable length (inner)
WM2-19
WM3-18
20 off 10 SWG 7-751n. (Mean length) 96: head
20 off 10 SWG 7-85in. (mean length) 80 head
10 off 9 SWG 5-8in. (mean length) 10° head
10 off 9 SWG 5-7in. (mean length) 102" head
20 off 9 SWG 7-21n. {mean length) 135 head
7 teeth
106 links
Sen. (15-875mm.)
Iain (9-525m mM)
1.2571 |
66in. (1676-4mm )
67-63in. (minimum) (1717-7mm.)
GD 7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GD GENERAL DATA
GENERAL DATA—(contd)
BRAKES
Front and rear:
Type _.
Disc diameter
Friction pads type
Lining thickness ..
Rear: (Prior to engine. no. HN62501)
Type |.
Lining thickness ..
Drum diameter ...
TYRES
Size: Front
Rear Ш _ i.
Tyre pressures: Front (4 10x19)
Rear (4-10 18)
Size. Front
Hear
Tyre pressure: Front (3. 25 > 19)
Rear (4-00 - 18)
Hydraulically operated disc.
10in (254mm.)
DON 230 FGDOBK
25in. (6 35mm.)
Internal expanding single leading shoe
-187/-197in. (4-75/5mm.)
7in. (+0-002in.) 177-Bmm. (+ 0-0508mm.)
4:10x 19 (104 x 484-6 mm.)
4-10x 18 (104 x 457-2 mm.)
28Ibs./in.? (1-90kg/cm?)
321bs./in? (2-25kg/cm*)
3-25 x 19in. (82-5x484-6mm)
4-00 x 18in. (101-6x457-2mm)
241bs./in.* (1-685kg/cm*)
241bs./in.* (1-685kg/cm”)
FRONT FORKS
TELESCOPIC FORK
Туре...
Spring details: Free length (when new)
Compressed length
No. of coils
Wire diameter
Stanchion diameter: (Bottom)
Outer member bore diameter
Telescopic {hydraulic damping)
19-1in. (485mm.)
11-4in. (289 5mm.)
68
‚168 ins, (4-26mm.)
1-:3610/1-3605in. (33-04/33-03mm.)
1:365/1-3631n. (33-15/33-1mm.)
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
Battery type
Rectifier type
Alternator type
Horn type
Zener diode type
Ignition coil type
Ignition switch type
Handlebar switch type
Flasher unit type
Contact breaker type
Condenser
BULBS
Headhgnt
Parking hght ...
Stop and tail light
Hi-beam, ignition and direction indicator warning 9 light
Speedometer. Tachometer ..
Direction indicators
Fuse rating (Amperes)
GD8
12 volt-8 amperes/hour
Lucas 2DS 506
Lucas RM2*
Lucas 6H
Lucas 20715
Lucas 17M12
Lucas S45
Lucas 169SA
Lucas 8FL
Lucas SCA
Lucas 54420128
No. Type
Lucas 410 45/40W pre-focus
Lucas 989 6W Mec
Lucas 380 S/21W
Lucas 281 2W (Wi.15)
Lucas 504 3W MES
Lucas 382 21W
35
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GENERAL DATA— (contd)
CAPACITIES
Fuel tank
Oit tank
Gearbox
Primary chaincase (inital fill only)
Telescopic fork legs .
BASIC DIMENSIONS
Wheel base
Overall length
Overall width
Seat height
WEIGHTS
Linladen weight
Engine unit (dry)
TORQUE WRENCH SETTINGS (DRY)
Flywheel bolts
Conn, rod bolts .
Crankcase junction bolts
Crankcase junction studs
Rocker box bolts—inner (7% in. dia) .
Cylinder head bolts—outer (§ in. día)...
Cylinder head bolt—centre (+ in. dia.)
Cylinder head bolt—inner (1 in. dia) -
Rocker box nuts ... ВЕ
Rocker box bolts (4 in. dia.)
Rock r spindle domed nuts
Oil jy mp nuts
Kick tirt ratchet pinion nut
Clut h centre nut
Rotor fixing nut...
Stat :ixing nuts. .
Primary cover domed nuts
Headlamp pivot bolts
Headrzace sleeve nut pinch bolt ..
Stanton pinch bolts
Front wheel spindle cap bolts
Rear brake drum to hub bolts ...
Brake cam spindle nuts
Zener diode fixing nut
Fork ¢ap nut -
Brake disc retaining bolts
GENERAL
GENERAL DATA GD
2 gall. (25 U.S. galls.) {4 galls (imp) General Export
Models)
4 pints (48 U.S. pints, 2-27 litres)
$ pint (500 c.e)
3 pint (350 c.c.)
+ pint (200 cc.)
55 in. (140 cm.)
875 in, (222 cm.)
33 in. (84 cm.)
31% in. (80 cm.)
408 tb. (185 kg.) 402 Ib. (182 kg.)
139 Ib. (67 kg.) 137 Ib. (63 kg.)
33 Ib. fe.
22 |b. ft.
13 Ib. ft.
20 Ib. ft.
10 Ib. ft.
18 Ib. ft.
16 Ib. ft.
18 Ib. ft.
5 Ib. ft. (7
5 Ib. ft. yA
27 Ib. ft.
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Kim The CD Man © 2002
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
500 MILE FREE SERVICE
All items marked (e) are carried out during the 500 mile free service plus the
additional three items:
Retorque the cylinder head nuts
Check the cylinder barrel nuts
Check the wheel spoke tension
DAIL Y
e Check the oil reservoir level and return oil flow …
Check the tyre pressures
e Check the operation of the tacho/speedo/horn and lights
e Check the operation of the front and rear brakes
EVERY 1500 MILES (2400 kms)
e Change the engine oil and clean the filters
# Grease the rear swinging fork pivots
¢ Check the tyre pressures
e Adjust/check/lubricate the rear chain |.
e Check the front and rear brake reservoir levels .
e Check and adjust the primary chain
se Adjust and lubricate all control cables
e Check the battery electrolyte level ...
e Check all accessible nuts and bolts
Check rear brake pedal clearance ...
EVERY 3000 MILES (4800kms)
e Check the contact breaker gap and lubricate
® Adjust the tappets
® Check the ignition timing |.
e Check and adjust the spark plugs ...
e Change the oil in the primary chaincase ...
Check the wheel bearings for Play - _
Check the tyres for wear |
Check the brake disc pads for wear i.
Check the rear brake shoes for wear (prior to frame no. . HN62501) …
Grease the rear brake pedal spindie
Clean the air filter element(s)
Clean the fuel filters
e Check the cluteh push rod adjustment
Check the gearbox oil level
Grease the rear brake cam spindle (prior to frame no. HN62501)
EVERY 6000 MILES (9600kms)
e Change the gearbox oil
e Check and adjust the steering head | races
Change the oil in the front fork legs
EVERY 10000 MILES (16000 kms)
Check the metal brake pipes and rubber hoses for signs of deterioration or corrosion
EVERY 15000 MILES (24000kms)
Grease the steering head bearings
Grease the wheel bearings …
EVERY 24000 MILES (38400 kms)
Drain and refill the front and rear hydraulic systems
EVERY 40000 MILES (64000kms)
Service or replace the FRONT brake master cylinder and front/rear brake calipers
Replace the REAR brake motor cylinder and front and rear metal pipes and brake hoses
RM
Section Ref:
B14
B13
F20
A3
“General Data", F?5
H9, H14 & H15
F28
A3
A16
“General Data", F25
A12, F24
F2
C2
A17, A18
H1
F1
F1
A9
B5
B28 & B29
H3
A11
F3
F3
F3
F15
A19
B6
E1
C1
A10
A16
A10
G1
A15
F6
G2
F12, F14, F17
F5
F9, F8
F7, F6
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION A
Section
TABLE OF RECOMMENDED LUBRICANTS … a, i. i. .. 8 i. " A1
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM .. i. i. ... _ i" i» |. _. A2
CHANGING THE ENGINE OIL AND CLEANING THE OIL FILTERS ... ... i. ... A3
OIL PRESSURE ... |. … i. .. .. .. .. .. " |. i" A4
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE OIL PRESSURE RELEASE VALVE ... " A5
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE OIL PUMP … i. |. i" ... |. Аб
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE OIL PIPE JUNCTION BLOCK ... .. . . A7
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ROCKER OIL FEED PIPE ... .. i. . 5 AS
CONTACT BREAKER LUBRICATION ... i. ... . |. A8 ... i. ... A9
GEARBOX LUBRICATION i. .. i" 5 ... |. .. |. |. . A10
PRIMARY CHAINCASE LUBRICATION i. a 5 .. .. _ 8 i. A11
REAR CHAIN LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE _ i. _ .. _ . А12
GREASING THE STEERING HEAD RACES ... .. .. | .. .. " . A13
WHEEL BEARING LUBRICATION i. | ... . _ _ i. _ . A14
TELESCOPIC FORK LUBRICATION ... |. .. .. i. |. i" i. i. A15
LUBRICATION NIPPLES … .. _. i" i. vn .. .. |. 5 . A16
LUBRICATING THE CONTROL CABLES —... _ |. A. ae a i. “ A17
SPEEDOMETER CABLE LUBRICATION a i. _ |. . |. _ |. A18
REAR BRAKE PEDAL SPINDLE LUBRICATION ... .. _ . i. _ . A19
CHECK PROCEDURE FOR WET SUMPING i. i. i. e. . _ "e A20
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION Al
RECOMMENDED LUBRICANTS (All Markets)
UNIT MOBIL CASTROL BP ESSO SHELL TEXACO
Engine and Primary Mobiloil Castrol GTX B.P. Super Uniflo Shell Super | Havoline
Chaincase................... Super or Visco-Static Motor Or Motor Oil
Castrol XL20/50 20W/50
Gearbox..................... Mobilube Castrol B.P. Gear Oil Esso Gear Ol! Shell Spirax | Multigear
GX90 Hypoy SAE 90 EP GX90/140 90 EP Lubricant EP 90
Telescopic Fork......... Mobi! Castrol BP B Esso Shell Donax | Texomatic
ATF 210 TQF. Autron Glide T.7 F
Wheel Bearings, Mobilgrease MP Castrol LM B.P. Energrease Esso Shell Marfak
Swinging Fork and or Grease L2 Multipurpose Retinax A All Purpose
Steering Races............... Mobilgrease Super Grease H
Easing Rusted Parts......... Mobil Handy Castrol esso Shell Graphited
Oi Penetrating Oil Penetrating Oll Easing Oil } Penetrating Oil
The above lubricants are recommended for all operating temperatures above - 18°C (O%F).
Appravat is given to lubricants marketed by companies other than those listed above provided that they have similar multigrade characteristics
and meet the A.P.S. Service M.S. pertormance level.
Also approved are:
Engine and
Swinging Fork and
Easing Rusted
Primary Chaincase Gearbox Telescopic Fork Steering Races Parts
DUCKHAM S Duckham's Duckham's Duckham's Duckham's Duckhams Adpenol
Q20/50 Hypoid 90 Q-Matic LB10 Grease Penetrating Oil
FILTRATE Filtrate Super Filtrate EP.90 Filtrate A.T. Filtrate Super
20W/50 Fluid F Lithium Grease
À 2
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
+,
a =
4
A
BREATHER
OREAMIER
|
Engine lubrication diagram
Fig. A1.
A3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION A2
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The engnie lubrication system is of the dry sump
type. The oil is fed by gravity from the oil reservoir
tank to the oil pump; the oil, under pressure from
the oil pump, is forced through drillings to the
crankshaft big ends, where it escapes, and lubricates
the cylinder walls, ball journal main bearings and
the other internal engine parts.
The oil pressure between the oil pump and crank-
shaft is controlled by the oil pressure release valve.
After lubricating the engine, oil fails to the sump
where it is scavenged through the sump filter, and
returned to the oil reservoir by the action of
the oil pump scavenge plunger. The oil pump has
been designed so that the scavenge plunger has a
greater capacity than the feed plunger; thus ensur-
ing that the sump does not become flooded.
Qil is fed to the valve operating mechanism by
means of the rocker oil feed pipe which is connected
to the scavenge return pipe just below the oil reser-
voir. After travelling through the rocker spindles,
the oil is fed into the rocker boxes after which it
falls by gravity down the push rod cover tubes.
The oil then passes through holes drilled in the
tappet guide blocks and into the sump, where it is
subsequently scavenged.
A positive oil feed is provided for the exhaust tappets.
The lubricant is ported through drillways from the
timing cover, and on through the crankcase and
cylinder block base flange to an annular groove
machined in the tappet guide block. Two oil holes are
provided in the groove to mate with the oil holes in the
tappets which provide a channel for the lubricant to the
tappet and camshaft working faces. See Fig. A3 and
Fig. A4. Current models use tappets ground to provide
a timing effect for the lubricant.
SECTION A3
CHANGING THE ENGINE OIL AND CLEANING THE OIL FILTERS
tt is advisable to drain the oil when the engine is
warm as the oil will flow more readily. When
changing the oil it is essential that the oi! filters are
thoroughly cleaned in paraffin (kerosene).
The hexagon-headed sump drain plug, which also
houses the sump filter, is situated underneath the
engine adjacent to the engine bottorm mounting lug, as
shown in Fig. A2, reference No. 4. Remove the plug
and aliow the oil to drain for approximately ten
minutes. Clean the filter in paraffin (kerosene) and re-
fit the plug but do not forget the joint washer.
The oil reservoir filter is contained in the bottom of
the reservoir by means of a rectangular plate
secured by four nuts. Remove the reservoir filler
cap, place a drip tray underneath the base of the
reservoir and remove the drain plug from the center
of the base plate. Allow the oil to drain for approx.
10 mins. Remove the four nuts and withdraw the
cover plate from its studs. Note that there are
two gaskets, one above the filter base flange and the
Ad
other below. Clean the filter thoroughly in kero-
sene (paraffin).
It is advisable to flush out the oil reservoir with a
flushing oil, or, if this is not available, paraffin
(kerosene) will do. However, if this is used ensure that
alt traces are removed from the inside of the oil
reservoir prior to re-filing with oil. (For the correct
grade of oil see Section A1).
When refitting the filter do not forget to replace
the gaskets. Refit the drain plug.
The capacity of the reservoir is 4 imperial pints
(4-8 U.S. pints, 2-27 litres). The level can be
checked with the combined dipstick and filler cap.
Check that the oil is returning trom the engine sump by
starting the engine and removing the reservoir filier
cap. Oil should be seen to be flowing from the pipe
which protrudes into the filler neck tube.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM A
CE oo,
Noa BISA
Fig. A2. Underside view of engine/gearbox unit
DRILLWAY
fe EXHAUST
| EEE EEE "pre В ; TAPPET
MEE | OIL FEED
EXHAUST ВОНИ
ТАРРЕТ HR rrr
| OIL FEED pm |
DRILLWAY/g |
Tappet oil feed arrangement
Fig. AJ. Tappet oil feed drillway
A5
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION A4
OIL PRESSURE
The oil pressure is controlled by means of the release
valve situated at the front of the engine at the right
side adjacent to the timing cover.
When the engine is stationary there will be nil oil
pressure. When the engine is started from cold
pressure may be as high as 80 |b./sq. in. reducing
when hot to a normal running figure of 65/80 Ib./
sq. in. At a fast idle when hot pressure should be
20:25 Ib..sq. in,
Pressure can only be checked with an oil gauge
connected to an adaptor replacing the oil pressure
switch on the front of the timing cover.
if satisfactory readings are not obtained, check the
following :—
{1) That the otl pressure release valve is clean and
that the piston has the correct working
clearance in the valve body as detailed in
“General Data”.
(2) That the oil reservoir level is not below mini-
mum and that the oil is Deing returned to the
réservoir.
(31 That che sump filter and oil reservoir filter are
cean and not blocked.
(4) That the oil pump is functioning properly and that
there 1s a supply of oll to the pump. Refer to
Sections A6 and A8 for checking the oll pump and
oil pipes with junction block respectively
(5) That the drillings in the timing cover are clean
and that the drillings in the crankcase connec:-
ing the oil pipe junction block to the oil pump
are clear.
(6) That the oil seal in the timing cover which fits
over the crankshaft is not badly worn, thus
resulting in the oil escaping to the sump,
(7) That the big ends are not badly worn. Should
the big end bearings not have the correct
working clearance, the oil will escape more
readily, particularly when the oil is warm and
is more fluid, thus giving a drop in pressure,
Extensive periods of slow running (such as in heavy
traffic), or unnecessary use of the air control, can
cause dilution in the oil reservoir, and an overall
drop in lubricating pressure due to the lower vis-
cosity of the diluted oil.
Most lubrication and oil pressure troubles can be
avoided by regular attention to the recommended
oil changes.
SECTION AS
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE OIL PRESSURE RELEASE VALVE
The oti pressure release valve is very reliable and
should require no maintenance other than cleaning.
It is situated at the front of the engine on the right
side, adjacent to the timing cover.
Oil pressure is governed by the single spring
situated within the release valve vody. When the
AG
spring is removed it can be checked for compressive
strength by measuring the length. Compare this
figure with that given in “GENERAL DATA”.
To remove the complete oil pressure release valve
unit from the crankcase, unscrew the hexagonal nut
adjacent to the crankcase surface. When removed
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM A
the cap can then be unscrewed from the body thus
releasing the piston which should be withdrawn.
Thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene) and
inspect for wear. The piston should be checked for
possible scoring and the valve body filter for possible
1 Cup
2 Main Spring
3 Piston
4 Fibre washer
5 Valve body
6 Fibre washer
blockage or damage. To reassemble the release valve
unit offer the piston into the valve body and screw on
the valve cap using a suitable loctite thread sealant
and a new fibre washer. Similarly, when screwing the
release valve unit into the crankcase. fit a new fibre
washer between the release valve body and the
crankcase. See Fig. AS.
Fig. AS. Oil pressure release valve
To dismantle, remove the complete valve and cap
and seperate the cap from the valve body. The
spring and piston can then be removed for cleaning
and examination.
On reassembly, note that the open end of the piston
faces towards the spring and cap.
SECTION A6
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE OIL PUMP
The oil pump is situated inside the timing cover and
is driven by an eccentric peg on the nut fitted to the
end of the inlet camshaft. The only part likely to
show wear after considerable mileage is the oil
pump drive block slider, which should be replaced
to maintain full oil pumping efficiency. The plungers
and pump body being constantly immersed in oil,
wear is negligible.
For removal of the timing cover see Section B30.
The oil pump is held in its position by two conical
nuts. When these are removed the oil pump can
then be withdrawn from the mounting studs. The
scavenge and feed plungers should be removed and
the two square caps from the end of the oil pump
unscrewed. This will release the springs and balls.
All parts should be thoroughly cleaned in paraffin
(kerosene).
À 7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The plungers should be inspected for scoring, and
for wear by measuring their diameters and com-
paring them with those given in "GENERAL DATA".
The springs should be checked for compressive
strength by measuring their lengths. Compare the
actual lengths with those given in ‘GENERAL
DATA".
Slider. _
Drive Block
#
E.4. .F
Scavenge Plunger — —.. IE eed Plunger
Body —-—— —— 4 a
ы E
Intake Scavenge Port -— o BIG
(e
Intake
_— Feed Port
Ball Valve Seating - - ee |
a” PRE: E >
ГВ чт
Scavenge Return Port —” = Pressure
~ © Feed Port
Ball, Pump Valve — 3 €
Spring, Ball Valve — — E A
Body Plug» —————. = я 111
Fig. A6. Oil pump
When reassembling the oil pump all parts should be
well lubricated and the oil pump finally checked for
efficiency by the following means: —
Place a small amount of oil in both bores (approxi-
mately 1c.c.) and press the plungers until oil 1s forced
through both outlet ports (these are the two holes
nearest the square caps (see Fig. A6). Place the
thumb over the intake ports (the holes nearest the
plunger tops) and withdraw the plungers siightly. If the
oll tevel falls in either outlet port then the ball valve is
not seating properly and the square caps should be
removed and the cleaning process repeated. The ball
valve can be tapped lightly, but sharply to ensure an
efficient and adequate seal.
The aluminium drive block slider which fits over the
eccentric peg on the inlet camshaft nut should be
checked for wear on both the boreand in the plunger
cross-head.
“When refitting the oil pump a new gasket should be
used and always remember that the cones of the
conical nut and washers fit into the countersunk
holes in the oil pump body.
When replacing the timing cover care should be
taken that the junction surfaces are cleaned prior
to application of the fresh coat of jointing compound.
SECTION A7
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE OIL PIPE JUNCTION BLOCK
Drain the oit from the gearbox by removing the oil drain
plug situated underneath the gearbox as shown in Fig.
A2. reference No. 3.
Remove the right-hand exhaust pipe, and the right
footrest, then remove the gearbox outer cover as
shown in Section D2.
Place a drip tray underneath the engine and remove
the drain plug where fitted, or, alternatively,
remove the nut securing the oil pipe junction block
to the crankcase and allow the oil reservoir to drain
for approximately ten minutes.
AS
Disconnect the rubber pipes from the oil resevior,
remove the junction block and thoroughly clean it
in paraffin (kerosene),
Check the pipes for cuts and abrasions and that the
rubber connections are a good tight fit on the
junction block pipes. lf there is any doubt about the
reliability of the rubber connectors, they should be
renewed.
Reassembly is the reversal of the above instructions
but remember to fit a new gasket between the
junction block and the crankcase.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM A
Fig. A7. Oil pipe securing clips
When replacing the rubber connection tubes, care
must be exercised to prevent chaffing the inside of
the rubber connections. Failure to observe this may
result in fragments of rubber entering the oil
system and causing blockage.
Replace the screwed clips and firmly clamp them in
position.
SECTION A8
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ROCKER OIL FEED PIPE
To disconnect the rocker oil feed pipe for removal,
the two domed nuts should be removed from the
ends of the rocker spindle, and the banjos with-
drawn.
Disconnect the rocker oil feed pipe from the oil
reservoir,
When removed, the rocker oil feed pipe should be
thoroughly cleaned in paraffin (kerosene) and
checked for blockage by sealing the first banjc with
the thumb and first finger, whilst blowing through
the other. Repeat this procedure for the other
banjo.
When refitting the rocker oil feed pipe it is
advisable to use new copper washers, but if the old
ones are annealed they should give an effective oil
seal. Annealing is achieved by heating to cherry red
heat and quenching in water. Any scale that is
formed on the washers should be removed prior to
re-fitting them.
SECTION A9
CONTACT BREAKER LUBRICATION
The contact breaker is situated in the timing cover
and it is imperative that no oil from the engine
lubrication system gets into the contact breaker
chamber. For this purpose there is an oil seal at
the back of the contact breaker unit pressed into
the timing cover. However slight lubrication of
the auto advance unit spindles is necessary.
A9
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
Fig. AB. Contact breaker mechanism lubrication points
10CA
To lubricate the auto advance mechanism it is
necessary to withdraw the mounting plate. Mark the
C.B. plate and housing so that it can be subsequently
replaced in exactly the same location, then unscrew
the two hexagonal pillar bolts. When the mounting
plate is removed, the mechanism should be tightly
olled (see arrows shown in Fig. A8) at the same
interval that is given above for the cam wick. Do not
allow more than one drop onto each pivot point, and
wipe off any surplus.
Two drops of oil should be applied to the spindle which
supports the cam to prevent corrosion and possible
seizure.
Finally, replace the mounting plate and re-set the
ignition timing. if the setting has been disturbed, the
correct procedure for accurate ignition timing is given
in Sections B27, B28 and B29.
The lubricating wicks adjacent to the contact breaker
nylon heels are treated intially with Shell Retinax A
grease and thereafter, 3 drops of clean engine oil
should be added to the wicks at 3000 mile intervals..
SECTION A10
GEARBOX LUBRICATION
Fhe gearbox is lubricated by means of an oil bath. Qil
15 splash ted to all gearbox components including the
enclosed gearchange and kickstarter mechanisms.
The oil in the gearbox should be drained and the
gearbox flushed out after the initial 500-mile (800km.)
running-in period. Thereafter, the oil should be
changed as stated in “Routine Maintenance".
The oit can be drained from the gearbox by means of
the oil drain plug located underneath the gearbox (see
"ig. A2, reference No. 3). It is best to drain the oil whilst
+:e engine Is warm as the oil will low more readily.
A10
The gearbox oil filler plug is situated on the outer
cover. When replenishing the oil, the oil drain plug
should be replaced omitting the smaller oil level plug
which screws into it. Oil should be poured into the
gearbox until it is seen to drip out through the oil level
plug hole. (See Fig. A9). The correct level has then
been obtained (see Section At for recommended oil).
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
1. Clutch cable nipple
2. Drain plug
3. Level plug
2 He —-3
Fig. A9. Gearbox drain and level plugs
SECTION A11
PRIMARY CHAINCASE LUBRICATION
The level of the oil in the primary chaincase is
automatically maintained by the engine breathing
system which operates through the drive side roller
bearing. Three small holes drilled in the crankcase
provide an inlet back into the crankcase when the
oil reaches a predetermined level.
Oil should be added to the chaincase when the oii has
been drained, or lost when using the chain tensioner.
When ‘priming’ the chaincase with fresh oil use
approximately Ys pint of engine oil. (See Section A1).
Fig. A10. Section through the primary chaincase
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The oil drain plug is siutated in the bottom of the
chaincase towards the rear of the machine. This
plug also gives access to the chain tensioner,
Fresh oil can be added by removing the filler plug
ad:acent to the cylinder base flange or the clutch
adjuster aperture in the centre of the outer cover.
The primary chain is lubricated by means of a
collection chamber and oil feed pipe built into the
primary chain housing. The oil feed pipe directs a
continuous supply of oil at the point where the
chain runs onto the engine sprocket. To check this
for possible blockages it is necessary to remove the
primary chaincase outer cover, and remove the
front clip securing the oil feed pipe.
The oil ways can then be cleaned by a jet of com-
pressed air from such as a cycle pump. When
replacing the feed pipe clip ensure that the pipe is
parallel to the top portion of the chain and firmly
gripped by the clip.
SECTION A12
REAR CHAIN LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE
The rear chain should be penodically lubricated with an
oni can or preferably with an oil soaked brush whenever
signs of dryness occur. But as recommended in
"Routine Maintenance” the chain should be removed
and thoroughly cleaned and greased.
Disconnect the connecting link and remove the
chain. If available, connect an old chain to the end
of the chain being removed and draw it onto the
gearbox sprocket until the chain to be cleaned is
clear of the machine and can be disconnected.
Remove all deposits of road dust etc. by means of
a wire brush. Clean thoroughly in paraffin or
kerosene and allow to drain.
Inspect the chain for excessive wear of the rollers
and pivot pins and check that the elongation does
not exceed 1. ".. To do this first scribe two marks
on a flat table exactly 12+ inches (31-75 cm.) apart,
place the chain opposite che two marks. When the
chain is compressed to its minimum free length the
marks should coincide with two pivot pins 20 links
apart. When the chain is stretched to its maximum
free length, the extension should not exceed } in.
(6-25 mm.). lf it is required to remove a faulty link,
or shorten the chain, reference should be made to
Section C12.
To lubricate use a proprietary chain lubricant.
The chain is now ready for refitting to the machine,
Foi chain adjustment refer to Section F.
NOTE: The connecting link retaining clip
must be fitted with the nose-end facing in the
direction of motion of the chain.
SECTION A13
GREASING THE STEERING HEAD RACES
The steering head bearings are packed with grease on
assembly and require re-packing with the correct
grade of grease at the interval stated in Routine
Maintenance”. Removal and replacement of the
bearings 15 comprehensively covered in the front fork
section.
A12
When the bearings are removed they should be
cleaned in paraffin (kerosene), also, the races fitted
to the frame head lug should be cleaned thoroughly
by means of a paraffin (kerosene) soaked rag, then
inspected for wear, cracking or pocketing.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM A
SECTION A14
WHEEL BEARING LUBRICATION
NOTE: Later models are fitted with sealed bearings
which do not require external lubrication. These
can be recognised by the plastic covers fitted on
To obviate further lubrication periods It would be
advantageous to fit the later sealed type bearing at the
first lubrication penod of 15000 miles.
each side of the baliraces. (To inspect first remove
the wheel and bearing retainers, see Section F). Removing and replacing the bearings for the front
and rear wheels is comprehensively covered in
EARLY MODELS Section F11 and F14.
The wheel bearings are packed with grease on
assembly but require re-packing with the correct grade
of grease at the interval stated in Routine
Maintenance
The bearings on both the front wheel and rear wheel
should be removed cleaned in paraffin tkerosene) and
assembled with the hubs well packed with the correct
grade of grease Far details concerning the grade of
grease to be used (which is the same tor hath wheels),
see Section At
SECTION A15
TELESCOPIC FORK LUBRICATION
The oil contained in the front fork has the dual purpose
of lubricating the stanchion bearing surface and also
acting as the suspension damping medium. Therefore
! 15 imperative that the fork legs have an equal amount
of oil in them and that it is the type as stated in Section
Al,
Particular attention should be given to the oil change
period,
To drain the oil from the fork legs remove the two
small hexagonal drain plugs adjacent to the left and
right ends of the front wheel spindle.
Qil can be expelled at a greater rate by compressing
the fork two or three times.
Qil leakage at the junction between the stanchion
and bottom fork leg is prevented by means of an
oil seal. If there is excessive oil leakage at this
junction it may be necessary to renew the oil seal
(see Section G3), but before undertaking this work,
the fork should be checked to ensure that there is
the correct amount of oil in each of the fork legs.
The correct amount is 190 c.c.
To refill the fork legs, the fork hexagonal cap nuts ano
the stanchion top nuts must be unscrewed and with-
drawn, and the correct amount of oil poured into each
fork leg. This will necessitate removal of the handlebar
On reassembly use a suitable jointing compound on
the stanchion top nut threads. To obviate leakage.
A13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION A16
LUBRICATION NIPPLES
Both the rear brake operating camshaft (prior to engine
no. HN62501) and the swinging fork pivot bearings
should be lubricated by means of the lubrication
nipples.
The rear brake camshaft has an integral lubrication
nipple. Care should be taken that the surface of the
nipple is not damaged. Slight distortion may be
removed with a fine grade file.
The rear wheel brake cam and spindle bearing
surfaces should be sparingly lubricated with the
correct grade of grease (Section At). This can be done
by giving the lubrication nipple on the end of the
camshaft one stroke from a grease gun. However, if
the grease does not penetrate, the brake cam should
be removed and cleaned thoroughly in paraffin
(kerosene). The cam bearing surfaces should then be
greased on reassembly.
SWINGING FORK PIVOT
The two nipples are situated at each end of the fork
pivot. Give each nipple several strokes with a high
pressure grease gun until grease is visible at the dirt
excluders.
If the grease does not penetrate then the pivot must be
removed to ensure adequate lubrication.
Removal of the swining fork is detailed in section E20.
When the fork is removed all parts should be thoroughly
cleaned out in paraffin (kerosene) and allowed to drain.
Reassembly is a reversal of the above instructions.
The space surrounding the distance tube should be
carefully packed with the correct grade of grease,
and the sleeves should be well greased on their
bearing surfaces.
Fig. A11. Swinging fork pivot lubrication nipples
SECTION A17
LUBRICATING THE CONTROL CABLES
The control cables can be periodically lubricated at the
exposed joints with a thin grade oil (see Section A1).
A more thorough method of lubrication is that of
feeding oil into one end of the cable by means of a
reservoir. For this the cable can be either disconnected
at the handlebar end only, or completely removed.
The disconnected end of the cable should be
threaded through a thin rubber stopper and the
stopper pressed into a suitable narrow-necked can
A14
with a hole in its base, If the can is then inverted
and the lubricating oil poured into it through the
hole, the oil will trickle down between the outer
and inner cables. It is best to leave the cable in this
position overnight to ensure adequate lubrication.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION A18
SPEEDOMETER AND TACHOMETER CABLE LUBRICATION
The speedometer and tachometer cables should be
lubricated by means of grease (see Section A1 for
correct grade)
It Is not necessary completely to remove the cable, but
only to diconnect If from the speedometer or tacho-
meter and withdraw the inner cable. Unscrew the
union nut at the base of the instrument, withdraw the
Inner cable and clean it in paratfin {kerosene} Smear
the surface with grease. except for 61m (15cm |
nearest to the instrument head
The cable 15 now ready to be offered into the outer
casing and excess grease wiped off. Care should be
taken that both "squared ends of tne inner cables are
located in their respective ‘square drive housings
before the union nut 1s tightened.
SECTION A19
BRAKE PEDAL SPINDLE LUBRICATION
No external grease nipple is provided, therefore the
spindle must be removed and greased at the intervals
stated in “Routine Maintenance”.
See Section E6 for removing and servicing the brake
pedal spindle.
Prior to engine no. HN62501
The brake pedal spindie 1s bolted to the left rear engine
mounting plate. The spindle should be covered with a
fresh supply of grease occasionally otherwise corrosion
and inefficient operation may result.
To gain access to the spindle, slacken off the rear
brake rod adjustment, unscrew the brake pedal
retaining bott and withdraw the pedal,
Remove any rust from the spindle with fine emery.
Clean the bore of the pedal and smear the spindle with
grease {see Section Al) prior to refitting.
A15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
A o LUBRICATION SYSTEM
SECTION A20
CHECK PROCEDURE FOR WET SUMPING
Wet sumping” or a lack of scavenge is a condition
which can occur due to a number of causes. The
symptoms of this condition are :—
(1) Excessive oil emitting from crankcase breather
tube and resulting high oil consumption.
(2) Smoking exhaust.
to verify that a wet-sumping condition exists, run
the engine until it is thoroughly warm. Within
five minutes after engine shutoff drain the sump.
Measure the amount of oil that drains out. An
amount cf oil over 100 c.c. indicates a wet-sumping
condition and corrective measures should be taken.
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF WET-SUMPING
ARE
(1) Foreign material preventing ball valve from
seating in the scavenge side of oil pump (most
common cause).
(2) Poor check valve ball seat.
(3) Air leak in crankcase oil scavenge pipe.
(4) Air leak in cil pump to crankcase joint.
(5) Porous crankcase casting.
(6) Air leak at E9336 plug bottom of engine.
(7) Cil pressure release valve piston in full bypass
position due to a stuck piston or broken or
missing spring.
(8) Restriction in oil reservoir vent pipe.
SCAVENGE SUCTION TEST (for checking
above causes numbers 1 to 6)
Obtain a vacuum gauge calibrated in inches of
mercury. Attach a length of standard Triumph
oil pipe to it and proceed as follows:
(1) Run engine until it is thoroughly warm.
(2) Remove the oil sump cap and screen,
(3) Connect hose from vacuum gauge to oil
scavenge pipe.
(4) Run engine at a fast idle—gauge should read a
vacuum of 18-26 inches of mercury.
(5) Stop engine and observe gauge. The needle
should gradually—not immediately—drop to
zero,
A16
IF THE SCAVENGE SUCTION
TEST IS SATISFACTORY
(1) Check oil pressure relief valve assembly and
also check oil pressure.
(2) Check the return system from the pump to the
oil reservoir and also the reservoir vent.
TO CHECK FOR A BLOCKED OR
RESTRICTED OIL RETURN TO
THE RESERVOIR
(1) On the oil reservoir using a hand brace or
and 4 and 1% drill bits, run the drill bits into
the return tube and rocker feed tube at the
top of the reservoir to see that both tubes are
free from internal burrs and restrictions that
can occur at their welded joints.
(2) After doing the above, blow out the return
oil line and the return tube in the oil reservoir
with compressed air.
IF THE ABOVE TESTIS NOT
SATISFACTORY
(1) Remove oil pump—clean thoroughly and see
that ball seats are concentric and free from
pits or grooves. Re-assemble pump, tighten
check valve caps securely and re-install pump
with a new gasket.
To check for crankcase scavenge tube leakage or
case porosity, fill a good ‘‘pumper’’ type oil can
with light oil and squirt through a folded rag into
pickup tube. Back pressure could prevent pumping
oil out of the can in a few pumps. If the oil can
still be pumped with no evidence of substantial
back pressure, obviously there is a leak in the
the crankcase tube or crankcase scavenge oll
passageways.
To be sure that the oil can is satisfactory for this
test, fill it with light oil and block the outlet tube.
After one or two pumps the can should ‘liquid
lock’. If the can can stil be pumped, the pump
mechanism is suffering from excessive blow-by and
the can will not suffice for this test.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION B
ENGINE
DESCRIPTION Section
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ENGINE UNIT ... _ В … ВЕ | | B1
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ROCKER BOXES | | |, ВЕ В2
INSPECTING THE PUSH RODS ... . . Ш . _ | B3
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE ROCKER BOXES |, . | 0 | B4
ADJUSTING THE VALVE ROCKER CLEARANCES .. | | | | В5
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE AIR CLEANER ВЕ | | | Bé
CONCENTRIC CARBURETTER—DESCRIPTION 8 ВЕ | | | В
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CARBURETTER . | ВВ
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE CARBURETTER a | B9
INSPECTING THE CARBURETTER COMPONENTS —.. | | | B10
CARBURETTER ADJUSTMENTS | . | |. | | B11
TWIN CARBURETTER ARRANGEMENT _ | a . BI
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE EXHAUST SYSTEM _ B13
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE CYLINDER HFAM ASSFMBLY | B14
REMOVING AND REPLACING THF VALVES . | | | | B15
RENEWING THE VALVE GUIDES i. | | | | . | .. Be
DECARBONISING —... . _ | . . | | | 817
RE-SEATING THE VALVES | . | | .. B18
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CYLINDER BLOCK AND TAPPETS _ | .. B19
INSPECTING THE TAPPETS AND GUIDE BLOCKS … | | . | B20
RENEWING THE TAPPET GUIDE BLOCKS . . ВЕ | В21
REMOVING AND REHTTING THE PISTONS ... | u i. В 822
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE PISTON RINGS ВЕ | | ‚. В23
INSPECTING THE PISTONS AND CYLINDER BORES | _ |. | B24
TABLE OF SUITABLE REBORE SIZES... . | ВЕ ВЕ В25
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CONTACT BREAKER |. | | ВЕ | В26
IGNITION TIMING—INITIAL PROCEDURE |. . | B27
IGNITION TIMING WHERE A STROBOSCOPE IS NOT AVAILABLE _ |. | В28
IGNITION TIMING BY STROBOSCOPE . В | | B29
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TIMING COVER | | B30
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE OIL PUMP |, | Bil
EXTRACTING AND REFITTING THE VALVE TIMING PINIONS | Bi.
VALVE TIMING e. | B33
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE CRANKCASE ASSEMBLY | .. B34
SERVICING THE CRANKSHAFT ASSEMBL Y | |. B35
REFITTING THE CONNECTING RODS ... _ … | ШИ | B36
INSPECTING THE CRANKCASE COMPONENTS a | . _ ВЕ | B37
RENEWING THE MAIN BEARINGS - … ;( _ _ | _ | | B38
RENEWING THE CAMSHAFT BUSHES . | . | | | B39
REMOVING AND REFITTING TACHOMETER DRIVE | ВЕ В40
E
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B2
Fig. B1.
ENGINE
Exploded view of 750c¢.c. engine gearbox unit
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
DESCRIPTION
The engine is of unit construction having two
aluminium alloy mating crankcase halves, the gear-
box housing being an integral part of the right half-
crankcase and the primary chain case an integral
part of the left half-crankcase.
The aluminium alloy cylinder head has cast in
Austenitic valve seat inserts, and houses the over-
head valves, which are operated by rocker arms
housed in detachable alioy rocker boxes. Four
aluminium alloy push rods operate the rocker arms,
which are each fitted with adjusters, accessible when
tie rocker box inspection raps are removed,
The aluminium alloy die cast pistons each have
two compression rings and ane oil scraper ring. The
connecting rods are of H Section in RR56 Hidu-
minium alloy, with detachable caps, and incorporate
steel-backed renewable ''shell”” bearings. Each of
the connecting rod caps Is machined from a steel
stamping and held in position by means of two high
tensile steel bolts, which are tightened to a pre-
determined torque figure to give the correct
working ciearance of the bearings on the crankshaft
journals.
The inlet and exhaust camshafts operate in sintered
bronze bushes which are housed transversely in the
upper part of the crankcase. The inlet and exhaust
camshafts are driven by a train of timing gears from
the right end of the crankshaft. The inlet camshaft
also operates the oil pump whilst the exhaust cam-
shaft drives the adjustable contact breaker, which is
fitted with an automatic advance and retard unit.
and the tachometer gearbox (when fitted).
The two-throw crankshaft has a detachable shrunk-
on cast-iron flywheel which is held in position ‘by
three high tensile steel bolts, locked by the use of
“TRIUMPH LOCTITE" sealant and tightened to a
pre-determined torque figure.
The big end bearings are lubricated at pressure with
oil which travels along drillings in the crankcase
and crankshaft from the double plunger oil pump:
oil pressure in the lubrication system is governed
by means of the oil pressure release valve sityated
at, the front of the engine, adjacent to the timing
cover,
The cylinder barrel is made from a high-grade cast-
iron and houses the press-fit tappet guide blocks.
Power from the engine is transmitted through the
engine sprocket and primary chain to the shock
absorbing clutch unit and five speed gearbox. Primary
chain tensioner is governed by an adjustable rubber-
pad chan tensioner which is immersed in the primary
chain oil bath.
The electrical generator set consists of a rotor,
which Is fitted to the left end of the crankshaft, and
an encapsulated six coil stator which is mounted on
three pillar bolts inside the primary chain housing.
Carburation Is by twin Amal carburetters with
integral float chamber. The TR7 has only one such
instrument.
B3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION BI
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ENGINE UNIT
Ensure that the fuel taps are in the “OFF” position
and disconnect the feed pipes. Remove the rubber
grommet from the centre of the fuel tank and
unscrew the sleeve nut below. The tank can now
be pulled away from the frame. Note assembly of
rubber sleeve and washers securing the tank. See
Section E1.
Remove Exhaust system as described in Section B13.
Disconnect the oil pressure switch at the timing
cover, the contact breaker leads and the alternator
leads.
Detach the engine torque stay by removing the
securing nut at each rocker box and removing the nut
and bolt at the frame.
Disconnect the tachometer cable {where fitted) by
unscrewing the union nut at the drive gearbox on the
left side crankcase.
Detach the carburetter(s) see Section B8.
Drain the oil from the reservoir by removing the
drain plug situated at the base of the main frame
tube behind the gearbox. Allow to drain into a
suitable receptacle for approximately 10 minutes.
The oil feed pipe and return pipe should then be
disconnected from the base of the reservoir and
from below the oil filter neck respectively. Detach
rocker feed pipe at the reservoir.
At this stage it is advisable to drain the oil from the
gearbox and primary chaincase by removing the
respective drain plugs. (See Section A3). The sump
should also be drained; this is done by unscrewing the
hexagon headed filter drain plug situated underneath
the engine adjacent to the bottom engine mounting-
lug. (See Fig. A2, No. 4).
Slacken off the clutch adjustment at the handlebar,
withdraw the rubber sleeve from the clutch abut-
ment at the gearbox and unscrew the abutment.
Unscrew and remove the plug on the gearbox outer
cover. Slip the bottom nipple of the clutch cable
free of the operating arm and withdraw the cable.
Disconnect the engine breather tubes at the rear
left crankcase by foosening the clips.
B4
1. Clutch cable
nipple
2. Drain plug
3. Level plug
Fig. B2. Clutch cable adjustment and gearbox
drain plug
Remove the chainguard by removing the front
retaining bolt and loosening the left side bottom
rear suspension unit bolt. Withdraw the guard from
the rear of the machine.
Remove the connecting link from the rear chain
and withdraw the chain from the gearbox sprocket.
Remove the left and right side footrests. These are
retained by bolts that screw into the footrest body.
Detach the two rear engine plates by removing the
ten nuts and bolcs.
Remove the bottom and front engine mounting
studs. Note assembly of distance pieces on both
these studs. The wider distance pieces fit on the
right side of the machine in each case and the narrow
ones on the opposite side.
It is now possible to remove the engine unit from
the left side, but as the unit weighs approximately
135 165. (61 kg.) the use of a second operator or a
small hoist is advised.
Replacement is the reversal of the above instruc-
tions. To ensure that the wiring harness is re-
connected correctly refer to the appropriate wiring
diagram in Section H19.
Do not forget to fit the distance pieces on the engine
mounting studs.
For correct grade and quantity of lubricant for the
engine, gearbox and chaincase, see Section A1.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B2
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE ROCKER BOXES
Disconnect the leads from the battery terminals
and remove the fuel tank as detailed in Section El.
Remove the torque stay by removing the nut at each
rocker box and the bolt and nut at the frame.
Unscrew the two domed nuts from the rocker
spindles and disconnect the rocker oil feed pipe.
Care should be taken not to bend the pipe exces-
sively as this may ultimately result in a fracture.
Remove the rocker inspection covers.
—— > — sac
Fig. B3. Rocker box securing nuts
Unscrew three nuts from the studs fitted to the
underside of the exhaust rocker box. Remove the
outer exhaust rocker box securing bolts and un-
screw the central hexagon retaining bolts. (Note
that, at this stage the rocker box may rise slightly,
due to a valve spring being compressed). The
exhaust rocker box is now free to be removed.
The procedure is the same for the intet rocker box.
Care should be taken to collect the six plain washers
which are fitted (one beneath each of the underside
securing nuts), as they sometimes adhere to the
cylinder head flanges and may be subsequently lost.
After completion of the rocker box removal opera-
tion, the push rods should be withdrawn and stored
in the order of their removal so that they can be
replaced in their original positions.
The junction surfaces of the rocker boxes and
cylinder head should be cleaned for reassembly, by
means of a soft metal scraper.
Replacement is a reversal of the above instructions.
When replacing the push rods place a small amount
of grease into the bottom cup of each of the push
rods, then locate the push rods, one at a time, by
means of feeling the engagement of the tappet ball
end and the push rod cup, and then testing the
resistance to lifting caused by suction between the
dome of the tappet and push rod cup. When the
push rods are correctly located, remove the spark-
ing plugs and turn the engine over until the INLET
push rods are level and at the bottom of their
stroke. The inlet rocker box should then be
assembled. Repeat this procedure for the exhaust
rocker box.
Before finally clamping the rocker boxes in position,
check that the valves are being operated by turning
the engine over siowly.
NOTE: It is important that the four central
rocker box bolts are tightened to the correct
torque setting. (See GENERAL DATA}. The
setting must be less than that of the cylinder
head bolts which the rocker box bolts screw
Into.
Before fitting the rocker oil feed pipe the four
copper washers which fit over the rocker spindle
should be annealed by quenching in water from
cherry red heat. Finally, remove any scale that may
have formed. Annealing softens the copper thus
restoring its original sealing qualities.
Bb
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B3
INSPECTING THE PUSHRODS
When the pushrods have been removed, examine
them for worn, chipped or loose end-cups; also
check that the push rod is true by rolling it slowly
on a truly flat surface (such as a piece of plate glass).
Bent pushrods are found to be the cause of
excessive mechanical noise and loss of power and
should be straightened if possible, or, preferably,
renewed,
SECTION B4
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE ROCKER BOXES
Removal of the rocker spindles from the rocker
boxes 15 best achieved by driving them out, using a
soft metal drift. When the spindles are removed the
rocker arms and washers can be withdrawn. All
parts should be thoroughly cleaned in paraffin
(kerosene) and the oil driilings in the spindles and
rocker arms should be cleaned with a jet of com-
dressed air.
Remove the oil seals from the rocker spindles and
renew them,
If it is required to renew the rocker ball pins, the
old ones should be removed by means of a suitable
drift.
To ensure an oil-tight seal between the rocker box
and cylinder head, in cases where an oil leak cannot
be cured by fitting new gaskets, the joint surface
of the rocker box should be linished to remove any
irregularities.
An effective linish can be achieved by first extracting
the rocker box studs {two nuts locked together on
the stud should facilitate an easy removal) then
lightly rubbing the junction surface on a sheet of
emery cloth mounted on a truly flat surface (such
as a prece of plate glass).
Assembly of the rocker spindles into the rocker boxes
Is assisted by the use of the oil seal compressor
51-7019.
The following method of assembly incorporates the
use of a home made alignment bar, which can be
made from a {4 in. dia. belt x 6 in. long by grinding
a taper at one end.
86
Fig. B4. Rocker box assembly
Before reasserr.bly note that the four plain washers
on each rocker spindle are of differing size. The
inside ones have a + in, dia. hole and the outside
ones have a £ in. dia. hole.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE
Fig. B5, Refitting the rocker spindie
Smear two plain washers with grease and place them
one either side of the centre bearing boss. Place
the left rocker arm in position, bringing it into
line with the alignment tool and slide a plain washer
and a spring washer (in the order shown in Fig. B4)
into position. Carefully repeat this procedure for
the other rocker arm and spring washer and slide
the last plain washer into position. Finally bring
each rocker arm in turn into line with the alignment
bar.
Lubricate the spindle with oil and slide it (complete with
oil seal) through the compressor (61-7019) and as far
as possible into the rocker box. finally tapping it home
with a hammer and soft metal drift (see Fig. B5).
SECTION B5
ADJUSTING THE VALVE ROCKER CLEARANCES
The valve rocker clearance should be checked and
adjusted if necessary every 3,000 miles (4,800 Km.).
The correct clearance, for the type of camshaft
employed, ensures that a high valve operating effici-
ency is maintained and that the valves attain their
maximum useful lives. The correct clearances are
given in ‘General Data”
NOTE: Adjustments should only be made
when the engine is COLD.
There are four adjusters on the rockers which are
accessible after removing the inspection caps from
the rocker boxes. A feeler gauge of the correct
thickness can then be inserted. (See Fig. B6).
The clearance must always be checked when the
engine is cold. lt will be zasiest to find the
correct point of the stroke to adjust the valve
clearance if the machine is placed on the centre
stand, top gear engaged and the sparking plugs
removed. By revolving the rear wheel slowly the
crankshaft will be turned and the valves can be
positioned.
Inlet valves (towards the rear of the engine)
Turn the rear wheel until one of the inlet rockers
moves-downwards, thus opening the valve. When
this valve is fully open the. operating mechanism nf
the other inlet valve will be seated on the base cf
the cam and clearance can how be checked and
adjusted if necessary. The clearance is 0.008 in.
(0-203 mm.) and is correct when a feeler gauge of
this thickness is a tight sliding fit between the valve
tip and the adjuster. Tighten the locknut and re-
check the clearance. Having adjusted one inlet valve,
turn the rear wheel until the valve which you have
adjusted is now fully open and repeat the procedure
for the other inlet valve.
В’
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
Exhaust valves
Having adjusted the inlet valves proceed to the ex-
- haust valves which are situated at the front of the
engine. Proceed in the same way as for the inlet
. valves and position one valve fully open whilst you
check the clearance on the other. In this case the
clearance is 0.006 in. (0.15 mm.).
Check that the inspection cover gaskets are in
good condition and replace the covers making sure
that they are tight.
Fig. B6. Adjusting the valve rocker clearance
SECTION B6
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE AIR CLEANER(S)
The TR7 modeis have a similar air filter assembly to
the T140 range except that it only has one aperture in
the housing. Access is easily gained to the filter
efement by first removing the outer trim panels
{disconnect the retaining springs) then removing the
central fixing bolt and pulling the side cover away. The
element can then be withdrawn.
The element is constructed from surgical gauze bound
with metal gauze. They may be washed in gasoline
and finally cleaned with a jet of compressed air.
Fig. B7. Air cleaners (T140V shown)
Be
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
21
АМА! МК!
CONCENTRIC CARBURETTER TYPE 900
T140V AND TR7
‚ Screw
. Chamber top
. Spring
. Needle clip
. Needle
. Guide sleeve
. Spring
. Air slide
==
0 0 “4 oon ob A во —®
. Throttle vaive
5 . —-
X
-
-
. , , A
X a A pu
С
—_
с
. Mixing chamber
—
—
+ ‘© ring
. Tickler
-
La J
. 'O' ring
—
+
. Air screw
—
in
. Stop screw
—
o
. Joint gasket
ok
=
. Needle jet
_
со
. Jet holder
—
so
. Main jet
[
o
. Float bowl!
. Needle
Ha}
—
+3
Po
. Hinge pin
ho
Las
. SCTEW
ho
A
. Float chamber
HH
Ln
, Filter
ps
o
. Banjo
pd
ad
. Sealing washer
bd
0
. Banjo bolt
“3
чо
. Drain plug
a
io
. Sealing washer
Fig. B8. Expioded view of Amal MkI carburetter
B9
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B
B10
KA)
CUUVU
!
УГ
U
Fig. B9.
ENGINE
АМА! МКИ
CONCENTRIC CARBURETTER TYPE 2900 SERIES
> T140E ONLY
|
Exploded view of Amal MkII carburetter
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B7
AMAL CONCENTRIC CARBURETTER
DESCRIPTION
All models are fitted with Amal concentric carburetters
which are fully adjustable. Briefly. they operate in the
folowing way’
When the engine 1s idling. mixture !s supplied from the
sealed pilot jet system. then as the throttle slide 15
raised. via the pilot by-pass. With the throttle just
opening the mixture is controlled by the tapered needle
working in the needle jet and finally by the size of the
main jet. The pilot system is supplied by a pilot jet,
permanently fitted into the carburetter body. The main
jet does not feed direct into the mixing chamber but
discharges through the needle jet into the primary air
chamber and the fuel goes from there as a rich petrol-
air mixture through the primary air choke into the main
air choke.
This primary air choke has a compensating action in
conjunction with bleed holes in the needle jet. which
serves the double purpose of air-compensating the
mixture from the needle jet. and allowing the fuel to
provide a well, outside and around the needle jet.
which is available for snap acceleration. The ding
mixture 1s controlled by the pilot air screw which
governs the amount of air that is allowed to mix with
the fuel at tick-over speeds. The throttle stop screw Is
used to adjust the slide so that the throttle is kept open
sufficiently to keep the engine running at a slow tick-
over. when the twist-grip is closed.
On T140 machines the carburetters are left and right
handed to allow for easy adjustment of the pilot air and
throttie stop screws.
The carburetter(s) have a drain plug provided in the
base of the float bowl. This plug is hollow and collects
foreign matter that may be resent in the carburetter.
The Amal Mk Il carburetter is designed to meet current
USA. emission regulations and is fitted to T140E
models only.
SECTION B8
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CARBURETTER
T140V AND TR7V MODELS ONLY
Due to the carburetter top securing screws being
inaccessible with the petrol tank fitted (TR7V only) it
will be necessary to dismount the carburetter before
removing the top for any reason.
Remove the air cleaner outer covers as stated in
Section B6. Ensure both taps are in the ОН’ position
and disconnect the fuel pipes at the taps beneath the
rear of the tank. Unscrew the two carburetter flange
securing nuts (self-locking) then carefully withdraw the
carburetter from over its mounting studs at the same
time disconnecting the rubber connectors from the air
box. (Slacken the clip securing the single rubber
connector — TR7V models). Lift off the cups and O”
rings.
As the carburetter 15 lowered. the top can be removed
by taking out the two Phillips headed screws. Unless
the top, slides etc. are to be removed from the cables
they can be wrapped carefully in a piece of cloth until
the carburetter is to be refitted.
When replacing the carburetter. great care should be
taken to ensure that the slide does not become
damaged as it is lowered into the mixture chamber
The peg at the top right of the slide locates In a
rorresponding groove in the carburetter body. Care
must be taken when replacing the slide as the needle
must be located in the needle jet, before the slide can
be positioned in the mixing chamber. When the siide
has been assembled satisfactorily, refit the mixing
chamber top. two screws and lock washers.
Refit the carburetter over the locating studs followed
by the rubber washers and cups.
Care should be taken not to overtighten the two
carburetter securing nuts. Refitting continues as a
reversal of the previous instructions.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
T140E MODELS ONLY
Remove the petrol tank, see Section F.
Remove both side cover trim panels, see Section BS,
then remove the L.H. and R.H. air filter covers by
removing the central securing nut. Completely slacken
off the L.H. cross brace securing bolt.
NOTE: All fasteners on T140E carburetters are
METRIC sizes.
Disconnect the fuel feed pipe from the L.H. carburetter.
Withdraw the retaining clip from the R.H. choke linkage
and disconnect the linkage.
Slacken off the carburetter to cylinder head jubilee
chps (4 off). Disconnect the crossbrace from the dowel
on the L.H. carburetter using a screwdriver.
Withdraw the R.H. carburetter out to the R.H. side,
disconnecting the cross brace tor the L.H. carburetter
at the same time.
NOTE: The mounting hole in the L.H. crossbrace is
slotted to allow for removal without removing the
securing bolt.
Withdraw he t.H. carburetter then unscrew the top
caps and withdraw the throttle slides.
Refitment 1s the reverse of the above instructions.
612
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B9
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE CARBURETTER
When the carburetter is removed. disconnect the slide
assembly from the throttle cable To do this pull back
the return spring and remove the needle and needle
chp. With the spring still retracted. push the cable
through the stide and when the nipple Is clear, across
the figure of eight slot. The slide and return spring (and
needle retaining disc — T140E} can now be removed.
T140V AND TR7V
To remove the air valve. push the valve quide tube and
spring along with air cable until the cable nipple
protrudes sufficiently out of its counterbore to be
pushed out of the slot. The cable spring and guide can
now be pulled clear of the valve.
T140E
To remove the cold start enrichment device unscrew
the plunger assembly and remove the lever and
bracket assemblies.
ALL MODELS
Unscrew the petrol pipe banjo connection and remove
the banjo and nylon filter.
Unscrew four Phillips screws and remove the float
bowl. The nylon float. spindle and triangular needle
can now be withdrawn.
Remove the cold start jet - T140E models only.
Unscrew the jet Nolder which will allow the main Jet to
be removed.
Unscrew the air adjusting screw and throttle stop
screw.
Thoroughly clean all parts in petrol {gasoline} several
times and dry with compressed air. or a hand pump. to
remove any particles of dirt. Any external deposits are
best removed with the use of a light wire brush.
Reassemble in the reverse order, referring to Figs BB
and B9 for guidance.
When refitting the float and needle valve, make сепат
that the recess on the valve is properly located in the
"UU" shaped slot in the Ноа! Replace the float bowl
sealing gasket, and if necessary. the two rubber "OO"
rings fitted to the adjusting screws.
When refitting the needle retaining disc on T140E
carburetters only ensure the ‘ear on the disc faces
downwards and locates against the lug inside the
throttle valve casting. This prevents the throttle cable
becoming twisted See Fig. B10.
Fig. B10. T140E Needle retaining disc iocation
SECTION B10
INSPECTING THE CARBURETTER COMPONENTS
The only parts liable to show wear after considerable
mileage are the throttle valve slide and mixing
chamber (and the air slide — T140V and TR7V).
(1) Inspect the throttle valve slide for excessive
scoring to the front area and check the extent of
wear on the rear slide face. If wear is apparent the
slide should be renewed. In this case. be sure to
replace the slide with the correct degree of cut-
away (see "General Data’).
T140V AND TR7V ONLY
(2) Examine the air valve for excessive wear and
check that it is not actually worn through at any
part. Check the fit of the air valve in the body.
Ensure that the air valve spring is serviceable by
tnspecting the coils for wear.
(3) Inspect the throttle return spring for efficiency and
check that it has not lost compressive strength.
B13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
В ENGINE
“A, + neck the needle jet for wear or possible
ring and carefully examine the tapered
cod of the needle for similar signs. Check
thir correct needle is in use. The needle for
| is marked above the top groove 000°",
re needle for alcohol is marked “Z”.
hack the float bowl joint surface for flatness
vf tHatten if necessary on emery paper on a
cuerrectly flat surface.
f. fimure that the float does not leak by shaking
2 see if it contains any fuel. Do not attempt
> repair a damaged float. A new one can be
~vchased for a small cost.
(7) Check the petrol filter. which fits into the petrol
pipe banjo. for any possible damage to the mesh.
Ensure that the filter has not parted from its
supporting structure. thus enabling the petrol
(gasoline) to by-pass it un-filtered.
(8) Concentric float carburetters have a pressed-in
pilot jet which is not removable. If the jet
becomes blocked the machine will be hard to
start and will not run at low speeds. This can
be cleared by blocking the low speed air
passage at the bell end of the carburetter
removing the pilot air screw and using a jet
of air at this point.
(9) T140E carburetter only: Check the cold star
enrichment plunger mesh fiiter for cleanliness
SECTION BII
CARBURETTER ADJUSTMENTS
Пособие Stop Screw. This screw, which is
situated on the right side of the carburetter (L.H.
ni case of the T140 left hand carburetter) sloping
uoysards and is fitted with a friction ring, should be
et tu open the throttle sufficiently to keep the
gine running at a slow tick-over, when the twist-
Grip closed,
Pilot Air Screw. To set the idling mixture, this
“crew, which is situated on the right side, is also
titi with a friction ring and should be screwed
1: tu cntichen the tick-over mixture or outwards
14 wésken It. As a guide to its approximate
iqulied position, screw It in fully, then unscrew
Marnptoxiinately 2% turns.
TE: surew controls the suction on the pilot jet by
cier the amount of air which mixes with the
Meira
EE
Мене and Needle Jet. Carburation is gov-
4
rend by the cut-away and needle jet in varying
‘nées from when the throttle is just open to
when it is approximately à full throttle. The needie
jet orifice is governed by the position of the needle.
The needle position should not be altered from its
specified setting without specialist advice.
Throttle Valve Cutaway. The amount of cut-
away to the bottom of the throttle valve slide is
indicated by a number marked on the slide, e.g.
930/31 means throttle type 930 with number 34
cutaway; a larger number such as 4 means that the
throttle valve slide has a slightly larger cutaway and
consequently gives a weaker mixture during the
period of throttle opening through which a cutaway
is effective, i.e. from just open to approximately
+ throttle. Similarly, 3 indicates a slightly smaller
cutaway and a slightly stronger mixture.
Jet Sizes. The recommended jet sizes are given in
“General Data”. The main jet is operative from approxi-
mately % to full throttle. this is when the needie jet or
orifice ceases to have any reduction effect on the
petrol flow.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION BI2
TWIN CARBURETTER ARRANGEMENT
DESCRIPTION
Twin carburetters are fitted to T140 machines.
There 1s a balance pipe fitted between the inlet
manifolds to improve tickover,
THROTTLE CABLE
The single throttle cable from the twistgnp enters a
junction box where it is fitted into a slide. The twin
shorter carburetter cables are fitted to the other side of
the junction box slide Both the shde and junction box
being made of plastic require no maintenance.
À simia’ cable arrangement IS used for air slide
operation. 1T140V only!
SETTING TWIN CARBURETTERS
The twin carburretersfitted to the T140 may reau rc
synchronisation and a simple method 15 as foliows.
First adjust the cables from the juction box so that
they have the minimum of free play.
Now start the motor and take off one plu, lead
and then adjust the pilot air screw and throttle
stop screw In the OPPOSITE carburetter until the
motor runs regularly. Replace the plug lead and
repeat the process similarly for the other car-
buretter. With both plug leads replaced the tick-
over will be too fast and the stop screws should be
lowered simultanecusty until correct. № 1$ mas:
important the throttle slides lift simultaneously or
the motor will run roughly, particufarly when
accelerating.
SECTION B13
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE EXHAUST SYSTEM
ALL T140 AND TR7 MODELS
To remove the complete exhaust system first
slacken the balance tube clamps forward of the
cylinder head. Remove the two cruciform headed
screws from the front attachment brackets and
slacken both silencer to exhaust pipe clips.
Now using a hide mallet tap both exhaust pipes
away fromthe cylinder head so that they are removed
together. This wiil allow the balance tube to be
detached from between the pipes.
Remove the silencers from the machine by detach-
ing the pillion footrests.
Replacement of the exhaust system is the reversal of
the above instructions. Remember to assemble the
exhaust pipes to the head together in one operation
with the balance tube and clips in between their
respective stubs. Finally tighten all nuts and bolts
securely.
B15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ol ENGINE
SECTION Bl4
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE CYLINDER HEAD ASSEMBLY
Proceed as detailed in Section B2 for removal of
the rocker boxes and pushrods.
Remove the exhaust system as in Section 813,
Detach the carburetter(s) from the cylinder head,
(see section BB). and place well clear of the cylinder
head.
Unscrew the ten cylinder head bolts/nuts, a turn
ara time, until the load has been released.
Remove the push rod cover tubes and note that it
is essential to renew the rubber scals. Check for
sharp edges on the corners of the top portion of
Fig. B11. Cylinder head bolt tightening sequence
(T140V shown)
B16
the tappet guide blocks which could cut the new
'‘O’ rings when reassembling. Use a file or emery
cloth to smooth any such sharp edges.
REFITTING THE CYLINDER HEAD
Ensure that the junction surfaces of the cylinder
block, gasket and cylinder head are clean. Grease
the gasket and place it in position. Coat the tappet
guide blocks with heavy grease and locate the push
rod cover tubes (complete with top and bottom oil
seals). Relieve any roughness at the push rod tube
counterbores in the head.
Lower the cylinder head into position over the
push rod cover tubes and fit the cylinder head-bolts/
finger tight, also, fit the central nuts finger tight.
Tighten the ten cylinder head bolts/nuts in the order
given in Fig. B11 and to the torque settings given in
“General Data”. Refit the rocker boxes as detailed in
Section B2.
To facilitate torguing the inner head nuts (A) Fig. 12
use servicing tool 61/7010
NOTE: Always re-torque the cylinder head bolts
nuts after the engine has thoroughly warmed up
for the first time, i.e. Run the machine for approxi-
mately 5 miles then re-torque the cylinder head
bolts/nuts.
Reassembly then continues in the reverse order to the
removal instructions. To obtain the correct valve rocker
clearance settings. reference should be made to
Section BS.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE
Cylinder head nut,
Rocker box bolt.
Cylinder head nut.
Cylinder head stud.
mo now»
Cylinder head stud
Fig. B12. Showing assembly of cylinder head studs and nuts
B17
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE
SECTION BI5
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE VALVES
Removal of the valves is facilitated by means о’ а
“GY clamp type valve spring compressor. When
the spring is compressed sufficientiy. tne <pic
cotters can be removed with a nirrow irresvileives,
and the valve spring withdrawn when the com.
pressor is released. As each valve :s removed it
should be marked so that it can be resized mts
original position
NOTE: The inlet valves are marked "IN"
and the exhaust valves ‘‘EX”
Fitting a new or reground valve necessitares seating
by the grinding in process described in Secon 813,
but it does not necessitate recutting the cylinder
4
head valve seat unless new valse guide |
fitted.
EE TP mon
The valve springs should be inspecie:
and cracks, and checked fer wear by cupo
them with a new spring or the dimenvon asno]
“General Data”
All parts should be thoroughiy cleaned in paraffır.
(kerosene) and allowed to drain before rcassem-
bling.
Fig. B13. Valve components
essen bie the inner and outer springs and top and
Nottom cups cver the valve guide, then slide the
“alive into position lubricating the stem with a small
amount of graphited oil.
Compress the springs and slide the two haives of
he split cotter into the exposed groove in the
valve stem,
SECTION 816
RENEWING [iE YALVE GUIDES
The valve guides can be pressed or drive oul us:
service tool 61-6013, with the cylinder head inverts:
on the bench. A suitable drift can be made by otitaming
a Sin. length of ‘ain. diameter mild steei bar (ENS! and
machining one end to *..in. (8mm j diameter for a
length о! п. (24.5 тт.)
The same method may be employed to fit the new
gulde, although the use of a press is recommended.
In either case lightly grease the valve guide to assist
B18
assembly. Ensure that the guide is pressed in until
the shouider is flush with the cylinder head.
Bronze valve guides are fitted, the shorter ones
being used In the iniet position.
Where new valve guides have been fitted it is
necessary ro ie-cut the valve seats in the cylinder
head and grind in the valves (see Section B18).
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION BI7
DECARBONISING
It is not normally advisable to remove the carbon
deposits from the combustion chamber and exhaust
ports until symptoms indicate that decarbonising is
necessary.
Such symptoms as falling off in power, {oss of com-
pression, noisy operation and difficult starting are
all indications that decarbonising may be necessary.
When the cylinder head is removed unscrew the
sparking plugs and clean them in paraffin (kerosene),
or preferably have them grit-blasted and checked.
Before fitting the plugs, check that the gap setting
is correct (see ‘General Data ’).
It special decarbonising equipment is not available
then a blunt aluminium scraper or a piece of lead
solder flattened at one end, should be used to
remove the carbon deposits. Do not use a screw-
driver or a steel implement of any kind on an
aluminium surface.
When removing the deposits from th. piston
crown, a ring of carbon should be left round the
periphery of the pistons to maintain the seal. Also
the carbon ring round the top of the cylinder bore
should not be disturbed. To facilitate this an old
piston ring should be placed on top of > piston,
level with the top surface of the cylinder block.
Remove the valves as shown in Section B15 then
remove the carbon deposits from the valve stems,
combustion chamber and ports of the cylinder head.
Remove all traces of carbon dust by means of a jet
of compressed air or the vigorous use of a tyre
pump, then thoroughly clean the cylinder head and
valves in paraffin (kerosene). Finally, check the
valves for pitting. If necessary, the valves can be
ground-in as shown in Section B18.
SECTION BI8
RE-SEATING
Where the valve guides have been renewed or the
condition of a valve seat is doubtful, it is advisable to
re-cut the cylinder head valve seat then grind in
the valve, using a fine grade grinding-in paste.
It is important that the cylinder head valve seat and
the valve guide bore should be concentric. For the
purpose of re-cutting the valve seats the following
service tools are available.
THE VALVES
61-7025 Valve sez ter inlet and exhaust
61-7027 Blending + rer inlet and exhaust
61-7029 Arbour pil. and tommy bar
The valve seat cutting operation shouid be carried
out with the greatest care, and only a minimum
amount of metal should be removed.
B19
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
After the seats have been re-cut, they should be
blended to give an even seating of 2% in. (2.4mm).
Examine the face of the valve to see if it is pitted,
scored or damaged. If necessary, the face can be
reground, but excessive re-grinding is not advisable
for this adversely affects the heat transference
properties of the valve and will ultimately result
in critical pocketing.
The stem of the valve should be inspected for wear
or scuffing and if either is pronounced, the valve
should be renewed.
Fig. B15. Cutting a valve seat
To grind in the valve use a fine grade carborundum
grinding paste. Place a small amount evenly on the
valve seat and place the valve in its guide with a
holding tool attached.
Use a semi-rotary motion, occasionally lifting the
valve and turning it through 180°, Continue this
process until a uniform seal results. Wash the parts
in paraffin (kerosene) to remove the grinding paste.
Apply a smear of “Engineer's'” marking blue to the
seat of the valve. Rotate the valve through one
revolution and inspect both seats. Successful valve
grinding will give an unbroken ring of blue on the
valve seat.
Alternatively, assemble the springs and split cotters
and pour a small amount of páraffin (kerosene) into
the port. |t should not penetrate the seating for at
least 10 seconds if a good seal has been achieved.
Prior to reassembling the cylinder head, ensure that
all traces of ‘‘Blue’’ or grinding paste are removed
by thoroughly washing in paraffin (kerosene).
Fig. B14. Valve seating tools
B20
Kim The CD Man © 2002
- SECTION BI9
REMOYING AND REPLACING THE CYLINDER BLOCK AND TAPPETS
Wedge a dis-used shock absorber rubber, or a suit- If for any reason the tappet guide block is removed,
able retaine. between the inlet and exhaust tappets it should be refitted as described in Section 221,
to prevent the tappets from falling through the but the oil feed holes should be checked to ensure
tappet block into the crankcase when the cylinder that they are not blocked by foreign matter.
block is removed. Turn the engine until the pistons
are at T.D.C. then unscrew eight 12 point nuts from
the base of the cylinder block and remove eight
washers, carefully raise the block clear of the pistons.
Raise the block sufficiently to insert non-tiufty rag into
the crankcase mouth. It is also advisable at this stage
to fit four rubber protectors (e.g. gear change lever
rubbers} over four cylinder base studs (see Fig. B16)
to avoid any damage to the alloy connecting rods
Remove the cylinder base gasket and ensure that the
two locating dowels are in ther correct positinn in the
crankcase.
Remove the tappets from the cylinder block stering
them in the order of their removal, and thoroughly
clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene). itis important
that the tappets are replaced in their original posi-
tions; failure to observe this may result in subse-
quent excessive tappet and cam wear.
Fig. B16. Refitting the cylinder block
If it has been decided to fit new pistor rings then
the bores must be lightly honed as described in
Section B24.
The correct method of assembly of the lappets Is
shown in Fig. B17. The machined cutaway faces IC!
should be facing the outside of the tappet guide block.
Lubricant is supplied under pressure direct to the Le. the tappets must not be fitted with the cutaways
exhaust tappet and camshaft working faces as facing one another. otherwise the oil holes (Bj drilled in
descnbed in Section AZ. the annutar groove of the tappet block (A) will not be
able to supply lubricant to the tappets.
When replacing the cylinder block ensure that the
cylinder base gasket is not fitted in such a way that
the oi! feed hole incorporated in the crankcase and Care shouid be tanen wo cisure tnat the cylinder
cylinder block is obscured, so preventing lubricant block is correctly located over the two dowels in
from reaching the tappets. the left half-crankcase.
B21
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
The tappets should be well lubricated prior to
wedging them in their original positions in the
tappet guide blocks. To facilitate an easy assembly
of the cylinder block over the pistons, two collars,
part number Z22, are required. The collars should
be placed over the pistons to compress the piston
rings, and withdrawn over the connecting rods
when the pistons are sufficiently engaged in the
block. Refit the eight cylinder base nuts.
Fig. B17. Showing the correct method of assembly
of the exhaust tappets
SECTION B20
INSPECTING THE TAPPETS AND GUIDE BLOCKS
The base of the tappet is fitted with a “'Stellite”
tip. This material has good wear resisting qualities
but the centre of the tip may show signs of slight
Indentation. H the width of the indentation exceeds
#5 in. then the tappet should be renewed.
lt is not necessary to remove the tappet guide
blocks for inspection purposes; the extent of wear
B22
can be estimated by rocking the tappet whilst it is
in position in the guide block. It should be a sliding
fit with little or no sideways movement, (see
“General Data’’ for working clearances).
Excessive play between the tappets and guide
block may cause undesirable mechanical noise.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE
SECTION B21
RENEWING THE TAPPET GUIDE BLOCKS
Place the cylinder block in an inverted position on the
bench. Remove the locking screw and drift out the
gutde block using service tool 61-6008, as shown in
Fig. B18.
‘О’ пр oil seals are fitted between the tappet
blocks and cylinder block. The seals must be re-
placed whenever oil leakage is noted at this point
or whenever the tappet blocks are removed and
refitted. Under no circumstances must the tappet
guide blocks be interchanged. The exhaust tappets
are pressure lubricated through the exhaust tappet
guide block and the oilways must therefore be
cleaned out carefully before assembly.
To fit the new guide block, first grease the outer
surface to assist assembly, then align the location
hole in the guide block and cylinder block base, and
drive in the guide block using 61-6008, until the
shoulder is flush with the flange.
Fig. B18. Refitting a tappet guide block
SECTION B22
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE PISTONS
lt is most important that the alloy connecting rods
are not damaged by contact with the sharp crank-
case edge. For this reason four gear lever rubbers
should be placed over the four central cylinder
base studs.
Remove the inner and outer circlips and press
out the gudgeon pin. The pistons are then free to
be removed.
When the pistons are removed they should be
suitably scribed inside so that they can be refitted
in their original positions. When refitting the
pistons, first place the inner circlip in position to
act as a stop, then press the gudgeon pin into
position.
It is advisable to renew the tour circhime: this can
be done for negligible cost.
Finally, check that all the gudgeon pin retainer
circlips are in position, and are correctly fitted.
This is extremely important.
B23
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B В ENGINE
SECTION B23
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE PISTON RINGS
There should be littie difficulty in removing piston
rings, if the following procedure is adopted. Lift
one end of the top piston ring out of the groove and
insert a thin steel strip between the ring and piston.
Move the strip round the piston, at the same time
lifting the raised part of the ring upwards with slight
pressure. The piston rings should always be lifted
off and replaced over the top of the piston.
If the piston rings are to be refitted the carbon
deposits on the inside surface of the rings must be
removed and the carbon deposits in the piston ring
grooves must also be removed.
When fitting new piston rings, the bores must be
lightly honed with a fine-grade emery cloth so that
the new piston rings can become bedded down
properly. The honing should be carried out with an
oscillatory motion up aid Jduwit the Lore dati af
even ‘criss-cross’ patterr is achiever. The recom
mended grade of emery for this purpose is 300.
Thoroughly wash the bores in paraffin (kerosene)
and check that all traces of abrasives are removed.
Pistons and rings are available in 017 and 020 inches
(254 and 508MM.) Oversizes When fitting new rings
the gap must be checked in the lowest part of the
cylinder bore The ning must !e square to the hore for
checking purposes. and to ensure this. place the
piston crown onto the ning and ease it down the bore
Check the gap with feeler gauges,
Fig. B19. Refitting a tapered piston ring
Piston rings, when new. should have the following
gap clearances:
Compression ring gap: -010" to 014" (-25 to +35 тт.)
Scraper ring gap: -010" to -014” (-25 to 35 mm)
Refitting the piston rings is straight forward, but
check that the two compression rings are fitted the
right way up.
The two taper compression rings are markad TOP" to
ensure correct assembly and should be fitted with the
“TOP marking towards the cylinder head (see Fia.
819).
SECTION B24
INSPECTING THE PISTONS AND CYLINDER BORES
PISTONS
Check the thrust areas of the piston skirt for signs
of seizure or scoring.
The piston skirt is of a special oval form and is de-
signed to have limited working clearances within the
bore.
B24
Prior to inspection, ensure that both the cylinder
bores and the pistons are clean and free from dirt,
etc. Any deposits of burnt oil round the piston
skirt can be removed by using a petrol (gasolene)
soaked cloth.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
NOTE: The top lands of the piston have
working clearance varying from -016 in. to -020
in. and thus allows the top piston ring to be
viewed from above, and the piston to be rocked
slightly. However, this is not critical, it is the
skirt clearances that are all-important.
CYLINDER BORES
The maximum wear occurs within the top half-inch
of the bore, whilst the portion below the piston
ring working area remains relatively unworn.
A badly worn block will have a lip at the thrust
faces of each bore about { in. from top face. Previous
symptoms such as smoking exhaust. heavy oli con-
sumption and noisy pistons when cold also indicate
that a rebore may be necessary.
CYLINDER BORE AND PISTON GRADING
Pistons and cylinder blocks are graded to sul! one
another during manufacturing The pistors are
identified by aletter stamped on the piston crown and
the barrels by the same letter on the top fin nex: 10 the
appropriate bore (see Fig. B201 Two different 1denti-
fications are in Use LE. IL: and (H, Each letter stands
for LOW and HIGH grades respectively The grades
with their corresponding dimensions are shown nelow
CYLINDER BLOCK AND PISTON GRADING
LOW (L} HIGH {Hi
DIAMETER OF PISTON fins: 2-98767/2-9871 2-9882/2-98/
QIAMETER OF PISTON (mr | 75885:75.877 75-90N75 888
BORE SIZE ins | 2 3918:72.9913 2.9924:2.9919
BORE SIZE 1mm 5997-75 979 760 007-775 99.4
SECTION B25
TABLE OF SUITABLE RE-BORE SIZES
Piston Marking in (MM) - 010 (254mm)
— :020 (-508mm;
Suitable bore sizes (ins) 3-0021:3-0010
3-0121 3-0110
Suitable bore sizes (mm) | 76-2533 76-2254
76-5073 76-4794
B25
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
MEASUREMENT OF BORE GRADING
TO BE TAMEN AT THIS LEVEL
DDN
7777,
pins
п A
À и
vs
7 Г,
/
7 7
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SKIRT DIAMETER MUST BE MEASURED AT “A”
Fig.20. Cylinder block and piston grading details.
B26
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B26
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CONTACT BREAKER
The contact breaker mechanism is housed in the
timing cover on the right of the engine and is driven by
the exhaust camshaft. It consists of two sets of points
(one per cvlinder), two auxiliary backplates with cam
adjustment and a fully automatic centrifugal type
advance and retard mechanism. The working parts are
protected by a circular cover and gasket. The engine
ofl 15 prevented from entering the contact breaker
cavity by means of an oil seat fitted. to the inner wail of
the timing cover. The complete contact breaker unit
can be removed from the timing cover with the aid of
service too! 61-7023.
First, disconnect the leads trom the batiery terminals
or remove the fuse from the holder adjacent to the
battery, then remove the two screws and withdraw the
outer cover and gasket. Remove the centre bolt and
screw in service tool 61-7023 until the cam unit is
released from it's locking taper in the camshaft.
Unscrew the tool and remove the cam unit.
To completely detach the contact breaker unit it
will be necessary to disccnnect the two leads from
the ignition coils and remove the appropriate frame
clips so that the leads can be withdrawn through
the holes in the crankcase and timing cover.
It is advisable to make a note of the degree
figure which is stamped on the back of the cam
unit, as this indicates the advance range, which
16 15 necessary to know for accurate static
timing purposes.
Prior to replacing the cam unit it is advisable to add
a small drop of lubricating oil to the pivot pins only,
not the cam pivot. The cam unit slot should be
located on the peg in the camshaft and the centre
bolt screwed in and tightened.
IMPORTANT NOTE: “Run out” on the contact
breaker cam or misalignment of the secondary
backplate centre hole can result in contact
between the cam and backplate. This can result in
the auto advance remaining retarded or the spark
retarding. To check for “run-out” check the point
gap with the contact nylon heel aligned with the
cam scribe mark for each set of points. Should
there be a discrepancy greater than 0-003in.
(0-076mm.) tap the outer edge of the cam with a
brass drift with the cam securing bolt tight. In
cases of misalignment of the secondary backplate
hole, check the carn clearance in different positions
and elongate the hole only where the backplate
rubs the cam.
. Black yellow
. Pillar bolt
. Black white
. Secondary
bracket screw
. Eccentric screw
. Contact locking
screw
7. Contact eccentric
adjusting screw
8. Lubricating pad
Ld pd +
a un
Fig. B21. Contact breaker
To adjust the contact breaker gaps. turn the motor with
the starter pedal unt the scribe mark on the car
aligns with the nylon heel of one set of points. Measure
the point gap using a 0-0151n. (0-38mm.) feeler gauge
If outside the limits, slacken the contact adjustinc
screw, adjust the gap by turning the eccentric scre….
and re-tighten the adjusting screw.
Revolve the motor until the second set of points is
lined up with the scribe line, and adjust as before.
NOTE: Setting the ignition timing is full;
described in Sections B27 to B29,
B27
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B27
IGNITION TIMING —INITIAL PROCEDURE
Initial assembly of the contact breaker mechanism
and auto advance unic prior to final timing of the
Engine.-—
(1) Remove both sparking plugs and all four rocker
box caps. Set the engine at T.D.C. with both
valves closed in the right hand cylinder.
(2) Assemble the auto advance unit into ‘the
exhaust camshaft, locating on the camshaft peg
where It Is fitted,
(41 Assemble the C.B. plate taking care not to
trap the C.B. ieads, assembling the plate so
that one set of C.B. points 15 located at 7
o'clock. Loosely assemble the hexagonal pillar
bolts and flat washers.
(4) Lock the auto advance cam into the taper
using the central fixing bolt. For static timing
remove the bolt again, taking care not to
release the taper of the cam. Temporarily fit
another washer with a centre hole just large
enough to fit over the cam bearing, thus
allowing the washer to bear hard on the end
of the cam. Rotate the cam carefully to its
limit against the auto advance springs, holding
in this position whilst the centre bolt is re-
fitted and nipped up. The fully advanced
position has then been located.
SECTION B28
STATIC TIMING WHERE NO STROBOSCOPE IS AVAILABLE
Rotate the engine until the nylon heel of the C.B. points
aligns with the scribe marking on the cam. At this stage
set both points gaps to O - 01 5in. (0 - 38mm.)
Locate the crankshaft at 38 B.T.D.C. using the timing
body and plunger 61-2195 and 61-572 as shown.
It will be found easiest to start with the pistons at
T.0.C. (checked through the sparking plug hole) and
then, with both sparking plugs removed and second
gear engaged, rotate the rear wheel backwards. As
the crank is turned by this means, pressure on the
timing plunger will locate it at 38% BTODC.
Remove the rocker caps to establish which cylinder
Is on the compression stroke (i.e. which cylinder
has both valves closed). Note that the timing side
cylinder is operated by the contact points with the
B28
black /yeliow lead and the drive side with the
black /white lead.
When it has been decided which cylinder 1s being
1-80, rotate the main contact breaker backplate tn its
slots until the particular contact points just open This
can be checked using a battery and light or by an
0.00150 (0.038 тт.) feeler gauge between the
ponts
Attention should now be turned to the other
cylinder. Remove the timing plunger, turn the
engine vorwards through 360° (1 revolution) and
relocate the timing plunger. The second set of
points should now be adjusted as above but the
main backplate must not be disturbed. Adjust
only on the secondary backplate. Finally secure all
screws, lubricate both sides of the cam with Shell"
Retinax A grease, replace the cover plate and the
sparking plugs, finally engaging neutral gear.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
Fig. B22. Showing T.D.C. body and plunger in situ
SECTION B29
IGNITION TIMING BY STROBOSCOPE
Undertake the initial procedure as in Section B29.
Remove the inspection plate secured by three screws
from the primary chaincase. As seen in Fig. B23 there
is & marking on the outer face of the rotor which is to
coincide with an ignition pointer on the primary chain-
case to achieve the correct 38 ignition timing position,
Fig. B23. Rotor marking
NOTE: When using a stroboscope powered
by a 12 volt battery as on external power
source, do not use the machines own battery
equipment. (A.C. pulses in the low tension
machine wiring can trigger the stroboscope
and give false readings).
(1) Connect the siroboscope to the right hand
spark plug lead and start the engine. Read
the strobo-light on the rotor marking in
relation to the timing pointer with the engine-
running at 2,000-R.P.M. or more.
Adjust the main backplate on its slots until the
marks align whereupon the timing on the one
cylinder is correct.
(2) Repeat for the LH. plug and adjust the timing by
slackening off the clamping screw on the auxilliary
backptate and turning the eccentric screw (see
Ftg. B21) until again the markings align. Timing is
then correct. Refit the primary chaincase
inspection plate.
B29
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B30
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TIMING COVER
Remove the contact breaker as described in
Section B28.
Disconnect the oil switch lead at the spade terminal.
Unscrew the eight recessed screws which serve to
retain the timing cover and if necessary tap the
cover on the front blanking plug with a hide mallet
until the cover is free. When the cover is removed,
the crankshaft and contact breaker oil seals should
be inspected for wear and cracks and renewed if er | Le =
necessary. To remove the crankshaft oil seal, the > NS
retainer circlip must first be removed by means of | /
long-nosed pliers or a narrow screwdriver. | . a
Unscrew the hexagonal plug from the tront edge of =D e oon. > , “
the cover and thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin N SF т”
(kerosene). Clean out the oil drillings with a jet of 5
compressed air and replace the plug and copper em
washer, Fig. B24. Timing cover oil seal location
The oil pressure switch in the front of the timing
cover has a taper thread and requires no sealant on
the threads, for competition use a blanking plug is
available to take the place of the switch,
To replace the cover, first check that the oll seals are
facing in the correct direction {see Fig. B24) and that
the circlip 1s located correctly in its groove. then care-
tuily clean the junction surfaces of the timing cover and
crankcase and remove any traces of used jointing
compound. Apply a fresh coat of a suitable proprietary
jointing compound evenly over the timing cover
junction surface. Screw the tapered adaptor pilot
(service tool 61-7013) into the exhaust camshaft and
smear it with oil to assist assembly Check that both
the location dowels are in their correct positions, slide ; ás
the cover into position and screw in the eight recessed > Biya
screws. Fig. B25. Location of three long screws in timing cover
Finally. replace the contact breaker assembly and
reset the ignition timing as shown in Sections B27 to NOTE: The three longer screws should be
379 fitted in the holes marked ‘’X”’ in Fig. B24.
SECTION B3I
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE OIL PUMP
To remove the oil pump, first remove the contact Full details concerning inspection, testing and
breaker mechanism, and the timing cover as rectification of the oil pump are given in Section
described in Sections B26 and B30. AG,
The oil pump is held in position by two conical nuts. When replacing the oil pump, care should be taken
When these are removed, the oil pump can be to ensure that the new gasket Is fitted correctly and
withdrawn from the mounting studs. The paper that the cones of the conical nuts and washers fit
gasket should be renewed. into the counter-sunk holes in the oil pump body.
B30
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B32
EXTRACTING AND REFITTING THE VALVE TIMING PINIONS
Before attempting to remove any of the valve
timing gears it is necessary to release the Icad on
the camshafts caused by compressed valve springs.
This shouid be done by removing the rocker boxes
as detailed in Section B2, or may be achieved by
sufficiently slackening the valve clearance adjuster
screws; however, this is not always advisable as it
may resuit in a push rod becoming disengaged.
Remove che contact breaker as detailed in Section
6526.
Fig Po Fx rachas
Remove the timing cover as described in Section B30
and the oll pump as shown in Section B31. Select 3th
(top) gear. apply the rear brake and unscrew the nuts
retaining the camshaft and crankshaft pinions. then
withdraw the intermediate wheel
NOTE: The camshaft pinion retainer nuts
have LEFT-HAND threads. The crankshaft
pinion retainer nut has a RIGHT-HAND
thread.
Tew BI50
12 crankshaft pinion
B31
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
CRANKSHAFT PINION
Removal of the crankshaft pinion is facilitated by
service tool 61-6019, which consists of a protective
cap and three claw extractor body, complete with
extractor bolt.
To extract the pinion, first press the protection cap over
the end of the crankshaft, then place the extractor over
the pinion, locate the three claws behind the pinion and
screw down the body to secure them, Using a tommy
bar and spanner the crankshaft pinion can then be
extracted (see Fig. B26). When this is achieved, the
key and {clamping washer if fitted) should be removed
and placed in safe-keeping.
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Fig. B17. Extractor tool 61-6019 showing protection cap
which fits over crankshaft
When replacing the clamping washer ensure
that the chamfered side is towards the crankshaft
shoulder. Screw the guide onto the crakshaft.
Smear the bore of the crankshaft pinion with grease
to assist assembly and position it over the guide, so
that the counter bore is outwards. Align the key
and keywayanddrive the pinion onto the crankshaft.
CAMSHAFT PINIONS
To extract both the inlet and exhaust camshaft pinions
extractor Pr. No. 61-6132 should be used. To extract
pinion screw the two outrigger bolts into the camwheel
and screw in the central bolt; the pinion will then be
withdrawn from the camshaft. See Fig. B28.
The location keys in each of the camshafts are a
tight fit and may be left in position if it is not
intended to subsequently remove the camshafts
from the crankcase. When replacing the camwheels
use a suitable hollow drift and lightly drive the
camwheels onto the camshaft as far as possible.
They will not drive fully home because of the cam-
shaft float, but when the retaining nucs are replaced
and tightened the camwheels will then seat into
position.
B228
Fig. B28. Extracting the cam wheels
B32
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE a B
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Fig. 29. Valve timing marks from ENG No. CX06001
Fig. B30. Valve timing marks — EARLY MODELS ONLY
B33
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B33
YALVE TIMING
The valve timing is sufficiently accurate for machines
which are to be used under normal conditions, when
the intermediate wheel is assembled in the position
shown in Fig. B29, (Fig. 30 refers to EARLY MODELS
only), and the camshaft pinions are located by means
of the keyway directly opposite the timing mark.
lt should be noted that, due to the intermediate
wheel having a prime number of teeth, the timing
marks only coincide every 94th revolution, thus
there is no cause for alarm if the timing marks will
not readily re-align.
When checking the valve timing against the
figures given in ‘‘General Data” for the
particular model, it should be noted that these
figures are relative to a valve rocker clearance
of -020 in. (-5 mm.) for checking only.
SECTION B34
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE CRANKCASE ASSEMBLY
It is advisable to partially dismantle the engine unit
whilst it is fixed to the motorcycle, then remove the
remaining crankcase assembly and dismantle it on
a work bench.
Proceed as described in Section B1 for removal of
the engine unit, but leave the rear chain connected
and the engine firmly mounted in the frame by
means of the front and bottom engine mounting
bolts. Remove the outer primary cover as shown
underneath the engine (two snap connectors).
Unscrew three nuts securing the stator and with-
draw it from over the mounting studs. Do not try
to withdraw the leads at this stage.
Remove the pressure plate and clutch plates as
detailed in Section C4. Select 5th gear and apply the
rear brake, then unscrew the clutch hub securing nut
and extract the clutch hub with the gearchange shaft
as shown in Section C9. When the primary chain has
been threaded over the stator the sleeve nut should be
unscrewed and the stator leads withdrawn.
Remove the gearbox outer cover and dismantle the
gearbox (see Section D) then remove the rocker
boxes, cylinder head, block and pistons as shown
in Sections B2, B14, B19 and B22 respectively, then
disconnect the control cable(s) and remove the
carburetter(s).
Remove the contact breaker, timing cover complete
with oil switch and oil pump (Sections B28, B32 and
B33) then extract the crankshaft pinion. If it is
B34
required to inspect or change the camshafts or
bushes, the camshaft pinions should also be
eytracted,
Remove the front and bottom engine mounting
studs, disconnect the rear chain and remove the
crankcase assembly.
Remove the crankcase filter and oilway blanking
plug located at the bottom of the crankcase in line
with the oil pump, and catch any oil that may be
present in the crankcase.
Grip the crankcase firmly in a vice by means of the
bottom mounting lug and unscrew the three bolts from
the left side which are situated at the cylinder barrel
spigots and rear of the primary drive breather outlet.
Then the remaining four studs and unscrew two nuts
adjacent to the gearbox housing. The crankcase-
halves may now be parted. If difficulty is encountered
parting the crankcase halves it will be due to the front
TOP (crankcase to frame) hollow dowel which is a
press fit. Prior to splitting the crankcase drift the dowel
out of position using a suitable bar (an old rocker shaft
Is ideal for this purpose). When the halves are apart.
withdraw the crankshaft assembly and store it carefully.
Remove the timing side main bearing, See Section
B38.
Thoroughly clean and degrease the crankcase paying
particular attention to the oilways. DO NOT
DAMAGE the scavenge pipe to crankcase joint.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
REASSEMBLY
Prior to reassembly, the junction surfaces should be
carefully scraped clean, giving special attention to
the location spigot and dowels. Replace the oilway
blanking plug located at the bottom of the R/H
crankcase in line with the oil pump, and crankcase
filter.
Mount the left half-crankcase on its side on two
wooden blocks, or a bench with a hole in for
crankshaft clearance, lubricate the main bearings
and camshaft bushes. Assemble the crankshaft into
position ensuring that it is right home in the bearing
by giving it a sharp blow with a hide mallet.
Apply a fresh coat of jointing compound to the
junction surface of the left half-crankcase then
lubricate the main bearings and camshaft bushes in
both halves of the crankcase. Position the con-rods
centrally and lower the right half-crankcase into
position over the crankshaft. When the halves are
mated, check the crankshaft and camshafts for
freedom of rotation. The crankshaft should revolve
freely whilst the camshafts should offer little or no
resistance to rotation by hand.
Refit the crankcase securing bolts and studs, and
tighten them until they are just ‘‘pinched-up’.
Check that the cylinder block junction surface of
the crankcase is level.
If there is a slight step between the two halves, this
should be corrected by tapping the front and rear
of the crankcases as required, until a level surface is
achieved. The crankcase securing bolts should then
be tightened, a turn at a time, to the torque figures
given in “General Data”.
Reassembly then continues as a reversal of the
dismantling instructions. Prior to refitting the cylinder
block, pour approximately Ya pint (0-14 litres) of oil into
the crankcase.
B35
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B35
SERVICING THE CRANKSHAFT ASSEMBLY
Grip the crankshaft conveniently in a suitable vice
and place rag over any sharp edges to avoid the
connecting rods becoming damaged. Mark the
connecting rods, caps and crankshaft so that they
can be replaced tn their original positions,
SLUDGE
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SECTION
Fig. B31. Sectional view of crankshaft—showing oil tube
B36
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
Unscrew the cap retainer nuts, a turn at a time to
avoid distortion, then remove the caps and con-
necting rods. Refit the nuts to their respective bolts
to ensure correct assembly.
Using a large impact screwdriver, unscrew the oil tube
retainer plug from the right end of the big-end journal. If
difficulty is encountered, drill a Yain. (3mm.) dia. hole to
Yein. (3mm) depth in the crankshaft, to remove the
centre punched indentation which locks the oil tube
retainer plug in position.
Unscrew the flywheel bolt adjacent to the big-end
journal, then withdraw the oil tube using a hooked rod
located in the flywheel bolt location hole (see Fig.31}.
Thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin {kerosene)
then clean the oil drillings using a jet of compressed
air. Particular attention should be given to checking
that each oil drilling is free from blockage.
B37
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B ENGINE
SECTION B36
REFITTING THE CONNECTING RODS
First, ensure that the connecting rod and cap and both
the front and rear of the bearing shells are scrupulously
clean, then offer the shells to the rod and cap and
locate the shell tabs into their respective slots. Smear
the bearing surfaces with oil and refit the rod and cap
to their original journals, ensuring that the tab location
slots are adjacent {see Fig. B32).
Refit the bolts and screw on the nuts te the given
torque figure.
Finally, force oil through the drilling at the right end
of the crankshaft with a pressure oil can until it is
expelled from both big-end bearings, thus indicating
that the oil passages are free from blockage and
full of oil.
NOTE: The connecting rod, cap and nut are
centre punched on initial assembly so that the
cap may be refitted correctly relative to the
connecting rod.
B38
Fig. B32. Refitting the connecting rods
CENTRE PUNCH
MARKS
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE
SECTION B37
INSPECTING THE CRANKCASE COMPONENTS
In preparation for inspection, thoroughly clean the
crankcase-halves, main bearings, crankshaft and
connecting rods, etc, in paraffin (kerosene) and
allow them to drain.
If there is an air pump
accessible, then dry the components with a jet of
compressed air and examine them as follows: —
(1)
BIG-END BEARINGS
The extent of wear to the big-end journals can
be determined by inspecting the bearing
surfaces for scoring and by measuring the
diameter of the journais. Light score marks
can be reduced with smooth emery cloth but
ensure that all parts are carefully washed after
this operation.
Where a journal has been slightly scored the
big-end shell bearings should be renewed. If
the scoring and wear i5 extensive the big-end
journals should be reground to a suitable size
as given below.
NOTE: The replaceable white metal big-
end bearings are pre-finished to give the
correct diametral clearance. Under no
circumstances should the bearings be
scraped or the connecting rod and cap
joint faces filed.
Suitable crankshaft size
Shell bearing marking
in. mm.
Standard:— 1-6235 41-237
1-6240 41-250
Undersize :—
— 010 1-6135 40-983
1-6140 40-996
—-020 1-6035 40-729
1-6040 40-742
Service re-ground crankshafts are avarlable from your.
TRIUMPH dealer.
(2)
(3)
MAIN BEARINGS
Clean the bearings thoroughly in paraffin
(kerosene), then dry them with a jet of com-
pressed air. Test the bearing for roughness by
spinning. Check the centre race for side-play
and inspect the balls and tracks for any signs
of indentation and pocketing. Examine the
main bearing diameters on the crankshaft for
wear, The bearings should be a tight push fit
on the crankshaft and a press fit in the crank-
case. A loose fitting bearing would tend to
cause crankcase ‘‘rumbie’’. The correct
diameters of the main bearing journals are
given in “General Data”,
CAMSHAFTS AND BUSHES
The camshaft bushes normally show very little
sign of wear until a considerable mileage has
been covered. A rough check on the wear can
be made by inserting the camshaft into the
bearing and feeling the up and down movement.
An exact check can be made by measuring the
camshaft with a micrometer and measuring the
camshaft bushes with calipers. The working
clearance figures are given in ‘General! Data".
Wear on the cam form will be mainly centred
on the opening flank of the cam and on the
lobe of the cam. Particular attention should
be given to these areas when examining the
cam form for grooving. In a case where there
is severe grooving the camshaft and tappet
followers should be renewed.
A method of estimating the extent of wear on the
cam form is that of measuring the over-all height
of the cam and the base-circle diameter. The
difference is the cam lift. If all other aspects of the
camshaft are satisfactory and the wear on the
cam form does not exceed 0-010in. (0-25mm.)
then the camshaft may be used for further
service.
CRANKCASE FACES AND DOWELS
Ensure that the faces of the crankcases are not
damaged in any way and that any dowels are in
position, particularly the metering dowel on
the timing cover face near the pressure release
valve. The dowel is counter bored, incorporates
a metering pin, and should be assembled with
the larger bore outermost.
B39
Kim The CD Man © 2002
B | ENGINE
SECTION B38
RENEWING THE MAIN BEARINGS
To remove the timing side ball journal bearing heat the
crankcase to approximately 100 C and drive the
Dearing inwards À surtable drift can be made from a
piece of 17am 131mm ) diameter mild steel bar, about
Gin. (150mm) long by turning it to l'en. (28-6mm }
diameter for ‘in 112mm ) at one end
Fig. B33. Roller main bearing
B40
On the drive side rolier bearing the
inner portion will be withdrawn with
the crankshaft. The outer spool
however will still involve heating the
crankcase and if itis very tight in the
case will require the use of special
tool 61-7017 which expands to arp
the cuter spool
The roller and cap can be removed
from the crankshaft using a
suitable extractor.
To assemble the new bearings first
ensure that the main bearing hous-
ing ts clean, then heat the crank-
case to approximately 100°C and
drive in the bearing using a tubular
drift onto the outer race. Ensure that
the bearing enters its housing
squarely. If possible, use a press.
Suitable dimensions for the drift are
2%in. (70mm.) outside diameter
Gin. (150mm.) long.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ENGINE B
SECTION B39
RENEWING CAMSHAFT BUSHES
To remove the camshaft bushes in the RIGHT half-
crankcase heat the crankcase to 100°C and drive the
bush out from the outside, using a suitable drift. While
the crankcase is still hot, drive in the new bush, ensuring
that the oil feed hole in the bush and the crankcase
drilling are aligned. A suitable drift for this purpose can
be made from a 6in. (150mm.) long piece of M.S. bar
of 1Vein. (28-6mm.) diameter, by machining a pitot on
one end Zain. (22-2mm.) x 1in. (25mm.) long.
To remove the camshaft bush from the LEFT half-
crankcase, a tap is necessary. An ideal size is = in.
diameter x 9 Whit. When a good thread has
been cut in the old bush, heat the crankcase
(100°C.) and screw in a suitable bolt. Grip the bolt
in a vice and drive the crankcase with a hide maliet
until the bush is removed. Do not attempt to lever
the bush out of position with the bolt, or the case
may be damaged. If the tap is used in place of the
bolt, care must be taken not to give too hard a
knock to the crankcase or the brittle tap may break.
Retained behind the inlet camshaft bush is the
breather valve porting disc, which is located by
means of a peg. When renewing the bush ensure
that the disc is located correctly on the peg.
The sintered bronze camshaft bushes are machined
to size before pressing in, therefore only the
smallest amount of metal will need to be removed
when they are renewed. See ‘General Data’ for
reaming sizes and working clearances.
When reaming is completed, the crankcase must
be thoroughly washed in paraffin (kerosene) and
allowed to drain. Preferably, use a jet of compressed
air to ensure that all swarf is removed.
SECTION B40
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE TACHOMETER DRIVE
Where the optional tachometer is i'tad, there is a right
angled drive gearbox as shown :5 Fig. B34. It is not
necessary to part the crankcases to remove the drive
gearbox. When the large slotted end cap is removed
and the engine turned over quickly the drive gear
should be ejected. lf this is not so, the gear can be
withdrawn with long-nosed pliers. The left-hand
threaded centre bolt holding the drive gearbox io the
crankcase will then be seen. A thin box spanner is
needed to release this and the box will then come
away from the crankcase. The driven gear housing is
secured by a locking pin and is a relatively tight fit.
It will be noted that a spade in the back of the
tachometer gearbox slots into a slotted plig which
is permanently driven into the end of the exhaust
camshaft.
The reassembly procedure for the drive gearbox is
the reversal of the above.
Fig. B34. Exploded view of tachometer gearbox
B41
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION C
TRANSMISSION
DESCRIPTION
ADJUSTING THE CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
ADJUSTING THE PRIMARY CHAIN TENSION
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE PRIMARY COVER
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE CLUTCH PLATES...
INSPECTING THE CLUTCH PLATES AND SPRINGS ...
ADJUSTING THE CLUTCH PRESSURE PLATE
RENEWING SHOCK ABSORBER RUBBERS
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE STATOR AND ROTOR
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CLUTCH AND ENGINE SPROCKETS
INSPECTION OF THE TRANSMISSION COMPONENTS
CLUTCH AND ENGINE SPROCKET ALIGNMENT
REAR CHAIN ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS ...
Section
C1
C2
C3
C4
(5
Cé
C7
C8
C9
c10
C11
C12
Ci
Kim The CD Man © 2002
С | TRANSMISSION
Fig. C1. General arrangement of clutch and shock absorber unit
DESCRIPTION
The clutch is of a multiplate type, using synthetic
friction material on the bonded drive plates and
Incorporating a transmission shock absorber. The
pressure on the clutch plates is maintained by three
springs held in position by three slotted nuts.
The clutch is designed to operate in oil and it Is
essential that the oil level in the chaincase is main-
tained. otherwise the bonded segments of the driven
clutch plates may burn and disintegrate under heavy
loading. Always use the recommended grade of oil
(see Section A1). If a heavier grade of oil is used the
clutch plates will not readily separate when
disengaged, which will cause a certain amount of
difficulty when changing gear due to clutch drag.
The shock absorbing unit transmits the power from
the clutch sprocket via the clutch plates to the
gearbox mainshaft. Within the shock absorber unit
the drive is transmitted through three large rubber
pads to the three-armed spider which is splined to
the clutch centre; this in turn is located to the
gearbox mainshaft by means of a locking taper and
key. In addition, there are three rubber rebound
pads. The total effect of the rubber pads is to reduce
the variations in engine torque at low speeds,
providing an extremely smooth transmission of
power to the gearbox.
SECTION Ci
ADJUSTING THE CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
The Clutch, which 1s situated within the outer
primary cover on the left of the machine, can be
adjusted by means of the handlebar adjuster,
pushrod adjuster and the pressure plate springs,
the latter only being accessible for adjustment
when the outer primary cover is removed. Section
C4 fully describes adjusting the springs and
pressure plate.
The clutch operating rod should have T3 in.(1-5
mm). clearance between the clutch operating
mechanism and the pressure plate. To achieve this
remove the inspection cap from the centre of the
C2
primary cover, then slacken the clutch cable
handlebar adjustment right off.
Unscrew the hexagonal lock nut and screw in the
slotted adjuster screw in the centre of the pressure
plate until the pressure plate just begins to lift.
Unscrew the adjuster one full turn and secure it in
that position by re-tightening the lock-nut.
The clutch operating cable should then be re-
adjusted, by means of the handlebar adjuster, until
there is approximately + inches (3 mm.) free move-
ment in the cable.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRANSMISSION C
If the clutch is dragging and normal adjustment of
the operating rod and operating cable produces no
improvement, it will be necessary to remove the
outer primary cover and check the pressure plate
E for true running as shown in Section C6.
To maintain a smooth and easy clutch operation.
particular attention should be given to the recom-
Fig. C2. Expioded view of clutch operating .
mechanism mended primary chaincase oil change periods (see
“Routine Maintenance”) and clutch cable lubrication
(see Section A17).
SECTION C2
ADJUSTING THE PRIMARY CHAIN TENSION
The primary chain is of the triplex type and is
non-adjustable as the centres of the engine main-
shaft and gearbox mainshaft are fixed. Provision for
take-up of wear in the primary chain is made by
means of a rubber faced tension slipper blade below
the lower run of the chain. The free movement in
the chain can be felt with the finger after removing
the top inspection plug adjacent to the cylinder
block, with the engine stopped, of course.
The correct chain adjustment is # in. (9-5 mm.) free
movement. To adjust the chain tension first place
a drip tray underneath the chaincase and unscrew
the hexagonal pillar bolt adjacent to the centre
stand left hand lug.
Fig. C3. Adjusting the chain tensioner
C3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
C TRANSMISSION
Insert the short screwdriver 61-7012 and adjust the
tension as requirea.
When the adjustment is completed. check that the
chaincase contans the recommended amount of oil
(see Section A1).
SECTION C3
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE PRIMARY COVER
Slacken the left finned clip bolt, left silencer clip
boit and remove the nut and bolt securing the left
exhaust pipe bracket forward of the engine. Re-
move the exhaust pipe as in Section B13.
For models with a right-hand gearchange slacken off
the adjustment at the rear brake operating rod until the
brake pedal is clear of the primary cover.
Unscrew the left footrest securing nut and
withdraw the footrest.
Place a drip tray underneath the primary cover and
remove the hexagonal pillar bolt adjacent to the
centre stand lug and allow the oil to drain from the
1. Filler plug
2. Oil level
3. Collection chamber
chaincase. It is not necessary to disturb the rotor
cover plate,
Remove the two domed nuts and copper washers
and unscrew eight recess screws from the periphery
of the primary cover. Withdraw the cover and
paper gasket.
Refitting the cover is the reversal of the above instruc-
tions but fit a new paper gasket and if necessary,
replace the 'O' ring on the gearchange spindle. Take
care when replacing the cover so as not to damage or
dispiace the 'O' ring.
Finally, replace the drain plug and fibre washer and
prime’ the chaincase with approximately “a pint of
fresh engine oil. (See Section A1).
4. Adjuster nut
5. Chain tensioner
6. Drain plug
7. Level plug
Fig. C4. Section through primary chaincase
C4
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRANSMISSION C
SECTION C4
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE CLUTCH PLATES
Remove the outer primary cover as described in
Section C3.
The three pressure plate springs are locked in
position by means of location ‘pips’ in the cups
and on the drive adjuster nuts. To facilitate removal
of the slotted adjuster nuts, insert a knife blade
under the head of the nut whilst the nut is unscrewed
(using a screwdriver of the type shown in Fig. C5).
Withdraw the springs, cup and pressure plate
assembly. Removal of the clutch plates is facilitated
by means of two narrow hooked tools which can be
made from a piece of =; in. dia. wire by bending to
form a hook at one end, Thoroughly clean all parts
in paraffin (kerosene) and inspect the clutch springs
and plates for excessive wear (see section C5).
When replacing the clutch plates remember that
the bottom position is occupied by a bonded plate.
\
Fig. C5. Unscrewing the clutch spring nuts
Ensure that the cups are located correctly and
assemble the springs and nuts, then adjust the
pressure plate for true running as described below.
Reassembly then continues as the reversal of the
above instructions.
SECTION C5
INSPECTING THE CLUTCH PLATES AND SPRINGS
The bonded friction plates should be examined for
excessive wear to the driving tags and the overall
thickness of the clutch plates should be measured to
determine the wear to the friction faces. If the
reduction in thickness is more than -030 in.
(75 mm.) when checked against a new plate the
plate should be renewed. Check the fit of the driv-
ing tags in the clutch housing. The clearance should
not be excessive,
Check the plain steel arive:. pic. for flatness by
placing the plates horizontally on a perfectly flat
surface such as a thick piece of plate glass.
Original finish on the driven plates is a phosphoric
acid etched surface and hence the plates need not
be polished. Check the fit of the plate on the shock
absorber housing. The radial clearance should not
be excessive.
Inspect the clutch springs for compressive strength
by measuring the length of the spring and comparing
it with the dimensions given in “General Data”.
If a spring has shortened more than 0-1 in. (2:5 mm.)
the complete set should be renewed. It is not
advisable to renew just one or two springs as this
may ultimately result in the pressure plate running
unevenly,
Ch
Kim The CD Man © 2002
C TRANSMISSION
SECTION C6
ADJUSTING THE CLUTCH PRESSURE PLATE
When the pressure plate is refitted or requires
adjustment, the following procedure should be
observed. With neutral selected, sit astride the
machine, disengage the clutch, then depress the
kickstart-pedal and observe the rotation of the
pressure plate; it should revolve true relative to
the clutch housing. If it does not do so, the three
slotted nuts must be initially adjusted so the ends
of the clutch pins are flush with the ‘heads of the
nuts. The nut is prevented from unscrewing by a
“pip on the underside and to unscrew a nut, a
narrow screwdriver should be used to hold the spring
away from the ‘‘pip’’ of the nut as shown in Fig. CS,
When the nuts are flush with the ends of the pins
depress. the kickstart again and mark the “high-
spot’’ with chalk, then screw in the nearest nut(s)
about half a turn and try again. Repeat this pro-
cedure until the plate rotates evenly without
“wobbling.
SECTION C7
RENEWING SHOCK ABSORBER RUBBERS
When the primary cover and clutch plates are
removed, access is gained to the shock absorber
unit, which consists of a housing, paddle or spider,
inner and outer cover plates and shock absorbing
rubbers.
To remove the rubbers for inspection or renewal. first
unscrew the three bolts which serve to retain the shock
absorber plate and lever the plate free. using a suitabie
small lever.
The shock absorber rubbers can be prised out of
position, using a sharp pointed tool, commencing
by levering out the smaller rebound rubbers first.
When the three small rebound rubbers are re-
moved the large drive rubbers wiil be free to be
withdrawn.
if the rubbers show no signs of punctures or
cracking, etc., they can be refitted, but remember
that a slight puncture in the rubber can ultimately
result in the rubber disintegrating.
C6
Fig. C6. Replacing the shock absorber rubbers
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRANSMISSION C
To replace the shock absorber drive and rebound
rubbers, first install all three of the larger drive rub-
bers in position as shown in Fig. C6. Follow through
by inserting and replacing the smaller rebound
rubbers. It may prove necessary to lever the shock
absorber spider arms using a small tommy bar or
similar to facilitate assembly, but this operation
can be accomplished ‘in situ’ on the machine
without the need for special tools or equipment,
or necessity for removing the complete unit from
the machine.
Although the rubbers are of an oil resistant type,
it is not advisable to use oil or grease as an aid to
reassembly as this may shorten the working life of
the rubber.
Ensure that the three outer cover bolts are tight then
peen’ the protruding threads thereby preventing the
bolts from unscrewing during service.
SECTION C8
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE STATOR AND ROTOR
First disconnect the stator leads at the top rear of the
primary chaincase then, with the primary cover
removed, unscrew the three stator retaining nuts and
withdraw the stator from over the mounting studs and
withdraw the lead from the sleeve nut. If any difficulty
IS encountered, unscrew the sleeve nut and the lead
can then be withdrawn easily. To remove the rotor
unbend the tab washer and unscrew the mainshaft nut
using a box spanner and mallet, or, alternatively,
select 5th (top) gear and apply the rear brake, then
unscrew the nut.
Check the rotor carefully for signs of cracking or
fatigue failure. Store the rotor within the stator
to prevent metal particles adhering.
When replacing the rotor ensure that the key is
located correctly, then tighten the nut to the torque
figure given in ‘General Data‘.
When refitting the stator, ensure that the side of
the stator with the leads connecting the coils
together is outermost, then tighten the retaining
nuts to the torque figure given in General Data
Section. Insert the lead into the sleeve nut and
connect the wires to those of the same colour code
from the main harness at the frame saddle tube.
Check that the position of the lead is such that it
cannot foul the chain.
Finally, rotate the crankshaft and ensure that the
rotor does not foul the stator. It should be possible
to insert a feeler gauge of at least 0-008 in.
(0-2 mm.) thickness between each of the stator
pole pieces and the rotor.
C7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
C TRANSMISSION
SECTION C9
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE CLUTCH AND ENGINE SPROCKETS
Remove the primary cover as shown in Section C3,
then remove the pressure plate and clutch plates, as
shown in Section C4. Insert the locking piate Z13 into
the clutch housing and remove the stator and rotor as
described in Section C8. Remove the rotor key and
distance piece and slacken off the chain tensioner.
Unscrew the clutch hub self locking nut then remove
the plain washer.
As the primary chain is of the endless type, the clutch
and engine sprockets have to be extracted simultan-
eously using extractor tool 61-7014 as shown in Fig.
C8.
NED
Неро в pr
Fig. C8. Extracting the clutch centre, using extractor
D662/3 and locking plate Z13
C8
Screw the body of the clutch extractor into the clutch
hub until the maximum depth of thread is engaged,
then tighten the centre bolt until the hub is released.
When this is achieved, assemble the engine sprocket
extractor, No, 61-6014, and screw in the centre bolt
and extract the engine sprocket.
Press out the hub from the shock absrber to release
the sprocket, thrust washer, rollers and threaded pins.
Finally, remove the key from the gearbcx mainshaft
and check that the oil seal in the primary chain inner
cover Is a good fit over the high gear. To renew this oil
seal the circular cover should be removed. When
replacing the cover, use a new paper gasket and
ensure that the oil seal is pressed in with the lip relative
to the cover as shown in Fig. C9.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRANSMISSION C
(1)
(2)
SECTION CIO
INSPECTION OF THE TRANSMISSION COMPONENTS
Inspect the primary chain for excessive wear of
the rollers and pivot pins and check that the
To do this
first scribe two marks on a flat surface exactly
elongation does not exceed 117.
12 in. (30-5 cm.) apart, then after degreasing or
washing the chain in paraffin (kerosene), place
the chain opposite the two marks. When the
chain is compressed to its minimum free
length the marks should coincide with the
centres of two pivot pins 32 links apart. When
the chain is stretched to its maximum free
length the extension should not exceed | in,
(6-25 mm.
Inspect the condition of the sprocket teeth for
signs of hooking and pitting.
A very good method of indicating whether the
chain is badly worn or not is to wrap it round
the clutch sprocket and attempt to lift the
chain from its seating at various points round
the sprocket. Little or no lift indicates that
both the sprocket and chain are in good
condition.
Check the fit between the shock absorber spider
and the clutch hub splines. The spider should
be a push fit onto the clutch hub and there
should not be any radial movement,
Similarly check the fit of the engine sprocket
splines onto the crankshaft. Again, there
should not be any radial movement.
(3)
(4)
(>)
If either the spider or the engine sprocket are
tight fitting on the clutch hub and crankshaft
respectively, there is no cause for concern as
such a fit is to the best advantage.
Check the clutch hub roller bearing diameter,
the rollers themselves and the bearing of the
clutch sprocket for excessive wear and pitting
etc. Measure the rollers, clutch hub and clutch
sprocket bearing diameters and compare them
with the dimensions given in “General Data"'.
If the diameters of the rollers are below the
bottom limit, they should be renewed. When
purchasing new rollers ensure that they are in
accordance with the dimensions given in
“General Data’. In particular, check that the
length is correct,
Check that the shock absorber spider is a good
working fit in the inner and outer retaining
plates and that the arms of the spider have not
caused excessive score marks on the inner
faces of the retaining plates. A good idea is to
check the working clearance by assembling
the shock absorber unit without the rubbers.
Inspect the clutch operating rod for bending,
by rolling it on a flat surface such as a piece of
plate glass. Check that the length of the rod
is within the límits given in “General Data”.
This component should not be replaced with
anything other than a genuine Triumph spare
part. The ends of the rod are specially heat
treated to give maximum wear resistance.
СЭ
Kim The CD Man © 2002
C TRANSMISSION
Fig. C9. Oil seal in gearbox sprocket detachable cover
Thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene) and
inspect them for wear or fatigue as shown in Section
СЭ.
Grease the clutch hub and fit the thrust washer and
20 of the correct rollers.
Do not use in. x { in. bright ended rollers.
Place the sprocket in position and press on the
shock absorber complete with the three threaded
pins. If the splines are loose use Triumph
“"LOCTITE™.
When replacing the primary chain and sprockets,
ensure that the taper ground boss of the engine
sprocket is towards the crankshaft main bearing and
the oil seal. With the gearbox mainshaft key care-
fully in position, locate the clutch hub onto the
mainshaft taper and tap it slightly to lock it onto the
taper.
Place the primary chain over the engine sprocket
and drive the sprocket onto the crankshaft.
Offer the clutch locking tool Z13 into the clutch plate
housing and then refit the plain washer. and clutch
self-locking nut.
Engage fourth gear, apply the rear brake and tighten
the clutch securing nut to the torque figure given
in “General Data”,
Do not forget to fit the distance piece between the
engine sprocket and rotor and remember to refit the
rectangular section rotor locating key. Reassembly
then continues as a reversal of the above instructions.
Finally, replenish the chaincase with the recommended
grade of oil {see Section A1).
Note.—Alternatively, the clutch sprocket may be
removed by prising out the twenty roller bearings
and allowing the sprocket to move both outwards
and forwards until it can be unmeshed from the
primary chain. This alternative only applies if the
shock absorber assembly can readily be detached
from the hub to allow access to the rollers.
SECTION CII
CLUTCH AND ENGINE SPROCKET ALIGNMENT
lt is important that the engine and gearbox
sprockets are accurately in line, otherwise rapid
wear of the primary chain and sprockets will occur.
This will result in the chain rollers fracturing and
the chain breaking. This would almost certainly
cause irreparable damage to the crankcase.
Correct alignment of the sprockets is easily effected
by the use of spacing shims removed or replaced
from behind the engine sprocket. The alignment
can be initally checked by placing a straight edge
alongside both sprockets (e.g. a steel rule) after
C10
first removing the primary chain (See previous
section). If any gap produced is in excess of 0-005"
(0-127mm.) maximum tolerance, then the engine
sprocket must be shimed accordingly. Place the
appropriate shim between the engine sprocket and the
spacer that sits up against the roller bearing.
Shims are avilable as follows: —
0.010” thick—Part Number 70-8038
0.030” thick—Part Number 71-2660
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRANSMISSION C
SECTION CI2
REAR CHAIN ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS
If the chains have been correctly serviced. very tew RIVET EXTRACTOR
repairs wiil be necessary. Should the occasion arise to
repair, lengthen or shorten a chain, a rivet extractor, as
shown in Fig. C11, and a few spare parts will cover all
requirements,
The rivet extractor can be used on all motorcycle
chains up to $ in. pitch, whether the chains are on
or off the wheels.
e When using the extractor :—
ETE ar ENG TT E
(О (ео) DUDE EZ DS
To SHORTEN a chain containing an EVEN NUMBER (2) Open the jaws by pressing down the lever (see
(1) Turn screw anti-clockwise to permit the punch
end to clear the chain rivet.
OF PITCHES remove the dark parts shown in (1) below).
and replace by cranked double link and single
connecting link (2). (3) Pass jaws over chain and release the lever.
Jaws should rest on a chain roller free of chain
link plates (see below).
= CE PO iw mE
aa DAS
LG >) > | ZZ
Fa
(4) Turn screw clockwise until punch contacts and
pushes out rivet end through chain outer link
plate. Unscrew punch, withdraw extractor and
repeat complete operation on the adjacent
rivet in the same chain outer link plate. The
E outer plate is then free and the two rivets can
EX DO E BJT ATA RY 4 a cidos wi
Y — A be withdrawn from opposite sides with the
opposite plate in position. Do not use the
removed part again.
| e (ee)
To SHORTEN a chain containing an ODD NUMBER
OF PITCHES remove the dark parts shown in (3)
; When the alterations are finished the chain
and replace by a single connecting link and inner
should be lubricated as shown in Section A12.
link as (4).
ya
UT Tur ES EY
e ATA AE ENTRER
To REPAIR a chain with a broken roller or inside
link, remove the dark parts in (5) and replace by
two single connecting links and one inner link as (6).
RIVET EXTRACTOR
WITH (AWS OPEN
Fig. C10. Rear chain alterations Fig. C11. Chain link rivet extractor
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION D
FIVE SPEED GEARBOX
DESCRIPTION
SEQUENCE OF GEARCHANGING...
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE QUTER COVER ASSEMBLY
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE KICKSTART MECHANISM
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE GEARCHANGE MECHANISM
INSPECTING THE GEARCHANGE AND KICKSTART COMPONENTS
RENEWING KICKSTART AND GEARCHANGE SPINDLE BUSHES
CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
DISMANTLING THE GEARBOX
INSPECTION OF THE GEARBOX COMPONENTS
RENEWING MAINSHAFT AND LAYSHAFT BEARINGS
REASSEMBLING THE GEARBOX
CHANGING THE GEARBOX SPROCKET
Section
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
Dé
D7
D8
D9
310
D11
D12
D1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D
11
Fumer . ma
12 16
00 On A Luba
6 7
. Low gcar
. Second gear
. Third gear
Fourth gear
. Fifth gear
Low gear
. Second gear
. Third gear
GEARBOX
8
14
9.
19.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
9 10
Fourth gear
Fifth gear
Mainshaft
Layshaft
First gear iayshaft selector fork
Third gear layshaft selector fork
Mainshaft selector fork
Layshaft engaging dog
Fig. D1. Plan of Gear Components
=
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBO X | | D
SECTION DI
SEQUENCE OF GEARCHANGING
The gearbox is operated by the pedal on the left-hand
side of the machine, the pedal being splined to the
gear change spindle. (Prior to engine no. HN62501 the
gearbox is operated from the right-hand side). Two
chamfered plungers with springs fit into the housing in
such a way that as the gear pedal is moved up and
down the piungers locate in the teeth at the outboard
end of the quadrant. The quadrant is pivoted in the
centre and the inboard end if formed to mate with the
captive pinion of the camplate. See Fig. D2.
Figs. D3(i) to D3(vi) illustrate the camplate with
its leaf spring and the three engaging pins of the
selector forks which can be seen in the camplate
track. The three sliding pinions are moved along
the mainshaft and layshaft by the selector forks.
The neutral positions of the camplate and gears are
shown in Fig. D3(ii).
Pedal Locking Bolt
Quadrant
Plunger
Plunger quadrant
Selector fork
. Selector spindle
. Footchange Spindle
. Footchange Spindie 'O' Ring
. Footchange Pedal
© юм ол —
Fig. D2. Gear selection components
When the pedal is depressed to engage low gear
(first) the camplate is turned anti-clockwise moving
the layshaft selector fork to mesh the sliding first
gear with the engaging dog on the end of the lay-
shaft. {The engaging dog is illustrated in Fig. D1.
As second gear is sclected by lifting the pedal, the
second layshaft selector fork brings the sliding third
gear into mesh with the layshaft second gear, while
the previous selector fork disengages first gear from
the engaging dog.
Movement of the gear lever in the same directior
will select third gear by moving the mainshaft
sliding gear into mesh with the mainshaft third gear.
At the same time the second layshaft selector dis-
engages second gear,
D3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D
FIRST GEAR
Fig. D3(i)
SECOND GEAR
Fig. D3(iii}. First gear selected (Note arrowed line
showing power being transmitted through the gear
cluster)
Further movement of the gear lever will select
fourth gear by moving the sliding layshaft third gear
into mesh with the layshaft fourth gear while the
mainshaft fourth gear is moved into a neutral
position.
Finally, fifth gear is obtained by a final movement of
the lever in the same direction. The mainshaft
selector fork will bring the mainshaft sliding gear
D4
GEARBOX
NEUTRAL
Fig. D3(iv)
(fourth gear) into mesh with the mainshaft fifth gear.
At the same time the second layshaft sliding gear
(third gear) is moved into a neutral position.
lt should be noted that throughout the range of gear
pedal movements the gear pedal spindle and plunger
housing return to the original position ready for the
next selection.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBO X
FOURTH
GEAR
Fig. D3(v)
FIFTH GEAR
—
Fig. D3(vi)
SECTION D2
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE GEARBOX OUTER COVER ASSEMBLY
Remove the right hand exhaust system. See sec-
tion B13.
Remove the. right footrest by detaching the fixing
nut from behind the rear engine plate.
Slacken off the clutch cable adjustment and slip out
the cable nipple at the handlebar control. Slide the
rubber cover up away from the abutment for the
cable at the gearbox end and unscrew the abutment.
Remove the large slotted plug from the gearbox
outer cover and access will be gained to the clutch
operating arm, lt is only necessary then to release
the cable nipple from the arm with the finger.
Place a drip tray underneath the gearbox and
unscrew the gearbox filler plug and drain plug.
Engage Sth {top) gear. This will allow several other-
wise difficult nuts to be unscrewed by subsequently
applying the rear brake when required.
Unscrew the top and bottom hexagonal nut and the
recess screws from the periphery of the gearbox
cover. Depress the kickstart lever slightly and tap
the cover until it is free.
1. Clutch cable
nipple
2. Drain plug
3. Leve! plug
A176
77 L-—13
Fig. D4. Showing gearbox oil level and oil drain plugs
When the cover is removed, the gear-change
mechanism, kickstart mechanism and clutch operating
mechanism will be accessible. The gearchange shaft
should be carefully turned, to control the release of the
plungers and springs from the gearchange quadrant.
Db
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D GEARBO X
Fig. DS. Gearbox outer cover, showing gearchange mechanism, clutch operating mechanism
and kickstart quadrant
Prior to refitting the outer cover ensure that the
junction suriace is clean and free from any deposits
of old jointing compound, then thoroughly clean
it in paraffin (kerosene). Apply a fresh coat of
jointing compound to the junction surface and
ensure that the two location dowels are in position.
Turn the kickstart pedal until it is halfway down its
operational stroke and offer the cover to the gearbox.
Check that the kickstart pedal returns to its normal
fully-returned position. Reassembly then continues as
a reversal of the above instructions. Finally, refill the
gearbox to the correct level with the recommended
grade of oil (see Section A1).
SECTION D3
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE KICKSTART MECHANISM
Slacken the kickstarter crank cotter pin nut about
two or three turns and release the cotter pin from
its locking taper by using a hammer and a soft metal
drift. Slide the pedal off the shaft and withdraw the
quadrant and spring assembly. Apply the rear
brake, bend back the tab on the lock washer and
unscrew the kickstart ratchet pinion securing nut
from the gearbox mainshaft. Withdraw the pinion,
ratchet, spring and sleeve, then thoroughly clean
DE
all parts in paraffin (kerosene) and inspect them for
wear etc., as shown in Section DS.
If the kickstarter quadrant is to be renewed the
spindle” should be driven out using a hammer or
press and the gear quadrant pressed onto the
spindle so that rhe kickstart crank location flat is
positioned correctly relative to the quadrant (see
Fig. D6).
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBOX
D
Fig. Dé. Kickstart quadrant and spring. Arrow
indicates correct spring location
To reassemble the mechanism, first refit the thin
walled steel sleeve, spring, pinion and ratchet to
the gearbox mainshaft and assemble the tab washer,
then screw on the retaining nut to the torque
figure given in “General Data”. Do not over-
tighten the retaining nut as this may result
in failure of the thin walled inner steel sleeve.
Fit the return spring to the kickstart quadrant as shown
in Fig. D6. Offer the spindle intc the kickstart bush and
locate the return spring onto the anchor peg at the rear
of the cover. Fit the oil seal over the spindle and
assemble the kickstart crank, locking it into position
with the cotter pin from the rear. Refit the outer cover
as shown in Section D2. Do not forget to refit the oil
seal. Refill the gearbox with the correct grade of
lubricant (Section A1).
SECTION D4
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE GEARCHANGE MECHANISM
Prior to engine no. HN62501 slacken off the gear
change pedal locking bolt and withdraw the pedal trom
the splined shaft. A litle leverage between the pedal
and the cover may be necessary. For this. choose a
suitable tool to avoid damage to the cover.
Remove the four nuts and locking washers securing
the guide plate. Withdraw the guide plate, plunger
quadrant and curved return springs. Thoroughly
ciean the parts in paraffin (kerosene) and inspect
them for wear etc., as shown in Section DS.
To reassemble the mechanism, offer it to the outer
cover bush then refit the two quadrant return
springs and ensure that they locate correctly over
the step in the cover.
Refit the retainer plate, not forgetting the locking
washers which fit one under each of the four nuts.
Finally, refit the springs and plungers, taking care
that they are not suddenly ejected from their seats
during assembly.
SECTION D5
INSPECTING THE GEARCHANGE AND KICKSTART COMPONENTS
GEARCHANGE:
(1) Inspect the gearchange plungers for wear and
ensure that they are a clearance fit in the
quadrant. Check the plunger springs by com-
paring their lengths with the figures given in
“General Data".
(2) Examine the piunger guide plate for wear and
grooving on the taper guide surfaces. Renew
the plate if grooving has occurred.
(3) Inspect the footchange return springs for fatigue
and if they show signs of corrosion due to con-
densation, they should be renewed.
(4) Examine the gearchange quadrant bush for
wear and possible ovality by inserting the
quadrant into the bush and feeling the amount
of play.
D 7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D | GEARBOX
(5) Check the tips of che plungers and the teeth of
the camplate operating quadrant for chipping
and wear. To remove the camplate quadrant,
first remove the inner cover as shown in
Section D8, then remove the two split pins
and withdraw the spindle,
KICKSTART:
(1) Examine the kickstart quadrant for chipped or
broken teeth or looseness on the spindle and
the kickstart return spring for fatigue cracks
and signs of wear, particularly at the centre
where it engages on the splines of the spindle.
(2) Examine the kickstart spindle bush for wear.
If the required measuring instruments are not
available, use the spindle as a gauge and feel the
amount of play.
(3) Examine the kickstart ratchet mechanism for
wear, giving particular attention to the ratchet
teeth ensuring that they have not become
chipped or rounded. Check that the thin
walled steel bush is a clearance fit in the kick-
start pinion and that the spring is not badly
worn.
(4) Finally, check that the kickstart stop peg is
firmly pressed into the inner cover and is not
distorted.
SECTION Dé
RENEWING KICKSTART AND GEARCHANGE BUSHES
If it is found necessary to renew the kickstart
spindle bush this should be done by completely
stripping the outer cover of its assembly parts and
heating it to 100"C., then driving the bush out using
a suitable shouldered drift. Press in the new bush
while the cover is still hot.
The gearchange spindle and plunger assembly are
supported in four cast ron bushes. One in the gearbox
outer cover, one In the inner cover, one in the L.H.
crankcase and one in the primary cover.
Remove the outer cover, see Sections D2 and D4.
Using a suitable tap (e.g. 3in. dia. U.N.C.) cut a thread
in the bush to a depth of Vzin. (12mm.) heat the cover
10 100°C, then insen a suitable bolt. Grip the bolt firmly
in a vice then drive the cover away using a hide mallet.
A suitably shouldered drift is required to drive in the
new bush, which should be done whilst the cover is still
hot.
Remove the inner cover see Section D7. Heat the
cover to 100°C and remove the bush using a suitable
drift. Press in the new bush whilst the cover is still hot.
Remove the primary cover, see Section C3 and
remove and replace the bush as above.
The L.H. crankcase bush is not prone to wear even
after considerable mileage. However, if necessary,
remove the L.H. crankcase half, see Section B34 and
using a suitable tap (e.g. * «sin. día. x UNC) cut a
thread in the bush to a depth of 32ain. (18mm.). Insert a
suitable bolt and remove the bush. Drift in the new
bush whilst the cover is still hot,
For early models with a right hand footchange adopt a
similar procedure for the gearbox outer and inner
bushes.
SECTION D7
CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
The clutch operating mechanism, which is situated
in the gearbox outer cover, consists of two spring
loaded plates held apart by three balls, which are
seated in conical indentations in the plates.
Wear in this mechanism is negligible, even after
excessive mileage has been covered, so long as the
gearbox oil level is maintained at the recommended
level. The mechanism is removed as a unit by
unscrewing two slotted screws and is then easily
dismantled. The parts are arranged as shown in
D8
Fig. D7, which should be referred to when
reassembling the mechanism.
Fig. D7. Exploded view of clutch
operating mechanism
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBOX D
SECTION D8
DISMANTLING THE GEARBOX
NX
NN
ARS
>
Fig. D8. Gearbox inner cover retaining screws
Remove the gearbox outer cover as shown in
Section D2, leaving the gearbox with 5th (top)
gear selected.
Remove the two short bolts, two long bolts and a
centre nut which serves to retain the rear right
engine mounting plate, then withdraw the plate.
Bend back the tags on the lock washer and unscrew
the kickstart pinion ratchet retainer nut from the
end of the gearbox mainshaft. This should be easily
achieved with 5th (top) gear selected and the rear
brake applied.
Remove the outer primary cover and dismantle the
transmission as shown in Section C, not forgetting,
finally to remove the key from the gearbox main-
shaft.
The gearbox inner cover is retained by a socket
screw, a Phillips recessed screw and a hexagonal bolt
(See Fig. D8). When these are removed the cover
can be released by tapping it outwards with a hide
mallet,
Withdraw the engaging dog from the layshaft. See
Fig. D9, then remove the circlip from the end of
the layshaft with a pair of circlip pliers. Pull the
selector rod out and then remove the layshaft first
gear with its selector fork. Withdraw the second
gear from the layshaft and then remove the main-
shaft complete with first, second and third gears
in position. Remove the mainshaft fourth and lay-
shaft third gears with their selector forks and then
withdraw the layshaft with the fifth and fourth gears
in position. Detach the two brass thrust washers
which locate over the needle roller bearings.
Before removal of the camplate, the mainshaft high
gear will have to be detached from the gearbox
sprocket and withdrawn from the crankcase, This
can be done by removing the circular plate from the
primary inner cover at the rear of the clutch.
tapping back the bent-over portion of the locking
plate and unscrewing the large hexagonal gearbox
D9
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D GEARBOX
Fig. D9. Showing removal of engaging dog
sprocket nut (1875" across the flats and remove the
O ring. To facilitate removal of the nut, Workshop Tool
number 61-6125 is available. When the nut has been
removed, tap the high gear into the gearbox using a
hide mallet or a soft metal drift. It is now possible to
remove the camplate from its housing in the crankcase.
To remove the gearbox sprocket, disconnet the rear
chain and remove it from around the sprocket which
can now be easily withdrawn through the aperture.
chain and remove it from around the sprocket which
can now be easily withdrawn through the aperture,
The oil is prevented from leaving the gearbox
through the main bearing by an oil seal which runs
on a ground boss on the gearbox sprocket. Check
the oil seal for cracking and wear (see Section D10
for bearing and oil seal removal details).
SECTION D9
INSPECTION OF THE GEARBOX COMPONENTS
Thoroughly clean all partsin paraffin (kerosene) and
check them for wear and fatigue, as follows: —
(1) Inspect the gearbox housing and inner cover
for signs of cracking and damage to the joint
faces. Check that the location dowels are in
position correctly in the gearbox and inner
cover (2 dowels cach). tn preparation for re-
assembly, clean the junction surfaces of the
DIO
gearbox, inner cover and outer cover of any old
deposits of jointing compound.
(2) Examine both the mainshaft and layshaft for
signs of fatigue, damaged threads and badiy
worn splines. Check the extent of wear to the
bearing diameters of both shafts by comparing
them with the figures given in “General Data”,
Examine the shafts carefully for signs of seizure.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBOX D
Excessive friction resistance and seizure will be
indicated by local colouring on the shaft.
(3) Check the layshaft needle rolier bearing by
inserting the layshaft and feeling the amount of
play.
(4) Inspect the gearbox mainshaft bearings for
roughness due to pitting or indentation of the
balliroller tracks. Note that the high gear
bearing operates directly in a roller bearing
pressed into the right hand side crankcase half.
If wear is apparent at the high gear bearings
(check general data for high gear spigot
dimenslons), it will be necessary to replace the
roller bearing and the high gear. Under no
circumstances should the bearing or the high
gear be replaced independently.
Check the inner cover bearing by feeling the
amount of side play of the centre track. It
should not be possible to detect any movement
by hand if the bearing is in good condition.
The mainshaft should be a push fit into the
inner cover bearing.
(5) Examine the gears thoroughly, for chipped,
fractured or worn teeth. Check the internal
splines, dogs and bushes. Make sure that the
splines are free on their respective shafts with
no tendency to bind, and the bushes in the
mainshaft third gear, layshaft second gear and
layshaft first gear are not loose or excessively
worn, Again, reference should be made to the
dimensions given in “General Data”.
(6) Check that the selector fork rod is not grooved
and that it is a good fit in the gearbox casing
and the inner cover. Inspect the selector fork
running faces for wear. This will only have
occurred if the gearbox is being continually
used with a badly worn mainshaft bearing.
(7) The gear selector camplate should be inspected
for signs of wear in the selector tracks. Excess-
ive wear will occur if the mainshaft main bearing
has worn badly. Check the fit of the camplate
spindle in its housing. Examine the camplate
gear wheel for excessive wear. Difficulty will
be encountered in gear selection, causing
subsequent damage to the gears, if this gear is
badly worn.
(8) Inspect the mainshaft high gear needie roller
bearings for roughness or fracture. Check the
mainshaft diameter with the “General Data”
and check for surface pitting or damage due to
scoring.
SECTION DIO
RENEWING MAINSHAFT AND LAYSHAFT BEARINGS
MAINSHAFT
The mainshaft bearings are a press fit into their
respective housings and are retianed by spring circlips
to prevent sideways movement due to end thrust. To
remove the right bearing, first lever out the circlip, then
heat the cover to approximately 100°C and drive out
the bearing using a suitably shouldered drift. The new
bearing should be pressed or drifted in whilst the cover
Is still hot using a suitable tubular drift onto the outer
race (2721n. (62mm.) outside diameter x Bin.
(150mm.) long}. Do not forget to refit the circlip.
To remove the high gear bearing on the left of the
machine, first lever out the large oil seal (which
must be renewed), then remove the retainer
circlip. Carefully heat the casing locally tc approx-
imately 100°C., then drive out the bearing from
the inside by means of a suitably shouldered drift.
Whilst the casing is still hot, drive in the new
bearing, using a suitable tubular drift onto the outer
race, then refit the circlip and press in the new oil
seal.
MAINSHAFT HIGH GEAR BEARINGS
Two caged needle bearings are fitted into each end
of the high gear and they can be both pressed out
together using a drift of the dimensions shown in
Fig. D10.
B11
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D GEARBO X
Le Y me 3" *i
1310 : | 106412“ -073/-078 Ins.
809 DA 1.05 OIA >
' — TL. r | у aM « I
Fig. D 10. Drift dimensions e +
PSN
SEINS
NS NS NO
Gin DIA.
1/4 ins.DIA.
B212
Fig. D11. Section through gearbox mainshaft oil seal
LAYSHAFT
The right needle roller bearing should be removed by
heating the cover to approximately 100 C, then
pressing or drifting out the bearing using a tool similar
to that shown in Fig. D12.
The new bearing should be pressed in, plain end first,
whilst the cover is still hot, from the inside of the cover,
until -073/-0781n. (1-85/1-98mm j) of the bearing
protrudes above the cover face (see Fig. D12)
Fig. D12. Sketch of needle roller and drift
The left needle roller bearing is of the closed-end type
and is accessible from the left, through the sprocket
cover plate aperture. The casing should be heated to
approximately 100°C and the bearing driven through
into the gearbox using a soft metal drift. taking care not
to damage the bore into which the bearing fits. The
new bearing must be caretully pressed in whilst the
casing is hot, until -073/-078in. (1-85/1-98mm_}
protrudes above the spot face surface inside the
gearbox. Do not use excessive force or the needle
roller outer case may become damaged. resulting in
the rollers seizing. or breaking up.
Finaily, the outer portion of the bore into which the
bearing fits, should be sealed with a suitable
proprietary sealant.
SECTION DI!
REASSEMBLING THE GEARBOX
Lubricate the camplate spindle and offer it into the
spindle housing within the gearbox.
Drive the new oil seal up to the main bearing with the
"p and spring towards the bearing. Insert the high gear
into the bearing. Lubricate the ground tapered boss of
the sprocket with oil and slide it onto the high gear. Fit
a new 'O ring and screw on the securing nut finger
tant
D12
Re-mesh the rear chain with the sprockets and replace
the connecting link. Apply the rear brake and tighten
the sprocket securing nut using service tool 61-6125 to
the torque figure given in “General Data .
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBOX D
/
Fig. D13. Reassembling the gearbox. Arrow indicates camplate in the neutral position.
Locate the bronze thrust washer over the inner
needle roller bearing. The thrust washer can be
held in position by smearing its rear surface with
grease. Note that the grooved surface of the thrust
washer is towards the layshaft. (See Fig. D13).
Set the camplate in the neutral gear position (See
Fig. D13). Lubricate the needle roller bearings in
the high gear (use oil recommended in Section A2)
and layshaft bearing. Place the mainshaft fourth
gear with its respective selector fork onto the
mainshaft. See Fig. D1. This selector fork has a
large engaging pin and no cuttaway on the housing.
Assemble the shaft into the high gear using a heavy
grease to retain the selector fork on the gear and
in the camplate track. Replace the layshaft assembly
with fifth and fourth gears into the gearbox and
engage with the mainshaft fifth and fourth gears
(note that with the gearbox in the neutral position
none of the sliding dogs will be engaged).
Replace the layshaft third gear with its respective
selector fork (See Fig. D1). This selector fork
has a large engaging pin and a cuttaway on the selec-
tor housing. Then replace the mainshaft third gear
and engage with the layshaft third. Replace the
layshaft second gear after first lubricating the bush
with oil. Replace the combined first and second
gear onto the mainshaft. Replace the layshaft
bottom gear with is selector fork (this selector fork
has a small diameter engaging pin and a cuttaway
to match the previous selector fork. See Fig. D1.
Replace the selector rod. Fit the circlip onto the
end of the layshaft and the engaging dog up against
the circlip. Turn the camplate towards the inner
cover from the top thereby placing the gearbox into
the first gear position (note engaging dog on tayshaft
will be in mesh with the dogs on the layshaft
first gear).
Check the camplate operating quadrant is moving
freely in the inner cover and position the bronze
layshaft thrust washer over the needle roller bearing
in the inner cover. Again, use grease to hold the
thrust washer in position during assembly.
D13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
D GEARBO X
Fig. D14. Refitting the gearbox inner cover using tool 61-7011
Using a pressure oil can, lubricate all the moving
parts in the gearbox, then apply a fresh coat of
jointing compound to the gearbox junction surface.
Ensure that the two location dowels are in position and
offer the inner cover assembly to the gearbox. When
the cover Is approximately Yain. (6Gmm.) away from the
gearbox junction face, position the camplate quadrant
as detailed in Fig. D14 and position service tool 61-
7011 as shown. If this tool is not available line up the
top edge of the second tooth on the quadrant with the
centre line passing through the footchange spindle
housing.
Screw in the socket screw, recessed screw and the
bolt, then temporarily assemble the outer cover and
gearchange lever and check that the gearchanging
sequence is correct by simultaneously operating the
gearchange pedal and turning the rear wheel. In
the event of any problem of selection it must be
assumed that the quadrant teeth are not engaged
accurately with the camplate pinion. To rectify
this, remove the inner cover again and check that
the camplate has been set as shown in Fig. D14.
Offer up the inner cover and repeat as previous.
When correct gearchanging is established, re-
assemble the kickstart pinion and ratchet, replace
the tab washer and screw on the securing nut to
the torqué figure given in “General Data”. To
facilitate this, the rear brake should be applied
with fifth gear selected.
Refit the gearbox outer cover as shown in section D2
then reassemble the transmission, referring to section
Al tor the correct grades of lubricant for the primry
chaincase and gearbox. See “General Data” for the
correct quantities.
SECTION DI2
CHANGING THE GEARBOX SPROCKET
To gain access to the gearbox sprocket, first remove
the left footrest, exhaust pipe and the gearchange
pedal and then remove the outer primary cover as
shown in Section C3.
D14
Remove the pressure plate, clutch plates and withdraw
the shock absorber unit, clutch sprocket and foot-
change shaft as shown in Section C9. Remove the key
from the gearbox mainshaft and unscrew the six
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GEARBO X D
screws which serve to retain the circular cover.
Apply the rear brake, then unscrew the gearbox
sprocket securing nut using service tool number 61-
6125. The rear chain may now be disconnected and
the gearbox sprocket withdrawn through the aperture.
before fitting the new sprocket check that the gearbox
oil seal is in good condition and that the rear chain is
not excessively worn. Check the extension as shown
in Section A12. If the old chain is to be retained for
further use it should be thoroughly cleaned in paraffin
(kerosene) and lubricated. Fit a new locking plate and
new 'O' ring then slide the sprocket over the gearbox
mainshaft and high gear. When the sprocket is located
on the splines screw on the securing nut finger tight,
then re-connect the chain. With the rear brake applied
tighten the nut until it is as tight as possible and tap
over the lockplate.
When replacing the circular cover plate, use a new
paper gasket. Reassembly then continues as a
reversal of the above instructions.
D15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION E
FRAME AND ATTACHMENT DETAILS
Section
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FUEL TANK _ … к … e. ... .. El
REMOVING SIDE PANELS AND FILTER HOUSING ... _ |. Е |. _ … EZ
REMOVING PROP STAND ... _ _ _ e |. .. .. |. _… .. ES
REMOVING THE CENTRE STAND _ |. Е _ on .. |. |. ... Е4
REMOVING REAR BRAKE PEDAL... e, _ НЕ _ _ ... e. .. .. ES
REMOVING AND SERVICING THE REAR BRAKE PEDAL SPINDLE = 2 _ … E6
REMOVING TWINSEAT |. _ e |. ‚ В _ ... |. _ .. EZ
CHAINGUARD REMOVAL .. _ _ = _ = _ _ |. _ ... EB
CONTROL CABLE REPLACEMENT _ | о = | ... _ _ … Es
REMOVING COIL PLATE ... _ _ | ... e e. _ _ _ … E10
REMOVING REAR LIGHT UNIT .., _ _ on _ vn |. ... .. … E11
REMOVING HORN ... o _ _ _ _ _ ... |. _ _ … ES?
REMOVING REAR STOP SWITCH _ _ _ _ |. ‚ “ _ .. E13
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE BATTERY CARRIER ASSEMBLY ... ce .. .. E14
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE FLASHER UNIT |. _ _ os ... .. E15
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE MUDGUARDS ... … … .. |. ... ... E16
ADJUSTING THE REAR SUSPENSION ... _. _ ... _ i. .. ... .. E17
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS ... … _ _ ... E18
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE SUSPENSION UNITS “ _ . _ ... E19
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE SWINGING FORK ... ... ... = |. ... E20
RENEWING THE SWINGING FORK BUSHES ... e. .. … … ce ... .. E21
FRAME ALIGNMENT ... +. _ _ ... _ i” _ ... ... i. … E22
REPAIRS “ .. _ _ _ |. ... ... ... ... не ... ... E23
PAINTWORK REFINISHING _ . ее _ ... не cos … ... … E24
FITTING REPLACEMENT SEAT COVERS e. ee … … “ … . .. E25
ET
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME
F2
Fig. El. Generali arrangement of frame assembly
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION El
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE FUEL TANK
Ensure that the fuel taps are in the “OFF” position
and disconnect the feed pipes. Remove the rubber
grommet from the centre of the fuel tank and un-
screw the sleeve nut revealed below.
The tank can now be pulled away from the frame.
Note assembly of rubber sleeve and washers
securing the tank. See Fig. E2.
Drain the tank and unscrew the fuel tap assemblies
and clean the mesh filters at the intervals stated in
“Routine Maintenance.
Fig. E2. Fue! tank mounting
SECTION E2
REMOVING SIDE PANELS AND FILTER HOUSING
Remove the outer trim panels by disconnecting the two frame by rubber bushes integral with the panel and
retaining Springs pushed onto spigots welded to the frame.
Detach filter cover by removing the single bolt
situated in the-centre. Loosen the two bolts and To remove the filter housing remove two securing
nuts contained inside the housing that retain the bolts retaining the housing to the frame and the
side panel. The holes in the panel are slotted; two 4BA bolts and nuts that secure the two halves
hence the panel can be pulled away from the frame. of the housing. These are contained in the well at
The rearmost end of the panel is secured to the the foremost part of the housing.
E3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
SECTION E3
REMOVING THE PROP STAND
The prop stand leg is secured to a lug on the frame
by means of a boit and locking nut. Remove the
bolt, pull the bolt away from the lug and disconnect
the return spring.
When reassembling, attach the spring to the frame
and leg, then push the leg onto the lug and fit the
bolt.
SECTION E4
REMOVING THE CENTRE STAND
The centre stand is secured to the frame by two
bolts passing through welded brackets. Remove the
bolts when the stand is in the raised position (i.e.
when the return spring is slackest).
When reassembling, bolt the stand to frame and
while holding the stand in the raised position stretch
the return spring with the aid of a “pozidrive"
headed screwdriver (or similar) and attach the
spring into position.
SECTION E5
REMOVING REAR BRAKE PEDAL
Remove the locknut and washer then withdraw the
brake pedal. When replacing the pedal tighten the
securing nut.
Prior to frame no. HN62501 unscrew the brake rod
adjustment screw at the rear brake operating lever and
remove. Remove the pedal securing bolt and locknut
and withdraw the pedal and rod from the machine.
When the pedal has been replaced refer to Section
F for the correct adjustment procedure.
SECTION E6
REMOVING AND SERVICING THE REAR BRAKE PEDAL SPINDLE
Detach the rear brake stoplight switch by removing the
two cross-head screws.
Remove the inner spindle retaining nut and washer.
Using a suitable drift break the taper fit of the trunnion
lever on the spindle and then withdraw the spindle and
pedal from the R.H. side.
Remove the brake pedal return spring and the
distance piece.
NOTE: The recess in the distance piece faces the
R.H. side.
Check the brake pedal spindle and the sleeve nut for
damage, scoring or excessive play. If necessary
replace the spindle and/or sleeve nut.
E4
Liberally grease spindle prior to reassembly.
Replace the sleeve nut and tighten to torque shown in
GD and insert pedal spindle complete with brake pedal
Replace the distance piece with the recess located in
the protruding sleeve nut. Locate the brake pedal
return spring on the frame see Fig. E4. -
Reconnect the lever to the spindle and refit the nut and
washer finger tight ONLY.
Make up a simple hook with wire or string and
connect the spring to the lever. See Fig. E5.
Tighten the nut and washer securely.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
INDEX ) O
SPINDLE
. SLEEVE NUT
DISTANCE PIECE
BRAKE PEDAL RETURN SPRING
~ TRUNNION LEVER
oP WN —
Fig. E3. Rear brake pedal spindle assembly - exploded
A
Fig. E4. Brake pedal return spring — frame location Fig. ES. Refitting the brake pedal return spring
(Shown with rear wheel removed)
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
Refit the brake lever and the nut and washer. Repiace the brake light stop switch assembly. |
necessary adjust the movable stop on the brake pedal
NOTE: Do not operate the rear brake while the rear such that the rear brake light is illuminated (ignition
wheel is still removed. 'ON') when the rear brake is operated.
Check the rear brake pedal adiustment. See section
F1.
REMOVING TWINSEAT
Detach check strap from the underside of the seat by Then remove the two attachment bolts at the front seat
removing the small “pozidrive” screw. hinge and slide the seat away towards the rear of the
machine.
CHAINGUARD REMOVAL
Remove the fixing boit at the front of the chainguard The chainguard mounting is slotted at the suspension
and foosen the tett side lower suspension unit bolt. unit boit fixing and the chainguard can now be lifted
clear ang withdrawn from the rear of the machine.
Еб
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION E9
CONTROL CÂBLE REPLACEMENT
Clutch Cable
Stacken off the clutch cable adjustment and slip out
the cable nippie at the handlebar control. Slide the
rubber cover away trom the abutment at the
gearbox end and unscrew the abutment. Remove
the large slotted plug from the gearbox outer
cover and access will pe gained to the clutch
operating arm. ft is then only necessary to release
the cable nipple from the arm with the finger.
Replacement is the reversal of the above instruction.
Note that there is a grease nipple incorporated in
the outer casing and this should be employed
regularly to ensure maximum lubricai no of the
cable.
Throttle Cable(s)
To remove the throttle cable(s) first of all remove
the fuel tank. See Section E1. Remove the top
cap(s) from the carburetter(s). It will be found
easier to disconnect the cable from the throttle
slide if the twist grip is removed from the handlebar
and the cable(s) disconnected.
Then pull back the return spring in the throttle slide and
remove the needle and needle clip. With the spring still
retracted push the cable through the slide and when
the nipple is clear pull it across the figure of eight slot
and withdraw the cable. Note that early UK. and
General Export T140's have a 'two into one’ throttle
cable arrangement incorporating a junction box. The
cables can be detached from the junction box by
unscrewing the two halves of the casing and releasing
the nipples.
When reassembling the box grease the internals
liberally.
Note: When reassembling the throttle siides into
the carburetter do not apply any form of lubricant
to the bearing surface; this will undoubtedly cause
the slide to stick. Simply remove any surface
deposits on the slide with a very fine carborundum
paper and then wash with gasoline (petro:).
When the cables have been replaced readjust them
as detailed in Section B12.
Air Control Cables - TRV 4: T140V models only
Remove the top caps of the carburetter(s) as for the
throttle cables. To disconnect the air valve. push the
valve guide tube and spring along with the air cable
until the cable nipple protrudes sufficiently out of its
counterbore to be pushed out of its slot. The cable.
spring and guide can now be pulied clear of the valve.
Disconnect the cable from the contro! lever by
unscrewing the centre fixing nut, removing the lever
arm and detaching the nipple.
The air cables incorporate a two into one junction box
simitar to the junction box for the throttie cables on
1140 models. The body of the junction box can be
dismantled by unscrewing each half and then
disconnecting the nipples therein. When replacing new
cables ensure that the junction box 1s well lubricated
with grease.
SECTION E10
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE COIL PLATE
The pressed steel plate holding the two ignition coils,
rectifier and condensers is situated beneath the twin-
seat. Disconnect all the wiring from the components at
the respective terminals. The front of the plate is
attached to the rear battery carner fixing bolts.
Remove the two retaining nuts and then detach the
two remaining nuts and bolts which attach the rear of
the plate to the mudguard. Remove the fixing bolt and
detach the rear brake hydraulic reservoir. Take care
not to spill any brake fluid. The plate assembly can
then be lifted clear of the machine.
Replacment is the reverse of the above instructions.
Refer to the wiring diagram for the correct re-wiring
procedure. (See Section H19).
EY
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
2. CONDENSER
3. RECTIFIER
Fig. E6. Coil plate mountings
Е8
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION E11
REMOVING AND REPLACING REAR LIGHT UNIT
Three bolts attach the unit to the mudguard and
these are accessible from underneath the mudguard
blade. As the unit is removed disconnect the snap
connectors from beneath the housing.
See Section H11 for the dismantling procedure of the
tail light.
SECTION E12
REMOVING THE HORN
The horn can be removed from the frame without
detaching the fuel tank, but if difficulty is encoun-
tered remove the fuel tank as detailed in section El.
Two nuts and bolts secure the horn to a bracket
below and behind “he head lug.
SECTION E13
REMOVING REAR STOP SWITCH
Two pozidrive screws secure the stop switch
assembly to the rear frame member.
Release these screws and detach the return spring,
Disconnect the electrical connections.
SECTION E14
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE BATTERY CARRIER
Using a screwdriver of suitable length remove the
three slotted constant diameter bolts that sit in the
rubber retaining bushes that secure the carrier to
the frame. The mountings towards the rear of the
machine have captive nuts attached to the coil plate.
The front mounting point has alocking nut on the
right side and earth connecting wire underneath.
It will now be possible to lift the battery carrier
vertically clear of the machine. Replacement is
the reversal of the above. Ensure that the earth
connection is clean and tight. Replace the battery
and note route of breather pipe.
SECTION 15
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE FLASHER UNIT
The flasher units contained behind the left side panel.
See Section EZ for removing panel. The unit is
attached to a damping spring which is in turn bolted to
a bracket on the frame. Detach both lucar connectors
and release the unit from the spring or remove the
assembly of spring and flasher unit. See Fr; E7 for
correct mounted position.
Fig. E7. Showing position of flasher unit
E9
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
SECTION Eló
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE MUDGUARDS
Rear Mudguard
F:rst disconnect the three snap connectors found
under the seat, two leading to the flashers and the
nther Icading to the rear brake light. Pull bach the
harness retaining clips found on the inside rim of
the muguard. (Withdraw green flasher wires
through the appropriate grommets.)
Detach the rear night unit by removing the three
attachment bolts from underneath the mudguard
blade, two of which act as bracket holders for the
number plate. Lift the light away from the mud-
guard and withdraw the wires through the grommet
[Detach the two nuts and bolts at the front mounting
bracket. Remove the two nuts and bolts at the top
of the mudguard. Note that the twinseat check
strap is attached to one of these bolts. Remove
the two nuts and bolts at the rear frame loop and
those connecting the grab rail to the mudguard.
Put the motorcycle on it's side and withdraw
mudguard.
Front Mudguard
Te remove the front mudguard detach the four
bolts securing the mudguard stay to the fork legs,
two found at the fork leg bottom and the others
on the mudguard boss found higher up the fork
leg.
SECTION E17
ADJUSTING THE REAR SUSPENSION
The movement :s controlled by Girling combined coil
spring and hydraulic or gas damper units. The
hydraulic or gas damping mechanism is completely
sealed but the static loading of the spring is adjustable.
À three position cam ring is concealed beneath a
sleeve with a castellated adjuster ring. The notch
location 1s not visible but rotation in the direction
shown increases the load and vice versa.
Ajusting spanner 60-2184 is needed for this adjust-
ment. Both units must be adjusted equally and a quick
visual check can be made on the adjusted positions by
comaprison from the rear of the machine.
The standard lowest position is for solo riding, the
second position is for heavier solo riders or when
luggage is carried on the rear of the machine and the
third or highest position is for use when a pillion
passenger is being carried.
E10
Fig. 8A. Adjusting the rear suspension unit
Note the arrow showing direction of rotation to increase
the spring rating.
Fig. 8B. Adjusting the rear suspension unit
Prior to frame no. BX05107
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
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Fig. 9B. Exploded view of the rear suspension unit
Prior to frame no. BX05107
E11
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
SECTION E18
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS
Lift the twinseat by releasing the catch on the right
side.
Remove the top two suspension unit bolts. Then
remove the lower fixing bolts. Note that the left side
fixing bolt secures the rear portion of the chainguard.
When replacing the units notice that the top fixing bolts
also secure the grab rail.
NOTE: if a unit is inadvertently fitted the wrong way up
irrepairable damage will be cause to the damping
mechanism within the unit.
Pt. No. 70056007
Fig. 10A. Gas filled suspension unit fitted after frame
no. BX05107
WARNING
Models prior to frame no. BX05107 were produced
with oil hydraulic rear suspension damper units and
must not be mixed with the later gas filled type, nor
should they be fitted incorrectly. The gas filled type
must be fitted with the castellated load adjusting ring at
the TOP of the unit and the ail hydraulic unit with the
adjuster ring at the BOTTOM of the unit.
If In doubt the units can be identified as follows:
Pt. No. 64052556
Fig. 108. Oil hydraulic suspension unit fitted prior to
frame no. BX05107
SECTION E19
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE SUSPENSION UNITS
The suspensions unit consists of a sealed hydraulic/gas
damper unit, and cuter coiled spring. The static loading
on the spring is adjustable and should be set according
to the type of conditions under which the machine is to
be used (see Section E17).
To dismantie the suspension unit and remove the
spring, It IS required to compress the spring whiist the
retaining collar (two semi-circular spring retainer plate
- prior to frame no. BX05107} is rernoved. To do this
first turn the cam untit it is in the "LIGHT-LOAD"
position, then compress the spring using suitable
spring clamps. Remove the spring retainer and with-
draw the spring.
E12
The damper unit should be checked for bending of the
plunger rod and damping action. Check the bonded
pivot bushes for wear and ensure that the sieeve 15 not
loose in the rubber bush.
The bushes can be easily renewed by driving out the
old one and pressing in the new one using a smear
of soapy water to assist assembly. Under no cir-
cumstances should the plunger rod be lubricated.
Note.—For information concerning suspension
units or spare parts, the local Girling agent should
be consulted.
Reassembly is a reversal of dismantling. Check that
the cam is in the light load position before com-
pressing the spring.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION E20
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE SWINGING FORK
Remove the rear wheel See Section F Slacken the
lower left side suspension unit fixing bolt and remove
the front securing bolt. Withdraw the chainguard from
the machine. Bemove the rear suspension units. See
Section E18.
Unscrew the swinging arm spindle nut from the right
side and withdraw the spwidle from the left side. The
swinging arm can now be pulled away from the frame.
Note the tour rubber dust covers on the pivot housing.
Remove the sleeve spindles from the pivot ends and
thoroughly wash all parts in kerosene (paraffin).
inspect the bore of the bushes and the diameter of the
sleeve spindles for excessive wear Check the
dimensions with the sizes given in "GENERAL
DATA If the working clearance is excessive the
bushes will require renewing. See Section E21,
The parts should be reassembled in the order shown in
Fig. E11 with a sufficient supply of grease as
recommended in Section Al. Assemble the spindle
sleeves into their housings and offer the swinging arm
up to the frame with the rubber dust covers in position.
Refit end thrust washers and replace the spindle. The
spindle should be tightened sufficiently until the fork
will move upwards and downwards with a little effort.
. Swinging arm
. Grease nipple
Sealing washer
. Bush
. Spacer tube
. Thrust washer (narrow)
. Thrust washer (wide)
. Dust cover
. Nut
10. Washer
a y Oh An da U =
. Spindle
Fig. E11. Swinging arm components
E13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
SECTION E21
RENEWING THE SWINGING FORK BUSHES
The bushes can be removed from their respective
housings using service tool 61-6117. Assemble the
tool into the housing as shown tn Fig. E12 (bottom) and
by turning the bolt nut it will be possible to extract the
bushes into the spacer tube. Reassemtle new bushes
as shown in Fig. E12 (top). Press in one bush at a time
from each end of the housing using a little grease to
assist assembly.
The new bushes are of the steel backed pre-sized
type and when pressed in will give the correct
diametral working clearance.
Alternatively the bushes can be removed using a
mild steel shouldered drift of suitable dimensions
(Le. 1 in, dia. and 14 in. día). lt will be possible
to drift one bush through the housing thereby
knocking out the second bush at the same time.
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Fig. E12. Removing and replacing the swinging arm bushes using Service Tool 61-6117
{Bottom view shows removal of bush)
E14
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION E22
FRAME ALIGNMENT
M the machine has been damaged in an accident the
frame must be checked for breakage or iracture at
all the welded seams. Due to the design of the
frame providing an extremely rigid structure, it is
highly unlikely that the frame will bend or twist
to any degree without fracture occurring. Under
no circumstances should any attempt be made to
re-align or reshape the frame as this will cause high
stress concentration which can only result in
further fracture taking place.
Fracture is likely to occur at the head lug gussets,
(particularly in the case of a head-on collision). The
fame must be completely stripped down and the
steering head races removed. Note the areas at the
webs joinging the head lug to the main frame tube an
at the lower bearing housing in the head lug itself.
See Figs. E13 and E14. Also carefully check the front
down tubes for any deforming or spitting. If necessar,
remove all the paint from the suspected area and
check again.
In cases of side collision etc. if the damage is not
immediately apparent a simple check can be made
by attempting to place spindles or bolts of suitav,
length and diameter through the swinging arm
pivots and engine mounting positions. Mis-align-
ment wil be apparent if the spindle or bolt fouls
its exit hole.
Note Fig. E15 for the critical dimensions ot the frame. If
possible check these if any doubt is revealed.
E15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
Fig. E13. Fracture at rear of head lug
Fig. E14. Fracture at bottom bearing housing
E16
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME
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E17
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME
Fig. E16. Checking the swinging fork
SWINGING FORK
It 1s required to check that the centre line of the
pivot spindle is in the same plane as the centre line
of the rear spindle. To do this, first place a tube or
bar of suitable diameter into the swinging fork
bearing bushes, then mount the swinging fork on
two “Y” blocks, one cither side, and clamp it
lightly to the edge of the checking table. Fit the
rear wheel spindle into the fork end slots or,
alternatively, use a straight bar of similar diameter,
then support a fork end so that the swinging fork
Is approximately horizontal. Height readings should
then be taken at both ends of the wheel spindle to
establish any mis-algnment. (Fig. E16).
Next, check that the distance between the fork
ends is as given in “General Data"
It is now necessary to lever the fork ends in the
E18
correcting direction until the wheel spindle can be
inserted and found to be parallel with the pivot bush
centre line. To do this, a bar of 4 ft. length and suit-
able diameter is required. lt is now that great care
is required. Insert the bar at the end of the swing-
ing fork adjacent to the suspension unit mounting
brackets so that it is over the “high” fork leg
and under the “low” fork leg. Exert gentle pres-
sure at che end of the bar then insert the spindle
and re-check the alignment. Repeat this procedure
using increased loads until the spindle height
readings shows that the swinging arm is now mis-
aligned in the opposite sense. A small leverage
how applied from the other side will bring the
wheel back to parallel.
Note: Apply the leverage bar as near as possible to
thesuspension unit brackets, otherwisethe tubes may
become damaged. DO NOT USE THE FORK ENDS.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FRAME E
SECTION E23
PAINTWORK REFINISHING
PAINT STRIPPING
Except in cases where a ‘‘touch-up'’ is to be
attempted, it is strongly recommended that the
old finish is completely stripped and the refinish
is carried out from the bare metal. A suitable
paint stripper can be obtained from most paint
scores and accessory dealers.
The stripper should be applied with a brush and
allowed approximately 10 minutes to react. A
suitable scraper should be used to remove the old
finish, then the surface cleaned with water using
a piece of wire wool. Ensure that all traces of paint
stripper are removed, If possible, blow out crevices
with compressed air.
It is advisable to strip a small area at a time to avoid
the stripper, drying and also to enable easier
neutralizing of the stripper.
Finally, the surface should be rubbed with a grade
270 or 280 emery cloth to give a satisfactory finish
then washed off with white spirits or a suitable
cleaner solvent.
PRIMING
A thin coat of cellulose primer must be sprayed
onto the surface prior to application of an under-
coat or stopper. Undercoat and stopper will not
adhere satisfactorily to bare metal. It is advisable
to thin the primer by adding 1 part cellulose thinners
to 1 part primer. Ensure that the primer is dry
before advancing further,
APPLYING STOPPER
Imperfections and slight dents in’ the surface may
be filled with stopper, but rubbing down with
“wet and dry” should not be attempted until
the undercoat or surfacer has been applied.
Apply the stopper with a glazing knife in thin layers,
allowing approximately 20 minutes for drying
between each layer. After the last layer, allow
the stopper about 6 hours (or over-night if possible)
to dry. Heavy layers or insufficient drying time will
result in risk of surface cracking.
UNDERCOAT (SURFACER)
Most cellulose undercoats also called surfacers, will
suffice for a base for TRIUMPH finishes. About two
or three coats are required and should be sprayed
on in a thinned condition using 1 part cellulose
thinners to 1 part undercoat. Allow approximately
20 minutes between each coat.
if stopper has been applied the final layer of under-
coat should be sprayed on after smoothing the
surface with "‘wet and dry’ abrasive as shown
below.
WET AND DRY SANDING
After application of the undercoat, the surface should
be rubbed down with 270 or 280 grade abrasive paper
used wet. An ideal method is to have a rubber block
around which to wrap the emery paper. However. this
IS only recommendable for flat surfaces: where rapid
change of sections occur, a thin felt pad is more useful
The abrasive paper should be allowed to soak In
coid water for at least 15 minutes before use. A
useful tip is to smear the abrasive surface of the
paper with soap prior to rubbing down. This
will prevent clogging and should at least treble
the useful life of the paper if it is washed thoroughly
after each rub-down.
When the surface is smooth enough, wash It thor-
oughly with water and dry off with a clean sponge.
If smoother surface than this is required it can be
given another layer of undercoat and then the
rubbing down procedure repeated using 320 or
400 grade of paper depending upon conditions
FINISHING
Before spraying on the finishing coats the surface
must be quite smooth, dry and clean. It is important
that conditions are right when finish spraying is
to be carried out otherwise complications may
occur. Best conditions for outdoor spraying are
those on a dry sunny day without wind. Moisture
in the atmosphere is detrimental to paint spraying.
E19
Kim The CD Man © 2002
E FRAME
The first coat should be thinned In the ratio of
507; cellulose thinners to 50% lacquer. Subsequent —
coats should have a higher prooortion of thinners
as shown below.
Cellulose
Thinners Lacquer
1st Coat 50% 50%,
2nd Coat 60% 40%
3rd Coat 70% 30%
4th Coat 80% 20%
Between each coat the surface may be flatted by
hand with 320 or 400 abrasive paper as required.
Allow at least 10 minutes between each coat and
after the final coat leave overnight or 24 hours if
possible. For most purposes the 2nd coat of finishing
is more than adequate.
POLISHING
The final colour coat must be completely dry
before cutting and polishing. Using a clean rag
rub down with brass polish or fine cutting paste
and burnish to a high gloss using a clean mop before
applying a suitable wax polish for protection and
shine,
Note. TRIUMPH supply only the finishing
lacquers. These are available in aerosol sprays
only,
SECTION E24
FITTING REPLACEMENT SEAT COVERS
‘Quiltop’ twinseats have a cover retained by sprags
which are part of the seat pan.
When fitting a replacement seat cover it is very
important to first soak the complete cover
assembly in hot water in order to soften the plastic
so that it can easily be stretched into place. After
soaking the cover in hot water, wring out the
E20
excess water and you will find that the cover can
very easily be stretched into place to give a neat
fit without any wrinkles. This job is very difficult
if you do not follow this suggested method.
Ideally the seat should be allowed to dry out in a
warm place before being put back into service.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION F
BRAKES WHEELS AND TYRES
DESCRIPTION
BRAKE ADJUSTMENTS
BRAKE FLUID LEVEL
BRAKE PAD AND LINING
BLEEDING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM ...
FLUSHING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM …
HYDRAULIC BRAKE HOSES—REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT _..
REAR BRAKE MASTER CYLINDER AND RESERVOIR
FRONT BRAKE AND MASTER CYLINDER
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE FRONT AND REAR BRAKE CALIPERS
BRAKE DISCS
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FRONT WHEEL ...
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR WHEEL
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR WHEEL BEARINGS
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE REAR BRAKE (PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501)
REAR WHEEL REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT (PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501) ...
REMOVING AND REPLACING REAR WHEEL BEARINGS (PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501)
REAR BRAKE ADJUSTMENT
RENEWING BRAKE LININGS
WHEEL BUILDING
WHEEL BALANCING ...
WHEEL ALIGNMENT
REMOVING AND REFITTING TYRES
SECURITY BOLTS
TYRE MAINTENANCE
TYRE PRESSURS
REAR CHAIN ADJUSTMENT
BRAKING PERFORMANCE DATA
FAL'.T FINDING—FRONT AND REAR HYDRAULIC DISC BRAKES
Section
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
F13
F14
F15
F16
F17
F18
F19
F20
F21
F22
F23
F24
F25
F26
F27
F28
F29
F1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
DESCRIPTION
All machines are fitted with a Lockheed hydraulic disc
brake on the front and rear wheels. (Early models are
fitted with a rear drum brake). The disc brake assembly
consiets of a high quality cast iron disc (hard chrome
plate) attached to the wheel hubs and a cast iron brake
caliper attached to the left fork leg or the rear swinging
fork. The brake caliper houses two co-axially aligned
pistons (Fig. F1) and a pair of brake pads the latter
being retained by two split pins.
The pistons and their bores are protected by dust seals
fitted in the open ends of the bores. (See Fig. F1).
Application of the brake lever generates hydraulic
pressure within the system and brake caliper causing
the pistons (Fig. F1) to apply equal and opposite
pressure on the brake pads (Fig. Ft) which in turn
move into contact with the rotating brake disc. The
operation of the master cylinder and hydraulic flow is
detailed in Section F7.
Piston Seal
Dust Seal
Dust Saal Cover
Piston
Piston
Saal
Blaad Nipple
Split Pins
Brake Pads
0 E E UNA Y
Fig. F1. Front and rear brake caliper—exploded
F2
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
Fig. F2. Front brake components (U.S.A. model shown)
F3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
Fig. F3. Rear brake components
F4
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
SECTION F1
BRAKE ADJUSTMENTS
The brake pads of the disc brake will require no adjust-
ment as the reducing thickness of the friction material
IS automatically cancelled out by the displacement of
hydraulic fluid in the system. However, the rear brake
pedal must be positioned to prevent a foul condition
against the R.H. footrest and consequently causing the
rear brake to bind.
The adjuster nuts (see Fig. F4) should be set to give a
MINIMUM clearance of "sin. (1-58mm.) between the
brake pedal and the R.H. footrest. Ensure both the
adjuster nuts are tight against the operating lever.
REAR BRAKE ADJUSTMENT—
Prior to Frame No. HN62501
Early models are fitted with a rear drum brake fitted
with internally expanding fully floating brake shoes.
The L.H. rear brake pedal is connected to the brake
show operating cam by means of an operating rod
which in turn 1s adjustable.
The brake must be adjusted to give maximum
efficiency at all times and for this to be maintained, the
shows should be just clear of the drum when the brake
IS off, and close enough for immediate contact when
the brake is applied. The brakes must not be adjusted
so closely, however, that they are in continual contact
with the dru.” =“xcessive heat may be generated.
resulting in deterc-. mn of braking efficiency.
Adjuster nuts
Fig. F4. Rear brake pedal adjustment
The rear brake is adjusted by turning the self-locking
sleeve in a clockwise direction (view from the rear of
the machine), to shorten the effective length of the
brake rod and so open the shoes in the drum.
Note that is maximum efficiency is to be obtained the
angle between the brake cable or rod and the
operating lever on the brake plate should not exceed
90° when the brake is fully applied.
The rear brake shoes are of the fully-floating type (ie.
they are not pivoted on a fulcrum) and are therefore
self-centralizing.
FS
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRÂKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F2
BRAKE FLUID LEVEL
The brake fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir It is necessary to ‘top-up' the fluid level at the intervals
shoutd be as shown in Fig. F5(F). There is a mark stated in “Routine Maintenace".
running around the inside periphery of the reservoir
about in. (6-35mm.) from the top. The level will drop Always hoid the handebars against full RIGHT lock
slightly as the pads wear and when new pads are fitted when ‘topping-up' the front brake reservoir. Do not
the fluid will return to the original level provided no overfill see 'F-.
leakage has occurred.
Fig. F5. Showing the front brake reservoir fluid level
and cap
F6 Fig. F6. Rear brake reservoir
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES. WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F3
BRAKE PAD LINING—FRONT AND REAR
C
The brake pads should be examined at regular
intervals for wear. The pads will require replacement
when the lining thickness reaches a minimum of ' sin.
{1-6mm.). This can be easily determined by removing
the pad from the caliper. Firstly detach the aluminium
cover from the caliper {front brake only) by removing
the two cross-head screws. Then remove both split
pins ‘B’ (See Fig. F7) and pull out both pads "D"
The brake pad friction material is bonded to the
pressure plate of the brake pad and therefore can
only be renewed by the fitting of complete brake
pad assemblies. New split pins are advisable when
fitt'ng new or replacing used brake pads.
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Fig. F7. Showing arrangement for bleeding the front
brake
Fig. F8. Showing arrangement for bleeding the rear
brake
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F4
“BLEEDING” THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM—FRONT AND REAR
If at any time it has been found necessary to dis-
connect a part of the hydraulic system (for repair
etc.) it will be necessary to replenish the master
cylinder reservoir and “bleed” the system free
of trapped air pockets. “Bleeding” (or expelling
air from} the hydraulic system is not a routine
maintenance operation. Always keep a careful
check on the fluid level in the reservoir during
“bleeding”. lt is most important that it is kept at
least half full, otherwise air may be drawn into the
system necessitating a fresh start.
Fluid drained from the system should not be used
again unless it is perfectly clean and free from air
bubbles. The fluid should not be used again in any
case if it has been in use for some time. To ensure
that the fluid is completely free of air bubbles it
should be allowed to stand for several hours before
use.
Use only the specified type of brake fluid for
topping up the reservoir. See General Data.
NOTE: For the rear brake, first partially withdraw
the rear wheel spindle, see Section F, out to the
L.H. side enabling the brake caliper and mounting
bracket to swing down to the position shown in
Fig. F9 prior to commencing with the “bleeding”
procedure.
Procedure for “bleeding” is as follows (Rear brake is
similar):—
TTT 77777777777 7777777
Connect a suitable sized rubber “pipe” “C” Fig. F7 to
the bleed nipple "A" Fig F7 and suspend the free end
of the tube in a glass jar with the open end immersed in
at least Yain. (12-7mm.) ot brake fluid. Remove the
screwed cap from the master cylinder reservoir and
take out the rubber diaphram “E" Fig. F5. Now slacken
the bleed nipple 2 to 34 of a turn, (with the bleed pipe
still attached).
Ensure that the master cylinder is full of the correct
fluid before commencing further. Now pull the tront
brake lever firmly to the handlebar holding it in that
position for a few seconds. Air in the system will now
be expelled through the rubber tube and will be
observed in the form of bubbles rising in the jar.
Release the brake lever and repeat the operation until
air bubbles are no longer seen to escape. As a safe-
guard to prevent any air being drawn back into the
system when the lever is released, loop the “bleed”
pipe as shown in Fig. 7. This ensures that a "head' of
fluid is maintained between the top of the loop and the
“bleed” nipple.
When the flow of air bubbles ceases hold the brake
lever in the fully “on” position and retighten the bleed
nipple (with the “bleed” pipe still connected).
Fig. F9. Folded condition of rubber diaphram
F8
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
Remember to maintain the level of hydraulic fluid in the
master cylinder during the entire operation. The
correct level for the fluid is shown in Fig. FS at “F”. This
will be the correct level when the brake pads are NEW.
When replacing the rubber diaphragm (Fig. FS “E”) it
will be easier to replace the cap with the diaphragm in
a folded condition. See Fig. F9.
Hold the diaphragm upside down on a flat surface and
push the middle section down until it touches the
surface it is resting on. It will now remain in that
position and the diaphragm can now be replaced into
the reservoir and the cap refitted. Do not forget the
paper washer that 1s fitted between the cap and the
diaphragm. When fitting the cap make sure it is
retightened firmly and make sure that the air vent is
unobstructed.
If at any time it has been necessary to replenish the
system with hydraulic fluid during the life of one set of
brake pads, remember that when new pads are fitted
the fluid level spill will arise appreciably in the cylinder
and may spill onto the gas tank. Therefore the level will
have to be corrected to that shown in Fig. F5.
(Hydraulic fluid instantaneously corrodes cellulose
paintwork and great care should be exercised when
handling this fluid).
SECTION F5
FLUSHING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM
If the hydraulic system has been contaminated by
foreign matter or other fluids it should be flushed out
and refilled with new fluid as described below. The
system should be flushed out, in any case, ai the
interval stated in "Routine Maintenance”
Firstly, pump all the fluid out of the system by opening
the bleed screw (connect a pipe to the bleed screw and
safely collect in a container) and operating brake lever.
Fill the master cylinder reservoir with methylated spirit
and pump out through the bleed screw in a manner
similar to that described above. Having ensured that all
the methylated spirit has passed through the bleed
screw replenish the master cylinder reservoir (see
Section F2) with the specified grade of Lockheed
brake fluid (see “General Data”). "Bleed" the brakes
as described in Section F4.
IMPORTANT NOTE: If the system has been con-
taminated by a mineral cil, all rubber parts includ-
ing flexible hoses must be replaced.
F9
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F6
HYDRAULIC BRAKE PIPES AND HOSES—REMOVAL AND REFITMENT
FRONT BRAKE
The hydraulic flow is taken from the master cylinder to
the front brake caliper via a rubber pressure hose
coupled to a steel brake pipe at the top head lug then
to a second hose coupled at the middle lug. The first
hose allows for adjustment of the handlebar position
DO NOT adjust the handlebars such that the hose
becomes kinked or stretched. The second hose allows
for the compression and extension of the front suspen-
sion. The position of the hose coupling at the middle
lug 1s important, see Fig. F10.
The brake hoses and pipe should be checked at the
intervals stated in “Routine Maintenance’ for leakage,
chafing or general deterioration. Do not attempt to
clear the bore of a flexible hose by probing. If a hose is
choked or perished, fit a replacement.
Hoses and pipe may be replced as follows:- Firstly
drain the system of its fluid see Section F5. Unscrew
the fixing bolt from the end of the master cylinder and
detach the union (U.S.A. models only). Note the
copper sealing washers at the front and back of the
union. These sealing washers must be annealed if
they are to be re-used and this is effected by heating
the washers to a cherry red colour and plunging them
into cold water. {Other export models with low handle-
bars have a feed hose that screws directly into the
master cylinder and this hose should be disconnected
at the fork top lug first and then unscrewed from the
master cylinder).
Unscrew the union at the top fork lug and disconnect
the pipe.
See Fig. F2 for assembly details. Similarly disconnect
the remaining pipe and hoses from the middie lug, left
fork leg and caliper. Note that the pipe junction at the
middle lug is mounted in such a fashion that the rubber
hose that hence travels down to the left fork teg is
splayed outwards and away from the wheel when the
front forks are compressed. See Fig. F10 for detail
drawing. When installing the hose ensure that the
coloured stripe travelling the length of the hose is
arranged such that it is not twisted. See Fig.
F10(A). To reset the angle as shown simply loosen the
bolt clamping nut and alter the position of the bolt
accordingly.
F10
A. COLOURED STRIPE
Fig. F10. Showing front brake pipe installation
Be careful not to overtighten the union nuts as their
threads may be easily stripped. After refitting the hoses
replenish the system as described in Section F4.
Check that no chafing of the hoses or pipes occurs
when the handlebars are turned from left lock to right
lock and when the front forks are fully compressed.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES F
REAR BRAKE
Brake fluid is contained in a separate reservoir mounted
beneath the twinseat. Fluid is supplied to the master
cylinder by a rubber hose retained by two hose clips.
Hydraulic flow is taken from the master cylinder via a
rubber pressure hose to a coupling at the caliper
mounting bolt. The final connection is made by a metal
pressure pipe to the caliper.
The rubber hose allows for movement of the rear
swinging fork.
The brake hose and pressure pipe should be checked
at the intervals stated in “Routine Maintenance” for
leakage, chafing or general deterioration. Do not
attempt to clear the bore of a flexible hose by probing.
If a hose is choked or perished, fit a replacement.
The hose and pressure pipe may be replaced as
follows: Firstly drain the system of its fluid. see Section
F5.
Unscrew the union at the rubber hose coupling then
unscrew the union out of the caliper and remove the
metal pipe.
—_
Remove the locking nut and disconnect the rubber
hose from the mounting bracket.
Unscrew and remove the hose assembly and copper
washer from the master cylinder.
When refitting the hose tighten the unions such that
the hose is in the position shown in Fig. F11. See Fig.
F3 for assembly detaits.
Н the copper washer is to be re-used it should be
annealed as described in the front brake section.
Be careful not to overtighten the union nuts as their
threads may be easily stripped. After refitting the hose
reolenish and bleed the system as described in
Section F4. Check that no chafing of the hose cccurs
when the rear suspension is compressed or extended.
Ensure that the rear metal brake pipe does not foul the
caliper casting.
When installing the hose ensure that the coloured
stripe travelling the length of the hose is arranged
such that it is not twisted. See Fig. F11A.
A. COLOURED STRIPE
Fig. F11. Rear brake pipe installation
F11
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F 5+(AKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F7
REAR BRAKE MASTER CYLINDER AND RESERVOIR
The rear brake master cylinder 1s a sealed unit and is only
serviced as such. The principle of operation is identical
to that of the front master cylinder with the exception
that the reservoir is mounted remotely beneath the
twinseat.
To remove the master cylinder first remove the rear
wheel, see Section F13.
Drain the system of its fluid see Sectinn F5.
Disconnect the brake pedal return sorina then remove
the nut and washer and withdraw the master cylinder
operating lever,
Disconnect the reservoir rubber hose from the master
cylinder by slackening the clip.
Remove the two nuts and bolts and withdraw the
master cylinder from the frame Unscrew the master
cytinder from the rubber hose. Note the cooper sealing
washer. (If the copper wsher is to be renewed it must
be annealed by heating the washer to a cherry red
colour and plunging it onto cold water).
Remove the operating lever by removing the adjuster
nuts.
Prior to fitting a new master cylinder check the
distance between the end of the cast mounting bracket
and the face of the pushrod nut, see Fig. F12. This
dimension should be 0.35in. to 0.37in. (8-9 to 9-4mm.)
and should be adjusted as necessary.
Refitment of the master cylinder is a reversal of the
above instructions, but see Section E6 for refitment of
the rear brake pedal return spring; Section F for
replenishing and bleeding the system with new brake
fluid.
Note the nut securing the master cylinder operating
lever should be tightened to a torque of 20ft Ibs.
(4-8kg.m).
F12
SCREW
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8.9 — 9.4mm — Ena
(0.35 — 0377) =,
Fig. F12. Push rod adjustment
REAR BRRAKE RESFRVOIR
To remove the rear hrake reservoir first drain the
system nf ts fluid. see Section F5.
Misconnect the riibber hose from the reservoir at the
master cylinder.
lift the twinseat and remove the bolt and washer
securing me reservoir assembly to the coil mounting
tray.
Remove the reservoir cap, sealing ring and the rubber
diaphragm.
Remove the boli, spring washer. plain washer, distance
piece then remove the bow! from the mounting block.
Detach the 'O' ring. Refer to Fig. F3.
Reassembly is a reversal of the above instructions. but
alwavs fit a new 'O' ring.
Tighten the bowl retaining bolt to a torque of 4 to Sib. ft.
(6 to 7 Nm.)
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
SECTION F8
FRONT BRAKE MASTER CYLINDER
The master cylinder is mounted in the right hand
handlebar electrical switch. It consists of a fluid
reservoir bolted to a cylinder body containing a
piston, seals and other parts as shown in Fig. F13.
With reference to the hydraulic flow diagram (Fig.
F14) and the exploded view (Fig. F2) the operation
ofthe cylinder is as follows: — When the front brake
lever is pulled on the push rod (1) moves the piston
(2) down the bore. The displaced fluid in front of
the piston is forced through holes in the check
valve (3) lifting the rubber seal clear of the holes to
provide an unblocked passage to the wheel cylinders.
On releasing the front brake lever the return spring
(4) thrust the piston (2) back faster than the fluid is
able to return from the wheel cylinders. This
creates a partial vrcuum in the cylinder which
causes fluid to be drawn past the lip of the primary
seal (5) from the main reservoir via the main feed
port (A) and the small feed holes in the head of the
piston (2).
Push Rod
Piston
Check Valve
Return Spring
Primary Seal
Circlip
. Piston Washer
о мон квн ню :^
‚ Secondary seal
0
. Spring Rétainer
10, Dust Cover
11. Grub Screw
12. Reservoir Recain-
img Nur
13. 'O' Ring
14. Paper Washer
15, Rubber Diaphram
16. Сар
17. Distance Piece
Fig. F13. Exploded view of master cylinder
F13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
Meanwhile fluid returning from the wheel cylinder
lifts the check valve (3) away from its seat and re-
When the piston has fully
returned a small breather port (B) 15s uncovered
enters the cylinder.
which allows a release of excess fluid to the reser-
voir and also compensates for contraction and
expansion of the fluid due to changes in temper-
The purpose of the check valve (3) is to
prevent the re-entry into the master cylinder of
fluid pumped into the line during the “bleeding”
ature.
operation, thus ensuring a fresh charge of fluid at
cachs.oke ofthe lever.
Removal and dismantling procedure of the cylinder
is as follows: Firstly drain the system of fluid. See
Section F5. Remove the rubber hose from the
wheel cylinder. Remove the brake lever and
push rod by unscrewing the pivot bolt. Unscrew
the four retaining screws that retain the right
switch console and remove the master cylinder
trom the handlebar. Detach the reservoir bowl
from the cylinder by removing the attachment nut
from the inside (See Fig. F13) Note assembly of
washer, spacer and 'O' ring. Kemove the grub
screw that locks the cylinder in position in the
switch that locks (See Fig. F 13) and then unscrew the
Detach the rubber boot from the end
of the cylinder. Using the push rod (1) depress the
piston in the cylinder to relieve the load on the
spring and remove the circlip (6). Remove the pis-
ton (2) piston washer (7), primary seal (5), return
spring (4) and check valve (3). The removal of the
primary seal (5) may be simplified by applying gentle
air pressure to the pipe connection at the end of
cylinder.
the cylinder.
F14
Remove the secondary seal (8) by stretching it over
the flange of the piston. Renew all seals and check
the bore of the cylinder for deep score marks. If
such damage is apparent a new cylinder should be
fitted.
Itis important that all parts are meticulously cleaned
with brake fluid before assembly. Do not use petrol,
trichlorethylene or any other similar cleaning
agents to wash the parts.
Fit the secondary seal (8) onto the piston (2) so that
the lip of the seal faces towards the head (drilled end)
of the piston. See Fig. F13. Gentiy work the seal
around the grcove with the fingers to ensure that it is
properly seated. Fit the spring retainer (9) onto the
smail end ot the spring (4) and the check valve (3) onto
the large end. insert the spring assembly onto the
cylinder bore, large end first. Insert the primary seal (5)
Into the cylinder bore. lip foremost (See Fig. F7), taking
care not to damage or turn back the lip. Insert the
piston washer (7) into the barre} with the dished side
towards the primary seal {5) (See Fig. F.14) followedby
the piston, head (drilled end) innermost, see Fig. F12.
Push the piston inwards with the end of the push rod
and refit the circiip (6). Make sure that the circlip beds
eveniy In its groove. Refit the boot (10) by stretching it
over the barrei. Refit the reservoir bowl, (tighten the
securing nut to a torque of 4 to 7 bs.ft. (6 to 7 Nm.) not
forgetting the ‘©’ ring and test the cylinder by filling the
reservoir and pushing the push rod and piston inwards
and allowing it to return unassisted. After a few
applications fluid should flow from the outlet connection
at the cylinder head.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES WHEELS AND TYRES F
С
—
. Push Rod
о юм во т
A. Feed Port
B. Breather Port
Piston
. Check Valve
Spring
Primary Seal
Circlip
Piston Washer
Secondary Sea!
Spring Retainer
Dust Cover
Fig. F14. Hydraulic flow diagram—front brake
F15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
If necessary refit the return spring. Empty the
cylinder of fluid and proceed to re-assemble the
At this
stage the final position of the cylinder barrel in the
cylinder barrel into the switch housing.
housing must be determined. Here reference must
be made to Fig. F14. It will be observed from Fig.
F14 that the lip of the primary seal (5) must be 1/16
of an inch behind the breather port and the
reservoir set at an angle of 10° to the vertical. The
milled flats on the threaded end of the cyiinder are
machined relative to the 10 position and the
appropriate one must be used when assembly takes
piace.
The foliowing method can be used to determine
the correct linear postition of the cylinder barrel.
{1} Remove the reservoir from the cylinder.
(2) Re-assembe the front brake lever and push rod
to the switch housing. Tighten the nylon nut to a
torque of 5 to 7Ib.ft. (7 to 9NM.+.
(3) Screw the cylinder barrel into the switch
housing whilst holding the brake lever in the
closed positron until it will screw no further.
(4) Place on finger over the main port (A) Fig. F13
and by blowing through the outlet end of the
cylinder it will be observed that no air will escape
from the breather port (B) Fig. F13.
(5) Now unscrew the cylinder barrel until air is
heard to escape from the breather port (B).
At this point the port will have just become
uncovered.
©
Unscrew the barrel one complete turn and set
the angle to 10° as shown in Fig. F15. The milled
flat on the threaded end of the barrel must be
located when the grub screw (Fig. F13) is being
re-tightened and will set the angle automatically.
Re-assemble the master cylinder to the handlebar
replenish the reservoir with fluid and “bieed” the
system as described in Section F4.
Fig. F15. Showing angle of brake reservoir
F16
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
SECTION F9
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE FRONT AND REAR BRAKE CALIPERS
FRONT BRAKE
Detach the protection cover from the caliper by
removing the two crosshead screws. (See Fig. F1
for exploded view). Drain the system of fluid. See
Section F5. Detach the feed pipe from the caliper
and remove the two securing nuts at the fork leg
and withdraw the caliper from its mounting studs.
Remove the two split pins that retain the brake
pads and pull them out.
REAR BRAKE
Drain the system of fluid. see Section F5. Remove the
R.H. wheel spindle nut and partially withdraw the
wheel spindle enabling the caliper and mounting plate
to swing down. Remove the caliper to plate securing
securing bolts and disconnect the pressure hose from
the master cylinder.
NOTE: Take care when handling brake fluid as it is
a powerful paint stripper.
Heptacment is a reversal of the above but refer to
Section F4 for ‘bleeding’ the system.
No attempt should be made to remove the caliper
bridge bolts jointing the two halves of the caliper.
There is no necessity to do so and all the servicing
can be carried out without splitting the haives, and
in addition the bolts are tightened to a critical
torque loading.
If in an emergency, the brake caliper has been split
and in event of the fluid channel seal being undam-
aged, the «caliper and bridge bolts should 5e
thoroughly cleaned, dried and reassembied and the
bridge bolts tightened to a torque loading of 35-40
ft. Ibs. (4.8 to 5.5 Kg.m). After reassembling, the
brake caliper should be checked for fluid tightness
under maximum brake lever pressure.
lt should be understood that this procedure will
only provide a temporary remedy and the caliper
should be returned to the manufacturers for over-
haul at the first opportunity. Service the rubber
seals as follows:- (read in conjunction with Fig. F1).
A rubber sealing ring (1) is fitted in a groove mach-
ined in each pistons bore to seai off the hydraulic
fluid. AU” shaped rubber dus: seal (2) having two
wiping edges and housed in a metal container (3) is
pressed into the open end of the piston bore to
prevent the ingress of dust from the brake pads.
The dust seal (2) together with its retainer (3) must
be renewed each time they are removed ‘rom the
piston bore. When the rubber seal (1) is worn or
damaged it must be renewed. Before installation
the seals should be lubricated with Lockheed disc
brake lubricant. The movement of the pistons (4)
and (5) within their respective bore extrude the
rectangular rubber seal (1) from its groove. On
releasing the brake lever the hydraulic pressure
coflapses and the rubber seal (1) retracts the
pistons (4) and (5) a pre-determined amount, thus
maintaining a constant clearance between the brake
pads and the brake disc when the brakes are not in
use,
To remove rubber seals:- Prise out and discard the
dust seal (2) and (3) from the open end of each
piston bore by inserting a blade of a blunt screw-
driver between the seal and retainer. Eject each
piston from their bores by applying compressed air
to the fluid inlet. Lift out and discard the sealing
rings (1) from the grooves in the piston bores by
inserting a blunt screwdriver under each ring
taking care not to damage the grooves.
Dry the new sealing rings (1) and smear them with
Lockheed disc brake lubricant and refit them into
the groove of each piston bore so that the large side
is nearer the open end of the piston bore. Gentiy
work the sealing rings into their respective
grooves with the fingers to ensure correct seating.
Dry the pistons and coat with Lockheed disc brake
lubricant. Offer up the pistons, closed end first
squarely to the bores in the caliper and press the
pistons fully home. Dry the dust seals and coat with
Lockheed disc brake lubricant.
F17
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
Fit a dust seal into a metal retainer and position
both squarely into the mouth of one piston bore
with the dust seal facing the bore. Press the dust
seal into the mouth of the piston bore using a ""G"”
clamp and support plate, until its outer edges are
flush with the bore. Repeat with the second dust seal
and retainer. Fit new brake pads (See Section F3).
Refit the brake caliper. Reconnect the hydraulic feed
pipe and “bleed” the system as in Section F4. Refit the
protection cover (front brake only).
SECTION F10
BRAKE DISCS
The brake disc will reguire no maintenance other
than when re-newal becomes necessary due to
damage or becoming excessively scored. If this
occurs the disc must be checked for run-out using a
dial test indicator. The maximum reading should
not exceed 0.0035 ins. (-089 mm)
To replace the disc. firstly remove the front wheel. See
section F11. Unscrew the four securing nuts and
detach the disc. Fit new disc and tighten the nuts
diagonally opposite to each other to the torque figure
given In General Data.
F18
Replace the wheel into the forks and attach a dial
test indicator to the fork leg and check the run-out
to the figure previously quoted. If it is outside
the limit the disc should be repositioned in an
attempt to obtain a more satisfactory combination
of machining limits.
Excessive run-out of the brake disc moves the
pistons back into the bores and creates excessive
lever travel when the brake is applied thus the
run-out must be kept to the specified minimum.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
SECTION F11
REMOYING AND REFITTING THE FRONT WHEEL
Place the machine on the centre stand or support so
that the front wheel is clear of the ground.
Unscrew the eight tork cap nuts and remove both caps
and withdraw the front wheel. Do not apply the front
brake while the wheel is out of the forks.
To replace the wheel engage the disc between the
brake pads in the caliper and replace the fork caps
tightening the four nuts of the left hand fork leg before
finally tightening the right hand leg. NOTE: Always
tighten the nuts diagonally opposite to each other.
This will enable the spindle to align correctly with the
left fork leg. (See “General Data” for correct torque
figures for the cap nuts).
WARNING: Always actuate the front brake PRIOR
to moving off with the machine. This will re-charge
the hydraulic with fluid in readiness for the first
braking application.
SECTION F12
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS
Remove the front wheel (See Section above). Un-
screw the wheel spindle fixing nut from the left
hand side and then unscrew the retaining ring
with service tool 61-3694 (Right hand thread).
The left hand bearing can now be removed by
driving che wheel spindie through from the
right hand side. Withdraw the
retaining disc from the left hand side. To remove the
right hand side bearing, spring out the circlip and
insert the wheel spindle from the left hand side and
inner grease
Fig. F16.
drive the bearing out complete with inner and
outer grease retaining plates.
NOTE: Early models were fitted with bearings of
the non-sealed type. Always fit bearings of the
latest sealed type when servicing. The sealed.
bearings can be easily recognised by the plastic
covers fitted to each side of the ball race.
Exploded view of front wheel bearing arrangement
F19
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
To refit the bearings first insert the right retainer,
bearing and outer dust cap. Refit the spring circlip and
insert the shouldered end of the wheel spindle from the
left and using it as a drift drive the bearing and grease
retainer until they come up to the circlip. Re-insert the
spindle the opposite way round and refit the left hand
grease retainer disc. Drive the left bearing into position
well smeared with grease then screw in the retainer
ring (right hand thread) until tight. Using Service Tool
No. 61-3694. Tap the spindle from the right to bring the
spindle shoulder up against the left bearing. Replace
the spindle fixing nut and re-tighten firmly. (Refer to
Fig. F16 for layout and identification).
SECTION F13
REMOVING AND FITTING THE REAR WHEEL
Raise the machine on its centre stand then lift the
machine an additiona! 3in. by placing a suitable block
underneath the stand. Remove the L.H. muffler by
removing the L.H. pillion footrest securing nut and
slackening off the muffler to exhaust pipe clamp. With-
draw the muffler. Disconnect the rear chain by remov-
ing the split link.
Using a tommy bar to secure the wheel spindle remove
the spindle nut. Withdraw the wheel spindle and swing
the caliper assembly away from the disc. Carefully
allow the wheel to drop then disconnect the
speedometer drive cable.
NOTE: Take care not to operate the rear brake
lever whilst the caliper is diconnected from the
disc.
F20
Take care of the distance piece between the speedo-
meter drive box and the caliper mounting bracket.
Replacement is the reversal of the above instructions
but ensure that the closed end of the chain spit link
taces the direction of travel.
Check the wheel alignment (Section .F22) and rear
chain adjustment (Section F?7).
WARNING: Always actuate the rear brake prior to
moving off with the machine. This will re-charge
the hydraulic circuit with fluid in readiness for the
first braking application.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
SECTION F14
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR WHEEL BEARINGS
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F21
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
Remove the rear wheel, see Section F13.
Unscrew the speedometer box drive ring (L.H. thread).
Unscrew and remove the L.H. side retainer ring using
a punch. {R.H. thread).
Using a long punch drive out the spindle suport spacer
from each side.
In most cases the bearing wil come out with the
spindle support spacers, however, it not then a
suitable drift will have to be manufactured (See Fig.
f-18) and placed into the bearing spacer tube then the
bearing (L.H. or R.H.) driven out.
Withdraw the bearing spacer tube.
Hemove the bearing retainer cups.
Replacement is a reversal of the above instructions,
but refit bearing retainer and assemble the new
bearings to the spindle support spacers first then drive
the bearing and spacer into the wheel hub. Do not
forget to insert the bearing spacer tube prior to
assembly.
NOTE: Early models were fitted with bearings of
the non-sealed type. Always fit the latest sealed
type of bearing when servicing. The sealed
bearings can be recognised by the plastic covers
fitted to each side of the ball race.
1in (25mm) |
|
-9841in (24-996mm)
-98361n (24-383mm)
|
|
-B25in. (20-955mm.)
-B20in. (20-878mm.)
|— —
3in (75mm)
—
Fig. F18. Rear wheel bearing drift
SECTIÓN F15
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING REAR BRAKE
(PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501)
Access to the rear brake shoes is gained by removing
the rear wheel. (See Section F16). remove the brake
shoes by lifting one brake shoe away from the brake
plate until the return spring becomes disconnected.
(See Fig. F19).
Check the linings tor wear. If the lining has worn down
to the surface of any of the rivets then the linings must
be replaced. Check the surface of the brake drum: if
heavy scoring or damage is evident the wheel hubs
need replacing.
F22
Fig. F19. Removing brake shoes
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
To reassemble the brake shoes to the brake anchor
plate first place the two brake shoes on the bench on
their relative positions. Fit the return springs to the
retaining hooks, then taking a shoe in each hand (see
Fig. £19) and at the same time holding the springs in
tension, position the shoes as shown over the cam and
fulcrum pin and snap down into position by pressing on
the outer edges of the shoes.
Note. When replacing the brake shoes, note that the
leading and trailing brake shoes are not interchange-
able and ensure that they are in their correct relative
positions as shown in Fig. F20.
The rear brake has a fully floating cam and therefore
the shoes are automatically self centralising.
Adjustment of the rear brake is achieved by the
wing nut on the rear end of the brake operating rod.
Turn the nut clockwise to reduce clearance. From
the static position before the brake is applied there
shouid be about + in. (1-2 cm.) of free movement
before the brake starts to operate,
Fig. F20. Position of brake shoes
SECTION F16
REAR WHEEL REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT
PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501
Support the machine on a suitable stand so that the
rear wheel is approximately 12in. clear of the ground.
Uncouple the rear chain at its spring link and
remove it from the rear wheel sprocket. Leave
the chain in position on the gearbox sprocket; this will
much simplify replacement.
Disconnect the speedometer drive cable at the drive
gearbox at the right side of the rear wheel. Detach
the torque arm at the brake plate and remove the bolt
and nut from the front fixing. Loosen the bottom left
side suspension unit bolt and lift chain-
guard for clearance. Loosen the whee! spindle nut at
the right-hand side and pull the wheel out of the
swinging fork and away from the machine. When
replacing the wheel check section F22 for front
and rear wheel alignment and section F27 for rear
chain adjustment.
F23
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F17
REMOVING AND REPLACING REAR WHEEL BEARINGS
PRIOR TO FRAME No. HN62501
The hub is fitted with two identical single row ball
bearings which are a press fit into the hub.
Remove the speedometer drive ring (left hand thread)
from the right side and the bearing retaining ring (right
hand thread) from the left side. Use service tool no. 61-
3694 to remove bearing retainer. Using a dnft (of the
dimensions shown in Fig. F21) knock out the spacer
tube contained between the bearings taking one
bearing with it. This operation can be carried out from
either side of the wheel See Fig F22.
Fig. F21. Wheel bearing drift
if a drift of the correct dimensions is not used then
the spacer tube will be damaged and have to be
replaced.
The bearing is an interference fit on the spacer tube
and should be removed using the same drift as
before. The spacer tube and drift can now be used
to knock the remaining bearing out of the hub.
Remove the bearing from the spacer tube.
NOTE: Early models were fitted with bearings of
the non-sealed type. Always fit the latest type of
sealed bearing when servicing. The sealed
bearings can be easily recognised by the pastic
covers fitted to each side of the ball race.
F24
Fig. F22. Drifting the wheel bearings
The cups behind the bearings should not require
attention. But if reptacement is necessary knock them
out using a drift from inside the hub.
Replace the bearing onto the spacer tube and place
the assembly into the hub from the left side. Drift the
bearing into the housing and down onto the retainer
with a suitable diameter drift. Force must be applied to
the outer ring of the bearing and not the inner ring. If
possible use a hand press for replacing these
bearings.
Replace the retaining ring and tighten using tool
No. 61-3694. Replace the remaining bearing from
the right side.
Reassembly of the hub is simply the reverse of the
dismantling procedure but, when pressing the
bearings in, apply pressure only to the outside ring
of the bearing and ensure that the retainer on the
left-hand side is quite tight.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
Y - A я
A
Mot
ПУ
Fig. F23." Exploded view of rear wheel assembly
SECTION F18
REAR BRAKE ADJUSTMENT
The rear brake does not require any adjustment other
thai setting the clearance between the brake pedal
and the R.H. footrest. See Section F1.
For machines prior to frame no. HN62501 fitted with a
rear drum brake the following procedure applies:
The brake must be adjusted to give maximum
efficiency at all times and for this to be maintained,
the shoes should be just clear of the drum when the
brake is off, and close enough for immediate contact
when the brake is applied. The brakes must not be
adjusted so closely, however, that they are in
continual contact with the drum; excessive heat
may be generated, resulting in deterioration of
braking efficiency.
The rear brake is adjusted by turning the self-
locking sleeve in a clockwise direction (viewed from
the rear of the machine), to shorten the effective
length of the brake rod and so open the shoes in
the drum.
Note that if maximum efficiency is to be obtained,
the angle between the brake cable or rod and the
operating lever on the brake plate should not
exceed 90° when the brake is fully applied.
The rear brake shoes are of the fully-floating type
(i.e., they are not pivoted on a fulcrum) and are
therefore seif-centralizing.
F25
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F nn BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F19
RENEWING REAR BRAKE LININGS
Hold the shoe firmly in a vice and, using a good sharp
chisel, cut off the peened-over portion of the rivet
as shown below.
Drive out the rivets with a suitable pin punch and
discard the old lining. Reverse the shoe in the vice
and draw-fite the face of the shoe to remove any > ;
burrs. LA
Y
at | 1 ß E 0 0)
Clamp the new lining tightly over the shoes and, ея dm a SN |
using the shoe holes as a jig, drill straight through 7" À Fi
the lining with a + in. diameter drill. |
ща
Remove the clamps and, holding the lining carefuily
in the vice, counterbore or countersink (according
to the type of rivet used) each hole to no more than
two-thirds the thickness of the lining, i.e., if the
lining is À in. thick, then the counterbore must
not be deeper than + in.
87
Fig. F25. Punching lining rivets
Having prepared the linings for riveting, start at the
centre ard position the lining with one or more
rivers. shown in Fig. F25, workirg alternatively outwards fom
the centre.
Place a suitable mandrel in the vice, clamp the
linings to the shoes with either small *G” or
toolmakers clamps and peen-over the rivets as
The mandrel used in the vice must be flat on the
end and the diameter should be no more than that
of the rivet.head. lt will also help to bed the rivet
down if a hollow punch is used bafo. e peening.
Note. If the clamps are used cortectly, that is,
next to the rivet being worked on, the linings can
be fitted tightly to the shoe.
If the linings are fitted incorrectly, a gap will occur
between the lining and the shoe, resulting in
inefficient and “‘spongy’’ braking.
When the riveting is completed, file a good chamfer
at each end of the lining to approximately half its
depth and lightly draw-file the face of the lining to
Fig. F24. Chiselling off brake rivets remove any fraze caused by the drilling.
F26
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
SECTION F20
WHEEL BUILDING
This is a job which is best left to the specialist as it
is essential that the wheel is laced correctly and
that when truing, the spokes are correctly ten-
sioned.
it is however, possible for the less experienced to
avoid trouble by periodically examining the wheels.
As spokes and nipples bed down the tension will be
lost and unless this is corrected the spokes will
chafe and ultimately break.
Periodically test the tension either by ‘ringing’,
that is striking with a metal tool or by placing the
fingers and thumb of one hi#nd over two spokes at
a time and pressing them together.
If tension has been lost there will be no ringing tone
and the spokes will move freely across each other.
When a spoke needs tensioning, the nippie through
the rim must be screwed further on to the spoke
but at the same time, the truth of the wheel must be
checked and it may be necessary to ease the tension
at another part of the wheel in order to maintain its
truth.
It will therefore be obvious that spoke replacement,
spoke tensioning or wheel truing are not operations
to be treated lightly.
Careful examination of the wheel will show that
for every spoke there is another pulling in the
opposite direction and that the adjacent spoke goes
to the opposite side of the hub.
Increasing the tension tends to puli the rim so, to
counteract this, it is sometimes necessary to increase
the tension on the spoke or spokes either side tc
maintain the truth of the wheel.
With a little care and patience it is possibie for the
unskilled to at least re-rension the spokes but, turn
each nipple only a little at a time as, once the spoke
is under tension only a fraction of a turn is some-
times sufficient to throw the rim badly out of truth.
SECTION F2I
WHEEL BALANCING
When a wheel is out of balance it means that there is
more weight in one part than in another. This is
very often due to varlation in the tyre and at
moderate speeds will not be noticed but at high
speeds it can be very serious, particularly if the
front wheel is affected.
Wheel balancing can be achieved by fitting standard
one ounce and half ounce weights which are readily
availabie, as required. All front wheels are balanced
complete with tyre and tube before leaving the
factory and if for any reason the tyre is removed it
should be replaced with the white balancing ‘spot
level with the valve. If a new tyre is fitted, existing
weights should be removed and the wheel re-
balanced, adding weights as necessary until it will
remain in any position at rear. Make sure that the
brake is not binding while the balancing operation
is being carried out.
For normal road use it is not found necessary for the
rear wheel to be balanced in this way.
F27
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F22
FRONT AND REAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT
When the rear wheel has been fitted into the frame it and parallel! to both battens. Turn the front wheel
should be aligned correctly by using two straight slightly until this can be seen. Any necessary
edges or “battens” about 7 feet long. With the adjustments must be made by first slackening the
machine off the stand the battens should be placed rear wheel spindle nut, then turning the spindie
atongside the wheel, one either side of the machine adjuster nuts as required ensuring that the rear
and each about four inches from the ground. When chain adjustment is maintained. Refer to Fig. F26
both are touching the rear tyre on both sides of the for illustration of correct alignment. Note that
wheel the front wheel should be midway between the arrows indicate the adjustment required.
Wrong" "Correct" Wrong” —
| | | | | 1 |
| | | | || 1 | Ш
| | | ui 1 UL
fi I | u | | it
i | | | it Ш
Е Na di jh _
| И
M | |
N i
| И
|
|
|
|
1
Y, |
| М
F28 | —
| |
| М
Fig. F26. Aligning the front and rear wheels
Kim The CD Man © 2002
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES F
SECTION F23
REMOVING AND REFITTING TYRES
To remove the tyre first remove the valve cap and
valve core, using the valve cap itself to unscrew the
core. Unscrew the knurled valve securing nut and
then place all parts where they will be free from
dirt and grit. lt is recommended that the cover
beads are lubricated with a little soapy water before
attempting to remove the tyre. The tyre lever
should be dipped in this solution before each
application. First, insert a lever at the valve posi-
tion and whilst carefully pulling on this lever, press
the tyre bead into the well of the rim diametrally
opposite the valve position (see Fig. F27). Insert a
Fig. F27. Removing the first bead of the tyre—Lever
inserted close to valve whilst bead is pressed into well on
opposite side of wheel
second lever close to the first and prise the bead
over the rim flange. Remove the first lever and
reinsert a little further round the rim from the
second lever. Continue round the bead in steps of
two to three inches until the bead is completely
away from the rim. Push the valve out of the rim
and then withdraw the inner tube. To completely
remove the tyre first stand the wheel upright and
then insert a lever between the remaining bead
and the rim. The tyre should be easily removed
from the rim as shown in Fig. F28.
Fig. F28. Removing the first bead of the tyre, using two
tyre levers
REFITTING THE TYRE
First place the rubber rim band into the well of the
rimand make sure that the rough side of the rubber
band is fitted against the rim and that the band is
central in the well. Replace the valve core and
inflate the inner tube sufficiently to round it out
without stretch, dust it with french chalk and insert
it into the cover with the valve located at the white
“balancing spot’ leaving it protruding outside the
beads for about four inches either side of the valve.
At this stage it is advisable to lubricate the beads
and levers with soapy water (see Fig. F29) .
Tm
Fig. F29. Cover and tube assembled read for refitting
to the wheel
Squeeze the beads together at the valve position to
prevent the tube from slipping back inside the tyre and
offer the cover to the rim, as shown in Fig. F30, at the
same time threading the valve through the valve holes
in the rim band and rim. Allow the first bead to go into
the well of the rim and the other bead to lie above the
level of the rim flange.
F29
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
Fig. F30. Refitting the tyre to the wheel. Note valve
engaged in rim hole
Working from the valve, press the first bead over
the rim flange by hand, moving forward in small
steps and making sure that the part of the bead
already dealt with, lies in the well of the rim, If
necessary use a tyre fever for the last few inches,
as shown in Fig. F31. During this operation continually
check that the ner tube is not trapped by the cover
bead.
Fig. F31. Levering the first bead onto the rim
Press the second bead into the well of the rim
diametrally opposite the valve. Insert a lever as
close as possible to the point where the bead passes
over the flange and lever the bead into the flange.
at the same time pressing the fitted part of the bead
into the well of the rim. Repeat until the bead is
completely over the flange, finishing at the valve
position {see Fig. F32).
Fig. F32. Refitting the second bead over the wheel
rim. Care must be taken not to trap inner tube
Push the valve inwards to ensure that the tube
near the valve is not trapped under the bead:
Pull the valve back and inflate the tyre. Check that
the fitting line on the cover is concentric with the
top of the rim flange and that the valve protrudes
squarely through the valve hole. Fit the knurled
rim nut and valve cap. The tyre pressure should
then be set to the figure given in General Data.
SECTION F24
SECURITY BOLTS
Security bolts are fitted to the rear wheel to prevent
the tyre ""creeping’’ on the rim when it is subjected
to excessive acceleration or braking. Such move-
ment would ultimately result In the valve being torn
from the inner tube. There are two security bolts
fitted to the rear wheel, which are equally spaced
F30
either side of the valve and thereby do not affect
the balance of the wheel,
Note. The security bolt nuts must not be over-
tightened, otherwise excessive distortion may
occur,
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES F
Where a security bolt is fitted the basic procedure
for fitting and removing the tyre is the same, but the
following instruction should be followed :—
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(>)
(6)
Remove the valve cap and core as described.
Unscrew the security bolt nut and push the
bolt inside the cover.
Remove the first bead as described.
Remove the security bolt from the rim.
Remove the inner tube as described.
Remove the second bead and tyre.
For refitting the tyre and inner tube :—
(1)
Fit the rim band.
Fig. F33. Placing the security bolt in position
(2)
(3)
(4)
Fig. F34.
Fit the first bead to the rim without the inner
tube inside.
Assemble the security bolt into the rim,
putting the nut onto the first few threads (see
-1g. F34).
Partly inflate the inner tube and fit it into the
the tyre.
Fit the second bead but keep the security bol
pressed well into the tyre. as shown in Fig. F33.
and ensure that the inner tube does not become
trapped at the edges.
Fit the valve stem nut and inflate the tyre.
Bounce the wheel several times at the point
where the security bolt is fitted and then
tighten the security bolt nut.
Refitting the second bead with the security
bolt in position
SECTION F25
TYRE MAINTENANCE
To obtain optimum tyre mileage and to eliminate
irregular wear on the tyres it is essential that the
recommendations governing tyre pressures and
general maintenance are followed. The following
points are laid out with this in mind.
(1)
Maintain the correct inflation pressure as
shown in ‘General Data’. Use a pressure
gauge frequently. It is advisable to check
and restore tyre pressures at least once per
week. Pressures should always be checked when
tyres are cold and not when they have reached
normal running temperatures.
When a pillion passenger or additional load is
carried, the rear tyre pressure should be
increased appropriately to cater for the extra
load.
(3)
(5)
Unnecessary rapidaccelerationandfierce braking
should always be avoided. This treatment
invariably results in rapid tyre wear.
Regular checks should be made for flints, nails.
small stones etc, which should be removed
from the tread or theymay ultimately penetrate
and damage the casing and puncture the tube.
Tyres and spokes should be'kept free of oil,
grease and paraffin. Regular cleaning should be
carried out with a cloth and a little petro:
(gasoline).
If tyres develop irregular wear, this may bc
corrected by reversing the tyre to reverse its
direction of rotation.
F31
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
Before inflating, check that the fitting line on the
tyre wall just above the bead on each side is con-
centric with the rim.
If necessary bounce the wheel to help seat the tyre
but, see that there is adequate pressure to prevent
damaging the tyre or tube and only use moderate
force. If the tyre will not seat, it is better to release
the pressure, apply soap solution to lubricate and
re-inflate.
Inflate to the required pressure and check fitting
lines again. Inflation should not be too rapid,
particularly at the commencement, to allow the
beads to seat correctiy on the rim.
See that the valve protrudes squarely through the
valve hole before screwing down the knurled nut
and finally, replace the dust cap.
SECTION F26
TYRE PRESSURES
The recommended inflation pressure as shown in
“General Data”, are based on a riders weight of 1401b.
If the riders’ weight exceeds 140Ib. the tyre pressure
should be increased as follows —
Front Tyre
Add 116. рег square inch for every 281b. in excess ot
1401b.
Rear Tyre |
Add 11b. per square inch for every 141b. in excess of
14015.
SECTION F27
REAR CHAIN ADJUSTMENT
REAR CHAIN
The adjustment of the rear chain is controlled by draw
bolts fitted to each end of the rear wheel spindle. The
correct adjustment for the rear chain is 3ain. free
movement with the machine on its wheels and the
chain at its tightest point or 13ain. with the machine on
the stand and the chain at its slackest point. !f the
adjustment of the chain is outside these limits it should
be corrected by loosening the wheel spindle nuts {and
the brake torque stay nut on the anchor plate prior to
frame no. HN62501) and then adiusting the draw bolts
an equal number of turns. Always apply the brake
pedal to centralise the brake plate and keep it applied
while you tighten the spindle nut. Recneck the chain
adjustment. it the wheel alignment was correct
originally the adjustment of the nuts by an equal
number of turns should preserve that alignment but if
you are doubtful whether the rear wheel is in line then
you should use a straight edge or piece of string along-
F32
side the rear wheel: making allowance for the
difference in section between the rear tyre and the
front tyre and then tighten or loosen the draw bolt
adjuster on the right side so that the rear wheel lines
up with the front wheel. If the rear wheel is not in line
the road holding of the machine will be adversely
affected and the effect on the rear chain and rear
wheel sprocket will cause rapid wear. When the agjust-
ment ts satisfactory check the tightness of the wheel
spindie nut, adjuster draw bolts {and brake torque stay
nuts. Finally check the adjuster of the brake operating
rod. Prior to frame no. HN62501). There is no
automatic oil feed to the rear chain which should be
lubricated manualiy with an cil gun weekly.
WARNING: For machines with a rear disc brake
always actuate the rear brake prior to moving off
with the machine, This will re-charge the hydraulic
circuit with fluid in readiness for the first braking
application.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
SECTION F28
BRAKING PERFORMANCE DATA
The following information is in accordance with the requirements of
the U.S. Federal Highway Administration, Department of Trans-
portation
tions of loading.
correct under other conditions.
This figure indicates braking performance that can be met or exceeded by the
vehicles to which it applies, without locking the wheels, under different condi-
The information presented represents results obtainable by skilled drivers
under controiled road and vehicle conditions, and the information may not be
Description of vehicles to which this table applies:—
TRIUMPH T140V BONNEVILLE 750
A. Fully Operational
Service Brake
LOAD
LIGHT
136
MAXIMUM 457
0 100 200
Wo 400 so
Stopping distance in feet from 60 m.p.h.
and a limiting speed of 80 m.p.h.
not be correct under other conditions.
This figure indicates passing times and distances that can be met or exceeded
by the vehicles to which it applies, in the situations diagrammed below,
The low-speed pass assumes an initial speed of 20 m.p.h, and a limiting
speed of 35 m.p.h. The high-speed pass assumes an initial speed of 50 m.p.h.
Notice :—The information presentedrepresents results obtainable by skilled
drivers under controlled road and vehicie conditions, and the information may
AS ABOVE
Description of vehicles to which this table applies: —
Summary Table
LOW-SPEED PASS 373 feet; 7.9 seconds
HIGH-SPEED PASS 932 feet; 9.3 seconds
LOW-SPEED
INITIAL SPEED:
20 MPH
"T TOTAL PASSING TIME, SECONDS
constant zomen 1 ——
| 55 TRUCK
HIGH-SPEED
INITIAL SPEED:
50 MPH
h —
TOTAL PASSING TIME, SECONDS
o — e == — — a wl
== mm mr — A Em mw окш — — == == = — 0
TOTAL PASSING DISTANCE,FEET
LIMITING SPEED: 35 MPH
TOTAL PASSING DISTANCE. FEET __. 1
LIMITING SPEED: 80 MPH
pm mm == === dem === == min ck === == Em EEE
F33
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F BRAKES, WHEELS AND TYRES
The following information is in accordance with the requirements of
the U.S. Federal Highway Administration, Department of Trans-
portation.
This figure indicates braking performance that can be met or exceeded by the
vehicles to which it applies, without locking the wheels, under different condi-
tions of loading.
The information presented represents results obtainable by skilled drivers
under controlled road and vehicle conditions, and the information may not be
correct under other conditions.
escription ‘of vehicles to which this table applies :—
TRIUMPH TR7Y TIGER 759
A. Fuliy Operational |
Service Brake
LOAD
LIGHT
| 136
MAXIMUM 157
o 400 2060 do 40 sh
Stopping distance in feet from 60 m.p.h.
This figure indicates passing times and distances that can be met or exceeded
by the vehicles to which it applies, in the situations diagrammed below.
The low-speed pass assumes an initial speed of 20 m.p.h. and a limiting
speed of 35 m.p.h. The high-speed pass assumes an initial speed of 50 m.p.h.
and a limiting speed of 80 m.p.h,
Notice .—The information presented represents results obtainable by skilled
drivers under controlled road and vehicle conditions, and the information may
not be correct under other conditions.
Description of vehicles to which this table applies :—
AS ABOYE
Summary Tabie
LOW-SPEED PASS 375 feet; 8.0 seconds
HIGH-SPEED PASS 940 feet; 9.4 seconds
LOW SPEED
INITIAL SPEED:
20 MPH L'MITING SPEED:35 MPH
TOTAL PASSING DISTANCE, FEET
TOTAL PASSING TIME SECONDS
carkbo o-oo LL o 52-0000 ‘
40 40
_+—" CONSTANT 20 MPH
55 TRUCK
HIGH-SPEED
INITIAL SPEED
50 MPH LIMITING SPEED: 80 MPH
TOTAL PASSING DISTANCE FEET >
TOTAL PASSING TIME SECONDS
EEE REEL . - - че
= + - -. --- . A
? 100 100°
мн
| y CONSTANT 50 MPH
55 TRUCK
F34
Kim The CD Man © 2002
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
SECTION F29
FAULT FINDING—FRONT AND REAR HYDRAULIC DISC BRAKES
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
ACTION
Excess travel of the front brake lever
rear brake pedal or ‘spongy feel
when applying either brake
(a) Air trapped in the hydraulic
system
(0) Incorrect positioning of master
cylinder
(C) Fluid leak past the main seal in
the master cylinder
Bleed the system. see Section F4
Reset positon. see Section F7 & F8
Examine the seals. see Section F7
F8.
Fluid level falls in either the front or
rear brake fluid reservoirs.
(a) Fnction pads wearing normally.
1D) Brake fluid leaking
Top up the fluid. see Section F2
Check all the hoses. pipes and
unions without applying the brakes
and look for evidence of leaks.
Repeat check with the brakes held
on under pressure. If necessary
tighten any unions or replace service
any components. see Section Е.
Brakes drag with subseguent over-
heating of disc resulting in brake
fade .
(a) Reservoir filler cap has a blocked
(b) Incorrect positioning of the
cylinder
(c} The friction pads binding in their
recess or the caliper piston ts
sticking.
(d) The brake fluid is contaminated
with fuei. paraffin or oil.
Clean and insect the filler cap vent
hole. Clear the hole ifmecessary.
Reset positon, see Section F7&F8
Remave the friction pads and clean
out their recesses.
Ctean the exposed surface of the
pistons with ciean brake fluid. If a
piston is found to be seized then a
new caliper assembly must be fitted.
If any high spots are found on the
friction pad backing n!stes remove
them with a file.
If contamination is suspected. firs:
check by smelling the fluid in the
reservoirs. if necessary dismantle
the front brake master cylinder and
check to see If the seals are con-
siderabiy swollen. !f so all rubber
components must be replaced. see
Section F8.
If the rear system is suspected the
master cylinder mus! be replaced as
a unit.
Before fitting any new parts flush
the system, see Section F5.
F35
Kim The CD Man © 2002
F
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
ACTION
Inefficient braking
(a) New friction pads. but are not
“bedded-in”.
(b) Friction pads glazed on the
brake disc has oxidised.
(C) Friction pads contaminated by
oll, grease or brake fluid.
Frequent use of brake will cure com-
plaint.
Remove the friction pads and re-
move any glazed areas with a fine
abrasive.
Inspect the contact area of the disc
any minor imperfections can be re-
moved with a fine carborundum
paper but if in doubt replace the
disc.
Replace the friction pads
Friction pads wear rapidly
(a) Friction pads fitted are the in-
correct grade.
(5) Brake disc has a scored contact
area.
(c) Partly or completety seized
caliper piston.
Replace pads with the correct tyne
Minor imperfection may be removed
with a fine grade carborundum
paper. but otherwise replace the
disc.
If the piston.is found to be seized the
the whole caliper assembly must be
replaced.
ja
Squealing brakes
(a) Friction pads vibrate at a high
frequency.
{b} Loose caliper mounting bolts.
Remove the friction pads and lubn-
cate the metal backing plate with
high melting point copper based
grease such as 'COPASLIP
ОО NOT allow the grease to contact
the friction pad material.
Confirm and rectify by tightening the
bolts.
F36
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION G
TELESCOPIC FORKS
INDEX
Section
DESCRIPTION ... ... ... … ... ... ... ... … ... cee ces —
STEERING HEAD ADJUSTMENT ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... … ... 61
RENEWING HEAD RACES … ... ces ... ... i. ... ... ... ... G2
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE FORK LEGS ... ... ... ... ... ... . G3
FORK ALIGNMENT ... ... ... ... " ... ... ... ve ... ... ... GA
HYDRAULIC DAMPING ... o Cos ... .. ce … ... ... ... ... ES
G1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
G TELESCOPIC FORKS
DESCRIPTION
The front fork is of the telescopic type using high
grade steel tube stanchions. They are ground to a
micro finish and hard chromium plated over their
entire length.
The alloy bottom members are precision bored and
provide the bearing for the stanchion. Internal main
springs are fitted and locate on the damper tube.
An oil seal is contained in the top lip of each bottom
member and is protected by a rubber dust cover.
Qil is contained in each bottom member and serves
the dual purpose of damping and lubrication. Oil is
added by removal of the fork cap nuts and drained at
the plugs provided.
Damping of the fork action is achieved by the use of
a damper vaive in conjunction with a series of bleed
holes in a fixed valve.
SECTION GI
STEERING HEAD ADJUSTMENT
It is most important that the steering head bearings
are always correctly adjusted.
Place a strong support underneath the engine so
that the front wheel is raised clear of the ground
then, standing in front of the wheel, attempt to
push the lower fork legs backwards and forwards.
Should any play be detected, the steering head
must be adjusted.
If possible, ask a friend to place the fingers of one
hand lightly round the head lug, whilst the forks
are being pulled back and forth. Any play will be felt
quite easily by the fingers.
It should be possible tc turn the forks from side
to side quite smoothly and without any “lumpy”
movement. If the movement is ‘lumpy’, the rollers
are 'ndented into the races or broken. In either
case the complete bearing should be renewed.
To adjust the steering head assembly, slacken the
clamp nut B, Fig. G1 and the top yoke adjuster nut A
then tighten down the adjuster nut until adjust-
ment is correct. There should be no play evident
G2
in the races but great care must be taken not to
overtighten, or the balls will become indented
into the races, making steering extremely difficult
and dangerous.
Having carried out the adjustment, tighten the
clamp nuts and the top yoke pinch bolt securely.
Re-check the adjustment.
Fig. G1. Steering head adjustment
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TELESCOPIC FORKS G
SECTION G2
RENEWING HEAD RACES
Place a strong support underneath the engine so that
the front wheel is raised clear of the ground. Remove
the front wheel (see Section F11). Remove the front
mudguard (see Section E16).
The steering head can be dismantled without
stripping the forks. First, disconnect the hydraulic
brake pipe from the :.:p and middle lug. See section
F6. Remove the he-ilamp. See section H10.
Detach the handle bar complete by unscrewing the
two self locking nuts which secure the two eye
bolts in the top lug. See fig. G2. Remove fork cap
nues. Place the speedometer and tachometer to one
side after first disconnecting the drive cables and
illuminating lights.
Slacken the top lug pinch bolt (A) fig: G1 and re-
move adjuster and middle nut (B). Loosen both
the top lug stanchion pinch bolts with an allen key.
Slide fork leg and stanchion from the lugs.
Using a raw-hide mallet strike the undersides of the
top lug alternately to release it from the stanchions.
Place the yolk to one side and withdraw the steering
stem out of the head lug. The taper roller bearings
can now be removed from the stem and the top lug
for cleaning and inspection. Check for pitting and
fracture of the roller surface. The bearing must be
replaced if any of these faults are in evidence.
The steering head outer races have a very long
serviceable life and should not need replacement
for a very considerable mileage. If however their
replacement is deemed necessary the races can F-
removed using a suitable drift from inside the head
lug. Replacement of the new race is effected by
using service tool 61-6121. Do not forget to refit
the bearing abutment rings behind the outer races.
Reassembly is the reverse of the above procedure.
Grease the bearings prior to replacement, see Section
A1 for correct grade. Note that head of both the top lug
and stanchion must be flush leaving the head of the
inner retaining plug standing proud. Care must be
taken to ensure that the headlamp shrouds are located
correctly in the prespective recesses in the top plug.
Note that when refitting the plastic dust cover ensure
that it sits square to allow the adjuster nut, + =3. "TA
to locate on the bearing. Readjust the steen=g he.
bearing as in Section G1. Reassembie the hydraube
system as described in Section F6.
SECTION G3
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE FORK LEGS
Before-commencing work on the forks it is advisable
to have the following service tools and replacemenst
available:
(a) Oil seal for fork leg (2)
(b) Oit seal for damper valve (2)
(c) Service tool (61-6113)
Remove small drain plug at the bottom of each fork
adjacent to the whee! spindle and drain out the oil by
pumping the forks up and down. Support the machine
on a box with the front wheel clear of the ground.
Remove front wheel as described in Section F11.
Remove front mudguard as described in Section E16.
Detach the handlebar complete by unscrewing the
two self locking nuts which secure the two eye bolts
in the top lug. Remove fork cap nuts. Place the
speedometer and tachometér to one side after
first disconnecting the drive cable and illuminating
lights.
Disconnect the hydraulic brake pipe at middle lug
and fork leg to stanchion. (See Section F6.) Remove
caliper and place carefully to one side. Unscrew the
two allen pinch bolts at the back of the top head lug.
Remove alluminium cap screws with suitably
sized allen key.
Hemispherical Rubbar Hemispherical
washer washer
Bush
Fig. G2. Handlebar mountings
G3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
G TELESCOPIC FORKS
Remove the stanchion top nuts then remove the
internal fork springs. Using service tool 61-6113
placed down into the stanchion; hold the valve
assembly while the retaining allen screw is being
unscrewed at the base of the fork leg.
At this stage it will be possible to remove the fork
leg by sliding it from the stanchion. Remove the
stanchions by slackening the pinch bolts on the
bottom yolk and withdrawing the stanchions.
When refitting tighten the pinch bolts to 18/20 165
E.
The dust cover on the fork leg can easily be prised
off by hand.
The damper valve assembly is retained in the bottom
of the stanchion by an aluminium nut which should
be carefully removed with a ring spanner or similar.
The valve assembly consists of a fixed bleed valve
which has its own oil seal, a clapper valve, a spring
support nut and a rebound spring. It should not be
necessary to strip this assembly unless the fixed
bleed valve has contracted damage in any way.
Fig. G3. Damper valve assembly
G4
The oil seal on the bleed valve can easily be replaced
by hand. If using a screwdriver to prise the seal
away from the valve be careful not to damage the
bearing surface as the material is a soft ailoy. (Refer
to Fig. G3 for details of the assembiy).
Care must be taken not to lose the sealing washer
contained in the bottom of the fork leg. The base
of the valve stem rests on this seal and the allen
screw is replaced from the outside of the ieg. Refer
to the exploded drawing on page G6 for assembly
details.
Remove the retamner cap and pull out the o' seal from
the top of the fork leg.
Early models were fitted with an interference fii seal
which can be removed with a tool of the design shown
In Fig. G4. This tool can be simpy manufactured from
a strip of mild steel material approx. 12in. tong - “in
wide and "ein. depth. The design 1s such that the tool
does not come into direct contact with the aluminium
fork leg thereby causing unreparable damage. As an
alternate a long tyre lever carefully used will be founa
adequate. Note. When using either of these 10015
make several attempts to remove the seal by working
around the periphery of the fork leg. otherwise the too
will rip through the lip of the seal.
NOTE: Always use the latest push fit seal and
retainer caps when servicing seals on early
models.
Place the stanchion into the fork leg and place a
small polythene bag over the top lip of the stanchion.
Push the oil seal over the stanchion and down into
position on the fork leg. it is important that the
polythene is used because the tip of stanchion has a
sharp edge that may easily scratch or damage the
precision edge of the seai. Even a scratch that may
pot be readily visible to the eye will cause leakage
at the seal.
Push a new seal into position then fit the retainer and
tap home.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TELESCOPIC FORKS G
мох
и
7
Fig. G4. Removing oil seal
Check all components for cleanliness and wash in
fuel if necessary. Examine the bore of the stanchion
and clean with a cloth pushed into the bore.
Reassembly of the fork leg is a reversal of the dis-
mantling procedure. Replace the valve into the
bottom of the stanchion. Apply some red loctite
to the aluminium retaining nut and tighten to a
torque of 25 ft./lbs.
Check that the small “Dowty” sealing washer is
tocated in the well in the base of the fork leg. (If
this washer shows signs of damage or wear it must
be replaced).
Push the rubber dust cover onto it's location groove
on the fork leg and then replace the leg on the
stanchion.
As the leg is refitted onto the stanchion the stem of
the damper valve assembly must be located on top
of the “Dowty” sealing washer. If difficulty is en-
countered during this operation, service tool
61-6113 which is used to retain the valve assembly
while it is being removed may be used to navigate
the damper valve onto its location.
The allen screw can then be replaced into the
bottom of the fork leg and tightened as described
above.
Replace fork leg and stanchion by sliding it up
through the rubber stop, middle lug, headlamp
bracket and top lug until the top of the stanchion
and the surface of the top lug lie exactly flush.
Retighten top lug and middle lug pinch bolts to a
torque setting of 20 ft/lbs.
Replace the fork springs and refill the fork legs with the
correct quantity of oii. See Section A15.
Coat the threads of the stanchion top nuts with “well
seal” jointing compound and refit, tightening to a
torque of 15ft./ibs. Replace tork cap nuts and tighten
them both to a torque of 30ft./Ibs. Reconnect the
speedometer drive cable and illuminating lights.
Refit the caliper on fork leg and reassemble the
hydraulic brake system as described in Section F6 and
F4. Replace the handlebars (see Section G3}.
Replace the front mudguard. Refit the front wheel (see
Section F11).
G5
Kim The CD Man © 2002
G TELESCOPIC FORKS
Fig. G5. Fork assembly details
G6
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION G4
FORK ALIGNMENT
After replacing the fork legs, mudguard and wheel,
it may be found that the fork is incorrectly aligned.
To rectify this, the fork wheel spindle cap nuts must
first be screwed up tight on the right-hand leg and
the spindle cap on the left-hand leg slackened off.
Also loosen the top caps and the pinch bolts in both
the bottom and top yokes. The forks should now be
pumped up and down several times to line them up
and then tightened up from bottom to top, that is,
wheel spindle, bottom yoke pinch bolts, top caps
and finally, the steering stem pinch bolt in the top
yoke.
If, after this treatment, the forks still do not
function satisfactorily then either the fork stan-
chions are bent or one of the yokes is twisted.
The stanchions can only be accurately checked for
straightness with special equipment such as a
surface plate. Special gauges are also required to
check the yokes. It is possible, however, to make
a reasonable check of the stanchjons by rolling
them on a surface plate or flat surface such as a
piece of plate glass, but it is not a simple operation
to straighten a bent tube, and a new part may be
necessary.
Check the stanchions for truth by rolling them
slowly on a flat checking table. A bent stanchion
may be realigned if the bow does not exceed -& in.
maximum. To realign the stanchion, a hand press
is required. Place the stanchion on two swage
M blocks at either end and apply pressure to
the raised portion of the stanchion. By means of
alternately pressing in this way and checking che
stanchion on a flat table the amount of bow can
be reduced until it is finally removed.
Having checked the stanchions for straightness and
reset as necessary, the top and bottom yokes can
now be checked. First, assemble the two stanchions
into the bottom yoke so that a straight edge across
the lower ends is touching all four edges of the
tubes, then tighten the pinch bolts. Now vie.
them from the side; the two stanchions should be
quite parallel. Alternatively, the lower 12 in. of
the stanchions can be placed on a surface plate,
when there should be no rocking.
To reset, hold one stanchion in a vice (using soft
clamps) and reposition the other stanchion, using a
longer and larger diameter tube to obtain sufficient
leverage. Having checked the stanchions this way,
check the gap between them on the ground portion,
The next step is to place the top yoke in position
over the stanchions, when the steering stem should
be quite central.
The final step is to check if the tubes are parallel
when assembled into the top yoke only. In this
case the bottom yoke can be fitted loosely on the
tubes, acting as a pilot only.
Though it is permissible to rectify slight errors in
alignment by resetting, it is much safer to replace
the part affected especially when there 1s excessive
misalignment. Works reconditioned units are
available to owners in the United Kingdom through
the dealer network.
BOTH LEGS SHOULD
BE PARALLEL
Fig. G6. Fork leg alignment
G7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
G | TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION G5
HYDRAULIC DAMPING
Note the valve assembly which is retained in the
bottom of the fork leg. Bleed holes are contained
in the valve stem and in a sub-assembly at the top of
the stem. This particular valve operates in conjunc-
tion with a damper valve which acts as a restrictor.
Oil is contained in the bottom member the level
of which is always above the valve assembly. On
compression the oil is forced through bleed holes
in the valve stem. As the travel increases the bleed
holes are progressively sealed off by a plastic sleeve
and the damping increases until finally the stanchion
Is trapped on a cushion of oil which acts as the final
G8
bump stop. During this operation a vacuum is
created in the space formed between the bottom of
the stanchion and the damper valve, hence oil is
transferred into this compartment through the
eight bleed holes in the valve.
On expansion the oil in this newly formed compart-
ment is compressed, the damper valve closes and the
oil is bled through four small holes in the damper
valve itself and then progressively through the holes
in the valve stem. While this operation is being
executed, oil is transferred back into the bottom
member in readiness for the next compression.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SECTION H
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
INTRODUCTION
BATTERY INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE о. H1
DESCRIPTION
(a) ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
(b) MAXIMUM PERMISSABLE ELECTROLYTE TEMPERATURES DURING CHARGING
COILIGNITION SYSTEM oo Hz
DESCRIPTION
(a) CHECKING THE LOW TENSION CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
(b) FAULT FINDING IN THE LOW TENSION CIRCUIT ...
(с) IGNITION COILS
(d) CONTACT BREAKER |
(e) CHECKING THE HIGH TENSION CIRCUIT
SPARKING PLUGS _ ... = _ _ e u ... cs = В НЗ
CHARGING SYSTEM _ _ |. _ _ ... |. _ e o _ НА
DESCRIPTION
(a) CHECKING THE D.C. OUTPUT AT THE RECTIFIER ..
(by CHECKING THE ALTERNATOR OUTPUT
(c) RECTIFIER MAINTENANCE AND TESTING ..
(d) CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
(e) CONSTRUCTING A 1 OHM LOAD RESISTOR
a
ZENER DIODE CHARGE CONTROL AND TEST PROCEDURE = … = я HS
ZENER DIODE LOCATION .. = ... = ... .. = |. … =. H6
ALTERNATOR AND STATOR DETAILS (Specifications and Output Figures): ... = H7
ELECTRIC HORN ... i. = = e. = .. .. = |. “e |. H8
HEADLAMP ... _ = в = .. |. = .. =. = = _ но
DESCRIPTION
BEAM ADJUSTMENTS
HEADLAMP REMOVING AND REFITTING = = = =. = … = H10
TAIL AND STOPLAMP UNIT ... = нет. … » e .. … H11
FUSES … = = = = i» = … = i» .. |. " ... H12
IGNITION SWITCH |. ... … = … .. …. ... … = = H13
IGNITION CUT-OUT BUTTON = = = = ... … ... а, = H14
WARNING LAMPS ... ... = |. ... ... = ... |. … =. H15
STOP LAMP SWITCHES ... = = … ... = " ... ... ... = H16
OIL PRESSURE SWITCH ... = .. ... ... … … cs … ... H17
CAPACITOR IGNITION . = ... .. .. ... ces = = H18
IDENTIFICATION OF CAPACITOR TERMINALS
STORAGE LIFE
TESTING os
SERVICE NOTES ...
WIRING
WIRING DIAGRAMS ... ve же | _ i. ... ... ... .. _ H+19
HI
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
INTRODUCTION
The electrical system 1s supplied from an aiternating
current generator contained in the primary chain-
case and driven from the crankshaft. The single
charge rate generator output 1s then converted into
direct current by a sificon diode rectifier. The
direct current is supplied to a 12 volt 8 ampere/hour
battery with a Zener diode in circuit to regulate
the battery current.
The current is then supplied to the ignition system
which is controlled by a double contact breaker
driven direct from the exhaust camshaft, The
contact breaker feeds two ignition coils, one for
cach cylinder, and the two capacitors are mounted
separately in a waterproof pack. The battery
supplies current for the headlamp, tail lamp and
instruments and warning lamps.
The routine maintenance needed by the various
components is set out in the following sections. All
electrical components and connections including
the earthing points to the frame of the machine
must be clean and tight.
No emergency start facility is provided since there is
however sufficient voltage to start the machine when a
discharged battery is in circit.
A single 12 volt 8 amp/hr battery is used.
SECTION HI
BATTERY INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE
The battery containers are moulded in translucent
polystyrene through which the acid level can be
seen. The battery top Is so designed that when the
cover is in position, the special anti-spill filler plugs
are sealed in a common venting chamber. Gas from
the filler plugs leaves this chamber through a vent
pipe union at the side of the top. The vent at the
other side of the top is sealed off. Polythene tubing
is attached to the vent pipe union to lead corrosive
fumes away from parts of the machine which may
otherwise suffer damage.
To prepare a dry-charged battery for service, first
discard the vent hole sealing tape and then pour
into each cell pure dilute sulphuric acid of appro-
priate specific gravity to THE COLOURED LINE.
(See table (a)). Allow the battery to stand for at
least one hcur for the electrolyte to settle down,
thereafter maintain the acid level at the coloured
line by adding distilled water.
H2
| |
' ГЕ EIN | ;
TR - Le fat !
||; ;" |
pp lp
Al EA 1
| A ! dde hi
Fig. Hi. Exploded view of battery
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
Hi. PART À. ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
Every week examine the level of the electrolyte in
each cell, Lift the battery our of the carrier so that
the coloured filling line can be seen. Add distilled
water until the electrolyte level reaches this line.
Note.—On no account should batteries be
topped up to the separator guard but only
to the coloured tine.
With this type of battery, the acid can only be
reached by a miniature hydrometer, which would
indicate the state of charge.
Great care should be taken when carrying our these
operations not to spill any acid or allow a naked
flame near the electrolyte. The mixture of oxygen
and hydrogen given off by a battery on charge, and
to a lesser extent when standing idle, can be
dangerously explosive.
The readings obtained from the battery electrolyte
should be compared with those given in table (a).
SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF ELECTROLYTE
FOR FILLING THE BATTERY
U.K. and Climates Tropical Climates
normally below over
90°F (32:2°C) 90°F (32-2°C)
Every 1,000 miles (1,500 k.m.) or monthly, or more
regularly in hot climates the battery should be
cleaned as follows. Remove the battery cover and
clean the battery top. Examine the terminals: if
they are corroded scrape them clean and smear
them with a film of petroleum jelly, such as -aseline.
Remove the vent plugs and check that the vent
holes are clear and that the rubber washer fitted
under each plug is in good condition. Note that
current batteries have the plugs en bloc and no
washers are used on this type.
Hi. PART B. MAXIMUM PERMISSABLE
ELECTROLYTE TEMPERATURE
DURING CHARGE
Filling | Fully charged | Filling | Fully charged
1-260 | 1-280/1-300 1-210 1-220/1-240
|
Climates | Climates | Climates
normally between + | frequently above
Below 80°F 80-100°F | 100°F
(27°C) (27-38°C) (38°C)
100°F 110°F 120°F
(38°C) (43°C) (49°C)
Notes.
The specific gravity of the electrolyte varies with the
temperature. For convenience in comparing specific
gravities, they are always corrected to 60°F., which
is adopted as a reference temperature. The method
of correction is as follows:
For every 5°F. below 60°F. deduct -020 from the
observed reading to obtain the true specific gravity
at 60°F. For every 5°F. above 60°F., add -020 to the
observed reading to obtain the true specific gravity
at 60°F.
The temperature must be indicated by a thermo-
meter having its bulb actually immersed in the
electruiyic wa. au. the ambient temperature. To
take a temperature reading tilt the battery side-
ways and then insert into the electrolyte.
H3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION H2
COIL IGNITION SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION
The coil ignition system comprises two ignition
coils and a contact breaker fitted in the timing
cover and driven by the exhaust camshaft. The
ignition coils are mounted behind the gearbox on a
pressed steel mounting plate. Apart from cleaningthe
coils, sn between the terminals and checking the low
tension and high tension connections, the coils will
not require any other attention. Testing the igni-
tion cots is amply covered in H2 Part C below whilst
testing the contact breaker is described in H2
Part D. The 10CA type of contact breaker is used.
The condensers are mounted underneath the twin-
seat on the electrical platform.
The best method of approach to a faulty ignition
system, is that of first checking the low tension
circuit for continuity as shown in H2 Part A, and
then following the procedure laid out in H2 Part B
to locate the fault(s).
Failure to locate a fault in the low tension circuit
(ndicates that the high tension circuit or sparking
plugs are fauity, and the procedure detailed in
H2 Part E must be followed. Before commencing
any of the foliowing tests, however, the contact
breaker and sparking plugs must be cleaned and
adjusted to eliminate this possible source of fault.
H2 PART A. CHECKING THE LOW
TENSION CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
To check whether there is a fault in the low-tension
Circuit and to locate its position, the following tests
should be carried out: —
First inspect the in-line fuse in the battery earth
cable (brown/blue lead} and replace if suspect.
Check also the cut-out switch; this can be done by
disconnecting the white, and white/yellow lead
from the left handiebar switch and connecting
them together. This will complete the ignition
circuit by by-passing the cut-out switch.
H4
H2 PART B. FAULT FINDING IN THE
LOW TENSION CIRCUIT
To trace a fault in the low tension wiring, turn the
ignition switch to ‘’IGN’’ position and then crank
the engine until both sets of contacts are opened,
or alternatively, place a piece of insulating material
between both sets of contacts whilst the following
test is carried out.
With the aid of a D.C. voltmeter and 2 test-prods
(voltmeter 0-15 volts for 12 volt electrical systems),
make a point to point check along the low tension
circuit starting at the battery and working right
through to the ignition coils, stage by stage, in the
following manner, referring to the relevant wiring
diagram in Section H14.
Note.—lt will be necessary to disconnect the Zener
Diode before the test is carried out. To do this
remove the brown /blue lead from the Diode centre
terminal. (See Section HS for Diode location).
(1) First, establish that the battery is earthed
correctly by connecting the volt meter across
the battery negative terminal and the machine
frame earth. No voltage reading indicates that
the red earthing lead is faulty (or the fuse
blown, where fitted). Also, a low reading
would indicate a poor battery earth connection.
Check also the fuse in the main negative lead.
(2) Connect the voltmeter between the left
ignition coil (—Ve) terminal and earth and then
the right ignition coil (— Ve) terminal and earth.
No voltage reading indicates a breakdown
between the battery and the coil (— Ve) ter-
minal, or that the switch connections are faulty.
(3) Connect the voltmeter between ignition switch
input terminal and earth. No reading indicates
that the brown and blue lead has faulty con-
nections. Check for voltage at the brown/
blue lead connections at rectifier, and lighting
switch terminals No's 2 and 3.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
(4) Connect the voltmeter across ignition switch
output terminal and earth. No reading indicates
that the ignition switch is fauity and should be
replaced. Battery voltage reading at this point
but not at the ignition coil (—Ve) terminals
indicates that the white lead has become
‘open circuit” or become disconnected.
(5) Disconnect the black/white, and black/yellow
leads from the (+ Ve) terminals of each ignition
coil. Connect the voltmeter across the ( ! Ve)
terminal of the left coil and earth and then
the (+ Ve) terminal of the right coil and earth.
No feading on the voltmeter in either case
indicates that the coil primary winding is fauity
and a replacement ignition-coil should be fitted.
(6) With both sets of contacts open reconnect the
ignition coil leads and then connect the volt-
meter across both sets of contacts in turn. No
reading in either case indicates that there is a
faulty connection or the internal insulation
has broken down in one of the condensers
(capacitors).
If a capacitor is suspected then a substitution
should-be made and a re-test carried out.
(7) Finally, reconnect the Zener Diode brown [blue
lead and then connect the voltmeter between
the Zener Diode centre terminal and earth.
The voltmeter should read battery volts. If it
does not the Zener Diode is faulty and a
substitution should be made. Refer to Section
HS for the correct procedure for testing a Zener
Diode on the machine. Ignition coil check
procedure is given in Section H2, Part C.
H2 PART C. IGNITION COILS
The ignition coils consist of primary and secondary
windings wound concentrically about a laminated
soft tron core, the secondary winding being next to
the core. The primary winding usually consists ot
some 300 turns of enamel covered wire and the
secondary some 17,000-26,000 turns of much finer
wire—also enamel covered. Each layer is paper
insulated from the next in both primary and secon-
dary windings.
To test the ignition coils on the machine, first ensure
that the low tension circuit is in order as described
in H2 Part A above then disconnect the high tension
leads from the left and right sparking plugs.
Turn the ignition switch to the on position and
crank the engine until the contacts (those with the
black /yellow lead from the ignition coil) for the
right cylinder are closed. Flick the contact breaker
lever open a number of times whilst the high tension
lead from the right ignition coil is held about -À in.
away from the cylinder head. If the ignition coil is
in good condition a strong spark should be obtained.
If no spark occurs this indicates the ignition coil to
be faulty.
Repeat this test for the left high tension lead and
coil by cranking the engine until the contacts with
the black/white lead from the remaining ignition
coil are closed.
Before a fault can be attributed to an ignition coll It
must be ascertained that the high tension cables
are not cracked or showing signs of deterioration,
as this may often be the cause of mis-firing etc. ft
should also be checked that the ignition points are
actually making good electrical contact when closed
and that the moving contact is insulated from earth
(ground) when open. See Test H2 Part B. It is
advisable to remove the ignition coils and test them
by the method described below.
BENCH TESTING AN IGNITION COIL
Connect the ignition coil into the circuit shown In
Fig. H3 and set the adjustable gap to 9 mm. for
17M12 types (12 volt). With the contact breaker
running at 100 r.p.m. and the coil in good condition,
not more than 5% missing should occur at the spark
gap over a period of 15 seconds. The primary
winding can be checked for short-circuit coils by
connecting an ohmeter across the low tension
terminals. The reading obtained should be within
the figures quoted hereafter (at 20°C).
Н5
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Primary Resistance
|
Coil
Min. Max.
17M12 3:0 ohms. 3-4 ohms.
DJUSTABLE GAP
+ —_—
0 Smm
| О 5mm
130
- AUXILIARY ELECTRODE
_ GREY FIBRE
OR BAKELISED
FABRIC BLOCK
(СИТ ОМ
COIL
CONTACT BREAKER
Ho UNIT
"FRM Mea Tg
|
Sww OR - WE
TERMINA!
: CBOR+vE.
BATTERY
e 1
3 TERMINAL —
od
—
93
Fig. HZ. Ignition coil test rig
H2 PART D. CONTACT BREAKER
Faults occurring at the contact breaker are in the
main due to, incorrect adjustment of the contacts
or the efficiency being impaired by piling, pitting
or oxidation of the contacts due to oil etc. There-
fore, always ensure that the points are clean and
that the gap is adjusted to the correct working
clearance as described in Section B26.
To test for a faulty condenser, first turn the ignition
switch to the on position and then take voltage
readings across each set of contacts in turn
with the contacts open. No reading indicates that
the condenser internal insulation has broken down.
Should the fault be due to a condenser having a
HE
reduction in capacity, indicated by excessive arcing
when in use, and overheating of the contact faces, a
check should be made by substitution.
Particular attention is called to the periodic lubrication
procedure for the contact breaker which is given in
Section A. When lubricating the parts ensure that no ail
or grease gets onto the contacts.
If it is felt that the contacts require surface grinding
then the complete contact breaker unit should
be removed as described in Section B26 and the
moving contacts disconnected by unscrewing the
nut which secures the low tension lead, removing
the lead and nylon bush. The spring and contact
point can be removed from the pivot spindle.
Repeat this procedure for the other contact point.
Grinding is best achieved by using a fine carborun-
dum stone or very fine emery cloth, afterwards
wiping away any trace of dirt or metal dust with a
clean petrol (gasoline) moistened cloth. The con-
tact faces should be slightly domed to ensure point
contact. There is no need to remove the pitting
from the fixed contact.
When reassembling, the nylon bush is fitted through
the low tension connection tab, and through the
spring location eye.
H2 PART E. CHECKING THE HIGH
TENSION CIRCUIT
If ignition failure or mis-firing óccurs, and the fault
is not in the low tension circuit, then check the
ignition coils as described in Part C. If the colls
prove satisfactory, ensure that the high tension
cables are not the cause of the fault.
If a good spark is available at the high tension cable,
then the sparking plug suppressor cap or the
sparking plug itself may be the cause of the fault.
Clean the sparking plug and adjust the electrodes to
the required setting as described in Section H3
and then re-test the engine for running perform-
ance. If the fault recurs then it is likely the
suppressor caps are faulty and these should be
renewed.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SECTION H3
SPARKING PLUGS
It is recommended that the sparking plugs be
inspected, cleaned and tested every 3,000 miles
(4,800 km.) and new ones fitted every 12,000
miles (20,000 km.).
To remove the sparking plugs a box spanner (12 in.
(19-5 mm.) across flats) should be used and if any
difficulty is encountered a small amount of pene-
trating oil (see lubrication chart Section A1)
should be placed at the base of the sparking plug
and time allowed for penetration. When removing
the sparking plugs identify each plug with the
cylinder from which it was removed so that any
faults revealed on examination can be traced back
to the cylinder concerned.
Due to certain features of engine design the sparking
plugs will probably show slightly differing deposits
and colouring characteristics. For this purpose it is
recommended that any adjustments to carburation
etc., which may be carried out to gain the required
colour characteristics should always be referred
to the left cylinder.
Examine both plugsforsignsofoilfouling. Thiswillbe
indicated by a wet, shiny, black deposit on the central
insulator. Thisis caused by excessive oil in the com-
bustion chamber during combustion and indicates
that the piston rings or cylinder bores are worn.
Next examine the plugs for signs of petrol (gaso-
line) fouling. This is indicated by a dry, sooty,
black deposit which is usually caused by over-rich
carburation, although ignition system defects such
as a discharged battery, faulty contact breaker, coil
or capacitor defects, or a broken or worn out cable
may be additional causes. To rectify this type of
fault the above mentioned items should be checked
with special attention given to carburation system.
Again, the left plug should be used as the indicator.
The right plug will almost always have a darker
characteristic.
Over-heating of the sparking plug electrodes is
indicated by severely eroded electrodes and a white,
burned or blistered insulator. This type of fault
is usually caused by weak carburation, although
plugs which have been operating whilst not being
screwed down sufficiently can easily become over-
heated due to heat that is normally dissipated
through to the cylinder head not having an adequate
conducting path. Over-heating is normally sympto-
mised by pre-ignition, short plug life, and “pinking”
which can ultimately result in piston crown failure.
Unecessary damage can result from over-tightening
the plugs and to achieve a good seal between the
plug and cylinder head a torque wrench should be
used to tighten the plugs to the figure quoted in
“General Data”.
Fig. H3. Sparking plug diagnosis
A plug of the correct grade will bear a light flaky
deposit on the outer rim and earth electrode, and
these and the base of the insulator will be light
chocolate brown in colour. A correct choice of
plug is marked A. B shows a plug which appears
bleached, with a deposit like cigarette ash; this is
too ‘hot-running’ for the performance of the engine
and a cooler-running type should be substituted.
A plug which has been running too ‘cold’ and has
not reached the self-cleaning temperature is shown
at C. This has oil on the base of the insulator and
electrodes, and should be replaced by a plug that
will burn off deposits and remove the possibility of
a short-circuit. The plug marked D is heavily svoted,
indicating that the mixture has been too rich, and
a further carburation check should be made. At
illustration E is seen a plug which is completely
worn out and badly in need of replacement.
To clean the plugs it is preferable to make use of a
properly designed proprietary plug cleaner. The
maker’s instructions for using the cleaner should
be followed carefully.
H7
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
When the plugs have been carefully cleaned,
examine the central insulators for cracking and the
centre electrode for excessive wear. In such cases
the plugs have completed their useful life and new
ones should be fitted.
Finally, before re-fitting the sparking plugs the
electrodes should be adjusted to the correct gap
setting of -020 in. (-5 mm.). Before refitting spark-
Ing plugs the threads should be cleaned by means
of a wire brush and a minute amount of graphite
grease smeared onto the threads. This will prevent
any possibility of thread seizure occurring,
If the ignition timing and carburation settings are
correct and the plugs have been correctly fitted,
but over-heating still occurs then it is possible that
carburation is being adversely affected by an air
leak between the carburetter, manifold and the
cylinder head. This possibility must be checked
thoroughly before taking any further action. When
it is certain that none of the above mentioned faults
are the cause of over-heating then the plug type and
grade should be considered.
Normally the type of plugs quoted in "General
Data’ are satisfactory for general use of the machine,
but in special isolated cases, conditions may demand
a plug of a different heat range. Advice is readily
available to solve these problems from the plug
manufacturer who should be consulted.
Note.—If the machine isof thetype fitted with an-air
filter or cleaner and this has been removed it will
affect the carburation of the machine and hence may
adversely affect the grade of sparking plugs fitted.
SECTION Ha
CHARGING SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION
The charging current is supplied by the alternator,
but due to the characteristics of alternating current
the battery cannot be charged direct from the
alternator. To convert the alternating current to
direct current a full wave bridge rectifier is con-
nected into the circuit, The alternator gives full
output, ali the alternator coils being permanently
connected across the rectifier. For this reason
the alternator has only 2 output leads.
Excessive charge is absorbed by the Zener Diode
ALTERNATOR
which is connected across the battery. Always
ensure that the ignition switch is in the “OFF”
position whilst the machine is not in use, to prevent
overheating of the ignition coils, and discharging
the battery.
To locate a fault in the charging circuit, first test the
alternator as described in H4 Part B. If the alter-
nator is satisfactory, the fault must lie in the
charging circuit, hence the rectifier must be checked
as given in Section H4 Part C and then the wiring
and connections as shown in Section H4 Part D.
IGNITION
OFFo
SWITCH
—
TO IGN.COILS & ON
"IGN. WARNING LIGHT
SH
12v.
LIGHT
OFFo
SWITCH
PILOTO o 256
HEADO
Fig. H4. Schematic diagram of 12 volt charging circuit
H8
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
H4 PART A. CHECKING THE D.C. OUT-
PUT AT THE RECTIFIER
For this test the battery must be in good condition
and a good state of charge, therefore before
conducting the test ensure that the battery is up
to the required standard, or alternatively fit a
good replacement battery,
Disconnect the brown/blue centre lead at the
rectifier, connect D.C. ammeter (0-15 amp.) in
series between the main brown/blue lead and the
centre terminal, then start the engine and run it at
approximately 3,000 r.p.m. (equivalent to 45 m.p.h.
in top gear).
Note.—Ensure that the ammeter is weil insulated
from the surrounding earth points otherwise a
short circuit may occur.
A single charge rate is used and irrespective of
switch positions the minimum D.C. output from
the rectifier at 3,000 r.p.m. should be no less than
9-5 amperes.
H4 PART B. CHECKING THE
ALTERNATOR OUTPUT
Disconnect the alternator output cab'ss underneath
the engine.
Connect an A.C voltmeter (0-15 volts) with
1 ohm load resistor in parallel with each of th9
alternator leads in turn as shown in the table
Fig. H20, and run the engine at 3,000 r.p.m. (equiva-
lent to 45 m.p.h. in top gear) and observe the volt-
meter readings. A suitable 1 ohm load resistor
can be made from a piece of nichrome wire as
shown in Section H7 Part E
From the results obtained, the following deductions
can be made: —
(I) If the readings are all equal to or higher than
9 volts then the alternator is satisfactory.
(1) A low reading on any group of coils indicates
either that the leads concerned are chafed or
damaged due to rubbing on the chains or that
some turns of the coils are short circuited.
(11) Low readings for all parts of the test indicates
either that the green/white lead has become
chafed or damaged due to rubbing on the
chain(s) or that the rotor has become partially
demagnetised. If the latter case applies, check
that this has not been caused by a faulty
rectifier or that the battery is of incorrect
polarity, and only then fit a new rotor.
(iv) A zero reading for any group of coils indicates
that a coil has become disconnected, is oran
circuit, or is earthed.
(Y) À reading obtained between any one lead and
earth indicates that coil windings or con-
nections have become earthed.
If any of the above mentioned faults occur, always
check the stator leads for possible chain damage
before attempting repairs or renewing the stator.
It is beyond the scope of this manual to give instruc-
tion for the repair of faulty stator windings.
H4 PART C. RECTIFIER MAINTENANCE
AND TESTING
The silicon bridge rectifier requires no maintenance
beyond checking that the connections are clean and
tight, and that the nut securing the rectifier to the
frame is tight. lt should always be kept clean and
dry to ensure good cooling, and spilt oil washed
off immediately with hot water.
Note.—The nuts clamping the rectifier plates
together must not be disturbed or slackened in
any way.
When tightening the rectifier securing nut, hold
the spanners as shown in Fig. H5, for if the plates
are twisted, the internal connections will be broken.
Note that the circles marked on the fixing bolt and
nut indicate that the thread form is } in. U.N.F.
Fig. H5. Refitting the rectifier
HO
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
TESTING THE RECTIFIER
For test purposes disregard the end earth
(ground) terminal
To test the rectifier, first disconnect the brown/
blue lead from the rectifier centre terminal and
insulate the end of the lead to prevent any possibility
of a short circuit occurring, and then connect a D.C.
voltmeter (with 1 ohm load resistor in parallel)
between the rectifier centre terminal and earth.
Note. Voltmeter positive terminal to frame
earth (ground) and negative terminal to centre
terminal on rectifier,
Turn the ignition switch to the ‘ignition only’
position and start the engine.
With the engine running at approximately 3,000
r.p.m. (approximately 45 m.p.h. in top gear)
observe the voltmeter readings. The reading
obtalned should be at least 7-5V minimum.
(i) If the reading is equal to or slightly greater
than that quoted, then the rectifier elements
in the forward direction are satisfactory.
(ii) If the reading is excessively higher than the
figures given, then check the rectifier earthing
bolt connection.
(li) If the reading is lower than the figures
quoted or zero readings are obtained, then the
rectifier or the charging circuit wiring is
faulty and the rectifier should be disconnected
and bench tested so that the fault can be
located.
Note that all of the above conclusions assume that
the alternator A.C. output figures were satis-
factory. Any fault at the alternator will, of course,
reflect on the rectifier test results. Similarly any
fault in the charging circuit wiring may indicate
that the rectifier is faulty. The best method of
locating a fault is to disconnect the rectifier and
bench-test it as shown below:
BENCH TESTING THE RECTIFIER
For this test the rectifier should be disconnected
and removed. Before removing the rectifier,
H10
disconnect the leads from the battery terminals to
avoid the possibility of a short circuit occurring.
Using a 12 volt battery and Tohm load resistor,
connect the D.C. voltmeter in the V2 position,
as shown in Fig. Hé. Note the battery voltage
(should be 12V) and then connect the volt-
meter in V1 position whilst the following tests
are conducted.
12v
|
E
|
{=} |
o BATTERY |
| |
—— mp |W
|
+ APPROX 50 AMP - HOUR |
1 OHM RESISTOR
140
Fig. H6. Bench testing the rectifier
A voltmeter in position V1 will! measure the volt
drop across the rectifier plate. In position V2 it
will measure the supply voltage to check that it is
the recommended 12 volts on load.
1 2 3
Capacitor |
ignition “| ! 1 |
terminal =
Fig. H7. Rectifier—showing terminal connections
for bench tests 1 and 2
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
TEST 1 CHECKING FORWARD RESISTANCE
— El +11 ] |!
А A
“yA 7 + „” ` ‚” “NA / / “Y,
“x x IE NA ‘ >. > N A,
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+ York <> 4 _-< а = »-- 4
2 зи, Y =" 2 2
AA “HSK A E
ss _T Y “oo, N ` sr MN
Y Y
13 13 +13 —13
TEST2 CHECKING BACK LEAKAGE
+11 — 11 e 3
A A
1, x d “ 7 2x oO 7 >
“XK Na +, SA A a , a
— E =” < >-- 4
2 © 1, м” 2 “vi, ` v7 A ` ñ
“ ^^ Ss КО с x % %
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Y
13 13 3 142
Fig. H8. Rectifier test sequence for checking forward resistance and back leakage
Test 1. With the test leads, make the following
connections but keep the testing time as short as
possible to avoid overheating the rectifier cell:
(a) 1 and 2, (b) 1 and 4, (c) 3 and 4, (d) 3 and 2. Each
reading should not be greater than 2-5 volts with the
battery polarity as shown.
Test 2. Reverse the leads or battery polarity and
repeat Test 1. The readings obtained should not be
more than 1-5 voits below battery voltage (V,)
(le. 10-5 volts minimum.)
If the readings obtained are not within the figures
given, then the rectifier internal connections are
shorting or aged. and the rectifier should be
renewed.
H4 PART D. CHECKING THE CHARGING
CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
All six alternator coils are connected in parallel so
that the full alternator output is available irrespec-
tive of the lighting switch position. This also makes
an emergency start system unnecessary and it is
therefore possible to use a simplified wiring circuit.
First check that there is voltage at the battery and
that it is correctly connected into the circuit
+ve earth (ground). Ensure that the fuse has not
blown.
(i) First, check that there is voltage at the rectifier
centre terminal by connecting a D.C. volt-
meter, with 1 ohm load resistor in parallel,
between the rectifier centre terminal (not the
end terminal and earth (remember (+ve)
positive earth (ground)). The voltmeter should
read battery volts. If it does not, disconnect
the alternator leads at the snap connectors
under the engine unit.
(a) Fit a jumper lead across the brown/blue and
green/yellow connections at the rectifier,
and check the voltage at the snap connector.
This test will indicate whether the harness
alternator lead is open circuit.
(b) Repeat this test at the rectifier for the white]
green lead.
H4 PART Е. CONSTRUCTING A ONE-
OHM LOAD RESISTOR
The resistor used in the following tests must be
accurate and constructed so that it will not over-
heat otherwise the correct values of current or
voltage will not be obtained.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
A suitable resistor can be made from 4 yards
(33 metres) of 18 S.W.G. (-048 in. (i.e. 1-2 m.m.)
dia.) NICHROME wire by bending it into two
equal parts and calibrating it as follows: —
(1) Fix a heavy gauge flexibie lead to the folded
end of the wire and connect this lead to the
positive terminal of a 6 volt battery.
(2) Connect a D.C. voltmeter (0-10V) across the
battery terminals and an ammeter (0-10 amp)
between the battery negative terminal and
the free ends of the wire resistance, using a
crocodile clip to make the connection.
(3) Move the clip along the wires, making contact
with both wires until the ammeter reading is
numerically equal to the number of volts
indicated on the voltmeter, The resistance is
then 1 ohm. Cut the wire at this point, twist
the two ends together and wind the wire on
an asbestos former approximately 2 inches
(5 cm.) dia. so that each turn does not contact
the one next to it.
SECTION H5
ZENER DIODE CHARGE CONTROL
DESCRIPTION
The Zener Diode output regulating system uses
all the coils of the 6-coil alternator connected
permanently across the rectifier, provides auto-
matic control for the charging current. The Diode
may be connected through the ignition switch or
direct to the centre terminal of thc rectifier,
Fig M9. Zener Diode
Assuming the battery is In a low state of charge its
terminal voltage (the same voltage is across the
Diode) will also be low, therefore the maximum
charging current will flow into the battery from the
alternator. At first none of the current is by-passed
by the Diode because of it being non-conducting
due to the low battery terminal volts. However,
as the battery is quickly restored to a full state of
H12
charge, the system voltage rises until at 13-5 volts
the Zener Diode is partially conducting, thereby
providing an alternative path for a small part of che
charging current. Small increases in battery volt-
age result in large increases in Zener conductivity
until, at approximately 15 volts about 5 amperes of
the alternator output is by-passing the battery, The
battery will continue to receive only a portion of
the alternator output as long as the system voltage
is relatively high.
Depression of the system voltage, due to the use of
headlamp or other lighting equipment, causes the
Zener Diode current to decrease and the balance to
be diverted and consumed by the component in
use.
If the electrical loading is sufficient to cause the
system voltage to fall to 14 volts, the Zener Diode
will revert to a high resistance state of non-
conductivity and the full generated output will go
to meet the demands of the battery,
MAINTENANCE
The Zener Diode is mounted in the right side air
cleaner body. The aluminium construction of
this lug acts as a heat sink for excess current.
Providing the Diode and the heat sink are kept
clean, and provided with an adequate airflow, to
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
ensure maximum efficiency, and provided a firm flat
‘’metal to metal'’ contact is mantained between the
base of the Diode and the surface of the heat sink,
to ensure adequate heat flow, no maintenance will
be necessary.
ZENER DIODE—
CHARGING REGULATOR
TEST PROCEDURE
(Procedure for Testing on the Machine)
The test procedure given below can be used when
lt is required to check the performance of the
Zener Dlode type ZD715 whilst it is in position
on the machine. It is essential that the battery is in
a fully charged state otherwise the tests below will
not be accurate. If in doubt, substitute a battery
that is fully charged.
Good quality moving coil meters should be used
when testing. The voltmeter should have a scale
0-18, and the ammeter 0-5 amps min. The test
procedure is as follows: —-
(A) Disconnect the cable from the Zener Diode
and connect ammeter (in series) between the
Diode Lucar terminal and cable previously
disconnected. The ammeter red or positive
lead must connect to the Diode Lucar ter-
minal.
(B) Connect voltmeter across Zener Diode and
heat sink. The red or positive lead must con-
nect to the heat sink which is earthed to the
frame of the machine by its fixing bolts and a
separate earth lead. The black lead connects
to the Zener Lucar terminal.
(C) Start the engine, ensure that all lights are off,
and gradually increase engine speed while at
the same time observing both meters:—
(i) the series connected ammeter must indicate
zero amps, up to 12:75 volts, which will be
indicated on the shunt connected voltmeter
as engine speed is slowly increased.
(if) increase engine speed still further, until Zener
current indicated on ammeter is 2-0 amp. At
this value the Zener voltage should be within
13-5 volts to 15:3 volts.
TEST CONCLUSIONS :-—
If the arnmeter in test (i) registers any current at all
before the voltmeter indicates 13:0 volts, then a
replacement Zener Diode must be fitted.
If test (i) is satisfactory but in test (ii) a higher
voltage than that stated is registered on the volt-
meter, before the ammeter indicates 2:0 amp, then
a replacement Zener Diode must be fitted.
H13
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM —
ZENER DIODE LOCATION
The Zener Diode is mounted in the wall of the right and the body causing overheating of the diode
hand side half of the air cleaner body. The alumin- insulation and resulting in damage.
tum construction of the air cleaner body serves as a
heatsink and dissipates excess charge current in the
form of heat, (See Section Hb}.
To remove the diode, first remove the R.H, air cleaner
outer cover, see Section B6.
When refitting, the diode nut must be tightened
with extreme care to a maximum torque of 22/28
Ib. in. Also great care must be taken to ensure that
any foreign matter does not become trapped bet-
ween the bottom face of the diode and the wall
of the cleaner body,
Any such particie would cause an air gap thereby
Fig. H10. Location of Zener Diode
reducing the heat conductivity between the diode
SECTION H7
ALTERNATOR AND STATOR DETAILS
System lgnitior. Alternator Stator
MODELS voltage type type No.
T140V |
TRV 12 Y. Coil RM.21 47205
Fig. H11, Alternator—type and stator detaiis
H14 —
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SECTION HS
ELECTRIC HORN
DESCRIPTION
The horn is of a high frequency single note type and
is operated by direct current from the battery.
The method of operation is that of a magnetically
operated armature, which impacts on the cone face,
and causes the tone disc of the horn to vibrate. The
magnetic circuit is made self interrupting by con-
tacts which can be adjusted externally.
If the horn fails to worl, check the horn connection
wiring. Check the battery for state of charge.
A low supply voltage at the horn will adversely
effect horn performance. If the above checks are
made and the fault is not remedied, then adjust the
horn as follows.
HORN ADJUSTMENT
When adjusting and testing the horn, do not Jepress
the horn push for more than a fraction of a second
or the circuit wiring may be overloaded.
A small hexagon head adjustment screw ituated
near the terminals is provided to take up wear in the
internal moving parts of the horn. To adjust, turn
this screw anticlockwise until the horn just fails
to sound, and then turn it back (clockwise)
about one quarter to half a turn.
SECTION H9
HEADLAMP
DESCRIPTION
The headlamp is of the sealed beam unit type and
access is gained to the bulb and bulb holder by
withdrawing the rim and beam unit assembly. To
do so, slacken the screw at the top of the headlamp
and prise off the rim and beam unit assembly.
The bulb can be removed by first pressing the
cylindrical cap inwards and turning it anticlockwise.
The cap can then be withdrawn and the bulb is free
to be removed.
When fitting a new bulb, note that it locates by
means of a cutaway and projection arrangement.
also note that the cap can only be replaced one way,
the tabs being staggered to prevent incorrect
reassembly. Check the replacement bulb voltage
and wattage specification and type before fitting.
Focusing with this type of beam unit is unnecessary
and there is no provision for such.
BEAM ADJUSTMENTS
The beam must in al! cases be adjusted as specified
by local lighting regulations. In the United Kingdom
the Transport Lighting Regulations reads as
follows :—
A lighting system must be arranged so that it can
give a light which is incapable of dazzling any person
standing on the same horizontal plane as the vehicle
at a greater distance than twenty five feet from the
lamp, whose eye level is not less than three feet—
six inches above that plane.
The headlamp must therefore be set so that the
main beam is directed straight ahead and parallel
with the road when the motorcycle is fully loaded.
To achieve this, place the machine on a level road
pointing towards a wall at a distance of 25 feet away.
with a rider and passenger, on the machine, slacken
the two pivot bolts at either side of the headlamp
and tilt the headlamp until the beam is focused at
approximately two feet six inches from the base
of the wall. Do not forget that the headlamp should
be on “full beam’ lighting during this operation,
H15
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION Hlo0
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE HEADLAMP
Disconnect the leads from the battery terminals
then slacken the light unit securing screws at the
top of the headlamp. Prise the rim of the light unit
free.
Disconnect the two red earth wires from their
copper holders, one on the main bulb retaining cap
and the other from the bottom of the inside shell.
Remove all connectng wires from the six snap
connectors and those positioned on the light
switch.
Remove the three warning lighes from the shell,
and the pilot light from the light unit. Withdraw
the harness from the headlamp through the appro-
priate grommets after bending back the harness
retaining clips.
Reassembly is the reversal of the above procedure,
but reference should be made to the wiring diagram.
See section H19. Finally set the headlamp main
beam. As described in Section H9.
SECTION HII
TAIL AND STOP LAMP UNIT
Access to the bulbs in the tail and stop lamp unit is
achieved by unscrewing the two slotted screws
which secure the lens. The bulb is of the doubie-
filament offset pin type and when a replacement is
carried out, ensure that the bulb is fitted correctly.
Check that the two supply leads are connected
correctly and check the earth (ground) lead to the
bulb holder is in satisfactory condition.
When refitting the lens, do not overtighten the
fixing screws or the lens may fracture as a result.
SECTION HI2
FUSES
B245
Fig. H12. Exploded view of fuseholder assembly
H16
The fuse is to be found on the brown/blue live lead
from the battery negative terminal. It is housed in
a quickly detachable shell and is of 35 amp fuse
rating.
Before following any fault location procedure always
check that the fuse is not the source of the fault.
A new fuse-cartridge should be fitted if there Is
any doubt about the old one.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SECTION HHI3
IGNITION SWITCH
All models are fitted with an ignition switch in-
corporating a ‘‘barrel’’ type lock. These locks use
individual "'Yale' type keys and render the ignition
circuit inoperative when the switch is turned off and
the key removed. lt is advisable for the owner to
note the number stamped on the key to ensure a
correct replacement in the event of the key being
lost.
Three Lucar connectors are incorporated in the
switch and these should be checked from time to
time to ensure good electrical contact.
The ignition switch is positioned on the left side
headlamp bracket. To detach first remove the
rubber cover and the lucar connectors at the back
of the switch and then the large retaining nut.
The battery leads should be removed before
attempting to remove the switch to avoid a short
circuit.
The lock is retained in the body of the switch by a
spring loaded plunger. This can be depressed with a
pointed instrument through a small hole in the side
of the switch body and the lock assembly with-
drawn after the lock and switch together have been
detached from the machine.
SECTION HI4
FLASHER LAMPS
Access to the bulb in the flasher lamp unit can be
obtained by unscrewing the two Phillips head
screws. To remove the bulb, depress inwards and
turn anti-clockwise. When replacing the bulb make
sure it is securely fitted.
REMOVING AND REFITTING
FRONT FLASHER LAMPS
Remove the headlamp rim and light unit. See
section H10. Disconnect the green wires at the
snap connectors. Remove the flasher lamp by
loosening the locking nut and turning the {amp
unit anti-clockwise.
Finatiy pul! the green wire through the flasher
stalk and grommet. When refitting check the
general data for locking nut torque.
REMOVING AND REFITTING REAR
FLASHER LAMPS
Disconnect the battery terminals and green wires
at the snap connectors, found under the seat and
repeat as in the removal of front flasher unit.
H17
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION HIS
WARNING LAMPS
Warning lamps are fitted into the headlamp shell
on all models. The green light indicates high beam.
The orange warning light serves the flasher lamps
and becomes illuminated in conjunction with the
flasher lamps when they are operational. The red
warning light is connected into the ignition circuit
and also to an electrirally controlled oil pressure
switch situated at the timing cover. This results in
the warning light operating as soon as the ignition
is turned on with the engine stopped but extin-
guishes as oil pressure develops beyond a predeter-
mined minimum critical pressure when the motor is
running.
SECTION HiI6
STOP LAMP SWITCHES
A rear stop light switch is fitted to both front and
rear braking systems and operate independantly.
The rear brake switch is fitted to the frame behind
the rear brake pedal and is controlled by adjusting
the short bolt and locknut mounted at the pedal
pivot. Adjustment should be such that the rear
brake light becomes illuminated immediately the
brake is applied. Other than checking the term-
inals for cleanliness and security the unit will
require no further maintainance,
The front brake stop switch is contained in the
right hand handle-bar switch housing and is actuated
by a push rod situated in the brake lever. The push
rod length is adjusted by means of a small screw
found in the hollow of the lever.
To make the adjustment slacken the screw with
the lever in the closed position until the rear stop
light becomes illuminated. Now screw in the
adjuster until the rear light is extinguished. The
rear stop light should now operate as soon as the
front brake is applied. The internal electrical
connections are all soldered and will require no
maintainance.
SECTION HI7
OIL PRESSURE SWITCH
The oil pressure switch is a sealed unit fitted into
the front of the timing cover on all models.
H18
The oil switch is designed to operate at 3-51b./in,? (0-2
to 0-35kg./cm.”) pressure at which stage the oil
warning light will be extinguished. There is no simple
method of checking the function of the switch except
by substitution.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SECTION HI8
CAPACITOR IGNITION (MODEL 2MC)
The Lucas motor cycle capacitor system has been
developed to enable machines to be run with or
without a battery. The rider therefore has the
choice of running with normal battery operation or
running without battery if desired (e.g. competing
in trials or other competitive events) and for
emergency operation in case of battery failure.
Machines can readily be started without the battery
and run as normal with full use of standard lighting.
When stationary, however, parking lights will not
work unless the battery is connected. The capacitor
system also has the advantage of being less critical
with regard to alternator timing.
The system utilises the standard 12-volt battery-coil
ignition equipment with the Zener diode charging
regulator mounted on an efficient heat sink, plus a
spring mounted high capacity electrolytic capacitor
(Model 2MC), of à special shock-resistant type.
The energy pulses from the alternator are stored
by the capacitor to ensure that sufficient current
ZZ
= =
= =
= ===
= =
= =
Ss =
=
==
Fig. H13, Capacitor and spring
flows through the ignition coil at the moment of
contact opening, thus producing an adequate spark
for starting. When running, the capacitor also
helps to reduce the d.c. voltage ripple.
Also with this system alternator timing is less
critical. Provided the centres of the rotor and
stator poles are roughly in line in the fully retarded
position (i.e. as normal battery) emergency start
condition which is 30° past magnetic neutral)
satisfactory starting will be obtained. Furthermore
any auto-advance angle and speed characteristics
may be used and perfect running ignition pe: ior
mance achieved.
IDENTIFICATION OF CAPACITOR
TERMINALS
The 2MC capacitor is an electroclytic (polarised)
type and care must be taken to see that the correct
wiring connections are made when fitting. Spare
Lucar connectors are supplied to assist in connecting
up. Looking at the terminal end of the unit it will
be seen that there are two sizes of Lucar connector.
The small 3 in. Lucar is the positive (earth) terminal
the rivet of which is marked with a spot of red
paint. The double + in. Lucar forms the negative
terminal.
The illustration on the previous page shows the
spring and capacitor. The capacitor should be
positioned with its terminals pointing downwards.
When fitting the spring to the capacitor, insert the
capacitor at the widest end of the spring and push
it down until the small coil locates in the groove on
the capacitor body.
STORAGE LIFE OF MODEL 2MC
CAPACITOR
The life of the 2MC is very much affected by storage
in high temperatures. The higher the temperature
the shorter its shelf life. At normal temperature
i.e. 20°C. (68°F.) it will have a shelf life of about 18
months. At 40°C. (86°F.) about 9 to 12 months.
Therefore, storing in a cool place will maintain
their efficiency.
H19
Kim The CD Man © 2002
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
TESTING
The efficiency of a stored capacitor can be deter-
mined fairly accurately with the aid of a voltmeter
{scale 0-12 volts) connected to the terminals of a
charged capacitor and the steady reading on
the meter noted. The procedure is as follows: —
(a) Connect the capacitor to a 1Z-volt supply and
leave connected for 5 seconds. Observe care-
fully the polarity of connections, otherwise the
capacitor may be ruined.
(b) Disconnect the supply leads and allow the
charged capacitor(s) to stand for at least 5
minutes.
(c) Connect the voltmeter leads to the capacitor
and note the steady reading. This should not
be less than 9-0 volts for a serviceable unit. If
it is less, the capacitor is leaking and must be
replaced.
If a voltmeter is not available a rough check can be
made by following the procedures in (a) and (b)
and using a single strand of copper wire instead of
the voltmeter to short-circuit the capacitor ter-
minals. A good spark will be obtained from a
serviceable capacitor at the instant he. .anals
are shorted together,
H20
WIRING AND INSTALLATION
The capacitor is fitted into the spring and should
be mounted with its terminals downwards. The
capacitor negative terminal and Zener diode must
be connected to the rectifier centre (d.c.) terminal
(brown white), and the positive terminal must be
connected to the centre bolt earthing terminal .
The mounting spring should be attached to any
convenient point under the twin seat.
SERVICE NOTES
Before running a 2MC equipped machine with the
battery disconnected it is essential that the battery
negative lead be insulated to prevent it from re-
connecting and shorting to earth (frame of machine).
This can be done by removing the fuse from its
holder and replacing it with a length of { in. dia.
dowel rod or other insulating medium.
A faulty capacitor may not be apparent when used
with a battery system. To prevent any incon-
venience arising, periodically check that the
capacitor is serviceable by disconnecting the
battery to see if the machine will start and run
in the normal manner, with full lighting also
available,
Do not run the machine with the Zener Diode
disconnected as the 2MC capacitor will be damaged
due to excessive voltage.
A capacitor kit is available under part number
C.P.210.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION Hi9
WIRING DIAGRAM
Kim The CD Man © 2002
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ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Kim The CD Man © 2002
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H22
Kim The CD Man © 2002
1979 T140E
Ignition System
Charging System
Description
&
Troubleshooting Guide
Published 12/79
Part No. 99-7140
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLES
1979 Electrical Specification
Major changes from 1978 to 1979 are a new The charging system comprises the alternator
desigr alternator (Model RM24) and the (rotor and stator), a plate-type rectifier pack and a
introduction of electronic ignition. Other changes voltage control zener diode. These components
include restyling of the switchgear and headlight anda circuit diagram are ihustrated in FIGS 1 & 2
and the repositioning of the warning lights and
tqmition/hght switch, which are now mounted
between the speedometer and tachometer.
3DS5
RECTIFIER
RM24
ALTERNATOR
STATOR
FIG. 1. CHARGING SYSTEM COMPONENTS
Further information may be obtained from: Customer Information Section.
Technical Service Department Lucas Electrical Limited Parts & Service Division. Great
Hampton Street Birmingham B18 6 AU.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
3DS5
RECTIFIER
| =
FUSE |
O+
Г ZENER y
DIODE |
IGN./LIGHTING
SWITCH
ALTERNATOR
FIG. 2. CHARGING CIRCUIT
The ignition system comprises an electronic two (twin) ignttion coils. These components and a
amplifier unit, à pick-up assembly, a reluctor and circuit diagram are illustrated in FIGS. 3 & 4.
CONNECTOR
nn IGN./LIGHTING
= и IGN. COILS SWITCH
m— CO JL — —é6 363% 1
-| | EMERGENCY
ыы SWITCH
| FUSE
+
AMPLIFIER A
PICK-UP
AND
RELUCTOR.
FIG. 3. IGNITION CIRCUIT
Kim The CD Man © 2002
5PU
5PU sa RELUCTOR
PICK-UP “Magnetic
ASSEMBLY base plate 17M6
e IGNITION COILS
> Pole-studs
a
Reluctor NN
Fixing bolt ~
с DN
Encapsulated
N winding
AB11 >,
AMPLIFIER "i*ing plate
3
FIG. 4. IGNITION SYSTEM COMPONENTS
1 CHARGING SYSTEM TECHNICAL DATA
The alternator produces 3 phase AC, rectified to DC by a 3DS5 rectifier and voltage controlled by a zener
diode.
Alternator RM24
ROOT EEE REREKRRRRRTKEEKRKKRRRREEEEEEEEE Permanent magnet
State EEE RR 3-phase AC
AC Output... ecran Lines renier near À - 5V {min.) at 1000 rev/min
(Measured between any two stator leads) 6-5V{(min.) at 5000 rev/min
DC output... В 11 A (max.) at 5000 rev‘min
(Measured between rectifier large terminal and earth)
Stator resistance... nia aii 0-80-0-950hm
(Measured between any two stator leads)
Stator insulation... iiem eno 100 megohms (min.} at 5000V
leads and laminations).
Rectifier 3DS5
Six diode plate-type rectifier... Surge and polarity conscious.
The DC circuits must not be
disconnected while the engine
IS running.
Zener diode voltage regulator
Standard negative earth type
Regulating voltage... 14:7-15-8V
Kim The CD Man © 2002
2. IGNITION SYSTEM TECHNICAL DATA
Thetwo 6Vignition colsareconnectedinseries
to provide simultaneous HT sparking. The
engine still fires in the correct sequence with
the spurious sparks having no effect.
The primary circuit of the ignition coils Is elec
tronically switched by the remotely mounted
amplitierunit whichistriggered by pulses from
the pick-up and reluctor working in conjunction
with each other
17M6 Ignition coil
Prirnary winding resistance: 1-7 - 1-9 ohms.
AB11 Amplifier
A remotely mounted electronic switching
system contained in a cast alummum box.
SPU Pick-up
A rivetted assembly comprising encapsulated
winding, a fixing plate with pole-studs, and a
permanent magnet sandwiched between the
fixing plate and a base plate. The assembly is a
stationary component mounted in the engine
crankcase, around the reluctor. Two fixing
screws tighten on slots in the fixing plate, the
stots providing adjustments for static igmtion
НО).
5PU Reluctor
A specially shaped steel timing device, moun-
ted onthe end af thecamshaftt. [ts position rela-
tive to the camshaft is determined by a keyway.
Fiomg as by means of a hexagon-headed bolt.
Working Principles
When the igmnitions switched ON, the amplifier
cerns conductive and current flows through the
primary wi ndimngs of the two series connected
«ion CONS and through the amplifer unit to
Eat
A permanent magnetic field surrounds the
pick-up base plate, the encapsulated winding
andthe pole-studs When the engineiscranked
thearmsoftherotatingreluctorapproachthese
poles, causing the field strength to change
which produces a pulse inthe pick-up winding.
This pulse is transmitted to the amplifier unit,
causing It to switch off and break the primary
circuit of the ignition coils. The HT spark is then
produced in the conventional manner,
Operating Characteristics
(1) Electronic advance curve
The advance curve 1s automatically determined
by the amplifier unit.
ENGINE DEGREES
REV/MIN ADVANCE
100 O
500 J
1000 19
2000 30
3000 36
3500 38
5000 40
(11) Voltage operating range
Limits: 8- 16V. Within this voltage range:
(a) A maximum timing tolerance of 1-5 15
permissible at 2000 reluctor rev. min.
(b) Consistent sparking, without missing,
must occur at reluctor speed range of 90
- 4000 rev/min.
3. CHARGING SYSTEM FAULT DIAGNOSIS
AND TESTING
NOTE 1
Ifthe battery rs imcapabic of starting the engine,
Must be rechargeior slave battery utihzed
tortesting purposes ¡Qrservepolarty Reverse
connections wiii dimage The rechter.)
NOTE 2
Test requirements: centre zero 25A moving-
coll ammeter
AC Voltmeter
DC Voltmete:
l ohm 1 TOOVWI 16A0
resistor
Flat or Discharged Battery
SUSPECT: The battery, the alternator and rectifier,
and the voltage control zener diode
(proceed to TEST 11}.
Overcharged Battery
SUSPECT: Voltage control zener diode {proceed
TEST 1).
TEST 1: Alternator Charging Current.
Connect ammeter in series with the battery
positive cable. It 1s convenient to do this at the
battery feed side of the main fuse, in which case
connect BLACK leadto cable and RED leadto fuse.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Runtheengineatapproximately 2000 res dd
switch the headlamp to main beam. The ammeter
should show a small amount of charge, indicating
the alternator is exceeding the maximum
continuous electrical load
it the test is satisfactory, stop engine, restore
Original connections and proceed directly to TEST
D.
If the testis unsatisfactory, proceed to TEST
2
TEST 2. Alternator AC Output.
Disconnect the three snap connectors between
GB (GREEN/BLACK)
WG (WHITE/GREEN)
alternatorandrectifier. Connect ACvoltmeter, with
al ohm {100W)]| load resistor across its terminals,
forthree tests as shown in FIG 5 Runthe engine at
approximately 2000 rev: mn for each test.
The voltmeter should show 5Y runimum for all
three tests, In which case the alternator AC output
Is satisfactory. Stop engine, restore original
connections and proceed to TeST 3
If zero or alow voltage 1s obtamed mn two tests, the
alternator stator is faulty.
If zero or alow voltage is obtained in all three tests,
either the alternator stators faulty or the rotor 1s
demagnetized. Determine whether the stator can
be eliminated by checking the resistance and
insulation of its windings
GY (GREEN/YELLOW)
FIG. 5. ALTERNATOR AC OUTPUT TEST
TEST 3: Alternator AC Continuity
Remove the ignition amplifier housing, for access
to the rectifier
Disconnect the three alternator connections to
therectifier {See FIG. 6.) and repeat TEST 2 at the
ends of the disconnected rectifier leads. The test
result should be the same as TEST 2, in which
case stop the engine, restore original
connections and proceed to TEST 4.
Test unsatistactory, check snap connectors and
leads to rectifier
TEST 4: Rectifier DC Output
Disconnect the large (DC output) terminal of the
rectifier. Connect DC voltmeter with a 1 ohm
(100W) toad resistor across its terminals, as
shown in FIG. 7. Run the engine at approximately
2000 rev/min.
The voltmeter should show 9V min, in which case
stop engine, restore originai connections and refit
the ignition amplifier housing and proceed to TEST
5.
If zero or a low voltage is obtained, the rectifer 15
faulty.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
GB (GREEN/BLACK) WG (WHITE/GREEN) GY (GREEN/YELLOW) =
Fig. 6. ALTERNATOR AC CONTINUITY TEST —
TEST 5: Zener Diode Voltage Regulator Start and run engine at increasing speed until
ammeter shows ZA, then observe voltmeter
reading.
Disconneci zener diode. Connect ammeter and DC
voltmeter as shownin FIG.8. The voltmeter should show 13:5 - 15:-3V. in
which case the charging system is now proved
satisfactory. Stop the engine, restore original
Niote: Theloadresistorconnected across the volt- connections and fit new battery.
meter and DC voltmeter as shown in FIG.
8. If voltage 1s outside the limits, replace zener diode.
FIG. 7. RECTIFIER DC OUTPUT TEST
Kim The CD Man © 2002
FIG. 8. ZENER DIODE VOLTAGE REGULATOR
TEST
A
4. IGNITION SYSTEM FAULT DIAGNOSIS
AND TESTING
NOTE: Test requirements: DC voltmeter
Chmmeter
Engine Fails to Start
Suspect: Discharged battery or no spark atone
or both spark plugs.
Check battery and if satisfactory
proceed to TEST 1.
Engine Runs on One Cylinder Only
Suspect: Spark plug, HT lead, or ignition coil.
Proceed to TEST 1, then if necessary
TEST 2.
Engine Misfires or Runs Erratic
Suspect: Spark plugs, HT leads, ignition timing,
ignition coil, electronic amplifier and
associated pick-up.
Clean spark plugs and check gaps.
Check timing. Finally, prove all items
by substitution.
TEST 1: HT Spark at Plugs.
Remove spark plugs and lay them on engine, HT
leads connected and spark gaps visible. Switch on
ignition, crank engine and check for regular
sparking at both plugs.
If the test is satisfactory, check ignition timing. If
this is also satisfactory, then the ignition system is
not the cause of the engine failing to start.
If sparking occurs atone plug only, interchange the
two plugs and repeat the test. !f fault is now
transferred from one HT lead to the other, replace
the non-sparking plug. If fault is not transferred,
either the HT lead or ignition coil associated with
the non-sparking plug is faulty (proceedto TEST 2).
Leave spark plugs removed from engine.
If there is no sparking at both plugs, check primary
circuitofignition coils {proceed directlyto TEST 3).
TEST 2: HT Spark at ignition Coils
Remove HT leads from one of the ignition coils and
fit substitute lead. Position free end of lead 6mm or
a" froma good earth point (e.g. coil fixing bracket).
Switch on ignition, crank engine and check for
regular sparking at end of lead. Repeat test with
other coll.
Sparking from both coils, replace faulty HT lead
(Reference TEST 1).
Sparking from one coil only, replace non-sparking
coil.
No sparking from either coil, check primary circuit
of ignition coils {proceed to TEST 3). Leave spark
plugs removed from engine.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
TEST 3: Ignition Coll Primary Circuit
With reference to FIG. 9, disconnect the WB
(WHITE/BLACK) lead from ignition coil No. 2,
switch on the ignition and connect DC voltmeter in
four tests À, B, C, & D as shown.
Voltmeter should show battery voltage (12V) for each
test, in which case leave ignition switched on and volt-
meter connected as for Test D and proceed directly to
(v).
(i) No voltage in Test A: Ascertain reason for lack of
supply voltage between coil, ignition switch and
battery.
{i No voltage in Test B: Coil primary winding open-
circuit. Replace coll.
tit} No voltage in Test C; Coil-to-coill WP (WHITE/PINK)
lead open-circuit.
{ivi No voltage in Test D: Coil pnmary winding open-
circuit. Replace coi,
(м) Reconnect WB (WHITE/BLACK} lead to coil No. 2
Voitmeter needle should now show zero volts, indi-
cating the coil primary circuit is satisfactory. Pro-
ceed to TEST 4, leaving ignition switched on and
volt-meter connected as for Test 3D.
If voltmeter still shows battery voltage, the coil
primary circuit is not being connected to earth by
the function of the amplifier, which is now suspect.
Before replacing the amplifier, check the wiring.
(i) Disconnect the amplifier at the 3-pin molded
connector assembly.
{i} Identify main harness side of the connector
assembly.
(11) Connect voltmeter in three tests A, B, and C as
shown in FIG.
Voltmeter should show battery voltage for each
test. If the test is satisfactory, amplifier is faulty. If
zero voltage is shown in any test, rectify open
circuit lead(s) or connectionís).
WY (WHITE/YELLOW) WP (WHITE/PINK) WB (WHITE/BLACK)
TEST SEQUENCE
w Y
a
r
IGNITION +
COIL
No. 1
A
— A
WP
J
+
IGNITION
COIL
No. 2.
(|
Му р
WB
Fig. 9. IGNITION COIL PRIMARY CIRCUIT TEST
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Y Y
TEST
SEQUENCE
FIG. 10. AMPLIFIER MAIN
}
HARNESS _
CONNECTOR, в
wiring —
tests
WY
WB
В
TEST 4: Amplifier Switching
Voltmeter connected as in Test 3D, crank engine.
The voltmeter needle should now oscillate
between zero volts and battery voltage {12V),
confirming the coil primary circuit is being
switched on and off by the amplifier unit, The
ignition system 15 therefore satisfactory.
Ir the voltmeter needle remains at zero volts while
tne engine 1s cranked, the amplifier unit and its
associated pick-up are both suspect. Check
whether the pick-up can be eliminated, TESTS.
TEST 5: Pick-up Winding Resistance Contmuity
Disconnect the WHITE/ORANGE and
VYHITE: PURPLE leads atthe amplifierunit. Identify
the two teads connected to the pick-up and check
the resistance and continuity of the pick-up
windi ng by connecting an ohmmeter between the
two leads. Ohmmeter shouid shown 650 - 750
ohms
Hf the tests satistactory, replace the amplifier.
If the testis unsatisfactory, replace the pick-up.
10
The pick-up fixing screws also determine
the rotary position in which the pick-up is
fixed relative to ignition timing. The
screws locate in slots which provide
adjustment for ignition timing when the
pick-ups fitted. Before disturbingthe fix-
ing screws of the originaipick-up, choose
a datum pointonthe pick-up {e.g.ashoul-
der ofthe magnetic base plate) andscribe
amarkonthe engineasatimingreference
otherwise when fitting the new pick-up
the timing will need to be reset and this
will necessitate the use of a strobe light
TEST 6: Ignition Timing
A strobe light 1s necessary. Remove plug cover on
opposite side of engine from pick-up, to expose
timing mark on alternator rotor. Refer to
motorcycie manufacturer's instructions for
ignition timing data and procedure,
Kim The CD Man © 2002
R. H. Side
_ LL lon, AH TURN
—— GW, GW =
wo wey Е
AH TURN
ow GW . ww |
pre AN] HH os
GW GW EE , we
4 =
‚= NG . M
ТН er o TRANSOUCER ABI
PILOT E Tyg — a AMPLIFIER |
| NG wg TAIL
x — = ci
pe w -
: o
EN VE un lo a
ee
SPEEDG OIL wiL N +
Bo NG TT mess ST Р
— o
TACHO
т
IDS cuss
в RECTIFIER]
: ID -
5 ne MW A | —
NEUTRAL = NU
W/L 14054 = 124 |
IGH/LTG 5W BATTERY °
5
GW PT -
By BEAM WI 4 149 SA SWITCH POSITIONS
TURM wr " Lo TEMMINALS
„ wd NU KEY ANTEC 1 à
CR т — y CLOCKWISE
FUSE cas
.— ++ 10 55 AMP
o NU T
DIR e
зи MB Eo mo Y CLOCKWISE e —e
' GY
3 мым y
Lor. vw [arm | ;
MEUTRAL A
ue ur GEAR 5W. A,
TT uw | 5 ыы 2
- URL LR 28 AM 24
= ALTERNATOR
uw —— +
| OT pret
_ - Sia PS
uw = --T uw WN y -
GR cc, - , - В | Gw Pa =
we GA + LGH LA LGH L | M AIT OIL PRESSURE
LH TURN = a SWITCH
LH] HORN/H
| PB PB TTI BEAM FLASH
R i
. H. Side
— —— AH TURN
- . w ‚
GW _ GW :
wo —— wr fer LL 3 {
eo] we |" [we _
AH TURN | Twp ' a с —_— ———
1 — a L WO, + wo wo |
4 ‚ a Pp y
3 Foyer L He +4 ое чо.
vis #Р we Twp
SPL
TRANSDUCER ABI
IG NITION |
; — . AMPLIFIER
; wB | ING HG TAM
Md о — Fe
wi . 17 м6 a
F BRAKE wl =] - — IGN
COL
SPEEDO | OIL wil wn + — - MN Nc IS
NG we stop
= 1
“в
| wi +3 nn 20
+ _ *| L | 7154
NEUTRAL —- *s NU {+4 Do
MIL 145 54 ti ,
IGN/LTS SW о
5 . '
с Louw i -
GW 5 |] | : 143 Sa SWITCH POSITIONS
TURM W/L HI BEAM МА; ; т TERMINAL 5
. | KET ANTIS,1 303
CLOCEWISE
e | ITM6 IGN | Y FUSE
' + WE CON | 435 AMP
“= _ NU
e LH я wo “Ay SU ELOER 9158 a —e
al | + we се} GY
1 | MAIN FL MY a
L Uw |. A I
-. |
| NEUTRAL | Л
| GEAR Sw LTT
¡Li of
El 24
ALTERMATOR
F
LGN he
wh
GR EL
г FLASHER GR GR
——— E OIL PRESSURE MIT E > ъ i
Ae. GB SWITCH y -
LH TURM LH TURN
HOYA AHI
HE AM FLASH —
Lights on with ignition (California - Canada)
cou
IN DROWN |
C.GREEN |]
К. РАК
Kim The CD Man © 2002
INTRODUCTION
SECTION |]
WORKSHOP SERVICE TOOLS
This section of the Workshop Manual illustrates pictorially the workshop service tools that are available
for carrying out the major dismantling and re-assembly operations on the UNIT CONSTRUCTION 750 c.c.
Triumph Motorcycle.
The section is divided into sub-sections relating to the main section headings in this manual, illustrating
those tools mentioned and used in the appropriate section text.
ENGINE...
TRANSMISSION
GEARBOX
WHEELS
FRONT FORKS
Section
J1
12
3
14
JS
J1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
J SERVICE TOOLS
SECTION | |
ENGINE
26/8
61-6008. Tappet guide block punch
61-6063. Valve guide removal —
and replacemant tool
61-7010. Sleeve nut adaptor tool—cylinder head
61-7019. Oil seal compressor
for replacing the rocker spindle
61-6132. Camwheel extractor.
61-7025 Valve seat cutter (inlet)
61-7026 Valve seat cutter (exhaust)
61-7027 Blending cutter a
61-7028 Blending cutter (exhaust)
61-7029 Arbor, pilot and tommy bars
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SERVICE TOOLS J
ENGINE (CONTINUED) J1
“=
ic
С
26/3
61-7023. Contact breaker cam extractor
«ED
61-7013. Pilot for contact breaker oil seal when
replacing timing cover
26/4
61-6135. Piston ring collar (75mm)
61-7017. Roller bearing outer race removal tool
61-7022. Flywheel locating body and plunger 61-6019. Crankshaft pinion extractor
J3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
| SERVICE TOOLS
SECTION J2
TRANSMISSION
61-7014. Clutch hub extractor
61-3768. Clutch locking plate
SECTION |3
GEARBOX
61-6026. Gearbox main bearing shouldered punch 156
61-6125 Gearbox nut spanner
Ja
Kim The CD Man © 2002
SERVICE TOOLS J
GEARBOX (CONTINUED)
© ee = ">
= .
- ———
— == = IT rr
- ee
=
M
=
61-7011. Gear box assembly tool—quadrant locator
SECTION J4
WHEELS
61-3694. Front wheel bearing locking ring spanner Swinging arm bush remover and replacer No. 61-6117
JS
Kim The CD Man © 2002
| SERVICE TOOLS
SECTION J5
FRONT FORKS
Li 7
AY
Fork damper valve removal tool No. 61-6113 Head race bearing drift 61-6121
JE
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONVERSION
TABLES
CT1
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CT
CONVERSION TABLES
CT2
INCHES TO MILLIMETRES—UNITS
Inches 0 10 20 30 40
0 254-0 508-0 7620 | 10160
1 25-4 2774 533-4 787-4 | 1041-4
2 50-8 3048 558-8 8123 | 10668
3 76:2 330-2 584-2 | 8382 | 10922
4 101-6 355-6 609-6 863-6 | 11176
5 127-0 381-0 635-0 889-0 | 11430
6 152-4 406-4 660-4 914-4 | 11684
7 177-8 431-8 685 8 939-8 | 1193-8
8 203.2 457-2 711-2 965-2 | 12192
9 228-6 482-6 736-6 990-6 | 12446
One Inch—25 199978 millimetres
One Metre—39-370113 inches
One Mile—1-6093 kilos
One Kilo—'62138 miles
DECIMALS TO MILLIMETRES—FRACTIONS
1/1000
inches men.
-001 0254
-002 -0508
-003 -0762
-004 -1016
-005 1270
006 1524
-007 1778
-008 -2032
-009 -2286
1/100
inches mm
-01 254
-02 508
03 ‘726
'04 1-016
05 1-270
‘06 1 524
"07 1:778
"08 2-032
-09 2-286
1/10
inches mm.
1 2-54
2 5-08
3 7-62
4 10-16
5 12-70
-6 15-24
7 17-79
8 20-32
9 22-86
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONVERSION TABLES
CT
FRACTIONS TO DECIMALS AND MILLIMETRES
Fractions Decimals mm.
1/64 015625 -3969
1/32 03125 7937
3/64 046875 1:1906
1/16 0625 1-5875
5/64 078125 1.9844
3/32 09375 23812
7/64 "109375 2.7781
1/8 "125 3-1750
9/64 ‘140625 3-5719
5/32 15625 3-9687
11/64 171875 4-3656
3/16 1875 4-7625
13/64 -203125 5-1594
7/32 -21875 55562
15/64 234375 59531
1/4 25 6:3500
17/64 -265625 67469
9/32 -28125 7-1437
19/64 -296875 7-5406
5/16 3125 7-9375
21/64 -328125 83344
11/32 34375 87312
23/64 359375 9.1281
3/8 375 9-5250
25/64 390625 9-9219
13/32 40625 10-3187
a 27/64 421875 10-7156
7/16 -4375 11-1125
29/64 453125 11-5094
15/32 -46875 11-9062
31/64 -484375 12-3031
1/2 5 12-7000
Fractions Decimals mm.
| 33:64 515625 13-0969
17/32 53125 13-4937
35/64 546675 13.8906
9/16 5625 14-2875
37:64 | 578125 14-6844
19/32 59375 15-0812
39/64 609375 15 1781
5,8 625 “458750 |
41:64 | -640625 16-2719
21/32 -65685 16-6687
43:64 | -671875 17.0656
11/16 6375 17-4625
45 ‘64 703125 17-8594
23/32 71875 18-2562
47:64 | -734375 18-6531
3/4 5 19.0500
49/64 765625 19-4469
25/32 78125 19-8437
51/64 | 796875 20-2406
13/16 8125 20-6375
53/64 | 828125 21-0344
27/32 — 84375 21-4312
55/64 859375 21-8281
7/8 875 22 2250
57:64 | -890625 22-6219
29/32 90625 23-0187
59:64 921875 23-4156
15/16 9375 23-8125
61/64 -953125 24-2094
31/32 95875 24-6062
63,64 984375 25-0031
1 25-4000
CT3
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CT
CONVERSION TABLES
СТА
MILLIMETRES TO INCHES—UNITS
—
mm. 0 10 20 30 40
0 39370 ‘78740 1-18110 1:57480
1 -03937 43307 -82677 1-22047 1-61417
2 -07874 -47 244 86614 1:25984 1-65354
3 11811 51181 90551 1-29921 1-69291
4 15748 55118 -94488 1-33858 1-73228
5 19685 59055 ‘98425 1.37795 1.77165
6 23622 ‘62992 1-02362 1-41732 1-81103
7 ‘27559 66929 1-06299 1-45669 1-85040
8 31496 -70866 1-10236 1-49606 1-88977
9 35433 74803 1:14173 1-53543 1-92914
mm 50 60 70 80 90
0 1-96851 236221 2:75591 314961 3-54331
1 2-00788 2-40158 279528 3.18891 358268
2 2.047725 2:44095 283465 3-22835 3-62205
3 2 08662 248032 2:87407 3-26772 3-66142
4 2-12599 2:51969 2-91339 3-30709 370079
5 2:16536 2-55906 2-95276 3-34646 3-74016
6 220473 2-59843 2-99213 3-38583 3-77953
7 2-24410 2-63780 3-03150 3-42520 3-81890
8 2.28347 2:€7717 3-07087 3-46457 3-85827
9 2-32284 2-71654 3-11024 350394 3-89764
MILLIMETRES TO INCHES—FRACTIONS
1/1000
mm, inches
0-001 -000039
0-002 -000079
0-003 000118
0-004 -000157
0-005 "000197
0-006 000236
0-007 "000276
0-008 "000315
0-009 "000354
1100
mm. inches
0-01 -00039
0:02 00079
0-03 -00118
0-04 "00157
0-05 00197
0:06 00236
0-07 "00276
0-08 -00315
0-09 "00354
110
mm. inches
0-1 00394
0-2 -00787
0-3 01181
04 | 01575
0:5 | 01969
0-6 02362
07 -02756
0-8 03150
0-9 03543
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONVERSION TABLES
CT
DRILL SIZES
Letter Size Letter Size Number | Size ! Number | Size | Number | Size | Number Size
A 234 N 302 1 2280 14 | -1820 27 1440 40 -0980
B 238 o 316 2 2210 15 1.1800 28 1405 41 -0960
C 242 Р 323 3 2130 16 | 1770 29 1360 42 0935
D ‘246 9 332 4 2090 17 | 1730 1 30 1285 43 -0890
E 250 R 339 5 2055 18 1695 | 3 1200 44 -0860
| |
F 257 S 348 & ! -2040 19 1.1660 | 32 1160 ; 45 0820
G 261 T 358 7 1.2010 | 20 ‘4610 { 33 | 4130 1 46 0810
H 266 U 368 8 , 19% | 21 {4590 | 34 | 1110 | 47 | -0785
| 272 Vv 377 9 | 1960 | 2 {1570} 35 1100 48 0760
J 277 | W | 386 10 1935 | 23 : 1540, 36 | 1065 | 49 | 0730
K 281 X 397 14 | 1910 24 1520 37 1040 | 50 0700
290 | Y 404 12 | 1890 | 25 | 1495 | 38 | 1015 | 5 0670
M 295 2 413 13 | 1850 | 2% | 1470 | 3%] 0995 | 52 | -0635
| _
WIRE GAUGES
No. of Imperial Standard Brown and Sharpe's
Gauge YYire Gauge American Wire Gauge
Inches Millimetres Inches Milletres
0000 400 10-160 460 11-684
000 | 372 9-448 410 10-404
00 | 348 8-839 365 9-265
0 | 324 8-299 325 8.251
1 300 7-620 289 7-348
2 276 7-010 258 6-543
3 | 252 6-400 ‘229 5-827
4 | 232 5-892 204 5-189
5 212 5.384 182 4-621
6 192 4-676 162 | 4115
7 | 176 4-470 144 | 3-664
8 | 160 4-064 128 | 3.263
9 | 144 3.657 114 | 2.906
10°! ‘+28 3-251 102 | 2-588
11: 116 2946 | 091 | 2-304
12 104 2641 © 081 | 2-052
13 092 2-336 072 | 1.827
14 -080 2-032 | 064 | 1-627
15 ; 072 1828 -057 | 1-449
16 | -064 1-625 G51 | 1-290
17 | -056 1-422 -045 | 1-149
18 -048 1:219 -040 : 1.009
13 040 1-016 035 911
20 036 914 -032 811
21 032 812 028 722
22 028 711 025 643
23 024 609 023 573
24 022 -558 -020 511
25 020 508 018 454
26 018 457 016 -404
27 0164 416 014 360
28 -0148 375 012 321
29 0136 -345 -011 235
30 0124 314 -010 ‘254
CTH
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONVERSION TABLES
FOOT POUNDS TO KILOGRAMETRES
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
— 0-138 0-227 0-415 0-553 0-691 0-830 0-968 1-106 1-244 —
10 1-383 1-521 1-659 1.797 1-936 2-074 2-212 2-350 2-489 2-627 10
20 2-765 2-903 3-042 3-180 3-318 3-456 3-395 3-733 3-871 4-009 20
30 4-148 4-286 4-424 4-562 4-701 4-839 4-977 5-116 5-254 5392 30
40 5-530 5-668 5-807 5-945 6-083 6-221 6-360 6-498 6-636 6774 40
50 6-913 7-051 7-189 7-328 7-466 7-604 7-742 7-881 8019 8-157 50
60 8-295 8-434 3-572 48-710 8-848 8-987 9-125 9-263 9-401 9-540 | 60
70 9-678 9-816 9-954 10-093 10-231 10-369 10-507 10-646 10-784 10-922 | 70
BO 11-060 11-199 11-337 11-475 11-613 11-752 11-890 12.028 12-166 12-305 80
90 12-443 12 581 12-719 12-858 12.996 13-134 13-272 13-411 13-549 13-687 90
MILES TO KILOMETRES
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
— 1-609 3-219 4-828 6-437 8-047 9-656 11-265 12-875 14-484 | —
10 16-093 17-703 19-312 20-922 22-531 24-140 25-750 27-359 28-968 30-578 | 10
20 32-187 33-796 35-406 37-015 38-624 40-234 41-843 43-452 45-062 46-671 ; 20
30 43-780 49-890 51-499 53108 54-718 56-327 57-936 59-546 61-155 62-765 | 30
40 64-374 65-983 67-593 69-202 70-811 72-421 74-030 75-639 77-249 78-858 | 40
50 80-467 82-077 83-686 85-295 86-905 88-514 90.123 91-733 93-342 94-951 | 50
60 96-561 98-170 99-780 101-389 102-998 104-608 106-217 107-826 109-436 111-045 ; 60
70 | 112-654 114-264 115-873 117-482 119-092 120-701 122-310 123-920 125-529 127-138 | 70
80 | 128-748 130-357 131-967 133-576 135-185 136-795 138-404 140-013 141-623 143-232 | BO
90 | 144-841 146-451 148-060 149-669 151-279 152-888 154-497 156-107 157-716 159-325 | 90
POUNDS TO KILOGRAMS
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
— 0-454 — 0:307 1-361 1-814 2-268 1-722 3175 3-629 4-082 —
10 4.536 4-990 5-443 5-987 6-350 6-804 7-257 7-711 8165 8-618 10
20 3072 9-525 9079 10-433 10-886 11-340 11-793 12-247 12-701 13-154 20
30 13-608 14 061 14.315 14-968 15-422 15-876 16-329 16-783 17-237 17-690 30
40 18-144 18-597 19-051 19-504 19-958 20-412 20-865 21-319 21-772 22-226 40
50 22-680 23-133 23-587 24-040 24-494 24-948 25-401 25-855 26-308 26-762 50
60 27-216 27-669 28-123 28-576 29-030 29-484 29-937 30-391 30-844 31-298 | 60
70 31-751 32-205 32-659 33-112 33-566 34-019 34-473 34-927 35-380 35-834 70
80 36-287 36-741 37-195 37-648 38-102 38-855 39 009 39-463 39-316 40-370 | 80
90 40-823 41-277 41-731 42-184 42-638 43-091 43-545 43-998 44-452 44-906 90
MILES PER GALLON (IMPERIAL) TO LITRES PER 100 KILOMETRES
10 28-25 | 15 18-83 | 20 14-12 | 25 11:30} 30 94235 807 | 40 7:06 | 50 5565| 60 471 ; 70 404
104 26:90 | 154 18-22 | 204 13-78 | 251 11:08 | 301 9-26 | 35} 7-96 | 41 6-89 | 51 5-54 | 61 4-63 | 71 3:98
11 2568 | 16 17-66 | 21 1345 | 26 10-87 | 31 911 | 36 785 | 42 6:73 | 52 5-43 | 672 4-55 | 72 3-97
114 24:56 | 16% 17-12 | 214 13-14 | 265 1066 | 314 897 | 36 7-74 | 43 6-57 |1 53 533163 448 | 73 387
12 2354 | 17 16:61 | 22 12-84 | 27 1046 | 32 883 | 37 763144 6-42 | 54 523764 44174 382
124 22-60 | 174 16-14 | 224 12:55 | 27% 10-27 | 324 8:69 | 371 7-53 | 45 6:28 | 55 513165 435175 377
13 2173 | 18 15:69 | 23 12.28 | 28 10:09 | 33 8:56 | 38 743| 46 6:14 | 56 504/56 428176 372
135 20-92 | 184 15:27 | 234 12-02 | 284 991 | 333 8-43 | 384 7-34 | 47 6-01 | 57 49 | 67 422 | 77 3-67
14 2018 | 19 1487 | 24 11-77 | 29 9-74 | 34 8:31 | 39 7.24 | 48 5-89 | 58 487 | 68 416|78 362
144 19-48 | 194 14-49 | 244 11-53 1 295 9-58 | 341 8-19 | 39$ 7.15 | 49 15-77 | 59 4772/69 4-10 | 79 3-57
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONVERSION TABLES
CT
PINTS TO LITRES
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
— — ‘568 1-136 1-705 2:273 2-841 3-841 3-978 4-546
+ 142 710 1:279 1:846 2-415 2:983 3-552 4-120 4-688
+ -284 "852 1-420 1-989 2-357 3-125 3125 4-262 4-830
+ 426 ‘994 1-563 2-131 2-699 3-267 3-836 4-404 4-972
GALLONS (IMPERIAL) TO LITRES
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
— 4-546 9-092 13-638 19-184 22-730 27-276 31-822 36-368 40914 | —
10 45-460 50-005 54-551 59-097 63-643 63-189 72-735 77-281 81-827 86-373 | 10
20 90-919 95-465 100-011 104-557 109-103 113-649 118-195 122.741 127-287 131-833 | 20
30 | 136-379 140-924 145-470 150-016 454-562 159-108 163 645 168-200 172-746 177-292 | 30
40 | 181-838 186.384 190-930 195-476 200-022 204-568 209-114 213-660 218-206 222-752 | 40
50 | 227-298 231-843 236-389 240-935 245-481 250-027 254-473 259-119 263-605 268-211 | 50
60 | 272-757 277-303 281-849 286-395 290-941 295-487 300-033 304-579 309-125 313-671 | 60
70 | 318-217 322-762 327-308 331-854 336-400 340-946 245-492 350-038 354-584 359130 | 70
80 | 363-676 368-222 372-768 377-314 381-860 386-406 390-952 395-498 400-044 404-590 | 80
90 | 409-136 413-681 418-227 422-773 427-19 431-865 436-411 440 957 445-503 450-049 | 90
POUNDS PER SQUARE INCH TO
KILOGRAMS PER SQUARE CENTIMETRE
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7
— 0-070 0-141 0-211 0-281 0-352 0-422 0-492 0-562 0-633 —
10 0-703 0-773 0-844 0-914 0-984 1-055 1-125 1-195 1-266 1-336 10
20 1-406 1-476 1-547 1-617 1-687 1-758 1-828 1-898 1-969 2-039 20
30 2-109 2-179 2-250 2:320 2-390 2-461 2-531 2-601 2672 2742 30
40 2-812 2-883 2.953 3-023 3-093 3-164 3-234 3-304 3-375 3-445 40
50 3-515 3-586 3-656 3-726 3-797 3-867 3-937 4.007 4-078 4148 50
60 4-218 4-289 4-359 4-429 4-500 4-570 4-640 4.711 4.781 4-851 60
70 4.921 4.992 5-062 5132 3-203 5-273 5-343 5-414 5-484 3-554 70
80 5-624 5-695 5:765 5-835 5906 5-976 6-046 6-117 6-187 6-257 80
90 6-328 6-398 6-468 6-538 6-609 6:679 6:749 6-820 6-890 6-960 90
СТ
Kim The CD Man © 2002
Cr
CT8
CONVERSION TABLES
U.N.E.F. SCREW THREADS
Cha. | No. of thds. | Core dia. Tap drill Dia. No. of thds, | Core dia. Tap drill
1:4 in. 32 | 2162 in. 5-60 mm. 1 in. 20 9459 in. 61/64 in.
5:16 in. 37 | 2787 in. | 7-20 mm. 1-116 in. 18 1-0024 in. 1-010 in.
38 in. 32 | 3412 in. ¡ 41.32 ins f 1-1:8 in. 18 1:0649 in. 1-072 ins.
716 in. 28 | 3988 in. 1020 mm. | 1-316 in. 18 11274 in. 1-135 in,
12 in. 28 | 4613in | 11-80 mm. | 1-1;4 in 18 11899 in. | 1-196 in.
946 in. 24 5174 in. | 1330 mm. | 1-516 in, 18 1.2524 in. | 32:00 mm.
5 8 in. 24 -5799 in, 14:75 mm. | 1-3.8 in, 18 1-3149 in. 33:50 mm,
11.16 in. | 24 6424 in. | -6480 in, 1-7:16 in, 18 1-3774 in. 1-385 ins.
34in, | 20 -6959 in. | 45:64 in. 1-1/2 in. 18 1-4399 in. 1-447 in.
13,16 in. | 20 7584 in, | 49 64 in. 1-9:16 in. 18 1.4948 in. | 1-1/2 in.
78 in. 20 8209 in. 53-64 in. 1-5/8 in. 18 1-5643 in. 1-572 in.
45 16 in. 20 8834 in. DS 64 in 1:11:16 in. 18 1.6274 in. | 41-50 mm.
B.A. SCREW THREADS
| ia. of | Thds. | Dia. tap | Core
Ho : bolt | perinch| drill dia.
0 | 2362 | 254 | 1960 | -1890
a 1 2087 | 282 | 1770 | +661
2 | 1850 | 314 | 1520 | -1468
3 | 1614 | 348 | 1360 | 4269
4 | 1417 | 385 | 1160 | 1106
5 | 4260 | 430 | 1040 | 0981
{ 6 | 1102 | 479 | -0935 | -0852
7 | 0984 | 529 | 0810 | 0738
8 | -0866 | 594 | -0730 | 0863
9 | 0748 | 651 | 0635 | 0564
10 | -0669 | 726 | 0550 | 0504 —
11 | 0591 | 819 | 0465 | -0445
12 | 0511 | 909 | -0400 | 0378
13 1 0472 | 1020 | 0360 | 0352
14 | 3394 1099 | -0292 | 0280
15 | 0354 ! 1205 | 0260 | 0250
The | ons | 1333 | 0225 | 0220
Kim The CD Man © 2002
CONYERSION TABLES CT
B.S.W. SCREW THREADS B.S.F. SCREW THREADS
Dia. of Threads Dia. tap | Core Dia. of Threads Dia. tap Core
bolt per driil | dia. bolt per drill dia.
(inch) inch (inch) | (inch) inch (inch)
1/4 20 1968 1860 7:32 28 1770 1731
5:16 18 1:4 2412 1,4 26 2055 -2007
3/8 16 8/16 2950 9/32 26 238 2320
7:16 14 23/64 3460 5/16 22 261 | +2543
17 12 13.32 139313 3,8 20 316 3110
96 12 15/32 -4558 746 — 18 | 38 3664
8 11 17,32 5086 12 | 16 27.64 4200
11:16 11. 37.64 | 5711 9 16 16 492 | +4825
3/4 10 | 4164 | 6249 58 14 35 64 5335
13:16 10 45.64 | 6844 19 1¢ 14 | 39:64 5960
7/8 9 3:4 7317 34 12 2:32 6433 |
15/16 9 13/16 7950 13.16 2 jun 7058
1 8 55/64 8399 7:8 11 2532 | 7586
1 10 57 64 -8719
1-1,8 9 1 9827 Ш
1.1/4 9 118 1 11077
1-3/8 8 1.15.64 | 12149
4-42 8 1 358 13399
1-58 8 1.31 64 1 4:49
U.N.C. SCREW THREADS U.N.F. SCREW THREADS
Dia. No. of thds. Core dia. Tap dril! Dia. | Ne. of thds. | Core dia. Tap drill
1/4 in. 20 1959 in. 5:20 mm. 1,4 in 28 2113 in. 5-50 mm.
5:16 in. 18 2524 in. | 6-60 mm. 5:16 in. 24 2674 in. 6-90 mm.
3/8 in. 16 -3073 in. | 800 mm. 3/8 in. a 24 Ш 329% in. 8-50 mm.
7/16 in. 14 3602 in. | 940 mm, 7460. 20 3834 in. | 990 mm.
1/2 in, 13 | 4167 in. | 10-80 mm. 1/2 in. 20 4459 in, 11-50 mm.
9/16 in. 12 | 4723 in. 12:20 mm. 9:16 in. 18 5024 in. 12-90 mm.
5/8 in. 11 | 5266 in. | 13-50 mm. 5/8 in. 18 -5649 in. 14:50 mm.
3/4 in. 10 -6417 in, 16-50 mm. 34 in. a 16 $823 in. 11/16 In.
78in. | 9 7547 in. | 49,64 in. 178i. | 14 7977 in. | 0-804 in.
1 in. 6 8647 in. | 22:25 mm. 1 in. 12 -9098 in. 3-25 mm.
1-1/8 in. 7 9704 in. | 63-64 in, 1-1/8 in. 12 1-0348 in. 26-50 mm.
1-1:4 in. 7 10954 in, | 1.7 64 in. 1.1/4 in. 12 1.1598 in. 29:50 mm.
1-3/8 in. 6 1:1946 in. | 1-13,64 in. 1-3/8 in. 12 12848 in. 1-290 in,
1-1/2 in. 6 1-3196 in | 1-21/64 in. 1.12 in. 12 1.4098 in, 36-00 mm.
1-3/4 in. 5 1-5335 in. | 1-35:64 in.
2 in. 4-1/2 1-7594 in. | 1-25/32 in.
Kim The CD Man © 2002
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