Moog Subsequent 25 User manual

Moog Subsequent 25 User manual
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
WARNING - WHEN USING ELECTRIC PRODUCTS, THESE BASIC PRECAUTIONS SHOULD ALWAYS
BE FOLLOWED:
1. Read all the instructions before using the product.
2. Do not use this product near water - for example, near a bathtub, washbowl, kitchen sink, in a wet
basement, or near a swimming pool or the like.
3. This product, in combination with an amplifier and headphones or speakers, may be capable of
producing sound levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do not operate for a long period
of time at a high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable.
4. The product should be located so that its location does not interfere with its proper ventilation.
5. The product should be located away from heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, or other
products that produce heat.
6. The product should be connected to a power supply only of the type described in the operating
instructions or as marked on the product.
7. The power-supply cord of the product should be unplugged from the outlet when left unused for
a long period of time.
8. Care should be taken so that objects do not fall and liquids are not spilled into the enclosure
through openings.
9. The product should be serviced by qualified personnel when:
a. The power supply cord or the plug has been damaged.
b. Objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled onto the product.
c. The product has been exposed to rain.
d. The product does not appear to operate normally or exhibits a marked change in performance.
e. The product has been dropped or the enclosure damaged.
INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS.
Do not open the chassis. There are no user serviceable parts inside. Refer all servicing to qualified
personnel only.
GROUNDING INSTRUCTIONS: This product must be grounded. If it should malfunction or breakdown,
grounding provides a path of least resistance for electrical current to reduce the risk of electric shock.
This product is equipped with a cord having an equipment grounding connector and a grounding
plug. The plug must be plugged into an appropriate outlet that is properly installed and grounded in
accordance with all local codes and ordinances.
DANGER: Improper connection of the equipment-grounding connector can result in a risk of electric
shock. Check with a qualified electrician or serviceman if you are in doubt as to whether the product
is properly grounded. Do not modify the plug provided with this product – if it will not fit in the outlet,
have a proper outlet installed by a qualified electrician.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
8
UNPACKING & INSPECTION
8
SETUP & CONNECTIONS
10
ABOUT SUBSEQUENT 25
10
FEATURES & CONTROLS
10
11
13
14
16
17
18
21
23
24
PRESETS PANEL
BASICS OF SOUND
SIGNAL FLOW
OSCILLATORS
MIXER
FILTER
ENVELOPES
MODULATION
GLOBAL PITCH CONTROLS
SHIFT MODE
27
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
27
29
30
31
33
35
PITCH
DUO MODE
FILTER / MODULATION
FILTER ENVELOPE
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE
MIDI GLOBAL SETTINGS
42
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS
42
43
45
45
46
TIME VALUE
BASIC INFORMATION
MIDI TIMING & SYNCHRONIZATION
EXTENSIONS COMPATIBILITY
PARAMETERS
50
SPECIFICATIONS
51
WARRANTY
51
SERVICE & SUPPORT
SUBSEQUENT 25
SUB
This 2-note paraphonic analog synthesizer is ideal for both performance
and sound design use. It combines the classic, hands-on control of vintage
Moog instruments with a dynamic and gritty new sound engine.
UNPACKING & INSPECTION
Check the contents of the shipping carton. Be careful when unpacking Subsequent 25 so that nothing
is lost or damaged. Moog recommends saving the carton and all packing materials in case you ever
need to ship the instrument for any reason.
The Moog Subsequent 25 ships with the following items:
1. Subsequent 25 synthesizer
2. Power cord
3. Owner’s manual
4. Quickstart guide
5. Registration card
What you will need:
1. A stand or table sufficient to support Subsequent 25
2. Either a 1/4” instrument cable and amplified speakers or headphones with a 1/4” inch plug
3. A properly wired AC outlet
SETUP AND CONNECTIONS
Place Subsequent 25 on a stable surface such as a table or keyboard stand at a height suitable for
playing comfortably.
INPUT
EXTERNAL
AUDIO IN
USB MIDI
POWER
SPEAKERS OR
AMPLIFIER
5 PIN
DIN MIDI
CONTROL
VOLTAGE
8
SETUP AND CONNECTIONS
(Continued)
POWER
Plug one end of the supplied AC cord into the standard IEC power connector on the Subsequent 25
left-side panel. Plug the other end into an AC outlet. The Subsequent 25 universal power supply will
operate with 50 or 60Hz AC power sources ranging from 100 to 240 volts. Flip on the power switch
located next to the power connector.
NOTE: Your Subsequent 25 is an analog instrument and should be allowed at least 60 seconds to warm up before
use. In cases where it has been left in a cold car overnight, for example, it may take as long as 10 minutes before
oscillator tuning has stabilized. Do not operate Subsequent 25 in direct sunlight.
AUDIO OUT
With the MASTER VOLUME turned all the way down, plug one end of a 1/4” instrument cable into the
unbalanced Subsequent 25 AUDIO OUT jack and the other end into an amplified speaker or mixing
console input. Adjust the level by slowly turning the MASTER VOLUME knob clockwise while playing
the keyboard.
If you’ll be using headphones, plug them into the headphones jack (on the front panel’s bottom-right
corner) with HEADPHONE VOLUME turned all the way down. Adjust the level by slowly turning the
HEADPHONE VOLUME knob clockwise while playing the keyboard. Note that MASTER VOLUME must
be turned up as well.
EXTERNAL AUDIO IN
Located just above the AUDIO OUT jack, the jack labeled EXT IN allows Subsequent 25 to shape and
filter external sounds. This is an unbalanced input that accepts a line-level signal. You can adjust the
audio level using Shift mode (see page 26) or the plug-in editor.
NOTE: You must press a key to pass external audio through the Subsequent 25 electronics. You also can use a
Moog FS-1 footswitch, or any 1/4” cable to open the gate. Simply connect to the 1/4” KB GATE jack.
USB
To use Subsequent 25 with a computer, connect one end of a USB cable to the Subsequent 25 USB
port and the other end to an available USB port on your computer. Subsequent 25 supports MIDI I/O
over USB, but not audio data.
MIDI
Using Subsequent 25 with an external MIDI device requires one or two MIDI cables. To use Subsequent
25 as a MIDI controller, connect one end of a MIDI cable to the Subsequent 25 MIDI OUT jack and the
other end to another device’s MIDI IN jack.
To control Subsequent 25 from an external MIDI controller, connect one end of a MIDI cable to the
Subsequent 25 MIDI IN jack and the other end to an external controller’s MIDI OUT jack. By default,
Subsequent 25 is set to transmit and receive MIDI data on MIDI Channel 1.
CONTROL VOLTAGE IN
The PITCH CV, FILTER CV, and VOL CV inputs each accepts an expression pedal (such as the Moog EP-2)
or a control voltage signal from 0 to +5 volts. If you connect an expression pedal to VOL CV, you can
use your foot to control the Subsequent 25 output level. If you connect an expression pedal to FILTER
CV, you can sweep the Filter Cutoff frequency in the same manner. The PITCH CV input is calibrated so
that a one-volt change in the control voltage will result in a one-octave change in frequency.
The KB GATE input accepts a +5 volt signal, which causes the Subsequent 25 Envelopes to trigger.
9
ABOUT SUBSEQUENT 25
Subsequent 25 is a 2-note paraphonic analog synthesizer, built in the tradition of classic Moog
synthesizers. It is housed in a rugged black steel chassis with aluminum extrusion, and finished with
classic wood sidepieces. Equipped with 25 full-size, velocity-sensing keys, Subsequent 25 provides
a highly expressive playing experience. The front panel delivers plenty of hands-on controls for
designing, saving, and retrieving your own sounds. Subsequent 25 offers a 100% analog audio signal
path with two exceptionally stable voltage-controlled oscillators, a square-wave sub oscillator, a noise
generator, two ADSR envelope generators, and a voltage-controlled, ladder-type lowpass filter capable
of self-oscillation. One feature that makes Subsequent 25 unique is MultiDrive, a variable multistage
drive circuit that delivers overdrive and distortion. Virtually every Subsequent 25 function has its own
dedicated knob, and every knob sends MIDI Control Change (CC) data.
As with its larger 37-key sibling, Subsequent 25 also has the ability to play more than one note at
a time using the Duo Mode function. This allows each of the two Subsequent 25 oscillators to play
independent pitches. In this case, Oscillator 2 can be designated to play either the higher or the lower
of two keys played on the keyboard. Both oscillators are then processed through the single, classic
20Hz-20kHz Moog Ladder Filter.
Subsequent 25 provides both a straightforward signal path and a traditional one-knob-per-function
user interface that is ideal for beginning synthesists. Nonetheless, Subsequent 25 stands as an
extraordinary addition to any electronic musician’s studio setup or to any live performer’s stage rig.
Equipped with vigorous MIDI capabilities, Subsequent 25 can be layered with other MIDI sound sources
or integrated into a multitrack DAW-based studio. Your Subsequent 25 can even be used to process
sound from other instruments, microphones, or other audio sources.
The Subsequent 25 internal Patches memory stores 16 user-rewritable Presets. The free editor/
librarian/controller plug-in allows your computer to store as many Presets as you like, and provides a
graphical user interface for programming your own sounds. Like other synths in the Voyager and Little
Phatty families, Subsequent 25 has syncable audio oscillators with continuously variable waveforms,
as well as a low-frequency oscillator (LFO) that syncs to MIDI clock and offers a choice of modulation
waveforms. In addition to a mono audio output with a dedicated volume knob, Subsequent 25 provides
a front-panel headphone output with a separate volume knob.
FEATURES & CONTROLS
PRESETS PANEL
BANK AND PATCH BUTTONS
Subsequent 25 ships with 16 Presets, and you can replace any of them with your
own Patches. (The word patch is a holdover from modular synthesis, which
requires patch cords to connect the various modules.)
Presets are arranged in four Banks, each containing four Patches. On the front
panel’s left side, you’ll see two rows of buttons in the PRESETS section. Use the
row on the left to select Banks and the row on the right to select Presets within
those Banks. For example, to select Preset 1 in Bank 2, first press the second
button on the left and then press the first button on the right. You can tell at
a glance which Preset is active because the corresponding BANK and PATCH
buttons will be illuminated. If you select a new Bank, the new BANK button will
pulsate slowly until a new Patch is selected.
Take your time, listen to all the Presets, and turn some knobs to get a feel for how
you can use them to alter the sounds.
10
PRESETS PANEL
(Continued)
(Bank and Patch Controls Continued)
Whenever you want to go back to the original stored Preset, just select it again using the same BANK
and PATCH buttons.
NOTE: The buttons found in the PRESETS section also provide access to Shift mode, which allows you to access
“under-the-hood” Subsequent 25 features directly from the front panel. To learn more, see page 27.
SAVING PRESETS
Saving Presets is a two-finger maneuver. Just remember that whenever you save a Preset to a
particular location, the Preset previously stored in that location will be deleted. To save your changes,
press and hold the BANK button corresponding to the Bank in which you want to store your new Preset.
While holding the BANK button, press the PATCH button corresponding to the location in which you
want to store it, hold both buttons for at least one second, and then release them.
NOTE: Both buttons will flash and then go solid again to indicate that your new Preset has been stored.
If you release both buttons before one second has elapsed, both buttons will continue flashing. By
pressing and holding the ACTIVATE PANEL button as they’re flashing, you can listen to the Preset
currently stored in the selected location to make sure it’s the one you want to replace. Releasing
ACTIVATE PANEL returns to your unsaved Patches. At this point, you can either finish saving your
Preset by repeating the save procedure or cancel saving by pressing any of the BANK buttons.
ACTIVATE PANEL
Pressing the ACTIVATE PANEL button puts Subsequent 25 in Panel mode. Pressing it again returns
Subsequent 25 to Preset mode. In Panel mode, the front-panel settings determine the sound rather
than a stored Preset. The current position of each knob and the status of each button determines the
natures of the sound emanating from your Subsequent 25. Dialing up sounds in Panel mode is exactly
like dialing up sounds in a classic synth without Patch memory, but when you’re finished sculpting your
sound, you can save your work. Saving a Preset stores all the settings that define your new sound.
BASICS OF SOUND
If you’re new to the world of music synthesis, it helps to have at least a rudimentary understanding of
music and acoustics. Even if you know this stuff like the back of your hand, it never hurts to approach
it from a fresh perspective. Several qualities distinguish one musical sound from another, including
pitch, loudness, duration, and timbre. Being able to manipulate those qualities allows you to turn raw
sound into music.
Simply put, sound occurs when a vibrating object causes the air around it to vibrate. That object could
be a guitar string, a loudspeaker, or anything capable of rapid movement. An individual vibration is
called a wave or cycle, and the rate of vibration is called frequency. Frequency determines the sound’s
pitch, and pitch determines how high or how low you perceive the sound on a musical scale. Frequency
is measured in Hertz (abbreviated Hz), which describes the actual number of times that something
vibrates every second. One thousand cycles per second is called a kilohertz (kHz).
WAVELENGTH
AMPLITUDE
LOW FREQUENCY
HIGH FREQUENCY
11
BASICS OF SOUND
(Continued)
Amplitude—the intensity of vibration—determines a sound’s loudness. A high-amplitude sound is
loud, and a low-amplitude sound is soft. A vibrating source’s loudness depends on the amount of air it
displaces, and that depends on how hard it vibrates.
It’s difficult for anyone to identify a musical instrument simply by the pitch or loudness of the sounds
it makes. Every musical sound also has a characteristic tone color or timbre (pronounced tam’–br, as
in tambourine, not tim’–br, as in a tree falling). Differences in timbre make it possible to distinguish one
instrument from another.
If you analyze a single cycle of a musical sound, you can perceive it as a complex combination of
simple sine waves, each wave different in frequency and amplitude. When their frequencies are wholenumber multiples of each other (and in musical sounds, they usually are), those simple waves are called
harmonics. A sound’s timbre depends on its harmonic content. The first harmonic—the one with the
lowest frequency and usually the greatest amplitude—determines its pitch. Higher harmonics are often
called overtones. Normally, the higher the overtone’s frequency, then the weaker its amplitude.
When those harmonics are combined in a musical sound, a single cycle of that sound has a specific
shape, which synthesists call a waveform. Just as the frequencies and relative amplitudes of the
sound’s harmonics determine its waveform, the waveform determines the sound’s timbre.
Instead of producing sounds acoustically the way vibrating objects do, synthesizers generate electrical
signals that are amplified and converted to sound. Just as sound has frequency and amplitude, so
does the kind of alternating current produced by a synthesizer. An analog synthesizer’s primary sound
source is called an oscillator.
The oscillator’s waveform, of course, determines the sound’s harmonic content. Some waveforms
are rich in harmonics, while others have relatively few. Depending on the waveform, some overtones
may be absent altogether. Waveforms with lots of overtones, such as sawtooth and square waves, are
harmonically the most complex. Waveforms with fewer overtones, such as triangle and narrow pulse
waves, are harmonically less complex.
Rather than building up waveforms one harmonic at a time, the way an additive synthesizer does,
analog synthesizers like Subsequent 25 provide the means to shape and filter complex, harmonically
rich waveforms to selectively remove, reduce, or emphasize specific harmonics—a technique called
subtractive synthesis.
THE SUBTRACTIVE SYNTHESIS MODEL
KB: Keyboard (Pitch Voltage)
VCO: Voltage Controlled Oscillator
VCF: Voltage Controlled Filter
EG: Envelope Generator
LFO: Low Frequency Oscillator
VCA: Voltage Controlled Amplifier
12
BASICS OF SOUND
(Continued)
The oscillators, filter, modulators, and other parts are connected in the most useful ways for producing
and modifying electronic signals that result in sounds. Unlike the patchable connections made on
modular synthesizers, many of the connections between the various Subsequent 25 circuits are
hardwired, meaning that it is not possible to change the routing of the pathways that connect them.
The electrical signals within a synthesizer are either audio signals or control signals, depending on
the pathway they follow. Typically, an audio signal begins with an oscillator and passes through the
filter on its way to the audio output. Control signals are used to change things, like the pitch, timbre,
waveshape, or loudness of an audio signal.
Any time a signal controls something, no matter whether it’s controlling an audio signal or another
control signal, we say that it modulates it. In synth-speak, you could say that a steering wheel
modulates a car’s direction and the accelerator pedal modulates its speed. When you play Subsequent
25 keyboard, the key you press modulates the instrument’s pitch. You can modulate filter cutoff by
turning a knob manually, or you can apply a control signal from a low-frequency oscillator or envelope
to modulate it electronically. It’s worth noting that a control destination can be modulated by more
than one control source.
SUBSEQUENT 25 SIGNAL FLOW
SUB 1
LEVEL
VCO 1
LEVEL
MULTIDRIVE
VCO 2
LEVEL
EXT
AUDIO
Subsequent 25 can be controlled using control voltages and MIDI commands. When your Subsequent 25
receives either a control signal from the onboard keyboard or a Note On command from an external
MIDI source, it responds by sending a gate signal to trigger the envelopes and a control voltage (CV)
to control oscillator pitch. The envelopes respond by sending control signals to the amplifier and filter.
Every Subsequent 25 knob and button transmits MIDI data. This functionality is useful for recording
your knob turns and button presses into a computer-based DAW, as well as for controlling external
devices using the Subsequent 25 front-panel controls. All the settings that make up a Patch are called
its parameters, which is simply another name for settings.
13
OSCILLATORS
Oscillator 1 and Oscillator 2 are the primary Subsequent 25 sound
sources. Each Oscillator generates four basic waveforms: triangle,
sawtooth, square, and pulse.
The triangle wave consists of odd-numbered harmonics only.
Its fundamental is very strong, and its overtones are very weak,
making it less harmonically complex than other waveforms. By
mixing a triangle from one Oscillator with a more complex wave
from the other, you can emphasize one particular harmonic without
mucking things up with unwanted overtones.
An unfiltered sawtooth wave is much brighter, because it contains
all the natural harmonics. As the harmonics ascend in frequency,
they grow weaker in amplitude. Sawtooth waves are useful for
synthesizing bass, simulating brass instruments, and more.
Although a pulse wave contains only odd-numbered harmonics, it
offers the most flexibility because you can change the balance of
those odd-numbered harmonics by changing its shape. Think of a
pulse-wave Oscillator as a switch you can turn off and on hundreds
or thousands of times per second. In a single pulse wave, the
“switch” is either on or off. Its pulse width is the proportion of the
wave that’s on, usually expressed as a percentage. A square wave is
simply a pulse wave with 50% pulse width, meaning that in a single
cycle, it is on half the time and off half the time. If its frequency
is 440Hz, that means it goes on and off 440 times every second, and the result you hear is the pitch
A above middle C. Every pulse width has its own characteristic sound, because each has a unique
harmonic structure, making a variety of basic timbres possible.
Unlike most synths, which simply switch between basic waveforms, Subsequent 25 allows you
to gradually change the Oscillator’s output from one waveform to another, so it can generate
something partway between a sawtooth and a square wave, for example. We refer to such controls as
continuously variable because there are no discrete steps between settings. In normal operation, either
the keyboard or external MIDI data controls Oscillator pitch. You can also apply the LFO or the Filter
Envelope to modulate Oscillator pitch and waveform.
OSCILLATOR CONTROLS
OCTAVE: This knob sets the pitch range for that Oscillator. Pitch range is expressed in feet, a
throwback to the age of pipe organs, when a pipe’s physical length determined its pitch. The
Subsequent 25 OCTAVE knobs cover four pitch ranges corresponding to four octaves. The lowest
setting is 16’, and the highest setting is 2’.
WAVE: This knob is used to control that Oscillator’s waveform from triangle to sawtooth to square to
narrow pulse wave. Turning the knob clockwise from the triangle to sawtooth position increases the
Oscillator’s harmonic content. Continuing to turn it to the square-wave position weakens and then
eliminates even-numbered harmonics while strengthening odd-numbered harmonics. Turning it from
the square to narrow-pulse position changes its harmonic content further by weakening the overtones
relative to the fundamental frequency.
FREQUENCY: This knob is used to fine-tune Oscillator 2’s pitch within its selected range. The knob’s
range is seven semitones higher or lower than its center position. At its center position, Oscillator 2 is
tuned to Oscillator 1. Turning it just slightly out of tune with Oscillator 1 can yield interesting detuned
or phasing effects.
14
OSCILLATORS
(Continued)
HARD SYNC OSC 2
This button locks Oscillator 2’s phase to Oscillator 1, eliminating any phase differences between them.
The HARD SYNC OSC 2 button illuminates when it’s engaged.
When both Oscillators are in sync, every time that Oscillator 1 begins a new cycle, it forces Oscillator
2 to begin its cycle at the same instant, regardless of whether its previous cycle is complete. As a
result, hard sync forces Oscillator 2’s waveform to take on a different shape—typically one with greater
harmonic complexity. Because Oscillator 2 is in sync with Oscillator 1, their combined harmonic content
depends on their pitch relationship, so that changing Oscillator 2’s frequency will have an immediate
effect on timbre. For that reason, modulating Oscillator 2’s frequency opens up some outstanding
waveshaping opportunities when HARD SYNC OSC 2 is engaged.
NOTE: If Oscillator 1’s frequency is higher than Oscillator 2’s, Oscillator 2 will be unable to complete its cycle,
resulting in little or no output from Oscillator 2.
TRY THIS
PATCH INITIALIZATION
1. Press the ACTIVATE PANEL button.
2. In the FILTER section, turn the CUTOFF knob all the way up, the EG AMOUNT knob to center
position, and the remaining knobs all the way down.
3. In the ENVELOPES section, turn the SUSTAIN knobs all the way up and the remaining knobs
all the way down.
4. Set the OCTAVE knobs for both Oscillators to 16’ and center the OSCILLATOR section’s
remaining knobs. The HARD SYNC OSC 2 and PITCH AMT OSC 2 ONLY buttons should be
turned off.
5. In the MODULATION section, turn the LFO RATE to 8 and the remaining knobs all the way
down. Make sure the MOD wheel is turned all the way down, too.
6. Next to the PRESETS section, FINE TUNE and OCTAVE should be centered and GLIDE RATE
should be all the way down.
7. Finally, turn all the MIXER knobs fully counterclockwise.
When you play the keyboard with these settings, you shouldn’t hear anything. This procedure
initializes the front panel and gives you a starting place for creating your own Patches and
exploring the capabilities of your Subsequent 25.
EXPLORE THE OSCILLATORS
After patch initialization, turn up the OSC 1 knob in the MIXER section. Listen carefully as you
play the keys while slowly turning Oscillator 1’s WAVE knob to the triangle, sawtooth, square, and
pulse positions. Listen to what happens when you turn the WAVE knob quickly while playing.
Now turn up Oscillator 2 in the Mixer. While holding a key, turn Oscillator 2’s FREQUENCY knob
to adjust its tuning relative to Oscillator 1. Notice the varied effects of adjusting them slightly out
of tune, ranging from obvious beating between the pitches to mild phasing between the slightly
detuned Oscillators.
If you turn the FREQUENCY knob all the way up, you’ll hear Oscillator 2 tuned seven semitones
(an interval of a perfect 5th) higher than Oscillator 1. If you turn it all the way down, it will be
seven semitones lower than Oscillator 1. (For extra credit, try to tune them a major 3rd and a
perfect 4th apart, too.) Now tune the Oscillators as close to unison as you can by turning the
knob to its center position again.
15
OSCILLATORS (Continued)
TRY THIS
OSCILLATOR SYNC
With the HARD SYNC OSC 2 button engaged, you can step through the harmonic series by
turning Oscillator 2’s FREQUENCY knob. To begin, make sure both Oscillators are turned up in the
Mixer. Turn both OCTAVE knobs to their lowest settings, and then press the HARD SYNC OSC 2
button so that it’s illuminated. Begin with the FREQUENCY knob turned fully counterclockwise
and slowly turn it while listening for how the overtones change. Using your ears, try to step
through each harmonic one at a time. Now turn Oscillator 2’s OCTAVE knob to its 8’, 4’, and 2’
settings and slowly turn the FREQUENCY knob again to hear the harmonic series in successively
higher octaves.
MIXER
The Mixer lets you combine audio signals from each of the four Subsequent 25
internal sources. Each has a dedicated knob for controlling its relative level.
In addition to level knobs for each Oscillator, the Mixer has level knobs for
the Sub Oscillator and Noise Generator. When a level knob is turned fully
counterclockwise, its input is effectively turned off. Turning it clockwise
from 0 increases the level until it reaches its maximum at 12. Settings higher
than 6 overdrive the Filter, meaning that you can specify which sources are
distorted and which simply pass through the Filter.
MIXER CONTROLS
OSC 1: This knob controls the level of Oscillator 1. Settings higher than 6 push
the level beyond unity, imparting gentle Filter distortion. A setting of 6 or
below delivers a clean signal to the Filter.
OSC 2: This knob controls the level of Oscillator 2. Settings higher than 6
push the level beyond unity, imparting gentle Filter distortion. A setting of 6
or below delivers a clean signal to the Filter.
SUB OSC: This knob controls the level of the Sub Oscillator signal. Settings
higher than 6 push the level beyond unity, imparting gentle Filter distortion.
A setting of 6 or below delivers a clean signal to the Filter. The Subsequent
25 Sub Oscillator is always tuned exactly one octave below Oscillator 1’s
pitch, and its waveform is always a square wave. Typically, the Sub Oscillator
adds a solid foundation to the Subsequent 25 sound. It is especially useful for
crafting monstrous Moog bass Patches.
NOISE: This knob controls the level of the Subsequent 25 Noise Generator. Settings higher than 6
push the level beyond unity, imparting gentle Filter distortion. Noise is useful for programming punchy
percussion and other unpitched sounds.
Whereas an Oscillator generates a pitched waveform, Noise is an unpitched sound source. Just as
white light contains all colors of the visual spectrum in equal proportion, white noise contains a random
distribution of all audible frequencies. Every frequency has equal amplitude. We hear white noise as
a constant ssshh sound, like an FM radio between stations. Because of the way our brains respond to
white noise, the higher frequencies sound more prominent than the lower ones.
The Subsequent 25 Noise Generator produces a signal called pink noise. Pink noise has equal
amplitude in every octave, making it sound deeper than white noise—more like the sound of a
waterfall. Most synthesists consider pink noise more useful than white noise.
16
FILTER
The number and relative strengths of a sound’s harmonic
frequencies determine its tone color or timbre. Subsequent 25
contains a Filter for removing certain frequencies from audio
signals. Because filtering gives you control over an audio signal’s
harmonic content, it physically alters the waveform being filtered.
Subsequent 25 uses the classic Moog lowpass Ladder Filter with
four selectable slopes (see Hidden Parameters on page 30).
Lowpass filters pass all frequencies up to a point called the Cutoff
frequency and gradually roll off, or attenuate, frequencies above
that point. You can change the Cutoff manually using a knob, or
you can change it by applying a signal from a control source such
as an Envelope or LFO.
Turning the Cutoff all the way down closes the Filter so that nothing
passes through it. Raising the Cutoff opens the Filter. As you turn
the CUTOFF knob clockwise from its lowest position, first you’ll hear
only the audio signal’s lowest frequencies, and then the timbre will
grow gradually brighter. The Filter Envelope, in combination with the
CUTOFF knob’s setting, is the Filter’s primary control source.
Another characteristic of the Subsequent 25 Filter is Resonance.
Resonance increases the level of audio frequencies closest to
the Cutoff frequency by making the Filter roll off frequencies
less gradually. It regenerates those frequencies by feeding them
back to the Filter. Turning up the Resonance emphasizes harmonics
closest to the Cutoff frequency and exaggerates any changes to
the Cutoff frequency.
FILTER CONTROLS
CUTOFF: The Cutoff frequency of the Filter is controlled by this knob. Its lowest setting is 20Hz, which
effectively closes the Filter and doesn’t allow any audio to pass through. Its highest setting is 20kHz,
which opens the Filter completely and allows all audio to pass through.
RESONANCE: Rotating this knob controls how much signal is routed from the Filter output back to
its input. Turning it clockwise increases the Resonance, causing a peak in amplitude at the Cutoff
frequency. Settings above 7 cause the Filter to self-oscillate.
MULTIDRIVE: MultiDrive acts as the Subsequent 25 distortion processor, offering effects ranging from
asymmetrical, tube-like warmth to aggressive hard clipping, with a smooth continuous transition in
between. The MULTIDRIVE knob controls how hard you drive the OTA and FET stages, which are located
between the Filter and the Amplifier in the signal path. The higher the setting, then the more aggressive
the clipping effect. Varying amounts of MultiDrive can give your sounds a distinct tonal edge, as well as
make them more responsive to changes in Filter Resonance, waveform, and Oscillator level.
EG AMOUNT: This knob determines how much the Filter Envelope modulates the Filter’s Cutoff
frequency. In other words, EG AMOUNT controls the depth of the Envelope Generator’s effect
on the Filter.
Notice that the EG AMOUNT knob is bipolar, meaning that its control value is positive when it’s turned
up and negative when it’s turned down. Turning it clockwise from center causes the Envelope to raise
the Cutoff frequency from the CUTOFF knob’s setting. Turning it counterclockwise from center causes
the Envelope to lower the Cutoff frequency from the CUTOFF knob’s setting.
17
FILTER
(Continued)
(EG Amount Continued)
The depth of the Envelope effect on the Cutoff frequency also depends a lot on the CUTOFF setting.
If the setting is very high and you adjust the EG AMOUNT to raise it further, then the Envelope will have
little effect. The lower the Cutoff frequency, then the more the Envelope will be able to modulate it.
On the other hand, if the setting is very low and you adjust the EG AMOUNT to lower it further by
turning the knob counterclockwise, again, the Envelope will have little effect.
KB AMOUNT: Rotating this knob will specify to what extent the Filter Cutoff frequency tracks the
keyboard; that is, how much the keyboard pitch affects the Filter lowpass frequency. With KB AMOUNT
turned up halfway, the Filter cutoff will follow the keyboard pitch at a 1:1 ratio centered around middle C
(MIDI note 60). KB AMOUNT at maximum sets a 2:1 ratio for Filter keyboard tracking.
ENVELOPES
When you make any sound, it may take
a moment for that sound to reach its
maximum amplitude and brightness.
This initial moment is called the sound’s
attack. An attack may be gradual (like a
cymbal roll), abrupt (like a cymbal crash),
or anything in between. The attack often
tells us more about how an instrument
is played than any other characteristic.
Likewise, when the sound ends, it may
take a moment to die away completely,
or it may stop suddenly. This final drop
in amplitude and brightness is called its
release. The attack and release, along with
variations in amplitude and timbre that
occur between the attack and release,
make up the sound’s Envelope.
Subsequent 25 shapes electronic
sounds using two Envelope Generators
(abbreviated EG). One envelope affects
the Subsequent 25 Filter, which controls
timbre, and the other affects its Amplifier, which controls amplitude. When you press a key on the
keyboard, it sends a signal that tells the Envelope Generator to begin the Attack Stage. In voltagecontrolled synthesizers like Subsequent 25, this signal is called a Gate. The Gate ends when you release
the key, telling the Envelope Generator to begin the Release Stage.
Each of the Subsequent 25 Envelope Generators has four stages: Attack, Decay, Sustain, and Release
(abbreviated ADSR). Just as Attack is the time it takes a level to peak, the Decay is the time it takes
to fall to a steady level, called the Sustain. The Sustain Level is held until the note ends. At that point,
the signal returns to zero at a rate determined by the Release setting. Whereas the Attack, Decay, and
Release Stages are specified as lengths of time, Sustain is a control-signal level.
18
ENVELOPES
(Continued)
AMPLITUDE
RELEASE
SUSTAIN
DECAY
ATTACK
TIME
ADSR
As you play the Subsequent 25 keyboard, technique determines how the Envelope Generators (EG)
respond, which impacts your musical expression and articulation. If you release the key before the
Envelope reaches either its maximum or Sustain Level, the Release Stage immediately takes effect.
When you play staccato (very short notes), the Envelope may never reach its Decay Stage, depending
on its Attack setting. Playing legato—holding down each key for the note’s full duration without lifting
your fingers between notes—prevents the Envelope from retriggering its Attack Stage on subsequent
notes. In that case, the Envelope maintains its Sustain Level until you trigger the Release Stage by
lifting your finger.
ENVELOPE CONTROLS
FILTER ATTACK: This knob specifies the time it takes the Filter frequency to ascend from the CUTOFF
knob’s manual setting to its maximum level, which is determined by the Filter EG AMOUNT setting. Its
value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
When you use the Filter Envelope to modulate pitch or wave amount, the ATTACK knob specifies the
time it takes the control level to ascend to its maximum value.
FILTER DECAY: This knob specifies the time it takes the Filter frequency to descend from its maximum
level to its Sustain Level. Its value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
When you use the Filter Envelope to modulate pitch or wave amount, the DECAY knob specifies the
time it takes the control level to descend from its maximum value to its Sustain Level.
FILTER SUSTAIN: Rotating this knob will set the Filter Cutoff frequency once the Decay Stage is
complete. The Sustain stage is held until the Envelope receives a Note Off command or the Gate
ends. Its value ranges from zero to 100 percent, calibrated 1 to 10. Note that the Filter EG AMOUNT
determines the depth of its effect.
When you use the Filter Envelope to modulate pitch or wave amount, the SUSTAIN knob specifies the
control value that is held once the Decay Stage is complete.
FILTER RELEASE: This knob specifies the time it takes the Filter Cutoff to descend from its Sustain
value to the CUTOFF knob’s manual setting. Its value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
When you use the Filter Envelope to modulate pitch or wave amount, the RELEASE knob specifies the
time it takes the control level to descend from the Sustain value to zero.
19
ENVELOPES (Continued)
(Envelope Controls Continued)
AMPLIFIER ATTACK: The time required for the Mixer output’s amplitude to ascend from zero to its
maximum value is controlled via this knob. Its value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
AMPLIFIER DECAY: The time required for the Mixer output’s amplitude to descend from its maximum
value to the Sustain Level is controlled via this knob. Its value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
AMPLIFIER SUSTAIN: Rotating this knob will set the Mixer output’s amplitude once the Decay Stage is
complete. The Sustain stage is held until the Envelope receives a Note Off command or the Gate ends.
Its value ranges from zero to 100 percent, calibrated 1 to 10.
AMPLIFIER RELEASE: The time required for the Mixer output’s amplitude to descend from its Sustain
value to zero is controlled via this knob. Its value ranges from 1 millisecond to 10 seconds.
TRY THIS
NOTE ARTICULATION
Load your favorite melodic Preset. For both Envelopes, turn the Attack to just under one second
and the Release to just over one second. Play the keys staccato, making sure to lift your fingers
between each note. Notice that you can hear the Release Stage after every note, especially when
you pause long enough for the Envelope to return to zero.
Now play legato, making sure you don’t lift you fingers between notes. Hear the difference? After
the first note, the Envelopes bypass their Attack, Decay, and Release Stages when you play legato
and maintain their Sustain Levels until you lift your fingers. Playing with a combination of staccato
and legato articulations adds to the expressivity of your performance.
CLASSIC ELECTRONIC KICK DRUM
One of the simplest sounds you can synthesize is a kick drum, also called a bass drum. Perhaps
the best example of an electronic kick drum comes from a classic analog drum machine, the 808.
It uses a sine wave and a 2-stage Envelope Generator to create the sound. Subsequent 25 lets you
re-create this vintage sound with just a bit more thump.
Although synthesizing most percussion begins with the Noise Generator, the kick drum is an
exception. After initializing the Patches, turn up the Mixer level on Oscillator 1. Turn Oscillator 1’s
OCTAVE knob to 16’ and the WAVE knob to triangle. On the Amplifier Envelope, turn the ATTACK
and SUSTAIN knobs all the way down. Now adjust the DECAY and RELEASE knobs to exactly
1 second. Because triangle waves have a few weak overtones, you’ll need to filter those out to
approximate a sine wave.
Turn the Filter CUTOFF knob to 320Hz and the MULTIDRIVE knob to 9 O’clock. On the front
panel’s left side, press the left OCTAVE button to lower the pitch an octave, and strike the low C
key. If necessary, slightly adjust the CUTOFF and DECAY to taste. And there you have it: a sound
that’s propelled millions of people out on the dance floor.
20
MODULATION
Controlling modulation (abbreviated as mod) is an important
aspect of programming and playing synthesizers. When you
modulate a synth’s audio signal, you’re changing something about
the way it sounds. When you modulate a control signal, you’re
changing something about its effect on whatever it’s controlling.
Synthesizers route their control signals from modulation sources
to modulation destinations. On your Subsequent 25, a changing
control signal can modulate pitch, filter cutoff, and waveform
shape. You control the modulation signal’s depth using the MOD
wheel immediately to the left of the keyboard.
All LFOs generate repeating waveforms in the sub-audio range.
The Subsequent 25 LFO has an extended range capable of
generating audio frequencies as well. At sub-audio rates, the LFO
is useful for generating repeating effects. At audio rates, the LFO
adds harmonic complexity to its destination.
When an LFO modulates an Oscillator’s frequency, the Oscillator’s
pitch follows the shape of the modulating waveform. If the LFO’s
output is a triangle wave, the pitch rises and falls at a regular rate.
At the proper rate and depth, this type of modulation is called
vibrato. Many performers rely on vibrato to add expression to
their performances. A violinist or guitarist employs vibrato with a
shaking motion of the hand as it applies pressure to the string. A
singer subtly fluctuates vocal pitch. A synthesist uses an LFO to
modulate Oscillator frequency. The LFO RATE knob controls the
rate of modulation, and the mod wheel controls its depth.
MODULATION CONTROLS
LFO RATE: By default, this knob varies the low-frequency Oscillator’s modulation rate from 0.1Hz (one
cycle every 10 seconds) to 100Hz (100 cycles per second). You can change this range in Shift mode
(see Hidden Parameters on page 30).
SOURCE: This knob specifies whether the mod source is the LFO or the Filter Envelope, as well as
the LFO waveform. At its counterclockwise position, the LFO generates a triangle wave, which is
particularly useful for vibrato. Turning the knob clockwise, the next position generates a square wave,
which is useful for performing trills and tremolo effects. The next two positions generate sawtooth and
ramp (reverse sawtooth) waves. Applied to pitch, sawtooth-wave modulation is useful for simulating
alarms, ray guns, and other ascending and descending effects.
The fifth position uses sample-and-hold as a mod source. Without going into a lot of technical
explanation, think of sample-and-hold as a source of random control signals.
The SOURCE knob’s most clockwise position, labeled FILTER EG, bypasses the LFO and routes the
Filter Envelope to the modulation destinations, which are determined by the settings of the PITCH
AMT, FILTER AMT, and WAVE AMT knobs below.
PITCH AMT: This knob specifies the depth of pitch variation applied to the Oscillators when the MOD
wheel is engaged. If the mod source is the Filter Envelope, you can control changes in pitch using the
Envelope’s Attack, Decay, Sustain, and Release settings.
21
MODULATION (Continued)
PITCH AMT OSC 2 ONLY: Pressing this button applies pitch modulation to Oscillator 2 only, with no
effect on Oscillator 1. The button illuminates when it’s engaged.
If you engage the HARD SYNC OSC 2 button (which phase-locks the Oscillators), then modulating
Oscillator 2’s frequency with an LFO or Envelope will change the Oscillator’s harmonic content but not
its pitch.
FILTER AMT: This knob specifies the depth of variation applied to the Filter Cutoff frequency when
the MOD wheel is engaged. Applying LFO modulation to the Filter is useful for generating slow Filter
sweeps, wobbles, and repeating effects.
WAVE AMT: This knob specifies the depth of variation applied to the waveform of both audio
Oscillators when the MOD wheel is engaged. As the waveform is modulated, the amplitudes,
frequencies, and phase of the harmonics change dynamically. Waveform modulation has no effect on
the Sub Oscillator, which always generates a square wave.
NOTE: Using Shift mode or the plug-in editor, you can also assign Wave Amount to affect Oscillator 1 or 2
independently (see Hidden Parameters on page 30).
TRY THIS
LFO WAVEFORMS
It’s likely that much of the time when you’re playing melodic sounds, you’ll use the MOD wheel
to control note vibrato to make your playing more expressive. To try this, begin by selecting
your favorite lead or solo Preset. In the MODULATION section, turn the SOURCE knob
counterclockwise to its triangle-wave position. Turn PITCH AMT up to 2 and turn LFO RATE to
6. Play a note and nudge the MOD wheel up slightly to produce vibrato. Play a few more notes,
adding vibrato during sustained notes when it feels appropriate. Adjust the LFO RATE to taste.
Learn your way around the LFO by trying the other waveforms and destinations, and by varying
the LFO RATE and depth. Begin by turning up the PITCH AMT knob slightly, raising the MOD
wheel, and then switching the SOURCE knob to the square wave setting. Square wave LFO
modulation produces a trill that alternates between two pitches. Varying the LFO RATE changes
the speed of the trill, and varying the PITCH AMT or the MOD wheel depth changes its interval.
Now vary the LFO RATE, PITCH AMT, and MOD wheel depth using the SOURCE knob’s sawtooth,
ramp, and sample-and-hold settings. Notice that sawtooth and ramp-wave modulation work best
at slow rates, and sample-and-hold modulation works really well when it’s applied to modulate
the Filter with RESONANCE turned up at least halfway. When you’re exploring Filter modulation,
try turning down the Oscillator signal and turning up the Noise.
PULSE WAVE MODULATION
By routing LFO or Envelope modulation to an Oscillator’s wave amount, you give the waveform
motion by changing its harmonic content dynamically. As the control signal changes, so does
the waveform. Although the continuously variable Subsequent 25 Oscillators let you apply
modulation to any waveform, it’s most traditional to modulate a pulse wave.
Beginning with an initialized Patch, turn up Oscillator 1 in the MIXER section and turn the WAVE
knob halfway between square and pulse. Set the LFO RATE at approximately 3Hz and the LFO
waveform to triangle.
When you press a key and push up the MOD wheel, you’ll hear the LFO’s effect on pulse width.
Push it up only slightly, and you’ll hear a dramatic sweeping of the harmonics that sounds a bit
22
MODULATION (Continued)
(Try This Continued)
like a chorusing effect. Turn it up more, and you’ll hear the entire waveform being canceled in rhythm
with the LFO. That’s because you’re pushing the pulse wave beyond its maximum width, so that the
waveform doesn’t have a chance to cycle back to its starting point. Applying LFO modulation to
pulse width is most useful at rates normally used for vibrato—usually between 6 and 9Hz.
In the MODULATION section, turn the SOURCE knob to the FILTER EG position and push the MOD
wheel up all the way. If you play the keyboard and the Filter Envelope is at its initialized setting,
you won’t hear anything until you release the keys. Again, that’s because the pulse width is pushed
beyond its maximum. Lower the MOD wheel to about halfway and play around with the Filter
Envelope settings to get a feel for the Envelope’s effect on pulse width.
GLOBAL PITCH CONTROLS
MIDI INDICATOR: This LED illuminates whenever Subsequent 25 receives MIDI
data through either its MIDI IN or USB PORT.
FINE TUNE: Rotating this knob will adjust the frequency of both Oscillators
as much as one semitone up or down from its center position. This feature
allows Subsequent 25 to be quickly tuned to match another instrument or a
previously recorded track that deviates slightly from standard pitch.
GLIDE RATE: Glide, also called portamento or glissando, causes smooth
pitch changes between notes. This knob specifies how much time it takes to
transition from one pitch to the next when you play the keyboard. Although
Glide is normally applied to every note you play when it’s engaged, you can
turn on Legato Glide using Shift mode (see Hidden Parameters on page 28).
OCTAVE BUTTONS: These buttons extend the Subsequent 25 keyboard
beyond its two-octave range. Pressing the left button once transposes the
Subsequent 25 pitch down an octave, and pressing it again transposes it down
another octave. Likewise, pressing the right button transposes the pitch up an
octave, and pressing it again transposes it up another octave. The illuminated
LED indicates the current transposition. The buttons also transpose the MIDI
Note Numbers that Subsequent 25 transmits by corresponding amounts.
Using the OCTAVE buttons gives the Subsequent 25 keyboard a six-octave
range. With a little practice, these buttons can even be pressed while
performing, in order to increase the available key range.
KEYBOARD: Subsequent 25 is equipped with a velocity-sensitive keyboard, so that all 25 keys transmit
MIDI velocity data in response to how fast the keys are depressed.
WHEELS: The PITCH and MOD wheels located to the left of the keyboard can contribute greatly to
the expressivity of your playing. Use the PITCH wheel to smoothly bend pitch during performance.
By default, it transposes pitch up two semitones and down two semitones. However, you can change
either interval in Shift mode (see Hidden Parameters on page 27). The PITCH wheel is spring-loaded
to automatically return to the center position.
The MOD wheel controls the depth of modulation. At its minimum setting, modulation is turned off.
At its maximum setting, modulation is at full throttle. The depth of the MOD wheel’s effect depends on
the settings of the PITCH AMT, FILTER AMT, and WAVE AMT knobs.
23
SHIFT MODE
Although you can control all Subsequent 25 functions directly from the front
panel, you’ll need to dig a little deeper to reach some of them. Shift mode
reassigns several front-panel controls so you can use them to edit hidden
parameters. Like all parameters, changes you make in Shift mode are
memorized when you save your Preset.
Engage Shift mode by holding down the BANK 4 button and then pressing the
ACTIVATE PANEL button. When you do, all the BANK and PATCH buttons will
go dark and the ACTIVATE PANEL button will blink. Pressing ACTIVATE PANEL
again will cancel Shift mode and return all the controls to their normal functions.
KNOB & BUTTON REASSIGNMENTS IN SHIFT MODE
PARAMETER: FILTER ENVELOPE DELAY
KNOB: FILTER ENVELOPE ATTACK
Adding a Delay stage to the Filter Envelope lets you specify a timed pause
before the onset of the Attack, effectively turning an ADSR Envelope into a
DADSR Envelope. By engaging Shift mode and turning the Amplifier Envelope’s
ATTACK knob, you can vary the Envelope’s Delay time from a minimum of 0 to a
maximum of 10 seconds. The Filter Envelope Delay stage is only available when
the Filter Envelope Repeat parameter is on (see Hidden Parameters on page 32).
PARAMETER: FILTER ENVELOPE HOLD
KNOB: FILTER ENVELOPE DECAY
Adding a Hold stage to the Filter Envelope lets you specify a fixed period
of time between the Attack and Sustain stages, effectively turning an ADSR
Envelope into an AHDSR Envelope. During this stage, the filter’s Cutoff
frequency is held at its maximum level, which is determined by the filter’s
EG AMOUNT setting. By engaging Shift mode and turning the Filter Envelope’s
DECAY knob, you can vary the Envelope’s Hold time from a minimum of 0 to a
maximum of 10 seconds.
PARAMETER: VELOCITY TO FILTER ENVELOPE AMOUNT
KNOB: FILTER ENVELOPE SUSTAIN
To make your sounds get brighter as you press the keys faster on the keyboard,
engage Shift mode and turn up the Filter Envelope’s SUSTAIN knob. The knob’s
range varies from 0 to 100%.
24
SHIFT MODE
(Continued)
PARAMETER: VELOCITY TO FILTER ENVELOPE DECAY/RELEASE
KNOB: FILTER ENVELOPE RELEASE
Changing this setting lets you specify how much velocity affects the Filter
Envelope’s Decay and Release times. To lengthen the Decay and Release in
response to how hard you play on the keyboard, engage Shift mode and turn
up the Filter Envelope’s RELEASE knob. The knob’s range is from 0 to 100%.
PARAMETER: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE DELAY
KNOB: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE ATTACK
Adding a Delay stage to the Amplifier Envelope lets you specify a timed pause
before the onset of the Attack, effectively turning an ADSR Envelope into a
DADSR Envelope. By engaging Shift mode and turning the Amplifier Envelope’s
ATTACK knob, you can vary the Envelope’s Delay time from a minimum of 0 to
a maximum of 10 seconds. The Amplifier Envelope Delay stage is only available
when the Amplifier Envelope Repeat parameter is on (see Hidden Parameters
on page 34).
PARAMETER: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE HOLD
KNOB: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE DECAY
Adding a Hold stage to the Amplifier Envelope lets you specify a fixed period
of time between the Attack and Sustain stages, effectively turning an ADSR
Envelope into an AHDSR Envelope. During this stage, the Mixer output’s
amplitude is held at its maximum value. By engaging Shift mode and turning
the Amplifier Envelope’s DECAY knob, you can vary the Envelope’s Hold time
from a minimum of 0 to a maximum of 10 seconds.
PARAMETER: VELOCITY TO AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE AMOUNT
KNOB: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE SUSTAIN
Your Patches will be much more dynamic if you make a habit of programming
their velocity sensitivity. To make your sounds get louder as you press the
keys faster on the keyboard, engage Shift mode and turn up the Amplifier
Envelope’s SUSTAIN knob. The knob’s range varies from 0 to 100%.
PARAMETER: VELOCITY TO AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE DECAY/RELEASE
KNOB: AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE RELEASE
Changing this setting lets you specify how much velocity affects the Amplifier
Envelope’s Decay and Release times. To lengthen the Decay and Release in
response to how fast you press the keys on the keyboard, engage Shift mode
and turn up the Amplifier Envelope’s RELEASE knob. The knob’s range is from
0 to 100%.
25
SHIFT MODE
(Continued)
PARAMETER: FEEDBACK / EXTERNAL INPUT LEVEL
KNOB: NOISE
To manually control the level of signals coming from the Subsequent 25 EXT IN
jack, engage Shift mode and turn the NOISE knob. When nothing is plugged
into the EXT IN jack on the left side of the Subsequent 25, the FDBK / EXT
IN parameter takes the output of the mixer and feeds it back into this mixer
channel, resulting in a variety of distorted, sometimes chaotic, sometimes
mellow qualities.
WARNING: This control can increase the output volume considerably!
PARAMETER: OSCILLATOR 2 BEAT FREQUENCY
KNOB: OSCILLATOR 2 FREQUENCY
Engage Shift mode and turn Oscillator 2’s FREQUENCY knob to set the “Beat
Frequency” of Oscillator 2 against Oscillator 1. The range is plus or minus
3.5 Hz, with no detuning (0Hz) in the middle. This parameter creates a linear
constant detuning of Oscillator 2 relative to Oscillator 1, so that Oscillator 2
is always detuned by the same number of cycles per second (Hz) regardless
of the musical pitch. The result is a musical detuning effect which phases or
“beats” at a consistent rate on every note.
By contrast, the OSCILLATOR 2 FREQUENCY knob detunes Oscillator 2 by
musical cents, where the rate of beating between Oscillators is halved or
doubled as you play an octave lower or higher in pitch.
NOTE: For this reason, if you want a constant beat frequency at all pitches, make sure that
the regular OSCILLATOR 2 FREQUENCY control is centered. If you want absolute unison
between Oscillator 2 and Oscillator 1, make sure this BEAT FREQUENCY control is centered.
PARAMETER: OSCILLATOR GATE RESET
BUTTON: HARD SYNC OSC 2
Engage Shift mode and press the HARD SYNC OSC 2 button to turn
on Oscillator Gate Reset. This function forces the audio Oscillators to
simultaneously begin their cycles whenever you play a new note. When turned
on, the result is a more well defined leading edge to sounds with a hard attack.
PARAMETER: LFO GATE RESET
BUTTON: PITCH AMT OSC 2 ONLY
Engage Shift mode and press the PITCH AMT OSC 2 ONLY button to turn on
the LFO Gate Reset. This function forces the LFO to begin a new cycle each
time you play a new note.
When LFO reset is turned off, the LFO runs freely, without regard to the notes
you’re playing. When it’s turned on, however, its instantaneous amplitude
always ascends from its zero-crossing point whenever an Envelope is triggered.
This can be especially important for creating realistic vibrato when you’re
emulating acoustic instruments, or for programming Filter sweeps.
26
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
You can access additional Subsequent 25 hidden parameters using a combination of buttons and the
keyboard. First, engage Shift mode by holding down the BANK 4 button and pressing the ACTIVATE
PANEL button. Next use the BANK and PATCH buttons to choose the parameter. Finally, press a key
on the keyboard to set the parameter’s value. All parameter options are shown on the following pages.
All parameters have at least two possible values (ON and OFF), and some parameters have up to 24
possible values. Lower keys specify lower values, and higher keys specify higher values. Because most
parameters have a limited range of values, they respond to only the leftmost keys. The low C key always
selects the lowest value. For parameters with two values, the low C always selects OFF and the low
C# always selects ON. For parameters that use less than the entire keyboard to select values, unused
keys play normally, allowing you to audition sounds while you make parameter changes. Once you have
set the value for a hidden parameter, you can remain in the Shift mode and use the BANK and PATCH
buttons to call up another hidden parameter, or simply press the key used to set the parameter value
a second time to exit the Shift mode. You can also press the ACTIVATE PANEL button to exit the
Shift mode at any time.
PITCH
KEYBOARD TRANSPOSE
Middle C
To transpose the entire keyboard to any pitch you choose, engage Shift mode,
press the BANK 1 and PATCH 1 buttons, and then press any key. Pressing a key
above middle C transposes up by the interval you select. Likewise, pressing a key
below middle C transposes down by the interval you select. For example, if you
press A below middle C, you will transpose the keyboard down 3 semitones, and
if you press C above middle C, you will transpose the keyboard up a full octave.
The maximum range is up or down 12 semitones.
NOTE: Middle C refers to the C key at the center of the Subsequent 25’s keyboard, not to
the pitch usually referred to as middle C, which is actually one octave higher.
PITCH BEND RANGE UP
Middle C
The Subsequent 25’s pitch bend defaults to two semitones up or down, but you
can change either direction to any interval you want. To specify the PITCH wheel’s
range when you push it up, engage Shift mode and press the BANK 1 and PATCH 2
buttons. Pressing any key selects the bend interval, with each key increasing the
interval by a semitone as you go from left to right. If you want to bend up an octave,
for example, press the middle C key. The maximum range is 24 semitones up.
PITCH BEND RANGE DOWN
Middle C
To specify the PITCH wheel’s range when you push it down, engage Shift mode
and press the BANK 1 and PATCH 3 buttons. Pressing any key selects the bend
interval, with each key increasing the interval by a semitone as you go from left
to right. If you want to bend down a perfect 5th, for example, press the low G key.
The maximum range is 24 semitones down.
27
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
LEGATO GLIDE
Legato Glide ON
You can change the default setting so that Glide is
engaged only when you press a key before you release
the previous key. This is called Legato Glide.
Legato Glide OFF
You can toggle Legato Glide on and off by engaging
Shift mode and pressing the BANK 1 and PATCH 4
buttons. Pressing the low C# key turns Legato Glide
on, and pressing the low C key turns Legato Glide off.
When Glide is turned on and Legato Glide is turned off,
Glide affects all notes you play.
Global Note Priority
Last-Note Priority
High-Note Priority
In addition to setting the Global Note Priority
parameter on page 39, the Subsequent 25 allows you to
set the Note Priority individually for each Preset, either
using or overriding this global setting. The default
setting is Global, which uses the current Global Note
Priority setting. High-note, low-note, and last-note are
also available. High-note and low-note priority can be
useful in creating trills, or mimicking the behavior of
other monophonic synthesizers.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 1, PATCH 1,
and PATCH 2 buttons. Pressing the low C key selects
the Low Note Priority setting, pressing low C# selects
high-note priority, and pressing low D selects last-note
priority. Press the low D# key to select the default
Global Note Priority.
GLIDE TYPE
Exponential
Linear Constant Time
Linear Constant Rate
Low-Note Priority
NOTE PRIORITY
Engaging Shift mode and pressing the BANK 1,
PATCH 2, and PATCH 4 buttons lets you choose from
three different types of Glide: linear constant rate
(LCR), linear constant time (LCT), and exponential
(EXP). When you select LCR (the default) by pressing
the low C key, the Glide time will depend on the size
of the interval; the larger the interval between pitches,
then the longer the Glide time will be. When you select
LCT by pressing the low C# key, the Glide time will
stay the same regardless of the interval. And when you
select EXP by pressing the low D key, the Glide rate will
follow an exponential curve that begins with a fast rate
and slows as it approaches the target note.
28
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
Gated Glide OFF
Gated Glide ON
GATED GLIDE
The Glide function creates a gradual, gliding change
in the Oscillator pitch voltage. Gated Glide causes
this gradual change to be started and stopped by
the keyboard Gate. When Gated Glide is off, the pitch
CV will continue gliding to the target pitch at the
current Glide Rate, regardless of whether or not the
Subsequent 25 is playing a note. When Gated Glide
is on, the pitch CV only glides while a note is playing,
and is held constant in between notes. The different
behaviors are more distinct with longer Glide times.
To toggle Gated Glide on and off, engage Shift mode
and press the BANK 1, PATCH 2, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4
buttons. Press the low C# to turn Gated Glide on, and
press the low C to turn Gated Glide off.
DUO MODE
Mono Mode
Duo Mode
VOICE MODE
Subsequent 25 has two Voice Modes, Mono Mode and
Duo Mode. Mono Mode is the traditional monophonic
behavior, where the synth plays “one key at a time”
and both Oscillators follow the pitch of the same key.
Duo Mode allows Oscillator 1 to follow the pitch of one
key, while Oscillator 2 can follow the pitch of a second,
different key at the same time. If only one key is played
while in Duo Mode, both Oscillators track the pitch of
that key, but if an additional key is played at the same
time, Oscillator 1 and Oscillator 2 will each track a
different key.
OSC 2 Tracks Low-Note
OSC 2 Tracks High-Note
To set the Voice Mode, engage Shift mode and press the
BANK 1, PATCH 1, and PATCH 3 buttons. Press the low C
to select Mono Mode, or the low C# to select Duo Mode.
OSC 2 PRIORITY
When the Voice Mode is set to Duo Mode, you can
choose whether Oscillator 2 will track the highest or
lowest note, when more than one note is played at a
time. This setting only applies when the Voice Mode is
set to the Duo Mode.
To set OSC 2 Priority, engage Shift mode and press the
BANK 1, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4 buttons. Press the low
C to set OSC 2 Priority = High-Note, or the low C# to
set OSC 2 Priority = Low-Note.
USER TIP: The Voice Mode is saved per Preset, so it is easy
to save a Preset with the Duo Mode already selected and
available as a template for programming your next sound.
29
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
4 Pole • 24dB Per Octave
3 Pole • 18dB Per Octave
2 Pole • 12dB Per Octave
1 Pole • 6dB Per Octave
FILTER / MODULATION
FILTER SLOPE
By default, the Subsequent 25 Filter rolloff is set to the
classic Moog 24dB-per-octave slope. You can change
this setting in real time as you play, making the change
in slope part of your performance.
To change the Filter slope, engage Shift mode and press
the BANK 2 and PATCH 1 buttons. Use the four lowest
notes on the keyboard to select the slope. Pressing low C
selects a 1-pole, 6dB-per-octave slope. Pressing low C#
selects a 2-pole, 12dB-per-octave slope. The low D key
selects a 3-pole, 18dB-per-octave slope, and low D#
selects the default 4-pole, 24dB-per-octave slope.
MODULATION PARAMETERS
Shift mode also lets you determine several modulation parameters, including the waveform modulation
destination, LFO Range, LFO pitch tracking, and whether the LFO syncs to tempo.
Oscillator 1
Oscillators 1 & 2
Oscillator 2
WAVEFORM MODULATION DESTINATION
To change how waveform modulation is routed, enter
Shift mode and press the BANK 2 and PATCH 2 buttons.
Then use the three lowest keys to specify whether
waveform modulation will be applied to Oscillator 1
(press the C key), Oscillator 2 (press the C# key), or
both Oscillators (press the D key). Note that the WAVE
AMT knob must be turned up for waveform modulation
to have an effect.
LFO RANGE
1Hz to 1,000Hz
0.01Hz to 10Hz
0.1Hz to 100Hz
The Subsequent 25 LFO has three selectable ranges:
0.01 to 10Hz, 0.1 to 100Hz, and 1 to 1000 Hz. Although
the Mixer has no audio input for the LFO, an audiofrequency oscillator can be very useful as a modulation
source, allowing Subsequent 25 to produce classic,
clangorous FM (frequency modulation) tones.
In Shift mode, press the BANK 2 and PATCH 3 buttons
to change the LFO’s range. Press the low C key to assign
the LFO to its lowest frequency range, from 0.01 to 10Hz.
Press C# to assign the LFO to its middle range, from 0.1
to 100Hz. Press the D key to assign the LFO to its upper
range, from 1 to 1,000Hz.
NOTE: No matter which range you choose, modulation
at normal vibrato rates (between 5 and 10Hz) is possible.
30
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
LFO KB Tracking Amt
+
LFO KEYBOARD TRACKING AMOUNT
Consistent LFO Rate
To specify how much the LFO rate tracks the keyboard
pitch, enter Shift mode and press the BANK 2 and
PATCH 4 buttons. Pressing the low C key sets keyboard
tracking to zero, meaning key pitch will have no effect
on LFO rate. Pressing higher keys sets a proportionally
greater amount of keyboard tracking; the middle C
on the keyboard sets 1:1 LFO pitch tracking, meaning
the LFO rate will double when the key pitch doubles.
The high C key sets 2:1 LFO pitch tracking, meaning
that the LFO rate will change by four times for every
octave of pitch change.
LFO MIDI Sync ON
LFO MIDI Sync OFF
LFO MIDI SYNC
This lets you synchronize the Subsequent 25 LFO with
an external MIDI clock signal, typically from another
synth, a sequencer, or a digital audio workstation.
When synced, the LFO rate locks to tempo, oscillating
in rhythm with its clock source. The LFO RATE knob
lets you select the note division—whether the LFO
cycles once every eighth note, half note, or whatever.
LFO MIDI sync is turned on by default. Engage Shift
mode and press the BANK 2, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4
buttons. Press the low C# key to turn on LFO MIDI sync,
and press the C key to turn it off. At the LFO RATE
knob’s fully counterclockwise position, a single LFO
cycle is 4 whole notes long (384 MIDI clocks). At its
fully clockwise position, one cycle equals a 1/64th-note
triplet (1 MIDI clock). Please refer to the chart on
page 42 for a list of clock divisions for LFO sync.
NOTE: When no clock is present, the LFO will run freely at a
rate determined by its RATE setting.
FILTER ENVELOPE
Single Trigger
Multi Trigger
FILTER ENVELOPE TRIGGER MODE
As mentioned in the Envelopes Overview, by default,
legato playing on the Subsequent 25 keyboard prevents
Envelopes from retriggering on subsequent notes. With
single triggering, Subsequent 25 prevents Envelopes
from retriggering on subsequent notes unless you’ve
released the previous key. With multiple triggering,
a new Gate occurs each time you play a note on the
keyboard, regardless of whether you’ve released the
previous key. You can select single or multiple triggering
separately for the Amplifier and Filter Envelopes.
To specify single or multiple triggering for the Filter
Envelope, engage Shift mode and press the BANK 3
and PATCH 1 buttons. Press the low C key to select
single triggering, and press the low C# key to select
multiple triggering.
31
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
When Filter Envelope (EG) Reset is turned on, each new
note triggers the Filter Envelope to reset from zero,
so its output sweeps fully from zero to maximum with
each Attack. By default, with Envelope reset turned off,
an Envelope Attack sweeps the Envelope output only
from its current level to maximum. The effect of Filter
Envelope Reset is more prominent with longer Attack
and Release times.
Envelope Reset ON
Envelope Reset OFF
FILTER ENVELOPE RESET
To change this function, engage Shift mode and press
the BANK 3 and PATCH 2 buttons. Pressing the low C
key turns Filter Envelope Reset off, and pressing C#
turns it on.
Envelope Repeat ON
Envelope Repeat OFF
FILTER ENVELOPE REPEAT
To turn on Filter Envelope Repeat, enable Shift mode,
press the BANK 3 and PATCH 3 buttons, and press the C#
key. Pressing the C key turns off Filter Envelope Repeat.
Filter KB Tracking Amt
Keyboard Tracking OFF
Normally, an Envelope occurs just once when you play
a note. It’s possible, however, to use the Filter Envelope
Generator as a multistage LFO for controlling Cutoff,
pitch, or waveform. When Filter Envelope Repeat is
enabled, then the Delay, Attack, Hold, Decay, and
Release Stages will loop continuously for as long as the
note is held. The shorter the Envelope times, the faster
the loop will repeat.
+
FILTER ENVELOPE KEYBOARD AMOUNT
When Filter Envelope keyboard tracking is enabled,
the Filter’s Envelope times will respond to how high or
how low you play on the keyboard. Engage Shift mode,
press the BANK 3 and PATCH 4 buttons, and press any
key besides low C to make the Filter Envelope track the
keyboard. The higher the key you press, then the more
keyboard tracking will affect Envelope times. Engage
Shift mode, press the BANK 3 and PATCH 4 buttons,
and press low C to turn off keyboard tracking.
32
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
KB, MIDI, or Gate CV
Gate CV
KB or MIDI
Filter Env Decay Fast
Filter Envelope Decay Slow
Gate Open (Always On)
FILTER ENVELOPE GATE SOURCE
You can control whether the Filter Envelope is triggered
by the keyboard, by an external control-voltage source,
by both, or whether the Envelope is always on. Engage
Shift mode and press the BANK 3, PATCH 1, and PATCH 2
buttons. Pressing the low C key leaves the Gate open
and bypasses the Envelope Generator. When you press
C#, only the keyboard or a MIDI signal will trigger the
Envelope. When you press D, only a Gate signal routed
from an external source to the GATE CV jack will trigger
the Envelope. When you press D#, the keyboard, a
MIDI signal, or an external Gate signal will trigger the
Envelope (default).
FILTER ENVELOPE DECAY SPEED
The range – and effectiveness – of the Filter Envelope
can be increased by changing the time scale of the
Decay stage of the envelope. Two options are available,
Slow and Fast.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 3, PATCH 2,
and PATCH 4 buttons. Pressing the low C key selects
the Slow setting. Pressing low C# selects the Fast
Setting for the Filter Envelope Decay stage.
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE
Single Trigger
Multi Trigger
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE TRIGGER MODE
As mentioned in the Envelopes Overview, by default,
legato playing on the Subsequent 25 keyboard prevents
Envelopes from retriggering on subsequent notes. With
single triggering, Subsequent 25 prevents Envelopes
from retriggering on subsequent notes unless you’ve
released the previous key. With multiple triggering,
a new Gate occurs each time you play a note on the
keyboard, regardless of whether you’ve released the
previous key. You can select single or multiple triggering
separately for the Amplifier and Filter Envelopes.
To specify single or multiple triggering for the Amplifier
Envelope, engage Shift mode and press the BANK 4
and PATCH 1 buttons. Press the low C key to select
single triggering (default), or press the low C# key to
select multiple triggering.
33
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
Amp. Env. Reset ON
To change this function, engage Shift mode and press
the BANK 4 and PATCH 2 buttons. Pressing the low C
key turns Amplifier Envelope Reset off, and pressing C#
turns it on.
Amplifier KB Tracking Amt
Keyboard Tracking OFF
When Amplifier Envelope Reset is turned on, each new
note triggers the Amplifier Envelope to reset from zero,
so its output sweeps fully from zero to maximum with
each Attack. By default, with Envelope reset turned
off, an Envelope Attack sweeps the Envelope output
only from its current level to maximum. The effect of
Envelope Reset is more prominent with longer Attack
and Release times.
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE REPEAT
Amp. Env. Repeat ON
Amp. Env. Repeat OFF
Amp. Env. Reset OFF
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE RESET
Just as with Filter Envelope Repeat, it’s possible to use
the Amplifier’s Envelope Generator as a multistage LFO
for controlling amplitude. When Amplifier Envelope
Repeat is enabled, then the Delay, Attack, Hold, Decay,
and Release Stages will loop continuously for as long
as the note is held. The shorter the Envelope times, the
faster the loop will repeat.
To turn on Amplifier Envelope Repeat, enable Shift
mode, press the BANK 4 and PATCH 3 buttons, and
press the C# key. Pressing the C key turns off Amplifier
Envelope Repeat.
+
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE KEYBOARD AMOUNT
When Amplifier Envelope keyboard tracking is enabled,
the Amplifier’s Envelope times will respond to how
high or how low you play on the keyboard. Engage
Shift mode, press the BANK 4 and PATCH 4 buttons,
and press any key besides low C to make the Amplifier
Envelope track the keyboard. The higher the key you
press, then the more keyboard tracking will affect
Envelope times. Engage Shift mode, press the BANK
4 and PATCH 4 buttons, and press low C to turn off
keyboard tracking.
34
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
KB, MIDI, or Gate CV
Gate CV
KB or MIDI
You can control whether the Amplifier Envelope is
triggered by the keyboard, by an external controlvoltage source, by both, or whether the Envelope is
always on. Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 4,
PATCH 1, and PATCH 2 buttons. Pressing the low C
key leaves the Gate open and bypasses the Envelope
Generator. When you press C#, only the keyboard or a
MIDI signal will trigger the Envelope. When you press
D, only a Gate (CV) signal routed from an external
source to the GATE CV jack will trigger the Envelope.
When you press D#, the keyboard, a MIDI signal, or an
external Gate signal will trigger the Envelope (default).
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE DECAY SPEED
Amplifier Env Decay Fast
Amplifier Envelope Decay Slow
Gate Open (Always On)
AMPLIFIER ENVELOPE GATE SOURCE
As with the Filter Envelope, the range – and
effectiveness – of the Amplifier Envelope can be
increased by changing the time scale of the Decay
stage of the envelope. Two options are available,
Slow and Fast.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 4, PATCH 2,
and PATCH 4 buttons. Pressing the low C key selects
the Slow setting. Pressing low C# selects the Fast
Setting for the Amplifier Envelope Decay stage.
MIDI GLOBAL SETTINGS
MIDI PARAMETERS
Shift mode lets you modify the Subsequent 25 default MIDI settings. You can change the MIDI transmit
and receive channels, turn local control on and off, filter MIDI data, enable and disable fine-resolution
data recognition, and enable and disable the DIN or USB ports to send, receive, and merge MIDI data.
Changing some MIDI settings requires that you press two BANK buttons and one PATCH button in
Shift mode.
MIDI IN CHANNEL
etc...
Channel 3
Channel 1
Channel 2
Channel 4
By default, Subsequent 25 sends and receives data on
MIDI Channel 1, but you can set it to send or receive on
any MIDI Channel from 1 to 16.
To change the input channel, engage Shift mode and
press the BANK 1, BANK 4, and PATCH 1 buttons. The
next key you press will determine the input channel.
Pressing the low C selects Channel 1, C# selects
Channel 2, and so on, all the way up to D# above
middle C, which selects Channel 16.
35
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
MIDI OUT CHANNEL
Channel 4
etc...
Channel 3
Channel 2
Channel 1
To change the output channel, engage Shift mode
and press the BANK 1, BANK 4, and PATCH 2 buttons.
The next key you press will determine the output
channel. Pressing the low C selects Channel 1, C#
selects Channel 2, and so on, all the way up to D#
above middle C, which selects Channel 16.
MIDI IN & USB Port
MIDI OUT & USB Port
USB Port Only
MIDI IN Jack Only
USB Port Only
MIDI OUT Jack Only
MIDI Transmission OFF
MIDI Reception OFF
MIDI INPUT SELECT
Subsequent 25 can send and receive MIDI data through
the DIN jacks labeled MIDI IN and MIDI OUT or through
its USB port, depending on your preferences.
To specify the MIDI In path, engage Shift mode and
press the BANK 1, BANK 4, and PATCH 3 buttons.
Pressing the low C key will turn MIDI reception off.
Pressing C# will cause Subsequent 25 to receive data
through the MIDI IN jack only. Pressing D will cause it
to receive data through the USB port only. Pressing D#
will cause it to receive data through both the MIDI IN
jack and the USB port (default).
MIDI OUTPUT SELECT
To specify the MIDI Out path, engage Shift mode and
press the BANK 1, BANK 4, and PATCH 4 buttons.
Pressing the low C key will turn MIDI transmission off.
Pressing C# will cause Subsequent 25 to send data
through the MIDI OUT jack only. Pressing D will cause
it to send data through the USB port only. Pressing D#
will cause it to send data through both the MIDI OUT
jack and the USB port, which is the default setting.
USB Port In To DIN
MIDI Out & USB Port
USB Port To USB Port Only
USB Port In To
DIN MIDI Out Only
MIDI Merging OFF
MIDI MERGE USB INPUT
To set the MIDI Merge parameters for the USB port,
engage Shift mode and press BANK 1, BANK 4, PATCH 3,
and PATCH 4. Pressing the low C key will turn off MIDI
merging. Pressing C# will cause data received by the
USB port to pass through to the MIDI OUT jack only.
Pressing D will cause data received by the USB port
jack to pass through to the USB port only. Pressing D#
will cause data received by the USB port jack to pass
through to both the MIDI OUT jack and the USB port.
36
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
DIN MIDI In To DIN
MIDI Out & USB Port
DIN MIDI In To USB Port Only
DIN MIDI In To
DIN MIDI Out Only
14-bit Fine Resolution
7-bit Coarse Resolution
MIDI Merging OFF
MIDI MERGE DIN INPUT
Subsequent 25 can merge MIDI data it receives with the
MIDI data it transmits. You can specify the path of the
merged data so that data received at either the MIDI IN
jack or the USB port is passed through to the MIDI OUT
jack or the USB port.
To set the MIDI Merge parameters for the MIDI IN jack,
engage Shift mode and press BANK 1, BANK 4, PATCH 1,
and PATCH 2. Pressing the low C key will turn off MIDI
merging. Pressing C# will cause data received by the
MIDI IN jack to pass through to the MIDI OUT jack only.
Pressing D will cause data received by the MIDI IN jack
to pass through to the USB port only. Pressing D# will
cause data received by the MIDI IN jack to pass through
to both the MIDI OUT jack and the USB port.
MIDI CC RESOLUTION
Most MIDI commands allow a range of values from 0
to 127, a number limited by the 7-bit words that make
up standard MIDI messages. For Control Change (CC)
commands that require greater resolution, it’s possible
to use 14-bit words that allow a much finer-resolution
range of values, from 0 to 16,383.
To enable Subsequent 25 to send MIDI CCs with 14bit fine resolution, engage Shift mode, press BANK
1, BANK 4 and PATCH 2, PATCH 4, and press the low
C# key. To return to standard 7-bit coarse resolution,
engage Shift mode, press BANK 1, BANK 4 and PATCH 2,
PATCH 4, and press the low C key.
Local Control ON
Local Control OFF
LOCAL CONTROL
Sometimes it’s useful to disable the keyboard when
you’re using it as a MIDI controller for other instruments
or when you’re recording tracks into a DAW. With Local
Control turned on, you can use the keyboard and the
front-panel controls to play and program Subsequent 25.
With Local Control turned off, any keys you press
or control settings you change send data directly to
the instrument’s MIDI Out or USB, without affecting
Subsequent 25.
To turn Local Control off, engage Shift mode, press
BANK 2, BANK 4, and PATCH 1, and then press the
low C key. To turn Local Control back on, engage Shift
mode, press BANK 2, BANK 4, and PATCH 1, and then
press the low C# key.
37
Send Note Data Only
Send Data From KB, MOD & PITCH Only
Send All Data Except
Volume Data
Use Preset Volume Level
Use Panel Volume Level
Filter OFF (Sends All Data)
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
MIDI OUTPUT FILTER
It is possible to filter the MIDI data that Subsequent 25
sends so that certain data isn’t received by external
MIDI devices. To turn on the MIDI output filter, engage
Shift mode and press the BANK 2, BANK 4, and PATCH 2
buttons. Press the C# key to send everything except
volume data. Press the D key to send data from the
keyboard, MOD wheel, and PITCH wheel only, filtering
out everything else. Press the D# key to send only note
data when you play the keyboard. Pressing the C key
turns off the filter, ensuring that Subsequent 25 sends
all MIDI data (default).
USE PRESET VOLUME
When you load a Preset, you can specify whether
its loudness is controlled by the MASTER VOLUME’s
current setting or by the volume level that was saved
as part of the Preset. Engage Shift mode and press the
BANK 2, BANK 4, and PATCH 3 buttons. Then, press
C if you want the current Patch to ignore its Preset
volume level, or press C# if you want it to use its Preset
volume level (default).
Use Preset MOD
Wheel Position
Use Current MOD Wheel Position
USE PRESET MOD WHEEL
When you load a Preset, you can specify whether its
modulation depth is controlled by the MOD wheel
setting that was current when you saved the Patch.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 2, BANK 4,
and PATCH 4 buttons. Press C# to use the Preset MOD
wheel setting (default), and press C to use the current
MOD wheel position.
38
(Continued)
USE PRESET KEYBOARD OCTAVE
Use Preset KB Octave
Use Panel Keyboard Octave
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
When loading a Preset, you can specify whether
the Keyboard Octave setting uses the current panel
settings, or the Keyboard Octave setting that was
saved with the Preset.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 2, BANK 4,
PATCH 2, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4 buttons. Pressing the
low C key turns this parameter off, and the Preset will
sound using the current octave panel settings. Pressing
the low C# will turn this parameter on, and the octave
setting stored with the Preset will be used.
Last-Note Priority
High-Note Priority
Low-Note Priority
GLOBAL NOTE PRIORITY
Subsequent 25 can operate as monophonic synthesizer
(Mono Mode), or as a 2-note paraphonic synthesizer
(Duo Mode). But what happens when you press two
keys at the same time in Mono Mode? By default,
Subsequent 25 plays the note corresponding to the
most recently played key - regardless of its position.
This is called last-note priority. You can change that
behavior, however, so that it will play either the lowest
or the highest note when you press more than one
key. High-note and low-note priority can be useful
in creating trills, or mimicking the behavior of other
monophonic synthesizers.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 2, BANK 4,
PATCH 1, and PATCH 2 buttons. Pressing the low C key
engages low-note priority, so that only the lowest note
plays when you hold down more than one key. Pressing
C# engages high-note priority, so that only the highest
note plays when you hold down more than one key.
Pressing D engages the default, last-note priority.
KNOB MODE
Relative Mode
Snap Mode
Pass-Thru Mode
When you change Presets, it’s unlikely that the
positions of the knobs will match the values of the
Preset’s parameters. When you turn a knob to make
changes, how it responds will depend on its mode.
To enter Knob mode, engage Shift mode and press
BANK 2, BANK 4, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4. Press the
low C to engage Snap mode, in which the value jumps
to the knob’s current position as soon as you begin
turning it. Press C# to engage Pass-Through mode, in
which turning the knob has no effect until it reaches its
Preset value and then takes effect. Press D to engage
Relative mode (the default), in which turning the knob
up or down slightly causes a minor change in value, and
turning it further causes a increasingly greater change
in value. This allows the value to “catch up” with the
knob’s position and prevents any sudden jumps.
39
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
Aftertouch Amount
+
AFTERTOUCH SCALE
Aftertouch Scale OFF
This parameter controls the scaling of the aftertouch
effect, and how deeply the use of aftertouch will
affect the VCF Cutoff frequency. Smaller scale values
will produce less effect; larger scale values will have
considerably more effect.
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 2, BANK 4,
PATCH 1, and PATCH 3 buttons. Pressing the low C key
turns the Aftertouch Scale off, creating no effect. Use
any of the remaining keys to set the Aftertouch Scale,
from the smallest scale value of low C# (minimum) to
the largest scale value of the highest C (maximum).
NOTE: The value of this parameter can be set using up to five
octaves of keys, exceeding the Subsequent 25 keyboard range.
Sending a MIDI note from an external device can set this value
beyond the range of the Subsequent 25 keyboard itself.
SYSTEM COMMANDS
Whenever you invoke a system command, you cause some kind of irreversible change. For this reason,
each command requires that you press a key twice to confirm your choice. Once you’ve selected a
command, press the C# key twice to invoke it, or press the C key to cancel it.
INITIALIZE PRESET
Engage Shift mode and press BANK 3, BANK 4, and PATCH 1. Press C# twice to
reset all the Shift-mode parameters to their default settings.
INITIALIZE GLOBAL PARAMETERS
Engage Shift mode and press BANK 3, BANK 4, and PATCH 2. Press C# twice to
reset the global parameters (Local Control, MIDI Output Filter, Use Preset Volume,
Use Preset MOD Wheel, Note Priority, Knob Wheel) to their default setting.
40
HIDDEN PARAMETERS
(Continued)
RESTORE FACTORY PRESETS
Engage Shift mode and press BANK 3, BANK 4, and PATCH 3. Press C# twice to
reload the 16 Subsequent 25 factory Presets.
NOTE: Invoking this command will delete any user Presets.
NOTE CALIBRATION
Engage Shift mode and press BANK 3, BANK 4, and PATCH 4. Press C# twice to
run a full-range note calibration routine for the two Oscillators. This will ensure that
the Oscillators remain in tune in every octave throughout their entire pitch range.
SEND CURRENT PRESET
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 3, BANK 4, PATCH 1, and PATCH 2
buttons. Press C# twice to send all the settings for the current Preset to your
computer as MIDI system exclusive data. If you record this data on your computer
and then send it back to your Subsequent 25, it will replace the Patch that’s
currently loaded into the panel buffer. Once it’s in the buffer, you must manually
save the data to a Preset location if you don’t want to lose it.
SEND ALL PRESETS
Engage Shift mode and press the BANK 3, BANK 4, PATCH 3, and PATCH 4
buttons. Press C# twice to send all 16 Presets to your computer as a single Preset
Bank file. If you record this MIDI system exclusive data on your computer and
then send it back to your Subsequent 25, it will replace all 16 Presets stored in the
Subsequent 25 memory.
For additional hidden parameters and updates visit www.moogmusic.com/subsequent-25.
41
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS
MIDI CHANNEL
By default, Subsequent 25 is set to receive and send MIDI on Channel 1, but it can be configured to
send and receive to MIDI Channel (1-16).
MIDI CONTROL CHANGE (CC) MESSAGES
The tables on the following pages list all Subsequent 25 MIDI CC messages.
MIDI CC VALUES FOR THE LFO CLOCK DIVIDER (CC #3)
Time Value
Division
Value
1/64 Note Triplet
1/64 T
122 - 127
1/32 Note Triplet
1/32 T
116 - 121
1/32 Note
1/32
110 - 115
1/16 Note Triplet
1/16 T
104 - 109
1/16 Note
1/16
98 - 103
1/8 Note Triplet
1/8 T
92 - 97
Dotted 1/16 Note
1/16 DOT
86 - 91
1/8 Note
1/8
80 - 85
1/4 Note Triplet
1/4 T
74 - 79
Dotted 1/8 Note
1/8 DOT
68 - 73
1/4 Note
1/4
61 - 67
1/2 Note Triplet
1/2 T
55 - 60
Dotted 1/4 Note Triplet
1/4 DOT
49 - 54
1/2 Note
1/2
43 - 48
Whole Note Triplet
WH T
37 - 42
Dotted 1/2 Note
1/2 DOT
31 - 36
Whole Note
WH
25 - 30
Whole Note + Half Note
WH + 1/2
19 - 24
2 Whole Notes
2 Whole
13 - 18
3 Whole Notes
3 Whole
7 - 12
4 Whole Notes
4 Whole
0-6
42
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
1. Basic Information
Transmit /
Export
Recognize /
Import
MIDI Channels
1 - 16
1 - 16
Note Numbers
0 - 127
0 - 127
Program Change
1 - 16
1 - 16
Bank Select Response
No
No
Modes Supported:
Mode 1: Omni-On, Poly
No
No
Mode 2: Omni-On, Mono
No
No
Mode 3: Omni-Off, Poly
Yes
Yes
Mode 4: Omni-Off, Mono
Yes
Yes
Multi Mode
No
No
Note-On Velocity
Yes
Yes
Note-Off Velocity
No
No
Channel Aftertouch
No
No
Poly (Key) Aftertouch
No
No
Pitch Bend
Yes
Yes
Active Sensing
No
No
System Reset
No
No
Tune Request
No
No
Universal SysEx: Sample
Dump Standard
No
No
Device Inquiry
No
Yes
File Dump
No
No
MIDI Tuning
No
Yes
43
Remarks
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
1. Basic Information
Transmit /
Export
Recognize /
Import
Master Volume
Yes
Yes
Master Balance
No
No
Notation Information
No
No
Turn GM1 System On
No
No
Turn GM2 System On
No
No
Turn GM System Off
No
No
DLS-1
No
No
File Reference
No
No
Controller Destination
No
No
Key-based Instrument Ctrl
No
No
Master Fine/Coarse Tune
No
Yes
Other Universal System
Exclusive
No
No
Manufacturer or
Non-Commercial System
Exclusive
Yes*
Yes*
NRPNs
No
No
RPN 00
(Pitch Bend Sensitivity)
No
Yes
RPN 01
(Channel Fine Tune)
No
Yes
RPN 02
(Channel Coarse Tune)
No
Yes
RPN 03
(Tuning Program Select)
No
Yes
RPN 04
(Tuning Bank Select)
No
No
RPN 05
(Modulation Depth Range)
No
No
44
Remarks
*No documentation for manufacturer
sysex at this time (factory calibration etc)
Values 0-32 are valid; 0 = standard tuning
(12-tone equal temperament). 1-32 are
available for user storage of tunings using
the MIDI Tuning Standard
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
2 - MIDI Timing and
Synchronization
Transmit /
Export
Recognize /
Import
MIDI Clock
No
Yes
Song Position Pointer
No
No
Song Select
No
No
Start
No
Yes
Continue
No
Yes
Stop
No
Yes
MIDI Time Code
No
No
MIDI Machine Control
No
No
MIDI Show Control
No
No
3 - Extensions Compatibility
Transmit /
Export
Recognize /
Import
General MIDI Compatible
(Level(s) / No)
No
No
Is GM default power-up
mode (Level / No)
No
No
DLS Compatible
(Level(s) / No)
No
No
DLS File
(Type(s) / No)
No
No
Standard MIDI Files
(Type(s) / No)
No
No
XMF Files
(Type(s) / No)
No
No
SP-MIDI Compatible
No
No
45
Remarks
Remarks
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
CC Number
(MSB)
Parameter
CC Number
(LSB)
Values
Mod Wheel
1
33
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter Mod Amount
2
34
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
LFO Rate
3
35
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Pitch Mod Amount
4
36
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Glide Rate
5
37
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Master Volume
7
39
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Noise Level
8
40
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
VCO 1 Wave
9
41
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
VCO 2 Frequency
12
44
-7 SEMITONES TO +7 SEMITONES (0 TO
16383 BIPOLAR; 8192 = 0 SEMITONES)
VCO 2 Beat
13
45
-3.5 HZ TO +3.5 HZ (0 TO 16383 BIPOLAR;
8192 = 0 HZ)
VCO 2 Wave
14
46
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
VCO 1 Level
15
47
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
VCO 2 Level
16
48
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
VCO 1 Sub Level
17
49
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
MultiDrive Amount
18
50
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter Cutoff
19
51
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Wave Mod Amount
20
52
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter Resonance
21
53
MIN TO MAX (0 to 16383)
Filter EG Amount
22
54
-MAX TO MAX (0 TO 16383 BIPOLAR;
8192 = ZERO AMOUNT)
Filter EG Attack
23
55
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
46
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
Parameter
CC Number
(MSB)
CC Number
(LSB)
Values
Filter EG Decay
24
56
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter EG Sustain
25
57
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter EG Release
26
58
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Filter KB Amount
27
59
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Amp EG Attack
28
60
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Amp EG Decay
29
61
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Amp EG Sustain
30
62
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Amp EG Release
31
63
MIN TO MAX (0 TO 16383)
Glide Enable
65
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Legato Glide
68
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Pitch Mod Osc 2 Only
70
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Modulation Source
71
-
0-15 = TRIANGLE LFO, 16-31 = SQUARE
LFO, 32-47 = SAW LFO, 64-79 = S&H,
80-127 = FILTER EG
Wave Mod Destination
72
-
0-42 = OSC 1 ONLY, 4 3-85 = OSC 2 ONLY,
86-127 BOTH OSC 1 & OSC 2
Gated Glide
73
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
VCO 1 Octave
74
-
16 = 16', 32 = 8', 48 = 4', 64 = 2'
VCO 2 Octave
75
-
16 = 16', 32 = 8', 48 = 4', 64 = 2'
LFO Range
76
-
0-42 = LOW (.01 HZ - 10HZ), 43-84 = MID
(.1HZ - 100HZ), 85-127 = HIGH (1HZ - 1KHZ)
VCO 2 Hard Sync
77
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
LFO KB Amount
78
-
0-127
47
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
Parameter
CC Number
(MSB)
CC Number
(LSB)
Values
Filter EG KB Amount
79
-
0-127
Amp EG KB Amount
80
-
0-127
VCO Gate Reset
81
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Filter EG Reset
82
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Amp EG Reset
83
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Glide Type
85
-
43-85 = LINEAR CONSTANT TIME,
86-127 = EXPONENTIAL
Filter EG Velocity to Time
86
-
0-127
Amp EG Velocity to Time
87
-
0-127
Release On/Off
88
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
KB Octave
89
-
0 = -2 OCTAVE, 16 = -1 OCTAVE, 32 = +0
OCTAVE, 48 = +1 OCTAVE, 64 = +2 OCTAVE
Filter EG Gate Source
90
-
0 = GATE ON, 32 = KEYS ONLY, 64 = EXT
GATE ONLY, 96 = KEYS OR EXT GATE
Amp EG Gate Source
91
-
0 = GATE ON, 32 = KEYS ONLY, 64 = EXT
GATE ONLY, 96 = KEYS OR EXT GATE
Amp EG Velocity to
Amplitude
92
-
0-127
LFO Gate Reset
93
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Duo Mode
94
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Duo Mode Priority
95
-
0-63 = VCO 2 TRACKS LOW NOTE,
64-127 = VCO 2 TRACKS HIGH NOTE
LFO MIDI Sync
102
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Filter EG Delay
103
-
0-127
Amp EG Delay
104
-
0-127
0-42 = LINEAR CONSTANT RATE,
48
MIDI OPERATIONS & CHARTS (Continued)
Parameter
CC Number
(MSB)
CC Number
(LSB)
Values
Filter EG Hold
105
-
0-127
Amp EG Hold
106
-
0-127
Pitch Bend Up Amount
107
-
0-24 (SEMITONES)
Pitch Bend Down Amount
108
-
0-24 (SEMITONES)
VCF Filter Poles
109
-
0 = 1 POLE, 32 = 2 POLES, 64 = 3 POLES,
96 = 4 POLES
Filter EG Velocity to
Amplitude
110
-
0-127
Note Priority
111
-
0-31 = LOW NOTE, 32-64 = HIGH NOTE,
64-95 = LAST NOTE. 96-127 = GLOBAL
Filter EG Repeat
112
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Amp EG Repeat
113
-
0-63 = OFF, 64-127 = ON
Filter EG Trigger Mode
114
-
0-63 = SINGLE TRIG, 64-127 = MULTI TRIG
Amp EG Trigger Mode
115
-
0-63 = SINGLE TRIG, 64-127 = MULTI TRIG
Ext Audio Input Level
116
-
0-127
Filter EG Decay Speed
117
-
0-63 = NORMAL, 64-127 = FAST
Amp EG Decay Speed
118
-
0-63 = NORMAL, 64-127 = FAST
KB Transpose (Semitones)
119
-
0 = -12 SEMITONES, 1 = -11 SEMITONES,
12 = +0 SEMITONES, 24 = +12 SEMITONES
49
SPECIFICATIONS
TYPE: Programmable Monophonic / Duophonic Analog Synthesizer
SOUND ENGINE: Analog
SOUND SOURCES: 2 Variable Waveshape Oscillators, 1 Square Wave Sub Oscillator, 1 Noise Generator
NUMBER OF KEYS: 25
TYPE OF KEYS: Semi-Weighted, Velocity-sensitive
OTHER CONTROLLERS: Pitch Bend, Mod Wheel
POLYPHONY: Monophonic, 2-Note Paraphonic
LFO: Triangle, Square, Sawtooth, Ramp, Sample & Hold
FILTER: Moog Ladder Filter with 6/12/18/24 per Octave Slopes
PRESETS: 16 (4 Banks, 4 Patches per Bank)
EFFECTS TYPES: MultiDrive
AUDIO INPUT: 1 x 1/4” (Ext. In)
AUDIO OUTPUT: 1 x 1/4”
USB: 1 x Type B
MIDI I/O: In/Out/USB
OTHER I/O: Filter CV In, Pitch CV In, Volume CV In, KB Gate In
SOFTWARE: Plug-in Editor for Mac/PC
POWER SUPPLY: 110V AC - 240V AC (Internal)
DIMENSIONS: 6.75” (17.1cm) High x 20.25” (51.4cm) Wide, 14.75” (37.5cm) Deep
WEIGHT: 16.5 lbs. / 7.48 kg
Specifications Subject To Change Without Notice
50
SERVICE & SUPPORT INFORMATION
MOOG’S STANDARD WARRANTY
Moog warrants its products to be free of defects in materials or workmanship and conforming to specifications at the
time of shipment. The Warranty Period is one year from the date of purchase. If, in Moog’s determination, it has been
more than five years since the product shipped from our factory, it will be at Moog’s discretion whether or not to
honor the warranty without regard to the date of the purchase. During the Warranty Period, any defective products
will be repaired or replaced, at Moog’s option, on a return-to-factory basis. This warranty covers defects that Moog
determines are no fault of the user.
The Moog Limited Warranty applies to USA purchasers only. Outside the USA the warranty policy and associated
service is determined by the laws of the country of purchase and supported by our local authorized distributor.
A listing of our authorized distributors is available at moogmusic.com.
If you purchase outside of your country, you can expect to be charged for warranty as well as non-warranty service
by the service center in your country.
RETURNING YOUR PRODUCT TO MOOG MUSIC
You must obtain prior approval in the form of an RMA (Return Material Authorization) number from Moog before
returning any product. Email [email protected] for the RMA number or call us at (828) 251-0090.
All products must be packed carefully and shipped with the Moog supplied power adapter. Your Subsequent 25
must be returned in the original inner packing including the cardboard inserts. Sorry, the warranty will not be
honored if the product is not properly packed. Once you have received the RMA number and carefully packed your
Subsequent 25, ship the product to Moog Music Inc. with transportation and insurance charges paid, and be sure to
include your return shipping address.
MOOG MUSIC
160 Broadway St.
Asheville NC, 28801
WHAT WE WILL DO
Once received, we will examine the product for any obvious signs of user abuse or damage as a result of transport.
If the product abused, damaged in transit, or is out of warranty, we will contact you with an estimate of the repair
cost. Warranty work will be performed and Moog will ship and insure your product to your United States address
free of charge.
HOW TO INITIATE YOUR WARRANTY
Please initiate your warranty online at www.moogmusic.com/register. If you do not have web access, please call
(828) 251-0090 to register your product.
CARING FOR SUBSEQUENT 25
Clean your Subsequent 25 with a soft, dry cloth only – do not use solvents or abrasive detergents. Heed the safety
warnings at the beginning of the manual. Do not drop the unit.
AN IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT SAFETY: There are no user serviceable parts in Subsequent 25. Refer all servicing
to qualified personnel only.
©2019 MOOG MUSIC INC. | 160 Broadway St. Asheville, NC 28801
Moog is registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
Moog (stylized with design) is registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
The Moog Icon is registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
Subsequent is registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
All rights reserved to Moog Music Inc. on all text and graphics here within.
Phone: 828.251.0090 | Email: [email protected] | Website: www.moogmusic.com
51
Moog Music Is An Employee-Owned Company Located In Asheville, NC
52
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