Hasbro Axis and Allies Pacific 2000 Operating instructions

Hasbro Axis and Allies Pacific 2000 Operating instructions
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COMPLEXITY LEVEL
S PACIFIC
GAMEPLAY MANUAL
O Advanced _ BE WHAT'S DIFFERENT ABOUT
@ Challenging
Game Designers: Larry Harris
Stephen Baker, Rob Daviau =
Lead Playtester: Mark McLaughlin
Playtesters: Michael Sandy, Ray Irwin, —
Aaron Chamberlain ,
AXIS & ALLIES PACIFIC?
Those of you who have played the classic version
of Axis & Allies should be familiar with the major-
ity of rules in this game. À summary of the major
gameplay differences is listed below.
Bombers conducting Strategic Bombing Raids
may be escorted by friendly fighters and attacked
by enemy fighters.
Battleships and submarines have new
powers and abilities.
There are three new types of combat
units — Destroyers, U.S. Marines and Artillery.
IPCs gained are subject to attack in convoy routes
and convoy centers.
There is no weapons development.
Order of play is different.
Fighter planes may be moved into a sea zone to
create Combat Air Patrols (CAPs).
Naval bases have been added to key territories.
This benefits friendly naval units moving to other
naval bases.
Air bases have been added to key
territories. This benefits friendly aircraft moving
to or from those key territories.
Japan has a special first turn attack
advantage.
Japan may launch Kamikaze attacks.
STRATEGY — THE BIG PICTURE
Japan wins the game by expanding her territorial
gains, in particular the Dutch East Indies, and
then holding them long enough to accumulate
sufficient victory points to win. The British player
must defend both India and Australia while
simultaneously looking for opportunities to
threaten Japanese territories. The Allies can use
submarines to great effect by cutting the convoy
routes to the more valuable Dutch East Indies ter-
ritories. The American player must act quickly to
counterattack. America has a strong economy but
must plan effectively. Naval units, air power and
land units will all be required to defeat Japan.
As you play, you'll discover that you must be a
military strategist and a clever economist to win.
Some territories you capture will increase your
income. Keeping convoy routes open is vital to
maintaining your economic income. As the game
progresses your ability to attack and the intensity
of these attacks will be influenced by how you
have planned your purchases over previous turns.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Game Setup and Components ................. 4
Industrial Production Certificates ............... 5
Gameboard ... LL LL LL 5
Combat Units ........ 0. 7
Object of the Game ......................... 9
What to Do on a Turn ...................... 10
Phase 1 Purchase Combat Units .............. 10
Phase 2 Combat Air Patrol Must Land ......... 10
Phase 3 Combat Movement ................. 11
Phase 4 Resolve Combat .................... 13
Amphibious Assaults ....................... 16
Multi-Player Forces ......................... 19
Strategic Bombing Raids .................... 19
Kamikaze .sreeereec. „21
Phase 5 Place / Remove National Control Markers
and Adjust the National Production Chart ...... 21
Convoy Routes and Convoy Centers . ........... 22
Phase 6 Non-Combat Movement ............. 23
Combat Air Patrol ......................... 24
Phase 7 Place New Units .................... 25
Phase 8 Submerged Submarines Resurface
Damaged Battleships Uprighted .............. 25
Phase 9 Collect Income ..................... 25
Combat Units 20er e aa L Lee 25
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
GAME SETUP AND COMPONENTS 3. Distribute National Control Markers (NCMs).
Carefully punch out the NCM’s from the card-
1. Pick a World Power. board sheets. Each country has its own NCMs as
There are three world powers in the game. shown here.
Japan
Great Britain controls two countries: India and
Australia.
The United States of America controls two coun-
tries: USA and China. INDIA AUSTRALIA USA
Choose which world power(s) you will be based
on the number of players in the game:
3-player Game
Player 1: Japan
Player 2: Great Britain (India and Australia) FARBEN CHINA
Player 3: United States (USA and China)
NCMs are used as ownership tokens to show
which country controls which area. This is helpful
as areas change hands. NCMs are also used as
scoring disks on the National Production Chart to
keep track of each country’s income.
2-player Game
Player 1: Japan
Player 2: Great Britain (India and Australia) and
United States (USA and China)
Note: Throughout this manual, the terms "coun- 4. Set Up the National Production Chart.
try" and "countries" refer to individual E E
economies such as India, Australia, propuerion| € 2 4
China or USA. -
4445 46 47 48
2. Distribute National Reference Charts.
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He: Place one NCM on top of its matching space for
yd ii each power (except China) on the National
Production Chart. This indicates each country’s
starting income.
Players have their own reference chart. These
charts offer a quick reference for initial unit
setup, unit movement abilities, attack and
defense capabilities, and unit costs. Each chart
also gives a summary list of Phases that you fol-
low during your turn. Land and naval combat
sequences are also shown.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Place the British Convoy Center marker on the
matching space.
BRITISH CONVOY
Place a Japanese marker on the number "0"
space of the red Japanese Victory Point track and
another on the "6" space of the Kamikaze track.
Appoint one player to be scorekeeper. It will be
his job to adjust the markers on the National
Production Chart as areas change hands.
5. Industrial Production Certificates (money)
The scorekeeper should also serve as banker in
charge of IPCs (Industrial Production Certificates),
commonly known as money. IPCs fuel the war
effort for the countries. Separate the IPCs by
denomination.
Starting Income
At the beginning of the game, the banker dis-
burses IPCs as shown on the National Production
Charts and below. The remaining money stays in
"the bank." IPC amounts change as territories are
captured or lost. The British player must keep the
IPCs for each of his two countries (India and
Australia) separate.
British Convoys
The British player also collects income for the
three British Convoy centers located in sea zones
15, 49 and 52. These twelve IPCs must now be
given to India or Australia, or divided between
the two countries in any manner the British play-
er wishes. They may not be kept separate.
Note: Place your IPCs next to your National
Reference Chart.
COSES A NE
Country Starting
Income
UNITED STATES o 75
INDIA | EE ВН — 15
AUSTRALIA — 20
JAPAN == o 19
BRITISH CONVOYS 12
China does not collect IPCs. See page 10 for details.
6. The Gameboard
The gameboard depicts the Pacific theater as of
December 7, 1941. Five major economic centers
are identified with national symbols representing
Japan, India, Australia, USA and China.
Color Coding
The following countries and territories are color-
coded on the gameboard map:
* China is sand-colored.
e Japan is brown.
e Chinese territories under the control
of Japan at the start of the game are brown
with a faded Chinese icon.
* India is dark green.
* Australia is light green.
* Dutch East Indies are purple and are
considered part of Australia.
* United States is blue.
The gameboard map is divided into sea zones
and territories.
Sea Zones
Each sea zone is identified with a different num-
ber. A white line separates each zone. A sea zone
may hold as many units as a player wants to put
in it.
Convoy Routes: Thirteen sea zones contain con-
voy routes — each indicated by a faded Japanese,
Indian or US control marker icon, as well as the
name of an adjacent territory. Convoy routes are
explained in detail on page 23.
Convoy Centers: There are also five sea zones that
contain convoy centers — each indicated by a rec-
tangular area, as well as a USA or British convoy
icon. The white number that appears with each
convoy center represents its IPC value. Convoy
centers represent the many supply convoys head-
ing into the Pacific from around the world. All
are subject to attack by Japanese submarines and
warships, as explained on page 22.
Territories
Territories include land territories, islands and
island groups. The white number that appears in
many territories represents the IPC value of the
area.
Land Territories: Boundaries between land territo-
ries are marked with a white line. A land territory
may hold as many land and air units as a player
wants to put on it.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Soviet Union and Himalayas: There are two beige ter- | Naval Bases and Air Bases
ritories on the gameboard (Soviet Union and Some territories contain Naval and/or Air bases.
Himalayas). Players may not move units into nor fly These bases provide movement advantages to
over either of these territories. | friendly units. Air bases are explained on page 12.
Naval bases are explai
China: Allied forces may move freely into and д
through Chinese controlled territories.
Islands and Island Groups: Islands vary considerably
in size. Borneo and Wake Island are both islands.
Some sea zones contain more than one island. Each
island or island group that's considered a separate
territory has a white line surrounding it as well as a
white name. Each island or island group may hold
as many land and air units as a player wants to put
on it. Naval Base
Example: Sea zone 25 has an island group, the Mariana Island
Islands, and the island.of Guam. Each of these is a separate |
land territory, and both are separate from the sea zone in which
they are situated. Sea Zone
Note: Throughout the rules, territories and sea
zones are sometimes referred to generically as
"spaces." When you or an ally control these spaces,
they are sometimes referred to as "friendly."
onvoy Center
Diagram 1. Key Board Definitions
COMBAT UNITS
7. The Combat Units.
Color: Each country has combat units with a dif-
ferent color.
* Great Britain uses the tan units.
* USA uses the green units, along with the dark
green Infantry (US Marines).
China uses the brown units.
Japan uses the red units.
Note: Antiaircraft guns and Industrial Complexes
are all gray. All players share them.
Type: There are three different types of units.
* Land Units (infantry, U.S. Marines, tanks, AA
guns and artillery)
* Air Units (fighters and bombers)
Naval Units (destroyers, battleships, aircraft
carriers, submarines and transports)
A detailed profile of each combat unit — how it
moves, how it attacks, how it defends, how it
interacts with other combat units, and how much
it costs — is provided in the Combat Units section
on page 25.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
8. Plastic Chips
Plastic chips are used as substitutes for combat
units to save space in overcrowded territories and
sea zones. One gray chip represents one unit and
one red chip represents five units.
Important: Stacked chips must always be topped
off with the identifying combat unit piece.
Example: To place seven infantry units on a territory,
stack up one red chip, one gray chip, and top it off with
one plastic infantry piece.
Diagram 2. Using Chips
7 Infantry Units
Infantry Unit
Red-Chip ———
Gray Chip ———
9. Task Force Markers and Cards
If you have a large fleet in a sea zone, you may
choose to place a single plastic task force marker
in the sea zone to reduce overcrowding. One of
your NCMs is then placed on top of the task force
marker, and the actual units are placed on the
corresponding task force card alongside the
board. The task force marker must be removed
from the board if all the units in the task force
have been destroyed.
Diagram 3. Task Force Markers
Task Force
ve Marker
National Control
Marker with Actual Units
* To reduce crowding in sea zone, use task force
marker.
* Place your NCM on top of task force marker.
* Place your units on task force card.
10. Place Starting Units on the Gameboard.
Look at your National Reference Chart. It lists the
number and type of combat units to be placed in
your territories. See the example of the British
player's setup for India on page 9. All players
place their units (color-coded by player) in their
territories now. Use chips as combat unit substi-
tutes, wherever you can, to save space.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Diagram 4. The Setup Chart
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
MEW SOUTH WALES
SHAN STATE
HONG KONG
NEW ZEALAND
SEA ZONE 29
NEW BRITAIN
SEA ZONE 13
QUEENSLAND
| INDIA
NI NORTHERN TERRITORY
| SEA ZONE 30
E Amin
= a
11. Battle Board
The battle board helps you keep track of units
engaged in combat, as well as the dice rolls need-
ed to attack and defend successfully. Place this to
one side within easy reach of all the players.
Diagram 5. Battleboard
[EL PEL POULE
LEE LE CEE ETS
CA LESS
[RI
*Increase each matching infantry/marine roll by 1
PLAYING THE GAME
Object of the Game
The Allied powers and Japan each have different
objectives:
* If you are Japan, you win in one of two ways:
1. Occupy one of the following Allied capitals
(India, New South Wales or USA) until the start of
your next turn. You must also control Japan.
OR
2. Accumulate 22 victory points (VPs). Japan
scores one point for each 10 IPCs collected at the
end of its turn.
Example: If Japan collects 12 IPCs then 1 VP would
be scored, if Japan collected 29 IPCs then 2 VPs would
be scored.
* If you are one of the Allied powers (Great
Britain or United States), you win in one of two
ways:
1. Occupy Japan and hold it until the start of your
next turn. You must also control your home coun-
try. (The Great Britain player must retain control
of both India and the Australian capital, New
South Wales). The Allies win as a team, not just
the player who occupies Japan.
OR
2. Prevent Japan from collecting any victory
points (VPs) on the Japanese player's turn. For
this to occur Japan's IPC income would need to be
reduced to 9 or less.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
What to do on a Turn
On your turn, follow the nine Phases as outlined
below. When you've completed the entire Phase
sequence, your turn is over. Play continues to the
next designated player who then completes the
entire sequence. When every player has complet-
ed an entire sequence, a round of play is over. It
will take more than one round of play to deter-
mine a winning side.
Order of Play
1. The Japanese player goes first.
2. The British player goes second. (India and
Australia move on the same turn.)
3. The American player goes third. (USA and
China move on the same turn.)
This order is repeated throughout the game.
Phases
During a turn, a player performs some or all of
the nine Phases in the following order:
Phase 1 Purchase Combat Units
Phase 2 Land Fighters on Combat Air
Patrol
Phase 3 Combat Movement
Phase 4 Resolve Combat
Phase 5 Place/Remove National Control
Markers and Adjust the National
Production Chart
Phase 6 Non-Combat Movement
Phase 7 Place New Units
Phase 8 Submerged Submarines Resurface
Damaged Battleships Uprighted
Phase 9 Collect Income
Players will not always want (or be able) to com-
plete all of the Phases. Each of these Phases is
explained in detail below.
PHASE 1. PURCHASE COMBAT UNITS
You may now buy new combat units using IPCs
you have on hand. These should be placed on
your National Reference Chart. New units are not
placed on the gameboard until Phase 7. Unit
prices are shown on the National Reference
Charts under COST. For example, a fighter plane
costs 12 IPCs.
You do not have to buy combat units on your turn.
Some or all IPCs may be kept and used (in addition
to any other income collected) on a later turn.
Purchased units for each country should be
placed alongside the player's National Reference
Chart. |
Only the U.S. may purchase Marines and Industrial
Complexes.
Note: If you run out of a type of playing piece,
you may still buy that unit. Simply use a piece of
paper with the type of unit written on it.
Countries
Great Britain: Great Britain controls both India
and Australia. The purple Dutch East Indies are
part of the Australian income. These countries
move and fight together. However, they buy and
place units separately.
China: The United States controls all Chinese
units. China is different from all other countries
as follows:
* Payment: China does not collect IPCs but
receives one infantry unit for each territory
(with an IPC value) controlled by China at the
start of its turn. China also receives one addi-
tional infantry unit if the Burma Road is open
at the start of its turn. (See below.) New
Chinese infantry units must always be placed
in Szechwan.
e The Burma Road: This road is considered
open as long as none of the following territo-
ries are under Japanese control: India, Burma,
Yunnan and Szechwan.
e [Infantry Units: Chinese infantry units operate
just like any other infantry units in the game
except they may not be loaded onto Allied
transports.
Note: The American player needs to check the
gameboard at this point on his turn to determine
how many Chinese infantry units to collect.
Earned infantry units are then put aside and
placed on the gameboard during Phase 7.
PHASE 2. COMBAT AIR CONTROL (CAP) FIGHTERS
MUST LAND
Combat Air Patrol is a special feature of this
game that involves fighter planes. CAP fighters
"take to the air" during Phase 6 of your turn and
must land in Phase 2 of your next turn. Fighters
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUA
on CAP may land on any friendly land territory
that is adjacent to the sea zone OR any friendly
aircraft carrier, island or island group that is with-
in the sea zone. If a CAP fighter cannot land
because there is no friendly landing area, then
the fighter is lost and removed from play. Having
landed, the fighter may then move as normal.
CAP is explained in detail on page 24.
PHASE 3. COMBAT MOVEMENT
You may now move units you already have on the
gameboard as long as they move into, or out of,
a territory that is occupied or controlled by the
enemy.
Controlling Territories and Sea Zones
Territories
You may control land territories, islands and
island groups (either your own, or by occupying
an enemy territory). If you are the last player to
have land units present in the territory at the end
of your turn, you control the territory. That terri-
tory is marked with one of your NCMs. (This is not
necessary if the territory was originally one of
yours.) A player may still control a territory even
if all units are removed from the space.
Sea Zones
Sea zones themselves are not captured, con-
trolled or affected by the outcome of a battle.
However, convoy routes and convoy centers, that
are part of a sea zone, can be successfully held by
a defender or captured by an attacker. Convoy
centers supply additional income to the British
and American players. Convoy centers and convoy
routes are explained in detail on page 22.
Moving units to an enemy occupied space creates
a combat situation. You may move into as many
combat situations as you wish during this Phase.
However, each attacking unit may only be
involved in one battle per turn. At no time may
an Allied power attack another Allied power.
Important: All combat movement must be com-
pleted before combat situations are resolved.
Movement on the Gameboard
e Movement occurs during the Combat
Movement and Non-Combat Movement por-
tion of a turn.
e Some units may move just one adjacent space
per turn, while others may move up to six
spaces. Each unit's movement ability is listed
on the National Reference Charts.
* Land units may only move between land ter-
ritories unless being convoyed by naval trans-
ports. Naval units may only move between
sea zones.
* Air units may move through land territories
and sea zones.
* Moving a unit to one land territory, island,
island group or sea zone from an adjacent
land territory, island, island group or sea .
zone counts as moving one space.
e Moving an aircraft from a sea zone to an
island or island group within that sea zone
also counts as moving one space.
Example: Marching from Burma to Shan State
is one land movement.
Diagram 6. Land Movement
Lo e 2e
SE A
, “EE A
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
iets — EA
Example: Sailing from the sea zone 34 to sea zone 38
is one sea movement.
Diagram 7. Naval Movement
e Land and naval units must end their move-
ment when they move into a space that is
occupied by enemy units.
* Aircraft may move through spaces occupied
by enemy units, including aircraft.
Example: Moving from Yunnan to Sumatra counts as a
one-turn move. From Yunnan to French Indo-China is
one. From French Indo-China to sea zone 46 is two.
From sea zone 46 to sea zone 47 is three. From sea zone
47 to Sumatra is four.
Diagram 8. Air Movement
Movement Summary
The following rules apply to Combat Movement
e You may move units into enemy-controlled
territories that have no combat units, other
than AA Guns and Industrial Complexes, to
take control of them without fighting. (This is
considered Phase 3 Combat Movement, but
there is no combat to resolve in Phase 4.)
e You may move any of your naval units out of
sea zones containing enemy units (as long as
your units were in the sea zone at the begin-
ning of your turn), even if the movement pre-
vents combat from taking place.
e You many not load or unload units on a
transport ship in a sea zone that contains
enemy units, unless the only enemy units
present are submerged submarines. If the
transport moves into a friendly or empty sea
zone, it may load or unload troops.
* When moving air units during this sequence,
there must be a friendly territory or aircraft
carrier on which to land air units after com-
bat is over. Aircraft may not be moved if
there is no possibility for them to land. (See
Air units section on page 24.)
e Any air units that fly over enemy antiaircraft
guns during Combat Movement are subject to
antiaircraft fire. If a unit flies over more than
one territory containing enemy guns, it is
subject to multiple attacks, one for each terri-
tory. This is in addition to any antiaircraft fire
the air units are subjected to from an enemy
territory being attacked. (See Resolving Land
Combat section on page 13.)
* Units involved in Amphibious Assaults are
moved during this sequence. (See Amphibious
Assaults section on page 16.)
® Air units involved in Strategic Bombing Raids
are moved during this sequence. (See
Strategic Bombing Raids section on page 19.)
AIR BASES
As stated earlier, air bases offer a movement
"bonus" to friendly units.
Air Bases: Aircraft flying to or from a territory
with a friendly air base do not have to use up
one movement to go between the territory and
the sea zone in which the base is situated, or is
adjacent to.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Enemy aircraft must still use up one movement
space to move to an enemy territory that contains
an air base.
Example: A fighter on New Britain can fly to sea zone
16, using up only one movement space, then on to the
Gilbert Islands (one more movement), engage in com-
bat, and return the same way. However, a fighter based
on the Gilbert Islands could not attack New Britain, as it
would need one movement to go from the Gilbert
Islands to sea zone 16, then another movement to go to
sea zone 27, and a third movement to go to New
Britain. This would leave only one movement to land,
and could only be done if there was a friendly carrier in
sea zone 27.
Diagram 9. Air Bases
PHASE 4. RESOLVING COMBAT
All combat movement must be completed before
combat situations are resolved. Combat is
resolved by rolling dice. This is often referred to
as "firing." No new units may be moved into bat-
tle as reinforcements once Resolving Combat has
begun. Each combat situation is resolved sepa-
rately, territory by territory (or sea zone), in any
order determined by the attacker. (Strategic
Bombing Raids are conducted first — see page 19
for details on Strategic Bombing Raids).
Resolving Land Combat
When land and/or air units move into an enemy-
occupied territory, follow the sequence below.
1. Put combat units on the battle board. Both the
attacking and defending players place the units
involved in a combat situation (one territory)
onto their respective side of the battle board.
Position units on their matching shapes. The
attack and defense strength for each unit is
shown on the battle board.
2. Antiaircraft (AA) gun fires at each aircraft.
When resolving combat, the attacking player nor-
mally goes first. However, when there is an AA
gun in any enemy territory being attacked, and
the attacking player has aircraft in the attacking
force, then the defending player may fire AA
guns first. (AA guns may also fire at enemy air-
craft that are flying over a territory in which they
are positioned during combat movement.) AA
guns on board transports may never fire at
enemy aircraft. The defending player fires his AA
gun(s) as follows:
A. The defending AA gunner rolls one die
against each attacking aircraft.
В. For each 1 that is rolled, one plane is shot
down and immediately removed (plane
owner's choice). The plane removed has no
chance to counterattack.
C. No matter how many AA guns are in a single
territory, only one die per aircraft is rolled for
that territory. Of course, a player may roll for
several AA guns if enemy aircraft flew over
other territories in which he also had AA
guns present.
Combat proceeds as described below.
3. Attacker fires.
The attacking player goes first. Note that the bat-
tle board is divided into four sections. The attack-
ing player may find it convenient to resolve all
combat in section 1 first, then section 2 and so
on. However, this is not required. The attacker
rolls one die for each attacking unit.
Example: In section 1 of the battle board, each roll of a
1 by an attacking infantry unit scores a hit against the
defender’s choice of units.
Example: In section 3 of the battle board, each roll of a
3, 2, or 1 by an attacking fighter plane or tank scores a
hit against the defender’s choice of units.
After all hits (if any) are scored, the defender
chooses which of his units will be casualties and
moves them to the Casualties area on the battle
board. These casualties will get a chance to fire
back before being removed. (Combat is consid-
ered simultaneous, so each defending unit that's
hit has an opportunity to return fire.)
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Important: Antiaircraft guns and Industrial
Complexes may not be chosen as casualties.
4. Defender fires back.
After the attacking player has fired, the defend-
ing player rolls one die for each defending unit,
including any that were moved to the Casualties
area. Units in the Casualties area still have their
normal defensive value: 2 or less for infantry, 2 or
less for armor and so on.
Example: In section 2 of the battle board, each roll of a
2 or 1 by a defending infantry unit scores a hit against
the attacker's choice of units.
Japan's First Turn
During Japan's first turn only, Japan
attacks in a normal fashion, but Allied
units may defend only with a roll of 1.
Exception: Any attacks made in Chinese
territory are defended by rolling at full
strength.
5. Remove all casualties.
After all hits are scored by the defender, the
attacker must remove that many units (attacker's
choice) from the battle board and place them out
of play. After the defender's counterattack, the
defender removes all of his units from the
Casualties area of the battle board. They are
placed out of play.
6. Repeat steps 3 through 5.
Combat continues until one of the following four
situations occurs:
A. Attacker retreats.
B. Attacker is destroyed.
C. Defender is destroyed.
D.
Both attacker and defender are destroyed.
A. The attacker retreats. The attacker must fight
at least one round of combat. After both the
attacker and defender have rolled, the attacker
may retreat, thereby stopping that particular bat-
tle. The attacking land units may only retreat to
an adjacent friendly territory that was under the
owner's control at the start of the turn and from
which any of the attacking land units came. The
units must all withdraw together to the same ter-
ritory.
Aircraft may retreat to any friendly land territory,
island, island group or aircraft carrier still within
movement range and under its owner's control
since the beginning of the turn. Retreating
planes, however, are still subject to enemy antiair-
craft gunfire if they pass over territories with AA
guns. Return the defending units that survived
from the battle board to the territory.
Note: Retreating is an attacker's privilege only.
B. The attacker is destroyed. If the defender
destroys all the attacking units, the battle is over.
Remove all destroyed units from play and return
the defending units that survived to the territory.
C. The defender is destroyed. If the attacker hits
all the defending units, the battle is over after the
defender counterattacks. Remove all destroyed
units from play and return the attacking units that
survived to the territory. The attacker captures the
territory.
D. Both attacker and defender are destroyed.
If all units are hit during an attack and counterat-
tack, the battle is over. Remove all destroyed
units. Control of the territory remains unchanged.
Resolving Naval Combat
When naval and air units move into an enemy-
occupied sea zone, follow the rules sequence
below.
1. Put all units on the battle board.
Both the attacking and defending players place
the units involved in a combat situation (one sea
zone) onto their respective side of the battle
board. Position units on their matching shapes.
The attack and defense strength for each unit is
shown on the battle board.
Note that there is a position for an attacking
transport ship on the attacker side of the battle
board, but there is no attack value assigned to it.
An attacker's transport should be placed on the
bottom of the attacker's side of the board, as
indicated. Even though the transport has no
attack factor, it may be selected as a casualty
should the attacking force be required to elimi-
nate a unit.
2. Attacking submarines may make “First-strike"
attack, or submerge.
Attacking submarines may usually fire before any
other unit during each round of combat. This is
called a First-strike attack.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUA
To launch a First-strike attack, roll one die for
each attacking submarine. For every 2 or less
rolled, the defender suffers a hit. Do not place
any casualties on the Casualties area of the battle
board. Instead, immediately remove them from
play. They do not get a chance to counterattack.
Note: The presence of an enemy destroyer in the
battle negates all submarines’ first-strike ability.
Submarines may never fire at air units, and air
units may not be chosen as casualties for any hit
scored by a submarine.
Submarines may submerge instead of attacking.
A submerged sub is turned onto its side to indi-
cate this submerged condition. It remains on its
side and may not attack or be attacked again on
this turn. Submerged subs are returned to their
upright position in Phase 8.
See Combat Units -Submarines section on page 33.
3. Attacker fires.
The attacker now rolls one die for each attacking
unit (except submarines that have already
attacked or submerged). If the number rolled is
equal to or less than the number shown on the
attacker's side of the battle board, then the
attacker scores a hit.
After all hits are scored (if any), the defender
chooses which of his units are casualties and
moves them to the Casualties area on the battle
board. These casualties will get a chance to fire
back before being removed. (Combat is consid-
ered simultaneous, so each defending unit that's
hit has one opportunity to return fire.)
Important: If a transport ship is hit, any units
onboard go down with the ship. (A unit onboard
may not be chosen as a casualty.)
4. Defender fires back and/or submerges.
After the attacking player has completed firing
all units on the battle board, the defending play-
er rolls one die for each defending unit, including
any that were moved to the Casualties area. Units
in the Casualties area still have the normal defen-
sive value shown on the battle board.
Defending submarines may submerge instead of
firing back. The sub is turned on its side to indi-
cate this submerged condition. It remains on its
side and may not attack or be attacked again on
this turn. Submerged subs are returned to their
upright position in Phase 8.
—=
Note: Submarines are the only defending units in
the game that may leave a battle (by submerging).
It Takes Two Hits to Sink a Battleship
In addition to their strong attack and defense
capabilities, battleships must be hit twice in the
same battle to be eliminated. On the first hit, the
battleship is placed on its side to indicate the hit.
On the second hit, the ship is removed. If it does
not receive a second hit during that battle, its
damage is "repaired" and it is turned upright at
the end of the turn.
5. Remove all casualties.
After all hits are scored by the defender, the orig-
inal attacker must remove that many of his units
(attacker's choice) from the battle board and
place them out of play.
After the defender's counterattack, the defender
removes all of his units that are in the Casualties
area of the battle board.
6. Repeat steps 2 to 5.
Combat continues until one of the following five
situations occurs:
A. Attacker retreats and/or submerges.
B. Attacker is destroyed and/or submerged.
C. Defender is destroyed and/or submerged.
D
Attacker and defender are both destroyed
and/or submerged.
E. All remaining units are unable to attack each
other.
A. The attacker retreats and/or submerges. After
both the attacker and defender have rolled, the
attacker may retreat with any remaining surface
ships or transports and/or submerge any sub-
marines. This ends that particular battle, as there
are no attacking units left in the territory (or only
submerged submarines). The attacker may not
retreat from a sea zone in which the only enemy
units are submerged submarines. In this case, the
battle is over.
An attacking sub may submerge in the same sea
zone instead of retreating. A submerged sub is
turned onto its side to indicate its submerged
condition. It remains on its side and may not
attack or be attacked again on this turn.
Submerged subs are returned to their upright
position in Phase 8.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
The attacking naval units may only retreat to an
adjacent friendly sea zone from which any of the
attacking naval units moved through or came
from. They must withdraw together to the same
sea zone.
The attacking units may not retreat to a sea zone
that contains any enemy units, even if they came
from that sea zone at the start of the turn.
Note: Retreating is an attacker's privilege only.
However, both defender and attacker have the
option to submerge any submarine involved in
the battle.
B. The attacker is destroyed and/or submerged. If
the defender destroys all the attacking units, or
the only attacking units left are submerged sub-
marines, the battle is over. Remove all destroyed
units and return the surviving units to the sea
zone.
C. The defender is destroyed and/or submerged.
If the attacker destroys all the defending units, or
the only remaining defending units are sub-
merged submarines, the battle is over after the
defender counterattacks. Remove all destroyed
units and return the units that survived to the sea
zone.
D. The attacker and defender are both destroyed
and/or submerged. If all units are hit during an
attack and counterattack, and/or all units are sub-
merged, the battle is over. Remove all destroyed
units and return any submerged units to the sea
zone.
E. All remaining units are unable to attack each
other. If only submarines and aircraft remain in
battle, the battle is over, as they may not attack
each other. Return all units to the sea zone.
Amphibious Assaults
An Amphibious Assault is an attack on an enemy
coastal land territory, island or island group
where at least one land unit has been moved
there by a transport ship, or Japanese Destroyer,
during Phase 3 — Combat Movement.
Japanese Destroyers
A Japanese destroyer may transport one infantry
unit. When transporting an infantry unit, a
Japanese destroyer loads and unloads in exactly
the same way as a transport ship. If the destroyer
is sunk, the infantry unit on board is also lost.
Movement
During Combat Movement, the attacker must
declare that he is performing an Amphibious
Assault and on what territory. He may not redi-
rect it to a different territory during Phase 4 —
Resolve Combat, although it can be called off.
Each transport can only unload into one territory
— it cannot split its cargo into two different terri-
tories. However, two different transports in the
same sea zone can unload into two different ter-
ritories, if the player desires. A single Amphibious
Assault may also be made against a single
territory from two different sea zones.
Land units that are on adjacent territories may
also take part in an Amphibious Assault. Air units
may also participate, as well as battleships and
destroyers in the same sea zone as the unloading
transport.
An Amphibious Assault is handled like any other
land battle, except that all land units (including
those that may have come from adjacent territo-
ries) lose their option of retreating. Air units may
retreat as normal, after at least one round of
combat has been fought. Moving a land unit into
or out of a transport counts as that unit's full
move.
Transports that have been in battle may either
load or unload (but not both) after the battle.
Transports that retreat from a sea battle during
an Amphibious Assault may not unload on that
turn. For more information about transports,
refer to the Naval Units — Transports section on
page 29.
Resolving an Amphibious Assault
Move all combatants to the battle board and do
the following:
1. Naval battle precedes Amphibious Assault.
During an Amphibious Assault, if there are enemy
units in the same sea zone as the amphibious
force, a naval battle must occur before land units
may be unloaded. All of the attacking naval
units, including transports, must defeat all enemy
naval units in the sea zone before the transports
may unload the attacking land units. If a player is
forced to eliminate a transport or Japanese
destroyer because of battle losses, any units
onboard are also lost.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Once the sea zone is clear, the transports may be
unloaded and the land battle begins. Any air
units involved in the naval battle may not attack
in land battle on the same turn.
Note: After a naval battle, the attacker is allowed
to call off the Amphibious Assault. He may not
redirect it to another territory.
Attacking Air Units
During combat movement, the attacking player
must declare the following:
e which aircraft are remaining in the sea zone
to participate in the naval battle
(and)
* which aircraft are flying to engage in the
land battle.
(movement permitting)
Note: If the naval battle is lost by the attacker, or
he decides to retreat his fleet, any aircraft
engaged against the land battle must fight at
least one round of combat before retreating.
2. Attacking battleships and destroyers conduct
shore bombardment.
If no naval battle was fought in the sea zone,
battleships and destroyers may then bombard the
shore provided they are in the same sea zone as
the unloading transport(s). This is a one-shot sup-
port attack to provide cover fire for landing units.
The attacker rolls one die for each battleship,
looking for a 4 or less per die. The attacker then
rolls one die for each destroyer, looking for a 2 or
less per die. (This is different from the destroyer’s
normal attack value of 3.) The defender chooses
his casualties (if any) and moves them to the
Casualties area of the battle board. (These
units may fire during the defender's normal
counterattack.)
The attacker removes the attacking ships from
the battle board and places them back in the sea
zone on the gameboard.
If a naval battle occurs before an Amphibious
Assault, battleships and destroyers may not then
conduct a shore bombardment. (These units were
too involved in the naval battle to provide cover-
ing fire.) Japanese destroyers unloading infantry
may not provide a support shot.
3. Defending AA gunfire.
Defending AA gunfire at attacking enemy air
units as previously described.
4. Conduct land combat.
The attacker fires with all units involved in the
land battle. The defender then counterattacks as
usual.
5. Repeat step 4 until one side (or both) is
destroyed.
Remember that only attacking air units may
retreat, and they may only retreat after at least
one round of combat has been fought.
Amphibious Assault Example #1
On Japan's turn the Japanese player loads a tank into a
transport in sea zone 36, moves it to sea zone 25, and
unloads it into Guam. The Japanese player also moves a
fighter plane from the Mariana Islands into Guam.
The destroyer in sea zone 25 provides a support shot,
since it is in the same sea zone as the unloading trans-
port, and has not participated in combat this turn. One
die is rolled, resulting in a 3 — a miss (destroyers only hit
on a 2 when conducting shore bombardment). Japan
now rolls for the tank and the fighter plane, a roll of
two 5s results in two misses.
Next, USA rolls one die for the defending marine unit in
Guam. A 2 is rolled — just one hit. Japan removes the
tank. Without a land unit to take Guam, Japan decides
to retreat. It moves the plane back to the Mariana
Islands, and the battle is over.
Diagram 10. Amphibious Assault 1
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Amphibious Assault Example #2 Diagram 11. Amphibious Assault 2
Japan is attempting an Amphibious Assault in
Queensland. Japan loads two infantry units into a trans-
port in sea zone 27, and moves into sea zone 32, along
with a submarine and a battleship.
In the first round of naval combat, Japan rolls a 4 for
the sub (which does not have a first shot attack because
of the defending destroyer present), and a 4 for the
battleship, scoring one hit. Great Britain then rolls a 1
for its destroyer, scoring a hit. Japan takes one hit on
the battleship and turns it on its side. Now that the sea
zone has been cleared of enemy ships, the transport
may unload its units into Queensland. (As stated previ-
ously, Japan may not change its plans and unload into
the Northern Territory, for example.) The battleship,
which has participated in combat this turn, may not fire
a support shot. Also, the Japanese destroyer in sea zone
29 may not fire a support shot since it is not in the same
sea zone as the unloading transport.
Japan fires for the infantry, rolling a 3 and a 4. Great
Britain then rolls a 2, scoring a hit. Japan removes an
infantry unit from the board. At this point, Japan would
like to retreat, but cannot, since land units may not
retreat from an Amphibious Assault. Japan fires for the
infantry units, rolling a 1 and scoring a hit. However,
the British player also rolls a 1, so both units are
removed. Queensland, although clear of units, remains
in British hands, since there are no Japanese ground
forces to claim it.
LE rr.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Multi-player Forces
When Allied units are in the same territory or sea
zone, a multi-player force is said to be present.
Such forces may defend themselves together, but
they may not attack together. British units may
attack together — there is no difference between
Australian and Indian forces.
Defending Together
When Allied units in the same territory (or sea
zone) are attacked — and a hit is scored — the
defenders mutually agree which unit is chosen as
the casualty. If they cannot agree, the attacker
chooses. When counterattacking, each defender
rolls separately for his units. Allied destroyers
negate submarines’ first strike capability and
allow all defending aircraft to attack subs.
Attacking Separately
When Allied units in the same territory (or sea
zone) wish to attack, each attacker must do so
only with his own units and only on his own turn.
Each player moves his units into combat on his
turn and resolves combat. It is possible for one
player to attack a sea zone that has both Allied
and enemy units present. In this situation, the
Allied units may be taken as casualties but they
do not participate in the combat.
Example: During Japan's turn, it moves two subs into
sea zone 30 and sinks three British transports that were
there. On Great Britains turn, it buys a destroyer and a
transport, which are placed into sea zone 30 at the end
of its turn. On the United States’ turn, it moves a sub-
marine and two fighter planes in sea zone 30 to attack
the Japanese submarines. The aircraft may attack since
there is an Allied destroyer present. The British destroy-
er and transport do not participate in the battle, but
may be taken as casualties if necessary. The naval battle
is then fought as normal. If all the US units are
destroyed or retreat, then the battle is over. The
Japanese submarines do not continue the battle with
the British units present.
Transporting Multi-Player Forces
A power may use its transports to carry units of
another Allied power. However, players may only
move their pieces on their respective turn. This
makes multi-player force transports a three-step
process:
1. On your turn, move your land units aboard
the Allied transport.
2. The player with the transport moves it (along
with your land units) on his turn.
3. You unload your land units on your next turn.
This three-step process is true whether the Allied
transport needs to move or not. In other words,
US units cannot board a British transport and
then unload from it on the same turn, whether
the British transport moves or not.
Note: Chinese infantry may not be loaded onto
transports.
Strategic Bombing Raids
A Strategic Bombing Raid (SBR) is an economic
attack against an enemy Industrial Complex (fac-
tory), allowing the attacker to "destroy" the IPCs
of the enemy. Only bombers may conduct SBRs,
although fighter planes may escort bombers as
protection.
Here is how a Strategic Bombing Raid is
launched:
1. Move and announce: On the Combat
Movement phase of your turn, move your
bomber(s) into a territory with an Industrial
Complex, and announce that you are making a
Strategic Bombing Raid. (Do not use the battle
board in this type of attack.)
2. Send escorts: You may send fighter planes
along with your bombers as "fighter escorts."
These fighters are moved along with the bombers
(range permitting) to the target. Any fighters and
bombers used in a Strategic Bombing Raid may
not also be used in a regular land attack on the
same turn.
3. Defender declares defending fighter planes:
Any fighters used to defend against a Strategic
Bombing Raid may not also defend in a regular
land attack in that same territory on the same
turn.
4, Defending AA guns fire first: Before the actual
bombing begins, any antiaircraft guns in the
defending territory may fire first in an attempt to
defend the Industrial Complex.
The defending player fires his AA gun by rolling
one die against each attacking aircraft (bombers
and any fighter escorts). Each roll of 1 scores a hit
and that number of units are immediately
removed.
5. Dogfight: Fighters that are defending against
the Strategic Bombing Raid may now be used to
dogfight enemy aircraft.
A. The defending player rolls one die for each
of his fighter planes located in the territory
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
being attacked. Each roll of 2 or lower scores
a hit and the number of hits is noted. (Note
that the fighters defending against a
Strategic Bombing Raid defend at 2, not 4.)
B. The escorting fighter planes (attackers) then
return fire at any defending fighter planes
involved in the battle. One die is rolled for
each escorting fighter. Each die roll of 1 is a
hit against the defending fighter planes and
they are immediately removed. (Fighter
escorts during a Strategic Bombing Raid
attack with 1, not 3.)
C. The attacking player removes his dogfight
casualties (attacker's choice of bombers or
fighters).
Important: This dogfight battle is now over (after
one round).
6. The bombing raid takes place: After passing
through any antiaircraft fire and any defending
enemy fighters, surviving bomber(s) each roll one
die. The total rolled on the die (or dice) is the
number of IPCs the defender must immediately
surrender to the bank. If the owner of the
bombed territory does not have enough IPCs to
cover the penalty, the owner surrenders as many
IPCs as he has to the bank.
Strategic Bombing of Japanese Industrial
Complexes.
For every full ten IPCs surrendered to the bank by
Japan, due to an Allied Strategic Bombing Raid,
Japan loses 1 VP.
Example Japan has 19 IPCs on hand and must lose 25
IPCs due to Allied bombing. Japan surrenders all 19 IPCs
held and loses 1 VP.
Note: Japan may not launch a Strategic Bombing
Raid against China, as China does not hold any
IPCs to give up. If, however, Japan captures
Szechwan or a U.S. built factory the allies may
conduct a Strategic Bombing raid against the
Industrial Complex there. Japan must then surren-
der IPCs as outlined above.
During Phase 6 — Non-Combat Movement, attack-
ing fighter planes and bombers that survived
combat return to a friendly territory (fighters can
land on carriers) within their movement range.
Fighter planes that were defending against the
SBR must land in the territory containing the
Industrial Complex. If that territory was captured
this turn they cannot land and are lost.
Strategic Bombing Raid Example
The American player announces a SBR against Japan.
The bomber in the Mariana Islands flies to Japan, and
two fighters on a carrier in sea zone 23 move to Japan
as escorts.
First, the Japanese player fires the AA gun in Japan.
Three dice are rolled, one for each plane, resulting in a
1, 3, and 4. The AA gun scored one hit and USA sacri-
fices fighter A.
Next, the Japanese player sends up a fighter. A 2 is
rolled — another hit. The U.S. player responds with his
remaining fighter and rolls a 3. This would normally be
a hit, but in a SBR, fighters only attack with a 1. The US
player chooses fighter B as the casualty.
Combat is over since SBR combat is only one round. The
US player rolls one die for every bomber in the raid (in
this case, one), and rolls a 6. The Japanese player imme-
diately turns over 6 IPCs to the bank. During Phase 6 —
Non-combat Movement, the US bomber returns to the
Mariana Islands using its remaining three moves.
Diagram 12. Strategic Bombing Raids
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AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
KAMIKAZE (Japan only)
Japan is allowed to make six Kamikaze attacks dur-
ing the game. These attacks may only be made in
sea zones that contain the Kamikaze symbol (sea
zones 23, 24, 25, 35, 36 and 37). They may be used
during any combat phase. If an allied player moves
ships into one of the above sea zones, the Japanese
player may announce, after all combat movement
has been completed, that he intends to launch
Kamikaze. Kamikaze may target specific enemy sur-
face ships and can be a useful way to destroy the
most vital ships in an enemy fleet. The Japanese
player must declare how many Kamikaze will be
used, in which sea zones they will be used, and
which enemy ships will be attacked. Before Japan
rolls dice to launch a Kamikaze attack, it must
announce the enemy target(s) and how many of
its Kamikaze are participating.
Kamikaze may not be used against submarines.
Kamikaze have an attack roll of 2. If a hit is
scored, it must be applied to the chosen unit.
The Japanese marker is moved down the
Kamikaze track on the National Production Chart
to record how may Kamikaze remain to be used.
If Japan uses Kamikaze during an allied combat
phase this counts as a naval battle and will pre-
vent any battleships or destroyers present from
conducting shore bombardment.
Kamikaze attacks may also be made in conjunc-
tion with a regular naval battle, in which case
they are used during the first round of combat.
Any ships sunk as a result still get to return fire.
Kamikaze cannot be taken as casualties, as they
are "destroyed" when they make their attack.
Phase 5. PLACE / REMOVE NATIONAL CONTROL
MARKERS AND ADJUST THE NATIONAL
PRODUCTION CHART
After combat is resolved, National Control
Markers (NCMs) may need to be placed on or
removed from the gameboard to show which
country now controls a particular space.
Territories
A territory is either held by the defender or
captured by the attacker.
e |f the attacker withdraws, the defender holds
the territory.
e If the attacker is destroyed, the defender
holds the territory.
e |f the attacker and the defender are both
destroyed, the defender holds the territory.
e If the defender is destroyed, the attacker cap-
tures the territory, as long as the attacker has
a surviving land unit. If planes remain as the
attacker's only surviving units, then the
attacker does not control the territory.
Air Units: You may not capture a territory with air
units alone. Attacking planes may not remain or
land in a land territory, island or island group
where a battle just took place.
Capturing Territories |
If you capture a territory, do the following:
A. Remove the defender's marker, if applicable. If
the space was originally an enemy territory, place
one of your own markers on the space.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Liberating Allied Territories: If an Allied country
originally controlled the captured territory, con-
trol returns to the original owner not the libera-
tor.
Note: Convoy routes (associated with the territo-
ry) may remain in enemy control.
B. Remove surviving units from the battle board
and place them in the newly acquired territory.
C. Any antiaircraft gun or Industrial Complex in
the territory remain, but now belong to the
attacker.
Manchuria, Shantung and Korea: If the Allies cap-
ture any of these territories, the territory is now
controlled by China.
Siam and French Indo-China: If the Allies capture
either of these territories, the NCMs are allocated
as follows:
If Britain captures the territory, the British
player always places an India NCM.
e |f a mixed force of American and Chinese
ground units captures the territory, choose
either country to place a NCM there.
Convoy Routes and Convoy Centers
As stated earlier, sea zones are not captured,
controlled or affected by the outcome of a battle.
However, convoy routes and convoy centers within
a sea zone can be successfully held by a defender
or captured by an attacker.
If, during combat movement, you move a naval
unit (except a transport) through or into an
empty sea zone containing a convoy route or
convoy center, you take control of that route
or center.
Note: Submarines that begin a turn in an empty
sea zone containing an enemy convoy route or
convoy center may spend one of their two moves
to remain in the sea zone and take control of it
before using their second move to go to an adja-
cent sea zone.
Following a Battle
е If the attacker is destroyed, withdraws and/or
submerges, then no change of control is
made to the convoy route or convoy center.
e |[f the attacker and the defender are both
destroyed and/or submerge, then no change
of control is made to the convoy route or
convoy center.
е If the defender is destroyed, the attacker may
take control of the convoy route or center, as
long as the attacker has a surviving warship. If
planes, transports or submerged submarines
remain as the attacker's only surviving units,
then control of the convoy route or center
does not change.
e If all remaining units cannot attack each
other, the attacker may take control of the
convoy route or center if he has submarines
present that have not submerged. If his only
remaining units are aircraft, then control of
the convoy route or center does not change.
Taking Control of a Convoy Route or Convoy
Center
If, after a battle, you take control of a convoy
route or center, do the following in Phase 5:
A. Remove the defender’s marker, if applicable,
and place one of your own markers on the space.
(You don't have to place a marker if the convoy
route or convoy center was originally one of
yours.)
B. Remove surviving units from the battle board
and place them in the space.
C. Adjust the National Production Chart.
Adjusting the National Production Chart
Although you do not collect IPCs until Phase 9,
the National Production Chart (NPC), which moni-
tors income, must be updated as soon as combat
is resolved. The control markers on the NPC are
adjusted as follows:
Convoy Centers
If Japan takes control of a US convoy center, then
the United States’ National Production level is
reduced by the amount shown on the center. If
Japan takes control of a British convoy center,
then the British convoy center's National
Production level is reduced by the amount shown
on the center.
In either case, Japan's National production level is
not increased. Japan cannot gain IPC income by
taking control of enemy convoy centers, but can
deny its enemies this income. If an Allied naval
unit liberates a convoy center, then Japan's NCM
is removed and the British or US National
Production level is increased accordingly.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Note: If a convoy center is successfully defended,
then no adjustment of the NPC is necessary.
Convoy Routes
If a convoy route is captured and the enemy con-
trols the associated territory then the enemy's
National Production level is decreased. The cap-
turing player does not increase his National
Production level.
If a convoy route is captured and you or a friend-
ly player controls the associated territory then the
nation controlling the territory increases its
National Production level.
Territories
If the defender loses the battle and the space has
an IPC value, the National Production level is
increased for the country now in control of the
space. However, as stated earlier, an attacker who
liberates an Allied space doesn’t earn the IPC
value. The IPC value returns to the original ally.
Note: If the attacker captures a territory but the
associated convoy route is in enemy control the
attacker does not increase his National
Production level. However, the enemy National
Production level is decreased.
Capturing an Enemy Capital
Remember that one object of the game is to cap-
ture and hold an enemy capital through one turn
(while still controlling your own capital).
Capturing a capital (identified with the country’s
national symbol) is done the same way as captur-
ing any other territory. Enemy forces must be
eliminated and a land combat unit must occupy
the territory. When a capital is captured, the
National Production Chart is adjusted accordingly
for the capturing player and the losing player. In
addition, the capturing player immediately takes
all of the IPCs that the losing player has on hand.
(This is an exception to the regular IPC rules.)
If Japan captures an allied capital, the Japanese
player may add any IPCs taken to those collected
at the end of the turn for calculating victory
points scored.
Note: If the Chinese capital province of Szechwan
Is captured, Japan does not collect any IPCs from
China. That's because China has no IPCs. (Their
infantry units are built automatically.) However,
China may not place any new infantry units until
Szechwan has been retaken. If Japan is captured,
©
the Japanese player loses 1 VP for every full 10
IPCs handed over.
To win the game, the capturing player must still
‘be in control of the enemy capital and his own
capital at the beginning of his next turn.
If you are the player whose capital has been cap-
tured, you are still in the game. On your turn, you
may not purchase units. You may move units and
engage in combat. If you regain control of your
capital on your turn, you are entitled to your IPCs
during Phase 9 -- Collect Income. If you do not
regain your capital, you may not collect income.
Liberating a Former Allied Territory
If you are an Allied power, and you capture a ter-
ritory (including a capital) originally owned by
another Allied player, you are not considered the
new owner but, rather, the liberator. Your ally
becomes the owner again. Remove the Japanese
marker from the territory and adjust the original
owner's National Production level.
Example: Capturing a Capital
Japan captures New South Wales on its turn. When New
South Wales is captured, Great Britain immediately
hands over all its available Australian IPCs to Japan.
On Great Britain's turn, it may not purchase any units
for Australia, though it may purchase units for India as
usual. Great Britain may use the pieces already on the
board. It moves two tanks, an infantry unit, and an
artillery unit from Queensland into New South Wales to
try to reclaim the capital. Against the one Japanese
tank, Britain succeeds easily.
At this point, Great Britain controls the capital again.
The National Production level for Australia is raised by
5, and the Japanese level is lowered by 5. Furthermore,
Great Britain is entitled to receive its IPC income on this
turn for Australia.
Phase 6. NON-COMBAT MOVEMENT
Land Air Units
Any air units that were involved in the Phase 3 —
Combat Movement are considered still in the
"air" and must now "land" in a friendly territory
within range. Remember that part of a fighter's
four-space range and a bombers six-space range
may have already been used up during the
Combat Movement phase.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Move Units
You may also move any, all, or none of your units
that you did not move during the Combat
Movement phase and did not participate in any
battle during Resolve Combat. These movements
help you prepare strong offensive or defensive
positions, strengthen vulnerable territories, or
reinforce units at the front.
Land units may be moved into any friendly terri-
tories, occupied or unoccupied, within range.
They may not be moved into enemy-occupied,
enemy-controlled, or neutral territories.
Antiaircraft guns may also be moved into friendly
territories at this time. AA guns in territories cap-
tured on a turn may not be moved on the same
turn.
Air units may be moved into any friendly territo-
ries, occupied or unoccupied, within range.
| Fighters (but not bombers) may fly out to land on
| any friendly aircraft carrier within range. Air units
may not land in enemy-occupied, enemy-con-
trolled, or neutral territories. They may not land
| in a territory just captured during your turn. Air
| units may not fly over neutral territories. Air units
flying over countries with AA guns are not shot
at during the Non-combat Movement phase.
Naval units may be moved into any sea zone
within range as long as there are no enemy naval
units (except submerged subs) in the sea zone.
Enemy NCMs on convoy centers and convoy
routes are not removed during the Non-combat
Movement phase when friendly ships move into,
or through, those sea zones. Transports moved to
(or already in) sea zones next to friendly coastal
territories may load and/or unload cargo there.
Naval Bases
During the Non-combat Movement phase, naval
units moving from a sea zone containing a friend-
ly naval base to another sea zone containing a
friendly naval base may move three spaces
instead of two. Either, or both, of these naval
bases may have been captured on this turn.
Example: At the start of his turn, the Japanese player
has a destroyer in sea zone 20 and a transport in sea
zone 36. During the Japanese turn, both New Britain
and Midway are captured. During non-combat move-
ment the Japanese player can move the destroyer three
spaces to sea zone 27. The transport in sea zone 36
loads two infantry and moves three spaces to sea zone
27 and unloads into New Guenia, which was captured
on a previous turn. Both ships are able to move three
spaces as the sea zone in which they start their non-
combat movement and the sea zone in which they
finish their movement both contain friendly territories
with naval bases.
Diagram 13. Naval Bases
Establish Combat Air Patrol (CAP)
Combat Air Patrol is a special feature of this
game that involves fighter planes. During the
Non-combat Movement phase, you may initiate a
CAP by moving fighter planes that have not
moved this turn from any territory to an adjacent
sea zone. However, a CAP fighter may not be
moved to a sea zone in which the presence of
enemy pieces would cause combat. During the
enemy's turn, the CAP will stop all enemy naval
units (except subs) from moving through the sea
zone. Naval units that move into the sea zone
must stop, and a battle will then be fought. An
enemy player may move air units through the sea
zone without being stopped by the CAP. An
enemy player may move fighter planes into the
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
sea zone with the CAP to engage the CAP, or to
fly to an island within the sea zone to engage
ground units there. This may or may not be part
of a planned Amphibious Assault.
As stated earlier, your CAP must land in Phase 2
of your next turn. Fighters on CAP may land on
any friendly land territory that is adjacent to the
sea zone or any friendly carrier, island or island
group that is within the sea zone. If a CAP fighter
cannot land because there is no friendly landing
place, then the fighter is lost and removed from
play. Having landed, the fighter may then move
as normal.
Phase 7. PLACE NEW UNITS
New units are placed at Industrial Complexes. The
maximum number of units that can be placed at
any Industrial Complex that was either captured
or built during the game is equal to the IPC
income of that territory. There is no limit to the
number of units that can be placed into an
Industrial Complex that was controlled at the
start of the game.
Land and Air units acquired by a country during
Phase 1 — Purchase Units are now placed in any
controlled territory that contains an Industrial
Complex. Newly purchased fighter planes may
not be placed directly on aircraft carriers.
Naval units acquired during Phase 1 are now
placed in sea zones adjacent to your home terri-
tory. If enemy ships also occupy these sea zones,
combat will occur during the Resolve Combat
phase of your enemy's turn (unless your enemy
moves away during the Combat Movement
phase).
Industrial Complexes acquired during Phase 1 by
the US player may be placed into any territory
that was controlled by the US at the start of his
turn. No more than one Industrial Complex may
be placed into a territory.
Phase 8. SUBMERGED SUBMARINES RESURFACE
DAMAGED BATTLESHIPS UPRIGHTED
All submarines and battleships that were tipped
on their sides are now turned upright on the
gameboard.
Phase 9. COLLECT INCOME
This is the last part of your turn. Collect IPCs from
the bank based on your current income level, as
shown on the National Production Chart (NPC).
This chart must be maintained to indicate the cur-
rent amount of IPCs for each country, including
income payable to the British player for the
British convoy centers. Income derived from the
British convoy center cannot be stockpiled. It
must immediately be given to India or Australia,
or divided between the two countries in any
manner the British player wishes.
Adjust Victory Point Track
If it is Japan's turn, adjust the victory point track.
Japan scores one victory point for every ten IPCs
collected this turn. This includes any IPCs that may
have been surrendered to Japan for having cap-
tured an Allied capital.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Combat Units
Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of
the various combat units is one of the keys to vic-
tory. A detailed description of each unit is listed
below.
Note: The attack and defense factors listed with
each unit pertains to the number you must roll
on a die to score a hit.
ANTIAIRCRAFT (AA) GUNS
Movement: 1
Attack Factor: none
Defense Factor: 1
Cost: 5 IPCs
These are special land units that help defend a
land territory against air attacks. AA guns are
neutral-colored and are taken over when located
in a territory captured by the enemy. They may
fire once at any enemy plane flying over that ter-
ritory during the Combat Movement phase.
AA guns do not attack like infantry, tanks or
artillery. They also may not be moved into an
enemy-occupied territory as an attacking land
unit. AA guns may be moved to friendly land ter-
ritories and may be transported to friendly
coastal territories, islands or island groups by
naval transports. AA guns that are carried into an
Allied territory remain in the possession of the
country that moved them there. Ownership is
shown by placing a National Control Marker
underneath the gun. AA guns in a captured terri-
tory may not be moved in the same turn that the
territory is captured. |
When air units fly over or into an enemy territory,
during combat movement, on which an AA gun is
positioned, the AA gun gets to fire first. (See
Phase 4 -- Resolving Combat on page 13)
Antiaircraft Guns Example
Japan is invading Burma with an armor unit and three
infantry units from Shan State. Japan also sends two
fighter planes from Kwangsi for support. Burma is
defended by three British infantry units, and there are
also two AA guns present.
There is also an AA gun in Yunnan, which is currently
under Chinese control. As the fighters fly over Yunnan,
the American player rolls two dice, one for each plane,
hoping to roll 1s. The American player rolls a 5 and a 1,
scoring one hit. Fighter A is removed from the board.
Fighter B arrives in Burma with the tank and infantry
from Shan State. The British player rolls one die for the
plane (you only roll one die per plane no matter how
many AA Guns are present), and rolls a 4, a miss.
Combat then continues, and the British infantry units
are wiped out.
During the Non-combat Movement phase, fighter B
returns to Kwangsi. Since this is non-combat movement,
the AA gun in Yunnan may not fire at the plane. The
two AA guns in Burma are now under Japanese control.
They will be used by the Japanese player to hold off
any Allied attack to reclaim Burma. The Japanese player
may not move the AA guns during the Non-combat
Movement phase, as the territory was just captured this
turn.
Diagram 14. AA Guns
ern : El a NE E
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
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INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
Great Britain is bringing two infantry units and one
artillery unit into Siam to attack the two Japanese units
there, one artillery and one infantry. The British artillery
unit attacks, as does one of the infantry units, both
hoping for a roll of 2 or less. The other infantry unit
0
Movement
none
Attack Factor
Defense Factor: none
Cost: 15 (USA only)
attacks, hoping for a 1, as there is no other artillery unit
to pair up with it. The Japanese infantry and artillery
units both defend, hoping to roll a 2 or less.
Description
Diagram 15. Artillery
Industrial Complexes are special land units that
do not attack, defend, or move. They may not be
destroyed during the game. Industrial Complexes
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Land Units
There are three types of land combat units —
artiller
y, and armor. These units may
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only participate in land battles, and only these
units may capture a land territory.
Land units cost
less than other kinds of units. Each has its own
strengths and weaknesses.
ARTILLERY
1
Movement
Attack Factor: 2
2
Defense Factor
Cost
4 IPCs
Description
Artillery units attack with a roll of 2 or less and
defend with a roll of 2 or less.
For each artillery unit attacking, one Infantry or
Marine unit may increase its attack strength by 1.
This pairing is on a one-to-one basis. For example,
two artillery units attacking with six infantry units
would only increase the attack value of two
infantry units. The final attack numbers would be
four 2s and four 1s. There are no dice roll adjust-
ments made when artillery and infantry units
are defending together. For each artillery unit
attacking during an Amphibious Assault, one
Marine may attack with a roll of 3 or less
(instead of 2 or less).
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
INFANTRY TANKS
Movement: 1
Movement: 2
Cost: 3 IPCs Cost: 5 IPCs
Description | Description
These units are a good buy for a defensive posi- Tanks cost more than infantry, yet they still
tion because each costs only 3 IPCs, and defend with a die roll of 2 or less. Therefore, as
they defend with a die roll of 2 or less. defensive land units, tanks are the weaker choice.
e For each artillery unit attacking the same ter- But as attacking land units, tanks are definitely
ritory one Infantry unit may attack with a roll more powerful than infantry. They also have
more mobility. They attack with a die roll of 3 or
of 2 or less. :
less instead of the weaker infantry attack capabil-
ity of 1.
U.S. MARINES
You may move a tank through two territories, if
the first territory is a friendly one. However, if the
Movement: 1
Attack Factor 1 or 2 cran first territory is enemy-controlled, but not enemy-
Défense Factor: 2 occupied, your tank may "blitz" through it. This is
Cost: 4 IPCs (USA only) described as follows:
Description The Blitz:
Only the United States has Marine units, these 1. Move the tank into the unoccupied enemy
are the dark green infantry pieces. Marines nor- territory.
mally attack just like infantry units (with a roll of
1). However, they are more effective in 2. Place a control marker on the territory.
Amphibious Assaults, as explained below: 3. Adjust the National Production Chart to show
* A Marine unit attacking in an Amphibious the change.
Assault scores a hit on a roll of 2 or less. A 4. Move the tank into the second territory. The
Marine unit that enters combat by moving second territory may be an enemy-occupied
from one land territory to another land terri- territory, an enemy-controlled territory, or a
tory may still attack with a roll of 2 or less as friendly territory.
long as at least one friendly unit attacks from a |
a sea zone making the battle an Amphibious A blitzing tank may also move into the first terri-
Assault. tory and back to its starting territory on the same
turn.
e For each artillery unit attacking the same ter-
ritory one Marine unit may attack with a roll Note: An enemy-controlled territory with nothing
of 2 or less. but AA guns is still considered occupied, and may
e For each artillery unit attacking the same ter- not be blitzed through. However, during the
ritory in an Amphibious Assault that is not Resolve Combat phase, a tank which moved into
paired with an infantry unit, one Marine unit the territory automatically takes control of the
may attack with a roll of 3 or less. territory without rolling dice.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Blitz Movement Example
A Japanese infantry unit and a Japanese artillery unit
both move one territory, from Manchuria to the
Suiyuan. A Japanese tank performs a blitz, moving
through Anhwe, a Chinese territory that is currently
empty. The Japanese tank captures Anhwe without a
fight and may join its fellow units for the battle in
Suiyuan.
Diagram 16. Blitzing
NAVAL UNITS
There are five types of naval units; transports,
aircraft carriers, battleships, destroyers and sub-
marines. Naval units may move up to 1 or 2 sea
zones per turn. Each type of ship has its own
strengths.
TRANSPORTS
Movement: 2
Attack Factor: 0
Defense Factor: 1
Cost: 8 IPCs
Description
A transport may carry land units across sea zones
to other land territories and unload them there.
A transport may hold one tank, or two of any
other land unit (including AA guns) in any combi-
nation.
Transports unload into a friendly territory during
the Non-combat Movement phase. When trans-
ports unload into an enemy territory during the
Combat Movement phase, it is called an
Amphibious Assault. (See page 16.)
A transport may move 0, 1 or 2 sea zones, and
unload its land unit(s) in the same move. The land
unit(s) may be picked up before, during or after
©
the transport moves. During play, units being
transported are placed with the transport directly
in the sea zone.
Example: A transport could pick up one infantry unit,
move one zone and pick up an antiaircraft gun, move
into another zone and unload both units in the same
move.
Transports may also pick up two units from two
different territories that are adjacent to the same
sea zone. The units do not have to be unloaded
either — a transport could move up to two sea
zones and remain at sea with the cargo aboard.
However, once a transport unloads, its move is
over. It also may not unload in two different loca-
tions during the same turn, even if the locations
both share the same sea zone. Transports do not
have to unload all of their cargo when unloading.
Transports may also carry any Allied land unit
(except Chinese), but this is a three-step process.
1. The Allied units must board on the Allies
unit's turn.
2. Then, they move (or stay in place) with the
transport on the transport owner's turn.
3. Finally, they are unloaded on the Allies unit's
next turn.
Following are additional rules pertaining to trans-
ports and the units aboard:
* Units may load and unload on the same turn,
only if the units belong to the same power as
the transport, and the transport has not been
in combat before loading.
* Moving a land unit into and out of a trans-
port counts as that land unit's full move. The
land unit may not move to additional territo-
ries after landing, nor may it move to a terri-
tory and then board a transport on the same
turn.
* A transport may not load or unload its cargo
directly to or from another transport.
е A transport that has been in combat may
load OR unload after combat, but not both.
It may not move.
e A transport that starts a turn with enemy
ships in the same sea zone may not load or
unload in that sea zone, unless an
Amphibious Assault is being made. It may
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
move out of an enemy-filled sea zone and unload in that zone, the transport may move. It moves
into a friendly or empty sea zone, where it into sea zone 32, where it picks up two infantry units,
may load or unload normally. A transport one from each of two territories, Queensland and
that moves in this way is not considered to Northern Territory. It then moves a second space to sea
havebeen incon bar mie tir zone 33 and unloads both infantry units into Dutch
: New Guinea.
е A transport must unload all units into the
same territory. It may not split units into two
adas Another transport in sea zone 43 also starts in a space
E with an enemy sub. It moves to sea zone 47 and joins
e Transports may not attack, but may defend in two British destroyers, which now battle the Japanese
sea zones. submarine that is present. The Japanese submarine is
sunk, with no loss to the British. Since the transport was
* Any land units aboard a transport that is in combat (but now has a clear sea zone), it may unload
attacked may not fire back. If the transport is or load units, but not both. An infantry unit in Malaya
destroyed, the land units aboard also "go enters the transport, but may not be unloaded (into
down with the ship" and are removed. DUE, 3013 i,
Transport Movement Example
On Great Britain's turn, it uses several transports. The
transport next to Queensland in sea zone 29 picks up
two infantry units, moves two zones to sea zone 33 and
unloads the two units into Dutch New Guinea. The
transport next to Papua in sea zone 28 starts its turn in
the presence of an enemy sub. It may not load nor
Diagram 17. Transports
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AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
BATTLESHIPS
Movement: 2
Attack Factor: 4
Defense Factor: 4
Cost: 24 IPCs
Description
Battleships attack and defend in sea zones. These
powerful (and expensive) ships attack and defend
with a die roll of 4 or less, and must be hit twice
in the same battle to be destroyed. On the first
hit, the ship is laid on its side.
Diagram 18. Carriers
It may still attack and defend normally. If hit a
second time, the ship is removed. If it does not
receive a second hit, it is considered repaired and
turned upright at the end of the turn.
Battleships may also support attacks on enemy
occupied coastal territories or islands. (See
Amphibious Assaults section on page 16 for
details.)
Note: If a battleship takes the hit from a subma-
rine's First-strike attack, then the battleship may
still fire back against the sub. However, if that
battleship takes a second hit from the sub's
attack, it gets no counter-shot. (See Submarine
First-strike rules on page 14.)
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS
Movement: 2
Attack Factor: 1
Defense Factor: 3
Cost: 18 IPCs
Description
Aircraft carriers have strong defensive capabili-
ties. They may attack and defend only in sea
zones. Carriers attack with a roll of 1 and defend
with a roll of 3 or less.
Aircraft carriers may carry (or provide landing
spots) for up to two Allied fighter planes. Allied
fighter planes may take off and land on a friend-
ly aircraft carrier on their respective turns.
Aircraft carriers may be moved during the Non-
combat Movement phase to allow fighters to
land on them when they would otherwise be out
of range.
Aircraft carriers and fighter planes "interact"
with each other somewhat differently depending
upon whether or not it is the carrier's turn.
If you own the carrier and it is your turn:
You must own the fighter aboard your aircraft
carrier in order to move the fighter and/or attack
with it. It must also take off before you move the
carrier. If the fighter doesn’t take off before you
move the carrier, the fighter is treated as cargo
for the remainder of your turn and may not fly,
fight or be used as a casualty. An Allied fighter
on your carrier may not take off, as it is not the
Allied fighter's turn.
If a fighter lands upon your aircraft carrier during
your turn, you may not move the carrier for the
remainder of that turn.
If you own the carrier and it is the enemy's turn:
If your carrier is defending against an attack, any
fighters aboard are allowed to defend, and may
be used as casualties instead of the carrier (except
against a successful submarine attack). If your car-
rier is destroyed, your fighters may move up to
one space to find a friendly carrier, island or terri-
tory on which to land. The landing site must have
been controlled by you (or under Allied control)
since the beginning of the turn. If your fighters
don't find a safe place to land, they are consid-
ered lost.
Aircraft Carrier Movement Example
The US player wants to move fighter planes from an air-
craft carrier in sea zone 10 to attack the Japanese trans-
port and submarine in sea zone 24. The fighters fly
three spaces to sea zone 24 ahead of the carrier.
On the first round, the fighters roll a 2, scoring a hit
and a 4 which is a miss. Japan must select a casualty.
Since a fighter may not attack a submarine without a
destroyer present, Japan must select the transport as a
casualty. The two infantry units aboard are also lost.
Japan returns fire with the transport and misses with a
2. The sub cannot fire back because it may not attack
air units.
Since subs and fighters may not attack each other, the
battle is over and the fighters must find a place to land.
During the Non-combat Movement phase, the US player
moves his aircraft carrier two spaces to sea zone 19. The
two fighters then move one space to land back on the
carrier.
On Japan's turn, the Japanese submarine moves into sea
zone 19 to attack the US carrier. With its first-strike
capability, the sub manages to sink the carrier. (The car-
rier must be selected as a loss against a sub attack.) The
two fighters are considered to be defending in the air,
but may not attack the sub. They must now find a place
to land that is one space away.
Since there is only ocean or the Japanese-held Wake
Island one space away, the fighters are also lost.
DESTROYERS
Movement: 2
Attack Factor: 3
Defense Factor: 3
Cost: 12 IPCs
Description
Destroyers attack and defend in sea zones with a
die roll of 3 or less. They may also support attacks
on enemy-occupied coastal territories or islands.
(See Amphibious Assaults section on page 16 for
details.) Destroyers are particularly effective
against submarines. They eliminate an attacking
submarine's first-strike ability and also allow
friendly air units to attack enemy submarines.
If all destroyers in a battle are taken as casualties,
then fighter planes lose the ability to attack sub-
marines, and submarines regain their first-strike
capability, if applicable.
When conducting shore bombardment in support
of an Amphibious Assault, destroyers roll a 2 or less
to hit, not their normal attack factor of 3 or less.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Japanese Destroyers
A Japanese destroyer may transport one infantry
unit. When loading or unloading an infantry unit
Japanese destroyers follow the same rules as
transport ships, summarized below.
о A Japanese destroyer may carry an
infantry across sea zones to other
land territories and unload it there.
They may unload into a friendly ter-
ritory during the Non-combat
Movement phase. When unloading
into an enemy territory during the
Combat Movement phase, it is called
an Amphibious Assault. (See page
16.)
* A Japanese destroyer that lands a
unit during an Amphibious Assault
may not conduct shore bombard-
ment. It may, however, participate in
a naval battle prior to the
Amphibious Assault being made.
* The destroyer may move 0, 1 or 2
sea zones, and unload its infantry
unit in the same move. The infantry
unit may be picked up before, dur-
ing or after the destroyer moves.
During play, units being transported
are placed with the destroyer direct-
ly in the sea zone.
* Once a Japanese destroyer unloads,
its move is over.
* An infantry unit may be loaded and
unloaded on the same turn.
e Moving an infantry unit into and
out of a destroyer counts as that
infantry unit's full move. The unit
may not move to additional territo-
ries after landing, nor may it move
to a territory and then board a
destroyer on the same turn.
* A destroyer may not load or unload
its cargo directly to or from another
destroyer or transport.
* A destroyer that has been in combat
may load OR unload after combat,
but not both. It may not move.
* À destroyer that starts a turn with
enemy ships in the same sea zone
may not load or unload in that sea
zone, unless an Amphibious Assault
Is going to be made. It may move
out of an enemy-filled sea zone and
into a friendly or empty zone, where
it may load or unload normally. A
transport that moves in this way is
not considered to have been in com-
bat this turn.
° An infantry unit aboard a destroyer
that is attacked may not fire back. If
the destroyer is sunk, the infantry
unit aboard also "goes down with
the ship" and is removed.
SUBMARINES
Movement: 2
Attack Factor:2
Defense Factor: 2
Cost: 8 IPCs
Description
Submarines attack and defend in sea zones. They
are relatively inexpensive, but they only attack
and defend with a die roll of 2 or less.
Following are a variety of rules pertaining to sub-
marines:
о Attacking submarines have a deadly first-strike
capability that is negated only by the presence
of an enemy destroyer. Defending submarines
do not have a first-strike capability.
* Air units may not attack a submarine unless a
friendly destroyer is also present in the bat-
tle. Submarines may never attack or defend
against air units. (But they may submerge.)
e Both attacking and defending submarines
may submerge to escape combat. They may
do so in the same sea zone during the same
battle. A submerged sub is turned onto its
side to indicate this submerged condition. It
remains on its side and may not attack or be
attacked again this turn. Submerged subs are
returned to their upright position in Phase 6.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
e Submarines are the only defending units in
the game that may leave a battle (by sub-
merging).
e Submerged submarines are not considered to
be present in a sea zone in which they are
submerged. Therefore, any naval unit may
move into or through that sea zone and
transports may load/unload during the
Non-combat Movement phase.
Japanese Submarines vs. Allied Ships
If an Allied player attacks a Japanese submarine
while other Allied naval units are present in the
same sea zone — and the Japanese sub successfully
returns fire — then the Allies may chose any one of
their ships as the casualty.
Example
Great Britain's turn: The British attack a Japanese sub
that then submerges. At the end of the British player's
turn, the sub resurfaces among the British ships.
United States’ turn: During the Combat Movement
phase, the United States moves into the same sea zone
as the Japanese sub and attacks it.
Following the United States’ attack on the submarine,
the sub may do either one of the following:
A. If the sub was hit, it may still take a "parting shot"
at the Allied ships present.
OR
В. If the sub was not hit, it may either submerge
again or fire back.
Either way, the combined Allied forces must chose one
of their ships as a casualty should the sub have a suc-
cessful hit.
Submarine Combat Example
Two Japanese submarines attack an American naval
force of one battleship and one destroyer with two sub-
marines. The Japanese player rolls two dice, hoping for
a 2 or lower. The roll is two 2s — two hits! The American
player tips his battleship on its side, showing it has
taken one hit. He then selects the destroyer as a casual-
ty, moving it into the Casualties area. Because the
destroyer is present, the submarine First-strike rule does
not apply. (See page 14). The American player rolls two
dice, hoping for a 3 with his destroyer and a 4 with his
battleship. The destroyer misses with a 5, but the battle-
ship hits with a 4. Japan loses a submarine.
In the second round, the Japanese submarine now gets
a first shot because there is no longer a destroyer in the
battle. The sub misses with a roll of a 5. The battleship
counterattacks, but misses with a 6. Not wishing to
push his luck, the Japanese player decides to submerge
the remaining submarine and tips it on its side.
With the sub submerged, the battle is over. At the end
of Japan's turn, both the submarine and the battleship
are uprighted. On the United States’ turn, combat will
resume in this sea zone unless the American moves the
battleship out during the Combat Movement phase.
Aircraft
There are two types of air units — fighters and
bombers. Air units may not capture territories,
but may enter combat and then return to a
friendly territory. Air units are the only units able
to attack and defend both in territories and sea
zones.
FIGHTERS
Movement: 4
Attack Factor: 3
Defense Factor: 4
Cost: 12 IPCs
Description
Fighter planes are very strong defensively,
although they have a limited flying range of four
spaces. Fighters attack with a roll of 3 or less and
defend with a roll of 4 or less. Fighters that fly
out to attack during the Combat Movement
phase, must land during the Non-combat
Movement phase. Fighters may also escort friend-
ly bombers or attack enemy air units during
Strategic Bombing Raids. (See page 19.)
Note: The Hellcats are provided for the American
player as well as the green P-38 Lightning. These
are both fighters and operate in exactly the same
way.
Combat Air Patrol (CAP)
A fighter plane may establish a Combat Air Patrol
CAP during the Non-combat Movement phase.
See page 24 for details.
AXIS AND ALLIES PACIFIC GAMEPLAY MANUAL
Following are some additional fighter
plane rules:
* Fighter planes on an island or island group
do not take part in a naval battle in the
adjacent, or surrounding, sea zone.
* Fighters may not be sent on "suicide runs"
where they go into combat with no place to
land afterward. However, fighters may be
sent on "risky" missions. These are combat
movements that need an aircraft carrier to
move (or survive) in order to land. If, during
combat, the aircraft carrier is lost, then the
fighters must finish their movements by land-
ing in another safe territory or carrier within
range. If unable to do this, the fighters are
lost.
* When fighters are sent on risky missions as
described above, you must declare up front
where each plane plans to land after combat
Is complete. For example, you may not move
a bunch of fighters into battle assuming
some will be lost so that there will be
enough room to land the surviving fighters
on nearby carriers.
* If you move a fighter its full four-space range
into battle with the intent of landing it on a
carrier in that battle, then you may not later
decide to retreat this fighter with other units.
If you do retreat your other units, the plane
Is destroyed. It may not land on the carrier
when the carrier retreats.
* Only fighters may land and take off from air-
craft carriers. No more than two fighters are
allowed on an aircraft carrier. If a fighter on
a carrier wants to take off and attack, it must
do so from where the carrier is positioned at
the start of its turn. When taking off from a
carrier, do not count the carrier's sea zone as
one space.
Note: There are other special rules for fighter
planes aboard aircraft carriers. These rules are
explained in the Aircraft Carriers section on
page 31 & 32.
©
BOMBERS
Movement: 6
Attack Factor: 4
Defense Factor: 1
Cost: 15 IPCs
Description
Bombers attack with a roll of 4 or less and defend
with a roll of 1. Bombers may fly the farthest,
but they cost more than fighters. Bombers that
fly out to attack during the Combat Movement
phase, must land during the Non-Combat
Movement phase. Bombers may also conduct
Strategic Bombing Raids. (See page 19.) They may
not do both on one turn.
Bombers must land in a friendly land territory
(including an island or island group) within
range. They may not land in territories you just
captured, nor may they land on aircraft carriers.
Bombers may not be sent on "suicide runs"
where they go into combat with no place to land
afterward.
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