Dell PowerVault DP600 storage Operations Guide

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Dell PowerVault DP600 storage Operations Guide | Manualzz

System Center Data Protection

Manager 2007 Operations Guide

Microsoft Corporation

Published: Sep 2007

Abstract

This guide provides recommendations for monitoring and managing DPM servers, tape libraries, protected file servers and workstations, and protected servers running SQL Server, Exchange

Server, and Windows SharePoint Services. The guide also provides instructions for disaster recovery.

The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of

Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.

This White Paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES,

EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT.

Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from

Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.

Contents

Managing DPM Servers .................................................................................................................. 9

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance ........................................................................... 9

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server ........................................................ 10

Applying Operating System Updates to the DPM Server ....................................................... 11

Running Antivirus Software on the DPM Server ..................................................................... 12

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks ............................................................................ 13

Managing the DPM Database Volume ................................................................................... 14

Finding DPM Servers in Active Directory Domain Services ................................................... 14

How to Migrate a DPM Server to New Hardware ................................................................... 15

Restarting the DPM Server ..................................................................................................... 16

Moving the DPM Server to a New Domain ............................................................................. 16

Renaming the DPM Server ..................................................................................................... 17

Changing the SQL Server Instance Used by DPM ................................................................. 17

Coordinating Protection Across Time Zones .......................................................................... 17

How to Change the Time Zone of the DPM Server ................................................................ 19

Managing the Storage Pool ........................................................................................................ 19

Adding Disks to the Storage Pool ........................................................................................... 20

How to Replace a Disk in the Storage Pool ............................................................................ 21

Removing a Disk from the Storage Pool ................................................................................ 22

Monitoring DPM Server .............................................................................................................. 22

Establishing a Monitoring Schedule ........................................................................................ 23

Locating Information ............................................................................................................... 23

Methods for Monitoring DPM .................................................................................................. 25

Monitoring with DPM Administrator Console ....................................................................... 26

Monitoring with Reports and Alert Notifications .................................................................. 31

Monitoring with DPM Management Packs .......................................................................... 32

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations ..................................................................... 33

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations ........................................ 33

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations ................................. 34

Applying Operating System Updates on File Servers and Workstations ............................... 35

Running Antivirus Software on File Servers and Workstations .............................................. 36

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks ................................................... 36

Changing the Path of a Data Source ...................................................................................... 36

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains ..................................................... 37

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation ........................................................................ 38

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation ............................................. 39

Managing Clustered File Servers ............................................................................................... 39

Changing File Server Cluster Members ................................................................................. 40

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered File Servers ......................................................... 40

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange ......................................................................... 41

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Exchange ............................................ 41

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers .................................................... 42

Performing Exchange Maintenance Tasks ............................................................................. 42

Applying Operating System Updates on Exchange Servers .................................................. 43

Running Antivirus Software on Exchange Servers ................................................................. 43

Performing Exchange Server Management Tasks .................................................................... 43

Upgrading Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange Server 2007 ................................................ 43

Moving Exchange Servers Between Domains ....................................................................... 44

How to Rename an Exchange Server .................................................................................... 45

Adding Storage Groups and Databases ................................................................................. 45

Dismounting Databases .......................................................................................................... 46

Changing the Path of a Database or Log File ........................................................................ 46

Renaming Storage Groups ..................................................................................................... 47

Moving Databases Between Storage Groups ........................................................................ 47

Managing Clustered Exchange Servers .................................................................................... 48

Changing Exchange Server Cluster Members ....................................................................... 48

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered Exchange Servers ............................................... 49

Recovering Exchange Data ....................................................................................................... 49

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location ...................................................... 50

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location .............................................................. 51

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database .......................................................... 52

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder ................................................................. 53

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape .................................................................................... 54

Recovering Mailboxes ............................................................................................................ 55

How to Recover an Exchange 2003 Mailbox ...................................................................... 56

How to Recover an Exchange 2007 Mailbox ...................................................................... 57

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers ................................................................................... 60

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server ....................................................................... 61

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running SQL ..................................................... 62

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers ............................................................. 62

Performing SQL Maintenance Tasks ...................................................................................... 63

Applying Operating System Updates on SQL Servers ........................................................... 63

Running Antivirus Software on SQL Servers .......................................................................... 63

Performing SQL Server Management Tasks ............................................................................. 63

Upgrading SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2005 ................................................................. 64

Moving SQL Servers Between Domains ................................................................................ 64

How to Rename a Computer Running SQL Server ................................................................ 65

Changing the Recovery Model of a Database ........................................................................ 66

Replacing a Disk on a SQL Server ......................................................................................... 67

Adding Databases to a SQL Server ........................................................................................ 67

Changing the Path of a SQL Server Database ....................................................................... 67

Renaming a SQL Server Database ........................................................................................ 67

Managing Clustered SQL Servers ............................................................................................. 67

Changing SQL Server Cluster Members ................................................................................ 67

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered SQL Servers ........................................................ 68

Recovering SQL Server Data ..................................................................................................... 68

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location ..................................................... 69

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database ..................................................................... 70

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server ...................................... 71

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder ............................................................... 72

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape .................................................................................. 73

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups ................................... 74

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services ......................................... 75

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services ............ 75

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers ................... 76

Performing Windows SharePoint Services Maintenance Tasks ............................................ 76

Applying Operating System Updates on Windows SharePoint Services Servers .................. 76

Running Antivirus Software on Windows SharePoint Services Servers ................................ 77

Performing Windows SharePoint Services Management Tasks ............................................... 77

Upgrading Windows SharePoint Services .............................................................................. 77

Moving Windows SharePoint Services Servers Between Domains ....................................... 78

How to Rename a Windows SharePoint Services Server ...................................................... 78

Changing the Front-End Web Server ..................................................................................... 79

Adding Databases to a Windows SharePoint Services Farm ................................................ 80

Adding or Removing Servers in a Windows SharePoint Services Farm ................................ 81

Recovering Windows SharePoint Services Data ....................................................................... 81

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Farm ........................................................ 82

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Site........................................................... 83

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Item .......................................................... 84

Managing Protected Virtual Servers .............................................................................................. 85

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Virtual Server ...................................... 85

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server............................................................ 86

Applying Operating System Updates on Virtual Server .......................................................... 86

Running Antivirus Software on Virtual Server ........................................................................ 87

Performing Virtual Server Management Tasks .......................................................................... 87

Moving Virtual Servers Between Domains ............................................................................. 87

How to Rename Virtual Servers ............................................................................................. 88

Renaming Virtual Machines .................................................................................................... 88

Moving a Virtual Machine or Virtual Hard Disk ....................................................................... 89

Protecting Application Data on Virtual Machines .................................................................... 89

Recovering Virtual Server Data .................................................................................................. 90

How to Recover the Virtual Server Host ................................................................................. 90

How to Recover a Virtual Machine ......................................................................................... 91

How to Recover Virtual Machines as Files ............................................................................. 92

Managing Performance ................................................................................................................. 93

How DPM Operations Affect Performance ................................................................................ 93

Replica Creation ..................................................................................................................... 94

Change Tracking ..................................................................................................................... 95

Synchronization ...................................................................................................................... 96

Consistency Check ................................................................................................................. 96

Express Full Backup ............................................................................................................... 97

Backup to Tape ....................................................................................................................... 97

DPM Processes ...................................................................................................................... 97

DPM and Memory ...................................................................................................................... 98

Performance Counters ............................................................................................................... 98

Improving Performance ............................................................................................................ 100

Modifying Workloads ............................................................................................................ 101

Using Network Bandwidth Usage Throttling ...................................................................... 102

Using On-the-Wire Compression ...................................................................................... 103

Staggering Synchronization Start Times ........................................................................... 103

Scheduling Consistency Checks ....................................................................................... 104

Creating Replicas Manually ............................................................................................... 105

Increasing Capacity .............................................................................................................. 105

Managing DPM Performance on a WAN ................................................................................. 106

How Protection Group Changes Affect Jobs ........................................................................... 106

Managing Tape Libraries ............................................................................................................. 108

Updating Tape Library Information........................................................................................... 108

Remapping Tape Drives .......................................................................................................... 109

Disabling Tape Libraries and Tape Drives ............................................................................... 110

Removing Tape Libraries ......................................................................................................... 110

Managing the Tape Catalog ..................................................................................................... 111

Cleaning Tape Drives ............................................................................................................... 111

Managing Tapes....................................................................................................................... 112

How to Add and Remove Tapes ........................................................................................... 112

How to Identify Tapes ........................................................................................................... 113

How to Import Tapes ............................................................................................................ 115

How to View Tape Contents ................................................................................................. 115

Rotating Tapes Offsite .......................................................................................................... 116

How to Copy Tapes .............................................................................................................. 116

How to Inventory Tapes ........................................................................................................ 117

Recovering Data from Tapes ................................................................................................... 118

Disaster Recovery ....................................................................................................................... 118

Preparing for Disaster Recovery .............................................................................................. 119

Best Practices for Disaster Recovery ................................................................................... 120

Backup of Protected Computer System State ...................................................................... 121

Backup of DPM Servers ....................................................................................................... 123

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server ...................................................... 123

Backing Up DPM Databases to Tape................................................................................ 126

Backing Up DPM by Using Third-Party Software .............................................................. 127

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports DPM ......................................... 127

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports VSS .......................................... 128

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Does Not Support VSS ............................ 129

Backup for Bare Metal Recovery .......................................................................................... 130

Installing DPM System Recovery Tool .............................................................................. 131

Configuring Backups for Bare Metal Recovery ................................................................. 132

Recovery .................................................................................................................................. 132

Switching Protection If the Primary DPM Server Fails ......................................................... 133

Recovering Protected Computers ......................................................................................... 135

Recovering DPM Servers ..................................................................................................... 137

How to Recover DPM Databases ...................................................................................... 137

How to Recover DPM Replicas ......................................................................................... 137

How to Reestablish Protection After Recovering the Primary DPM Server ...................... 138

How to Perform a Bare Metal Recovery ............................................................................... 139

Using DpmSync .................................................................................................................... 139

Using Pre-Backup and Post-Backup Scripts ............................................................................ 141

Appendix A: Quick Reference to DPM Tasks .............................................................................. 142

Appendix B: DPM 2007 Schema Extension ................................................................................ 143

Appendix C: Custom Report Views ............................................................................................. 146

Managing DPM Servers

As a system administrator, you are accustomed to managing servers in different roles. You plan your maintenance routines to accommodate each server’s role, and you take that role into account when making structural changes such as changing the server name or relocating the server. So what do you need to consider when the role of a server running System Center Data

Protection Manager (DPM) is added to your network structure?

This section discusses performing common maintenance tasks on DPM servers. It provides guidance on making changes to server configurations after DPM is set up and on how DPM manages time zones. This section provides information about configuring firewalls on both the

DPM server and protected computers so that communication can be maintained. This section also provides recommendations for monitoring DPM and offers methods for monitoring.

In This Section

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Managing the Storage Pool

Monitoring DPM Server

See Also

Disaster Recovery

Managing Performance

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

Managing Tape Libraries

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups. Some special considerations apply when you are performing server maintenance on

DPM servers.

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In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Applying Operating System Updates to the DPM Server

Running Antivirus Software on the DPM Server

See Also

Managing the Storage Pool

Monitoring DPM Server

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

In general, you can add the DPM server to your regular maintenance schedule and use the maintenance tools provided in Windows Server 2003. However, you need to be aware of some considerations that apply to a few specific tools when you use them with DPM. Those tools are listed in the following table.

Windows Maintenance Tools and DPM

Windows Tool Considerations

Disk Cleanup : Use to remove temporary files,

Internet cache files, and unnecessary program files.

Disk Cleanup is not available for replica volumes and recovery points volumes in the

DPM storage pool.

Disk Defragmenter : Use to analyze volumes for the amount of fragmentation and to defragment volumes.

You should not run Disk Defragmenter on disks that are members of the storage pool on the

DPM server. Knowledge Base article 312067 explains the issue with Disk Defragmenter as follows:

"The System Shadow Copy provider uses a copy-on-write mechanism that operates at a 16-

KB block level. This is independent of the file system's cluster allocation unit size. If the file system's cluster size is smaller than 16 KB, the

System Shadow Copy provider cannot easily determine that disk defragmentation I/O is different from typical write I/O, and performs a copy-on-write operation. This might cause the

Shadow Copy storage area to grow very quickly. If the storage area reaches its userdefined limit, the oldest shadow copies are deleted first."

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Windows Tool Considerations

For more information about this issue, see the

Microsoft Knowledge Base article Shadow copies may be lost when you defragment a volume

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=65210).

Chkdsk.exe

: Use to check the file system and file system metadata for errors and to display a status report of its findings.

Do not run chkdisk on DPM replica and recovery point volumes. Chkdsk causes the volumes to dismount, and if data is written to the replica volume while the recovery point volume is dismounted, it might cause a complete loss of recovery points.

See Also

Applying Operating System Updates to the DPM Server

Running Antivirus Software on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Applying Operating System Updates to the DPM Server

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, both on DPM servers and on protected computers. Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

You should also check regularly for updates to DPM and prerequisite software. The prerequisite software is as follows:

Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0

Microsoft Software Quality Metrics (SQM)

Microsoft SQL Server 2005

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1)

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Updates to DPM are available through Microsoft Update, which is a service from Microsoft that delivers required updates from the Microsoft Update Catalog. The Microsoft Update Catalog is a repository for Microsoft software updates and contains updates that address security and reliability issues. The Microsoft Update service queries the Microsoft Update Catalog to determine what updates are available for the computer that Microsoft Update is installed on.

You can subscribe to Microsoft Update at any time on the Microsoft Update Web site

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=41291).

See Also

Running Antivirus Software on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Running Antivirus Software on the DPM Server

To prevent file conflicts between DPM and antivirus software, on the DPM server, disable realtime monitoring by the antivirus software of the following directories in the DPM program files:

\XSD

\Temp\MTA

DPM is compatible with most popular antivirus software products. However, antivirus products can affect DPM performance and, if not configured properly, can cause data corruption of replicas and recovery points. To mitigate these issues, consider taking the following actions:

Disable real-time monitoring of dpmra.exe on the DPM server.

To minimize performance degradation, disable antivirus real-time monitoring of replicas and transfer logs for all protected volumes by disabling real-time monitoring of the DPM process dpmra.exe, which is located in the folder Program Files\Microsoft Data Protection

Manager\DPM\bin.

Real-time monitoring of replicas degrades performance because it causes the antivirus software to scan the replicas each time DPM synchronizes with the protected server and to scan all affected files each time DPM applies changes to the replicas. The problem is resolved when you disable the feature for the replicas. For information about configuring realtime monitoring based on process name, see your antivirus product documentation.

Disable real-time monitoring of csc.exe on the DPM server.

If you experience degraded performance while using DPM Administrator Console, disable real-time monitoring of the csc.exe process, which is located in the folder

Windows\Microsoft.net\Framework\v2.0.50727\csc.exe. The csc.exe process is the C# compiler. Real-time monitoring of the csc.exe process can degrade performance because it causes the antivirus software to scan files that the csc.exe process emits when it generates

XML messages. For information about configuring real-time monitoring based on process name, see your antivirus product documentation.

Delete infected files on protected servers and the DPM server.

12

To prevent data corruption of replicas and recovery points, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that DPM cannot detect.

Whenever DPM attempts to synchronize a replica that has been modified by another program, data corruption of the replica and recovery points can result. Configuring the antivirus software to delete infected files resolves this problem. For information about configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

Important

You must run a manual synchronization with consistency check job each time that the antivirus software deletes a file from the replica, even though the replica will not be marked as inconsistent.

See Also

Applying Operating System Updates to the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

This section provides instructions and guidelines for managing the DPM server and making changes after the initial DPM configuration.

In This Section

Managing the DPM Database Volume

Finding DPM Servers in Active Directory Domain Services

How to Migrate a DPM Server to New Hardware

Restarting the DPM Server

Moving the DPM Server to a New Domain

Renaming the DPM Server

Changing the SQL Server Instance Used by DPM

Coordinating Protection Across Time Zones

How to Change the Time Zone of the DPM Server

See Also

Managing the Storage Pool

Monitoring DPM Server

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance

13

Managing the DPM Database Volume

The DPM database (DPMDB) location is specified during DPM installation. When you use the dedicated instance of SQL Server installed by DPM, the default location of DPMDB is C:\Program

Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\DPMDB. When you use an existing instance of SQL Server for DPM, the default location of DPMDB is the path on the SQL Server where the SQL databases are located.

To determine which instance of SQL Server is being used by DPM, in DPM Administrator

Console, click the Information icon.

Space in the volume on which DPMDB is stored can be increased by the following methods:

Deleting unneeded files from that volume (such as temporary files)

Increasing the size of the volume

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Finding DPM Servers in Active Directory Domain Services

Active Directory Domain Services is designed to provide information about directory objects when queried by either users or programs. When you install DPM on a server that is a member of a domain, a service connection point is registered in Active Directory Domain Services. The information registered with the service connection point makes it possible for you to search Active

Directory Domain Services to locate computers running DPM.

Note

If DPM is installed on a server that is not a member of a domain and the server is then added to a domain, the service connection point will not be registered in Active Directory

Domain Services.

To locate DPM servers in Active Directory Domain Services, use a query tool such as Adsiedit to find all computers in the domain that have a “serviceClassName=MSDPM” service connection point.

Note

Adsiedit is a Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in that is available when you install the Windows Server 2003 Support Tools. For more information about using

Adsiedit, see Adsiedit Overview on the Windows Server 2003 TechCenter

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=50377).

To install Windows Server 2003 support tools

1. Insert the Windows Server 2003 CD.

2. Browse to the \support\tools directory.

3. Double-click the suptools.msi file name.

14

To locate DPM servers by using Adsiedit

1. Run adsiedit.msc.

2. Right-click the Domain node, point to New , and then click Query .

3. Enter a name for the query, such as “MSDPM Servers.”

4. Choose the Machines node as the root of the search.

5. In Query String , enter serviceClassName=MSDPM .

6. Click OK to display a query node under the Domain node.

7. Select the query node; the servers on which DPM is installed are displayed in the list pane.

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

How to Migrate a DPM Server to New Hardware

To ensure data source protection and availability of recovery points across the process, you should create a plan for the DPM server migration process, including considerations of the following factors:

The service level agreement (SLA) that you need to maintain for the period of the migration.

The length of time that you can continue running the existing DPM server before retiring or repurposing it.

Maintenance windows for the protected computers.

To migrate a DPM server to new hardware,

1. Install DPM on a new server. For more information, see Installing DPM

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91851).

2. Identify a protected computer to migrate and carry out the following steps: a. On the existing DPM server, stop protection for all data, choosing to retain replicas for this protected computer, and uninstall the protection agent. b. Restart the target computer. c. Install the protection agent from the new DPM server to the selected computer. d. Restart the protected computer. e. Repeat for all protected computers.

3. Create protection groups on the new DPM server for the protected computers. For more information, see Configuring DPM (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91852).

4. Maintain the previous DPM server until the recovery points from inactive replicas on it are no longer required.

15

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Restarting the DPM Server

If you need to restart the DPM server for any reason, check the Monitoring task area in DPM

Administrator Console for jobs currently running, and then follow these guidelines:

If there are no jobs currently running or scheduled to run during the time required for the restart, restart the DPM server.

If a synchronization with consistency check job is running, restart the DPM server.

Synchronization with consistency check will resume at the next scheduled time or you can retry the job manually.

If a replica creation job is running, postpone the restart until the job is completed. If the restart cannot be postponed, you must run synchronization with consistency check manually for the replica after you restart the DPM server.

If any synchronizations or express full backups are scheduled to run during the restart, either postpone the restart until the recovery points are created or re-run the synchronizations and create the recovery points manually after you restart the DPM server.

If any jobs that use the tape library are running, postpone the restart until the jobs are complete. If the restart cannot be postponed, the following job types will be canceled by the restart and must be re-run after the restart:

Back up to tape

Copy to tape

Recovery from tape

Tape verification

If you are erasing a tape, postpone the restart until the current job is complete. Cancel any pending tape erase jobs, restart the computer, and then reschedule the canceled tape erase jobs.

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Moving the DPM Server to a New Domain

We recommend that you avoid changing the domain of the DPM server because doing so causes all protection and recovery operations to fail.

If it essential that you change the domain membership of a DPM server, you must stop protection of the protection group members assigned to that DPM server and then restart protection of those data sources, either by adding them to protection groups on another DPM server or adding them to new protection groups on the same DPM server after you change its domain.

16

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Renaming the DPM Server

Renaming the DPM Server

We recommend that you avoid changing the name of the DPM server because doing so causes all protection and recovery operations to fail.

If it essential that you change the name of a DPM server, you must stop protection of the protection group members assigned to that DPM server and then restart protection of those data sources, either by adding them to protection groups on another DPM server or adding them to new protection groups on the same DPM server after you change its name.

See Also

Moving the DPM Server to a New Domain

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Changing the SQL Server Instance Used by DPM

DPM uses a specified instance of SQL Server to stores its database. You specify the instance of

SQL Server that DPM will use during the DPM installation process. It is possible to change the instance of SQL Server that a DPM server uses only by uninstalling and reinstalling DPM.

If you need to change the instance of SQL Server for a DPM server, use the following process:

1. Ensure that you have a recent backup of the DPM database (DPMDB).

2. Uninstall DPM and choose to retain data.

3. Install DPM and choose a new instance of SQL Server. For more information, see Installing

DPM (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91851).

4. Restore DPMDB to the new instance of SQL Server, run DpmSync, and run a consistency check for the data sources protected by the DPM server.

The process depends on the availability of a backup of the DPM database. For more information

about backing up and restoring the DPM database, see Disaster Recovery .

See Also

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Installing DPM

Coordinating Protection Across Time Zones

In an Active Directory domain, the system times on servers are synchronized according to the time zone configuration of each server. However, when a DPM server is protecting computers

17

that are in a different time zone from the DPM server, you must consider the time differences when scheduling jobs, reviewing reports, managing alerts, and performing data recovery.

How DPM Displays Times

DPM automatically schedules synchronization and recovery point jobs in the time zone of the protected computer. In all other areas of DPM Administrator Console, system times are displayed in the time zone of the DPM server. Although you schedule jobs to run in the time zone of the protected computer, the start times and recovery point times of the jobs are displayed in the time zone of the DPM server.

For example, suppose that your DPM server is located in Berlin and a protected file server is located in Reykjavik, which is two hours earlier than Berlin. When you schedule synchronization and the recovery point for 6:00 P.M., the jobs run at 6:00 P.M. in Reykjavik time, the time on the file server. However, if a user in Reykjavik requests to have data recovered to its state as of

6:00 P.M. yesterday, you must search for the recovery point that represents 8:00 P.M. Berlin time, because the DPM recovery user interface represents recovery point times in the time zone of the DPM server.

In DPM Administrator Console, in the Recovery task area, the Last Modified column displays the date and time of the most recent changes to the file, which could be either changes to the contents or changes to the metadata.

Work hours for network bandwidth usage throttling use the time zone of the protected computer.

Scheduling Initial Replica Creation

Initial replica creation jobs are scheduled by using the time of the DPM server; you cannot schedule a job to run at a time that is already in the past for the DPM server, even if that time is still in the future for the protected computer. In our example of a DPM server in Berlin that is protecting a file server in Reykjavik, there is a two hour difference between the times of the two servers. At 9:00 P.M. Berlin time, you cannot schedule an initial replica creation job for the file server in Reykjavik at 8:00 P.M. on the same day, even though it is not yet 8:00 P.M. in

Reykjavik, because that time is in the past for the DPM server in Berlin.

Initial replica creation jobs occur by using the time of the protected computer. This means that if you schedule an initial replica creation job for the file server in Reykjavik to occur at 9:00 P.M. on a set date, the job will run at 9:00 P.M. Reykjavik time on that day.

Suppose the DPM server in Berlin is also protecting a file server in Sofia, which is an hour later than Berlin. At 8:00 P.M. in Berlin, you schedule an initial replica creation job for the file server in

Sofia to begin at 8:30 P.M. You can schedule it for 8:30 P.M. because that time is in the future for the DPM server. However, because it is already past 8:30 P.M. in Sofia, the initial replica creation will begin immediately.

How DPM Manages Daylight Saving Time

DPM automatically identifies the time zone of a protected computer during installation of the protection agent. Providing that both the DPM server and the protected computer reside in time

18

zones that observe the same rules for daylight saving, DPM also automatically adjusts to accommodate the start and end of daylight saving time. However, if the DPM server and the protected computer reside in locations that observe different rules for daylight saving time—for example, if the DPM server resides in a location that observes daylight saving time and the protected server resides in a location that does not—the start of daylight saving time disrupts the time zone offsets between DPM and the protected computer.

To resolve this problem, you can force the DPM server to reset the time zone offset by removing the data sources from protection and then adding the data sources back to protection groups.

See Also

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

How to Change the Time Zone of the DPM Server

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

How to Change the Time Zone of the DPM Server

You can use the following procedure to change the time zone of the DPM server.

To change the time zone of the DPM server

1. Close DPM Administrator Console.

2. Stop the DPM service (MsDpm.exe).

3. Change the time zone on the DPM server in Control Panel by using the Time Zone tab in the Date and Time Properties dialog box.

4. Open DPM Administrator Console. This action restarts the DPM service as well.

5. In DPM Administrator Console, click Options in the Action pane.

6. In the Options dialog box, on the Auto Discovery tab, change the time of day for auto discovery to run, and then click OK .

Changing the schedule for auto discovery causes all DPM jobs to be regenerated with the new time zone of the DPM server.

See Also

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

Coordinating Protection Across Time Zones

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Managing the Storage Pool

The storage pool is a set of disks on which the DPM server stores the replicas and recovery points for the protected data. DPM can use any of the following for the storage pool:

Direct attached storage (DAS)

19

Fibre Channel storage area network (SAN)

• iSCSI storage device or SAN

The storage pool supports most disk types, including Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE), Serial

Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA), and SCSI, and it supports both the master boot record (MBR) and GUID partition table (GPT) partition styles.

You cannot add USB/1394 disks to the DPM storage pool.

DPM cannot use space in any pre-existing volumes on disks added to the storage pool. Although a pre-existing volume on a storage pool disk might have free space, DPM can use space only in volumes that it creates. To make the entire disk space available to the storage pool, delete any existing volumes on the disk and then add the disk to the storage pool.

Important

Some original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) include a diagnostic partition that is installed from media that they provide. The diagnostic partition might also be named the

OEM partition, or the EISA partition. EISA partitions must be removed from disks before you can add the disk to the DPM storage pool.

In This Section

Adding Disks to the Storage Pool

How to Replace a Disk in the Storage Pool

Removing a Disk from the Storage Pool

See Also

Monitoring DPM Server

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance

Adding Disks to the Storage Pool

DPM cannot use space in any pre-existing volumes on disks added to the storage pool. Although a pre-existing volume on a storage pool disk might have free space, DPM can use space only in volumes that it creates. To make the entire disk space available to the storage pool, delete any existing volumes on the disk and then add the disk to the storage pool.

DPM regularly rescans the disks and volumes in the storage pool and updates the storage pool space. If you add a disk that contains a volume to the storage pool and later delete that volume, when DPM rescans the disk, it will add the new unallocated space to the available storage pool.

If the name of a disk is listed as “Unknown” on the Disks tab in the Management task area of

DPM Administrator Console, you cannot add the disk to the storage pool until the disk name is corrected. To resolve this issue, perform the following procedure.

20

To correct a disk name

1. In Device Manager , expand Disk drives .

2. Right-click each disk listed as "Disk drive", and select Uninstall .

Note

All disks without a friendly name are listed as “Disk Drive.” An example of a friendly name is “HITACHI_DK23EB-40”.

3. On the Action menu, click Scan for hardware changes to reinstall the disk.

See Also

How to Replace a Disk in the Storage Pool

Removing a Disk from the Storage Pool

How to Replace a Disk in the Storage Pool

You can use the following procedure to replace a disk in the storage pool if a disk fails.

To replace a disk in the storage pool

1. In the Disk Management console, identify the replica volumes and recovery point volumes that are stored on the failed disk.

2. Remove protection from the data sources that have replica volumes and recovery point volumes on the failed disk, and select Delete protected data .

3. Physically remove the disk that needs to be replaced.

4. Physically add the replacement disk.

5. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar, and then click the Disks tab.

6. Select the disk that you removed, and in the Actions pane, click Remove .

7. In the Actions pane, click Add .

8. In the Available disks section, select the replacement disk, click Add , and then click OK .

9. Add the data sources from step 2. to an existing protection group, or create a new protection group for these data sources. a. If you create a new protection group and have tape backup of the data sources, create the replicas manually by using the tape backup. b. If you create a new protection group and do not have tape backup of the data sources, allow DPM to create the replicas across the network. c. If you add the data sources to an existing protection group, DPM will start an immediate consistency check, which will re-create the replicas.

Note

For more information, in the TechNet Library, see Configuring DPM

21

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91852).

See Also

Adding Disks to the Storage Pool

Removing a Disk from the Storage Pool

Removing a Disk from the Storage Pool

A storage pool disk is both physically attached to the DPM server and programmatically attached by DPM to the storage pool.

When a disk that belongs to the storage pool is physically removed or fails, DPM sends an alert that there is a missing volume. The missing volume also displays on the Disks tab in the Management task area.

In the missing volume alert Details pane, you will see that there is a link to remove the disk from the storage pool. When you click this link, you remove the programmatic attachment.

If you remove the disk from the storage pool and later bring the disk online again, DPM cannot access the existing data on it. If DPM labels a disk as "missing volume" and you do not remove the disk from the storage pool, when you bring the disk online again, DPM will remap the volumes on the disk and can access the existing data on it.

See Also

Adding Disks to the Storage Pool

How to Replace a Disk in the Storage Pool

Monitoring DPM Server

After you set up data protection, you should monitor DPM activity to verify that everything is working correctly and to troubleshoot any problems that occur. Monitoring is essential to give you an overview of what has already happened, what is currently happening, and what is scheduled to happen. By monitoring DPM, you will know that data protection activities are working as expected, and you will have confidence that errors and warnings will be brought to your attention when they occur.

Note

For information about monitoring server performance, see Managing Performance .

In This Section

Establishing a Monitoring Schedule

Locating Information

Methods for Monitoring DPM

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See Also

Managing Performance

Managing the Storage Pool

Performing DPM Server Management Tasks

Performing General DPM Server Maintenance

Establishing a Monitoring Schedule

After you begin protecting your data, DPM operations require little intervention from you. When a situation does require action, you will be informed by an alert. For information about responding to alerts, see Resolving Alerts in DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102159). We recommend that you establish a monitoring schedule and follow it routinely so that you are aware of trends and troubleshooting issues, and so that you can respond quickly to any problems that require your attention. The following table lists suggestions for a monitoring schedule.

Suggested Monitoring Schedule

At this interval

Daily

Monthly

On Demand

Check these sources

Critical and warning alerts

E-mail notifications (if they are configured)

Status report

And look for this information

Replica issues, synchronization and recovery point creation issues, agent issues, jobs waiting for tape, backup failures

Reports:

Status

Tape Management

Disk Utilization

Recovery job status

Trends and patterns that might indicate problems or potential issues

Recovery job failures

See Also

Locating Information

Managing Performance

Methods for Monitoring DPM

Locating Information

After you implement your monitoring schedule, you will observe certain trends and notice various alerts. You might want to investigate the issues underlying the alerts, troubleshoot problems, or analyze some of the trends. DPM provides a number of resources to help you with your research.

23

The following table lists a number of references that you can use to locate information that will help you answer many common questions.

Information Locations

What do you want to know?

Does anything need my attention?

Are there any changes on the protected computers that affect data protection?

Did all the backups that were supposed to happen yesterday happen correctly?

Is there an issue that keeps coming up?

Are recovery goals being met?

Do I need to add disk space to the storage pool?

Is the DPM server able to contact each protected computer?

What is the status of the DPM service?

What problems have occurred over the past month?

Look here:

E-mail notifications of alerts, if you subscribe to them

Monitoring task area, Alerts tab

Status report

Protection report

When will a job run?

How long did the last consistency check take?

How much data was transferred by the most recent synchronization job?

How many recovery points are available for a data source?

Are all replicas consistent?

What tapes are available in the library?

What data is on each tape?

Did a recovery job complete successfully?

Management task area, Disks tab

Disk Utilization report

Monitoring task area, Jobs tab

Protection task area, Details pane

Recovery task area

Management task area, Libraries tab

Monitoring task area, Alerts tab

Monitoring task area, Jobs tab

E-mail notification (if you subscribe to email notification when you initiate a recovery)

Management task area, Agents tab

Microsoft Management Console (MMC)

Services snap-in

Event log, in case of service failures

Status report

Monitoring task area, Alerts tab,

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What do you want to know?

What is the status of each of my DPM servers and the computers that they protect?

Why is recovery point creation failing for a protection group member?

Look here: with Show inactive alerts selected

MOM Operator console, State view

Status report

See Also

Establishing a Monitoring Schedule

Managing Performance

Methods for Monitoring DPM

Methods for Monitoring DPM

To monitor protection activities, you can use the following methods:

Use DPM Administrator Console to view DPM operations running on a specific DPM server.

Configure DPM to provide reports and notifications of alerts by e-mail. For instructions, see How to Create or Modify Report Subscriptions in DPM Help ( http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102161).

Monitor operations for multiple DPM servers by using the System Center Data Protection

Manager (DPM) Management Pack for Microsoft Operations Manager 2005 or System

Center Operations Manager 2007.

Monitor the instance of SQL Server that DPM installs by using the System Center

SQL Server Management Pack for Microsoft Operations Manager 2005.

In This Section

Monitoring with DPM Administrator Console

Monitoring with Reports and Alert Notifications

Monitoring with DPM Management Packs

See Also

Establishing a Monitoring Schedule

Locating Information

Managing Performance

25

Monitoring with DPM Administrator Console

To use DPM Administrator Console, you must be logged on to a DPM server with an account that has Administrator rights on that server.

This section explains each of the following task areas of DPM Administrator Console and describes the information that each provides:

Monitoring task area

Protection task area

Management task area

Note

You do not need to monitor each task area in DPM Administrator Console. For more

information, see Establishing a Monitoring Schedule .

Monitoring Task Area

The Monitoring task area contains two tabs: Jobs and Alerts .

For monitoring purposes, the Alerts tab provides the more critical information. You should check the Alerts tab daily to provide timely resolution of issues that might be preventing successful protection of data.

Monitoring Task Area: Alerts

What do you look for on the Alerts tab?

Current problems (critical alerts)

Potential problems (warning alerts)

Important activity (informational alerts)

Recommended actions

The Alerts tab displays errors, warnings, and informational messages. You can group alerts by protection group, computer, or severity. You can also choose to display active alerts exclusively or to display both active alerts and inactive alerts (alerts that have been resolved). You can also subscribe to notifications to receive alerts sent by e-mail.

DPM ensures that the Alerts tab reflects the set of issues that are currently active in the system.

When the issue that generated an alert is corrected, the alert becomes inactive. In fact, many issues reported as alerts never require your intervention at all, either because they reflect temporary conditions or because they are self-correcting. For example, an alert that indicates that the DPM server is unable to contact a protected computer might result from a transient network issue; the subsequent attempt might be successful. In some cases, DPM automatically designates an informational alert as inactive after a predefined period of time. A "Recovery collection completed successfully" alert, for example, becomes inactive three days after the recovery is completed.

DPM enables you to mark alerts as inactive. Marking alerts as inactive can be done for a variety of reasons, such as when the alert is no longer meaningful or if you do not plan to resolve the

26

alert. For example, you see failure alerts for the past three days for a data source that is configured for daily backups to tape. You decide to rerun only the latest failed backup job. In this situation, you might want to mark the alerts for the previous failures as inactive.

When you mark an alert as inactive, the protection status for the protection group will change to OK in DPM Administrator Console and in the DPM Management Pack.

For more information, see the “Resolving Alerts” section in Data Protection Manager Help.

As a general guideline, we recommend that you do the following:

View active alerts when you want to focus on active, current issues.

Use inactive alerts as a source of information when you want to identify trends or analyze issues.

Mark alerts as inactive only when you are sure that you need not address the issue.

Note

Marking an alert as inactive should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and should not be done except when absolutely necessary.

Monitoring Task Area: Jobs

What do you look for on the Jobs tab?

When jobs ran

When jobs are scheduled to run

Which jobs of a specific type are scheduled

Which jobs are scheduled for a protected computer

Which jobs are scheduled for a protection group

Which jobs did not complete successfully and why

How long jobs took to run

The amount of data transferred for a job

Number of files scanned during a consistency check

Which tape and library resources were used

The Jobs tab displays the status of jobs. You can group jobs by protection group, computer, status, or type. You can also create filters to customize the view of jobs according to any combination of job parameters.

Detailed information for each job is available only on the Jobs tab in the Details pane. Detailed information about job failures can be useful for advanced troubleshooting.

You can choose to include regularly scheduled synchronization operations in the list of jobs.

However, it is not necessary to monitor synchronization jobs regularly because any problems will be reported on the Alerts tab.

Protection Task Area

What do you look for in the Protection task area?

Status of volumes and shares in each protection group

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Configuration of each protection group, such as recovery goals, disk allocation, and protection schedule

The Protection task area provides the status of each protected item.

Management Task Area

The Management task area contains three tabs: Disks , Agents , and Libraries .

Management Task Area: Disks

What do you look for on the Disks tab?

Capacity of disks in the storage pool (used and free space)

Status of disks in the storage pool

Which protected volumes are contained on each disk

The Disks tab displays a list of disks included in the storage pool, and it enables you to add and remove disks from the pool.

Management Task Area: Agents

What do you look for on the Agents tab?

Version of deployed agents

Status of deployed agents

Availability of agent licenses

The Agents tab displays a list of protection agents deployed on computers, and it enables you to install, uninstall, and update the agents and to update licenses.

Management Task Area: Libraries

What do you look for on the Libraries tab?

State of the tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives

Status of individual tapes

The Libraries tab displays a list of libraries and tape drives attached to the DPM server, and it enables you to inventory, add, and remove tapes.

Reporting Task Area

What can you do in the Reporting task area?

Generate and view reports on DPM operations.

Schedule automatic report generation.

Manage Reporting Services settings.

Subscribe to reports by e-mail.

DPM uses Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services as the basis for its reporting functionality.

SQL Server Reporting Services includes a Report Manager tool that is not installed during DPM installation. Because settings made through Report Manager can create conflicts with DPM settings, we recommend that you do not install the Report Manager tool that is included with

SQL Server Reporting Services.

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You can enable the DPM reporting feature at any time after installing and configuring DPM.

However, to ensure that DPM has enough information to generate meaningful report data, we recommend that you wait at least a day after starting data protection activities to begin viewing reports. For instructions to help you enable DPM reporting, see “ Using Reports ” in DPM Help

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102085).

Note

When a DPM server is protecting a large number of computers, you should stagger the delivery schedule for reports sent by e-mail. If you schedule all reports to be sent at the same time, the memory limitations of SQL Server Reporting Services might prevent some reports from being sent.

The following table summarizes the available reports and indicates how you should use them. For information about interpreting the data in reports, see “ Report Types ” in DPM Help ( http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102086).

DPM Reports

Report Name

Status

Summary of Contents

The Status report provides the status of all recovery points for a specified time period, lists recovery jobs, and shows the total number of successes and failures for recovery points and disk-based and tape-based recovery point creations. This report shows trends in the frequency of errors that occur and lists the number of alerts.

Use this report to answer questions such as the following:

What happened yesterday? Last week? Last month?

What succeeded and what failed?

What is the trend of errors? Which errors occur most frequently?

Are we achieving the recovery point objective

(RPO) established in our service level agreement

(SLA)?

Note

The Status report includes the error codes for any alerts recorded during the report period.

To view the error message associated with an error code, see the Error Code Catalog

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=91861).

29

Report Name

Tape Management

Tape Utilization

Protection

Recovery

Disk Utilization

See Also

Managing Performance

Monitoring DPM Server

Monitoring with DPM Management Packs

Monitoring with Reports and Alert Notifications

Summary of Contents

The Tape Management report provides details for tape rotation and decommissioning, and it verifies that the free media threshold is not exceeded.

Use this report to manage tape circulation between the library and your offsite location.

The Tape Utilization report provides trending of resource (disk/tape) usage over time to assist capacity planning.

Use this report to make decisions about tape allocations and purchases.

The Protection report provides the commonly used metrics for backup success rolled up over long periods of time to track how backups are doing.

Use this report to identify which computers or protection groups have been backed up successfully.

The Recovery report provides the commonly used metrics for recovery success rolled up over long periods of time to track how recoveries are doing.

Use this report to identify how well you performed against your service level agreements for recovery time objectives and recovery success guarantees.

Summarizes disk capacity, disk allocation, and disk usage in the DPM storage pool.

Use this report to do the following:

Identify trends in disk usage

Make decisions about modifying space allocations for protection groups and adding disks to the storage pool

Identifying how much disk resource each computer is using on DPM

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Monitoring with Reports and Alert Notifications

Notifications increase the ease of your routine monitoring. Rather than connecting to DPM

Administrator Console to find out whether any alerts require your attention, you can subscribe to receive the following by e-mail:

Any or all DPM reports, in the format that you select and on a schedule that you establish.

Individual notification for each alert of the type to which you subscribe, and a notification when the alert has been resolved.

If you enable notifications or subscribe to reports, consider setting up a rule in Microsoft Office

Outlook to filter notification and report mail into one or more dedicated mailbox folders. You can filter these e-mail notifications by using the From address or subject line. The From address of email messages that contain notifications or reports will be the address that you specify when you configure the SMTP server.

The Subject Lines Contained in E-Mail Notifications table provides a list of subject lines that are used in each type of alert notification and each type of DPM report. You can use the text in these subject lines when you set up rules in Outlook to filter reports and alert notifications into specific folders. You can customize your e-mail notifications by using Operations Manager.

Subject Lines Contained in E-Mail Notifications

E-Mail Type

Notification of an alert

Notification of a resolved alert

Report

Subject Line

DPM: Information (Protected computer name)

DPM: Warning (Protected computer name)

DPM: Critical (Protected computer name)

DPM: Recovery (Protected computer name)

DPM: Resolved (Protected computer name)

Status Report from specified server

Media Management Report from specified server

Protection Report from specified server

Recovery Report from specified server

Tape Utilization Report from specified server

Disk Utilization Report from specified server

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See Also

Managing Performance

Monitoring DPM Server

Monitoring with DPM Administrator Console

Monitoring with DPM Management Packs

Monitoring with DPM Management Packs

The System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 Management Packs for Operations Manager enable an administrator to use a MOM Management Server to centrally monitor data protection, state, health, and performance of multiple DPM servers and the computers that they protect.

From the Operations Manager Operator console, the administrator can monitor DPM and network infrastructure simultaneously, analyzing issues with data protection in the context of other factors in system and network performance. From the same console, the administrator can monitor other mission-critical applications, such as Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Exchange Server.

From the Operations Manager server, administrators can perform the following monitoring tasks for managed DPM servers and the computers that they protect:

Centrally monitor the health and status of data protection and critical performance indicators of multiple DPM servers and the computers that they protect.

View the state of all roles on DPM servers and computers servers.

Monitor actionable DPM alerts relating to replica creation, synchronization, and recovery point creation. The DPM Management Pack filters out alerts that do not require an action, such as a synchronization job in progress.

Through Operations Manager alerts, monitor the status of memory, CPU, and disk resources on DPM servers, and be alerted to DPM database failures.

Monitor resource usage and performance trends on DPM servers.

Diagnose and resolve problems on a remote DPM server.

The DPM Management Packs are not included with the DPM product. You can download management packs at the DPM Management Pack download site

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=50208).

See Also

Managing Performance

Monitoring DPM Server

Monitoring with DPM Administrator Console

Monitoring with Reports and Alert Notifications

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Managing Protected File Servers and

Workstations

The topics in this section provide information about performing common maintenance tasks on protected file servers and workstations, as well as guidance for making changes to the computer configuration or cluster configuration after the computer or cluster is protected by DPM.

In This Section

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks

Managing Clustered File Servers

See Also

Disaster Recovery

Managing DPM Servers

Managing Performance

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

Managing Tape Libraries

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups.

When you need to perform maintenance on a protected server and do not want protection jobs to continue for the duration of the maintenance, you can use the following procedure to disable the protection agent.

Note

If you disable a protection agent for a server that is a cluster node, you should disable the protection agent for every node of the cluster.

33

To disable a protection agent

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. On the Agents tab, in the display pane, select the name of the computer with the protection agent you want to disable.

3. In the Actions pane, click Disable protection agent .

4. In the dialog box, click OK to confirm that you want to proceed.

In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Applying Operating System Updates on File Servers and Workstations

Running Antivirus Software on File Servers and Workstations

See Also

Managing Clustered File Servers

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and

Workstations

In general, you can continue maintenance on file servers and workstations protected by DPM using your regular maintenance schedule and the maintenance tools provided in the operating system. Those tools and any impact on data protection are listed in the following table.

Windows Maintenance Tools and Protected Computers

Windows Tool Considerations

Disk Cleanup : Use to remove temporary files,

Internet cache files, and unnecessary program files.

Running Disk Cleanup should have no adverse affect on performance or data protection.

Disk Defragmenter : Use to analyze volumes for the amount of fragmentation and to defragment volumes.

Before adding a volume to a protection group, check the volume for fragmentation, and if necessary, defragment the volume by using

Disk Defragmenter. When protection is applied to extremely fragmented volumes, boot times on the protected computer might be slowed down and protection jobs might fail.

It is recommended that you run Disk Cleanup before running Disk Defragmenter.

Chkdsk.exe

: Use to check the file system and Before you run chkdsk /f on a protected

34

Windows Tool file system metadata for errors and to display a status report of its findings.

Considerations volume, verify that a consistency check of that volume is not being performed.

Running chkdsk /f on a protected volume while a consistency check is being performed on that volume can cause 100% CPU utilization.

Run synchronization with consistency check after running Chkdsk.exe on the protected computer.

See Also

Applying Operating System Updates on File Servers and Workstations

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Running Antivirus Software on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Applying Operating System Updates on File Servers and

Workstations

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, on DPM protected computers. Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

See Also

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Running Antivirus Software on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

35

Running Antivirus Software on File Servers and Workstations

To prevent data corruption of replicas and shadow copies, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that DPM cannot detect. For information about configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

For information about configuring firewalls on computers when installing protection agents, see Installing Protection Agents (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95113).

See Also

Applying Operating System Updates on File Servers and Workstations

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Performing File Server and Workstation

Management Tasks

When events or business requirements demand it, you might need to make changes to your protected file servers and workstations or to the data sources on the protected computer. The topics in this section discuss the impact certain changes might have on DPM protection.

In This Section

Changing the Path of a Data Source

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

See Also

Managing Clustered File Servers

Managing Performance

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

Changing the Path of a Data Source

Changing the Path of a Shared Data Source

When you protect a shared folder, the path to the shared folder includes the logical path on the volume. If you move the shared folder, protection will fail.

36

If you must move a protected shared folder, remove it from its protection group and then add it to protection after the move.

Changing the Path of an Encrypted Data Source

If you change the path of a DPM protected data source on a volume that uses the Encrypting File

System (EFS) and the new file path exceeds 5120 characters, data protection will fail. You must ensure that the new file path of the protected data source uses fewer than 5120 characters.

See Also

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains

You cannot do the following for protected computers:

Change the domain of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the domain of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the computer when it is re-protected.

We recommend that you do not change the domain of a protected computer. If you must change the domain of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection while the computer retains its original domain membership.

Protect the data source on the computer after it becomes a member of another domain.

To change the domain membership of a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the domain membership of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about performing tasks involving protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

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See Also

Changing the Path of a Data Source

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation

DPM uses the computer name as a unique identifier for replicas, recovery points, DPM database entries, reporting database entries, and so on.

You cannot do the following:

Change the name of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the name of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the new computer name.

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected computer. If you must change the name of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection (the old computer name).

Protect the data source on the computer (the new computer name).

To rename a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the name of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about tasks that involve protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

See Also

Changing the Path of a Data Source

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains

38

How to Change the Time Zone of a File Server or Workstation

DPM automatically identifies the time zone of a protected computer during installation of the protection agent. If a protected computer is moved to a different time zone after protection is configured, ensure that you do the following:

Change the computer time in Control Panel by using the Time Zone tab in the Date and

Time Properties dialog box.

Update the time zone in the DPM database.

For more information about time zones and DPM protection, see Coordinating Protection Across

Time Zones .

To update the time zone in the DPM database

1. On the protected computer, in Add or Remove Programs , uninstall Microsoft System

Center Data Protection Manager Protection Agent .

2. On the DPM server, in DPM Administrator Console, in the Management task area, click the Agents tab, select the computer, and then, in the Actions pane, click Refresh information .

The agent status will change to Error .

3. In the Details pane, click Remove the record of the computer from this DPM computer .

4. Reinstall the protection agent on the computer.

5. Run synchronization with consistency check for each protected volume on the protected computer.

See Also

Changing the Path of a Data Source

How to Rename a File Server or Workstation

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Moving File Servers and Workstations Between Domains

Managing Clustered File Servers

On planned failover of a cluster, DPM continues protection. On unplanned failover, DPM issues an alert that a consistency check is required.

For a non-shared disk cluster, planned failover may also require a consistency check.

In This Section

Changing File Server Cluster Members

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered File Servers

39

See Also

Managing Performance

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

Changing File Server Cluster Members

When you make changes to a server cluster that is protected by DPM, DPM takes the following actions:

When a new server is added to a cluster, DPM issues an alert to install a protection agent on the new cluster node and protection fails.

When a server is removed from a cluster, DPM detects that a node has left the cluster and the server now appears separate from the cluster with no data protected on it.

For example, assume you have a server cluster that contains four computers: Node1, Node2,

Node3, and Node4. You need to replace computer Node4 with a new computer, named Node5.

You use the administration console for your cluster service to add Node5 to the cluster and configure the resources that can be failed over to Node5.

DPM issues an alert that protection of the server cluster will fail until a protection agent is installed on Node5. You install the protection agent on Node5.

You fail over the resources from Node4 to other nodes in the cluster. When no resources remain on Node4, you remove it from the cluster. DPM detects the failovers and continues protection of the cluster.

DPM detects that Node4 has left the cluster—it appears as a stand-alone node now. If it no longer exists on the network, you can remove the record for this server in DPM Administrator

Console.

See Also

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered File Servers

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered File Servers

A cluster node can have any number of resource groups. Moving a DPM protected data source to a resource group, between resource groups, or out of a resource group can cause protection job failures. To successfully make any of those changes to resource group membership, perform the following steps:

1. Stop existing protection of the data source. The data source could belong to a protection group as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group.

40

2. Begin protection of the data source according to its new status, either as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group. This will allocate a new replica for the data source.

Changing the name of a resource group will affect the protection of all data sources in the resource group. To change the name of a resource group, perform the following steps:

1. Stop protection of the resource group.

2. Change the name of the resource group.

3. Begin protection of the resource group under its new name.

See Also

Changing File Server Cluster Members

Performing File Server and Workstation Management Tasks

Performing General Maintenance on File Servers and Workstations

Managing Protected Servers Running

Exchange

All information in this section pertains to both Microsoft Exchange 2003 and Exchange 2007, unless otherwise specified.

In This Section

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Exchange

Performing Exchange Server Management Tasks

Managing Clustered Exchange Servers

Recovering Exchange Data

Performing General Maintenance on Servers

Running Exchange

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups.

For servers running Microsoft Exchange Server, there are also Exchange maintenance tasks that occur regularly, such as database defragmentation and index purging.

When you need to perform maintenance on a protected server and do not want protection jobs to continue for the duration of the maintenance, you can use the following procedure to disable the protection agent.

41

Note

If you disable a protection agent for a server that is a cluster node, you should disable the protection agent for every node of the cluster.

To disable a protection agent

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. On the Agents tab, in the display pane, select the name of the computer with the protection agent you want to disable.

3. In the Actions pane, click Disable protection agent .

4. In the dialog box, click OK to confirm that you want to proceed.

In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Performing Exchange Maintenance Tasks

Applying Operating System Updates on Exchange Servers

Running Antivirus Software on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Running Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, or Chkdsk.exe should have no adverse affect on performance or data protection.

See Also

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Performing Exchange Maintenance Tasks

Most Microsoft Exchange maintenance tasks should have no adverse affect on performance or data protection. However, special considerations apply when you are performing offline database defragmentation on Exchange servers that are protected by Data Protection Manager (DPM).

Offline defragmentation involves using the Exchange Server Database Utilities (Eseutil.exe), an

Exchange Server utility that you can use to defragment, repair, and check the integrity of

Exchange server databases.

If you must perform an offline defragmentation, you should perform a synchronization with consistency check for protected storage groups when defragmentation is complete.

42

Applying Operating System Updates on Exchange Servers

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, on Exchange servers that are protected by Data Protection

Manager (DPM). Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

Running Antivirus Software on Exchange Servers

To prevent data corruption of replicas and shadow copies, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that Data Protection Manager (DPM) cannot detect. For instructions on configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

For instructions on configuring firewalls on computers when installing protection agents, see Installing Protection Agents (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95113) in Deploying

DPM 2007 .

Performing Exchange Server Management Tasks

This section provides instructions and guidelines for managing a protected Exchange server and making changes after the initial DPM configuration.

In This Section

Upgrading Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange Server 2007

Moving Exchange Servers Between Domains

How to Rename an Exchange Server

Adding Storage Groups and Databases

Dismounting Databases

Changing the Path of a Database or Log File

Renaming Storage Groups

Moving Databases Between Storage Groups

Upgrading Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange Server 2007

You cannot upgrade a computer running Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange

Server 2007. For instructions on transitioning from Exchange Server 2003 to Exchange

43

Server 2007, see Upgrading to Exchange Server 2007

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=72602).

In general terms, the transition consists of deploying computers running Exchange Server 2007 and then moving storage groups from the computers running Exchange Server 2003 to the new servers.

How to maintain data protection during a transition to Exchange Server 2007

1. Deploy Exchange Server 2007.

2. Create empty storage groups and databases on the computer running Exchange

Server 2007.

3. Install protection agents on the computers running Exchange Server 2007.

4. Create new protection groups, and add the databases and storage groups that you created in step 2.

5. Move the mailboxes to the computers running Exchange Server 2007.

6. Remove all storage groups that will be moved to computers running Exchange

Server 2007 from their existing protection groups, selecting the Retain protected data option.

DPM will retain the associated replica, recovery points, and tapes for the retention range specified. You can recover data from the recovery points and tapes to a computer running Exchange Server 2003.

Moving Exchange Servers Between Domains

You cannot do the following for protected computers:

Change the domain of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the domain of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the computer when it is re-protected.

We recommend that you do not change the domain of a protected computer. If you must change the domain of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection while the computer retains its original domain membership.

Protect the data source on the computer after it becomes a member of another domain.

To change the domain membership of a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

44

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the domain membership of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about performing tasks involving protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

How to Rename an Exchange Server

DPM uses the computer name as a unique identifier for replicas, recovery points, DPM database entries, reporting database entries, and so on.

You cannot do the following:

Change the name of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the name of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the new computer name.

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected computer. If you must change the name of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection (the old computer name).

Protect the data source on the computer (the new computer name).

To rename a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the name of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about tasks that involve protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

Adding Storage Groups and Databases

When adding a new storage group to a protected Microsoft Exchange server, you must add it to a protection group manually.

45

When adding a new database to the storage group, a full backup is required, which can be accomplished by an express full backup or a consistency check. Incremental backups will fail until a full backup is completed.

Dismounting Databases

When a database that belongs to a protected storage group is dismounted, protection jobs for that database only will fail. Logs for that storage group will not be truncated. However, the longer that the database remains dismounted, the more likely it is that the log space on the Microsoft

Exchange server will overflow, which will result in the dismount of the storage group on the

Exchange server. If the database will not be needed, you should delete it.

Changing the Path of a Database or Log File

If a protected database or log files are moved to a volume that contains data that is protected by

Data Protection Manager (DPM), protection continues. If a protected database or log files are moved to a volume that is not protected by DPM, DPM displays an alert and protection jobs will fail. To resolve the alert, in the alert details, click the Modify protection job link and then run a consistency check.

If a recovery point is created after the path changes, you cannot recover the storage group or recovery points from recovery points based on the old path. You can still recover data to a network folder.

If you recover a Microsoft Exchange 2003 storage group after the path for databases or log files has changed and the most recent recovery point was created before the path change, the recovery copies the files to the old path and tries to mount the databases. If the databases can be mounted, the recovery appears to succeed.

If this occurs, you can take one of the following actions:

Change the databases back to the original path and then recover the storage group again.

Recover the databases using the Copy to a network folder option. Specify the new location of the databases as the copy destination. Select the Bring database to a clean shutdown after copying the files option. Mount the database after recovery.

If you recover an Exchange 2007 storage group after the path for databases or log files has changed and the most recent recovery point was created before the path changed, DPM will recover the databases to the new location.

When you change the path of log files for a storage group that uses disk-to-tape backup and only incremental backups have been performed since the path change, recovery of a storage group using Latest as the recovery point will fail. To avoid this issue, perform one of the following actions:

Run a full backup and then retry the storage group recovery.

Recover individual databases, rather than the storage group.

Recover the storage group to a network folder as files.

46

Renaming Storage Groups

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected storage group. To change the name of a storage group, you must stop protection of the storage group, change the name, and then reprotect the storage group. You cannot do the following:

Change the name of a protected storage group and continue protection without disruption.

Change the name of a protected storage group, and associate the existing replica and recovery points with the storage group when it is reprotected.

To change the name of a protected storage group

1. Remove the storage group from the protection group.

If you retain the replica and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replica.

2. Change the name of the storage group.

3. Add the storage group to a protection group on the Data Protection Manager (DPM) server.

For instructions on tasks involving protection groups, see DPM Help

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

Moving Databases Between Storage Groups

The following table describes the impact on data protection when you move a database between storage groups.

Data Protection When Databases Are Moved Between Storage Groups

From To Result

A protected storage group A protected storage group

A protected storage group

A storage group that is not protected

A storage group that is not protected

A protected storage group

Data Protection Manager

(DPM) continues protection of the database. Run a consistency check for both storage groups after the move.

DPM stops protection of that database. Run a consistency check for the protected storage group after the move.

DPM begins protection of that database if the database files are on a volume protected by

DPM. If the database files are

47

From To Result not on a protected volume, run the Modify Group Wizard. Run a consistency check for the protected storage group after the move.

Managing Clustered Exchange Servers

On planned failover of a cluster, Data Protection Manager (DPM) continues protection. On unplanned failover, DPM issues an alert that a consistency check is required.

For a non-shared disk cluster, planned failover might also require a consistency check.

In This Section

Changing Exchange Server Cluster Members

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered Exchange Servers

Changing Exchange Server Cluster Members

When you make changes to a server cluster that is protected by Data Protection Manager (DPM),

DPM takes the following actions:

When a new server is added to a cluster, DPM issues an alert to install a protection agent on the new cluster node and protection fails.

When a server is removed from a cluster, DPM detects that a node has left the cluster and the server now appears separate from the cluster with no data protected on it.

For example, assume you have a server cluster that contains four computers: Node1, Node2,

Node3, and Node4. You need to replace computer Node4 with a new computer, named Node5.

You use the administration console for your cluster service to add Node5 to the cluster and configure the resources that can be failed over to Node5.

DPM issues an alert that protection of the server cluster will fail until a protection agent is installed on Node5. You install the protection agent on Node5.

You fail over the resources from Node4 to other nodes in the cluster. When no resources remain on Node4, you remove it from the cluster. DPM detects the failovers and continues protection of the cluster.

DPM detects that Node4 has left the cluster—it appears as a stand-alone node now. If it no longer exists on the network, you can remove the record for this server in DPM Administrator

Console.

48

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered Exchange Servers

A cluster node can have any number of resource groups. Moving a protected data source to a resource group, between resource groups, or out of a resource group can cause protection job failures. To successfully make any of those changes to resource group membership, perform the following steps:

1. Stop existing protection of the data source. The data source could belong to a protection group as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group.

2. Begin protection of the data source according to its new status, either as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group. This will allocate a new replica for the data source.

Changing the name of a resource group will affect the protection of all data sources in the resource group. To change the name of a resource group, perform the following steps:

1. Stop protection of the resource group.

2. Change the name of the resource group.

3. Begin protection of the resource group under its new name.

Recovering Exchange Data

When you select a Microsoft Exchange database for recovery, you can select from the following recovery options:

Recover the database to its original location .

This option is available only if you select Latest as the recovery point.

If you select this option, and the recovery destination contains files that have the same names as the files you are recovering, the current database files will be overwritten during recovery.

For Exchange 2003 only: You must configure the target database to allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so

That the Restore Process Overwrites Them " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

Recover the database to another database on an Exchange 2007 server .

This option is available only for Exchange 2007.

This option is not available if you select Latest as the recovery point. You must specify an existing database to which the selected database will be recovered. You must configure the target database to allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so That the Restore Process Overwrites Them "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

Recover to Recovery Storage Group .

This option is available only for Exchange 2007.

This option is not available if you select Latest as the recovery point.

49

Copy the database to a network folder .

This option is not available if you select Latest as the recovery point. Data Protection

Manager (DPM) creates the following directory structure at the destination that you specify:

DPM_Recovery_Point_timestamp \ DPM_Recovered_At_timestamp \S erver name \ Exchange application \ Database name \ Files

To use the Bring the database to a clean shutdown after copying the files option , the

DPM protection agent and the Eseutil utility must be installed on the destination server. The

Eseutil utility can be installed as part of either an Exchange Server installation or an

Exchange Server Administrator-only-mode installation.

Copy the database to tape .

This option is not available if you select Latest as the recovery point. This option copies the replica of the storage group that contains the selected database.

In This Section

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Recovering Mailboxes

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

When you recover a storage group to its original location, and the recovery destination contains files that have the same names as the files you are recovering, the current database files will be overwritten during recovery.

How to recover a storage group to its original location

1. On the server to which the storage group will be recovered, configure each database to allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so That the Restore Process Overwrites Them "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

2. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

3. Using the browse functionality, select the storage group to recover.

4. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

5. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

6. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

50

The Recovery Wizard starts. The wizard options vary depending on the version of

Exchange.

7. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

8. Select Recover to original Exchange Server location , and then click Next .

9. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select Send an e-mail when this recovery completes.

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must enter the e-mail address to notify. Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Recovering Mailboxes

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

When you recover a Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 database to the original location, Data

Protection Manager (DPM) does not use the latest log files from the protected server; therefore, the recovery is to the last saved state. To perform a database recovery without losing data, recover the database to the original location using one of the following methods:

If there are no databases mounted under the storage group, recover the storage group using the Latest recovery point.

If any database is mounted under the storage group, create a recovery point for the storage group, and then recover the database using the Latest recovery point.

If you select Latest as the recovery point for an Exchange Server 2007 database, DPM applies the log files from the protected server and performs a lossless recovery without any additional steps.

Note

In Exchange 2007, if there are multiple databases in a storage group, all databases will be dismounted during recovery. An Exchange 2007 best practice is to have one database per storage group.

How to recover a database to its original location

1. On the server to which the database will be recovered, configure the target database to

51

allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so That the Restore Process Overwrites Them "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

2. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

3. Using the browse functionality, select the database to recover.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select Latest .

You must select the most recent recovery point to recover the storage group to its original location.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts. The wizard options will vary depending on the version of

Exchange.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Recover to original Exchange Server location , and then click Next .

8. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select Send an e-mail when this recovery completes.

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must also enter the e-mail address to notify.

Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

9. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Recovering Mailboxes

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

Use the following procedure to recover a database to an alternate database.

How to recover a database to an alternate database

1. On the server to which the database will be recovered, configure the target database to allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so That the Restore Process Overwrites Them "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

2. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

3. Using the browse functionality, select the database to recover.

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4. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

5. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

6. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard launches. The wizard options will vary depending on the version of

Exchange.

7. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

8. Select Recover to another database on an Exchange Server , and then click Next .

9. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select Send an e-mail when this recovery completes .

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must enter the e-mail address to notify. Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Recovering Mailboxes

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

When you copy a storage group to a network folder, Data Protection Manager (DPM) creates the following directory structure at the destination that you specify:

DPM_Recovery_Point_timestamp \ DPM_Recovered_At_timestamp \S erver name \ Exchange application \ Database name \ Files

Example:

DPM_Recovery_Point_8-12-2007_0.1.54AM\DPM_Recovered_At_8-13-

2007_10.49.21AM\Server1.DPM.LAB\J-Volume\Files

The DPM protection agent and the Eseutil utility must be installed on the destination server. The

Eseutil utility can be installed as part of either a Microsoft Exchange Server installation or an

Exchange Server Administrator-only-mode installation.

How to copy Exchange data to a network folder

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using the browse functionality, select the storage group or database to recover.

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3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Time menu, select the recovery point you want to use. Do not select Latest for the recovery point.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts. The wizard options vary depending on the version of

Exchange.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Copy to a network folder , and then click Next .

8. Specify the destination path to which the storage group or database should be copied.

9. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select from the following options:

Bring the database to a clean shutdown after copying the files .

This option is available if you are copying a database, and it brings the database files to a mountable condition by copying the logs. Select this option only if the destination is an Exchange-based server that has the same version of the Exchange application and the same or later version of Eseutil.exe as at the time of protection.

Send an e-mail when this recovery completes.

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must enter the e-mail address to notify.

Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Recovering Mailboxes

Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

How to Copy Exchange Data to Tape

Use the following procedure to copy Exchange data to tape.

How to copy Exchange data to tape

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using the browse functionality, select the storage group or database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that

54

date. The Time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Time menu, select the recovery point you want to use. Do not select Latest for the recovery point.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts. The wizard options vary depending on the version of

Exchange.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Copy to tape , and then click Next .

8. On the Specify Library page, in Primary library , select a library to use for recovery.

( Copy library is available only when the job cannot be completed using only the tape library selected in Primary library .)

When the data is being copied from disk, the library you select in Primary library will copy the data to tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has multiple tape drives, the library you select in Primary library will read from the source tape and copy the data to another tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has only a single tape drive, the library you select in Primary library will read from the source tape and the library you select in Copy library will copy the data to tape.

9. Enter a label for the tape on which the storage group will be copied.

10. Specify if the data that is copied should be compressed.

11. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select Send an e-mail when this recovery completes .

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must enter the e-mail address to notify. Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

12. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Copy Tapes

How to Recover a Storage Group to its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to an Alternate Database

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

Recovering Mailboxes

You can recover deleted e-mail messages using Microsoft Outlook. For instructions, see " How to

Recover a Deleted Item " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97933). To recover a deleted

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mailbox, use the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange Management Console. For instructions, see " How to Recover a Deleted Mailbox "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97934).

If you cannot recover the mailbox using the Exchange Management Shell or the Exchange

Management Console, such as when the retention period is expired, you can use Data Protection

Manager (DPM) to recover the mailbox.

To recover a mailbox, DPM must copy the entire database because this is the recommended method that Exchange supports, as explained in Knowledge Base article 904845, " Microsoft support policy for third-party products that modify or extract Exchange database contents "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=96542).

When you select a mailbox for recovery, you cannot select Latest as the recovery point.

The Latest option recovers the data from the most recent recovery point, and then applies all committed transactions from the server logs. This functionality is not available for individual mailboxes.

Item details will not appear on the Recovery Wizard Summary page for Exchange Server mailboxes.

How to Recover an Exchange 2003 Mailbox

The procedure for recovering a mailbox to Microsoft Exchange 2003 includes the use of

Eseutil.exe and Exmerge.exe. For more information on the Exchange Server Database Utilities tool (Eseutil.exe), see Eseutil (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=83451). For more information on Exmerge.exe, see Knowledge Base article 174197, "Microsoft Exchange Mailbox

Merge program (Exmerge.exe) information" (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=83459).

How to recover a previous version of an active Exchange 2003 mailbox

1. Use the Search tab and a date range to locate the mailbox you want to recover.

2. Select a recovery point for the database that contains the mailbox to be restored.

3. In the Actions pane, click Recover . The Recovery Wizard starts.

4. Review your recovery selection, and then click Next .

5. On the Select Recovery Type page, select Copy to a network folder .

6. On the Specify Destination page, enter a volume on an Exchange server that has a recovery storage group enabled.

7. On the Select Recovery Options page, select the Bring the database to a clean shut down state after copying the files check box.

8. Move the database file to the location of the Exchange recovery storage group database.

9. Mount the database under the recovery storage group.

10. Complete the Recovery Wizard. DPM recovers the database.

11. Extract the mailbox from the recovered database.

For Exchange Server 2003, use the Microsoft Exchange Server Mailbox Merge

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Wizard (ExMerge).

For Exchange Server 2003 SP1, extract and merge data using Exchange 2003

System Manager.

How to recover a disabled or deleted Exchange 2003 mailbox

1. Use the Search tab and a date range to locate the mailbox you want to recover.

2. Select a recovery point for the database that contains the mailbox to be restored.

3. In the Actions pane, click Recover . The Recovery Wizard starts.

4. Review your recovery selection, and then click Next .

5. On the Select Recovery Type page, select Recover mailbox to an Exchange server database .

6. On the Specify Destination page, enter the full names of the Exchange server, including the domain, storage group, and database.

The database should be dismounted and configured to allow it to be overwritten by the recovered data. For instructions, see " How to Configure the Exchange Databases so

That the Restore Process Overwrites Them "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=97929).

7. Complete the Recovery Wizard. DPM recovers the database.

8. Extract the mailbox from the recovered database.

For Exchange Server 2003, use the Microsoft Exchange Server Mailbox Merge

Wizard (ExMerge).

For Exchange Server 2003 SP1, extract and merge data using Exchange 2003

System Manager.

See Also

How to Copy Exchange Data to a Network Folder

Recovering Mailboxes

How to Recover an Exchange 2007 Mailbox

How to Recover an Exchange 2007 Mailbox

To recover a Microsoft Exchange 2007 mailbox, the recovered .edb and .log files need to be attached to the Recovery Storage Group in Exchange and you must use Exchange-supported tools, such as Exmerge.exe, to extract a .pst file.

The procedure you use depends on whether there is an existing mailbox to which you want to recover a previous version or the mailbox no longer exists and you want to recover it.

How to recover an Exchange 2007 mailbox for an existing mailbox

1. If you do not have an existing Recovery Storage Group, create one by using the newstoragegroup cmdlet in Exchange Management Shell.

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2. Create a recovery database in the Recovery Storage Group by using the newmailboxdatabase cmdlet in Exchange Management Shell.

3. Configure the recovery database to allow it to be overwritten by using the setmailboxdatabase cmdlet in Exchange Management Shell.

4. In DPM Administrator Console, click the Search tab and select a date range to locate the mailbox you want to recover.

5. Select a recovery point that contains the mailbox to be restored, and then click Recover .

DPM recovers the database that contains the selected mailbox.

6. On the Review Recovery Selection page, click Next .

7. On the Select Recovery Type page, select Recover mailbox to an Exchange server database .

8. On the Specify Destination page, enter the full names of the Exchange server, including the domain, the name of the Recovery Storage Group that you created in step 1, and the name of the recovery database that you created in step 2.

9. Complete the Recovery Wizard. DPM recovers the database.

10. Configure the destination database to allow it to be overwritten by using the setmailboxdatabase cmdlet in Exchange Management Shell.

11. Merge the mailbox data in the recovery database to the production mailbox database, using the restore-mailbox cmdlet in Exchange Management Shell.

Example

You need to retrieve some items from a mailbox for an employee who has left the organization.

The following is the identification of the mailbox:

Exchange Server: exchangeserver1

Storage group: SG1

Database: DB11

Mailbox: John

Storage group SG1 is protected by DPM. You decide to recover the mailbox John to the manager's mailbox so that he can retrieve the necessary items. The following is the identification of the manager's mailbox:

Exchange Server: exchangeserver1

Storage group: SG2

Database: DB21

Mailbox: Simon

To recover the mailbox John to the mailbox Simon, you perform the following steps:

1. Create a Recovery Storage Group (RSG) by running the following Exchange Management

Shell cmdlet:

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new-storagegroup -Server exchangeserver1 -LogFolderPath C:\RSG\ -Name RSG -

SystemFolderPath C:\RSG\ -Recovery

This creates a storage group named RSG on exchangeserver1.

2. Add a recovery database to the RSG by running the following Exchange Management Shell cmdlet: new-mailboxdatabase -mailboxdatabasetorecover exchangeserver1\SG1\DB11 storagegroup exchangeserver1\RSG -edbfilepath C:\RSG\DB11.edb

This creates a mailbox on exchangeserver1\RSG\DB11. The .edb file name must be the same as the .edb file name for the mailbox you are recovering.

3. Set the recovery database to allow overwrites by running the following Exchange

Management Shell cmdlet: set-mailboxdatabase -identity exchangeserver1\RSG\DB11 -AllowFileRestore 1

4. Open DPM Administrator Console and click Recovery on the navigation bar.

5. Expand the tree and select SG1.

6. Double-click database DB11.

7. Select John , and click Recover .

8. In the Recovery Wizard, on the Review Recovery Selection page, click Next .

9. On the Select Recovery Type page, select Recover mailbox to an Exchange server database .

10. On the Specify Destination page, enter the following information:

For Exchange server: exchangeserver1

For storage group: RSG

For database: DB11

11. Specify your recovery options, and then click Recover .

12. Set the destination database to allow overwrites by running the following Exchange

Management Shell cmdlet: set-mailboxdatabase -identity exchangeserver1\SG2\DB21 -AllowFileRestore 1

The destination database is the database that contains the mailbox to which we want to recover the e-mail from the John mailbox.

13. When the recovery is complete, run the following Exchange Management Shell cmdlet:

Restore-Mailbox -RSGMailbox 'John' -RSGDatabase 'RSG\DB11' -id 'Simon' -

TargetFolder 'John E-mail'

The manager opens his mailbox and finds a new folder named John E-mail, which contains the e-mail items from the recovered mailbox.

See Also

Recovering Mailboxes

How to Recover an Exchange 2003 Mailbox

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Recovering Data to Clustered Servers

Stand-alone and Shared Disk Cluster Recovery

To recover the storage group or database to the latest point in time

1. Set the Exchange server database property Override by restore to True .

2. On the DPM server, recover the storage group or database, selecting the Restore to original location option.

To recover the storage group to a previous point in time

1. Delete the existing log files and checkpoint files on the Exchange server.

2. Set the Exchange server database property Override by restore to True .

3. On the DPM server, recover the storage group or database, selecting the Restore to original location option.

To recover a storage group or database in clean shutdown state to a network share, you cannot select Latest as the recovery point.

To recover the storage group or database in clean shutdown state to a network share

1. On the DPM server, recover the storage group or database, selecting the Copy to a network folder option.

2. On the Specify Destination page, specify a folder on a server running Exchange 2007 server.

3. On the Specify Recovery Options page, select the Bring the database to a clean shutdown state after copying the files option.

4. On the Summary page, click Recover .

Cluster Continuous Replication and Local Continuous Replication

Recovery

Data Protection Manager (DPM) will always recover to the active node, regardless of protection topology.

To recover from failure on the active node

1. Set the Exchange Server database property Override by restore to True .

2. On the DPM server, recover the storage group or database, selecting the Restore to original location option.

3. On the Exchange server, in Exchange Management Shell, run getstoragegroupcopystatus to verify the copy status.

After recovery, you should synchronize the passive nodes with the active node.

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If the database or logs on the passive node are corrupt, use either of the following procedures to recover data.

To recover from failure on the passive node

1. On the Exchange server, in Exchange Management Shell, run suspendstoragegroupcopy for the failed storage group.

2. Delete all .logs, .chk, and .edb files from the copy location (passive node).

3. In the DPM Recovery Wizard, copy the database files without running database clean shutdown to the passive node.

4. Move the files to appropriate locations in the passive node.

5. Remove the common log files (between active and passive nodes) from the passive node. For example, a failover might have created a new log stream with the same log file names.

6. On the Exchange server, in Exchange Management Shell, run resumestoragegroupcopy for the failed storage group.

To recover from failure on the passive node (if both copies are corrupt)

1. Set the Exchange Server database property Override by restore to True .

2. In the DPM Recovery Wizard, recover to the active node.

3. On the Exchange server, in Exchange Management Shell, run getstoragegroupcopystatus to verify the copy status.

4. After recovery, synchronize the passive nodes with the active node.

See Also

Managing Clustered Exchange Servers

Recovering Exchange Data

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL

Server

This content applies to both Microsoft® SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2005, unless otherwise specified.

In This Section

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running SQL

Performing SQL Server Management Tasks

Managing Clustered SQL Servers

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Recovering SQL Server Data

Performing General Maintenance on Servers

Running SQL

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups. Some special considerations apply when you are performing server maintenance on

SQL Servers that are protected by Data Protection Manager (DPM).

When you need to perform maintenance on a protected server and do not want protection jobs to continue for the duration of the maintenance, you can use the following procedure to disable the protection agent.

Note

If you disable a protection agent for a server that is a cluster node, you should disable the protection agent for every node of the cluster.

To disable a protection agent

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. On the Agents tab, in the display pane, select the name of the computer with the protection agent you want to disable.

3. In the Actions pane, click Disable protection agent .

4. In the dialog box, click OK to confirm that you want to proceed.

In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Performing SQL Maintenance Tasks

Applying Operating System Updates on SQL Servers

Running Antivirus Software on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Running Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, or Chkdsk.exe should have no adverse effect on performance or data protection.

You should not use other backup applications on a computer running SQL Server that is protected by DPM.

See Also

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

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Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Performing SQL Maintenance Tasks

Coordinate with the SQL Server administrator to ensure that the following tasks are not scheduled at the same time as the express full backup performed by DPM:

Check database integrity

History cleanup

Maintenance cleanup

Rebuild index

Reorganize index

Shrink database

Update statistics

Best practices for SQL Server include running a weekly database consistency check (DBCC).

You should continue this practice for databases protected by DPM to avoid backing up a database with corruption issues.

Applying Operating System Updates on SQL Servers

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, on computers running SQL Server that are protected by

DPM. Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

Running Antivirus Software on SQL Servers

To prevent data corruption of replicas and recovery points, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that DPM cannot detect. For instructions on configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

Performing SQL Server Management Tasks

This section provides instructions and guidelines for managing a protected SQL server and making changes after the initial configuration of Data Protection Manager.

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In This Section

Upgrading SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2005

Moving SQL Servers Between Domains

How to Rename a Computer Running SQL Server

Changing the Recovery Model of a Database

Replacing a Disk on a SQL Server

Adding Databases to a SQL Server

Changing the Path of a SQL Server Database

Renaming a SQL Server Database

Upgrading SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2005

If you upgrade a protected server running SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2005, you must reprotect the databases after the upgrade by performing the following steps:

1. Stop protection of the databases, choosing the retain data option.

2. Start the SQL Writer Service on the upgraded server.

3. Add the databases on the upgraded server to a new protection group.

You will be able to use the retained replica to recover data from points in time before the upgrade.

Data created by SQL Server 2000 must be restored to a computer running SQL Server 2000.

You can also use the retained replica to manually create the initial replica for each database in the new protection group.

Note

After you reconfigure protection, DPM Administrator Console displays the protected database as two separate nodes. The protection status in the Protection task area appears as Inactive replica for one of the database nodes, and the Recovery task area displays two database nodes with the same name.

Moving SQL Servers Between Domains

You cannot do the following for protected computers:

Change the domain of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the domain of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the computer when it is re-protected.

We recommend that you do not change the domain of a protected computer. If you must change the domain of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection while the computer retains its original domain membership.

Protect the data source on the computer after it becomes a member of another domain.

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To change the domain membership of a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the domain membership of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about performing tasks involving protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

How to Rename a Computer Running SQL Server

DPM uses the computer name as a unique identifier for replicas, recovery points, DPM database entries, reporting database entries, and so on.

You cannot do the following:

Change the name of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the name of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the new computer name.

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected computer. If you must change the name of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection (the old computer name).

Protect the data source on the computer (the new computer name).

To rename a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the name of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about tasks that involve protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

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Changing the Recovery Model of a Database

SQL Server databases can have one of three types of recovery models: simple, full, or bulklogged. By default, new databases are usually created in the full recovery model. The following table describes how each model uses log backups.

SQL Server Database Recovery Models

Recovery model Use of log backups

Simple

Full

Does not use log backups.

SQL Server maintains the transactions logs for the databases, allowing log backups to be taken. The logs must be truncated explicitly; otherwise, they continue to grow.

Bulk-logged Similar to the full recovery model except that certain types of transactions are not logged in the transaction log.

When a database is added to a protection group, DPM detects the recovery model that the database is configured to use. DPM does not allow log, or incremental, backups for databases configured in the simple recovery model. Log backups are only allowed for databases configured in the full and bulk-logged recovery models.

When the recovery model of a protected database is changed from simple to full or bulk-logged,

DPM protection continues as configured. When the recovery model of a protected database is changed from full or bulk-logged to simple, express full backups will continue to succeed, but incremental backups will fail.

To change the recovery model of a protected database to the simple recovery model

1. Stop protection of the database, selecting the retain replica option.

2. Change the recovery model on the SQL Server database.

3. Add the database to a protection group.

You should also stop protection of a database before you configure log shipping for the database or change the database to Read Only. After you make the changes to the database, you can reconfigure protection for the database.

When protecting SQL Server databases that are configured to use the full or bulk-logged recovery models, DPM creates a folder on the SQL Server that is being protected. This folder is created in the same location as the first log file (*.ldf) of each protected database.

This folder is used as a temporary store for logs during SQL Server log backup and SQL Server log restore by DPM. If DPM finds the folder missing, DPM will re-create the folder.

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Replacing a Disk on a SQL Server

You might replace a disk on a SQL Server to upgrade capacity or to replace a failed disk. If you replace a disk that contains SQL Server data protected by DPM, you should assign the same drive letter to the new disk. You can then recover the protected data from the DPM server to the new disk.

Adding Databases to a SQL Server

New databases on a protected computer running SQL Server are not automatically added to an existing protection group. When a new database is created, you should manually add the database to an existing or new protection group to ensure the data is protected.

Changing the Path of a SQL Server Database

When a path associated with a protected database changes, backup jobs will fail. To resolve this issue, remove the database from protection and then add the database back to the protection group. This change to the protection group will require a consistency check. After the consistency check completes successfully, normal protection jobs will resume.

Renaming a SQL Server Database

If you rename a database that is protected by DPM, you must add the database under its new name to an existing or new protection group and then remove the database under its old name from its protection group. The database will be protected as a new data source.

Managing Clustered SQL Servers

On planned failover of a cluster, DPM continues protection. On unplanned failover, DPM issues an alert that a consistency check is required.

For a non-shared disk cluster, planned failover may also require a consistency check.

You cannot backup and recover the master database for clustered SQL Servers.

In This Section

Changing SQL Server Cluster Members

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered SQL Servers

Changing SQL Server Cluster Members

When you make changes to a server cluster that is protected by DPM, DPM takes the following actions:

When a new server is added to a cluster, DPM issues an alert to install a protection agent on the new cluster node and protection fails.

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When a server is removed from a cluster, DPM detects that a node has left the cluster and the server now appears separate from the cluster with no data protected on it.

For example, assume you have a server cluster that contains four computers: Node1, Node2,

Node3, and Node4. You need to replace computer Node4 with a new computer named Node5.

You use the administration console for your cluster service to add Node5 to the cluster and configure the resources that can be failed over to Node5.

DPM issues an alert that protection of the server cluster will fail until a protection agent is installed on Node5. You install the protection agent on Node5.

You fail over the resources from Node4 to other nodes in the cluster. When no resources remain on Node4, you remove it from the cluster. DPM detects the failovers and continues protection of the cluster.

DPM detects that Node4 has left the cluster – it appears as a stand-alone node now. If it no longer exists on the network, you can remove the record for this server in DPM Administrator

Console.

Changing Resource Groups on Clustered SQL Servers

A cluster node can have any number of resource groups. Moving a protected data source to a resource group, between resource groups, or out of a resource group can cause protection job failures. To successfully make any of those changes to resource group membership, perform the following steps:

1. Stop existing protection of the data source. The data source could belong to a protection group as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group.

2. Begin protection of the data source according to its new status, either as a single data source on a protected server or as a data source as a member of a resource group. This will allocate a new replica for the data source.

Changing the name of a resource group will affect the protection of all data sources in the resource group. To change the name of a resource group, perform the following steps:

1. Stop protection of the resource group.

2. Change the name of the resource group.

3. Begin protection of the resource group under its new name.

Recovering SQL Server Data

When you recover SQL Server data, you can choose from the following options:

Recover the database to its original location

Recover the database with a new name to its original location or to a different instance of

SQL Server

Recover the database to a different instance of SQL Server

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Copy the database to a network folder

Copy the database to tape

When you recover a SQL Server 2000 database to a different instance of SQL Server, the recovery path on the new server must be the same as the path of the database when it was protected on the source server. For example, DB1 on D:\sample on server1 can be recovered only to D:\sample on server2. If you want to recover to a completely new path, then you will only be able to recover express full backups (typically one copy per day).

When you recover a SQL Server 2005 database to a different instance of SQL Server, you can recover the database to any chosen path on the new server. You can back up once every 15 minutes and recover to any point in time on the target SQL Server.

In both SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2005, you can rename the database and recover to the original SQL instance.

You cannot recover a database from an instance of SQL Server on a computer running Windows

Server 2008 to an instance of SQL Server on a computer running Windows Server 2003.

You cannot recover a system database to a different instance of SQL Server.

In This Section

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

To recover a database to its original location

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using the browse functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Recover to original SQL Server location , and then click Next .

8. If you selected a recovery point other than Latest , on the Specify Database State page, select Leave database operational .

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9. Specify recovery options for network bandwidth usage throttling, SAN-based recovery, and e-mail notifications, and then click Next .

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

To recover and rename a database, use the Recover to any SQL instance option. This option is unavailable if you select Latest as the recovery point from which to recover the database.

To recover and rename a database

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using either the browse or search functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use. Do not select Latest for the recovery point.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard launches.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Recover to any SQL instance , and then click Next .

8. On the Specify recovery destination page, enter the path to recover the database to, and specify a new name for the recovered database.

9. Specify recovery options for network bandwidth usage throttling, SAN-based recovery, and e-mail notifications, and then click Next .

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

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How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

To recover a database to a different instance of SQL Server, you use the Recover to any SQL instance option. This option is unavailable if you select Latest as the recovery point from which to recover the database.

To recover a database to a different instance of SQL Server

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using either the browse or search functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use. Do not select Latest for the recovery point.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Recover to any SQL instance , and then click Next .

8. On the Specify recovery destination page, the actions you can take depend on the version of SQL Server database:

If you are recovering a database created by SQL Server 2000, specify the alternate instance of SQL Server to which the database should be recovered. The database must use the same complete path that it used in its original location.

If you are recovering a database created by SQL Server 2005, specify the alternate instance of SQL Server to which the database should be recovered. You can also specify a path for the database that differs from the path that it used in its original location.

9. Specify recovery options for network bandwidth usage throttling, SAN-based recovery, and e-mail notifications, and click Next .

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

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How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

You can only copy a SQL Server database from a recovery point that was created from an express full backup.

To copy a database to a network folder

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using the browse functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Copy to a network folder , and then click Next .

If the recovery point that you selected was not created from an express full backup, you will be presented with new recovery point choices.

8. Specify the destination path to which the database should be copied.

9. On the Specify recovery options page, you can select either or both of the following options:

Restore security

Specify whether to use the security settings of the data being recovered or the security settings of the target destination.

Send an e-mail when this recovery completes.

Select this option to specify an e-mail address or addresses to notify upon recovery completion. If you select this option, you must enter the e-mail address to notify.

Multiple e-mail addresses must be separated by a comma.

10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

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How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

You can copy a SQL Server database to tape only from a recovery point that was created from an express full backup.

To copy a database to tape

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using either the browse or search functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

You must select the most recent recovery point to recover the storage group to its original location.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Copy to tape , and then click Next .

If the recovery point that you selected was not created from an express full backup, you will be presented with new recovery point choices.

8. On the Specify Library page, in Primary library , select a library to use for recovery.

( Copy library is available only when the job cannot be completed using only the tape library selected in Primary library .)

When the data is being copied from disk, the library you select in Primary library will copy the data to tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has multiple tape drives, the library you select in Primary library will read from the source tape and copy the data to another tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has only a single tape drive, the library you select in Primary library will read from the source tape and the library you select in Copy library will copy the data to tape.

9. Enter a label for the tape on which the storage group will be copied.

10. Specify if the data that is copied should be compressed or encrypted.

11. On the Set notification page, you can select Send an e-mail when this recovery completes.

12. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Copy Tapes

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

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How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log Backups

How to Recover a SQL Database and Allow Additional Log

Backups

The DPM recovery process uses SQL Server functionality to recover a database such that all uncommitted transactions are rolled back. The recovery process opens the transaction log to identify uncommitted transactions. Uncommitted transactions are undone by being rolled back, unless they hold locks that prevent other transactions from viewing transactionally inconsistent data. This step is called the undo, or roll back , phase.

In some circumstances, the SQL Server administrator might require the database to be restored in a mode that allows log backups to be selectively played back. Using DPM, you can recover a database and leave it in a restoring state in which additional log backups can be applied to the database.

To recover a database without transaction roll back

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using the browse functionality, select the database to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use. You can select any recovery point except Latest .

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Recover to original SQL Server location or Recover to any SQL instance , and then click Next .

8. If you select Recover to any SQL instance , on the Specify recovery destination page, specify the instance of SQL Server to which the database should be recovered.

9. On the Specify Database State page, select Leave database non-operational but able to restore additional transaction logs .

10. Select Copy SQL transaction logs between the selected recovery point and latest available recovery point , specify a copy destination for the transaction logs, and then click Next .

DPM must have Write permission for the copy destination for the transaction logs.

11. Specify recovery options for network bandwidth usage throttling, SAN-based recovery, and e-mail notifications, and then click Next .

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12. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

13. Use the Restore Transact-SQL command with the HeaderOnly argument to retrieve the header information for the transaction logs. The header contains information that allows the log backup sequences to be correctly ordered.

14. Use the Restore command with the Log argument to apply the desired logs to the database in the right order.

For more information on the Restore command, see RESTORE Arguments (Transact-

SQL) (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=104665).

See Also

How to Recover a SQL Database to Its Original Location

How to Recover and Rename a SQL Database

How to Recover a Database to a Different Instance of SQL Server

How to Copy a SQL Database to a Network Folder

How to Copy a SQL Database to Tape

Managing Protected Servers Running

Windows SharePoint Services

This section provides instructions for managing protected servers running Windows SharePoint

Services. All information in this section pertains to both Microsoft® Office SharePoint®

Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, unless otherwise specified.

In This Section

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Performing Windows SharePoint Services Management Tasks

Recovering Windows SharePoint Services Data

Performing General Maintenance on Servers

Running Windows SharePoint Services

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups. Some special considerations apply when you are performing server maintenance on computers running Microsoft® Windows® SharePoint Services that are protected by System

Center Data Protection Manager 2007 (DPM).

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When you need to perform maintenance on a protected server and do not want protection jobs to continue for the duration of the maintenance, you can disable the protection agent.

To disable a protection agent

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. On the Agents tab, in the display pane, select the name of the computer with the protection agent you want to disable.

3. In the Actions pane, click Disable protection agent .

4. In the dialog box, click OK to confirm that you want to proceed.

In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Performing Windows SharePoint Services Maintenance Tasks

Applying Operating System Updates on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Running Antivirus Software on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint

Services Servers

Running Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, or Chkdsk.exe should have no adverse effect on performance or data protection.

See Also

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Performing Windows SharePoint Services Maintenance Tasks

If you schedule automatic deletion of inactive Web sites, coordinate the automatic deletion schedule with the protection schedule to ensure you have a recent copy of the site backed up.

Applying Operating System Updates on Windows SharePoint

Services Servers

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

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You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, on computers running Windows SharePoint Services that are protected by DPM. Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

Running Antivirus Software on Windows SharePoint Services

Servers

To prevent data corruption of replicas and recovery points, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that DPM cannot detect. For instructions on configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

Performing Windows SharePoint Services

Management Tasks

This section provides instructions and guidelines for managing a protected server running

Windows SharePoint Services and making changes after the initial DPM configuration.

In This Section

Upgrading Windows SharePoint Services

Moving Windows SharePoint Services Servers Between Domains

How to Rename a Windows SharePoint Services Server

Changing the Front-End Web Server

Adding Databases to a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

Adding or Removing Servers in a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

Upgrading Windows SharePoint Services

Windows SharePoint Services data, such as the configuration databases, content databases, and other databases and files that are part of the Windows SharePoint Services farm for Windows

SharePoint Services 2.0 (WSS 2.0), can be protected by DPM as SQL Server databases.

If you protect WSS 2.0 data as SQL Server databases and then upgrade to WSS 3.0 or Microsoft

Office SharePoint Server 2007, you must reconfigure protection of the data.

To upgrade from Windows SharePoint Services 2.0 to Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 or Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007

1. Create a recovery point of the WSS 2.0 data that is protected as a SQL Server database.

2. Stop protection of the data, choosing the Retain replica option.

3. Upgrade the server running Windows SharePoint Services.

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4. Add the upgraded Windows SharePoint Services farm to a protection group by selecting it as a Windows SharePoint Services data source.

Data in the retained replica remains available for recovery, but it is not associated with the upgraded Windows SharePoint Services farm.

Moving Windows SharePoint Services Servers Between

Domains

You cannot do the following for protected computers:

Change the domain of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the domain of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the computer when it is re-protected.

We recommend that you do not change the domain of a protected computer. If you must change the domain of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection while the computer retains its original domain membership.

Protect the data source on the computer after it becomes a member of another domain.

To change the domain membership of a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the domain membership of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about performing tasks involving protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

How to Rename a Windows SharePoint Services Server

DPM uses the computer name as a unique identifier for replicas, recovery points, DPM database entries, reporting database entries, and so on.

You cannot:

Change the name of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

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Change the name of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the new computer name.

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected computer. If you must change the name of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection (the old computer name).

Protect the data source on the computer (the new computer name).

To rename a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data remains accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the name of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about tasks that involve protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

Changing the Front-End Web Server

To protect a server farm on servers running Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 or

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007, you start the Windows SharePoint Services VSS Writer service (WSS Writer service) and install the DPM protection agent on a single front-end Web server. DPM uses this front-end Web server to perform backups.

The following procedure uses the example of a server farm with two front-end Web servers,

Server1 and Server2. DPM uses Server1 to protect the farm. You need to change the front-end

Web server that DPM uses to Server2 so that you can remove Server1 from the farm.

Note

If the front-end Web server that DPM uses to protect the farm is unavailable, use the following procedure to change the front-end Web server by starting at step 4.

To change the front-end Web server that DPM uses to protect the farm

1. Stop the WSS Writer service on Server1 by running the following command at a command prompt: stsadm -o unregisterwsswriter

2. On Server1, open the Registry Editor and navigate to the following key:

HKLM\System\CCS\Services\VSS\VssAccessControl

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3. Check all values listed in the VssAccessControl subkey. If any entry has a value data of 0 and another VSS writer is running under the associated account credentials, change the value data to 1.

4. Install a protection agent on Server2.

5. On Server2, at a command prompt, change the directory to DPM installation location \bin\ and run the following command:

ConfigureSharepoint.exe

A prompt appears requesting your Windows SharePoint Services farm administrator credentials. The administrator credentials you provide for the Windows SharePoint

Services farm must be a local administrator on the server.

6. There is a known issue when the server farm is the only member of the protection group and the protection group is configured to use tape-based protection. If your server farm is the only member of the protection group using tape-based protection, to change the frontend Web server that DPM uses to protect the farm, you must temporarily add another member to the protection group by performing the following steps: a. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar. b. Select the protection group that the server farm belongs to, and then click Modify protection group . c. In the Modify Group Wizard, add a volume on any server to the protection group. You can remove this volume from the protection after the procedure is completed. d. If the protection group is configured for short-term disk-based protection and longterm tape-based protection, select the manual replica creation option. This avoids creating a replica for the volume that you are temporarily adding to the protection group. e. Complete the wizard.

7. Remove Server1 from the protection group, selecting to retain the replicas on disk and tape.

8. Select the protection group that the server farm belongs to, and then click Modify protection group .

9. In the Modify Group Wizard, on the Select Group Members page, expand Server2 and select the server farm, and then complete the wizard.

A consistency check will start.

10. If you performed step 6, you can now remove the volume from the protection group.

Adding Databases to a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

When a database is added to or removed from a Windows SharePoint Services farm, DPM will mark the replica as inconsistent and alert the administrator.

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When a database is added, the alert includes a link to modify the protection group. After you complete the Modify Group Wizard, DPM performs a consistency check. Protection of the farm, including the added database, continues.

When a database is removed, you should stop protection of the server farm using the retain replica option, and then add the farm to the protection group again.

Adding or Removing Servers in a Windows SharePoint Services

Farm

DPM uses a single front-end Web server to protect the server farm. When you add other frontend Web servers or remove front-end Web servers other than the server used by DPM, there is no impact on protection of the farm.

To remove the front-end Web server that DPM is using while continuing protection of the server

farm, see Changing the Front-End Web Server .

Recovering Windows SharePoint Services Data

The following points apply to the recovery of Windows SharePoint Services data:

Item details will not appear on the Recovery Wizard Summary page for Windows SharePoint

Services sites and items. When you recover a Windows SharePoint Services farm, DPM recovers the configuration database of the farm but does not list this database in the item details on the Recovery Wizard Summary page.

The administration content database is the first content database created with the administration central site when you set up your farm. Do not directly recover the administration content database because this could lead to data corruption in the Windows

SharePoint Services farm.

The recovery point times on the Browse tab may differ from the times on the Search tab for

Windows SharePoint Services data. The Search tab lists the correct recovery point time for sites, documents, and folders. The Browse tab displays the backup time for the farm.

Documents in Windows SharePoint Services could be in one of the following states if document versioning is enabled:

Created not checked in - Visible only to the creator

Checked in - Visible to administrator and users with permission to publish

Published - Visible to users with permission to approve

Approved - Visible to all viewers

When you recover Windows SharePoint Services data, only documents that are checked in, published, or approved are recovered. Documents that are not checked in will not be recovered as part of a site collection or document recovery. Documents that are in either the user Recycle Bin or the site collection Recycle Bin will not be recovered as part of a site collection or document recovery.

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In This Section

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Site

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Item

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

To recover a Windows SharePoint Serfvices farm, the recovery destination must meet the following requirements:

The front-end Web servers are configured the same as they were when the recovery point was created.

The farm structure must be created on the front-end Web server; the farm data will be recovered to the existing structure.

The instances of SQL Server are configured with the same names used when the recovery point was created.

To recover farm data to a functioning farm

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. In the Protected data pane, expand the server that contains the farm you want to recover, and then click All Protected SharePoint Data .

The farm displays in the Recoverable item pane as server name \ farm name .

3. Use the calendar and Recovery time menu to select a recovery point.

4. In the Recoverable item pane, click the farm item.

5. Click Recover in the Actions pane.

6. Complete the wizard.

To recover farm data when the protected farm is unavailable

1. Create a new farm that uses the same instance of SQL Server and the same front-end

Web server as the original protected farm.

2. On the front-end Web server that DPM used to protect the original farm, register the

Windows SharePoint Services VSS Writer service (WSS Writer service) by running the following command at a command prompt: stsadm -o registerwsswriter

3. On the DPM server, in DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

4. In the Protected data pane, expand the server that contains the farm you want to recover, and then click All Protected SharePoint Data .

The farm displays in the Recoverable item pane as server name \ farm name .

5. Use the calendar and the Recovery time menu to select a recovery point.

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6. In the Recoverable item pane, click the farm item.

7. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

8. Complete the wizard.

9. On the main front-end Web server for the server farm, run the SharePoint Products and

Technologies Configuration Wizard and disconnect the front-end Web server from the farm.

Note

If the main front-end Web server for the server farm is not the front-end Web server that DPM uses to protect the farm, you must also disconnect the front-end

Web server that DPM uses to protect the farm.

10. Open Internet Information Services (IIS) and delete all Web site and application pool entries related to the farm.

11. Run the SharePoint Products and Technologies Configuration Wizard, select to connect to an existing server farm, and specify the server name and database name for the farm you created in step 1.

Note

Perform step 11 for all front-end Web servers for the server farm.

12. On the Completing the SharePoint Products and Technologies Configuration

Wizard page, click Advanced Settings ,and thenclick Next .

13. On the Advanced Settings page, select the option Use this machine to host the web site , and complete the wizard.

See Also

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Site

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Item

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Site

To recover a Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services site, you must:

1. Create a farm to be used for the recovery.

2. Create a Web application for the recovery.

3. Use DPM to recover the site to the recovery farm.

The following requirements apply to a site recovery:

The farm used for recovery should be a single server farm.

If you protect a MOSS farm, then the recovery farm must also be MOSS.

The features and templates installed on the recovery farm must match those of the target farm.

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If a service pack or update is installed on the protected farm, the recovery farm must have the same service pack or update installed or item-level restore operations could fail.

Both the recovery and target farms must be in the same language and have the same language packs installed.

The target farm must contain a site collection with the same path as the original protected site. If the site collection does not exist, you can create an empty site collection with the correct path on the target farm before you perform the recovery.

When you restore a site, DPM restores the database to the recovery farm, extracts the site from the recovery farm, and imports it into the target farm. During this process, DPM creates a temporary file on the recovery farm at a location specified in the Recovery Wizard. You should periodically delete the temporary files at that location.

To recover a site

1. Create a farm that DPM can use for the recovery. To create a recovery farm, see the instructions at " Deploy in a simple server farm "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95150).

2. Create a Web application and name it DPMRecoveryWebApplication. To create a new

Web application, see the instructions at " Create or extend Web applications (Windows

SharePoint Services) " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=94374).

3. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

4. In the Protected data pane, expand the server that contains the farm you want to recover, and then click All Protected SharePoint Data .

The farm displays in the Recoverable item pane as server name \ farm name .

5. Double-click the farm item.

The databases for the farm display in the Recoverable item pane.

6. Select a recovery point for the site you want to recover, and click Recover in the Actions pane.

7. On the Select Recovery Type page, select Recover to original site .

8. On the Specify Recovery Farm page, enter the information for the recovery farm you created in step 1, and then complete the wizard.

DPM recovers the site to the original farm.

See Also

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Item

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Item

You can recover Windows SharePoint Services items, such as lists and documents, from a DPM recovery point to the original site or to an alternate site.

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To recover an item

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. In the Protected data pane, expand the server that contains the farm you want to recover, double-click All Protected SharePoint Data , and then double-click the server farm name.

Content databases display in the Recoverable item pane.

3. Use the calendar and Recovery time menu to select a recovery point.

4. In the Recoverable item pane, double-click the content database, double-click the site, and then double-click the displayed items to navigate to the item that you want to recover.

5. Click Recover in the Actions pane, and then complete the wizard.

See Also

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Farm

How to Recover a Windows SharePoint Services Site

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

This section provides guidance on performing common maintenance tasks on protected servers.

It also provides guidance on making changes to the computer configuration after the computer is protected by DPM.

In This Section

Performing General Maintenance on Servers Running Virtual Server

Performing Virtual Server Management Tasks

Recovering Virtual Server Data

Performing General Maintenance on Servers

Running Virtual Server

General maintenance includes tasks such as disk and file maintenance, updating operating systems and applications, and protecting data by using antivirus software and performing regular backups. Some special considerations apply when you are performing server maintenance on computers running Virtual Server that are protected by System Center Data Protection

Manager 2007 (DPM).

When you need to perform maintenance on a protected server and do not want protection jobs to continue for the duration of the maintenance, you can use the following procedure to disable the protection agent.

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Note

If you disable a protection agent for a server that is a cluster node, you should disable the protection agent for every node of the cluster.

To disable a protection agent

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. On the Agents tab, in the display pane, select the name of the computer with the protection agent you want to disable.

3. In the Actions pane, click Disable protection agent .

4. In the dialog box, click OK to confirm that you want to proceed.

In This Section

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Applying Operating System Updates on Virtual Server

Running Antivirus Software on Virtual Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Virtual Server

Running Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, or Chkdsk.exe should have no adverse effect on performance or data protection.

See Also

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on the DPM Server

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on File Servers and Workstations

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Exchange Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on SQL Servers

Using Windows Maintenance Tools on Windows SharePoint Services Servers

Applying Operating System Updates on Virtual Server

An important part of computer maintenance is ensuring that operating systems and software are up to date. Updates—known as "fixes," "patches," "service packs," and "security rollup packages"—help to protect computers and data.

You can use your preferred method for deploying software updates, such as Automatic Updates or Windows Server Update Services, on computers running Virtual Server that are protected by

DPM and on virtual machines that are protected by DPM. Because some software updates require a computer restart, you should schedule or perform the updates at times that have the least impact on protection operations.

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Running Antivirus Software on Virtual Server

To prevent data corruption of replicas and recovery points, configure the antivirus software to delete infected files rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes that DPM cannot detect. For instructions on configuring your antivirus software to delete infected files, see the documentation for your antivirus software.

Performing Virtual Server Management Tasks

This section provides instructions and guidelines for managing a protected virtual server and making changes after the initial DPM configuration.

In This Section

Moving Virtual Servers Between Domains

How to Rename Virtual Servers

Renaming Virtual Machines

Moving a Virtual Machine or Virtual Hard Disk

Protecting Application Data on Virtual Machines

Moving Virtual Servers Between Domains

You cannot do the following for protected computers:

Change the domain of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the domain of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the computer when it is re-protected.

We recommend that you do not change the domain of a protected computer. If you must change the domain of a protected computer, you must complete two tasks:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection while the computer retains its original domain membership.

Protect the data source on the computer after it becomes a member of another domain.

To change the domain membership of a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the domain membership of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

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5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about performing tasks involving protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

How to Rename Virtual Servers

DPM uses the computer name as a unique identifier for replicas, recovery points, DPM database entries, reporting database entries, and so on.

You cannot:

Change the name of a protected computer and continue protection without disruption.

Change the name of a protected computer and associate the existing replicas and recovery points with the new computer name.

We recommend that you do not change the name of a protected computer. If you must change the name of a protected computer, you must:

Remove the data sources on the computer from protection (the old computer name).

Protect the data source on the computer (the new computer name).

To rename a protected computer

1. Remove all members from protection groups.

If you retain the replicas and recovery points, the data will remain accessible for administrative recovery until you delete the replicas. However, it will not be accessible for end-user recovery.

2. Uninstall the protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

3. Change the name of the computer.

4. Install a protection agent by using DPM Administrator Console on the DPM server.

5. Add the data sources to protection groups on the DPM server.

For information about tasks that involve protection agents and protection groups, see DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

Renaming Virtual Machines

Renaming a virtual machine changes the name of the virtual machine configuration (.vmc) file, the virtual machine name shown in the Administration Web site, and the display name of the virtual machine window, but not the name of the folder containing the virtual machine.

If you change the name of a virtual machine that is protected as a guest on a Virtual Server, DPM continues protection and captures the change as it does any other change to protected data.

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Moving a Virtual Machine or Virtual Hard Disk

Moving a Virtual Machine

To move a virtual machine that is protected by DPM

1. Copy the virtual machine to the new host. For instructions, see " Copying, managing, and renaming virtual machines " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95298).

2. Add the copied virtual machine to a protection group.

3. Remove the original virtual machine from the original host. For instructions, see

" Removing virtual machines " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95299).

4. Stop protection of the original virtual machine.

Moving a Virtual Hard Disk

You might want to move a virtual hard disk to store a large amount of data or improve disk performance. A virtual hard disk for a virtual machine is stored as a .vhd file. To continue protection of a virtual hard disk that is moved to a new volume, run the Modify Group Wizard for the protection group to which it belongs, and then run a consistency check.

Protecting Application Data on Virtual Machines

When you add a virtual machine to a protection group, you are protecting the complete configuration of the virtual machine, including operating system, applications, and application data. However, you cannot specifically recover application data from the recovery points for the virtual machine; you can only recover the entire virtual machine. When you recover the virtual machine, applications are recovered with all data that was present at the time that the recovery point was created.

It is not necessary to install a DPM protection agent on a virtual machine to protect it as a virtual machine on the Virtual Server host.

To recover only application data for applications running in virtual machines, you must install a protection agent on the virtual machine and select the application data explicitly as a protection group member.

You can protect both the virtual machines as guests on the Virtual Server host and the application data within the virtual machines as applications.

For more information about protecting application data, see the topics on protecting specific data types, such as Exchange Server data or SQL Server data, in DPM Help

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102087).

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Recovering Virtual Server Data

In This Section

How to Recover the Virtual Server Host

How to Recover a Virtual Machine

How to Recover Virtual Machines as Files

How to Recover the Virtual Server Host

When you protect a Virtual Server host and its virtual machines, the recoverable items are the

Virtual Server configuration and each virtual machine. You should recover the Virtual Server configuration before you recover the individual virtual machines.

To recover a virtual machine

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Browse or search for the virtual server name you want to recover, and then select the data in the results pane.

3. Select the bold date for the recovery point you want to recover. Available recovery points are indicated in bold on the calendar in the recovery points section.

4. In the Recoverable item pane, click the Virtual Server configuration item.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover . The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. Review your recovery selection, and then click Next .

7. Select Recover to original instance ,and then click Next . The current files will be overwritten during recovery.

8. Specify your recovery options, and then click Next . The following recovery options are available: a. Select Enable SAN-based recovery using hardware snapshots to use SAN-based hardware snapshots for quicker recovery.

This option is valid only when you have a SAN where hardware snapshot functionality is enabled, the SAN has the capability to create a clone and to split a clone to make it writable, and the protected computer and the DPM server are connected to the same SAN. b. In the Notification area , click Send an e-mail when the recovery completes , and specify the recipients who will receive the notification. Separate the e-mail addresses with commas.

9. Review your recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover a Virtual Machine

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How to Recover Virtual Machines as Files

How to Recover a Virtual Machine

When you protect a Virtual Server host and its virtual machines, the recoverable items are the

Virtual Server configuration and each virtual machine. You should recover the Virtual Server configuration before you recover the individual virtual machines.

When you recover the virtual machine, applications are recovered with all data that was present at the time that the recovery point was created.

To recover a virtual machine

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Browse or search for the virtual machine name you want to recover, and then, in the results pane, select the data.

3. Available recovery points are indicated in bold on the calendar in the recovery points section. Select the bold date for the recovery point you want to recover.

4. In the Recoverable item pane, click to select the virtual machine item you want to recover.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover . DPM starts the Recovery Wizard.

6. Review your recovery selection, and then click Next .

7. Select Recover to original instance ,and then click Next . The current files will be overwritten during recovery.

8. Specify your recovery options, and then click Next . a. Select Enable SAN-based recovery using hardware snapshots to use SAN-based hardware snapshots for quicker recovery.

This option is valid only when you have a SAN where hardware snapshot functionality is enabled, the SAN has the capability to create a clone and to split a clone to make it writable, and the protected computer and the DPM server are connected to the same SAN. b. In the Notification area , click Send an e-mail when the recovery completes , and specify the recipients who will receive the notification. Separate the e-mail addresses with commas.

9. Review your recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover the Virtual Server Host

How to Recover Virtual Machines as Files

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How to Recover Virtual Machines as Files

You can recover the Virtual Server configuration and virtual machines as files to a network folder, enabling you to copy those files to an alternate Virtual Server host.

The following files are recovered to the network folder:

For the Virtual Server configuration, options.xml

For each virtual machine, all associated .vhd, .vmc, and .vsv files

When you restore a virtual machine to a network folder and then copy the files to a new Virtual

Server host and start the virtual machine, you may see an error message that the server shut down unexpectedly. This can occur because DPM cannot mark the recovery files as an expected shutdown. The recovered files are otherwise application-consistent.

When the .vhd file for a virtual machine is stored in the root of a volume and you recover the virtual machine to an alternate location as files, the .vhd file will be recovered with directory attributes set to hidden and system. To view the recovered .vhd file, you must remove the directory attributes.

To recover virtual machines as files

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Using either the browse or search functionality, select the storage group to recover.

3. On the calendar, click any date in bold to obtain the recovery points available for that date. The Recovery time menu lists the time for each available recovery point.

4. On the Recovery time menu, select the recovery point you want to use.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard starts.

6. On the Review recovery selection page, click Next .

7. Select Copy files to network location , and then click Next .

8. On the Specify destination page, specify the network folder to which the files should be copied.

9. Specify your recovery options: a. Select Apply security settings of the destination computer or Apply the security settings of the recovery point version . b. Select Enable SAN-based recovery using hardware snapshots to use SAN-based hardware snapshots for quicker recovery.

This option is valid only when you have a SAN where hardware snapshot functionality is enabled, the SAN has the capability to create and split a clone to make it writable, and the protected computer and the DPM server are connected to the same SAN. c. In the Notification area, click Send an e-mail when the recovery completes , and specify the recipients who will receive the notification. Separate the e-mail addresses with commas.

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10. On the Summary page, review the recovery settings, and then click Recover .

See Also

How to Recover the Virtual Server Host

How to Recover a Virtual Machine

Managing Performance

The topics in this section define performance expectations and explain how to optimize Data

Protection Manager (DPM) performance. Network speed, the performance characteristics of the protected computer, the size of your protected data, and the rate at which the protected data changes will determine your actual results.

In This Section

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

DPM and Memory

Performance Counters

Improving Performance

Managing DPM Performance on a WAN

How Protection Group Changes Affect Jobs

See Also

Disaster Recovery

Managing DPM Servers

Managing Protected File Servers and Workstations

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

Managing Tape Libraries

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

As an administrator, one of your concerns will be the impact of DPM data transfer operations on system and network resources. The primary data transfer operations are:

Replica creation . This occurs once for each protection group member.

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Change tracking . This is a continuous process on each protected computer.

Synchronization . This occurs on a regular schedule.

Consistency check . This occurs when a replica becomes inconsistent.

Express full backups . This occurs on a regular schedule.

Back up to tape . This occurs on a regular schedule.

Understanding these operations and DPM processes will help you establish reasonable expectations for DPM performance.

In This Section

Replica Creation

Change Tracking

Synchronization

Consistency Check

Express Full Backup

Backup to Tape

DPM Processes

See Also

Managing Performance

Replica Creation

In DPM, a replica is a complete copy of the protected data on a single volume, database, or storage group. The DPM protection agent on the protected computer sends the data selected for protection to the DPM server. A replica of each member in the protection group is created.

Replica creation is one of the more resource-intensive DPM operations, with its greatest impact being on network resources.

Typically, the performance of the replica creation will be limited by the speed of the network connection between the DPM server and the protected computers. That is, the amount of time that it takes to transfer a 1-gigabyte (GB) volume from a protected computer to the DPM server will be determined by the amount of data per second that the network can transmit.

The following table shows the amount of time it would take, at different network speeds, to transmit various amounts of data under optimal conditions. Times are given in hours, except where specified as minutes.

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Time Required to Transmit Data over a Network at Various Speeds

Data size Network speed

1 Gbps

1 GB

Network speed

100 Mbps

< 1 minute < 1 hour

Network speed

32 Mbps

< 1

Network speed

8 Mbps

< 1

Network speed

2 Mbps

1.5

Network speed

512 Kbps

6

50 GB <10 minutes 1.5 hour

200 GB <36 minutes 6 hours

5

18

18

71

71

284

284

1137

500 GB <1.5 hours 15 45 178 711 2844

Note

In the preceding table, Gbps = gigabits per second, Mbps = megabits per second, and

Kbps = kilobits per second. The figures for a network speed of 1 Gbps assume that the disk speed on the DPM server and the protected computer are not a bottleneck.

Typically, the time to complete initial replica (IR) creation can be calculated as follows:

IR: hours = ((data size in MB) / (.8 x network speed in MB/s)) / 3600

Note 1: Convert network speed from bits to bytes by dividing by 8.

Note 2: The network speed is multiplied by .8 because the maximum network efficiency is approximately 80%.

On an extremely fast network, such as a gigabit connection, the speed of replica creation will be determined by the disk speed of the DPM server or that of the protected computer, whichever is slower.

The impact of replica creation on network performance can be reduced by using network

bandwidth usage throttling. For more information, see Using Network Bandwidth Usage

Throttling .

To avoid the network load of replica creation, you can create replicas manually from tape or other

removable media. For more information, see Creating Replicas Manually .

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

Change Tracking

After the replica is created, the DPM protection agent on the computer begins tracking all changes to protected data on that computer. Changes to files are passed through a filter before being written to the volume. This process is similar to the filtering of files through antivirus software, but the performance load of DPM tracking changes is less than the performance load of antivirus software.

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See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

Synchronization

Synchronization is the process by which DPM transfers data changes from the protected computer to the DPM server and then applies the changes to the replica of the protected data.

For a file volume or share, the protection agent on the protected computer tracks changes to blocks, using the volume filter and the change journal that is part of the operating system to determine whether any protected files were modified. DPM also uses the volume filter and change journal to track the creation of new files and the deletion or renaming of protected files.

For application data, after the replica is created, changes to volume blocks belonging to application files are tracked by the volume filter.

How changes are transferred to the DPM server depends on the application and the type of synchronization. For protected Microsoft Exchange data, synchronization transfers an incremental Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) snapshot. For protected Microsoft SQL Server data, synchronization transfers a transaction log backup.

DPM relies on synchronization to update replicas with the protected data. Each synchronization job consumes network resources and can therefore affect network performance.

The impact of synchronization on network performance can be reduced by using network

bandwidth usage throttling and compression. For more information, see Using Network

Bandwidth Usage Throttling

and Using On-the-Wire Compression .

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

Consistency Check

A consistency check is the process by which DPM checks for and corrects inconsistencies between a protected data source and its replica.

The performance of the protected computer, DPM server, and network will be affected while a consistency check is running, but it is expected to be optimized because only the changes and checksums are transferred.

The network impact from a consistency check is significantly lower than initial replica creation after a successful replica creation. If the initial replica creation is interrupted or unsuccessful, the first consistency check can have an impact similar to replica creation.

We recommend that consistency checks be performed during off-peak hours.

DPM automatically performs a consistency check in the following instances:

When you modify a protection group by changing the exclusion list.

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When a daily consistency check is scheduled and the replica is inconsistent.

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

Express Full Backup

An express full backup is a type of synchronization in which the protection agent transfers a snapshot of all blocks that have changed since the previous express full backup (or since the initial replica creation, for the first express full backup) and updates the replica to include the changed blocks. The impact of an express full backup operation on performance and time is expected to be less than the impact of a full backup because DPM transfers only the blocks changed since the last express full backup.

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

Backup to Tape

When DPM backs up data from the replica to tape, there is no network traffic and therefore no performance impact on the protected computer.

When DPM backs up data from the protected computer directly to tape, there will be an impact on the disk resources and performance on the protected computer. The impact on performance is less when backing up file data than when backing up application data.

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

DPM Processes

On the DPM server, three processes can impact performance:

DPM protection agent (MsDpmProtectionAgent.exe) . DPM jobs affect both memory and

CPU usage by the DPM protection agent. It is normal for CPU usage by

MsDpmProtectionAgent.exe to increase during consistency checks.

DPM service (MsDpm.exe) . The DPM service affects both memory and CPU usage.

DPM Administrator Console (an instance of Mmc.exe) . DPM Administrator Console can be a significant factor in high memory usage. You can close it when it is not in use.

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Note

Memory usage for the DPM instance of the SQL Server service

(Microsoft$DPM$Acct.exe) is expected to be comparatively high. This does not indicate a problem. The service normally uses a large amount of memory for caching, but it releases memory when available memory is low.

See Also

How DPM Operations Affect Performance

Managing Performance

DPM and Memory

When the memory in use by all the existing processes exceeds the amount of RAM available, the operating system will move pages (4-KB pieces) of one or more virtual address spaces to the computer’s hard disk, freeing that RAM for other uses. In Microsoft Windows systems, these pages are stored in one or more files, called pagefile.sys, in the root of a partition.

DPM requires a pagefile size that is 0.2 percent the size of all recovery point volumes combined, in addition to the recommended size (generally, 1.5 times the amount of RAM on the computer).

For example, if the recovery point volumes on a DPM server total 3 TB, you should increase the pagefile size by 6 GB.

For information about modifying the pagefile size, see " Change the size of the virtual memory paging pool " (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=95116).

There is a Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) non-paged pool limitation on x86 32-bit operating systems. Therefore, if you are protecting more than 10 TB of data, the DPM server must be running on a 64-bit operating system.

See Also

Managing Performance

Performance Counters

One method you can use to monitor DPM server performance is Performance in Administrative

Tools. You can configure the monitored data to be saved as a log. You can also configure

Performance to generate alerts. For information about how to create and configure performance alerts, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 324752, How to create and configure performance alerts in Windows Server 2003 , (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=47881).

Note

You can use the DPM Management Pack for Microsoft Operations Manager 2005 (MOM) or System Center Operations Manager 2007 to centrally monitor the state, health, and performance of multiple DPM servers from an Operations Management server. For

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information about downloading the DPM Management Pack, see the Microsoft

Management Pack and Product Connector Catalog

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=47215).

The Performance Counters for Monitoring DPM table lists counters that can be useful for monitoring DPM server performance. For more information about specific performance counters, see Performance Logs and Alerts Help. To open the Performance tool, click Start , point to Administrative Tools , and then click Performance . On the Action menu, click Help .

Performance Counters for Monitoring DPM

Performance Object and Counter

Description Value That Might

Indicate a Problem

Possible Causes

Memory: Avail/MBytes Measures the memory that is available to

Processor: %

Processor Time processes running on the specified DPM server. The

Avail/MBytes value is the sum of memory assigned to the standby (cached), free, and zero-paged lists.

< 50 megabytes

(MB).

Indicates low memory on DPM server.

Measures the percentage of time the processor was busy during the sampling interval.

> 95% for more than

10 minutes.

Indicates very high

CPU usage on the

DPM server.

One or more applications are consuming large amounts of memory.

Multiple DPM jobs are running simultaneously.

The DPM server does not have sufficient memory to handle the current

DPM workload.

Multiple DPM jobs are running simultaneously.

Synchronization with consistency check jobs are particularly

CPU-intensive.

On-the-wire compression has been enabled on the

DPM server. On-thewire compression allows faster data throughput without negatively affecting network performance.

However, it places a

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Performance Object and Counter

Description

Physical Disk: Current

Disk Queue Length

(for all instances)

Measures the number of disk requests that are currently waiting and the requests currently being serviced.

Value That Might

Indicate a Problem

Possible Causes large processing load on both the protected computer and the DPM server.

A runaway process is exhausting system resources.

The DPM server does not have sufficient processing capacity to handle the DPM workload.

> 80 requests for more than 6 minutes.

Multiple DPM jobs that are running

Indicates possibly excessive disk queue length. simultaneously are placing a high demand on disk resources.

Disk performance needs tuning.

Disk resources on the DPM server are not sufficient for the current DPM workload.

See Also

Managing Performance

Improving Performance

Performance is determined by workload and capacity. A slow computer might perform adequately when it has a very light workload. In contrast, the performance of an extremely powerful computer might suffer when challenged by an excessive workload. In operations between two computers on a network, the workload that can be handled effectively will be limited by the component with the least capacity, whether it is one of the computers or the network connection itself.

As a general rule, you can improve performance by making changes to the workload, the capacity, or both.

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In This Section

Modifying Workloads

Increasing Capacity

See Also

Managing Performance

Modifying Workloads

DPM offers several methods that you can use to modify protection workloads to improve performance. The following table lists the methods you can use and indicates what you can expect from each method.

Methods for Modifying Protection Workloads

Method Impact

Network bandwidth usage throttling

On-the-wire compression

Causes jobs to use less bandwidth, but they take longer to complete.

Reduces size of data transfer but increases

CPU utilization on the DPM server and the protected computers.

Staggering synchronization start times

Scheduling consistency checks during off-peak hours

Prevents DPM from interfering with regular business use of protected computers.

Creating replicas manually

Balances the loads of synchronization jobs across protection groups.

Might make replica creation faster. There is no performance load on the protected computer or network resources. However, the first consistency check will impact performance of the protected computer.

In This Section

Using Network Bandwidth Usage Throttling

Using On-the-Wire Compression

Staggering Synchronization Start Times

Scheduling Consistency Checks

Creating Replicas Manually

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See Also

Increasing Capacity

Managing Performance

Using Network Bandwidth Usage Throttling

Network bandwidth usage throttling limits the amount of network bandwidth that DPM can use to create and synchronize replicas. Throttling helps to ensure that network bandwidth is available to applications other than DPM.

The advantage of using network bandwidth usage throttling is that it enables you to limit the amount of network resources a synchronization job can consume. The disadvantage of network bandwidth usage throttling is that it can lengthen the amount of time each synchronization job takes to complete.

Network bandwidth usage throttling is configured for each protected computer. Set network bandwidth usage throttling in terms of an absolute maximum amount of data to be transferred per second.

To enable network bandwidth usage throttling

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Agents tab.

3. In the Display pane, select a server.

4. In the Actions pane, click Throttle computer .

5. Click Enable network bandwidth usage .

You can configure network bandwidth usage throttling separately for work hours and nonwork hours, and you can define the work hours for the protected computer. Work hours and non-work hours use the time zone of the protected computer.

Network bandwidth usage can be limited by Group Policy. The Group Policy reservable bandwidth limit on the local computer determines the combined reservable bandwidth for all programs that use the Packet Scheduler, including DPM. The DPM network bandwidth usage limit determines the amount of network bandwidth that DPM can consume during replica creation, synchronization, and consistency checks. If the DPM bandwidth usage limit, either by itself or in combination with the limits of other programs, exceeds the Group Policy reservable bandwidth limit, the DPM bandwidth usage limit might not be applied.

For example, if a DPM computer with a 1-gigabit-per-second (Gbps) network connection has a

Group Policy reservable bandwidth limit of 20 percent, 200 Mbps of bandwidth is reserved for all programs that use the Packet Scheduler. If DPM bandwidth usage is then set to a maximum of

150 Mbps while Internet Information Services (IIS) bandwidth usage is set to a maximum of

100 Mbps, the combined bandwidth usage limits of DPM and IIS exceed the Group Policy reservable bandwidth limit, and the DPM limit might not be applied.

To resolve this issue, reduce the DPM setting for network bandwidth usage throttling.

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See Also

Improving Performance

Modifying Workloads

Using On-the-Wire Compression

Compression decreases the size of data being transferred during replica creation and synchronization, and it allows more data throughput with less impact to network performance.

However, this option adds to the CPU load on both the DPM server and the protected computers.

The amount of compression and improvement on network performance depends on workload.

Compression is enabled for a protected computer and applies to replica creation, synchronization, and consistency check operations. Recovery jobs also use compression.

To enable on-the-wire compression

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

2. In the Actions pane, click Optimize performance .

3. On the Network tab, select Enable on-the-wire compression .

4. To apply your changes, click OK .

See Also

Improving Performance

Modifying Workloads

Staggering Synchronization Start Times

You can specify the starting time, in minutes after the hour, of synchronization jobs for each protection group. Staggered starting times minimize the network impact of running multiple large protection jobs simultaneously.

To determine whether staggering the start times of synchronization jobs is appropriate for your needs, first gather information about scheduled protection jobs in DPM Administrator Console:

In the Monitoring task area, on the Jobs tab, review jobs that are scheduled for times when the DPM server experiences large disk queues.

In the Protection task area, review details for protection groups to determine the size and frequency of protection jobs.

Offsetting synchronization start times can also be used to optimize secondary protection of another DPM server. Secondary protection is when a DPM server protects the database and replicas of another DPM server, referred to as the primary DPM server. You can offset the synchronization of the primary DPM server to the secondary DPM server to occur after the data sources are synchronized to the primary DPM server.

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To stagger synchronization start times

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

2. In the display area, select a protection group.

3. In the Actions pane, click Optimize performance .

4. On the Network tab, select the hours and minutes to offset the start of the synchronization job in the Offset <time> start time by field.

The maximum allowed value for offset is the same as the synchronization frequency.

5. To apply your changes, click OK .

Changing the start time offsets recovery points for files by the equivalent amount of time.

You can choose between two modes of synchronization: at regular intervals or just before a recovery point is created.

Synchronization at regular intervals distributes the load on the network throughout the day. In the case of synchronization just before a recovery point is created, the network traffic is potentially greater at the time of synchronization, but data is not sent throughout the day.

If an organization has limited network bandwidth between the protected computer and the DPM server and this limited bandwidth is also expected to be shared by normal corporate usage, consider using synchronization only before recovery point and schedule it during off-peak hours.

Although the impact on network traffic and performance is important, you must also consider how the choice of synchronization mode affects your ability to recover data. If you synchronize only once a day, the maximum loss window is 24 hours. However, if you choose to synchronize every hour, your maximum loss window is 1 hour.

See Also

Improving Performance

Modifying Workloads

Scheduling Consistency Checks

Because consistency checks affect the performance of both the DPM server and the protected computer, you should schedule consistency checks for hours when reduced responsiveness of the protected computer has the least impact on your business operations and there is the least amount of network traffic.

After a protection group is created manually or if a replica becomes inconsistent because of a network outage or another reason, you must perform a manual consistency check. For instructions, see How to Synchronize a Replica in DPM Help ( http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102162).

You can also schedule a daily consistency check to ensure that inconsistent replicas are automatically repaired.

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As part of the scheduling options, you can configure a duration or time window when consistency checks jobs can run. For example, you can configure the consistency check to begin at 8:00 P.M. when most of your company’s employees are gone, with a maximum duration of 10 hours.

See Also

Improving Performance

Modifying Workloads

Creating Replicas Manually

When you create a protection group, you can choose to create the replicas manually from tape or other removable media to reduce the load on the protected computers and network.

Automatic replica creation is easier; however, depending on the size of the protected data, manual replica creation can be faster. For smaller data sets, we recommend the automatic option. For large data sets and slow networks, the manual option is likely to be a better choice.

After the replica is created, you must run synchronization with consistency check.

For information about how to create a replica manually, see How to Manually Create a Replica in

DPM Help (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102160).

See Also

Improving Performance

Modifying Workloads

Increasing Capacity

You can also improve performance by increasing the capacity of the DPM server through hardware upgrades:

Adding disks to the storage pool and reallocating the replicas across the storage pool can help reduce disk queue length.

Using striped volumes can increase disk throughput to deal with disk bottlenecks.

Adding memory is a relatively inexpensive upgrade that can result in a noticeable improvement in performance if the server frequently experiences low available memory.

Adding more processors or upgrading to faster processors can reduce CPU issues.

Also, consider your data protection requirements: you might need additional DPM servers to balance the workload.

See Also

Improving Performance

Managing Performance

Modifying Workloads

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Managing DPM Performance on a WAN

Performance is a serious consideration when the DPM server and the servers that it is protecting are connected by low-speed wide area network (WAN) links, particularly for resource-intensive jobs such as replica creation and consistency checks. For example, transferring a 20-GB volume across a 512-Kbps link would take at least 120 hours.

In this network configuration, you should enable compression for all protection groups. For replica creation of volumes larger than 5 GB, we recommend that you create the replica manually.

See Also

Managing Performance

How Protection Group Changes Affect Jobs

Changes to the configuration of a DPM protection group can result in the cancellation of some active jobs. A change could affect replica jobs, archive jobs, or both. The following table lists the jobs that are canceled in each category.

Job types

Replica jobs

Replica creation

Consistency check

Synchronization

Create recovery point on disk

Recovery from disk

Archive jobs

Create recovery point on tape

Verification of data on tape

Copy data to tape

Back up to tape

Recovery from tape

The following table lists the affects of protection group changes on active jobs. Jobs can be canceled for all members of the protection group ("protection group"), all data sources on the protected computer ("protected computer"), or all protected computers in the same time zone as the computer hosting the data sources in the protection group that is changed ("time zone").

Protection group changes and active jobs

Change to protection group

Remove tape-based protection

Add disk-based protection

Remove disk-based protection

Job cancellations

Archive jobs for the protection group

Archive jobs for the protection group if tapebased protection is configured

Replica and archive jobs for the protection group

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Change to protection group

Add or remove data sources

Change protected objects, including folder exclusion

Change file type exclusion

Job cancellations

Replica for the protected computer and archive jobs for time zone

Replica and archive jobs for the protected computer and time zone

Replica and archive jobs for the protection group

Delete a protection group

Change the preferred server for clustered

Exchange Server data

Change protection of a mounted volume to a different mount point

Stop protection and delete data on tape

Stop protection and delete data on disk

Change the tape library that the protection group uses

Change the tape data verification selection

Change to number of tape copies

Replica and archive jobs for the protection group

Replica and archive jobs for the protected computer and time zone

Replica and archive jobs for the protected computer and time zone

Archive jobs for the time zone

Replica and archive jobs for the protected computer

Archive jobs for the protection group if data verification is enabled

Archive jobs for the protection group

Archive jobs for the protection group

Add or remove tape-based protection Archive jobs for the protection group

Change data verification setting for tape-based protection

Archive jobs for the protection group

Change data verification setting for disk-based protection

Replica jobs for the protection group

Archive jobs for the protection group Change compression setting for tape-based protection

Change encryption setting for tape-based protection

Archive jobs for the protection group

Change network bandwidth usage throttling setting for short-term tape-based protection

Change compression, encryption, or network bandwidth usage throttling for disk-based protection

Archive jobs for the protection group

Replica jobs for the protection group

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See Also

Managing Performance

Managing Tape Libraries

This section explains how to manage tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives that are attached to the System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 (DPM) server, including routine maintenance tasks.

For hardware operations, maintenance, and troubleshooting, see the documentation for the tape drive product.

In This Section

Updating Tape Library Information

Remapping Tape Drives

Disabling Tape Libraries and Tape Drives

Removing Tape Libraries

Managing the Tape Catalog

Cleaning Tape Drives

Managing Tapes

Recovering Data from Tapes

Updating Tape Library Information

You can update tape library information by using Rescan on the Libraries tab in the Management task area. The Rescan operation performs the following tasks:

Checks for new tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives attached to the DPM server.

Refreshes the state of all tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives attached to the DPM server.

Rescan can take several minutes to complete. Any library jobs that begin during rescan will be queued until rescan completes. If a library job is already in progress when rescan begins, the rescan operation fails.

If a new tape library or stand-alone tape drive is identified during rescan, DPM adds its information to the Libraries tab.

If you installed a new tape library or stand-alone tape drive on the DPM server and it is not identified during rescan, try the following steps to troubleshoot the problem:

1. Ensure that the tape library and drives are properly connected.

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2. For SCSI connections, ensure that the logical unit number (LUN) for each device is unique.

3. Ensure that Device Manager lists all tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives attached to the DPM server.

4. Ensure the proper drivers are installed for each device.

You should rescan to refresh the state of tape libraries and stand-alone tape drives attached to the DPM server only when changes have been made to the hardware.

Remapping Tape Drives

The Rescan action on the Libraries tab in the Management task area causes DPM to examine the tape drives that are attached to the DPM server and update the information displayed on the Libraries tab. The Libraries tab displays each stand-alone tape drive and each tape library and its drives.

When the physical state of the tape drives does not display correctly in DPM Administrator

Console, you need to remap the tape drive information. For example, drives from a tape library are listed as stand-alone tape drives, a drive for Library 1 is listed as belonging to Library 2, or a stand-alone tape drive is reported as a drive within another library rather than as a stand-alone tape drive.

Note

If a tape drive is not mapped correctly, jobs that require the tape drive that is incorrectly mapped will fail.

To correct the tape drive mapping, you must create a file named DPMLA.xml with the correct information, and then click Rescan . A template file for drive remapping,

LADriveRemappingTemplate.xml, is added to the DPM server when you install DPM.

To create DPMLA.xml, open LADriveRemappingTemplate.xml from Microsoft Data Protection

Manager\DPM\Config in an XML editor or Notepad, follow the instructions in the template file, and then save the file as DPMLA.xml in the Microsoft Data Protection Manager\DPM\Config folder.

Important

You should not make changes to LADriveRemappingTemplate.xml because future updates to DPM might include changes to the template file. If you modify

LADriveRemappingTemplate.xml, updates to DPM cannot replace the template file.

The following is an example of the contents of a DPMLA.xml file that maps a drive that is reported as a stand-alone tape drive into a library at the drive bay 0 in the library:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>

<LAConfig xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/dls/LAConfig.xsd">

<DriveReMapInfo IsMannuallyMapped="true">

<DriveLibraryAssociation>

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<Drive SerialNumber="HUL4B06579" SCSIPort="10" SCSIBus="23" SCSITargetId="80"

SCSILun="4" DriveBayIndex="0" />

<Library SerialNumber="2B41146637" SCSIPort="6" SCSIBus="5" SCSITargetId="0"

SCSILun="1" />

</DriveLibraryAssociation>

</DriveReMapInfo>

</LAConfig>

Disabling Tape Libraries and Tape Drives

You can temporarily disable a tape library or stand-alone tape drive in DPM to perform maintenance or repairs.

To disable a tape library or stand-alone tape drive

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab.

3. In the Display pane, select the tape library or stand-alone tape drive that you want to remove, and then in the Actions pane, click Disable .

If any jobs are using the tape library or stand-alone tape drive, DPM will not disable the device until all jobs in progress complete.

If you disable the only tape drive installed on the DPM server, all jobs that are scheduled to use the tape drive will fail.

See Also

Removing Tape Libraries

Removing Tape Libraries

If you physically disconnect a tape library or stand-alone tape drive, or physically remove a drive from inside a library that is associated with a protection group, DPM Administrator Console displays the disconnected or removed tape library or stand-alone tape drive as offline.

If you disconnect or remove a tape library or stand-alone tape drive that is not associated with a protection group, the entry for the tape library or stand-alone tape drive is removed from DPM

Administrator Console during the daily inventory or when rescan runs, whichever occurs first.

If you remove a tape library that is associated with a protection group and you do not intend to bring the tape library online again, you should modify the protection group to specify a different tape library. When all protection groups that were associated with the tape library that you removed are associated with other tape libraries, the entry for the tape library or stand-alone tape drive will be removed from DPM Administrator Console during the daily inventory or when rescan runs, whichever occurs first.

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See Also

Disabling Tape Libraries and Tape Drives

Managing the Tape Catalog

DPM maintains metadata for each tape, referred to as the tape catalog , in a database. You can manage the retention settings for the tape catalog to determine when the catalog is pruned , which consists of removing entries from the catalog.

DPM automatically prunes the catalog when the retention range for the protection group expires.

You can direct DPM to prune the catalog for all protection groups sooner to reduce the size of the database.

To specify tape catalog retention settings

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

2. Select a protection group.

3. In the Actions pane, click Specify tape catalog retention .

4. Select For , and then specify the duration. To use the default retention setting, select For the duration of retention period specified for each protection group .

5. Click OK .

The Tape Catalog Retention dialog box also lists the current size of the catalog in the database.

You can modify the threshold at which DPM will alert you to the database size.

Cleaning Tape Drives

To clean a stand-alone tape drive, load a cleaning tape and follow the hardware manufacturer's instructions. To clean a drive in a tape library using DPM, specify which tape to use for cleaning and then start the cleaning job. If the bar code on a tape starts with "CLN" (for example, bar code

CLN0000812), DPM identifies the tape as a cleaning tape after a fast inventory; you do not need to designate the tape as a cleaning tape.

However, if the cleaning tape does not have a bar code or the bar code does not start with "CLN", you must mark the tape as a cleaning tape and then run a fast inventory.

If a cleaning tape that does not have a bar code or the bar code does not start with "CLN" is added to the library and you run a detailed inventory before you mark the tape as a cleaning tape and run a fast inventory, a cleaning job starts when DPM mounts this tape during the detailed inventory.

Follow the guidelines from the manufacturer of your tape device for cleaning frequency.

To specify the cleaning tape

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab.

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3. In the Display pane, select the tape to be used for cleaning, and then in the Actions pane, click Mark as cleaning tape .

To clean a tape drive

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab.

3. In the Display pane, select the drive to be cleaned, and then in the Actions pane, click Clean drive .

Note

If a cleaning tape is online and marked as a cleaning tape, you only need to run the cleaning job.

Managing Tapes

On a stand-alone tape drive, DPM will use the same tape for daily backups of a specific protection group until there is insufficient space on the tape.

If a backup job requires more space than is available on a single tape, the job will begin, and then

DPM will display an alert that a job is waiting for tape when you need to remove the full tape and add a blank tape.

DPM will not append backups from different protection groups on the same tape.

In This Section

How to Add and Remove Tapes

How to Identify Tapes

How to Import Tapes

How to View Tape Contents

Rotating Tapes Offsite

How to Copy Tapes

How to Inventory Tapes

How to Add and Remove Tapes

If your tape library has an insert/eject (IE) port, use the Add tape (IE port) and Remove tape (IE port) actions on the Library tab in the Management task area to add tapes or remove tapes from library slots.

If your tape library does not have an IE port, you must select the library on the Library tab in the Management task area, click Unlock library door , physically add or remove the tape, and then click Lock library door .

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If you add or remove tapes to the tape library using Unlock door or Add tape , DPM will automatically inventory the library. If you add or remove tapes to the tape library without using Unlock door or Add tape , you must use the Inventory library action to update the information in DPM Administrator Console.

Adding or removing a tape from a stand-alone tape drive is accomplished manually according to the hardware instructions, without using DPM Administrator Console.

How to Identify Tapes

DPM identifies tapes by using the tape label. Tape labels for tapes used for long-term protection are assigned when you create a protection group. DPM assigns a default tape label in this format: DPM - <ProtectionGroupName> - long-term tape <number> . You can modify this label in the Create New Protection Group Wizard.

Each tape includes an on-media identifier (OMID), which is written to the start of the tape. DPM reads the tape OMID before performing an operation that uses the tape, to ensure that the tape is correct.

If your tape library includes a bar code reader, DPM displays the bar code of each tape in DPM

Administrator Console. If the bar code on a tape starts with "CLN", such as bar code

CLN0000812, DPM identifies the tape as a cleaning tape after a fast inventory.

Identifying Unknown Tapes

When a tape containing data is added to the tape library and the tape label displays as

"Unknown," you can use DPM to identify the tape.

When DPM identifies the tape, it reads the tape header and updates the tape label as follows:

A tape created by the DPM server displays the assigned tape label.

A tape created by another DPM server displays Imported as the tape label.

A tape that contains content that was not created by DPM displays Unrecognized as the tape label.

A tape that has conflicting identification information, such as the bar code or the on-media identifier, DPM displays Suspect as the tape label.

To identify unrecognized tapes

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar, and then click the Libraries tab.

2. In the display pane, expand the tape library or stand-alone tape drive and select the unrecognized tape.

3. In the Actions pane, click Identify unknown tape .

4. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

5. On the Libraries tab, select the unrecognized tape.

6. In the Actions pane, click Identify unknown tape .

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Managing Suspect Tapes

A suspect tape is a tape that has conflicting identification information. Tapes are marked as suspect in the following cases:

Two tapes have the same bar code and different on-media identifiers (OMID)

Two tapes have the same OMID and different bar codes

Two tapes have same OMID, and one of the tapes does not have a bar code

A non-cleaning tape is used for cleaning

DPM cannot use a suspect tape. To resolve the suspect status of the tape, perform the appropriate steps as listed in the following table.

Reason the tape is suspect

Two tapes have the same bar code and different OMIDs

Two tapes have the same OMID and different bar codes

-or-

Two tapes have same OMID, and one of the tapes does not have a bar code

A non-cleaning tape is used for cleaning

Resolution

Change the bar code for one of the suspect tapes. After you resolve the issues for all suspect tapes, open a command prompt window and run the ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd script.

This indicates that one of the tapes is valid, while the invalid tape has the same OMID and is causing both tapes to be marked as suspect.

1. Remove both tapes that are marked suspect from the tape library.

2. Open a command prompt window and run the ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd script.

At this point the suspect tapes will no longer be labeled as suspect .

3. Insert one of the tapes into the library.

4. On the Libraries tab in the Management task area, click Inventory library .

If the tape is labeled suspect after the inventory, this is the invalid tape and you should eject it. Re-run

ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd, insert the other tape, and then run Inventory library .

If the tape is not labeled suspect after the inventory, the other tape is the invalid tape.

After you determine the invalid tape, do not use it in this DPM server again without erasing it.

Open a command prompt window and run the

ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd script.Do not mark

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Reason the tape is suspect

The bar code of a tape is changed after the

OMID has been written.

Resolution this tape as a cleaning tape again.

Put back the old bar code, and then run

ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd.

The OMID of the tape is changed or the tape is erased by software other than DPM.

Put a new bar code on the tape, and then run

ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd.

You can download the ResolveSuspectMedia.cmd script at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=96738.

How to Import Tapes

An imported tape contains content that was created by another DPM server. When you add an imported tape to the tape library, you must recatalog the tape to identify the contents of the tape.

During the recatalog operation, DPM reads from the tape and adds information about the data that it contains to the database. After recatalog completes, you can recover data from the tape by selecting a recovery point from the data on the tape.

To import tapes

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab, and then select the tape to import.

3. In the Actions pane, click Recatalog imported tape .

How to View Tape Contents

If you find a tape that you cannot identify and are uncertain what to do with it, view the contents.

When viewing the contents, you can copy the data that is on the tape to disk by clicking Copy in the tape contents dialog box. Using the Copy option is useful when you cannot use DPM to recover the data from the tape, such as when data spanned two tapes and only one tape can now be located.

To view tape contents

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab, and then select the tape to view.

3. In the Actions pane, click View tape contents .

To view the tapes associated with a protection group

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

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2. In the Display pane, click a protection group.

3. In the Actions pane, click View tape list .

Rotating Tapes Offsite

DPM Administrator Console indicates when a tape in the library should be removed and stored in your archive location by displaying a green icon in the Offsite Ready column. You can also view all tapes ready to be stored offsite in the Tape Management Report. The Tape Management

Report lists tapes that will be due for offsite storage in the upcoming period of time selected for the report.

When the data on a tape expires, return the tape to the tape library. Expired tapes not returned to the tape library will be marked as "overdue" in the Tape Management Report. Overdue tapes expired during an earlier reporting period. Expired tapes should be returned to the tape library for reuse.

How to Copy Tapes

You can use DPM to copy data from a tape to disk, or from a disk or tape to tape.

To copy the contents of a tape to disk

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab, expand the tape library or stand-alone tape drive, select the tape that you want to copy, and then click View tape contents .

3. In the tape contents dialog box, select the data to be copied, and then click Copy .

4. In the Specify Alternate Recovery Destination dialog box, specify a destination on a server that has the protection agent installed, and then click OK .

5. Click Yes to proceed with the copy operation.

6. Click OK to close the message.

You can view the progress of the copy job in the Monitoring task area on the Jobs tab.

To copy data from disk or tape to tape

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Select the data that you want to copy to tape, and then click Recover .

The Recovery Wizard opens.

3. On the Review Recovery Selection page, you can confirm which tape or tapes the data is on. Click Next to continue.

4. On the Specify Recovery Type page, select the copy to tape option, and then click Next .

5. On the Specify Library page, in Primary library , select a library to use for

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recovery. Copy library is available only when the job cannot be completed using only the tape library selected in Primary library .

When the data is being copied from disk, the library you select in Primary library copies the data to tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has multiple tape drives, the library you select in Primary library reads from the source tape and copies the data to another tape.

When the data is being copied from tape and the tape library has only a single tape drive, the library you select in Primary library reads from the source tape and the library you select in Copy library copies the data to tape.

6. On the Specify Recovery Options page, you can specify e-mail addresses to receive notification upon completion of the recovery. Click Next to continue.

7. On the Summary page, review the settings, and then click Recover .

How to Inventory Tapes

The purpose of inventory is to identify new tapes and recognize tapes DPM has seen before.

A fast inventory involves reading the bar code of each tape in the library. DPM can perform a fast inventory for tapes that have bar codes in a tape library that has a bar code reader.

A detailed inventory involves reading the header area of a tape in the library to identify the onmedia ID (OMID) on each tape. DPM must perform a detailed inventory when a tape does not have a bar code or the tape library does not have a bar code reader.

A fast inventory detects any tape (with or without a bar code) in any library. However, to uniquely identify the media, perform a detailed inventory.

Note

If a cleaning tape does not have a bar code or the bar code does not start with "CLN" is added to the library, and you run a detailed inventory before you mark the tape as a cleaning tape and run a fast inventory, a cleaning job will start when DPM mounts this tape during the detailed inventory.

To inventory tapes in a library

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Management on the navigation bar.

2. Click the Libraries tab, and then select a library.

3. In the Actions pane, click Inventory .

4. In the Inventory dialog box, select Fast inventory or Detailed inventory , and then click Start .

If the tape does not have a bar code or the tape library does not have a bar code reader, the fast inventory option is disabled.

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Recovering Data from Tapes

Recovering Data from Tapes Created by Another DPM Server

To recover data from tapes created by another DPM server, such as when a DPM server fails and critical information must be recovered before the server can be restored, you must first physically add the tape to a DPM server and then use the Recatalog imported tape action.

During the recatalog operation, DPM reads from the tape and adds information about the data it contains to the database. After recatalog completes, you can recover data from the tape by selecting a recovery point from the data on the tape.

Recovering Data When a Tape Set Is Missing a Tape

When protected data, such as a volume or a SQL Server database, spans multiple tapes, all tapes from the tape set must be available for DPM to recover the data. When a tape from a tape set is missing, perform the following steps to access the remaining data:

1. Add the tape to the tape . You might need to recatalog the tape.

2. View the contents of the tape.

3. Copy the contents of the tape to the desired location.

After you copy the contents of the remaining tapes, you can use the copied data as you like.

See Also

How to Add and Remove Tapes

How to Import Tapes

How to View Tape Contents

How to Copy Tapes

Disaster Recovery

Using Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 (DPM) in your organization enables you to protect file and application data, and provides fast and efficient recovery of that data when the original data is lost or corrupted or mistakenly deleted. But what if the entire data center with all your critical servers is partially or completely destroyed? Or if the DPM server that is protecting the data is damaged or fails?

Disaster recovery refers to restoring your systems and data in the event of partial or complete failure of a computer because of natural or technical causes. This section explains how to prepare for disaster recovery and how to rebuild protected servers and the DPM server when

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server failure occurs, by using a combination of the features in DPM and the DPM System

Recovery Tool.

The procedures for routine data recovery using DPM are in DPM Help and in the Operations sections for specific server types.

In This Section

Preparing for Disaster Recovery

Recovery

Using Pre-Backup and Post-Backup Scripts

See Also

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

Preparing for Disaster Recovery

When a computer is damaged or fails, your ability to restore that computer's functions and data depends on the actions you take before the disaster occurs.

If you use DPM for routine protection of file and application data and take no additional measures to prepare for disaster recovery, you can use DPM to recover the data after a protected computer is damaged or fails. However, you must first rebuild the computer manually by reinstalling the operating system, applications, and server configuration.

If the DPM server is damaged or fails, you must rebuild the DPM server manually and then reconfigure protection. Disk-based recovery points will not be recoverable; however, you can import existing tapes for data recovery. For more information, see Importing Tapes

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=102163).

If both the protected computer and the DPM server are damaged or fail, you can recover the latest backup from imported tapes after you rebuild the computers.

If both the protected computer and the DPM server are damaged or fail and you used only shortterm disk-based protection, all data could be lost.

Prepare for disaster recovery using the following methods:

1. Back up the protected computer system state.

You can back up the system state of protected computers in a protection group by using DPM. System state backup enables you to restore a computer configuration after you reinstall the operating system and applications.

2. Back up critical data to both disk and tape.

A thorough disaster recovery plan will include offsite storage of critical information; however, you want to be able to recover your

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organization's data should your facility be damaged or destroyed. Tape is a popular medium for offsite storage.

3. Add a secondary DPM server.

A secondary DPM server can protect and restore a primary

DPM server, which is a DPM server directly protecting file and application data sources. The secondary server can protect the databases of the primary DPM server, as well as the data source replicas that are stored on the primary DPM server. If the primary DPM server fails, you can restore the databases and replicas to the rebuilt primary DPM server from the secondary DPM server. You can restore data to protected computers directly from the secondary DPM server when the primary DPM server is unavailable. The secondary DPM server can also protect servers until the primary DPM server is available.

4. Back up DPM databases to tape. You can use a DPM server to back up its own databases to its tape library, or you can use non-Microsoft software to back up the databases to tape or removable media. Backup of the DPM databases enables you to recover the configuration of protection groups after you reinstall DPM.

Important

Of these options, adding a secondary DPM server provides the greatest amount of protection. At a minimum, we strongly recommend that you back up the DPM databases regularly, either using DPM or non-Microsoft software.

In This Section

Best Practices for Disaster Recovery

Backup of Protected Computer System State

Backup of DPM Servers

Backup for Bare Metal Recovery

See Also

Recovery

Best Practices for Disaster Recovery

Backups of data, whether by DPM or third-party software, rely on the integrity of the data being protected. To minimize the risk of data corruption, we recommend the following guidelines:

Run tools that check application integrity regularly, such as DBCC in SQL Server.

Monitor event logs on the protected computers and DPM server for hardware and file system errors.

Perform regular test recoveries of protected data.

Perform frequent consistency checks on critical data.

Use a secondary DPM server to provide additional protection and redundancy.

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DPM runs the pre-backup and post-backup scripts by using the local system account. As a best practice, you should ensure that the scripts have Read and Execute permissions for the administrator and local system accounts only. This level of permissions helps to prevent unauthorized users from modifying the scripts.

On each protected computer, you should back up the scripting file, ScriptingConfig.xml, at

\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Scripting, and all pre-backup and post-backup scripts.

See Also

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server

Using Pre-Backup and Post-Backup Scripts

Backup of Protected Computer System State

System state is a collection of system-specific data maintained by the operating system that must be backed up as a unit. It is not a backup of the entire system. The backup of a computer's system state can be used when you need to return the computer to a known state, such as after an installation that puts the computer in an undesirable state.

DPM can protect the system state for any computer on which a DPM protection agent can be installed, except computers running Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008.

The system state of a protected computer can be added to a protection group. DPM leverages the Windows Backup utility on the protected computer to back up the system state to a backup

(.bkf) file, which is saved to the DPM medium you specify for that protection group (disk, tape, or both).

Because system state does not change frequently, consider placing system state in protection groups separate from file and application data so that you can specify the most efficient protection schedule for each data source.

Member Server and Desktop System State

When DPM backs up the system state of a member server or desktop, the following components are protected:

The boot files

The COM+ class registration database

The registry

Domain Controller System State

When DPM backs up the system state of a domain controller, the following components are protected:

Active Directory (NTDS)

The boot files

The COM+ class registration database

The registry

The system volume (SYSVOL)

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For more information about backing up and restoring system state for a domain controller, see

" Introduction to Administering Active Directory Backup and Restore "

(http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=90626).

Server Running Certificate Services System State

When DPM backs up the system state of a member server or domain controller with Certificate

Services installed, Certificate Services is protected in addition to the member server or domain controller system state components.

Cluster Server System State

When DPM backs up the system state of a cluster server, the cluster service metadata is protected in addition to the member server system state components.

To Change the Location of the Backup File

The backup file of system state is created at %systemdrive%\DPM_SYSTEM_STATE.

To change the location of the system state backup file

1. On the protected computer, open PSDatasourceConfig.xml in an XML or text editor.

PSDatasourceConfig.xml is typically located at install path \Program Files\Microsoft Data

Protection Manager\DPM\Datasources.

2. Change the <FilesToProtect> value from %systemdrive% to the desired location.

3. Save the file.

4. On the DPM server, if there is a protection group protecting the system state of the protected computer in step 1, run a consistency check.

5. The consistency check will fail and generate an alert. Perform the recommended actions in the alert as follows: a. In the alert details, click the Modify protection group link, and then step through the wizard. b. Perform a consistency check.

System State Backup Logs

The logs for system state backup are stored at C:\Document and Settings\Default

User\Application Data\Microsoft\NTBackup.

Log files will be named NTBackup0.log, NTBackup1.log, and so forth. You can view these logs to help resolve any issues that occur with the system state backup.

See Also

Recovering Protected Computers

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Backup of DPM Servers

You should protect the following components of a DPM server:

The DPM database, which is required for DPM recovery.

Replicas. Note that replicas are not required if the data sources are protected on tape, because tapes can be used to recover the data to the protected computers and to create initial replicas on a rebuilt DPM server.

The \Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Config folder. This folder is required to protect the tape drive remapping file, DPMLA.xml.

A DPM server can protect its own database to tape. You can back up the recommended components of a DPM server by using a secondary DPM server or by using non-Microsoft software.

In This Section

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server

Backing Up DPM Databases to Tape

Backing Up DPM by Using Third-Party Software

See Also

Backup for Bare Metal Recovery

Recovering DPM Servers

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server

A DPM server can back up other DPM servers. A DPM server that protects data sources directly is called the primary DPM server . A DPM server that protects other DPM servers is called the secondary DPM server . The secondary DPM server can protect both the databases and the replicas on the primary DPM server. A DPM server can provide both secondary protection for another DPM server and primary protection for data sources.

The following illustration shows a sample topology using a primary DPM server and a secondary

DPM server. In the illustration, the primary DPM server protects volumes C and D of the file server. The secondary DPM server protects the database of the primary DPM server, and also protects the replicas of volumes C and D of the file server.

Sample topology for backing up DPM

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Using the topology shown in the illustration, if data loss occurs on the file server, you can recover the data from the primary DPM server. If the primary DPM server fails, the secondary DPM server can continue protection of the file server while the primary DPM server is unavailable, and you can recover the databases and replicas to the rebuilt primary DPM server from the secondary

DPM server.

A DPM server that is providing secondary protection cannot be protected by another DPM server.

For example, Server1 provides primary protection for Computer1, and Server2 provides secondary protection for Server1. Server1 cannot provide secondary protection for Server2.

A primary DPM server cannot be protected by more than one secondary DPM server.

Before you configure secondary protection for your servers, verify the following:

The selected DPM servers are not protecting additional DPM servers.

The DPM server or selected DPM servers are not being protected by other DPM servers.

Important

Before you can protect the database of the primary DPM server, you must start the SQL

Server VSS Writer service on the primary DPM server. To start the SQL Server VSS

Writer service, in the Services console, right-click SQL Server VSS writer , and then click Start .

To back up a primary DPM server using a secondary DPM server

1. On the secondary DPM server, install a protection agent on each primary DPM server that you want to protect. No restart is required.

2. To enable protection of the replicas, you must establish communications between the secondary DPM server and the data sources protected by the primary DPM server. When local data sources are protected on a cluster node, you should enable protection for each cluster node in addition to the cluster. To establish communications, perform the following

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steps: a. On the Agents tab in the Management task area, select a primary DPM server. b. In the Details pane, next to Protected servers enabled for protection , click Modify . c. In the View details of protected computers dialog box, select one or more computers, and then click Enable protection . d. Type the user name and password for a domain account that is a member of the local administrators group on all selected computers, and then click OK .

The Protection enabled column in the View details of protected computers dialog box will change to Yes .

3. You can use an existing protection group or create a new protection group for the primary

DPM servers. On the Select Group Members page, the following data sources will be listed for each DPM server on which a protection agent is installed:

The databases in the instance of SQL Server on the primary DPM server

All volumes on the primary DPM server

All replicas on the primary DPM server, listed in the Protected computers item

Each of these data sources can be selected as a protection group member. At a minimum, you should select the databases, the \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\Config folder, and the \Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Scripting folder.

Note

You cannot exclude file name extensions from protection for a replica.

4. On the Select Data Protection Method page, you can select short-term disk-based protection, long-term tape-based protection, or both. Short-term tape-based protection is unavailable when a primary DPM server is a member of a protection group.

5. Complete the Create New Protection Group Wizard with the desired protection options.

Note

If a replica is selected as a member of the protection group and you select shortterm disk-based protection, you must specify a synchronization frequency; the option to synchronize just before a recovery point will be unavailable. We recommend that you synchronize every 24 hours.

See Also

Switching Protection If the Primary DPM Server Fails

Recovering Protected Computers

Recovering DPM Servers

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Backing Up DPM Databases to Tape

You can use a DPM server to protect its own database by backing up the database to tape. We recommend that you use a unique protection group to back up the DPM server database, make at least two copies of the backup tapes, and store each of the backup tapes in a different remote location. You should also consider subscribing to the DPM Status report, which will list the tape with the most recent database backup.

To back up DPM databases to tape by using the primary DPM server with a local SQL

Server installation

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

2. In the Actions pane, click Create protection group .

3. On the Select group members page, expand the DPM server item, and then select DPMDB .

4. On the Select data protection method page, select I want short-term protection using tape , and then click Next .

5. Specify the short-term protection policy options. We recommend a retention range of two weeks for DPM databases.

6. Complete the Create New Protection Group Wizard with the protection options you want to use.

Important

If DPM uses a remote SQL Server installation, you must install the DPM protection agent on the remote SQL Server-based computer before you can protect the DPM databases on that server.

To back up DPM databases to tape by using the primary DPM server with a remote SQL

Server installation

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Protection on the navigation bar.

2. In the Actions pane, click Create protection group .

3. On the Select group members page, expand the SQL Server item for the remote SQL

Server installation that DPM uses, and then select DPM database .

4. On the Select data protection method page, select I want short-term protection using tape , and then click Next .

5. Specify the short-term protection policy options. We recommend a retention range of two weeks for the DPM databases.

6. Complete the Create New Protection Group Wizard with the protection options you want to use.

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

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Using Reports

Backing Up DPM by Using Third-Party Software

The process for archiving the replicas and databases by using non-Microsoft software differs depending on whether the backup software supports DPM and the Volume Shadow Copy Service

(VSS).

Backup software that supports DPM is specifically designed to work with DPM and will support the DPM VSS Writer service (DPM Writer).

Backup software that supports VSS uses VSS-enabled file system shadow copies but does not operate with the DPM Writer service. This software has two limitations compared to software that supports DPM:

Archive and restore operations are more complex than they are when using software that supports DPM.

The software that supports VSS organizes the archived replicas so that they appear to have been backed up directly from the DPM server. Organizing the backup in this way can make the process of restoring data less intuitive.

When you use backup software that does not support VSS, you cannot back up directly from the replicas. Instead, you must use the DPMBackup tool to create backup shadow copies of the replicas and database backups of the DPM database, and then use the backup software to archive the backup shadow copies and database backups to tape.

In This Section

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports DPM

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports VSS

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Does Not Support VSS

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports DPM

The optimal way to use non-Microsoft software to archive the DPM replicas and databases is to use backup software that is specifically designed to work with DPM. The principal advantages of software that supports DPM are:

The archived data is organized in a way that makes restore operations intuitive and comparatively simple

The number of steps involved in archive and restore operations are minimized

The following procedures provide general instructions for archiving DPM databases and replicas when using backup software that supports DPM. For instructions on using the backup software, see the documentation for the backup software.

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To back up databases by using DPM-enabled backup software

1. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\, and select the DPMDB folder. The file name of the DPM database file is

DPMDB2007.mdf.

2. Select the media to which you want to back up the database.

3. Start the backup.

To back up replicas by using DPM-enabled backup software

1. In the console tree of the backup program, expand DPM server.

2. Select the computer whose replicas you want to archive or the individual protected volumes.

3. Select the backup type.

4. Select the media to which you want to back up the files.

5. Start the backup.

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Supports VSS

If your backup software supports VSS, you can back up data directly from the replicas at

\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Volumes\Replica; however, you must ensure that the software does not modify data on the replica volumes. For example, if you are using Windows

Backup to archive data, use only the “copy” backup type.

To verify that the backup types for that software that will not modify data on the replica volumes, consult the documentation for your backup software or contact the vendor.

You must back up the database for both the DPM database and the Report database. The following procedures provide general instructions for archiving DPM databases and replicas when using backup software that does not support DPM but does support VSS. For instructions on using the backup software, see the documentation for the backup software.

To back up databases by using backup software that supports VSS

1. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\, and select the DPMDB folder. The file name of the DPM database file is

DPMDB2007.mdf.

2. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\Prerequisites\, and select the Data folder. The file name of the Report database file will default to ReportServer.mdf.

3. Select the media to which you want to back up the databases.

4. Start the backup.

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Note

Some VSS-enabled backup software does not have a SQL VSS Requester for backing up SQL Server databases through the VSS infrastructure and the MSDE VSS Writer. In that situation, use the procedure for backing up databases with non-VSS-enabled backup software.

To back up replicas by using VSS-enabled backup software

1. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\Volumes\Replica\ on the DPM server.

2. Select the computer for the replicas you want to archive or the individual protected volumes.

3. Select the backup type.

Important

Consult your backup software documentation or contact the software vendor to determine which backup types will not modify the replica data.

4. Select the media to which you want to back up the files.

5. Start the backup.

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

Backup Using Non-Microsoft Software That Does Not Support VSS

If your backup software does not support VSS or DPM, you must use DPMBackup, a commandline tool, to create backup shadow copies of the replicas and database backups of the DPM database, and then use the backup software to archive the backup shadow copies and database backups to tape.

Use DPMBackup to prepare files for backup when using non-VSS-enabled backup software.

DPMBackup is a command-line tool included with DPM that performs the following tasks:

Creates and mounts backup shadow copies of each replica volume on the DPM server.

Creates database backups of the DPM database (DPMDB.mdf).

DPM creates a mount point of the backup shadow copies of the replicas on the DPM server in the folder \Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Volumes\ShadowCopy\. The backup shadow copies of the replicas are organized by computer.

You can configure either your tape backup program or Windows Scheduler to run DPMBackup before the tape backup program runs. The amount of time that DPMBackup requires to create the backup shadow copies and database backups depends on factors such as disk and database activity, but as a guideline, you can expect the tool to take approximately 2 minutes per replica volume to complete the operation.

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The DPMBackup.exe program is stored on the DPM server in the folder \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\bin. DPMBackup requires Administrator rights on the DPM server.

The backup shadow copies created by DPMBackup are read-only copies of the replica volumes, and can be archived as you would archive a file system. Because the backup shadow copies of the replicas are mounted, you must configure your tape backup software to traverse mount points.

You must back up the database for the DPM database. The following procedures provide general instructions for archiving DPM databases and replicas when using backup software that does not support DPM or VSS. For instructions about using the backup software, see the documentation for the backup software.

To back up databases by using backup software that does not support DPM or VSS

1. Run DPMBackup.exe.

You can run the DPMBackup tool manually, or configure your backup program to run it automatically.

2. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\Volumes\ShadowCopy\Database Backups. The file name of the DPM database backup is DPMDB.bak. The default file name of the Report database backup is

ReportServer.bak.

3. Select the media to which you want to back up the databases.

4. Start the backup.

To back up replicas by using backup software that does not support DPM or VSS

1. Run DPMBackup.exe. You can run the DPMBackup tool manually, or configure your backup program to run it automatically.

2. In the console tree of the backup program, browse to \Program Files\Microsoft

DPM\DPM\Volumes\ShadowCopy\. The backup shadow copies of the replicas are organized by computer.

3. Select the shadow copies that you want to back up.

4. Select the backup type.

5. Select the media to which you want to back up the files.

6. Start the backup.

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

Backup for Bare Metal Recovery

The DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) is software provided with DPM to facilitate bare metal recovery for the DPM server and the computers that DPM protects. Bare metal recovery is a

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feature that helps you recover a system that will not start. DPM SRT backs up the system volume and master boot record by copying the entire volume and using VSS writers to ensure all applications are in a consistent state for the copy.

Do you need bare metal recovery backup?

The decision to add protection for bare metal recovery by using DPM SRT depends on your business needs. Your backup needs may be met adequately by disk-based and tape-based protection using DPM and a secondary DPM server. Application servers and file servers can be restored by installing the operating system and necessary applications, and then recovering the data from DPM recovery points. A DPM server can be restored by installing the operating system and necessary applications, and then recovering the DPM database from tape or the secondary

DPM server.

Using DPM SRT to back up selected servers requires additional storage space. However, DPM

SRT provides the ability to repair or roll back unstable systems, including unbootable systems.

DPM SRT can back up a drive's master boot code, partition table, partition information, volume information, and the Logical Disk Management Database, allowing you to rebuild physically damaged or corrupted system drives.

In This Section

Installing DPM System Recovery Tool

Configuring Backups for Bare Metal Recovery

See Also

How to Perform a Bare Metal Recovery

Installing DPM System Recovery Tool

DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) can be installed on a DPM server or on a separate server.

When you install DPM SRT, you must specify the location for the primary file store, which will contain the DPM SRT Recovery Points. Ideally, you should locate the primary file store on a disk separate from the disk on which the operating system and DPM SRT are installed. If that is not possible, you can locate the primary file store on a separate volume on the same disk.

The amount of space required by the primary file store depends on the amount of system files you are trying to protect. For example, assume that you are protecting the system volumes of three computers running Windows Server 2003 and the average size of the system volumes is

6 GB. The storage space required would be 6 GB for one computer, and an additional 2 percent to 5 percent of space for each of the other computers. This requirement is because of DPM

SRT's storage method, which stores only one copy of any file with a unique content address computed by a 128-bit MD5 cryptographic algorithm.

For more information about calculating the size of the primary file store and instructions for using the SRT Installation Wizard, open DPM SRT Help, which is the DPMSRT.chm file on the product

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DVD, and view the topics "How Much Space Should I Allocate for the File Store?" and

"Installation."

See Also

Configuring Backups for Bare Metal Recovery

Configuring Backups for Bare Metal Recovery

You can use DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) to back up DPM servers, file and application servers, and workstations for bare metal recovery.

To configure backups for bare metal recovery of a server, you create a Recovery Point Schedule .

The Recovery Point Schedule specifies the computers to be backed up, the dates and times for the backup, and the Recovery Set, which is the definition of the volume entries to include in the

Recovery Point.

DPM System Recovery Tool defines two Recovery Sets:

System Volumes , which protects system files, system settings, and boot files

Disk Layout , which protects disk information, including master boot code, partition table, partition, and volume information

You can create custom Recovery Sets in DPM SRT.

The DPM SRT agent must be installed on each computer that is backed up by DPM SRT. You can configure automatic installation of the agent when you create the Recovery Point Schedule, or you can install the agent manually.

For instructions about using DPM SRT, see DPM SRT Help, which is the DPMSRT.chm on the product DVD.

Custom Recovery Set for Front-End Web Server

To back up a front-end Web server for a Microsoft Windows SharePoint Services farm, we recommend that you select the system volumes and disk layout Recovery Sets, and create a custom Recovery Set that protects the following data:

Virtual directories that are not on the system volume

The registry

The Internet Information Services (IIS) metabase

Windows SharePoint Services installation files if they are not on the system volume

See Also

How to Perform a Bare Metal Recovery

Recovery

This section provides instructions for recovery in case of a disaster, such as a DPM server failing or a protected server failing. For instructions about routine data recovery using DPM, see DPM

Help and the Operations sections for specific server types.

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In This Section

Switching Protection If the Primary DPM Server Fails

Recovering Protected Computers

Recovering DPM Servers

How to Perform a Bare Metal Recovery

Using DpmSync

See Also

Managing Protected Servers Running Exchange

Managing Protected Servers Running SQL Server

Managing Protected Servers Running Windows SharePoint Services

Managing Protected Virtual Servers

Switching Protection If the Primary DPM Server Fails

If the primary DPM server fails, the secondary DPM server can continue protection of protected computers. To continue protection, you must switch protection of the protected computers to the secondary DPM server. You must also switch protection of the protected computers to the secondary DPM server to recover data directly from the secondary DPM server to the protected computer.

Important

To recover Windows SharePoint Services data directly from the secondary DPM server to the protected computer when Windows SharePoint Services uses an instance of SQL

Server on another computer, you must switch protection for both the Windows

SharePoint Services server and the SQL Server-based computer to the secondary DPM server.

To switch protection to the secondary DPM server

On the secondary DPM server, in DPM Management Shell, run the Start-

ProductionServerSwitchProtection cmdlet.

-or-

On the secondary DPM server, at a command prompt, run the SwitchProtection.ps1 script, using the following syntax:

SwitchProtection.ps1 dpmservername Name psname Name protectiontype Type

username User password Password domain Domain

SwitchProtection.ps1 Parameters

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Parameter

-dpmservername

-psname

-protectiontype

Description

The name of the server to which you are switching protection

The name of the protected computer for which you are switching protection

The type of protection the server will provide: primary or secondary

-username

-password

Credentials for an account with domain administrator privileges

-domain The domain to which the protection computer belongs

When the primary DPM server is available again, you switch protection back to the primary DPM server to enable the primary DPM server to resume protection of the computers. You must also switch protection on the secondary DPM server to enable it to resume secondary protection of the data sources protected by the primary DPM server.

When you resume secondary protection, the replicas for the protected data sources will be inactive. You must add the data sources to a protection group on the secondary DPM server again, using the automatic replica creation option, and then the replicas will become active.

Note

After you resume secondary protection, if the replicas are not inactive, run

SwitchProtection.ps1 on the secondary DPM server again.

Example

In the following example, you switch primary protection for computer SQL1 to the secondary DPM server, DPM2, for recovery or continued protection, by running the following command on DPM2:

SwitchProtection.ps1 dpmservername dpm2 psname sql1 protectiontype primary username administrator password Password~1 domain dc990

In the following example, you switch primary protection for computer SQL1 back to the primary

DPM server, DPM1.

First, you run the following command on DPM1:

SwitchProtection.ps1 dpmservername dpm1 psname sql1 protectiontype primary username administrator password Password~1 domain dc990

Second, you run the following command on DPM2:

SwitchProtection.ps1 dpmservername dpm2 psname sql1 protectiontype secondary username administrator password Password~1 domain dc990

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Note

The SwitchProtection.ps1 script is available on the DPM 2007 product DVD. During DPM setup, the script is installed to the installation path at \Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin.

See Also

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server

Recovering Protected Computers

Recovering Protected Computers

This topic includes instructions for recovering system state to a protected computer and recovering data to a protected computer from the secondary DPM server.

Recovering System State to Protected Computers

You can recover the system state to protected computers that are in a working state , meaning the operating system and necessary applications are installed.

When you protect a computer's system state, DPM uses the Windows Backup utility on the protected computer to back up the system state to a backup (.bkf) file, which is saved to the DPM medium you specify for that protection group (disk, tape, or both). The restore of the system state is a two-phase process:

1. Use the DPM Recovery Wizard to restore the .bkf file to the protected computer.

2. Use Backup to restore the system state from the .bkf file to the protected computer.

To recover the system state .bkf file

1. In DPM Administrator Console, click Recovery on the navigation bar.

2. Browse or search for the protected computer, and then, in the results pane, select the data.

3. Available recovery points are indicated in bold on the calendar in the recovery points section. Select the date for the recovery point you want to recover.

4. In the Recoverable item pane, click to select the .bkf file to recover.

5. In the Actions pane, click Recover . DPM starts the Recovery Wizard.

6. Review your recovery selection, and then click Next .

7. Specify to recover the .bkf file to an alternate location on the protected computer.

8. Click Next .

9. Specify your recovery options:

Existing version recovery behavior . Select Create copy , Skip , or Overwrite .

Restore security . Select Inherit security settings of target when overwriting or of parent folder when creating copy or Apply the security settings of the recovery point version .

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Throttling . Click Modify to enable throttling.

Notification . Click Send an e-mail when the recovery completes and specify the recipients that will receive the notification. Use commas to separate e-mail addresses.

10. Click Next .

11. Review your recovery settings, and then click Recover .

Any synchronization job for the selected recovery item will be canceled while the recovery is in progress.

To restore system state from the .bkf file

1. On the computer to which you recovered the system state .bkf, click Start , click Run , type ntbackup , and then click OK .

2. When the Backupor Restore Wizard starts, click Next .

3. On the Backup or Restore page, click Restore files and settings , and then click Next .

4. On the What to Restore page, click the items to expand their contents, locate and select the .bkf file that you recovered using DPM, and then click Next .

5. On the Completing the Backup or Restore Wizard page, if you want to change any of the advanced restore options, such as restoring security settings and junction point data, click Advanced . When you are done setting advanced restore options, click OK . Verify that all settings are correct, and then click Finish .

Recovering Protected Computers from a Secondary DPM Server

When the primary DPM server is unavailable, you can recover data for protected computers from the secondary DPM server. To recover data to an alternate location from a secondary DPM server, you use the Recovery Wizard in DPM Administrator Console on the secondary DPM server with no additional steps required. To recover data to the original location from a secondary

DPM server, you must first switch protection to the secondary DPM server.

To recover data to its original location on protected servers from a secondary DPM server

1. Switch protection of the protected computer to the secondary DPM server by using the

Start-SwitchProductionServer cmdlet or the SwitchProtection.ps1 script. For instructions

about switching protection, see Switching Protection If the Primary DPM Server Fails .

2. Use DPM Administrator Console on the secondary DPM server to recover the data to the original location.

See Also

Backup of Protected Computer System State

Backing Up DPM by Using a Secondary DPM Server

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Recovering DPM Servers

If the server is inaccessible, set up a new server either by restoring the DPM server image using

DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) or installing the operating system and applications, including

DPM, and then restoring the DPM database and replicas.

When you recover a primary DPM server, you must reestablish protection for the computers that were previously protected by the DPM server.

For more information about recovering a DPM server by using DPM SRT, see "Bare Metal

Recovery" in DPM SRT Help.

In This Section

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

How to Reestablish Protection After Recovering the Primary DPM Server

See Also

Using DpmSync

How to Recover DPM Databases

When recovering the DPM database files, ensure that the location on the DPM computer where you restore the files is secure.

To recover the DPM database when the database is corrupt

1. Uninstall DPM and retain the disk-based replicas.

2. Delete the DPM database.

3. Install a new instance of DPM server.

4. Import the latest DPM tape backup and recover the database to an alternate location, or recover the database as a file from the secondary DPM server.

5. Run DPMSync dbrestore dbloc location .

6. Run DPMSync sync .

DPMSync takes the DPM service offline and attaches the backed up database to SQL

Server.

See Also

Using DpmSync

How to Recover DPM Replicas

To recover a DPM replica, you must first run DpmSync to reallocate it. DpmSync marks the replica as manual replica creation pending. You can only recover the replica when its status in

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DPM Administrator Console is manual replica creation pending. If a replica recovery fails, the replica status changes to inconsistent, which prevents repeated recovery attempts.

If a replica recovery fails, you must stop protection of the data source using the delete replica option, add the data source to a protection group again using the manual replica creation option, and then retry the replica recovery.

If the recovery fails, simply retrying the recovery will always fail, because the replica is now marked invalid and not in a waiting manual load state.

To recover replicas after the DPM database is recovered

1. Run DpmSync -reallocateReplica . This command reformats any replicas that are missing and marks them as "manual replica creation pending." For instructions,

see Using DpmSync .

2. Manually create the replica from either the secondary DPM server or a tape backup of the data source corresponding to each of the replicas.

When using a secondary DPM server, a Restore to replica option is enabled in the Recovery task area.

When using tape backups, use DPM Management Shell with the RestoreToReplica option.

3. Perform a consistency check to continue protection.

See Also

Backup of DPM Servers

How to Reestablish Protection After Recovering the Primary DPM Server

After you rebuild a primary DPM server, you must reestablish protection of the computers that were protected by the primary DPM server. Perform the following procedure on each computer that was protected by the primary DPM server.

To reestablish protection after rebuilding the primary DPM server

1. On the protected computer, at the command prompt, run the following command:

Setdpmserver.exe <primary DPM server name>

2. Open Computer Management and perform the following steps: a. Select Local Users and Groups . b. Verify that the primary DPM server, in the format of Domain / Name , is a member of the following groups:

Distribute COM Users

DPMRADCOMTrustedMachines

DPMRADmTrustedMachines c. If the primary DPM server is not listed in any of the groups in step b, manually add

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the server as a member in the format of Domain / Name .

If protection fails after completing the steps in the previous procedure, perform the following steps:

1. In Administrative Tools, open Component Services.

2. Expand Computers , expand My Computer , and then click DCOM Config .

3. In the results pane, right-click DPM RA Service , and then click Properties .

4. In the Properties dialog box, click the Security tab.

5. In the Launch and Activation Permissions area, click Edit , and then do one of the following:

If the primary DPM server is listed, the Access Control List (ACL) entry might be incorrect. Remove the entry, and then add the primary DPM server with full permissions.

If the primary DPM server is not listed, add the primary DPM server with full permissions.

How to Perform a Bare Metal Recovery

If you use DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) to back up the DPM server or a protected computer, you can perform a bare metal recovery in the case of a hardware failure.

For instructions about recovering a DPM server by using DPM SRT, see "Bare Metal Recovery" in DPM SRT Help.

See Also

Backup for Bare Metal Recovery

Using DpmSync

DpmSync is a command-line tool that enables you to synchronize the DPM database with the state of the disks in the storage pool and with the installed protection agents. The DpmSync tool restores the DPM database, synchronizes the DPM database with the replicas in the storage pool, restores the Report database, and reallocates missing replicas.

DpmSync Syntax

DpmSync -Sync

DpmSync -DpmDbLoc location

DpmSync -DpmReportDbLoc location

DpmSync -ReallocateReplica

DpmSync -?

Parameters

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Parameter

-Sync

-DpmDbLoc location

-DpmReportDbLoc location

Description

Synchronizes restored databases and reallocates missing replica volumes.

You must run DpmSync –Sync after you restore the databases.

After you run DpmSync –Sync, some replicas may still be marked as missing. To reallocate these replicas, on the Disks tab of the Management task area in DPM

Administrator Console, remove the missing disks from DPM and then run DpmSync reallocatereplica.

Identifies the location of backup of DPM database.

Identifies the location of backup of Report database.

-ReallocateReplica Reallocates all missing replica volumes without synchronization.

-?

Describes usage of the command.

Example

To restore the DPM and Report databases from local backup media on the DPM server, you run the following commands:

DpmSync -DpmDbLoc G:\DPM\Backups\2005\November\DPMDB.bak

DpmSync -DpmReportDbLoc G:\DPM\Backups\2005\November\ReportServer.bak

After you restore the DPM and Report databases, to synchronize the databases, you run the following command:

DpmSync -Sync

After you restore and synchronize the DPM and Report databases and before you restore the replicas, you run the following command to reallocate disk space for the replicas:

DpmSync -ReallocateReplica

See Also

How to Recover DPM Databases

How to Recover DPM Replicas

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Using Pre-Backup and Post-Backup Scripts

A pre-backup script is a script that resides on the protected computer, is executed before each

DPM backup job, and prepares the protected data source for backup.

A post-backup script is a script that runs after a DPM backup job to do any post-backup processing, such as bringing a virtual machine back online.

When you install a protection agent on a computer, a ScriptingConfig.xml file is added to the install path \Microsoft Data Protection Manager\DPM\Scripting folder on the protected computer. For each protected data source on the computer, you can specify a pre-backup script and a post-backup script in ScriptingConfig.xml.

When DPM runs a protection job, ScriptingConfig.xml on the protected computer is checked. If a pre-backup script is specified, DPM runs the script and then completes the job. If a post-backup script is specified, DPM completes the job and then runs the script.

Note

Protection jobs include replica creation, express full backup, synchronization, and consistency check.

DPM runs the pre-backup and post-backup scripts by using the local system account. As a best practice, you should ensure that the scripts have Read and Execute permissions for the administrator and local system accounts only. This level of permissions helps to prevent unauthorized users from modifying the scripts.

ScriptingConfig.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<ScriptConfiguration xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/dls/ScriptingConfig.xsd">

<DatasourceScriptConfig DataSourceName=" Data source ">

<PreBackupScript >”Path\Script ” </PreBackupScript>

<PreBackupCommandLine> parameters </PreBackupCommandLine>

<PostBackupScript>" Path\Script ” </PostBackupScript >

<PostBackupCommandLine> parameters </PostBackupCommandLine>

<TimeOut> 30 </TimeOut>

</DatasourceScriptConfig>

</ScriptConfiguration>

To specify pre-backup and post-backup scripts

1. On the protected computer, open the ScriptingConfig.xml file in an XML or text editor.

2. For each data source, complete the DatasourceScriptConfig element as follows: a. For the DataSourceName attribute, enter the data source volume (for file data

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sources) or name (for all other data sources). The data source name for application data should be in the form of Instance\Database for SQL, Storage group name for

Exchange, ? for Virtual Server, and ? for Windows SharePoint Services. b. In the PreBackupScript tag, enter the path and script name. c. In the PreBackupCommandLine tag, enter command-line parameters to be passed to the scripts, separated by spaces. d. In the PostBackupScript tag, enter the path and script name. e. In the PostBackupCommandLine tag, enter command-line parameters to be passed to the scripts, separated by spaces. f. In the TimeOut tag, enter the amount of time in minutes that DPM should wait after invoking a script before timing out and marking the script as failed.

3. Save the ScriptingConfig.xml file.

Note

DPM will suffix an additional Boolean (true/false) parameter to the post-backup script command, indicating the execution status of the DPM backup job.

Appendix A: Quick Reference to DPM Tasks

The following table matches administrative tasks with the object that you select to perform the task.

To perform this task Select

Manually synchronize a replica

Perform a manual consistency check on a replica

Manually create a recovery point

Remove a member from a protection group

Delete a replica

The protected data source in the Protection task area

Modify the schedules for synchronization, express full backups, consistency checks, and recovery points

Enable compression

Add a member to a protection group

View a list of tapes

Stop protection of a group

Configure tape catalog retention

The protection group in the area

Protection task

Either the protected computer or the protection

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To perform this task

Modify disk allocation

Configure network bandwidth usage throttling

Update, disable, enable, or uninstall a protection agent

Lock or unlock the tape library door

Rescan the tape library

Clean a tape library drive

Run a fast or detailed inventory

Select group in the Protection task area

Either the protected data source or the protection group in the Protection task area

The protected computer on the Agents tab in the Management task area

The tape library or stand-alone tape drive on the Libraries tab in the Management task area

The tape drive on the Libraries tab in the Management task area

Any tape library, stand-alone tape drive, drive, slot, or tape on the Libraries tab in the Management task area

A tape on the Libraries tab in the Management task area

Erase a tape

Mark a tape as free

Mark a tape as a cleaning tape

View the contents of a tape

Appendix B: DPM 2007 Schema Extension

The DPMADSchemaExtension tool performs the following tasks to support end-user recovery:

Extends the schema

Creates a container (MS-ShareMapConfiguration)

Grants the DPM server permissions to change the contents of the container

Adds mappings between source shares and shares on the replicas

This appendix describes the classes and attributes that Data Protection Manager (DPM) adds to

Active Directory to support end-user recovery.

Classes Added by DPM describes the classes that are added to Active Directory when you

enable end-user recovery on DPM.

Attributes Added by DPM describes the attributes that are added to Active Directory when you

enable end-user recovery on DPM.

143

Classes Added by DPM

DPM adds one class, ms-SrvShareMapping , to the Active Directory directory service when you enable end-user recovery. This class contains the mapping from the protected computer (and share) to the DPM server (and share).

Caution

It is recommended that you do not modify this class.

The following table provides a detailed description of the ms-SrvShareMapping class:

Attribute objectClass objectClass instanceType possSuperiors possSuperiors subClassOf governsID mustContain mustContain rDNAttID showInAdvancedViewOnly adminDisplayName lDAPDisplayName adminDescription objectClassCategory

Value

Top classSchema

4

Container organizationalUnit

Top

1.2.840.113556.1.6.33.1.22 ms-backupSrvShare ms-productionSrvShare

Cn

TRUE ms-SrvShareMapping ms-SrvShareMapping

Maps servers with shared resources.

1

Attributes Added by DPM

DPM adds two attributes to Active Directory when you enable end-user recovery. The following table lists the added attributes:

Attribute ms-BackupSrv-Share Attribute

Description

Provides the DPM share name and DPM

144

Attribute ms-ProductionSrv-Share Attribute

Description computer name in a string.

Provides the protected computer share name and protected computer computer name in a string.

ms-BackupSrv-Share Attribute

The following table provides a detailed description of the ms-BackupSrv-Share attribute:

Attribute objectClass objectClass attributeID attributeSyntax rangeUpper isSingleValued showInAdvancedViewOnly adminDisplayName adminDescription oMSyntax

IDAPDisplayName objectCategory

Value

Top attributeSchema

1.2.840.113556.1.6.33.2.23

2.5.5.12

260

TRUE

TRUE ms-BackupSrv-Share

Identifies a server with shared resources.

64 ms-backupSrvShare

CN=Attribute-Schema,<SchemaContainerDN>

ms-ProductionSrv-Share Attribute

The following table provides a detailed description of the ms-ProductionSrv-Share attribute:

Attribute objectClass objectClass attributeID attributeSyntax

Value

Top attributeSchema

1.2.840.113556.1.6.33.2.24

2.5.5.12

145

Attribute rangeUpper isSingleValued showInAdvancedViewOnly adminDisplayName adminDescription oMSyntax

IDAPDisplayName objectCategory

Value

260

TRUE

TRUE ms-ProductionSrv-Share

Identifies a computer with shared resources.

64 ms-productionSrvShare

CN=Attribute-Schema,<SchemaContainerDN>

Appendix C: Custom Report Views

Data Protection Manager 2007 includes several SQL views to help you create custom reports.

SQL views simplify your queries by populating columns with data collected from multiple tables in the database. These views offer several advantages over querying the tables directly:

You do not need in-depth knowledge of the entire database or the relationship between tables and keys.

If the database structure changes in future versions of the product, the views can be updated so that they behave the same.

For DPM installations that use a separate, dedicated computer for the SQL Server database, the views are queried on the database computer, not the computer running DPM. This results in less competition for resources when large numbers of views are queried over a short period of time.

The potential disadvantages of the SQL views include the following:

Because the view runs each time it is queried, server performance may be degraded if the view is used too frequently.

The available supported views might not include all of the columns you need.

This appendix lists the views available in DPM 2007.

Vw_DPM_Agents: Contains the list of computers on which a DPM protection agent from this

DPM server has been installed.

Field

ServerName

Version

Data type

String

String

Description

The name of the computer

The version of the DPM agent

146

on that computer

Vw_DPM_Alerts: List of all alerts from the last 30 days.

Field

Severity

Data type

Integer

0=Error

1=Warning

2=Information

Description

The severity level of the alert

Resolution Integer

0 = Active

1 = Recommended action in progress

2 = Resolved

Date and time

The state of the alert

OccurredSince

ResolvedTime Date and tiime

The first time this alert was raised

The time at which the alert was resolved

Type Integer

See "Alert Types" in this appendix

The type of the alert

Vw_DPM_CurrentOnlineMedia: The tapes that are online in DPM owned libraries currently, as of the last inventory.

Field

UserFriendlyName

ImportPoolMediaCount

Data type

String

Integer

FreePoolMediaCount

AdminPoolMediaCount

Integer

Integer

Description

The name of the library

Tapes imported to this DPM server

Tapes marked as free or blank

Tapes with active data.

Expired tapes change to free when the tape is marked free or the protection group is deleted.

147

Vw_DPM_Disk_Usage_Replica: Disk usage statistics for replicas in the storage pool.

Field

PhysicalPath

ReplicaId

PGId

ProductionServerName

DiskAllocated

DiskUsed

FreeSpace

ReplicaAllocated

ReplicaUsed

ShadowCopyAllocated

ShadowCopyUsed

StartDateTime

EndDateTime

ScheduleType

Data type

String

GUID

GUID

String

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

Date and time

Date and time

Integer

0=Weekly

1=Monthly

2=Quarterly

Description

The name of the protected data source

Unique identifier for the replica on DPM disks

Unique identifier for the protection group to which this data source belongs

The name of the server on which the data source exists

Total disk space allocated to this data source

Total disk space used by this data source

DiskAllocated – DiskUsed

The part of DiskAllocated that is reserved for the replica of the data source

The part of ReplicaAllocated that is actually in use

The part of DiskAllocated that is reserved for the recovery points of the data source

The part of

ShadowCopyAllocated that is actually in use

The time this statistic was collected

Internal field

The schedule period which this data represents

148

3=Yearly

Vw_DPM_DiskRecoveryPoints: Counts for disk recovery points available for each data source.

Field

DataSourceName

PGId

ServerId

Data type

String

GUID

GUID

Description

The name of the protected data source

The unique identifierentifier for the protection group to which this data source belongs

The unique identifierentifier for the server to which this data source belongs

Frequency Integer The number of available recovery points

Vw_DPM_LongRecoveries: Provides historical information about recoveries that took longer than 24 hours.

Field

DataSourceName

Data type

String

TargetServerName

WriterId

StartTime

EndTime

RecoverySize

RecoverySource

String

GUID

Date and time

Date and time

Big integer

Description

The data source that was recovered

The name of the server to which recovery was done

Identifies the type of the data source that was recovered

The time at which the recovery was started

The time at which the recovery ended

The size of the data recovered by the job

The recovery source Integer

0=Disk

1=Tape

149

Vw_DPM_Media: Provides information about state of all tapes known to DPM.

Field

MediaLabel

MediaBarcode

IsOnline

LibraryName

MediaSlotNumber

PGName

MediaExpiryDate

Data type

String

String

Integer

String

Integer

String

Date and time

Description

The label on the tape

The barcode for the tape

Whether the tape is online

The name of the library in which the tape exists.

NULL if tape is offline

The slot number in which the tape exists.

NULL if tape is offline

If in a drive, this represents the home slot of the tape (to which the tape returns on a dismount).

The name of the protection group in which the tape exists

The time when all data sets on this tape will expire.

Can have the date in the past or NULL if the tape is free.

Vw_DPM_MediaPool_Media: Tape counts for a given library.

Field

LibraryName

Data type

String

Description

The name of the library

FreeMedia Integer Number of tapes that are free in this library

FreeMediaThreshold Integer The threshold below which this library generates an alert

Vw_DPM_ProtectedDataSource: Current disk space usage by various data sources.

Field

ReplicaId

Data type

GUID

Description

Identifier of the replica

150

PGId

AllocatedSize

UsedSize

ProductionServerName

GUID

Big integer

Big integer

String

Identifier of the protection group to which the replica belongs

Disk space allocated to the data source

Disk space currently used by the data source

The name of the computer on which the data source exists

StorageNode String Always set to the DPM server

Vw_DPM_ProtectedGroup: Table with information about all protection groups.

Field

PGId

Data type

GUID

Description

Unique identifierentifier for the protection group

Name of the protection group ProtectionGroupName String

CreationTime Date and time The time at which the protection group was created

Vw_DPM_RecoveryDuration: History of counts for recovery jobs in various time durations.

Field Data type Description

StartDateTime

EndDateTime

ScheduleType

RecoveryDuration

Date and time

Date and time

Integer

Integer

The time at which the statistic was collected

Internal

The frequency for which this particular statistic was collected

Indicates if the recovery was less than 6 hours, between 6-

24 hours, or greater than 24 hours

RecoveryCount Integer Number of recoveries

Vw_DPM_RecoveryJob: Detailed information about recent recovery jobs.

151

Field

DataSourceName

ServerName

CreationTime

FailureCode

Data type

String

String

Date and time

Integer

Description

The data source for which recovery was run

The server to which recovery was performed

Time at which the recovery job was run

Error code in case of failure of the recovery job

Status Integer

0/1=Progress

2=Succeeded

3=Failure

Status of the recovery job

Vw_DPM_RecoveryPointDisk: Status of recent recovery point creation jobs on disk.

Field

DataSourceName

Data type

String

Description

The data source for which the backup was created

ServerName

CreationTime

String

Date and time

The server on which the data source exists

The time at which the recovery point creation job was run

Status of the recovery point creation job

Status Integer

0/1=Progress

2=Succeeded

3=Failure

ErrorCode Integer Zero if succeeded.

Else, set to a DPM error code.

Vw_DPM_RecoveryPointTape: Status of recent recovery point creation jobs on tape.

Field Data type Description

152

DataSourceName

ServerName

CreationTime

String

String

Date and time

The data source for which the backup was created

The server on which the data source exists

The time at which the recovery point creation job was run

Status of the recovery point creation job

Status Integer

0/1=Progress

2=Succeeded

3=Failure

Integer ErrorCode Zero if succeeded.

Else, set to a DPM error code.

Vw_DPM_Replica: Listing of all replicas managed by DPM.

Field

ReplicaId

Data type

GUID

PhysicalPath

ServerName

ValidFrom

ValidTo

PGId

String

String

Date and time

Date and time

GUID

StorageNode String

Vw_DPM_Server: List of all protected computers.

Description

Unique identifierentifier generated by DPM for the replica volume

The name of the data source on the replica

Name of the server to which the data source belongs

When the replica was created

The date on which the replica was made inactive

Unique identifierentifier generated by DPM for the protection group to which the data source belongs

Always set to the DPM server

153

Field

ServerId

ServerName

Data type

GUID

String

Description

Unique identifierentifier generated by DPM for the protected computer

Fully qualified domain name for the computer

Name NetBiosName String

DomainName String Domain in which the computer belongs

IsRG Integer If this computer represents a

Resource Group

Vw_DPM_TapeRecoveryPoints: Counts for tape recovery points available for each data source.

Field

DataSourceName

PGId

ServerId

Frequency

Data type

String

GUID

GUID

Integer

Description

The name of the protected data source

The unique identifierentifier for the protection group to which this data source belongs

The unique identifierentifier for the server to which this data source belongs

The number of available recovery points

Term Integer

0=ShortTerm

1=LongTerm

Vw_DPM_TapeStat: Historical information on tape usage counts.

The schedule to which this recovery point corresponds

Field

StartDateTime

EndDateTime

ScheduleType

Data type

Date and time

Date and time

Integer

Description

Integer

154

Free Integer

0=Weekly

1=Monthly

2=Quarterly

3=Yearly

Number of free tapes at endtime

Online Integer Number of online tapes at end time

Vw_DPM_TapeUsagePerPG: Historical tape usage data per protection group.

Field

StartDateTime

EndDateTime

PGName

ScheduleType

Data type

Date and time

Date and time

String

Integer

Description

Start time

End time

Name of the protection group

Online Integer

Integer

0=Weekly

1=Monthly

2=Quarterly

3=Yearly

Number of online tapes at end time

Offline Integer Number of offline tapes at end time

Vw_DPM_Total_Disk_Trend: Total disk space usage historical trend.

Field

StartDateTime

EndDateTime

ScheduleType

Data type

Date and time

Date and time

Integer

Description

Integer

0=Weekly

1=Monthly

2=Quarterly

155

DiskSpaceCapacity

PreviousDiskSpaceCapacity

DiskSpaceAllocated

Big integer

Big integer

Big integer

3=Yearly

The total storage in storage pool at end-time

Total storage in storage pool in previous corresponding period

The disk space from storage pool that has been allocated

PreviousDiskSpaceAllocated Big integer The disk space from storage pool that was allocated in the previous corresponding period

The actual disk space usage DiskSpaceUsed Big integer

PreviousDiskSpaceUsed Big integer The used disk space in the previous corresponding period

Vw_DPM_Total_RecoveryPoint: Information about all recent recovery point jobs.

Field

DataSourceName

ServerName

CreationTime

Status

Data type

String

String

Date and time

Description

The name of the protected data source

The server to which the data source belongs

The time at which the recovery point creation job was run

Status of the recovery point creation job

ErrorCode

Integer

0/1=Progress

2=Succeeded

3=Failure

Integer Error code in recovery point creation

156

Alert Types

22

23

24

25

26

27

17

18

19

20

21

13

14

15

16

10

11

12

8

9

6

7

1

2

-1

0

5

RestoreDBAlert

NullType

AgentIncompatibleAlert

AgentUnreachableAlert

MediaVerificationFailedAlert

MediaEraseFailedAlert

DetailedInventoryFailedAlert

MediaDecommissionedAlert

MediaDataEraseAlert

FreeMediaThresholdAlert

DataSetCopyFailedAlert

BackupToTapeFailedAlert

BackupToTapeCatalogFailedAlert

LibraryDriveAlert

LibraryNotAvailableAlert

LibraryNotWorkingEfficientlyAlert

MediaRequiredAlert

ReplicaInitializationInProgressAlert

SynchronizationFailedAlert

StopProtectionFailedAlert

RecoveryInProgressAlert

RecoveryPartiallySuccessfulAlert

RecoverySuccessfulAlert

RecoveryFailedAlert

ShadowCopyFailedAlert

ReplicaInMissingStateAlert

ReplicaInInvalidStateAlert

157

36

37

38

39

32

33

34

35

28

29

30

31

40

41

42

PartialDeployedClusterAlert

AgentTaskFailAlert

SqmOptInAlert

DiskThresholdCrossedAlert

VerificationInProgressAlert

DiskMissingAlert

CatalogThresholdCrossedAlert

DatasetDataVerificationFailed

SCDiskThresholdCrossedAlert

ConfigureProtectionFailedAlert

ReplicaManualLoadPendingAlert

ReplicaInitializationPendingAlert

CertificateExpiringAlert

EvalShareInquiryAlert

ShadowCopyConsolidationRequired

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