Detroit Radiant Products HLV Series Installation, Operation, Maintenance And Parts Manual

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and P arts Manual

A

WARNING:

This heater must be installed and serviced by trained gas installation and service personnel only!

Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or maintenance can cause property damage, injury or death.

Read the installation, operating and maintenance instructions thoroughly before installing or servicing this equipment.

Protect yourself and others by observing all safety information. Retain instructions for future reference.

HLVSERIES

TUBE HEATER

VACUUM SYSTEM

FOR YOUR SAFETY

Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in the vincinity of this or any other appliances.

Description

Vacuum type tube heaters are negative pressure gasfired infrared heaters designed to provide comfort heat. They consist of four (4) main components: a burner control box, radiant tube, reflector assembly, and vacuum exhauster . The heaters are typically suspended from the ceiling by chains and controlled by a thermostat. They can be installed either vented or unvented, and may use outside air for combustion if necessary. The radiant tube may be

installed

in different configurations depending on the heating requirements.

FOR YOUR SAFETY

What to do if you smell gas:

Do not try to light any appliance.

Do not touch any electrical switch; do not use any phone in your building.

Immediately call your gas supplier from a neighbor's phone. Follow the gas supplier's instructions.

If you cannot reach your gas supplier, call the fire department.

·

These heaters use infrared energy to heat spaces.

·

When heat is required, the burner control box

ignites

a gas/air mixture and the vacuum pulls the hot gases into th~ radiant tube. As the gases pass through the assembly, the tubing is heated and emits infrared, which is then directed toward the floor by reflectors.

This is known as primary infrared and is absorbed by the floor, objects and people in the space , raising their temperatures

.

They in turn reradiate this heat, known as secondary infrared, to create a comfort zone at the floor level. This is how tube heaters can heat large spaces without having to provide primary infrared for every square foot of area. However, if the goal is to spot heat a small area within a large space, only the primary infrared makes this possible.

Vacuum tube heaters are design certified for use in industrial and commercial buildings, such as warehouses, manufacturing plants, aircraft hangars and vehicle maintenan~e shops. No heater may be used in a class 1 or class

"

2 explosive environment.

Unless otherwise indicated, they are

not certified for

residential use or where flammable gases or vapors are generally present, such as spray booths.

LIOHLV-1M-11/02 (MWG)

A.

WARNING/

In locations used for the storage of combustible materials, signs must be posted to specify the maximum permissible stacking height to maintain the required clearances from the heater to the combustibles. Signs must either be posted adjacent to the heater thermostats or in the absence of such thermostats in a conspicuous location.

CONSIGNES DE SE.CUR/TE

Sivous sentez une odeur de gaz:

1. Ouvrez /es fenetres .

2. Ne touchez pas aux interrupteurs electriques.

3. eteingnez toute flamme nue.

4. Contactez immediatement votre compagnie de gaz .

II est interdit d ' utiliser des liquides inflammables ou degageant des vapeurs inflammables, a proximite de tout appareil fonctionnant au gaz .

Printed in U .

S.A.

© Detroit Radiant Products Co.

21400 Hoover Rd., Warren, Ml 48089

T (586) 756-0950 F . (586) 756-2626 http://www.reverberray.com

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

Warnings

Detroit Radiant Products Company cannot anticipate every use which may be made of their heaters.

Check with your local fire safety authority if you have questions about local regulations.

This infrared heater is designed for use in industrial and commercial buildings such as warehouses, manufacturing plants, aircraft hangars

,

service garages, etc.

Maintain all clearances to combustibles at all times!

See page 5 for clearance to combustibles guidelines.

WARNING!

This heater must be installed and serviced by trained gas installation and service personnel only.

Read and understand these instructions thoroughly before attempting to install, operate or service this heater . Failure to comply could result in personal injury , asphyxiation, death, fire, and/or property damage. Retain these instructions for future reference.

WARNING!

NOT FOR RESIDENTIAL USE!

Do not use in the home, sleeping quarters

,

attached garages, etc.

WARNING!

Do not operate heater with any part bypassed, with any part failed or in any scenario that may compromise safety .

WARNING!

This is not an explosion-proof heater. Where there is the possibility of exposure to flammable vapors, consult the local fire marshal, the fire insurance carrier and other authorities for approval of the proposed installation.

IMPORTANT!

Any alteration of the system or of factoryauthorized components specified in this manual or by Detroit Radiant Products Company voids all certification and warranties .

2

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

/ /

'•

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·

Table of Contents and Certifications

s

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1. SAFETY INFORMATION ............................

.

................................................................. 4

2. DESIGN ........

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. 6

2.1 Pre-Design ........

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2.2 Design for Non-Condensing System .....

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2 .

3 Design for Condensing Systems .... .

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. 8

2.4 Definitions ........

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. 10

2.5 Vacuum Pump Application .

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2.6 Damper Application ....

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3. INSTALLATION .........

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3.1 Pre-Installation ...

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. 13

3 .

2 Vacuum Pump Assembly & Mounting .................................................

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.. 15

3.3 Tube & Burner Box Mounting .......................................................................................

. 15

3.4 Baffle Assembly ..

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3.5 Reflector Assembly ...

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3 .

6 Reflector Accessories ..

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3 . 7 Flue Venting for Non Condensing Systems .............................

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3.8 Flue Venting for Condensing Systems ...............

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3 .

9 Combustion Air Intake ........

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3.10 Gas Supply ......

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4. OPERATION .....................

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25

4.1 Electrical Requirements ......

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4 .

2 Lighting Instructions ......

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4 .

3 Shutdown Instructions ...

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4.4 Theory of Operation .....

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4 .

5 System Start-Up & Damper Setting ...

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5. MAINTENANCE ........

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5.1 Troubleshooting Chart .

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5.2 Troubleshooting Flowchart ......

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5.3 HLV Parts List ................................................................................................

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6. LIMITED WARRANTY ..................

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Approval Standards and Certfications

Detroit Radiant Products units comply with or are certified by the following organizations or standards:

American Nat i onal Standards (ANSI Z83.6 and Z83 .

20)

Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)

CSA International (CSA)

National Standards of Canada

3

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

The following

must

be reviewed before installing this heater.

1. SAFETY INFORMATION

j

A

CAUTION

j

Check .

the CSA rating label on the heater to venfy the proper gas to be used.

Check the other labels on the heater to verify proper mounting and clearance to combustibles.

The installation of this heater must conform with local building codes or, in the absence of local codes, with the National

Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1 (NFPA 544) (latest edition).

Applications in Canada must conform to CAN/CGA B 149 .

1 and 2 codes and Canadian Electrical Code C22.1 (latest edition).

Unless otherwise indicated on the AGA label (Chart 2 (C2) or Chart 3 (C3)), this infra-red heater is designed to operate on standard BTU gas ( either 1000 BTU ft 3 for natural gas or

2500 BTU ft 3 for propane gas) at elevations Oto 4000 feet

MSL (Sea Level).

GARAGES

IMPORTANT NOTE

The installation of this heater in public garages must conform with the Standard for Parking Structures, ANSI/NFPA 88A

(latest edition), or the Standard for Repair Garages, ANSI/

NFPA 888 (latest edition), and must be at least 8 ft. above the floor (see page 5 for Clearances to Combustibles).

Applications in Canada must conform to the Canadian Electric

Code C22.1 (latest edition) when an external electrical source is used.

HANGARS

The installation of this heater in aircraft hangars must conform with the Standard for Aircraft Hangars, ANSI/NFPA 409 (latest edition). The heater must be installed at least 10 ft . above the upper wing surfaces and engine enclosures of the highest aircraft which might be stored in the hangar. In areas adjoining the aircraft storage area, the heaters must be installed at least 8 ft. above the floor. The heaters must be located in areas where they will not be subject to damage by aircraft, cranes, movable scaffolding or other objects.

ELECTRICAL

The heater , when installed, must be electrically grounded in accordance with the National Electrical Code ANSI/NFPA 70

(latest edition).

Under no circumstance is either the gas supply line or the ,€ · electrical supply line to the heater to provide any assistanc8' · in the suspension of the heater. ·

The weight of the heater must be entirely suspended from a permanent part of the building structure having adequate load characteristics .

Neither the gas supply line, electrical supply line nor sprinkler heads shall be located within the minimum clearances to combustibles as shown in the Clearances to Combustibles

Chart on page 5.

Signs should be posted in storage areas to specify maximum stacking height allowed in order to maintain clearances to combustibles . DRP part #PLQ warning plaques are recommended .

Detroit Radiant Products Company

21400 Hoover Road, Warren, Ml 48089

T. (586) 756-0950 F. (586) 756-2626 http://www.reverberray.com

4

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Safety Clearance Information

Clearances to Combustibles

A

WARNING!

In locations used for the storage of combustible materials, signs must be posted to specify the maximum permissible stacking height to maintain the required clearances from the heater to the combustibles . Signs must either be posted adjacent to the heater thermostats or in the absence of such thermostats in a conspicuous location.

For the safe installation of this unit, consult the clearance to combustibles chart. It contains clearances that must be maintained .

IA WARNING

I

Failure to comply with the stated clearances to combustibles could result in personal injury, death and/or property damage.

TOP TOP t

~

BELOW

O"MOUNTING ANGLE o · w,1 SIDE SHIELD

BELOW

45 " MOUNTING ANGLE

BELOW o · w,2 SIDE SHIELDS

NOTE : Infra-red heaters can cause discomfort to building occupants if the heaters are mounted too low . Therefore , a minimum mounting height must be observed, based upon the clearance to combustibles and the spec ifi ed minimum mounting height. Also, a m~ximum mounting height for each heater should be observed for effective radiant heating.

NOTE: See HLV Design Guide for Determination of Published

Clearances to Combustibles.

jAWARNINGI

This heater should be installed so that the minimum clearances to combustibles, as marked on the heater, will be maintained from vehicles parked below. If vehicle lifts are present, ensure that these clearances will be maintained from the highest raised vehicle.

Clearances listed in the following table apply to individual burners located in the HLV system. Inspect each burner rating label to ensure that clearances are maintained

CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLES {IN .

)

SIDE

MODEL NO.

MOUNTING

TOP

HL V 50 (N , P)

ANGLE o •

FRONT BEHIND

9 9 4

45° 39 10

W /1 side sh i e l d

W/2 side s h ield s

20 ft from b urner

HLV 60 HLV 75 (N,P)

W/1 s i de shield

W/2 side shields

20 ft from burner

HL V BO (N, P)

O"

O"

O" o•

45° o•

O"

O"

O"

39

29

9

7

29

9

7

9

11

8

8

9

7

1 1

8

8

9

7

9

4

4

4

4

10

4

4

4

4

W / 1 s id e sh ield

W/2 side shields

20 ft from burner

HLV 90 ( N ,P)

W/1 side shield

W 12 side shie lds

20 ft from burner

HLV 1 00 (N , P)

45° o•

O'

O'

O"

45° o•

0'

O'

0'

29

16

7

14

39

39

29

16

7

12

39 8

8

16

7

14

8

8

8

16

7

12

10

4

4

' 4

4

10

4

4

4

4

10

W /1 side sh i eld

W/2 side s h ie l ds

20 ft from burner

HLV 1101 25(N,P)

W/1 side shield

W/2 side shiel ds

20 ft from burner

HL V 140 -HLV 150 (N,P)

45° o•

0 '

O"

O"

45°

O'

0'

O'

29

16

7

18

58

4 2

20

7

24

58

8

16

7

18

8

8

20

7

24

8

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

10

6

10

WI 1 s i de shiel d

W/2 s i de sh i elds

20 ft from burner

HLV 1 70 - HLV 175 (N,P)

W /1 side shield

W/2 side shiel ds

20 ft from burner

HLV 180 - HLV 200 (N , P )

W/1 side shield

W/2 side shields

21 ft from burner

0 '

45°

0'

O"

O' o•

45°

0 '

0'

O" o•

45° o• o•

O'

42

30

11

34

63

50

30

11

41

63

54

30

11

8

30

11

34

8

8

30

11

41

8

8

30

11

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

10

6

6

6

6

10

BELOW

47

47

47

47

30

48

48

48

48

30

48

48

48

48

30

54

54

54

54

30

66

66

81

81

44

92

92

92

92

44

72

72

30

81

81

94

94

94

94

44

66

66

30

72

72

5

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

2. DESIGN

2.1 Pre-Design for Condensing and Non-Condensing Systems

1) The HLV can be a Non-condensing system or a

condensing system. After the pre-design section is read,

5) When determining the location of the system, keep in mind clearances to combustible materials, lights, sprinkler go to the appropriate section for the desired system. If it is uncertain what type of system is to be used , start off

by going to the condensing section (2 .

3) and if the heads , overhead doors , storage areas with stacked materials, gas and electrical lines , parked vehicles, cranes completed design does not require condensing pipe, then by default, the system will be a non-condensing system. and any other possible obstructions or hazards. Adequate clearance around air openings leading into the combustion chamber and accessibility for service must be provided .

2) All non-condensing systems must be on a ~ temperature zone. If two temperature zones are required , the system will be a condensing system thus continue to section 2.3.

Refer to the Warnings, Cautions and the Clearances to

Combustibles Chart on the previous page and on the heater to verify that a safe installation condition exists.

6) Section 2.4 lists the 'System Design Parameter' definitions. These definitions will need to be referenced

3) Determine the heat load required for the building . for system design .

4) Mounting height and coverage are the two critical variables in selecting the proper size burners and the number of burners for a layout. a) The mounting height of the system will determine the largest size burner that can be used. Refer to the chart on page 6 of the HLV Design Guide for recommended mounting height information. b) During the design phase it may be discovered that the number of burners is not enough to achieve proper coverage , it may be necessary to use a larger number of smaller burners.

'

'

,,

~-,

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~

6

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Design

2.2 Design for Non-Condensing Systems

The system tube lengths are determined by the gas input (BTU / H) . The chart below indicates the system design parameters for each burner model used in a system. Elbows and tees have already been accounted for, therefore do not add them when calculating tube lengths .

Designing a non-condensing system can be quite simple if the following four steps are read carefully. Along with these four steps, an understanding of the design definitions is critical. Refer to section 2.4 for definitions and illustrations .

1) The best approach to designing a system is to start off by actually laying out a design without concerning oneself with the system design parameters . In using this approach it is ideal to place the burners where desired and the vacuum pump where desired. Referring to the Typical

Layouts' section of the HLV Design Guide may be helpful.

2) Now that there is a tentative layout for the system, make sure that each run in the system meets the ' calculated minimum run ' criteria. Calculated minimum run is figured by adding the total ' single flow' plus one-half of the common clow (refer to section 2.4 for illustrations and definitions). If the system does not meet the

Calculated Minimum Run, add length to the run to make sure all burners meet calculated minimum run .

3) Refer to the chart below for " Non-condensing system design parameters" and check the 'calculated maximum run' for every burner. It will be necessary to make the system a condensing system or shorten a run if the calculated maximum run is exceeded. Refer to section

2.4 for examples to determine 'calculated maximum run'.

4) Check to make sure the following applies for non-

condensing systems only. a) A maximum of two elbows per run is allowed in a system . b) A maximum of three intersections (tees or crosses) are allowed in a system (per vacuum pump). c) A reflector over an elbow or intersection is required if

20 feet or less from the burner.

Design Parameters for Non-Condensing Systems

(Refer to Section 2.4 For Chart Definitions)

HLV Burner

Model

50, 60

75 , 80

90, 100

110, 125

140, 150

170 , 175, 180

200 ·

Minimum Distance from Burner to first

Elbow or Intersection

(feet)

10

10

10

10

15

15

20

Calculated

Minimum Run

(feet)

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

Calculated

Maximum Run

(Distance is of Actual

Radint Pipe) (feet)

45

50

55

60

65

70

75

7

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

2.3 Design for Condensing Systems

The system tube lengths are determined by the gas input (BTU/H). The chart below indicates the system des i gn parameter for each burner model used in a system. Elbows and tees have already been accounted for, therefore do not add them when calculating tube l engths.

Designing a condensing system can be quite simple if the following six steps are read carefully Along with these six steps , an understanding of the design definitions i s crit i cal. Refer to section 3.6 for definitions and illustrations.

1) The best approach to designing a system is to start off by actually laying out a design with out concerning oneself with the system design parameters. In unsing this approach it is ideal to place the burners where desired and the vacuum pump where desired. Referring to the Typical Layouts section 3 .

2 may be helpful.

2) Now that there is a tentative layout for the system , make sure that each run in the system meets the 'Calculated

Minimum Run ' criteria. Calculated minimum run is figured by adding the total 'Single Flow' plus one-half of the Common Flow (refer to section 2.4 for illustrations and definitions). If the system does not meet the calculated minimum run , add length to the run to make sure all burners meet calculated minimum run .

3) Determine the calculated starting point of the condensing run . Look up each burner size on the chart to determine at what point in the 'calculated run' where condensing pipe must begin . Once the condensing pipe begins in a run, all intersections and elbows thereafter must be condensing pipe as well. Do this for each individual run.

If none of the runs are long enough to use c ondensing pipe then the system is regarded as a ' non-condensing' system.

3a) Alternate approach to step 3 if simulating an in-line design.

If doing an in-line system , the tie

Starting Point of Condensing for '

in burners must be at the minimum distance to elbow (no more , no less) . Reference the Maximum Actual Distance between Tie-Ins to make

J i sure the tie-in distance is not exceeded. Reference the'f l

Similated In-Line ' system s and determine when the condensing pipe starts after the last tie-in . When using this approach, step {does not apply.

Minimum Distance

HLV Burner from Burner to first

Model Elbow or

Intersection (feet)

50, 60

75 , 80

90, 100

110 , 125

140 , 150

170, 175 , 180

2 0 0

10

10

10

10

15

15

20 .

C •

Design Parameters for

Condensing

Systems

(Refer t o Secti o n 2.4 For Chart Definitions)

Calculated

Minimum

Run (feet)

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

Calculated

Starting Point of

Condensing Run

(feet)

45

50

55

60

65

70

75

Calculated

Maximum Run

(Including

Condens i ng Pipe)

(feet)

85

95

105

110

120

1 3 0

140

Simulated in-line Systems

Maximum Actual

Distance between Starting Point of

Tie-Ins for

'Simulated In-

Condensing for

'Simulated In-Line'

Line' systems

(feet) systems

35

40

45

50

55

55

55

30 ft After Last Tiei n

30 ft Aft e r Last Tie-in

30 ft After Last Tie-in

40 ft After Last Tie-in

40 ft After Last Tie in

40 ft After Last Tie-in

40 ft After Last Tie-in

- - - - - - - - - - - - - t

8

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

( C

· .

Design

, f:.

, ,

4) Check the calculated maximum run for every burner. It is usually recommended to shorten a run if the calculated maximum run is exceeded. Refer to section 2.4 for examples to determine 'calculated maximum run ' .

6) Check to make sure the following applies for condensing systems only. If these items are exceeded, contact the factory for approval.

5) If two different temperature zones are going to be used on a system , where some burners will be on one thermostat and the remainder of the burners will be on a second thermostat , the following guidelines must be met. a) A maximum of three elbows per run is allowed in a system. b) A maximum of six intersections (tees or crosses) are allowed in a system (per vacuum pump) . c) A reflector over an elbow or intersection is required if

20 feet or less from the burner. a) At the point where the two different zones will have burners that share common tubing, condensing pipe must be used. The condensing pipe will start at this point and continue through to the pump . See figure 2-1 for an e x ample.

Zone 1

Conden s ing pipe

Points where zone

1 & 2 sha r e common tubing . Cond e nsing pipe must begin here.

Zone 2

-(!) -

Figure 2-1

9

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

Definitions

2.4 Definitions

Run - The total actual length of radiant pipe from the individual burner box to the exhauster.

Minimum Distance to Elbow or Intersection - The minimum allowable distance from the burner box to the first elbow or intersection.

Single Flow - The radiant pipe in a run from the burner box to the first intersection (tee or cross). Refer to figure 2-2.

Common Flow - The radiant pipe in a run between the first intersection (tee or cross) and the exhauster. 'Common

Flow' begins at the point where two (2) or more burners share a common exchanger. Refer to figure 2-2.

(Please read this important definition carefully/)

Calculated Run - Calculated run is determined by adding the total 'single flow' plus one half of the 'common flow' of Pipe. For Example, if an actual run, has 30 feet of 'single flow' and 20 feet of 'common flow', this equals

40 feet (30 ft. + one half of 20 ft.) of Calculated Run.

Refer to figure 2-2.

Calculated Minimum Run - The minimum allowable

'calculated run'.

Calculated Starting Point of Condensing Run - The point in the 'calculated run' where condensing pipe must begin.

Refer to figure 2-3 for an example.

Calculated Maximum Run -The longest allowable 'calculated run' from the burner to the exhauster including the condensing pipe.

ISOLATION BOOT

20 FT

C

0:;:

Eo

E-

(.)

LL

PRIMARY DAMPER

Single

Flow

30 FT

-JL

Figure 2-2

I

40FT

--+-Jr

40FT

4 c;,------=mr-r--------------7

" '

HLV-75

~OFT

Start point of / 2 0 condensing

J_

+

I

I

40FT JJ t

HLV-75

""----- VACUUM PUMP

Figure 2-3

In figure 2-3, a model HLV-75 starts it's condensing pipe at 50 cacluated feet (40 feet plus one-half of 20 feet). The amount of condensing pipe in this particular example is 20 ft.

10

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Design

Pump Application

2.5 Vacu .

um Pump Application

The following table indicates which vacuum pump should be used for a system based on the specific BTU/H input.

VACUUM

PUMP

MODEL NO .

NC-7 *

PB-8

PB-9

PB-10A

TOTAL SYSTEM

INPUT RANGE

(BTU/H)

50,000 - 150,000

50 , 000 275,000

280 , 000 - 545 , 000

550,000 - 750,000

MAXIMUM

BURNERS

ON PUMP

2

5

6

6

*

NC-7 IS FOR NON-CONDENSING SYSTEMS ONLY .

A system containing a HLV-150 burner and two HLV-100 burners would have a total system input of 350,000 BTU/H.

Therefore, this system requires a PB-9 vacuum pump as indicated the table.

The vacuum pump exhaust venting length must be between 2 feet and 25 feet. The maximum number of elbows in the exhaust vent is two.

Isolation boots provided with the system must be installed before the vacuum pump on all systems .

Use appropriate hardware to attach to structure

/ Thn,aded Rod

~

4" Vent ~

\

Isolation

_ Bo?

Primary Damper

Support Plate

\

L

_vacuum Pump Control Box l

Vibration Isolators

I

L

Tube & Reflector Hanger w/ Chain Hanging Set

Figure 2-4

11

Tube He a ter Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

2.6 Damper Application

All systems are provided with a pr j mary damper which i s placed before the vacuum pump . Due to variations in gas input and rad i ant tube length , secondary dampers should be placed at various points as ne c essary to balance the system ' s e x haust flow .

A maximum of six dampe r s per system is allowed . The following are three typical examples of damper placement :

Example #1 - Figure 2 5

A system containing two HLV-75 burners with equal lengths of radiant tube running to the vacuum pump from each burner.

Th i s system required only a primary damper as shown in

Figure 2-5.

Examp l e #2 - Figure 2-6

Figure 2-6 shows a system containing a HLV-75 burn e r ( gas input of 75 MBTU/H) and a HLV-100 burner (gas input of 100

MBTU/H) with equal lengths of radiant tube running to the vacuum pump from each burner . This system required a primary damper at the vacuum pump and a secondary damper before the tee ( HLV-T) serving the lower MBTU/H heater .

S E C OND A R Y D AM P ~

H CV0

~

I SOLA T ION B O OT

H LV 75

F i gure 2-5

P RI MAR Y D AMP E R

H LV 7 5

30 FT .

__J c:

VAC UU M P UM P

PRIMAR Y DAMPE R

H L V 100

Figure 2-6

ISO LAT ION B OOT

SE CO NDAR Y D A M P E R

HL V-7 5

~

4 D FT .

__J

S E CO ND A R .Y D A M P ~ ~

HCV O

~

Example #3. Figure 2-7

A system containing two HLV-75 burners with unequal le n gth s of radiant tube running to the vacuum pump from each burner .

This system requires a primary damper at the vacuum pump and a secondary damper before the tee (HLV-T) on the shorter tube length as shown in Figure 2-7 .

V A C UU M P U M P ~

PRIM A RY D A MPER f

I

20 FT.

ISOLATION BOOT

SE CON D ARY D AM PER

Figure 2 7

(

12

(

.

.

.

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

A

· ~ .

3. INSTALLATION

3.1 Pre-Installation

1) Verify that all parts have been received by checking them against the packing list. If anything is missing , notify the

Re-Verber-Ray representative or Detroit Radiant Products .

2) Check the AGA rating label on the burner to verify the model number , the gas to be used and that the clearances to combustibles will be met.

3) Check the AGA rating label on the vacuum pump to verify that it is adequate for the gas input (BTU/H) of the system.

4) Identify the Alumi-Ti 10 ft. tube(s), and ensure that one exists for each burner.

5) Following a layout drawing, determine the location of the suspension points for the system in relation to the building structure. Ensure that the finished installation will conform to the design requirements listed in the foreword, and the Clearances to Combustibles Chart on page 5.

6) Each system is supplied with the necessary wire hangers for suspending the burner, radiant tubing and reflectors

(see Figure 3-1).

7) Use of 12 gauge, size #1, double-loop chain (THCS) is recommended when hanging the system . Quantity 3 per burner, 1 pertube.

8) Mounting chains must hang perpendicular to the system.

9) The first 10 ft . of tube downstream from a burner must be titanium alloy aluminized steel tube (Alumi-Ti). Identify this tube and make sure it is installed with welded seam down (see Figure 3-1 ).

First Tube (Alum-Ti) downstream of the burner

box Referred to as the ------------

Combustion Chamber

_.

c__ _ Welded seam must be positioned downward

175,000 · 225,000 models require a stainless steel tube clamp between the first and second

10 foot radiant tubes.

Figure 3-1

13

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Patts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

INSTALLATION NOTES

l@I

MOUNT BURNER BOX LEVEL

WELDED SEAM MUST BE POSITIONED DOWNWARD

Figure 3-3 Figure 3-2

IMPORTANT: Mount burner control box and chain sets level to the ground. Do not rotate control box assembly .

IMPORTANT: 175,000 through 225,000 BTU/H models must be installed with a stainless steel tube clamp at t h e ~ joint of the exchanger between the first and second radiant tubes.

NOTE: When positioning heaters, keep in mind the clearance to combustible materials, lights, sprinkler heads, overhead doors, storage areas with stacked materials, gas and electrical lines, parked vehicles, cranes and any other possible obstructions or hazards. Refer to the Warnings, Cautions and the Clearance to Combustibles chart in the Safety

Information Section and on the heater to verify that a safe installation condition exists.

IMPORTANT: Mount all tubes with welded seam facing downward (see figure 3-3) . Be sure to have swaged ends pointed towards the exhaust end of the heater .

IMPORTANT -

Do not exceed the maximum vent length for exhausting the heater. Consult sections 3.7 & 3.8 for guidelines. NOTE: If windy conditions exist in the space around the heater, it may be necessary to rigidly mount the heater to prevent swaying. It is recommended that threaded rod be used for the two hanging points at the burner control box (see

Figure 3-2). The remaining hanging points should use chains to allow for heater expansion.

Consult Combustion Air Requirements section on page 22.

Do not exceed the maximum duct length for fresh air intake. Consult Air Intake Duct Chart on page 22.

NOTE: The tube clamps provided with the heater are preassembled at the factory. If a clamp is dismantled , it is important that upon reassembly the spacer is properly inserted

(see Figure 3-7). The spacer's concave surface must face the radiant tube. Incorrect spacer placement will result in shearing of the bolt when torqued to the recommended specifications (40-60-lb. ft .

) .

Do not draw fresh air into the heater from an attic space.

There is no guarantee that adequate air will be supplied.

All unvented heaters must use Part No. WVE-GALV vent with flapper.

Once all of the safety precautions and design criteria the actual installation of the heater may begin. are met,

\ l'

'· ·

.

··

14

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

'

.;

: " ··

__

·

·'·.

··

C

3.2 Vacuum Pump Assembly and Mounting

3.3 Tube & Burner Box Mounting

1. Before mounting vacuum pump make sure that the building structure and support brackets have adequate load characteristics to support the pump. See chart below.

Vacuum Pump

Model No.

NC-7

PB-8

PB-9

PB-10A

Vacuum Pump

Weight (lbs.l

20

60

67

73

2 Install vacuum pump as shown on plan drawing. Make sure pump is properly aligned with system. Allow an 8" to 12" space for the isolation boot between the primary damper and the vacuum pump inlet adapter. Refer to figure 3-6.

1) Installation will begin at the vacuum pump. Condensing

Qin.§ has to be sloped downward at 1 per 10 feet as it approaches the pump (which is upward at 1 /4" per 10 feet going from the pump). The standard radiant pipe wiil be mounted level. Refer to figure 3-6 on the following page.

2) It may be easiest to start by mounting the first tube with two (2) hangers spaced approximately 8 to 9 feet apart.

Every 10 foot tube thereafter should only need one ( 1) hanger spaced at approximately 8 to 9 feet apart. Refer to figure 3-13 on page 18 for an example of hanger placement.

3) It is critical that the tube mounting starts with the run having the greatest amount of condensing pipe.

If there is no condensing pipe in the system, start with the longest run.

3. Mount the inlet and outlet adapters to the vacuum pump using self-tapping sheet metal screws, and seal the joints with high temperature sealant.

(The NC-7 does not require an inlet adapter or isolation boots . See figure 3-5 for illustration) .

4) Clamps must be placed directly over the tube seams .

Refer to figure 3-7.

4 . Install isolation boot with clamps provided .

See figure 3-6.

5) After the first run is completely installed with all tubes, dampers , elbows, intersections , etc ., install the run with next greatest amount of condensing pipe, and so on and so on, until all runs are complete.

NOTE: The average sound level of the PB series vacuum pumps is between 60 and 63 DBA. If the application requires a lower sound level, relocation of the vacuum pump or a sound-deadening enclosure may be used.

Consult factory.

B ar Joist Clip

Beam Clamp

Wood B ea m

6) For ease of installation, it is recommended that reflectors be mounted with each tube as it is installed (see instructions on reflector assembly.

7) Make sure all dampers have been properly placed in the system and temporarily set each damper to half-closed.

8) Adjust suspension hardware so that the tubes are in line and straight. Adjust chain lengths until standard radiant pipe is level and the condensing pipe is at the proper pitch. It is recommended that the condensing pipe is installed with turnbuckles (Part# V-TB) for ease of sloping the tube(s). One V-TB needed per suspension point.

9) Heater must be independently supported. It must not rely on the gas or electrical lines for any of its support.

,,. e

,'.

:: ' ·

;

Turnbuckle (Part#V-TB) is recommended on all condensing pipe suspension points for ease of slope adjustments.

Figure 3-4

15

10) Mount burner control box level and be sure that the burner sight glass is visible from the floor .

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

Use appropriate hardware to attach to structure

SAFETY

CHAIN

EXHAUSTER

ASSEMBLY

NOTE: Isolation boots are not needed between the damper and exhauster assembly when using the

NC-7 model exhauster on an H L V system

-POWER

BOX

/,be

& Roflocto,

Haoge,

Figure 3_5 w/ Chain Hanging Set lsolatio

Boot

Primary Damper

/

Turnbuckle Part#V-TB is ~

/'";;.commended for all condensing tube suspension points for ease of slope adjustment.

: i

CON E,S,NG , , , . _,.,..._,,,.~ '

1 l

~~

Vacuum Pump Control Bo x Vibration Isolators

All Condensing pipe must be installed on 1/4" per 10 foot downward slope toward exhauster. I

L

Tube & Refleclor Hanger wl Chain Hanging Set

Figure 3-6

All standard exchanger pipe must be installed level.

Swaged Tube / Tube Clamp

----..<i

p--~m~+--_-

--=----_-___,,-,Ii

FLAT

SURFACE

4

Correct

~ Seam-

Clamp ·

Incorrect

Figure 3-7

CONCAVED

SURFACE

16

(

1

/

; :

·

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

Baffle Assembly

3.4 Baffle Assembly & Installation Instructions

1. All systems include 99" of baffle . Baffle must be installed as close to the pump as possibe in the section of tubing that allows insertion of the entire length of baffle. Refer to figure 3-8 .

NOTE: Install assembled baffle so that the key hole is inserted first. All baffles must be placed vertically in the radiant tube/heat exchanger.

2. As shown in figure 3-9, assemble the baffle to the proper length. Baffle assembly may be done on the ground or assembled in increments of 33" while being fed into the tube.

/

' /

Figure 3-8

® ·-·

~-~--

Plac e male side (tab fittings) against female side (keyhole) at a 9 0-degrce angle.

Insert one tab into keyhole and slide fully to one side.

' '

1 l

With tabs cent e red, rotate haffle

90-degrees to complete ass embly .

! !

Center tabs. Repeat process as necessary to complete e ntire baffle.

Figure 3-9

Place opposite tab through k ey hole and slide baffle back towards the center position.

Place complete baffle into radiant tubes .

In s tall baffle in the horizontal position .

17

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

3.5 Reflector Assembly

1 . Mount reflector center support (RCS) at halfway point between hangers (see figure 3-10).

2 . Slide reflectors through wire hangers and overlap mating reflector ends four inches for support (see figure 3 11) .

Install sheet metal screws as shown.

3 . Install elbow and tee reflector assemblies if used.

4 . Install elbow and tee reflector end-caps at any exposed ends of the reflectors using four clips per end cap (see figure3-12) .

·-

, -~

16-18 In.

APPROX.

8"-10"

1

-

,

APPROX . 4 IN. r -

OVERLAP

=-.i

APPROX.

9-8 ft. HANGER

RCS 1

ANTI-RATILE SPRING

ANTI-RATTLE SPRING

CLIPS ..._____ __ _

Figure 3-11 sheet metal screws at all non.expansion joints .

Figure3-10

REFLECTOR ENDCAP

Figure 3-12

\

Reflector

Expansion

Joints

I

I

Note: Leave an expansion joint in each run of reflector , the preferred location is between reflector one and two.

Figure3-13

~

F>~t ;",tallod tobo(s) " " be mounted using two hangers. 7

All tube(s) installed after the

4 first tube typically require

""''"t'"'\

~

\

Reflector

Expansion

Joints

I

I

_ ;

,

18

'i

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

3.6 Reflector Accessories

Different applications will require the use of reflector accessories. Available options include side shield extensions, protective guards, elbow or U shields, stainless steel reflectors and drop ceiling panels. Consult the Detroit Radiant Products

Accessory Guide for detailed product information.

Side Shield Extensions . (Part No. SSE) Designed to direct infra-red rays downward, away from sidewalls and combustibles. This includes stored combustible containers, heating between two large vehicles, crane rail motors, wiring and other applications that require protection. Figure 3-14 details a side shield assembly installation. Figure 3-15 shows where to measure the new clearances from. Data for these clearances is available in the product insert for each series of heaters.

Figure3-14

Reflector Elbows (Part No . RE) are designed to fit atop an elbow tube fitting (see figure 3-16).

"U" Reflectors (Part No. RU) cover TF1 B "U" Fittings. They attach to standard reflectors covering the end of a "U" configuration (see figure 3-17). Reflectors cannot be rotated after installation of this accessory .

Figure 3-16 Figure 3-17

Protective Guards. (Part No. PG) Designed to attach to the standard reflector . They are typically used to prevent debris or objects from becoming lodged between the radiant tube and reflector .

Aluminum Egg Crate . (Part No. EC) is designed to fit into a standard 2' x 4' ceiling tile opening . Drop ceiling side panels

(Part No. DCSP) are needed for complete installation of egg crate . The side panels are used to direct infra-red rays away from ce i ling tiles.

Protective Heat Shields (Part No. PHS) attach below reflector to shield heat sensitive areas. Can only be used on 0 ° mounted reflectors.

Stainless Steel Reflectors (Part No . SSR or SSRAO) are also available for applications in harsh environments.

See the Accessory Guide for product specific information.

TOP

O"W/1 SIDE SHIELD

Figure 3-15

BELOW

O W/2 SIDE SHIELDS l i n

·

:1

!

t

['

.

,

19

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

3.7 Flue Venting for Non-Condensing Systems

The following guidelines must be observed to ensure proper system performance and safety.

• Check all applicable codes prior to installing any exhaust vent. Local codes may vary . In the absence of local codes see the National Fuel Code ANSI Z223 .

1 (NFPA 54) latest edition. This system is designed to operate with a 4 " diameter exhaust vent.

It is recommended that single-wall vent material be used.

The portion of the vent which goes through combustible material in the building wall or roof must pass through a dual insulated vent sleeve with an approved 1 inch clearance thimble (see Figure 3-18 and 3-19).

• Vertical vents which e x it through the roof should be at least

2 ft. higher than any portion of the building within a horizontal radius of 10 ft. of where it passes through the roof of the building (see Figure 3-18). A standard rain cap may be used to shield the vent.

• The vent tube length allowed must be between 2 ft. and ft. Do not use more than two 90° elbows in the vent models) .

• Horizontal venting must be terminated using a vent cap with flapper {HLV-WVE) and have a 1 inch clearance from combustible walls (see Figure 3-19) . Through the wall venting shall not terminate over public walkways and must > be at least 4 ft . below , 4 ft. horizontally from, or 1 ft. above < any door, window or gravity air inlet into any building .

• All vent tubes must be sealed to prevent leakage of flue gas into building.

• Single-wall vent tube that is exposed to cold air must be insulated to prevent condensation.

• Vent cap must be protected from blockage by snow.

• The building must be protected from damage by flue gases.

·

• Single wall aluminum flue pipe - minimum 26 ga.

,.,· ...

'

.

CO M3US'i': BLE Jl: OOf

SU!>P ORT RO D

('l'YP~ 4 )

ISO LATlO~

BOOT

.\Pl'

:..ovr.o

1 IN.

:: :.t.

AR.t.NC

E ':" fl J~l aL3

: YP.! " B " V!-:h't '

Vi\ cuc.w

:

E'-' U:'i?

S:JPFC::l f

PLATE:

Typical Vertical Venting for Non-Condensing Systems

Figure 3-18

\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \

!

:oM c!US'.::l B1.C.

WALL

CA'.' -W \.

"E

TY PE: "' B" V E NT

Typical Horizontal Venting for Non-Condensing Systems

Figure 3-19

20

,

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Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

Flue Venting

3.8 Flue Venting for Condensing Systems

For condensing systems all of the non-condensing rules apply as well as the following.

A condensate trap is required on the discharge side if there is a vertical rise in the discharge line (figure 3-20).

On a horizontal discharge the condensate trap can be eliminated if the discharge is pitched down one inch per foot (figure 3-21 ) . Check with local codes for proper condensate disposal.

For ease of installation and condensate disposal, horizontal venting is recommended and preferred .

For horizontal venting, extend the vent a minimum of two feet past the building exterior in order to minimize potential building discoloration from condensate drippage.

Vent Recommendations in order of preferred use:

Stainless Steel condensing tube 4 " 0 .

0.

-part# 1 OSST for 1 Oft. sections.

-part# SST-60 for 5 ft. sections .

Single wall aluminum flue pipe - minimum 26ga.

G for condensate disposal.

Figure 3-20

'--condensate Trap Assembly

Part No. V-CDT

Figure 3-21

21

I '

11

I

I

I

I

·

I

.

t

'

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Paris Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

3.9 Combustion Air Requirements

Combustion air intake has a factory preset air orifice. If indoor combustion air is to be supplied for a tightly closed room, one square inch of free air opening should be provided for each

1,000 BTU/Hof heater input.

Non-contaminated air for combustion must be ducted to the heater if chlorinated or fluorinated contaminants are present in the area where the heater is installed , or if the building has a negative pressure. Typical sources of these contaminants are refrigerants, solvents, adhesives, degreasers, paint removers, paints, lubricants, pesticides, etc.

Outside combustion air may be provided by an accessory air duct , and directly attached over the air orifice. A WIV wall inlet cap must be used with horizontal outside air intake ducts.

The use of flexible 4 " hose, connecting the air intake pipe to the heater is recommended to allow flexibility for expansion.

See figure 3-22 .

For limitation of length and size, see the Air Intake Duct-

Chart below. The maximum number of 90 ° elbows allowed is two.

Keep intake opening at least 4 ft. from any exhaust vent openings. On rooftop penetrations, always place the vent stack higher than the air intake stack.

The air intake cap must be installed to prevent blockage .

Locate WIV air intake by an area that dirt , steam, snow, etc . will not contaminate or clog the 1/2" intake screen.

NOTE: In humid applications use insulated duct or PVC pipe to prevent condensation on outer surface of the intake pipe .

NOTE: Sidewall air intake is preferred over roof air intake.

Duct to Outside r

Flexible Air Inlet Boot 16"

(Part# AIRH) r;::: :::::::: :::::: :.: :::: :::: :·: ::::: J

1

·--

.

-············-·

..

I

_____

_ .H~~~~~p

I ))

- b , ., .............

.

.....

.. /

Proper use of flexible air inlet boot & hook-up

Figure 3-22

MODEL

AIR INTAKE DUCT CHART

ALL MODELS

AIR INTAKE DUCT

SIZE IN.

4

5

6

LENGTH

30

45

75

VENTING

THROUGH ROOF

ALTER..NATE AIR INTAKE

~ - - - " n'°'

THROUGH ROOF

HEAT E R

Figure 3-23

AIRINTA~ W A c c = A ~

W/BIRD SC REEN

(WIV-4 )

22

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

Gas Supply

3.1 O Gas Supply lcAUTtON!I

CORRECT INLET PRESSURES ARE VITAL FOR EFFICIENT

OPERATION OF HEATER. REFER TO AGA/CGA(CSA)

RATING PLATE AND, IF NECESSARY, CONSULT GAS

COMPANY.

If all or a portion of the gas supply line consists of used pipe, it must be cleaned and then inspected to determine its equivalency to new pipe. Test all main supply lines according to local codes. (Isolate heater gas valve and supplied gas cock during test.)

Excessive torque on manifold may misalign orifice. Always use two wrenches when tightening mating pipe connections.

WARNING!

Never use a match or any other flame to test for gas leaks. Use a soap and water solution to check for leaks.

If any portion of the gas supply line is located in an area that could cause an abnormal amount of condensate to occur in the pipe, a sediment trap should be installed (see figure

3-24).

AGA Ball Valve/Gas Cock

\

Drip Leg/Sediment Trap i

L)

I\

\

AGA Stainless Flexible Gas Connector

,,,..

;_

~

Ii

''

NOTE: For high pressure gas above 14 in. W.C.P. (Water

Column Pressure), a high pressure regulator and gas cock must be used. If compressed air is used to detect leaks in the gas supply line, disconnect and cap shutoff cock to avoid damage to regulator and gas valve.

A typical gas supply line connection is illustrated in figure

3-24. The method shown will decrease the possibility of any loose scale or dirt in the supply line entering the heater's control system and causing a malfunction. Provide a 1/8 in.

(3.2mm) NPT, plugged tapping accessible for test gauge connection immediately up stream of gas connection to heater.

The gas supply line must be of sufficient size to provide the required capacity and inlet pressure to the heater (consult gas company) as follows.

NOTE: Manifold pressure should be checked at the tap on the gas valve. Readings will be above atmospheric pressure.

• Natural Gas

To obtain the required manifold pressure of 3.5 in. W.C.P., a minimum inlet pressure of 5.0 in. W.C.P. is necessary for purposes of input adjustment. A maximum inlet pressure of 14.0 in. W.C.P. is allowed for 911 units.

Liquefied Petroleum Gas

To obtain the required manifold pressure of 10.0 in. W.C.P., a minimum of 11.0 in. W.C.P. for purposes of input adjustment to a maximum of 14.0 in. W.C.P. must be provided ahead of the control system on each heater. Do not exceed a manifold operating pressure of 10.0 in. W.C.P.

Use only a pipe joint compound that is resistant to liquefied petroleum gases.

• Pressure Equivalents

1 in. W.C.P. equals 0.58 oz/sq. in. or 2.49 millibars.

Figure 3-24

23

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

• Allowance for Expansion

Allowances must be made for the system to expand. A stainless steel, flexible gas connector is recommended.

If, however, local codes require rigid piping to the heater, a swing joint can be used.

• Gas Line Connection a . The gas outlet shall be in the same room as the appliance and the connector must not be concealed within or run through any wall, floor or partition. b. The connector shall be of adequate length. c. The final assembly shall be tested for leaks.

CAUTION : Matches, candles , open flame or other sources of ignition shall not be used for this purpose.

Leak test solutions may cause corrosion. Water rinse after test. d. Contact with foreign objects or substances should be avoided. e. The connector should not be kinked, twisted or torqued. f. Connectors are not designed for movement after installation . Bending, flexing or vibration must be avoided.

Connectors are for use only on piping systems having fuel gas pressures not in excess of½ pound per square inch .

I

CAUTION!

I

CONNECTOR NUTS MUST NOT BE CONNECTED DIRECTLY

TO PIPE THREADS. THIS CONNECTOR MUST BE

INSTALLED WITH ADAPTORS PROVIDED. DO NOT

REUSE.

1/2" pipe Adapter

J.ir-Jv

Gas Cock.t

(Note location of tap}

24" SS Flex Connector

-

t

Appliance Inlet

*See kit content chart on page 12 of product insert to determine if above piece(s) should be supplied.

24

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Operation

4. OPERATION

4.1 Electrical Requirements

1. The system operates on 120V, 60 Hz.

2. The system must be grounded in accordance with the

National Electrical Code NFPA 70 latest edition .

3. The system must be installed in accordance with the typical wiring diagrams (see Figures 4-1 & 4-2) .

4. Figure 4-3 illustrates the wiring of a PB series pump assembly.

5 . All systems are two-stage heat systems and will be operated by a two-stage controller.

6. Check vacuum pump (PB Series) to ensure wiring is correct for proper fan wheel rotation. Check directional arrow on pump housing for proper wheel rotation ( excludes

NC-7 Series) .

7. The amperage draws for the individual HLV components are as follows . The circuit(s) must be sufficient to handle the starting current of the buner control boxes and the running amperage of the pump.

HLV

VACUUM

PUMPS

NC-7

PB-8

PB-9

PB-10A

HLV BURNER

CONTROL BOX

CIRCUIT (amp)

RUNNING

CIRCUIT

(amp)

2 .

2

7 .

6

9.6

11.4

STARTING RUNNING

0.7 0 .

2

4.2 Burner Lighting Instructions

1. Purge main gas supply line.

2. Rotate burner ' s manual gas valve knob to the " ON" position.

3. Close electrical circuit.

4. If burner fails to light, turn off gas and wait five minutes before repeating the above procedure.

4.3 Burner Shutdown Instructions

1. Open electrical circuit.

2. Rotate burner's manual gas valve to the " OFF" position.

4.4 Theory of Operation

Starting Circuit

(Figures 4 .

1 and 4.2)

There is constant line voltage sitting at both the vacuum pump and burner(s) . When the thermostat closes it sends power to relays at both the vacuum pump and burner(s).

At the vacuum pump , the relay closes to allow a completed circuit across L 1 and L2.

At the burner control bo x negative air pressure generated by the vacuum pump will cause the normally open differential switch to close. A low voltage circuit is completed from the secondary side of the transformer through the relay and pressure switch to the control module. The hot surface igniter is now immediately powered. After the ignitor has been powered for 4-5 seconds, the control causes the gas valve to open and then initiates a 15 second i gnition trial.

Running Circuit

After ignition, the flame rod monitors the flame. As long as a flame is present, the valve is held open . If proof of flame is not established within 15 seconds, the unit will attempt ignition two more times and then lock out. If lockout occurs, the control can be reset by briefly interrupting the power source.

If the flame is established for a period of time and then lost, the control acts to close the valve within one second, and a new trial sequence identical to that at start-up is initiated .

25

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

Internal Wiring for Burner Control Box·

P R ES SURE S WIT CH

INDI CAT OR LI G HT S IGN IT OR FLAME

ROD f

D

0

TRITON 2 465 H

IG NITION MODULE

W MV1 GND

B K

1 H

BURNE R

GY

-

.....

-;.

.

•, - • • • _

T' ST A T

TER MINAL

TE RMI N AL

BL OC K

12 0 2 40 I 2 4V

T RAN SF ORMER

1 20 24 0V w

L - K --,1

1 2 0 V A C

L2 - -w - - -

·--------.

G A S VALVE

Figure 4-1 Block Wiring Diagram

L1 120V-240V AC l

• -W ~

RELAY

BL

BOARD

,-rBL

1 20V

~V

- -

~

-

,

- B K - - -

PRESSURE

L2

SWITCH

T-STAT

.

TERMINAL

BK

0

TRITON 2 4 65H

IGNITION MODULE

):( LIGHT

BK

ROD

B K

WMV1GND

FC1

FC2 S1 L1 L2 S2

D

~ - - - H - - - , . . - BK l

B K ~ B K -· - , . - ---. w

Figure 4-2 Ladder W i ring Diagram

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ ft/

~ :,,;:

26

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Installation

Internal Wiring for Pump & Panel Assembly

, - -

~

~ }

-

-( ~ }

~~

[Xx

~ ~

:x

[X )(

.___

K7

~

~

//,) m9

~

L-rn

4J rn I

-

4J

Not e: In North America, pump and panel are pre-wired at the fact ory for 120V. If alternate volt age will be used consult fact ory.

.

R w

G

NO

00

I

1

2

3

4

R

BL

-----

~

BL y

BL

R ~

FUSE

1 i

~

~

IN

L w

:ii:

0::

0

LI. rn z

<(

-

> ~

0

"'

>

0

N

~

0:: I -

~

R

____llL_ w

L 2 120V/230V

-G

~

G jBL

I

[" :a:]NO

BL

L

Ek:iNo

~COM m

~

[ f------

~ N C

L

0 r==r

I

I

I

'

24V INPUT FOR

ZONE#1

GY

Figure 4-3

[&

[~]NC

~

F or

,JGY

24V INPUT FOR

ZONE#2

IF USED

[&

!

27

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

System Field Wiring

( ) ;~~,~~~;

Zone 2 Burner(s) (if second

24V INPUT

,o\z,o"e

l======:::!Jle

heat zone is to be used)

1 8

Zone~

-~~-u~~-r~n:~-e~:r:~~s~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~!~·'rc==1,~,E;:!~~~=--~-~--__ -

__ -_-__ -__ -_-__ -__ -__

-_-_-.:::::,------~s:::§~~[~tff~:::~

1 i

NUMBER OF BURNERS ALLOWED PER

SYSTEM AS STATED IN THE PUMP

APPLICATION GUIDELINES

0

:rr, c;;cc;~~ - - - - - - ~ , ... ;

I

,---------------------- "'Ji

~-:~_::

:J

.

[,

:·.·.·· ............... r .... .

24V "TWO-STAGE

CONTROLLER

24V OUT - STAGE 2

{HIGH FIRE)

24V OUT· STAGE 1

(LOW FIRE)

24VIN

COMMON g

EXTERNAL

TRANSFORMER

{FIELD SUPPLIED}

: A COMMON WIRE IS REQUIRED:

-~-~ FOR THERMOSTATS THAT '

[_REQUIRE CONSTANT POWER f

Figure4-4

28

---------------

..,

________________ _

lifif~:J

fl\

! .. ~ __ ::>

-r---..

c~,

.

! ' i

}~;~?l~~;-~-----1 (' (' :,

I

---J

-E~TERNAL i

24V OUT- STAGE 2 ~-

4

:.:_:.-1 j_

-----7i

TRANSFORMER

I::::, _ _ _ _

(HIGH FIREj

~~~-;:~:f ___ --i -~ r-(~~~~;-~u~:~I~-~)-~

. ,w,;~:~;;11111~;::;:'.:-l2~: ...

0

P~~!R :

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Operation

4.5 System Start-Up and Damper Setting

1. Recheck installation of gas piping, electrical, etc.

2. Preset primary and secondary dampers to half open.

3. Unassisted outside combustion air ducts (if required) must be installed before start-up.

4. Fan assisted outside combustion air ducts (if used) must not be connected to control box upon initial start-up.

5. To set the dampers, the system must be run for 20 minutes in High Fire Mode. Check to make sure all lights on the burner control are on .

6. All dampers in the system are initially set to half closed.

If a burner does not light and stay lit, the damper for that burner will need to be adjusted to get the burner to light for the initial 20 miniute start-up.

7. Using a manometer with an adequate range, measure the vacuum at the burner (Figure 4-5) farthest away from the vacuum pump. Adjust the primary damper at the pump until the manometer reaches the specified reading shown in the chart below.

8. If secondary dampers have been installed in the system, connect manometer to the designated burner and set secondary damper to the specified reading shown in the chart below.

9. All dampers must now be readjusted a second time in the same order. Lock the dampers in place.

/ Bumer Control Box

¾E:

[

-----·-~-~

I

[]

!

0 0

-------------- Vacuum Po rt

When measuring box pressure, make certain burner box lid is tightened securely.

Figure4-5

Each system damper must be adjusted to obtain the following box pressure.

The systems must be operating for a minimum of 20 minutes before adjusting the dampers to the following setpoints.

BTU Rating

50,000 - 60,000

75,000 - 110,000

120,000 - 180,000

200,000 - 225,000

Box Pressure

(inches W.C.)

-0.51 +/-.01

-0.19 +/-.01

-0.22 +/-.01

-0.19 +/-.01

29

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

5. MAINTENANCE

The HLV Series Vacuum System requires basic maintenance to keep it operating at peak performance. This system requires no filters to be replaced.

1 . Routinely inspect the vent intakes and vent exhausts for dirt and/or obstructions. If dirt becomes a problem, installation of outside air intake ducts for combustion are recommended .

2. Keep the aluminum reflectors clean using a light soap and water solution. Use a metal pol i sh if reflectors are severely dirty. Maintenance of the reflectors can vary significantly depending on the environment.

3 . Annually inspect the exhauster system for abnormal noise. Consult factory for troubeshooting .

4 . Periodically check the integrity of the combustion tube and heat exchangers . Replace if there are signs of structural failure.

Date Maintenance Performed Replacement Components Requied

f . >{i:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -'U ;i'·'

-.

30

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation , Operation , Maintenance and Parts Manual

Maintenance

5.1 Troubleshooting Chart

SYMPTOM

Thermost at c l osed but nothing happ ens.

General Trouble Shooting Chart

POSSIBLE CAUSE CORRECTIVE ACTION

1. Blown fuse.

2. Defective \hemostat.

3 . Defective vacuum purrp relay.

4. Loose or disconnected wire.

5. De fect i ve vacuum purrp.

1. Replace.

2. Replace.

3. Replace.

4. Repair as requ i red.

5. Repair or replace.

The r mos tat closed.

Vacu u m purrp operates.

1 . Lo w vac uum pressure sett i ng .

5. Defective circuit control.

1. Adjust darrper for

2 . Loose or disconnected wi ri ng .

3. R ugg e d or restricted ex h aust vent and/or air in take

2. Repair as needed .

3. Oea n .

4. Rugged vacuum pressu re switch lines. 4. Clean or replace.

5. Replace. proper pressure .

Thermostat closed.

Vacuum pur,,p ope rates .

No glo-bar energizat i on.

1 Defective glo-bar.

2. Loose or disconn ec t ed wire.

3. Defec t i v e c ir c uit control.

1. Rep l ace.

2. Repair or rep l ace.

3. Rep lace.

1 . Sys tern no t grounded.

Thermostat closed. Ignit i on

2. Defective ci r c ui t contro l. occurs. Burner cycles off 3. Vac uum pressure setting incorrect. and will not recycle .

4. Low gas inlet pressure .

5. Restricted air inlet.

1. Connec t elect r ica l ground.

2. Re pl ac e.

3. Adjust.

4. Fl"ovide req uired ga s pressure.

5. Oean

Thermostat clos ed . Ign it ion occ u rs . Burner cyc l es off and w i ll no: re cyc le .

1. Low gas in le t

2 . Defective v acuum

3. Restricted ai r inlet. pressu re sw i tch .

4. Vacu u m pressu r e set incorrectly .

1 . Fl"ovide re quired gas p ressure.

2. Re p la ce.

3 . Oean .

4 . A djus t

31

:::i C:

1 -----------------------------------~(

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Tube Heater Vacuum System

5.3 Parts List

34

Tube Heater Vacuum System Installation, Operation, Maintenance and Parts Manual

Limited Warranty

6. Limited Warranty

One-Year Limited Warranty. Radiant Tube Heaters covered in this manual, are warranted by Detroit Radiant Products

Company to the original user against defects in workmanship or materials under normal use for one year after date of purchase.

Any part which is determined to be defective in material or workmanship and returned to an authorized service location, as

Detroit Radiant Products Company designates, shipping costs prepaid, will be, as the exclusive remedy, repaired or replaced at

Detroit Radiant Products Company's option. For limited warranty claim procedures, see PROMPT DISPOSITION below. This limited warranty gives purchasers specific legal rights which vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Additional Limited Warranty. In addition to the above mentioned one-year warranty, Detroit Radiant Products Company warrants the original purchaser five years on the combustion chamber, five years on aluminized steel radiant tubes (three years on hot-rolled steel radiant tubes) and ten years on the stainless steel burner.

Limitation of Liability. To the extent allowable under applicable law, Detroit Radiant Products Company's liability for consequential and incidental damages is expressly disclaimed. Detroit Radiant Products Company's liability in all events is limited to and shall not exceed the purchase price paid.

Warranty Disclaimer. Detroit Radiant Products Company has made a diligent effort to provide product information and illustrate the products in this literature accurately; however, such information and illustrations are for the sole purpose of identification, and do not express or imply a warranty that the products are merchantable, or fit for a particular purpose, or that the products will necessarily conform to the illustrations or descriptions. Except as provided below, no warranty or affirmation of fact, expressed or implied, other than as stated in the "LIMITED WARRANTY" above is made or authorized by Detroit

Products Company.

Product Suitability. Many jurisdictions have codes and regulations governing sales, construction, installation, and/or use of products for certain purposes, which may vary from those in neighboring areas. While Detroit Radiant Prod

0 ucts Company attempts to assure that its products comply with as many codes, it cannot guarantee compliance, and cannot be responsible for how the product is installed or used. Before purchase and use of a product, review the product applications, and all applicable national and local codes and regulations, and be sure that the product, installation, and use will comply with them.

Certain aspects of disclaimers are not applicable to consumer products: e.g., (a) some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you: (b) also, some jurisdictions do not allow a limitation on how long an implied warranty lasts, consequently the above limitation may not apply to you: and (c) by law, during the period of this limited warranty, any implied warranties of implied merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose applicable to consumer products purchased by consumers, may not be excluded or otherwise disclaimed.

Prompt Disposition. Detroit Radiant Products Company will make a good faith effort for prompt correction or other adjustment with respect to any product which proves to be defective within limited warranty. For any product believed to be defective within limited warranty, first write or call dealer from whom the product was purchased. Dealer will give additional directions. If unable to resolve satisfactorily, write to Detroit Radiant Products Company at address below, giving dealer's name, address, date and number of dealer's invoice, and describe the nature of the defect. Title and risk of loss pass to buyer on delivery to common carrier. If product was damaged in transit to you file claim with carrier.

Registration. Register on-line at www.reverberray.com/warranty or mail or fax a completed copy of the manual insert cover.

Detroit Radiant Products Company.

21400 Hoover Road Warren, Ml 48089 U.S.A.

T. (586) 756-0950 F. (586) 756-2626

36

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