Dell Broadcom NetXtreme II User Manual

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Dell Broadcom NetXtreme II User Manual | Manualzz

Broadcom NetXtreme II™ Network Adapter User Guide

Broadcom NetXtreme II™ Network Adapter User Guide

The information below is provided by the supplier of the referenced device without independent verification by Dell and is subject to the Restrictions and Disclaimers noted below.

Introduction

Functionality and Features

Teaming

Virtual LANs (VLANs)

Manageability

Installing the Hardware

Installing the Driver Software

Broadcom Boot Agent Driver Software

NDIS2 Driver Software

ODI Driver Software

Linux Driver Software

NetWare Driver Software

Solaris Driver Software

VMware Driver Software

Installing Windows Drivers and Management Applications

Using iSCSI

Configuring Teaming

NIC Partitioning

Fibre Channel Over Ethernet

Using Data Center Bridging

Using Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

User Diagnostics

Specifications

Regulatory Information

Troubleshooting

Information in this document is subject to change without notice.

© 2011 Broadcom Corporation. All rights reserved.

Trademarks used in this text: Broadcom, NetXtreme II, Ethernet@Wirespeed, LiveLink, and Smart Load Balancing are among the trademarks of Broadcom Corporation and/or its affiliates in the United States, certain other countries, and/or the EU. Dell and the DELL logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds. NetWare is a trademark of Novell Corporation. Intel is a trademark of Intel Corporation. Magic

Packet is a trademark of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Red Hat is a trademark of Red Hat, Inc. PCI Express is a trademark of

PCI-SIG. Any other trademarks or trade names mentioned are the property of their respective owners.

Restrictions and Disclaimers

The information contained in this document, including all instructions, cautions, and regulatory approvals and certifications, is provided by the supplier and has not been independently verified or tested by Dell, except where specifically noted. Dell cannot be responsible for damage caused as a result of either following or failing to follow these instructions. All statements or claims regarding the properties, capabilities, speeds or qualifications of the part referenced in this document are made by file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/index.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:25 PM]

Broadcom NetXtreme II™ Network Adapter User Guide the supplier and not by Dell. Dell specifically disclaims knowledge of the accuracy, completeness or substantiation for any such statements. All questions or comments relating to such statements or claims should be directed to the supplier.

Export Regulations

Customer acknowledges that these Products, which may include technology and software, are subject to the customs and export control laws and regulations of the United States ("U.S.") and may also be subject to the customs and export laws and regulations of the country in which the Products are manufactured and/or received. Customer agrees to abide by those laws and regulations. Further, under U.S. law, the Products may not be sold, leased or otherwise transferred to restricted endusers or to restricted countries. In addition, the Products may not be sold, leased or otherwise transferred to, or utilized by an end-user engaged in activities related to weapons of mass destruction, including without limitation, activities related to the design, development, production or use of nuclear weapons, materials, or facilities, missiles or the support of missile projects, and chemical or biological weapons.

Initial release: December 2005

Last revised: December 2011

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Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Functional Description

Features

Functional Description

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter is a new class of Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) and 10 GbE converged network interface controller (C-NIC) that can simultaneously perform accelerated data networking and storage networking on a standard

Ethernet network. The C-NIC offers acceleration for all popular protocols used in the data center, such as:

TCP Offload Engine (TOE) for accelerating TCP over 1 GbE and 10 GbE

Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) offload for accelerating network storage access featuring centralized boot functionality (iSCSI boot)

Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) offload and acceleration for fibre channel block storage

NOTE: Separate licences are required for all offloading technologies.

Enterprise networks that use multiple protocols and multiple network fabrics benefit from the C-NICs ability to combine data communications, storage, and clustering over a single Ethernet fabric by boosting server CPU processing performance and memory utilization while alleviating I/O bottlenecks.

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter includes a 10/100/1000-Mbps or 10-Gbps Ethernet MAC with both half-duplex and fullduplex capability and a 10/100/1000-Mbps or 10-Gbps PHY. The transceiver is fully compatible with the IEEE 802.3 standard for auto-negotiation of speed.

Using the Broadcom teaming software, you can split your network into virtual LANs (VLANs) as well as group multiple network adapters together into teams to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance functionality. See Configuring Teaming and Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services for detailed information about teaming. See Virtual LANs , for a description of VLANs. See Configuring Teaming for instructions on configuring teaming and creating VLANs on Windows operating systems.

Features

The following is a list of the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter features. Some features may not be available on all adapters.

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) offload

Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE)

NIC Partitioning

Data Center Bridging (DCB)

Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS; IEEE 802.1Qaz)

Priority-based Flow Control (PFC; IEEE 802.1Qbb)

Data Center Bridging Capability eXchange Protocol (DCBX; CEE version 1.01)

Single-chip solution

Integrated 10/100/1000BASE-T transceivers

Integrated 10GBASE-T transceivers

10/100/1000 triple-speed MAC

SerDes interface for optical transceiver connection

PCI Express 1.0a x4 (Gigabit Ethernet)

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Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Full fast-path TCP offload

Zero copy capable hardware

Other performance features

TCP, IP, UDP checksum

TCP segmentation

Adaptive interrupts

Receive Side Scaling (RSS)

Manageability

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite diagnostic and configuration software suite

Supports PXE 2.0 specification (Linux Red Hat PXE Server, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, Windows Server 2008,

Windows Server 2008 R2, Intel APITEST, DOS UNDI)

Wake on LAN support

Universal Management Port (UMP) support

Statistics for SNMP MIB II, Ethernet-like MIB, and Ethernet MIB (IEEE Std 802.3z, Clause 30)

SMBus controller

ACPI 1.1a compliant (multiple power modes)

IPMI support

Advanced network features

Jumbo frames (up to 9 KB). The OS and the link partner must support jumbo frames.

Virtual LANs

IEEE Std 802.3ad Teaming

Smart Load Balancing Teaming

Smart Load Balancing TOE Teaming (with the correct configuration)

Flow Control (IEEE Std 802.3x)

LiveLink™ (supported in both the 32-bit and 64-bit Windows operating systems)

Logical Link Control (IEEE Std 802.2)

Layer-2 Priority Encoding (IEEE Std 802.1p)

High-speed on-chip RISC processor

Up to 4 classes of service (CoS)

Up to 4 send rings and receive rings

Integrated 96 KB frame buffer memory

GMII/MII Management Interface

Four unique MAC unicast addresses

Support for multicast addresses via 128 bits hashing hardware function

Serial flash NVRAM memory

JTAG support

PCI Power Management Interface (v1.1)

64-bit BAR support

EM64T processor support

1.2 V core voltage, 0.13 µm process iSCSI Boot support

Virtualization

Microsoft

VMware

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

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Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

The TCP/IP protocol suite is used to provide transport services for a wide range of applications for the Internet, LAN, and for file transfer. Without the TCP Offload Engine, the TCP/IP protocol suite runs on the host CPU, consuming a very high percentage of its resources and leaving little resources for the applications. With the use of the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter, the TCP/IP processing can be moved to hardware, freeing the CPU for more important tasks such as application processing.

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter's TOE functionality allows simultaneous operation of up to 1024 fully offloaded TCP connections for 1-Gbps network adapters and 1880 fully offloaded TCP connections for 10-Gbps network adapters. The TOE support on the adapter significantly reduces the host CPU utilization while preserving the implementation of the operating system stack.

Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI)

The IETF has standardized the Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI). SCSI is a popular protocol that enables systems to communicate with storage devices, using block-level transfer (i.e., address data stored on a storage device that is not a whole file). iSCSI maps the SCSI request/response application protocols and its standardized command set over TCP/IP networks.

As iSCSI utilizes TCP as its sole transport protocol, it greatly benefits from hardware acceleration of the TCP processing (i.e., use of a TOE). However, iSCSI as a Layer 5 protocol has additional mechanisms beyond the TCP layer. iSCSI processing can also be offloaded, thereby reducing CPU utilization even further.

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter targets best-system performance, maintains system flexibility to changes, and supports current and future OS convergence and integration. Therefore, the adapter's iSCSI offload architecture is unique as evident by the split between hardware and host processing.

NOTES: The iSCSI offload feature is not available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Fibre Channel over Ethernet

FCoE (Fibre Channel Backbone-5 (FC-BB-5)) allows Fibre Channel protocol to be transferred over Ethernet. FCoE preserves existing Fibre Channel infrastructure and capital investments. The following FCoE features are supported:

Full stateful hardware FCoE offload

Receiver classification of FCoE and FIP frames. FIP is the FCoE Initialization Protocol used to establish and maintain connections.

Receiver CRC offload

Transmitter CRC offload

Dedicated queue set for Fibre Channel traffic

Data Center Bridging (DCB) provides lossless behavior with Priority Flow Control (PFC)

DCB allocates a share of link bandwidth to FCoE traffic with Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)

NOTES: FCoE is not available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Power Management

Adapter speed connection when the system is down waiting for a wake-up signal may be at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps, but can return to 1000 Mbit/s when the system is up and running if connected to a 1000 Mbps capable switch. Systems intending to use Wake on LAN (WOL) should be connected to a switch capable of both 1000 and 10/100 Mbps speeds.

NOTES:

Dell supports WOL on only one adapter in the system at a time.

For specific systems, see your system documentation for WOL support.

WOL is supported in Broadcom NetXtreme II BCM5708 devices with silicon revisions of B2 or later. For more information, see Limitations .

Adaptive Interrupt Frequency

The adapter driver intelligently adjusts host interrupt frequency based on traffic conditions to increase overall application file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/features.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:28 PM]

Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide throughput. When traffic is light, the adapter driver interrupts the host for each received packet, minimizing latency. When traffic is heavy, the adapter issues one host interrupt for multiple, back-to-back incoming packets, preserving host CPU cycles.

ASIC with Embedded RISC Processor

The core control for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters resides in a tightly integrated, high-performance ASIC. The ASIC includes a RISC processor. This functionality provides the flexibility to add new features to the card and adapts it to future network requirements through software downloads. This functionality also enables the adapter drivers to exploit the built-in host offload functions on the adapter as host operating systems are enhanced to take advantage of these functions.

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) is an integrated utility that provides useful information about each network adapter that is installed in your system. The BACS utility also enables you to perform detailed tests, diagnostics, and analyses on each adapter, as well as to modify property values and view traffic statistics for each adapter.

Supported Operating Environments

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter has software support for the following operating systems:

Microsoft ® Windows ® (32-bit and 64-bit extended)

Linux

®

(32-bit and 64-bit extended)

MS-DOS

®

ESX Server (VMware)

NetWare ®

Oracle Solaris

SCO ® UnixWare ®

SCO OpenServer ®

Network Link and Activity Indication

For copper-wire Ethernet connections, the state of the network link and activity is indicated by the LEDs on the RJ-45 connector, as described in Table 1 . For fiber optic Ethernet connections and SFP+, the state of the network link and activity is indicated by a single LED located adjacent to the port connector, as described in Table 2 . Broadcom Advanced Control Suite also provides information about the status of the network link and activity (see Viewing Vital Signs ).

Table 1: Network Link and Activity Indicated by the RJ-45

Port LEDs

Port LED LED Appearance

Link LED

Off

Network State

No link (cable disconnected)

Continuously illuminated Link

Activity LED

Off

Blinking

No network activity

Network activity

Table 2: Network Link and Activity Indicated by the Port LED

LED Appearance Network State

Off No link (cable disconnected)

Continuously illuminated Link

Blinking Network activity

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Functionality and Features: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Configuring Teaming: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Configuring Teaming: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter

User Guide

Broadcom Advanced Server Program Overview

Load Balancing and Fault Tolerance

Broadcom Advanced Server Program Overview

Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP) is the Broadcom teaming software for the Windows family of operating systems.

BASP settings are configured by Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) utility.

BASP provides heterogeneous support for adapter teaming to include all of the Broadcom NetXtreme and NetXtreme II adapters as well as Dell-shipping Intel NIC adapters/LOMs. BASP provides support for TOE teaming only for NetXtreme II adapters.

BASP supports four types of teams for Layer 2 teaming:

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

Link Aggregation (802.3ad)

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

BASP supports two types of teams for TOE teaming:

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

For more information on network adapter teaming concepts, see Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Teaming Services .

Load Balancing and Fault Tolerance

Teaming provides traffic load balancing and fault tolerance (redundant adapter operation in the event that a network connection fails). When multiple Gigabit Ethernet network adapters are installed in the same system, they can be grouped into teams, creating a virtual adapter.

A team can consist of two to eight network interfaces, and each interface can be designated as a primary interface or a standby interface (standby interfaces can be used only in a Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover type of team, and only one standby interface can be designated per SLB team). If traffic is not identified on any of the adapter team member connections due to failure of the adapter, cable, switch port, or switch (where the teamed adapters are attached to separate switches), the load distribution is reevaluated and reassigned among the remaining team members. In the event that all of the primary adapters are down, the hot standby adapter becomes active. Existing sessions are maintained and there is no impact on the user.

NOTE: Although a team can be created with one adapter, it is not recommended since this defeats the purpose of teaming. A team consisting of one adapter is automatically created when setting up VLANs on a single adapter, and this should be the only time when creating a team with one adapter.

Types of Teams

The available types of teams for the Windows family of operating systems are:

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

Link Aggregation (802.3ad) (TOE is not applicable)

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static (TOE is not applicable)

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Configuring Teaming: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover

Smart Load Balancing™ and Failover is the Broadcom implementation of load balancing based on IP flow. This feature supports balancing IP traffic across multiple adapters (team members) in a bidirectional manner. In this type of team, all adapters in the team have separate MAC addresses. This type of team provides automatic fault detection and dynamic failover to other team member or to a hot standby member. This is done independently of Layer 3 protocol (IP, IPX, NetBEUI); rather, it works with existing Layer 2 and 3 switches. No switch configuration (such as trunk, link aggregation) is necessary for this type of team to work.

NOTES:

If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring SLB teams, disabling Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) or enabling

Port Fast at the switch or port is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to spanning tree loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.

TCP/IP is fully balanced and IPX balances only on the transmit side of the team; other protocols are limited to the primary adapter.

If a team member is linked at a higher speed than another, most of the traffic is handled by the adapter with the higher speed rate.

Link Aggregation (802.3ad)

This mode supports link aggregation and conforms to the IEEE 802.3ad (LACP) specification. Configuration software allows you to dynamically configure which adapters you want to participate in a given team. If the link partner is not correctly configured for 802.3ad link configuration, errors are detected and noted. With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. The outbound load-balancing scheme is determined by our BASP driver. The team link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets. In this mode, at least one of the link partners must be in active mode.

NOTE: Link Aggregation team type is not supported for TOE teaming.

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static

The Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static type of team is very similar to the Link Aggregation (802.3ad) type of team in that all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. The Generic Trunking

(FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static) type of team, however, does not provide LACP or marker protocol support. This type of team supports a variety of environments in which the adapter link partners are statically configured to support a proprietary trunking mechanism. For instance, this type of team could be used to support Lucent's OpenTrunk or Cisco's Fast

EtherChannel (FEC). Basically, this type of team is a light version of the Link Aggregation (802.3ad) type of team. This approach is much simpler, in that there is not a formalized link aggregation control protocol (LACP). As with the other types of teams, the creation of teams and the allocation of physical adapters to various teams is done statically through user configuration software.

The Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC/802.3ad-Draft Static) type of team supports load balancing and failover for both outbound and inbound traffic.

NOTE: Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC/802.3ad-Draft Static) team type is not supported for TOE teaming.

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

The SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) type of team is identical to the Smart Load Balancing and Failover type of team, with the following exception—when the standby member is active, if a primary member comes back on line, the team continues using the standby member, rather than switching back to the primary member.

All primary interfaces in a team participate in load-balancing operations by sending and receiving a portion of the total traffic.

Standby interfaces take over in the event that all primary interfaces have lost their links.

Failover teaming provides redundant adapter operation (fault tolerance) in the event that a network connection fails. If the primary adapter in a team is disconnected because of failure of the adapter, cable, or switch port, the secondary team member becomes active, redirecting both inbound and outbound traffic originally assigned to the primary adapter. Sessions will be maintained, causing no impact to the user.

Limitations of Smart Load Balancing and Failover/SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) Types

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Configuring Teaming: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

of Teams

Smart Load Balancing™ (SLB) is a protocol-specific scheme. The level of support for IP, IPX, and NetBEUI protocols is listed in

Table 1 .

Table 1: Smart Load Balancing

Operating System Failover/Fallback — All Broadcom Failover/Fallback — Multivendor

Protocol

Windows Server 2008

Windows Server 2008 R2 Y

IP

Y

Operating System

IPX

Y

Y

NetBEUI

N/S

N/S

Load Balance — All Broadcom

Protocol

Windows Server 2008

Windows Server 2008 R2 Y

IP

Y

IPX

Y

Y

NetBEUI

N/S

N/S

IP

Y

Y

IPX

N

N

NetBEUI

N/S

N/S

Load Balance — Multivendor

IP

Y

Y

IPX

N

N

NetBEUI

N/S

N/S

Legend Y = yes

N = no

N/S = not supported

The Smart Load Balancing type of team works with all Ethernet switches without having to configure the switch ports to any special trunking mode. Only IP traffic is load-balanced in both inbound and outbound directions. IPX traffic is load-balanced in the outbound direction only. Other protocol packets are sent and received through one primary interface only. Failover for non-IP traffic is supported only for Broadcom network adapters. The Generic Trunking type of team requires the Ethernet switch to support some form of port trunking mode (for example, Cisco's Gigabit EtherChannel or other switch vendor's Link

Aggregation mode). The Generic Trunking type of team is protocol-independent, and all traffic should be load-balanced and fault-tolerant.

NOTE: If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring SLB teams, disabling Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) or enabling

Port Fast at the switch is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to the spanning tree loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.

Teaming and Large Send Offload/Checksum Offload Support

Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum Offload are enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are configured for the feature.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Virtual LANs: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Virtual LANs: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

VLAN Overview

Adding VLANs to Teams

VLAN Overview

Virtual LANs (VLANs) allow you to split your physical LAN into logical parts, to create logical segmentation of workgroups, and to enforce security policies for each logical segment. Each defined VLAN behaves as its own separate network with its traffic and broadcasts isolated from the others, increasing bandwidth efficiency within each logical group. Up to 64 VLANs (63 tagged and 1 untagged) can be defined for each Broadcom adapter on your server, depending on the amount of memory available in your system.

VLANs can be added to a team to allow multiple VLANs with different VLAN IDs. A virtual adapter is created for each VLAN added.

Although VLANs are commonly used to create individual broadcast domains and/or separate IP subnets, it is sometimes useful for a server to have a presence on more than one VLAN simultaneously. Broadcom adapters support multiple VLANs on a per-port or per-team basis, allowing very flexible network configurations.

Figure 1: Example of Servers Supporting Multiple VLANs with Tagging

Figure 1 shows an example network that uses VLANs. In this example network, the physical LAN consists of a switch, two servers, and five clients. The LAN is logically organized into three different VLANs, each representing a different IP subnet.

The features of this network are described in Table 1 .

Table 1: Example VLAN Network Topology

Component Description

VLAN #1 An IP subnet consisting of the Main Server, PC #3, and PC #5. This subnet represents an engineering group.

VLAN #2

VLAN #3

Main Server

Includes the Main Server, PCs #1 and #2 via shared media segment, and PC #5. This VLAN is a software development group.

Includes the Main Server, the Accounting Server and PC #4. This VLAN is an accounting group.

A high-use server that needs to be accessed from all VLANs and IP subnets. The Main Server has a Broadcom adapter installed. All three IP subnets are accessed via the single physical adapter interface. The server is attached to one of the switch ports, which is configured for VLANs #1, #2, and #3. Both the adapter and the connected switch port have tagging turned on. Because of the tagging VLAN capabilities of both devices, the server is able to communicate on all three IP subnets in this network, but continues to maintain broadcast file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/vlan.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:33 PM]

Virtual LANs: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Accounting

Server

PCs #1 and

#2

PC #3

PC #4

PC #5 separation between all of them.

Available to VLAN #3 only. The Accounting Server is isolated from all traffic on VLANs #1 and #2. The switch port connected to the server has tagging turned off.

Attached to a shared media hub that is then connected to the switch. PCs #1 and #2 belong to VLAN #2 only, and are logically in the same IP subnet as the Main Server and PC #5. The switch port connected to this segment has tagging turned off.

A member of VLAN #1, PC #3 can communicate only with the Main Server and PC #5. Tagging is not enabled on PC #3 switch port.

A member of VLAN #3, PC #4 can only communicate with the servers. Tagging is not enabled on PC #4 switch port.

A member of both VLANs #1 and #2, PC #5 has an Broadcom adapter installed. It is connected to switch port

#10. Both the adapter and the switch port are configured for VLANs #1 and #2 and have tagging enabled.

NOTE: VLAN tagging is only required to be enabled on switch ports that create trunk links to other switches, or on ports connected to tag-capable end-stations, such as servers or workstations with Broadcom adapters.

Adding VLANs to Teams

Each team supports up to 64 VLANs (63 tagged and 1 untagged). Note that only Broadcom adapters and Alteon

®

AceNIC adapters can be part of a team with VLANs. With multiple VLANs on an adapter, a server with a single adapter can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets. With multiple VLANs in a team, a server can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets and benefit from load balancing and failover. For instructions on adding a VLAN to a team, see Adding a VLAN for

Windows operating systems.

NOTE: Adapters that are members of a failover team can also be configured to support VLANs. Because VLANs are not supported for an Intel LOM, if an Intel LOM is a member of a failover team, VLANs cannot be configured for that team.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Manageability: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Manageability: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

CIM

SNMP

HBA API

CIM

The Common Information Model (CIM) is an industry standard defined by the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF).

Microsoft implements CIM on Windows server platforms. Broadcom will support CIM on Windows server platforms.

Broadcom's implementation of CIM will provide various classes to provide information to users through CIM client applications.

Note that Broadcom CIM data provider will provide data only, and users can choose their preferred CIM client software to browse the information exposed by Broadcom CIM provider.

Broadcom CIM provider provides information through BRCM_NetworkAdapter and BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup classes.

BRCM_NetworkAdapter class provides network adapter information pertaining to a group of adapters including Broadcom and other vendors' controllers. BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup class provides team configuration for the Broadcom Advanced Server

Program. Current implementation will provide team information and information of physical network adapters in the team.

Broadcom Advanced Server Program provides events through event logs. Users can use the "Event Viewer" provided by

Windows server platforms, or use CIM to inspect or monitor these events. Broadcom CIM provider will also provide event information through the CIM generic event model. These events are __InstanceCreationEvent, __InstanceDeletionEvent and

__InstanceModificationEvent, and are defined by CIM. CIM requires the client application to register the events from the client application, using queries as examples shown below in order to receive events properly.

SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_NetworkAdapter"

SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup"

SELECT * FROM __InstanceCreationEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_NetworkAdapter"

SELECT * FROM __InstanceDeletionEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_NetworkAdapter"

SELECT * FROM __InstanceCreationEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_ActsAsSpare"

SELECT * FROM __InstanceDeletionEvent where TargetInstance ISA "BRCM_ActsAsSpare"

For detailed information about these events, see the CIM documentation at http://www.dmtf.org/sites/default/files/standards/documents/DSP0004V2.3_final.pdf

.

Broadcom also implements the Storage Management Initiative-Specification (SMI-S), which defines CIM management profiles for storage systems.

SNMP

BASP Subagent

The BASP subagent, baspmgnt.dll, is designed for the Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SNMP service. It is required to install the SNMP service before installing the BASP subagent.

The BASP subagent allows an SNMP manager software to actively monitor the configurations and performance of the

Broadcom Advanced Server features. The subagent also provides an alarm trap to an SNMP manager to inform the manager of any changes to the conditions of the BASP component.

The BASP subagent allows monitoring of the configurations and statistics for the BASP teams, the physical NIC adapters participating in a team, and the virtual NIC adapters created as the result of teaming. Non-teamed NIC adapters are not monitored at this time. The BASP configuration data includes information such as team IDs, physical/virtual/VLAN/team adapter IDs, physical/virtual/VLAN/team/ adapter descriptions, and MAC addresses of the adapters.

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Manageability: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

The statistics include detailed information such as data packets transmitted and received for the physical/virtual/VLAN/team adapters.

The alarm trap forwards information about the changes in configuration of the physical adapters participating in a team, such as physical adapter link up/down, and adapter installed/removed events.

To monitor this information, an SNMP manager must load the Broadcom BASP MIB database files to allow monitoring of the information described above. These files, which are shown below, are included with the driver source media.

baspcfg.mib

baspstat.mib

basptrap.mib

HBA API

Broadcom supports the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) Common HBA API on Windows and Linux operating systems. The Common HBA API is an application program interface for the management of Fibre Channel Host Bus Adapters.

BASP Extensible-Agent

The Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller Extended Information SNMP extensible-agent (bcmif.dll) is designed for Windows Server 2008 SNMP service.

The extensible-agent allows the SNMP manager software to actively monitor the configurations of the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter. It is intended to supplement the information already provided by the standard SNMP Management Network Interface information.

The extensible-agent provides in-depth information about a Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter such as:

MAC address

Bound IP address

IP subnet mask

Physical link status

Adapter state

Line speed

Duplex mode

Memory range

Interrupt setting

Bus number

Device number

Function number

To monitor this information, a SNMP manager needs to load the Broadcom Extended information MIB file to allow monitoring of the information described above. This file, bcmif.mib, is included on the installation CD.

The monitored workstation requires the installation of the Broadcom Extended Information SNMP extensible-agent, bcmif.dll, and requires the Microsoft Windows Server 2008 SNMP service to be installed and loaded.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Installing the Hardware: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Installing the Hardware: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Overview

System Requirements

Safety Precautions

Preinstallation Checklist

Installation of the Add-In NIC

Overview

This section applies to Broadcom NetXtreme II add-in network interface cards.

System Requirements

Before you install a Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter, verify that your system meets the following hardware and operating system requirements:

Hardware Requirements

IA32- or EMT64-based computer that meets operating system requirements

One open slot: PCI Express 1.0a x4 or PCI Express Gen2 x8

128-MB RAM (minimum)

Operating System Requirements

General

PCI Express v1.0a, x4 (or greater) Host Interface

Microsoft Windows

One of the following versions of Microsoft Windows:

Windows Server 2008 family

Windows Server 2008 R2 family

Novell NetWare

Novell NetWare 6.5 with the latest support pack.

Linux

Although the adapter driver should work with many Linux kernel versions and distributions, it has only been tested on 2.4x

kernels (starting from 2.4.24) and 2.6.x kernels. The driver may not compile on kernels older than 2.4.24. Testing is concentrated on i386 and x86_64 architectures. Only limited testing has been done on other architectures. Minor changes to some source files and Makefile may be needed on some kernels.

VMware ESX

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Installing the Hardware: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

VMware ESX 3.5

VMware ESX 4.0

VMware ESX 4.1

VMware ESX 5.0

Safety Precautions

CAUTION! The adapter is being installed in a system that operates with voltages that can be lethal. Before you open the case of your system, observe the following precautions to protect yourself and to prevent damage to the system components.

Remove any metallic objects or jewelry from your hands and wrists.

Make sure to use only insulated or nonconducting tools.

Verify that the system is powered OFF and is unplugged before you touch internal components.

Install or remove adapters in a static-free environment. The use of a properly grounded wrist strap or other personal antistatic devices and an antistatic mat is strongly recommended.

Preinstallation Checklist

1. Verify that your system meets the hardware and software requirements listed under System Requirements .

2. Verify that your system is using the latest BIOS.

NOTE: If you acquired the adapter software on a disk or from the Dell support website ( http://support.dell.com

), verify the path to the adapter driver files.

3. If your system is active, shut it down.

4. When system shutdown is complete, turn off the power and unplug the power cord.

5. Remove the adapter from its shipping package and place it on an antistatic surface.

6. Check the adapter for visible signs of damage, particularly on the edge connector. Never attempt to install a damaged adapter.

Installation of the Add-In NIC

The following instructions apply to installing the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter (add-in NIC) in most systems. Refer to the manuals that were supplied with your system for details about performing these tasks on your particular system.

Installing the Add-In NIC

1. Review Safety Precautions and Preinstallation Checklist . Before you install the adapter, ensure that the system power is

OFF, the power cord is unplugged from the power outlet, and that you are following proper electrical grounding procedures.

2. Open the system case and select the slot based on the adapter: PCI Express 1.0a x4, PCI Express Gen2 x8, or other appropriate slot. A lesser width adapter can be seated into a greater width slot (x1 in a x4), but a greater width adapter cannot be seated into a lesser width slot (x4 in a x1). If you do not know how to identify a PCI Express slot, refer to your system documentation.

3. Remove the blank cover-plate from the slot that you selected.

4. Align the adapter connector edge with the PCI Express connector slot in the system.

5. Applying even pressure at both corners of the card, push the adapter card into the slot until it is firmly seated. When the adapter is properly seated, the adapter port connectors are aligned with the slot opening, and the adapter faceplate is flush against the system chassis.

CAUTION! Do not use excessive force when seating the card, as this may damage the system or the adapter. If you have difficulty seating the adapter, remove it, realign it, and try again.

6. Secure the adapter with the adapter clip or screw.

7. Close the system case and disconnect any personal antistatic devices.

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Installing the Hardware: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Connecting the Network Cables

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter has either an RJ-45 connector used for attaching the system to an Ethernet copper-wire segment or a fiber optic connector for attaching the system to an Ethernet fiber optic segment.

NOTE: This section does not apply to blade servers.

Copper Wire

NOTE: The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter supports Automatic MDI Crossover (MDIX), which eliminates the need for crossover cables when connecting machines back-to-back. A straight-through Category 5 cable allows the machines to communicate when connected directly together.

1. Select an appropriate cable. Table 1 lists the copper cable requirements for connecting to 10/100/1000BASE-T and

10GBASE-T ports:

Table 1: 10/100/1000BASE-T and 10GBASE-T Cable Specifications

Port Type

10BASE-T

100/1000BASE-T 1

Connector Media

RJ-45

RJ-45

Category 3, 4, or 5 unshielded twisted pairs (UTP)

Category 5 2 UTP

Maximum Distance

100m (328 ft)

100m (328 ft)

10GBASE-T RJ-45

Category 6 3

Category 6A

UTP

3

UTP

50m (164 ft)

100m (328 ft)

1

1000BASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 5 balanced cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC

11801:2002 and ANSI/EIA/TIA-568-B.

2

Category 5 is the minimum requirement. Category 5e and Category 6 are fully supported.

3 10GBASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 6 or Category 6A (augmented Category 6) balanced cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC 11801:2002 and ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.

2. Connect one end of the cable to the RJ-45 connector on the adapter.

3. Connect the other end of the cable to an RJ-45 Ethernet network port.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Broadcom Boot Agent Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Broadcom Boot Agent Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II

Network Adapter User Guide

Overview

Setting Up MBA in a Client Environment

Setting Up MBA in a Server Environment

Overview

Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters support Preboot Execution Environment (PXE), Remote Program Load (RPL), iSCSI, and

Bootstrap Protocol (BootP). Multi-Boot Agent (MBA) is a software module that allows your network computer to boot with the images provided by remote servers across the network. The Broadcom MBA driver complies with the PXE 2.1 specification and is released with both monolithic and split binary images. This provides flexibility to users in different environments where the motherboard may or may not have built-in base code.

The MBA module operates in a client/server environment. A network consists of one or more boot servers that provide boot images to multiple computers through the network. The Broadcom implementation of the MBA module has been tested successfully in the following environments:

Linux Red Hat PXE Server . Broadcom PXE clients are able to remotely boot and use network resources (NFS mount, and so forth) and to perform Linux installations. In the case of a remote boot, the Linux universal driver binds seamlessly with the Broadcom Universal Network Driver Interface (UNDI) and provides a network interface in the Linux remotelybooted client environment.

Intel APITEST . The Broadcom PXE driver passes all API compliance test suites.

MS-DOS UNDI . The MS-DOS Universal Network Driver Interface (UNDI) seamlessly binds with the Broadcom UNDI to provide a network adapter driver interface specification (NDIS2) interface to the upper layer protocol stack. This allows computers to connect to network resources in an MS-DOS environment.

Windows Deployment Service (WDS) . To extend functionalities beyond basic network connectivity when loading an operating system through WDS, see Using the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver .

Automated Deployment Service (ADS) . To extend functionalities beyond basic network connectivity when loading an operating system through ADS, see Using the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver .

Setting Up MBA in a Client Environment

Setting up MBA in a client environment involves the following steps:

1. Enabling the MBA driver.

2. Configuring the MBA driver.

3. Setting up the BIOS for the boot order.

Enabling the MBA Driver

To enable or disable the MBA driver:

1. Insert an MS-DOS 6.22 or Dell Real Mode Kernel bootable disk containing the uxdiag.exe file (for 10/100/1000-Mbps network adapters) or uediag.exe (for 10-Gbps network adapters) in the removable disk drive and power up your system.

NOTE: The uxdiag.exe (or uediag.exe) file is on the installation CD or in the DOS Utilities package available from http://support.dell.com/ .

1. Type: uxdiag -mba [ 0-disable | 1-enable ] -c devnum

(or uediag -mba [ 0-disable | 1-enable ] -c devnum) where devnum is the specific device(s) number (0,1,2, ...) to be programmed.

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Broadcom Boot Agent Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Configuring the MBA Driver

This section pertains to configuring the MBA driver on add-in NIC models of the Broadcom network adapter. For configuring the

MBA driver on LOM models of the Broadcom network adapter, check your system documentation.

NOTE: You can use the MBA Configuration Menu to configure the MBA driver one adapter at a time as described below, or you can use the Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics MS-DOS based application to simultaneously configure the MBA driver for multiple adapters.

1. Restart your system.

2. Press CTRL+S within 4 seconds after you are prompted to do so.

NOTE: The message prompting you to press CTRL+S is displayed once for each Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter you have in your system that has MBA enabled. The messages are displayed in the same order as the assigned adapter device number.

3. Use the UP ARROW and DOWN ARROW keys to move to the Boot Protocol menu item. Then use the RIGHT ARROW or

LEFT ARROW key to select the boot protocol of choice if other boot protocols besides Preboot Execution Environment

(PXE) are available. If available, other boot protocols include Remote Program Load (RPL), iSCSI, and Bootstrap Protocol

(BOOTP).

NOTE: For iSCSI boot-capable LOMs, the boot protocol is set via the BIOS. See your system documentation for more information.

NOTE: If you have multiple adapters in your system and you are unsure which adapter you are configuring, press

CTRL+F6, which causes the port LEDs on the adapter to start blinking.

4. Use the UP ARROW, DOWN ARROW, LEFT ARROW, and RIGHT ARROW keys to move to and change the values for other menu items, as desired.

5. Press F4 to save your settings.

6. Press ESC when you are finished.

Setting Up the BIOS

To boot from the network with the MBA, make the MBA enabled adapter the first bootable device under the BIOS. This procedure depends on the system BIOS implementation. Refer to the user manual for the system for instructions.

Setting Up MBA in a Server Environment

Red Hat Linux PXE Server

The Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution has PXE Server support. It allows users to remotely perform a complete Linux installation over the network. The distribution comes with the boot images boot kernel (vmlinuz) and initial ram disk (initrd), which are located on the Red Hat disk#1:

/images/pxeboot/vmlinuz

/images/pxeboot/initrd.img

Refer to the Red Hat documentation for instructions on how to install PXE Server on Linux.

The Initrd.img file distributed with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, however, does not have a Linux network driver for the Broadcom

NetXtreme II adapters. This version requires a driver disk for drivers that are not part of the standard distribution. You can create a driver disk for the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter from the image distributed with the installation CD. Refer to the

Linux Readme.txt file for more information.

MS-DOS UNDI/Intel APITEST

.

To boot in MS-DOS mode and connect to a network for the MS-DOS environment, download the Intel PXE PDK from the Intel website. This PXE PDK comes with a TFTP/ProxyDHCP/Boot server. The PXE PDK can be downloaded from Intel at http://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?

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Broadcom Boot Agent Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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NDIS2 Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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NDIS2 Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Overview

Preinstallation Requirements

Installing the NDIS2 Driver Software for Use on MS-DOS Platforms

Using Keywords for the Drivers

Overview

Two drivers are discussed in this section:

BXND20X: Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet driver

BNX2EV: Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet driver

The examples used in this section refer to the BXND20X driver, but also apply to the BNX2EV driver.

Preinstallation Requirements

Before you can successfully install the NDIS2 driver software, the Broadcom network adapter must be physically installed in the server. Networking software that is appropriate to the operating system (such as Microsoft LAN Manager 2.2 for MS-DOS) must already be running on your server.

Installing the NDIS2 Driver Software for Use on MS-DOS Platforms

The NDIS2 driver software can be run from an MS-DOS startup disk using Microsoft Network Client 3.0 or from the hard disk using Microsoft LAN Manager 2.2.

Creating a Startup Disk to Run Microsoft Network Client

To perform this installation you must have the following items

Windows NT Server 4.0 CD-ROM

A blank MS-DOS system disk (3.5" high-density floppy disk)

Access to the Broadcom NDIS2 driver file (BXND20X.dos). This file is located on the driver source media.

NOTES:

Windows NT Server 4.0 users. When running Setup for Microsoft Network Client v3.0 for MS-DOS, click any network card from the list (NE2000 Compatible, for example) to create the startup disk.

After creating the startup disk, follow the instructions in Modifying the Startup Disk .

To create a startup disk

1. Create a folder called NCADMIN in the root of the C drive.

2. Copy the NCADMIN.CN_, NCADMIN.EX_, and NCADMIN.HL_ files from the I386 folder on the Windows NT Server 4.0

CD-ROM.

3. Open a command prompt window and change the directory to C:\NCADMIN.

4. Type expand -r ncadmin.*

and press ENTER .

5. Close the command prompt window by typing exit and then pressing ENTER .

6. Start Windows Explorer.

7. Open the NCADMIN folder and double-click ncadmin.exe

.

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NDIS2 Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

8. Follow the on-screen instructions to make the network startup disk (choose NE2000 Compatible from the list of adapters).

Modifying the Startup Disk

To modify the startup disk

1. Edit A:\Net\Protocol.ini with Notepad or a similar text editor.

a. Change

DriverName=$

to

DriverName=BXND20X$

.

b. Remove all other parameter entries under the [MS$NE2CLONE] or equivalent section such as IOBASE=0x300 or

INTERRUPT=3, and so on.

Example Protocol.ini file for IP

[network.setup] version=0x3110 netcard=ms$ne2clone,1,MS$NE2CLONE,1 transport=tcpip,TCPIP lana0=ms$ne2clone,1,tcpip

[MS$NE2CLONE]

DriverName=BXND20X$

[protman]

DriverName=PROTMAN$

PRIORITY=MS$NDISHLP

[tcpip]

NBSessions=6

DefaultGateway=0

SubNetMask=255 0 0 0

IPAddress=192 168 0 1

DisableDHCP=0

DriverName=TCPIP$

BINDINGS=MS$NE2CLONE

LANABASE=0

Example Protocol.ini file for IPX

[network.setup] version=0x3110 netcard=ms$ne2clone,1,MS$NE2CLONE,1 transport=ms$ndishlp,MS$NDISHLP transport=ms$nwlink,MS$NWLINK lana0=ms$ne2clone,1,ms$nwlink lana1=ms$ne2clone,1,ms$ndishlp

[MS$NE2CLONE]

DriverName=BXND20X$

[protman]

DriverName=PROTMAN$

PRIORITY=MS$NDISHLP

[MS$NDISHLP]

DriverName=ndishlp$

BINDINGS=ms$ne2clone

[ms$nwlink]

DriverName=nwlink$

FRAME=Ethernet_802.2

BINDINGS=MS$NE2CLONE

LANABASE=0

Example Protocol.ini file for NetBEUI

[network.setup] version=0x3110 netcard=ms$ne2clone,1,MS$NE2CLONE,1 transport=ms$ndishlp,MS$NDISHLP transport=ms$netbeui,MS$NETBEUI lana0=ms$ne2clone,1,ms$ndishlp lana1=ms$ne2clone,1,ms$netbeui

[MS$NE2CLONE]

DriverName=BXND20X$

[protman]

DriverName=PROTMAN$

PRIORITY=MS$NDISHLP

[MS$NDISHLP]

DriverName=ndishlp$

BINDINGS=MS$NE2CLONE

[MS$NETBEUI]

DriverName=netbeui$

SESSIONS=10

NCBS=12

BINDINGS=MS$NE2CLONE

LANABASE=0

2. Edit A:\Net\System.ini.

a. Change netcard=

to netcard=BXND20X.dos

.

b. Check for references to C:\NET and change

C:\NET

to

A:\NET

if necessary.

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NDIS2 Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Example System.ini file

[network] sizworkbuf=1498 filesharing=no printsharing=no autologon=yes computername=MYPC lanroot=A:\NET username=USER1 workgroup=WORKGROUP reconnect=yes dospophotkey=N lmlogon=0 logondomain= preferredredir=basic autostart=basic maxconnections=8

[network drivers] netcard=BXND20X.dos

transport=ndishlp.sys,*netbeui devdir=A:\NET

LoadRMDrivers=yes

3. Copy BXND20X.dos

to A:\Net.

4. Create the appropriate Autoexec.bat file in drive A for the chosen protocol as shown below.

For TCP/IP path=a:\net a:\net\net initialize a:\net\netbind.com

a:\net\umb.com

a:\net\tcptsr.exe

a:\net\tinyrfc.exe

a:\net\nmtsr.exe

a:\net\emsbfr.exe

a:\net\net start basic net use z: \\SERVERNAME\SHARENAME

For IPX

SET PATH=A:\NET

A:\NET\net initialize

A:\NET\nwlink

A:\NET\NET START BASIC net use z: \\SERVERNAME\SHARENAME

For NetBEUI

SET PATH=A:\NET

A:\NET\NET START BASIC net use z: \\SERVERNAME\SHARENAME

5. Create a Config.sys file on the startup disk in drive A as shown below.

files=30 device=a:\net\ifshlp.sys

lastdrive=z

Installing the DOS NDIS2 Driver Software on the Hard Disk

To install the DOS NDIS2 Driver Software on the hard disk

1. Verify that the system has Microsoft LAN Manager 2.2 installed, with a protocol such as NetBEUI configured.

2. Create a folder on your hard disk to store the NDIS 2.01 driver.

Example: C:\LANMAN

3. Copy the BXND20X.dos

file to this folder.

Edit the Config.sys

file by adding the following lines:

DEVICE = C:\LANMAN\PROTMAN.DOS

DEVICE = C:\LANMAN\BXND20X.DOS

DEVICE = C:\LANMAN\NETBEUI.DOS

4. Edit the Autoexec.bat

file by adding the following lines:

C:\ LANMAN\NETBIND.EXE

C:\LANMAN\NET START WORKSTATION

C:\LANMAN\NET USE drive letter : \\ server name \ resource name

5. Edit the Protocol.ini

file (located in C:\LANMAN) to configure the driver to bind with NetBEUI or any other protocols.

Example:

[PROTOCOL MANAGER]

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NDIS2 Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

[NETBEUI_XIF]

DriverName = netbeui$

BINDINGS = BXND20X

[BXND20X]

DriverName = "BXND20X$"

6. Restart the computer to complete the installation.

NOTE: The driver loads during system configuration and displays the Broadcom banner, controller name, MAC address, IRQ number, detected line speed, and the controller BusNum and DevNum. If the driver fails to load, an initialization fail message is displayed.

Using Keywords for the Drivers

The Protocol.ini file contains certain keywords that are used by the BXND20X.dos AND BXND20X.dos drivers. These keywords are listed below:

BusNum . Specifies the number of the PCI bus on which the network adapter is located. Requires a decimal number having a value ranging from 0 to 255.

DevNum . Specifies the device number assigned to the network adapter when it is configured by the PCI BIOS. Requires a decimal number having a value ranging from 0 to 255.

FuncNum or PortNum . Specifies the PCI function or port number assigned to the network controller. Requires a decimal number having a value ranging from 0 to 7.

NOTE: These keywords, BusNum , DevNum , and FuncNum (or PortNum ) are needed when multiple adapters are installed in the server and when a specific controller must be loaded in a certain order. These keywords are used concurrently and are included for manufacturing purposes. Do not use them unless you are familiar with how to configure PCI devices. A

PCI device scan utility is needed to find this information.

LineSpeed . Specifies the speed of the network connection in Mbit/s. Requires the decimal number 10, 100, or 1000.

Technically, a line speed of 1000 Mbit/s cannot be forced and is achievable only through auto-negotiation. For the sake of simplicity, the driver performs auto-negotiation when the line speed is set to a value of 1000.

NOTE: LineSpeed is not available with the Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet driver.

Duplex . Specifies the duplex mode of the network adapter. Requires a setting of either Half or Full . When this keyword is used, the LineSpeed keyword must also be used. If neither keyword is used, the network adapter defaults to autonegotiation mode.

NOTE: LineSpeed is not available with the Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet driver.

NodeAddress . Specifies the network address used by the network adapter. If a multicast address or a broadcast address is specified, the adapter uses the default MAC address.

Example:

[BXND20X]

DriverName = "BXND20X$"

BusNum = 3

DevNum = 14

PortNum = 2

LineSpeed = 1000

Duplex = Full

NodeAddress = 001020304050

FixCheckSumOff . Turns off the driver's workaround for the TCP/IP stack to recognize the 1s complemented version of the checksum.

AcceptAllMC . Informs the driver to deliver all multicast packets to the upper protocol.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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ODI Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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ODI Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter

User Guide

Overview

ODI Client32

DOS ODI

Overview

Three drivers are discussed in this section:

BX2.LAN: Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet 32-bit driver

BX2.COM: Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet 16-bit driver

BNX2EV.COM: Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet 16-bit driver

The examples used in the ODI Client32 section only refer to the BX2.LAN driver. The examples used in the DOS ODI section refer to the BX2.COM driver, but also apply to the BNX2EV.COM driver.

ODI Client32

The Open Data-Link Interface (ODI) driver software allows LAN drivers to work together irrespective of differences between the hardware and/or the protocol stacks of communicating systems. An intervening layer, called the link support layer (LSL), is responsible for routing different packet types between local area network (LAN) drivers and protocol stacks.

Installing the Driver Software

The ODI Driver software must be installed on a system having an MS-DOS operating system. MS-DOS 6.22 is recommended.

Preinstallation Requirements

1. Copy the Broadcom ODI driver files to a floppy disk. Copy the BX2.LAN and BX2.LDI files for the Client32 driver.

2. Go to the Novell web site http://www.novell.com/coolsolutions/tools/13555.html

and download the NetWare DOS Client files to the hard disk: download the dw271e.zip file for the Client32 installation.

Installing the Novell NetWare Client32 Driver for MS-DOS

1. Extract the dw271.zip file to a temporary directory on the hard disk.

2. Double-click the dw271e.exe file.

3. Type y

and then press ENTER when you are prompted for a response.

4. Restart your system in MS-DOS mode.

5. Change to the directory where the extracted files are located.

6. Type install

, and then press ENTER .

7. Read the agreement, and then press ENTER to accept the agreement.

8. Using the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW key as necessary, highlight Novell Client for DOS (required) , and then press F10 to save and continue.

9. Highlight 32-bit LAN Drivers , and then press F10 to save and continue.

10. Insert the floppy disk containing the Broadcom 32-bit LAN driver files into the floppy disk drive.

11. Highlight USER SPECIFIED 32-BIT DRIVER , and then press ENTER .

12. Press ENTER .

13. Highlight the NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Driver, and then press ENTER .

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ODI Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

14. Press ENTER .

15. Select Receive Buffers , type

32

for the value, and then press F10 to save and continue.

NOTE: Do not change the default settings for any of the other items in the Installation Configuration Summary.

16. Press F10 to save and continue. The Bx2.LAN and Bx2.LDI files are copied to the directory.

17. Restart the system to complete the install.

18. As the files are being loaded, the system attempts to attach to a NetWare server using the frame types specified in

Net.cfg. If the connection is successful, a dialog box is displayed.

19. Change to drive F and log on to the NetWare server.

NOTE: The driver loads during system configuration, and the Broadcom banner, the adapter name, the MAC address, the IRQ number, the detected line speed, and the bus number (BusNum) and device number (DevNum) of the adapter are displayed. If the driver fails to load, an initialization fail message appears.

Configuring the Driver Software

The ODI driver software can be configured by adding specific optional keywords to the Net.cfg file.

If multiple (or multiport) Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters are installed in a system, the ODI driver software loads by default on the adapter/port that has a good link. If two or more adapters have a good link, the ODI driver software loads on the adapter having the latest Device ID. If two or more adapters that have a good link have the same Device ID, the ODI driver software loads on the adapter that is located in the slot having the lowest bus number.

If it is necessary to have the ODI driver load on certain adapters in a certain order, the BusNum , DevNum , and FuncNum keywords can be used. Do not use these keywords unless you know how to configure PCI devices.

The BusNum keyword value, which represents the PCI bus number in which the adapter is located, is a hexadecimal number ranging from 0 to FF.

The FuncNum keyword value, which represents the function (port) number of a multiport adapter, is a hexadecimal number with 0 representing the first port and 1 representing the second port.

The DevNum keyword value, which represents the assigned device number, is a hexadecimal number ranging from 0 to 1F.

NOTES:

At the end of the ODI driver software installation process, note the BusNum and DevNum values that are displayed. Alternatively, use Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (see Viewing Resource Information ) to view the bus number, function (port) number, and device number assigned to each adapter (Windows users only).

The values for the BusNum , DevNum , and FuncNum keywords are displayed in hexadecimal notation when the driver loads on the adapter.

Example BusNum , DevNum , and FuncNum keyword entries for loading the ODI driver on multiple adapters in a certain order are shown below:

PROTOCOL <protocol name>

BIND BX2

BIND BX2

LINK DRIVER BX2

BUSNUM 1

DEVNUM 9

FRAME <frame #1 name>

LINK DRIVER BX2

BUSNUM 1

DEVNUM A

FRAME <frame #2 name>

The LineSpeed keyword is used to force the speed of the network connection. The LineSpeed keyword requires a decimal number and of either 10, 100, or 1000. Technically, a line speed of 1000 Mbit/s cannot be forced and can be achieved only through auto-negotiation. For the sake of simplicity, the driver performs auto-negotiation when the line speed is set to a value of 1000.

The Duplex keyword is used to force the duplex mode of the adapter. The Duplex keyword requires a text string of either

HALF or FULL. When the Duplex keyword is used, the LineSpeed keyword must also be used. If neither keyword is used, the network adapter defaults to auto-negotiation mode.

Example keyword entries for the LineSpeed , and Duplex keywords are shown below: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/dosodi.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:43 PM]

ODI Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

LINK DRIVER BX2

LINESPEED 100

DUPLEX FULL

DOS ODI

The Open Data-Link Interface (ODI) driver software allows LAN drivers to work together irrespective of differences between the hardware and/or the protocol stacks of communicating computers. An intervening layer, called the link support layer

(LSL), is responsible for routing different packet types between LAN drivers and protocol stacks.

NOTE: The examples used in this section refer to the BX2.COM driver, but also apply to the BNX2EV.COM driver.

Installing the Driver Software

Installing the DOS/ODI driver software involves the following steps:

1. Verifying that the DOS 6.22 operating system files are installed on your computer hard disk or are available on a removable storage device.

2. Installing the DOS/ODI driver software in the DOS environment.

3. If necessary, reconfiguring the driver software after installation.

Preinstallation Requirements

1. Verify that the Broadcom Ethernet adapter driver software has been installed on your computer and install it if it has not (see Installing the Driver Software ). Otherwise, you cannot use a Broadcom Ethernet adapter in the DOS environment.

NOTE: To successfully install the adapter driver for DOS, the adapter must be installed in the computer before you install the driver.

2. Install the DOS 6.22 files on your computer hard disk or have them available on a removable storage device.

Installing the DOS ODI Driver on DOS 6.22

1. Copy the DOS ODI driver file to the root directory of the hard disk.

2. Copy Lsl.com, Ipxodi.com, and Vlm.com to the same directory (these files are provided by Novell).

3. Edit the Autoexec.bat file by adding the following lines:

C:\LSL

C:\BX2

C:\IPXODI

C:\VLM

4. Edit the Net.cfg file and place the file in the same location as the Autoexec.bat file (located in drive C) to configure the driver to bind with different frame types.

Example:

LINK DRIVER BX2

FRAME ETHERNET_802.2

FRAME ETHERNET_802.3

FRAME ETHERNET_II

FRAME ETHERNET_SNAP

NetWare DOS Requester

FIRST NETWORK DRIVE=F

NETWARE PROTOCOL=NDS BIND

PROTOCOL IPXODI

5. Restart the computer to complete the installation.

6. As the files are being loaded, the computer attempts to attach to a NetWare server using the frame types specified in

Net.cfg. If the connection is successful, a dialog box appears.

7. Change to drive F and log onto the NetWare server.

F: <enter>

F:\login admin <enter>

NOTE: The driver loads during system configuration, and the Broadcom banner, the adapter name, the MAC address, the IRQ number, the detected line speed, and the BUSNUM and DEVNUM of the adapter are displayed. If the file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/dosodi.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:43 PM]

ODI Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide driver fails to load, an initialization fail message appears.

Configuring Parameters for the BX2.com/BX2EV.COM Driver (in the Net.cfg file)

The following are optional custom keywords used in the Net.cfg file:

BUSNUM

DEVNUM

FUNNUM

SUBVID

MODEL

The first two keywords ( BUSNUM and DEVNUM ) are used together and have been included for manufacturing purposes. Do not use them unless you are familiar with PCI device configuration. These two keywords are needed if multiple Broadcom

NetXtreme II adapters are installed on a system, and each adapter must be loaded in a specific order.

BUSNUM specifies the PCI bus number and DEVNUM specifies the device number that is assigned to the board when it is configured by the PCI BIOS.

The values for these adapter parameters are displayed in hexadecimal notation when the driver loads (the Net.cfg file expects hexadecimal values). A PCI device scan utility can also be used to find this information. If the driver loads on a single adapter, the displayed values can be used in the Net.cfg file.

If a PCI scan utility displays card 1 at bus 4 and device 11 (hexadecimal), and card 3 at bus 3 and device 13 (hexadecimal), the following load instructions are written to the Net.cfg file (load card 3 first, and optionally load card 1 second):

LINK DRIVER BX2

BUSNUM 3

DEVNUM 13 (13 hex = 19 decimal)

LINK DRIVER BX2

BUSNUM 4

DEVNUM 11 (11 hex = 17 decimal)

The FUNNUM keyword is used to determine which function/port the driver is to load on when using a multifunction

(multiport) adapter. Function number values are limited to 0 and 1, for the first and second function of the adapter.

The SUBVID keyword is used to for load the driver only on the first network interface card found that has a subvendor ID

(SVID) that matches the one set in Net.cfg. The driver ignores all other network interface cards that do not have a matching

SVID. SUBVID expects a hexadecimal number.

Example:

LINK DRIVER BX2

SUBVID 14E4

SUBVID cannot be used with BUSNUM , DEVNUM or FUNNUM .

The MODEL keyword is for loading the driver only on the first network interface card found that has a subvendor ID (SVID) that matches the one set in MODEL . The driver ignores all other NICs that do not have a matching SVID. MODEL expects a decimal number.

Example:

LINK DRIVER B44

MODEL 5348

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter

User Guide

Introduction

Limitations

Packaging

Installing Linux Driver Software

Unloading/Removing the Linux Driver

Patching PCI Files (Optional)

Network Installations

Setting Values for Optional Properties

Driver Defaults

Driver Messages

Teaming with Channel Bonding

Remote PHY Support

Statistics

Linux iSCSI Offload

Introduction

This section discusses the Linux drivers for the Broadcom NetXtreme II network adapters.

Table 1: Broadcom NetXtreme II Linux Drivers

Linux

Driver Description bnx2 cnic

Linux drivers for the BCM5708/BCM5709 10/100/1000/2500 Mbps network adapters. The bnx2 driver is the networking driver and the cnic driver supports additional features required by the bnx2i iSCSI offload driver.

bnx2x Linux driver for the BCM57710/BCM57711/BCM57712 10 Gbps network adapters

Limitations

bnx2 Driver bnx2x Driver bnx2i Driver

bnx2 Driver

The current version of the driver has been tested on all 2.6.x kernels. Testing is concentrated on i386 and x86_64 architectures. Only limited testing has been done on other architectures. Minor changes to some source files and Makefile may be needed on some kernels. Additionally, the Makefile will not compile the cnic driver on kernels older than 2.6.16. iSCSI offload is only supported on 2.6.16 and newer kernels.

NOTE: For Broadcom NetXtreme II BCM5708 devices with a silicon revision prior to B2, the open source bnx2 driver does not support the reporting and configuration of NetXtreme II WOL settings via ethtool. For silicon revisions of B2 or later, the file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide bnx2 driver reports support for Magic Packet WOL via ethtool. Enabling support via ethtool is mandatory to successfully wake the system. To determine the silicon revision of your Broadcom NetXtreme II device, use the lspci

command, where "10" = revision B0, "11" = revision B1, and "12" = revision B2.

bnx2x Driver

The current version of the driver has been tested on 2.6.x kernels starting from 2.6.9. The driver may not compile on kernels older than 2.6.9. Testing is concentrated on i386 and x86_64 architectures. Only limited testing has been done on some other architectures. Minor changes to some source files and Makefile may be needed on some kernels.

bnx2i Driver

The current version of the driver has been tested on 2.6.x kernels, starting from 2.6.18 kernel. The driver may not compile on older kernels. Testing is concentrated on i386 and x86_64 architectures, Red Hat EL5, and SUSE 11 SP1 distributions.

Packaging

The Linux driver is released in the packaging formats shown in Table 2 . The netxtreme2 package contains the bnx2 (1 Gb network adapter) driver, the bnx2x (10 Gb network adapter) driver, and the bnx2i (iSCSI) driver for source RPM and compressed tar.

Table 2: Linux Driver Packaging

Format

Source RPM

Drivers netxtreme2version .src.rpm

Compressed tar netxtreme2version .tar.gz

Source DKMS RPM netxtreme2version .dkms.src.rpm

Binary DKMS RPM netxtreme2version .dkms.noarch.rpm

Supplemental tar netxtreme2_supversion .tar.gz

Source KMP RPM broadcom-netxtreme2version .src.rpm

KMP RPM broadcom-netxtreme2-kmp-defaultversion .x86_64.rpm

KMP trace RPM

KMP Xen RPM broadcom-netxtreme2-kmp-traceversion .x86_64.rpm

broadcom-netxtreme2-kmp-xenversion .x86_64.rpm

Identical source files to build the driver are included in both RPM and TAR source packages. The supplemental tar file contains additional utilities such as patches and driver diskette images for network installation.

Updated open-iSCSI components are released in source RPM format.

netxtreme2version .src.rpm: NetXtreme II L2/cnic/bnx2i driver source RPM.

netxtreme2version .tar.gz: tar zipped NetXtreme II L2/cnic/bnx2i driver

Installing Linux Driver Software

Installing the Source RPM Package

Building the Driver from the Source TAR File

Installing the Binary DKMS RPM Driver Package

NOTE: If a bnx2/bnx2x/bnx2i driver is loaded and the Linux kernel is updated, the driver module must be recompiled if the driver module was installed using the source RPM or the TAR package. This does not apply to the source DKMS RPM.

Installing the Source RPM Package

NOTE: The examples in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x and bnx2i drivers.

1. Install the source RPM package: rpm -ivh netxtreme2 version .src.rpm

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

2. Change the directory to the RPM path and build the binary driver for your kernel (the RPM path is different for different

Linux distributions): cd /usr/src/ redhat,OpenLinux,turbo,packages,rpm ...

or rpmbuild -bb SPECS/netxtreme2.spec (for RPM version 4.x.x)

NOTE: During your attempt to install a source RPM package, the following message may be displayed: error: cannot create %sourcedir /usr/src/redhat/SOURCES

The most likely cause of the error is that the rpm-build package has not been installed. Locate the rpm-build package on the Linux installation media and install it using the following command: rpm -ivh rpm-buildversion .

arch .rpm

Complete the installation of the source RPM.

3. Install the newly built package (driver and man page): rpm -ivh RPMS/i386/netxtreme2 version .

arch .rpm

The --force option is needed if installing over an existing distribution that may already contain an older version of the driver.

The driver is installed to the following path:

2.6.x kernels

/lib/modules/ kernel_version /kernel/drivers/net/bnx2.ko

2.6.16 kernels and newer (bnx2 driver)

/lib/modules/kernel_version/kernel/drivers/net/bnx2.ko

/lib/modules/kernel_version/kernel/drivers/net/cnic.ko

2.6.16 kernels and newer (bnx2i driver)

/lib/modules/kernel_version/kernel/drivers/scsi/bnx2i/bnx2i.ko

4. Load the driver: insmod bnx2.ko (on 2.6.x kernels) or modprobe bnx2

Verify that your network adapter supports iSCSI by checking the message log. If the message "bnx2i: dev eth0 does not support iSCSI" appears in the message log after loading the bnx2i driver, then iSCSI is not supported. This message may not appear until the interface is opened, as with: ifconfig eth0 up

5. Load the cnic driver (if applicable): insmod cnic.ko

or modprobe cnic

To configure the network protocol and address, refer to the documentation provided with your operating system.

Installing the KMP Package

NOTE: The examples in this procedure refer to the bnx2x driver, but also apply to the bnx2 and bnx2i drivers.

1. Install the KMP package: rpm -ivh <file> rmmod bnx2x

2. Load the driver: modprobe bnx2x

Building the Driver from the Source TAR File

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

NOTE: The examples used in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x driver.

1. Create a directory and extract the TAR files to the directory: tar xvzf netxtreme2 version .tar.gz

2. Build the driver bnx2.ko (or bnx2i.ko) as a loadable module for the running kernel: cd netxtreme2 version make

3. Test the driver by loading it (first unload the existing driver, if necessary): rmmod bnx2 (or bnx2x, or bnx2i) insmod bnx2/src/bnx2.ko (or bnx2x/src/bnx2x.ko, or bnx2i/src/bnx2i.ko)

Verify that your network adapter supports iSCSI by checking the message log. If the message "bnx2i: dev eth0 does not support iSCSI" appears in the message log after loading the bnx2i driver, then iSCSI is not supported. This message may not appear until the interface is opened, as with: ifconfig eth0 up

4. Load the cnic driver (if applicable): insmod cnic.ko

5. Install the driver and man page: make install

NOTE: See the RPM instructions above for the location of the installed driver.

6. Install the user daemon (brcm_iscsiuio).

Refer to Load and Run Necessary iSCSI Software Components for instructions on loading the software components required to use the Broadcom iSCSI offload feature.

To configure the network protocol and address after building the driver, refer to the manuals supplied with your operating system.

Installing the Binary DKMS RPM Driver Package

Dynamic Kernel Module Support (DKMS) is designed to simplify the rebuilding of modules whenever you upgrade the kernel.

This is accomplished by creating a framework where a kernel-dependent module source can reside.

To install the binary DKMS RPM driver package

1. Download the binary DKMS RPM (dkmsversion .noarch.rpm) from http://linux.dell.com/dkms/ .

2. Install the binary DKMS RPM package: rpm -ivh dkmsversion .noarch.rpm

3. Install the DKMS RPM driver package: rpm -ivh netxtreme2 -version dkms.noarch.rpm

Verify that your network adapter supports iSCSI by checking the message log. If the message "bnx2i: dev eth0 does not support iSCSI" appears in the message log after loading the bnx2i driver, then iSCSI is not supported. This message may not appear until the interface is opened, as with: ifconfig eth0 up

4. To use Broadcom iSCSI, refer to Load and Run Necessary iSCSI Software Components to load the necessary software components.

For more information, go to http://linux.dell.com

.

Load and Run Necessary iSCSI Software Components

The Broadcom iSCSI Offload software suite consists of three kernel modules and a user daemon. Required software components can be loaded either manually or through system services.

1. Unload the existing driver, if necessary:

Manual: rmmod bnx2i

2. Load the iSCSI driver: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Manual: insmod bnx2i.ko

or modprobe bnx2i

Unloading/Removing the Linux Driver

Unloading/Removing the Driver from an RPM Installation

Removing the Driver from a TAR Installation

Unloading/Removing the Driver from an RPM Installation

NOTES:

The examples used in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x driver.

On 2.6 kernels, it is not necessary to bring down the eth# interfaces before unloading the driver module.

If the cnic driver is loaded, unload the cnic driver before unloading the bnx2 driver.

Prior to unloading the bnx2i driver, disconnect all active iSCSI sessions to targets.

To unload the driver, use ifconfig to bring down all eth# interfaces opened by the driver, and then type the following: rmmod bnx2

NOTE: The above command will also remove bnx2, bnx2x, and cnic modules.

If the driver was installed using RPM, do the following to remove it: rpm -e netxtreme2

Removing the Driver from a TAR Installation

NOTE: The examples used in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x and bnx2i drivers.

If the driver was installed using make install from the tar file, the bnx2.ko driver file has to be manually deleted from the operating system. See Installing the Source RPM Package for the location of the installed driver.

Patching PCI Files (Optional)

NOTE: The examples used in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x and bnx2i drivers.

For hardware detection utilities such as Red Hat kudzu to properly identify bnx2 supported devices, a number of files containing PCI vendor and device information may need to be updated.

Apply the updates by running the scripts provided in the supplemental tar file. For example, on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, apply the updates by doing the following:

./patch_pcitbl.sh /usr/share/hwdata/pcitable pci.updates

/usr/share/hwdata/pcitable.new bnx2

./patch_pciids.sh /usr/share/hwdata/pci.ids pci.updates

/usr/share/hwdata/pci.ids.new

Next, the old files can be backed up and the new files can be renamed for use.

cp /usr/share/hwdata/pci.ids /usr/share/hwdata/old.pci.ids

cp /usr/share/hwdata/pci.ids.new /usr/share/hwdata/pci.ids

cp /usr/share/hwdata/pcitable /usr/share/hwdata/old.pcitable

cp /usr/share/hwdata/pcitable.new /usr/share/hwdata/pcitable

Network Installations

For network installations through NFS, FTP, or HTTP (using a network boot disk or PXE), a driver disk that contains the bnx2/bnx2x driver may be needed. The driver disk images for the most recent Red Hat and SuSE versions are included. Boot file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide drivers for other Linux versions can be compiled by modifying the Makefile and the make environment. Further information is available from the Red Hat website, http://www.redhat.com

.

Setting Values for Optional Properties

Optional properties exist for the different drivers: bnx2 Driver bnx2x Driver bnx2i Driver

bnx2 Driver

disable_msi

The disable_msi optional property can be supplied as a command line argument to the insmod or modprobe command. The property can also be set in modprobe.conf. See the man page for more information. All other driver settings can be queried and changed using the ethtool utility. See the ethtool man page for more information. The ethtool settings do not persist across a reboot or module reload. The ethtool commands can be put in a startup script such as /etc/rc.local to preserve the settings across a reboot.

NOTE: Some combinations of property values may conflict and result in failures. The driver cannot detect all such conflicting combinations.

This property is used to disable Message Signal Interrupts (MSI), and the property is valid only on 2.6 kernels that support

MSI. By default, the driver enables MSI if it is supported by the kernel. It runs an interrupt test during initialization to determine if MSI is working. If the test passes, the driver enables MSI. Otherwise, it uses legacy INTx mode.

insmod bnx2.ko disable_msi=1 or modprobe bnx2 disable_msi=1

bnx2x Driver

disable_tpa

The disable_tpa parameter can be supplied as a command line argument to disable the Transparent Packet Aggregation

(TPA) feature. By default, the driver will aggregate TCP packets. Use disable_tpa to disable the advanced TPA feature.

Set the disable_tpa parameter to 1 as shown below to disable the TPA feature on all NetXtreme II network adapters in the system. The parameter can also be set in modprobe.conf. See the man page for more information.

insmod bnx2x.ko disable_tpa=1 or modprobe bnx2x disable_tpa=1 int_mode

The int_mode parameter is used to force using an interrupt mode.

Set the int_mode parameter to 1 to force using the legacy INTx mode on all NetXtreme II adapters in the system.

insmod bnx2x.ko int_mode=1 or modprobe bnx2x int_mode=1

Set the int_mode parameter to 2 to force using MSI mode on all NetXtreme II adapters in the system.

insmod bnx2x.ko int_mode=2 or file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide modprobe bnx2x int_mode=2

Set the int_mode parameter to 3 to force using MSI-X mode on all NetXtreme II adapters in the system.

dropless_fc

The dropless_fc parameter can be used to enable a complementary flow control mechanism on BCM57711/BCM57712 adapters. The default flow control mechanism is to send pause frames when the on-chip buffer (BRB) is reaching a certain level of occupancy. This is a performance targeted flow control mechanism. On BCM57711/BCM57712 adapters, one can enable another flow control mechanism to send pause frames, where one of the host buffers (when in RSS mode) are exhausted.

This is a "zero packet drop" targeted flow control mechanism.

Set the dropless_fc parameter to 1 to enable the dropless flow control mechanism feature on all BCM57711/BCM57712

NetXtreme II adapters in the system.

insmod bnx2x.ko dropless_fc=1 or modprobe bnx2x dropless_fc=1 disable_iscsi_ooo

The disable_iscsi_ooo parameter is to disable the allocation of the iSCSI TCP Out-of-Order (OOO) reception resources, specifically for VMware for low-memory systems.

multi_mode

The optional parameter multi_mode is for use on systems that support multi-queue networking. Multi-queue networking on the receive side depends only on MSI-X cability of the system, multi-queue networking on the transmit side is supported only on kernels starting from 2.6.27. By default, multi_mode parameter is set to 1. Thus, on kernels up to 2.6.26, the driver will allocate on the receive side one queue per-CPU and on the transmit side only one queue. On kernels starting from 2.6.27, the driver will allocate on both receive and transmit sides, one queue per-CPU. In any case, the number of allocated queues will be limited by number of queues supported by hardware.

The multi_mode optional parameter can also be used to enable SAFC (Service Aware Flow Control) by differentiating the traffic to up to 3 CoS (Class of Service) in the hardware according to the VLAN PRI value or according to the IP DSCP value

(least 3 bits).

num_queues

The optional parameter num_queues may be used to set the number of queues when multi_mode is set to 1 and interrupt mode is MSI-X. If interrupt mode is different than MSI-X (see int_mode ), the number of queues will be set to 1, discarding the value of this parameter.

pri_map

The optional parameter pri_map is used to map the VLAN PRI value or the IP DSCP value to a different or same CoS in the hardware. This 32-bit parameter is evaluated by the driver as an 8 value of 4 bits each. Each nibble sets the desired hardware queue number for that priority. For example, set pri_map to 0x11110000 to map priority 0 to 3 to CoS 0 and map priority 4 to 7 to CoS 1.

qs_per_cos

The optional parameter qs_per_cos is used to specify how many queues will share the same CoS. This parameter is evaluated by the driver up to 3 values of 8 bits each. Each byte sets the desired number of queues for that CoS. The total number of queues is limited by the hardware limit. For example, set qs_per_cos to 0x10101 to create a total of three queues, one per CoS. In another example, set qs_per_cos to 0x404 to create a total of 8 queues, divided into 2 CoS, 4 queues in each CoS.

cos_min_rate

The optional parameter cos_min_rate is used to determine the weight of each CoS for round-robin scheduling in transmission. This parameter is evaluated by the driver as up to 3 values of 8 bits each. Each byte sets the desired weight for that CoS. The weight ranges from 0 to 100. For example, set cos_min_rate to 0x101 for fair transmission rate between 2

CoS. In another example, set the cos_min_rate to 0x30201 to give CoS the higher rate of transmission. To avoid using the fairness algorithm, omit setting cos_min_rate or set it to 0.

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Set the multi_mode parameter to 2 as shown below to differentiate the traffic according to the VLAN PRI value.

insmod bnx2x.ko multi_mode=2 pri_map=0x11110000 qs_per_cos=0x404 or modprobe bnx2x multi_mode=2 pri_map=0x11110000 qs_per_cos=0x404

Set the multi_mode parameter to 4 as shown below to differentiate the traffic according to the IP DSCP value.

insmod bnx2x.ko multi_mode=4 pri_map=0x22221100 qs_per_cos=0x10101 cos_min_rate=0x30201 or modprobe bnx2x multi_mode=4 pri_map=0x22221100 qs_per_cos=0x10101 cos_min_rate=0x30201

bnx2i Driver

Optional parameters en_tcp_dack , error_mask1 , and error_mask2 can be supplied as command line arguments to the insmod or modprobe command for bnx2i.

error_mask1 and error_mask2

"Config FW iSCSI Error Mask #", use to configure certain iSCSI protocol violation to be treated either as a warning or a fatal error. All fatal iSCSI protocol violations will result in session recovery (ERL 0). These are bit masks.

Defaults: All violations will be treated as errors.

CAUTION! Do not use error_mask if you are not sure about the consequences. These values are to be discussed with

Broadcom development team on a case-by-case basis. This is just a mechanism to work around iSCSI implementation issues on the target side and without proper knowledge of iSCSI protocol details, users are advised not to experiment with these parameters.

en_tcp_dack

"Enable TCP Delayed ACK", enables/disables TCP delayed ACK feature on offloaded iSCSI connections.

Defaults: TCP delayed ACK is ENABLED. For example: insmod bnx2i.ko en_tcp_dack=0 or modprobe bnx2i en_tcp_dack=0 time_stamps

"Enable TCP TimeStamps", enables/disables TCP time stamp feature on offloaded iSCSI connections.

Defaults: TCP time stamp option is DISABLED. For example: insmod bnx2i.ko time_stamps=1 or modprobe bnx2i time_stamps=1 sq_size

"Configure SQ size", used to choose send queue size for offloaded connections and SQ size determines the maximum SCSI commands that can be queued. SQ size also has a bearing on the number of connections that can be offloaded; as QP size increases, the number of connections supported will decrease. With the default values, the BCM5708 adapter can offload 28 connections.

Defaults: 128

Range: 32 to 128

Note that Broadcom validation is limited to a power of 2; for example, 32, 64, 128.

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

"Configure RQ size", used to choose the size of asynchronous buffer queue size per offloaded connections. RQ size is not required greater than 16 as it is used to place iSCSI ASYNC/NOP/REJECT messages and SCSI sense data.

Defaults: 16

Range: 16 to 32

Note that Broadcom validation is limited to a power of 2; for example, 16, 32.

event_coal_div

"Event Coalescing Divide Factor", performance tuning parameter used to moderate the rate of interrupt generation by the iscsi firmware.

Defaults: 1

Valid values: 1, 2, 4, 8 last_active_tcp_port

"Last active TCP port used", status parameter used to indicate the last TCP port number used in the iSCSI offload connection.

Defaults: N/A

Valid values: N/A

Note: This is a read-only parameter.

ooo_enable

"Enable TCP out-of-order feature", enables/disables TCP out-of-order rx handling feature on offloaded iSCSI connections.

Defaults: TCP out-of-order feature is ENABLED. For example: insmod bnx2i.ko ooo_enable=1 or modprobe bnx2i ooo_enable=1

Driver Defaults

bnx2 Driver bnx2x Driver

bnx2 Driver

Speed : Autonegotiation with all speeds advertised

Flow Control : Autonegotiation with RX and TX advertised

MTU : 1500 (range is 46–9000)

RX Ring Size : 255 (range is 0–4080)

RX Jumbo Ring Size : 0 (range 0–16320) adjusted by the driver based on MTU and RX Ring Size

TX Ring Size : 255 (range is (MAX_SKB_FRAGS+1)–255). MAX_SKB_FRAGS varies on different kernels and different architectures. On a 2.6 kernel for x86, MAX_SKB_FRAGS is 18.

Coalesce RX Microseconds : 18 (range is 0–1023)

Coalesce RX Microseconds IRQ : 18 (range is 0–1023)

Coalesce RX Frames : 6 (range is 0–255)

Coalesce RX Frames IRQ : 6 (range is 0–255)

Coalesce TX Microseconds : 80 (range is 0–1023) file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

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Coalesce TX Microseconds IRQ : 80 (range is 0–1023)

Coalesce TX Frames : 20 (range is 0–255)

Coalesce TX Frames IRQ : 20 (range is 0–255)

Coalesce Statistics Microseconds : 999936 (approximately 1 second) (range is 0–16776960 in increments of 256)

MSI : Enabled (if supported by the 2.6 kernel and the interrupt test passes)

TSO : Enabled (on 2.6 kernels)

WoL : Initial setting based on NVRAM's setting

bnx2x Driver

Speed : Autonegotiation with all speeds advertised

Flow control : Autonegotiation with RX and TX advertised

MTU : 1500 (range is 46–9000)

RX Ring Size : 4078 (range is 0–4078)

TX Ring Size : 4078 (range is (MAX_SKB_FRAGS+4)–4078). MAX_SKB_FRAGS varies on different kernels and different architectures. On a 2.6 kernel for x86, MAX_SKB_FRAGS is 18.

Coalesce RX Microseconds : 25 (range is 0–3000)

Coalesce TX Microseconds : 50 (range is 0–12288)

Coalesce Statistics Microseconds : 999936 (approximately 1 second) (range is 0–16776960 in increments of 256)

MSI-X : Enabled (if supported by the 2.6 kernel and the interrupt test passes)

TSO : Enabled

WoL : Disabled

Driver Messages

The following are the most common sample messages that may be logged in the /var/log/messages file. Use dmesg -n

<level> to control the level at which messages appear on the console. Most systems are set to level 6 by default. To see all messages, set the level higher.

bnx2 and bnx2x Driver bnx2i Driver

bnx2 and bnx2x Driver

NOTE: The examples used in this procedure refer to the bnx2 driver, but also apply to the bnx2x driver.

Driver Sign on

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Driver bnx2 v1.6.3c (July 23, 2007)

CNIC Driver Sign on (bnx2 only)

Broadcom NetXtreme II cnic v1.1.19 (Sep 25, 2007)

NIC Detected eth#: Broadcom NetXtreme II BCM5708 1000Base-T (B0)

PCI-X 64-bit 133MHz found at mem f6000000, IRQ 16, node addr 0010180476ae cnic: Added CNIC device: eth0

Link Up and Speed Indication file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide bnx2: eth# NIC Link is Up, 1000 Mbps full duplex

Link Down Indication bnx2: eth# NIC Link is Down

MSI enabled successfully (bnx2 only) bnx2: eth0: using MSI

MSI-X enabled successfully (bnx2x only) bnx2x: eth0: using MSI-X

bnx2i Driver

BNX2I Driver signon

Broadcom NetXtreme II iSCSI Driver bnx2i v2.1.1D (May 12, 2010)

Network port to iSCSI transport name binding bnx2i: netif=eth2, iscsi=bcm570x-050000 bnx2i: netif=eth1, iscsi=bcm570x-030c00

Driver completes handshake with iSCSI offload-enabled CNIC device bnx2i [05:00.00]: ISCSI_INIT passed

NOTE: This message is displayed only when the user attempts to make an iSCSI connection.

Driver detects iSCSI offload is not enabled on the CNIC device bnx2i: iSCSI not supported, dev=eth3 bnx2i: bnx2i: LOM is not enabled to offload iSCSI connections, dev=eth0 bnx2i: dev eth0 does not support iSCSI

Exceeds maximum allowed iSCSI connection offload limit bnx2i: alloc_ep: unable to allocate iscsi cid bnx2i: unable to allocate iSCSI context resources

Network route to target node and transport name binding are two different devices bnx2i: conn bind, ep=0x... ($ROUTE_HBA) does not belong to hba $USER_CHOSEN_HBA where ROUTE_HBA --> net device on which connection was offloaded based on route information USER_CHOSEN_HBA -->

HBA to which target node is bound (using iscsi transport name)

Target cannot be reached on any of the CNIC devices bnx2i: check route, cannot connect using cnic

Network route is assigned to network interface, which is down bnx2i: check route, hba not found

Attempting to offload iSCSI connection onto a Jumbo Frame-enabled device bnx2i: eth# network i/f mtu is set to #mtu bnx2i: iSCSI HBA can support mtu of 1500

NOTE: Change mtu to 1500 using ifconfig and restart the interface in order to offload iSCSI connections.

SCSI-ML initiated host reset (session recovery) bnx2i: attempting to reset host, #3

CNIC detects iSCSI protocol violation - Fatal errors bnx2i: iscsi_error - wrong StatSN rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - hdr digest err bnx2i: iscsi_error - data digest err bnx2i: iscsi_error - wrong opcode rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - AHS len > 0 rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid ITT rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - wrong StatSN rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - wrong DataSN rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - pend R2T violation file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, UO bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U1 bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U2 bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U3 bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U4 bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U5 bnx2i: iscsi_error - ERL0, U bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid resi len bnx2i: iscsi_error - MRDSL violation bnx2i: iscsi_error - F-bit not set bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid TTT bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid DataSN bnx2i: iscsi_error - burst len violation bnx2i: iscsi_error - buf offset violation bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid LUN field bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid R2TSN field bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid cmd len1 bnx2i: iscsi_error - invalid cmd len2 bnx2i: iscsi_error - pend r2t exceeds MaxOutstandingR2T value bnx2i: iscsi_error - TTT is rsvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - MBL violation bnx2i: iscsi_error - data seg len != 0 bnx2i: iscsi_error - reject pdu len error bnx2i: iscsi_error - async pdu len error bnx2i: iscsi_error - nopin pdu len error bnx2i: iscsi_error - pend r2t in cleanup bnx2i: iscsi_error - IP fragments rcvd bnx2i: iscsi_error - IP options error bnx2i: iscsi_error - urgent flag error

CNIC detects iSCSI protocol violation - non-FATAL, warning bnx2i: iscsi_warning - invalid TTT bnx2i: iscsi_warning - invalid DataSN bnx2i: iscsi_warning - invalid LUN field

NOTE: The driver needs to be configured to consider certain violation to treat as warning and not as a critical error.

Driver puts a session through recovery conn_err - hostno 3 conn 03fbcd00, iscsi_cid 2 cid a1800

Reject iSCSI PDU received from the target bnx2i - printing rejected PDU contents

[0]: 1 ffffffa1 0 0 0 0 20 0

[8]: 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0

[10]: 0 0 40 24 0 0 ffffff80 0

[18]: 0 0 3 ffffff88 0 0 3 4b

[20]: 2a 0 0 2 ffffffc8 14 0 0

[28]: 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Open-iSCSI daemon handing over session to driver bnx2i: conn update - MBL 0x800 FBL 0x800MRDSL_I 0x800 MRDSL_T 0x2000

Teaming with Channel Bonding

With the Linux drivers, you can team adapters together using the bonding kernel module and a channel bonding interface. For more information, see the Channel Bonding information in your operating system documentation.

Remote PHY Support

The bnx2 driver supports Remote PHY on blade servers that use the NetXtreme II BCM5708S or BCM5709s device, support

Remote PHY, and have Remote PHY enabled.

On Remote PHY-enabled systems, the bnx2 driver enables the NetXtreme II BCM5708S or BCM5709S device to take advantage of the features available in the blade chassis' copper twisted pair PHY. The bnx2 driver will indicate that it is using

Remote PHY twisted pair mode in ethtool output.

NOTE: bnx2 driver versions prior to 1.63d do not support Remote PHY and operating systems using these older drivers may behave differently than operating systems with Remote PHY driver support. Refer to your system and operating system documentation for the status of Remote PHY support.

Configure the adapter using the standard ethtool commands.

Statistics

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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Detailed statistics and configuration information can be viewed using the ethtool utility. See the ethtool man page for more information.

Linux iSCSI Offload

User Application - brcm_iscsiuio

Open iSCSI User Applications

Bind iSCSI Target to Broadcom NX2 iSCSI Transport Name

Making Connections to iSCSI Targets

Maximize Offload iSCSI Connections

Linux iSCSI Offload FAQ

User Application - brcm_iscsiuio

Run the brcm_iscsiuio daemon before attempting to create iSCSI connections. The driver will not be able to establish connections to the iSCSI target without the daemon's assistance.

brcm_iscsiuio

Open iSCSI User Applications

Install and run the open-iscsi programs, iscsid and iscsiadm , from the Broadcom distributed open-iscsi packages. Refer to

Packaging for details. All pre-installed open-iscsi packages need to be removed before the Broadcom iSCSI-supported packages can be installed.

1. Remove all existing open-iscsi packages.

RHEL5 rpm -e iscsi -initiator-utils

2. Install the source RPM package.

rpm -ivh <open -iscsi -package-name>.src.rpm

3. CD to the RPM path and build the binary driver for your kernel.

cd /usr/src/{redhat,OpenLinux,turbo,packages,rpm ..} or rpmbuild -bb SPECS/<open-iscsi -package-name>.spec (for RPM version 4.x.x)

Note that the RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.

4. Install the newly built package.

rpm -ivh RPMS/<arch>/<open-iscsi -package-name>.<arch>.rpm

where <arch> is the machine architecture such as i386.

rpm -ivh RPMS/i386/<open -iscsi -package-name>.i386.rpm

5. Start the daemon.

iscsid

Bind iSCSI Target to Broadcom NX2 iSCSI Transport Name

By default, the open-iscsi daemon connects to discovered targets using software initiator (transport name = 'tcp'). Users who wish to offload iSCSI connection onto CNIC device should explicitly change transport binding of the iSCSI node. This can be done using iscsiadm cli utility as follows, iscsiadm --mode node --targetname iqn.2004-06.com.broadcom:tg1 \

--portal 192.168.1.100 --op=update \

--name=iface_file_name where the iface file includes the following information for RHEL 5.4, RHEL 5.5, and SLES 11 SP1: iface.net_ifacename = ethX iface.iscsi_ifacename = <name of the iface file> iface.hwaddress = XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX iface.ipaddress = XX:XX:XX:XX file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/linux.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:46 PM]

Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide iface.transport_name = bnx2i

Ensure that the iface.hwaddress is in lower case format.

If you wish to switch back to use the software initiator, use the following: iscsiadm --mode node --targetname iqn.2004-06.com.broadcom:tg1 \

--portal 192.168.1.100 --op=update \

--name=iface_file_name where the iface file includes the following information: iface.net_ifacename = ethX iface.iscsi_ifacename = <name of the iface file> iface.transport_name = tcp

Making Connections to iSCSI Targets

Refer to open-iscsi documentation for a comprehensive list of iscsiadm commands. This is a sample list of commands to discovery targets and to create iscsi connections to a target.

Add static entry iscsiadm -m node -p <ipaddr[:port]> -T iqn.2007-05.com.broadcom:target1 -o new iSCSI target discovery using 'SendTargets' iscsiadm -m discovery --type sendtargets -p <ipaddr[:port]>

Bind iSCSI target to Broadcom NX2 transport (bnx2i) iscsiadm -m node -p <ipaddr[:port]> -T <iqn.targetname> --op=update --name=iface_file_name

Login to target using 'iscsiadm' command iscsiadm --mode node --targetname <iqn.targetname> --portal <ipaddr[:port]> --login

List all drives active in the system fdisk -l

Maximize Offload iSCSI Connections

With default driver parameters set, which includes 128 outstanding commands, bnx2i can offload the following number of connections:

BCM5708: 28

BCM5709: 43

BCM5771x: 128

This is not a hard limit, but just a simple on-chip resource allocation math. bnx2i will be able to offload > 28 connections on

1G devices by reducing the shared queue size, which in turn limits the maximum outstanding tasks on a connection. See

Setting Values for Optional Properties for information on sq_size and rq_size. The driver logs the following message to syslog when the maximum allowed connection offload limit is reached - "bnx2i: unable to allocate iSCSI context resources".

Linux iSCSI Offload FAQ

Not all Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters support iSCSI offload.

The iSCSI session will not recover after a hot remove and hot plug.

For MPIO to work properly, iSCSI nopout should be enabled on each iSCSI session. Refer to open-iscsi documentation for procedures on setting up noop_out_interval and noop_out_timeout values.

In the scenario where multiple CNIC devices are in the system and the system is booted via Broadcom's iSCSI boot solution, ensure that the iscsi node under /etc/iscsi/nodes for the boot target is bound to the NIC that is used for booting.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Overview

Preinstallation Requirements

Installing NetWare Server 6.5 Driver Software

Viewing or Modifying Adapter Properties

Removing Drivers from Autoexec.ncf

Overview

This section discusses three NetWare drivers:

BX2.LAN: Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet 32-bit driver

BX2.COM: Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet 16-bit driver

BNX2EV.COM: Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet 16-bit driver

Preinstallation Requirements

A network device driver must be installed before the Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet adapter can be used with your

Novell NetWare system.

Before you can successfully install the adapter driver for Novell NetWare, the adapter card must be physically installed in the system and, typically, NetWare operating system software must already be running on the system. Make sure that your system meets the hardware and operating system software requirements described in Installing the Hardware.

To enable the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter to function correctly, you must install the latest Novell NetWare support pack files. The NetWare support pack or patch file(s) needed for the operating system running on your server are indicated below:

Table 1: NetWare Support Files

NetWare

Version

Support Pack

NetWare 6.5

Latest support pack

Files to be Installed

The latest support pack can be found at: http://support.novell.com/tools/csp/index.html

Installing NetWare Server 6.5 Driver Software

You may want to create an archive disk by copying all the files from the CDROM\NetWare\Driver directory onto a floppy disk.

If you elect to use the CD directly, ensure that the CDROM.NLM file is loaded and that you know the NetWare volume name for the CD.

1. From the NetWare Server console, type

HDETECT

, and then press ENTER.

2. From Options, press ENTER to accept Platform Support Module and Hot-Plug Support Module and continue detecting devices.

3. From Options, scroll down to select Modify, and then press ENTER to change focus to detected devices.

4. Scroll down to Network boards and press ENTER.

5. From Additional Driver Options, scroll down to Modify, and then press ENTER.

6. Insert the CD or archive floppy disk you created, and then select the Add option by pressing INSERT.

7. Select the Install an unlisted driver option, by pressing INSERT.

8. If you inserted the archive floppy disk, press ENTER. If you have the CD mounted as a NetWare volume, press F3 and type Volume Name: NetWare\Driver as the source path, where Volume Name is the name of the NetWare volume for file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/netware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:49 PM]

NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide the CD, and NetWare\Driver is the directory of the specific files on the CD needed for this installation.

9. Press DOWN ARROW or TAB to switch back to Additional Driver Options .

10. Choose Return to driver summary, and then press ENTER.

11. Choose Continue in Options.

12. Choose Continue from Protocol Options unless you want to configure and bind protocols before continuing. Installation is now complete.

Viewing or Modifying Adapter Properties

When an adapter configuration is saved, the NetWare installation program adds load and bind statements to the Autoexec.ncf

file. By accessing this file, you can view and modify properties or add properties for each network adapter.

NOTE: The Novell monitor program and the config command are also useful for viewing driver configuration properties.

For information on how to use these programs, see the Utilities Reference in your Novell NetWare online documentation.

The properties that can be defined in the load statements are described below:

Configuration Properties for BX2.LAN Driver

TxDescriptors=

Initializes Descriptor resources on the adapter for transmits.

Min = 100

Max = 512

Default = 120

RxBuffers=

This is to pre-allocate receive ECBs & Receive adapter resources. This setting may be affected by the NetWare Server maximum/minimum packet receive buffer settings.

Min = 32

Max = 1000

Default = 200

Speed=

This keyword forces the line speed of the adapter. When this keyword is used, the switch to which the adapter cable is connected must be forced. Otherwise, the adapter and switch may run at different duplex modes. It is important to have the switch and adapter set properly. The best way to ensure good connectivity is to not set the speed keyword and allow for automatic link setup (auto-negotiation).

AUTO

10FD

10HD

100FD

100HD

The default setting is AUTO. Note that 1000 Mbit/s speed is auto-detected and cannot be forced.

Link=

This keyword is set to AUTO to allow the adapter to auto-negotiate with a switch using the Speed keyword as an advertised speed upper limit. It is best to allow for auto-negotiation of the adapter and switch by not setting this keyword or the Speed keyword.

AUTO

FORCE

The default is Auto. When set to FORCE, auto-negotiation is disabled and the link speed is forced to a specific value.

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RxTicks=

Enables the use of batching receives within a specific time period.

Min = 0 (Disabled)

Max = 5000000 (5 seconds)

Units are in microseconds, The default value is 300.

TxTicks=

Enables the use of a transmit tick threshold interrupt within a specific time period.

Min = 0 (Disabled)

Max = 5000000 (5 seconds)

Units are in microseconds. The default value is 200.

TxPacketsPer=

Enables allowing an interrupt to occur after a specific amount of packets is transmitted.

Min = 0 (Disabled)

Max = 100

The default value is 20.

RxPacketsPer=

Enables allowing an interrupt to occur after a specific amount of packets is received.

Min = 0 (Disabled)

Max = 100

The default value is 75.

CheckSum=

Enables or disables the transmit and receive checksum offload feature. Checksum offload support is only for TCP/IP packets; therefore, the default setting for checksum offload is OFF.

OFF

ON

TX

RX

FlowCtrl=

This keyword allows enabling/disabling of transmit and receive flow control.

BOTH

RX

TX

OFF

The default setting is OFF.

PDriver=

Enables the driver to operate in persistent driver mode. Use only if the adapter is placed in a hot-plug slot and only if you must swap with an adapter that is exactly the same.

OFF

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NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

The default setting is OFF.

NODE=

A Novell NetWare keyword that allows an input Ethernet node address to replace the adapter factory-programmed Ethernet node address until a subsequent reboot.

NODE= nnnnnnnnnnnn

FRAME=

A Novell NetWare keyword for specifying the frame type.

ETHERNET_II

ETHERNET_802.3

ETHERNET_802.2

ETHERNET_SNAP

The default value is ETHERNET_802.2.

SLOT=

A Novell NetWare keyword used to set a system-wide unique hardware instance number (HIN) that may be the physical slot number on a slot-based bus such as PCI.

SLOT= n

Jumbo=

Enables jumbo frame support. When enabled, jumbo packets of up to 9000 bytes are supported.

Jumbo=1536–9000

The default setting is no jumbo packets.

NOTES:

Jumbo frames are supported only on NetWare 6.0 and later. Also, the first frame loaded must be ETHERNET_II.

Jumbo frame support must have the following text in the Startup.ncf file: "Set maximum physical receive packet size = 18000."

P3=

This keyword is used when running Perform3.exe tests and may be used to increase performance on networks running with many IPX clients.

Set P3=1 when running the Perform3 test back to back to a single client.

Set P3=2 when running the Perform3 test with many clients.

The default setting is P3=0.

Spuriousfix=

When this keyword is set to 1 (Spurious Fix is ON), the spurious interrupts count that is sometimes displayed on the NetWare console may be reduced. Setting this keyword to 0 (Spurious Fix is OFF) may enhance performance.

Spuriousfix = 0 (Spurious Fix is off)

Spuriousfix = 1 (Spurious Fix is on)

The default value is 1 (Spurious Fix is on).

Poll=

Disables the interrupt driven mode. When set to Poll=1, the driver does not use interrupts, but is polled by the NetWare file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/netware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:49 PM]

NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide operating system. This is a common feature supported in NetWare. The poll mode may increase driver performance in some environments.

Poll = 1 (on)

Poll = 0 (off)

The default value is 0 (Poll mode is off).

Wirespeed=

This feature provides adapter link and data integrity even if the adapter is attached to a questionable cable and/or switch. For example, an adapter that is trying to connect at 1000 Mbit/s on a Category 3 cable ordinarily would not link. With Wirespeed set to 1, the link is made at 100 Mbit/s.

Wirespeed = 1 (on)

Wirespeed = 0 (off)

The default value is 1 (Wirespeed is on).

Model=

This keyword allows the addition of a subsystem ID of a specific NIC so that the driver loads only on the first NIC found with a matching subsystem ID. For example, MODEl= 0x14e4. The default value is 0

MagicP=

When MagicP=1, the driver enables the adapter to wake up the system when a Magic Packet™ frame is received after the system is shut down. MagicP=0 is the default setting with the adapter having no wake-up ability.

MagicP = 1 (on)

MagicP = 0 (off)

The default value is 0 (No wake-up capability).

Fiber=

The driver has support for the 1000FD fiber adapter. The fiber auto-negotiates link with a fiber switch even though it only supports 1000FD. In some cases, the user may want to force the adapter to 1000FD.

AUTO (default)

FORCE

NOTE: If you modify any of the adapter properties, you must reboot the system before the changes take effect. If you make changes and do not reboot, you may experience problems.

A valid Autoexec.ncf file is shown below. One set of load and bind commands (in bold ) is added for each frame type the adapter is configured to support.

SET Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00

SET Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (MARCH SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)

SET End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00 AM)

SET Time Zone = TPST8TPDT

# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above

# should always precede the SERVER name.

# WARNING!!

FILE SERVER NAME DL760

# WARNING!!

# If you change the name of this server, you must update

# the server name in all the licenses that are assigned

# to it using iManager.

SERVERID 487B10D

LOAD ODINEB.NLM

LOAD IPXRTR

LOAD IPXRTRNM

LOAD TCPIP

LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.2 NAME=BX2_1_E82

BIND IPX BX2_1_E82 NET=FAFD3D25

LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.3 NAME=BX2_1_E83

BIND IPX BX2_1_E83 NET=5A2D8D6D

LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_SNAP NAME=BX2_1_ESP

BIND IPX BX2_1_ESP NET=477A35BD file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/netware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:49 PM]

NetWare Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_II NAME=BX2_1_EII

BIND IPX BX2_1_EII NET=C3C8F2E4

BIND IP BX2_1_EII ADDR=172.16.1.1 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0

mount all

SEARCH ADD SYS:\JAVA\BIN

SEARCH ADD SYS:\JAVA\NWGFX

Removing Drivers from Autoexec.ncf

To remove the drivers from the Autoexec.ncf file, locate the load and bind command lines associated with the Broadcom driver and remark them out by inserting the # symbol at the beginning of each command line, or by deleting the statement.

Example:

# LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.2 NAME=BX2_1_E82

# BIND IPX BX2_1_E82 NET=FAFD3D25

# LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.3 NAME=BX2_1_E83

# BIND IPX BX2_1_E83 NET=5A2D8D6D

# LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_SNAP NAME=BX2_1_ESP

# BIND IPX BX2_1_ESP NET=477A35BD

# LOAD BX2 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_II NAME=BX2_1_EII

# BIND IPX BX2_1_EII NET=C3C8F2E4

# BIND IP BX2_1_EII ADDR=172.16.1.1 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0

NOTE: If you modify the Autoexec.ncf file, you must reboot the server before the changes take effect.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

Back to Contents Page file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/netware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:49 PM]

Solaris Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Solaris Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Overview

Installing the Driver

Upgrading the Driver

Uninstalling Driver

Configuring the Driver

Memory Usage

Interrupt Management

FCoE Support

Overview

This file describes how to install the Solaris driver for Broadcom's NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet network adapters. Refer to the 'bnxe' manual page for details on how to configure the driver.

The Solaris driver is released in two formats:

BRCMbnxeversion .pkg: Datastream format

BRCMbnxeversion .tar.Z: Compressed TAR file system format.

NOTE: A DU image does not exist at this time because of driver size limitations. Solaris DU diskettes can be used to install the driver into the system both during system installation and/or after the system has been installed and booted.

This driver only works with the GLDv3 Streams interface as it appears in Solaris 10 (Update 4) and later.

Installing the Driver

1. Change directory to where BRCMbnxeversion .pkg resides.

2. pkgadd -d BRCMbnxeversion .pkg

or

1. Copy BRCMbnxe-X.Y.Z.tar.Z to /tmp.

2. cd /tmp

uncompress BRCMbnxeversion .tar.Z

tar -xvf BRCMbnxeversion .tar

pkgadd -d /tmp

3. Execute prtconf to determine instance numbers of the NIC.

4. ifconfig bnxe[instance_number] plumb

5. ifconfig bnxe[instance_number] ip_address netmask .... up

To make these changes permanent:

1. Use your favorite text editor and create a file named hostname.bnxe[instance_number] in the /etc directory. Add the

IP address of the interface to this file, save, and exit.

2. Add a proper subnet mask to the file /etc/netmasks.

Upgrading the Driver

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/solaris.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:52 PM]

Solaris Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

To upgrade the Broadcom driver package to the current version, you must first uninstall the previous driver version from the system. See Uninstalling Driver . Once the previous driver has been removed, you can follow any of the installation methods in this document to install the new driver version.

NOTE: Do not install multiple instances of the driver on a single system.

Uninstalling Driver

1. ifconfig bnxe[instance_number] down

2. ifconfig bnxe[instance_number] unplumb

3. pkgrm BRCMbnxe

Configuring the Driver

The bnxe driver can be configured via the bnxe.conf file installed under /kernel/drv. When this config file is modified, the system must be either rebooted or the driver unloaded and reconfigured using the update_drv admin command.

All configuration can be specified per-instance. The format used is as follows and each line must end with a semicolon: bnxe<#>_<config_item>=X;

So for adv_autoneg_cap, you would use the following: bnxe0_adv_autoneg_cap=1; bnxe1_adv_autoneg_cap=0; bnxe2_adv_autoneg_cap=1; bnxe3_adv_autoneg_cap=1;

If a configuration item is not specified for a specific instance, then the default value will be used. The default value used by all instances can be overridden using: default_<config_item>=X;

For boolean values, 1 = TRUE and 0 = FALSE.

Memory Usage

The number of RX/TX buffer descriptors specified in the configuration file can have a detrimental affect on memory usage. If the counts are too high, DMA allocations can fail, thereby affecting other drivers loaded on the system. If DMA allocations fail during system initialization and/or boot, then there is a chance the system will not boot. This behavior is an implementation constraint of the Solaris OS. Additionally, it has been seen that the amount of DMA allocation space available on a system running in 32-bit mode is less than when running as 64-bit.

For a single RX descriptor, the following is allocated:

1 DMA handle

1 DMA memory buffer that is MTU in size

1K memory overhead

For a single TX descriptor, the following is allocated:

9 DMA handles for sending chained mblks

1 DMA memory buffer that is MTU in size

1K memory overhead

NOTE: The number of DMA handles available in the system scales with the amount of RAM. With more RAM, the descriptor counts can be safely increased.

The default number of RX/TX buffer descriptors is 2048 for each. When using a Broadcom BCM57711 network adapter in multifunction mode, the number of configured descriptors is divided by four, ending up at 512. This is to keep the number of

DMA allocations at a minimum. After installation, it is suggested these descriptor counts be increased until stability is guaranteed and the desired performance is reached.

For example, using the default setting of 2048 for the number of both RX and TX descriptors, the approximate amount of file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/solaris.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:52 PM]

Solaris Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide memory a single interface would consume is:

Single Function Mode

RX: 2048 DMA handles and 5M (MTU=1500) or 21M (MTU=9216) of memory

TX: 20480 DMA handles and 5M (MTU=1500) or 21M (MTU=9216) of memory

Total: 22528 DMA handles and 10M (MTU=1500) or 42M (MTU=9216) of memory

Multifunction Mode (#descs / 4)

RX: 512 DMA handles and 1M (MTU=1500) or 5M (MTU=9216) of memory

TX: 5120 DMA handles and 1M (MTU=1500) or 5M (MTU=9216) of memory

Total: 5335 DMA handles and 2M (MTU=1500) or 10M (MTU=9216) of memory

Interrupt Management

If you have a system with many interfaces, it is possible to reach the allocation limit of MSIX interrupts. By default, Solaris limits each driver to 2 MSIX allocations, and there is an issue with the pcplusmp module where only a maximum of 31 MSIX interrupts are available per interrupt priority level.

If your system has four Broadcom BCM57711 network adapter ports, each running in multifunction mode, Solaris will enumerate 16 bnxe interfaces. The last interface attached will fail to allocate its second MSIX interrupt and revert to Fixed.

This in turn can eventually expose an issue in the system regarding interrupt management resulting in interrupts never being received on the interface that reverted back to Fixed.

To ensure all interfaces are able to allocate their two MSIX interrupts, the workaround is to change the priority levels of specific interfaces. Network drivers are automatically assigned an interrupt priority level of 6, so changing an interface's priority level to 5 is common.

1. First read the driver.conf man page for a background primer.

2. Find out the driver instance paths assigned on your system.

% grep bnxe /etc/path_to_inst

"/pci@0,0/pci8086,2779@1/pci14e4,1650@0" 0 "bnxe"

"/pci@0,0/pci8086,2779@1/pci14e4,1650@0,1" 1 "bnxe"

3. Normally, the name of the driver is the last portion of the path, but you should use the most appropriate PCI ID found in /etc/driver_aliases. Depending on how the hardware is layered, there are cases where the name identified in path_to_inst will not work. To figure out which name to use, examine the output from prtconf -v and match against the IDs specified in the driver_aliases file.

% grep bnxe /etc/driver_aliases bnxe "pci14e4,164e" bnxe "pci14e4,164f" bnxe "pci14e4,1650" bnxe "pciex14e4,164e" bnxe "pciex14e4,164f" bnxe "pciex14e4,1650"

4. The parent of the driver is the entire path leading up to the name.

5. The unit-address is located after the final @ in the path.

6. Therefore, change both of the bnxe interfaces found in path_to_inst to interrupt priority 5 and use the following config lines to bnxe.conf: name = "pciex14e4,1650" parent = "/pci@0,0/pci8086,2779@1" unit-address = "0" interrupt-priorities =

5; name = "pciex14e4,1650" parent = "/pci@0,0/pci8086,2779@1" unit-address = "0,1" interrupt-priorities

= 5;

7. After modifying the config, either reboot the system or unplumb all interfaces and run the update_drv command.

8. When the system has been reconfigured and the interfaces plumbed back up, verify the new interrupt priority settings by running the following command as root:

% echo "::interrupts -d" | mdb -k

FCoE Support

Overview

FCoE is supported on Solaris 11 with limited support on Solaris 10, Update 9. The following features are the differences in

Solaris 10, Update 9 when compared to Solaris 11: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/solaris.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:52 PM]

Solaris Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Support does not exist for NPIV in the Solaris 10 Update 9.

Some of the fcinfo(1M) options, which are available in Solaris 11, are not be available in Solaris 10, Update 9. For more information, read the man page fcinfo(1M).

brcmfcoeadm(1M) feature is supported in both Solaris 10 Update 9 and Solaris 11. However, when "delete-fcoe-port" is complete, you need to issue the following two commands to unload the bnxef driver before you can re-issue "createfcoe-port". There is a reaper thread in Solaris 11 that aggressively looks for unused driver modules and unloads the driver. That thread does not exist in Solaris 10 Update 9. Therefore, you have to explicitly look for the driver module ID of the bnxef driver by issuing the following command.

# modinfo | grep bnxef

249 fffffffff8d63000 486b8 54 1 bnxef (6.4.13)

Then issue the modunload command to unload the module before "create-fcoe-port" is issued to create a new FCoE port.

# modunload -i 249

Any time "create-fcoe-port" needs to be issued, the driver must be unloaded, if it is already loaded. If not, the "create-fcoeport" will fail indicating the driver is busy. This is true when you have two or more instances of bnxef loaded, in which case, you should first delete all FCoE ports and then unload the driver. Unloading will occur only when all the instances are deleted.

Supported FC/FCoE Devices

The bnxef Broadcom 10 Gb FCoE driver works with all the major FCoE fabric devices. It is also compatible with all known FC disk devices and tape devices working through the FCoE fabric.

Unloading FCoE Driver

Delete all FCoE ports created across the various bnxe instances.

1. Delete all the NPIV ports created before deleting FCoE ports.

2. brcmfcoeadm delete-fcoe-port bnxe<instance_number>

3. modinfo | grep bnxef

The first column for the above command will give the module ID for the bnxef driver.

4. modunload -i <module id>

The procedure should unload the driver. However, if there are many instances of the FCoE ports created, all the FCoE ports must be deleted before the unload can be attempted.

Configuring the FCoE Driver

The bnxef driver can be configured via the bnxef.conf file installed under /kernel/drv. When this config file is modified, the system must be either rebooted or use the update_drv(1M) command to update the driver configuration.

The details of the configurations parameters are detailed in the bnxef(7D) man page. The default parameters should work for all conditions.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Packaging

Networking Support

Drivers

FCoE Support

Packaging

The VMware driver is released in the packaging formats shown in Table 1 .

Table 1: VMware Driver Packaging

Format Drivers

Compressed tar bnx2xversion .tar.gz

VMware VIB vmware-esx-drivers-net-bnx2xversion .x86_64.vib

Networking Support

This section describes the bnx2x VMware ESX driver for the Broadcom NetXtreme II PCIE 10 GbE network adapters.

Drivers

Download, Install, and Update Drivers

To download, install, or update the VMware ESX/ESXi driver for NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapters, see http://www.vmware.com/support .

Driver Parameters

Several optional parameters can be supplied as a command line argument to the vmkload_mod command. These parameters can also be set via the esxcfg-module command. See the man page for more information.

int_mode

The optional parameter int_mode is used to force using an interrupt mode other than MSI-X. By default, the driver will try to enable MSI-X if it is supported by the kernel. If MSI-X is not attainable, then the driver will try to enable MSI if it is supported by the kernel. If MSI is not attainable, then the driver will use the legacy INTx mode.

Set the int_mode parameter to 1 as shown below to force using the legacy INTx mode on all NetXtreme II network adapters in the system.

vmkload_mod bnx2x int_mode=1

Set the int_mode parameter to 2 as shown below to force using MSI mode on all NetXtreme II network adapters in the system.

vmkload_mod bnx2x int_mode=2 disable_tpa

The optional parameter disable_tpa can be used to disable the Transparent Packet Aggregation (TPA) feature. By default, the driver will aggregate TCP packets, but if you would like to disable this advanced feature, it can be done.

Set the disable_tpa parameter to 1 as shown below to disable the TPA feature on all NetXtreme II network adapters in the system.

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/vmware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:54 PM]

VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide vmkload_mod bnx2x.ko disable_tpa=1

Use ethtool to disable TPA (LRO) for a specific network adapter.

num_rx_queues

The optional parameter num_rx_queues may be used to set the number of Rx queues on kernels starting from 2.6.24 when multi_mode is set to 1 and interrupt mode is MSI-X. Number of Rx queues must be equal to or greater than the number of

Tx queues (see num_tx_queues parameter). If the interrupt mode is different than MSI-X (see int_mode parameter), then then the number of Rx queues will be set to 1, discarding the value of this parameter.

num_tx_queues

The optional parameter num_tx_queues may be used to set the number of Tx queues on kernels starting from 2.6.27 when multi_mode is set to 1 and interrupt mode is MSI-X. The number of Rx queues must be equal to or greater than the number of Tx queues (see num_rx_queues parameter). If the interrupt mode is different than MSI-X (see int_mode parameter), then the number of Tx queues will be set to 1, discarding the value of this parameter.

pri_map

The optional parameter pri_map is used to map the VLAN PRI value or the IP DSCP value to a different or the same CoS in the hardware. This 32-bit parameter is evaluated by the driver as 8 values of 4 bits each. Each nibble sets the desired hardware queue number for that priority.

For example, set the pri_map parameter to 0x22221100 to map priority 0 and 1 to CoS 0, map priority 2 and 3 to CoS 1, and map priority 4 to 7 to CoS 2. In another example, set the pri_map parameter to 0x11110000 to map priority 0 to 3 to

CoS 0, and map priority 4 to 7 to CoS 1.

qs_per_cos

The optional parameter qs_per_cos is used to specify the number of queues that will share the same CoS. This parameter is evaluated by the driver up to 3 values of 8 bits each. Each byte sets the desired number of queues for that CoS. The total number of queues is limited by the hardware limit.

For example, set the qs_per_cos parameter to 0x10101 to create a total of three queues, one per CoS. In another example, set the qs_per_cos parameter to 0x404 to create a total of 8 queues, divided into only 2 CoS, 4 queues in each CoS.

cos_min_rate

The optional parameter cos_min_rate is used to determine the weight of each CoS for Round-robin scheduling in transmission. This parameter is evaluated by the driver up to 3 values of 8 bits each. Each byte sets the desired weight for that CoS. The weight ranges from 0 to 100.

For example, set the cos_min_rate parameter to 0x101 for fair transmission rate between two CoS. In another example, set the cos_min_rate parameter to 0x30201 to give the higher CoS the higher rate of transmission. To avoid using the fairness algorithm, omit setting the optional parameter cos_min_rate or set it to 0.

dropless_fc

The optional parameter dropless_fc can be used to enable a complementary flow control mechanism on Broadcom network adapters. The default flow control mechanism is to send pause frames when the on-chip buffer (BRB) is reaching a certain level of occupancy. This is a performance targeted flow control mechanism. On Broadcom network adapters, you can enable another flow control mechanism to send pause frames if one of the host buffers (when in RSS mode) is exhausted. This is a

"zero packet drop" targeted flow control mechanism.

Set the dropless_fc parameter to 1 as shown below to enable the dropless flow control mechanism feature on all Broadcom network adapters in the system.

vmkload_mod bnx2x dropless_fc=1

Driver Defaults

Speed : Autonegotiation with all speeds advertised

Flow Control : Autonegotiation with rx and tx advertised

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VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Rx Ring Size : 4078 (range 0–4078)

Tx Ring Size : 4078 (range (MAX_SKB_FRAGS+4) - 4078). MAX_SKB_FRAGS varies on different kernels and different architectures. On a 2.6 kernel for x86, MAX_SKB_FRAGS is 18.

Coalesce RX Microseconds : 25 (range 0–3000)

Coalesce TX Microseconds : 50 (range 0–12288)

MSI-X : Enabled (if supported by 2.6 kernel)

TSO : Enabled

WoL : Disabled

Unloading and Removing Driver

To unload the driver, type the following: vmkload_mod -u bnx2x

Driver Messages

The following are the most common sample messages that may be logged in the file /var/log/messages. Use dmesg -n

<level>

to control the level at which messages will appear on the console. Most systems are set to level 6 by default. To see all messages, set the level higher.

Driver Sign On

Broadcom NetXtreme II 5771x 10Gigabit Ethernet Driver bnx2x 0.40.15 ($DateTime: 2007/11/22 05:32:40 $)

NIC Detected eth0: Broadcom NetXtreme II BCM57710 XGb (A1)

PCI-E x8 2.5GHz found at mem e8800000, IRQ 16, node addr 001018360012

MSI-X Enabled Successfully bnx2x: eth0: using MSI-X

Link Up and Speed Indication bnx2x: eth0 NIC Link is Up, 10000 Mbps full duplex, receive & transmit flow control ON

Link Down Indication bnx2x: eth0 NIC Link is Down

Memory Limitation

If you see messages in the log file that look like the following, then the ESX host is severely strained. To relieve this, disable

NetQueue.

Dec 2 18:24:20 ESX4 vmkernel: 0:00:00:32.342 cpu2:4142)WARNING: Heap: 1435: Heap bnx2x already at its maximumSize. Cannot expand.

Dec 2 18:24:20 ESX4 vmkernel: 0:00:00:32.342 cpu2:4142)WARNING: Heap: 1645: Heap_Align(bnx2x, 4096/4096 bytes, 4096 align) failed. caller: 0x41800187d654

Dec 2 18:24:20 ESX4 vmkernel: 0:00:00:32.342 cpu2:4142)WARNING: vmklinux26: alloc_pages: Out of memory

Disable NetQueue by manually loading the bnx2x vmkernel module via the command.

vmkload_mod bnx2x multi_mode=0 or to persist the settings across reboots via the command esxcfg-module -s multi_mode=0 bnx2x

Reboot the machine for the settings to take place.

MultiQueue/NetQueue

The optional parameter num_queues may be used to set the number of Rx and Tx queues when multi_mode is set to 1 and interrupt mode is MSI-X. If interrupt mode is different than MSI-X (see int_mode parameter), the number of Rx and Tx file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/vmware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:54 PM]

VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide queues will be set to 1, discarding the value of this parameter.

If you would like the use of more then 1 queue, force the number of NetQueues to use via the following command: esxcfg-module -s "multi_mode=1 num_queues=<num of queues>" bnx2x

Otherwise, allow the bnx2x driver to select the number of NetQueues to use via the following command: esxcfg-module -s "multi_mode=1 num_queues=0" bnx2x

The optimal number is to have the number of NetQueues match the number of CPUs on the machine.

FCoE Support

This section describes the contents and procedures associated with installation of the VMware software package for supporting

Broadcom FCoE C-NICs.

Drivers

Table 2: Broadcom NetXtreme II FCoE Drivers

Driver Description bnx2x bnx2fc bnx2i

This driver manages all PCI device resources (registers, host interface queues, etc.) and also acts as the Layer 2

VMware low-level network driver for Broadcom's NetXtreme II 10G device. This driver directly controls the hardware and is responsible for sending and receiving Ethernet packets on behalf of the VMware host networking stack. The bnx2x driver also receives and processes device interrupts, both on behalf of itself (for L2 networking) and on behalf of the bnx2fc (FCoE protocol) and cnic drivers.

The Broadcom VMware FCoE driver is a kernel mode driver used to provide a translation layer between the VMware

SCSI stack and the Broadcom FCoE firmware/hardware. In addition, the driver interfaces with the networking layer to transmit and receive encapsulated FCoE frames on behalf of open-fcoe's libfc/libfcoe for FIP/device discovery.

The bnx2i driver is Broadcom VMware iSCSI HBA driver. Similar to bnx2fc, bnx2i is a kernel mode driver used to provide a translation layer between the VMware SCSI stack and the Broadcom iSCSI firmware/hardware. Bnx2i functions under the open-iscsi framework.

Supported Distributions

The FCoE/DCB feature set is supported on VMware ESXi 5.0 and above.

Enabling FCoE

To enable FCoE hardware offload on the C-NIC

1. Determine the ports that are FCoE-capable:

# esxcli fcoe nic list

Output example: vmnic4

User Priority: 3

Source MAC: FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF

Active: false

Priority Settable: false

Source MAC Settable: false

VLAN Range Settable: false

1. Enable the FCoE interface:

# esxcli fcoe nic discover -n vmnicX

Where

X

is the interface number gained from esxcli fcoe nic list.

2. Verify that the interface is working:

# esxcli fcoe adapter list

Output example: vmhba34

Source MAC: bc:30:5b:01:82:39

FCF MAC: 00:05:73:cf:2c:ea

VNPort MAC: 0e:fc:00:47:04:04 file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/vmware.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:54 PM]

VMware Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Physical NIC: vmnic7

User Priority: 3

VLAN id: 2008

The output of this command should show valid:

FCF MAC, VNPort MAC, Priority, and VLAN id for the Fabric that is connected to the C-NIC.

The following command can also be used to verify that the interface is working properly:

#esxcfg-scsidevs -a

Output example: vmhba34 bnx2fc link-up fcoe.1000<mac address>:2000<mac address> () Software FCoE vmhba35 bnx2fc link-up fcoe.1000<mac address>:2000<mac address> () Software FCoE

NOTE: The label "Software FCoE" is a VMware term used to describe initiators that depend on the inbox FCoE libraries and utilities. Broadcom's FCoE solution is a fully state connection-based hardware offload solution designed to significantly reduce the CPU burden encumbered by a non-offload software initiator.

Installation Check

To verify the correct installation of the driver and to ensure that the host port is seen by the switch, follow the procedure below.

To verify the correct installation of the driver

1. Verify the host port shows up in the switch FLOGI database using the "show flogi database" command for the case of a

Cisco FCF and "fcoe -loginshow" command for the case of a Brocade FCF.

2. If the Host WWPN does not appear in the FLOGI database, then provide driver log messages for review.

Limitations

FCoE Boot from SAN is not currently supported

NPIV is not currently supported with this release on ESX, due to lack of supporting inbox components.

Non-offload FCoE is not supported with offload-capable Broadcom devices. Only the full hardware offload path is supported.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Windows Driver and Application Installation: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Windows Driver and Application Installation: Broadcom

NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Installing the Driver Software

Modifying the Driver Software

Repairing or Reinstalling the Driver Software

Removing the Device Drivers

Using the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver

Inserting the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver in a WinPE 2.0 Image

Configuring the Speed/Duplex Setting for the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver

Viewing or Changing the Properties of the Adapter

Setting Power Management Options

Installing the Driver Software

NOTE: These instructions are based on the assumption that your Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter was not factory installed.

If your controller was installed at the factory, the driver software has been installed for you.

When Windows first starts after a hardware device (such as a Broadcom NetXtreme II Adapter) has been installed, or after the existing device driver has been removed, the operating system automatically detects the hardware and prompts you to install the driver software for that device.

Both a graphical interactive installation mode (see Using the Installer ) and a command-line silent mode for unattended installation (see Using Silent Installation ) are available.

NOTES:

Before installing the driver software, verify that the Windows operating system has been upgraded to the latest version with the latest service pack applied.

A network device driver must be physically installed before the Broadcom NetXtreme II Controller can be used with your Windows operating system. Drivers are located on the driver source media as well as at the Dell website at http://support.dell.com

.

To use the TCP/IP Offload Engine (TOE), you must have Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2. You must also have a license key installed on the motherboard (for LOMs). For add-in NICs, the license key is preprogrammed in the hardware.

BACS is not supported on the Server Core installation option for Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2.

Using the Installer

In addition to the Broadcom device drivers, the installer installs the management applications. The following are installed when running the installer:

Broadcom Device Drivers . Installs the Broadcom device drivers.

Control Suite . Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS).

BASP . Installs Broadcom Advanced Server Program.

SNMP . Installs the Simple Network Management Protocol subagent.

CIM Provider . Installs the Common Information Model provider.

iSCSI Crash Dump Driver . Installs the driver needed for the iSCSI Crash Dump utility.

NOTE: Although installing the BACS software and related management applications is optional, the Broadcom device file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/umwindrv.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:57 PM]

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NOTE: BASP is not available on Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2008.

To install the Broadcom NetXtreme II drivers and management applications

1. When the Found New Hardware Wizard appears, click Cancel .

2. Insert the Dell-provided CD into the CD or DVD drive or download the software driver package from the Dell website at http://support.dell.com/ .

3. On the driver source media, or from the location to which you downloaded the software driver package, open the folder for your operating system, open the Driver_Management_Apps_Installer folder, and then double-click Setup.exe

to open the InstallShield Wizard.

4. Click Next to continue.

5. After you review the license agreement, click I accept the terms in the license agreement and then click Next to continue.

6. Select the features you want installed.

7. Select how you want to install the NetXtreme II drivers and then click Next .

8. Click Install .

9. Click Finish to close the wizard.

10. The installer will determine if a system restart is necessary. Follow the on-screen instructions.

To install the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator for iSCSI Crash Dump

If supported and if you will use the Broadcom iSCSI Crash Dump utility, it is important to follow the installation sequence:

Run the installer

Install the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator along with the patch (MS KB939875)

NOTE: If performing an upgrade of the device drivers from the installer, re-enable iSCSI Crash Dump from the

Advanced section of the BACS Configuration tab.

Perform this procedure after running the installer to install the device drivers and the management applications.

1. Install Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator (version 2.06 or later) if not included in your OS. To determine when you need to install the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator, see Table 1 . To download the iSCSI Software Initiator from Microsoft, go to http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=18986 .

2. Install Microsoft patch for iSCSI crash dump file generation (Microsoft KB939875) from http://support.microsoft.com/kb/939875.

To determine if you need to install the Microsoft patch, see Table 1 .

Table 1: Windows Operating Systems and iSCSI Crash Dump

Operating System MS iSCSI Software Initiator Required Microsoft Patch (MS KB939875) Required

NDIS

Windows Server 2008 Yes (included in OS)

Windows Server 2008 R2 Yes (included in OS)

OIS

Windows Server 2008 No

Windows Server 2008 R2 No

No

No

No

No

Using Silent Installation

NOTES:

All commands are case sensitive.

For detailed instructions and information about unattended installs, refer to the Silent.txt file in the

Driver_Management_Apps_Installer folder.

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Type the following: setup /s /v/qn

To perform a silent upgrade from within the installer source folder

Type the following: setup /s /v/qn

To perform a silent reinstall of the same installer

Type the following: setup /s /v"/qn REINSTALL=ALL"

NOTE: The REINSTALL switch should only be used if the same installer is already installed on the system. If upgrading an earlier version of the installer, use setup /s /v/qn

as listed above.

To perform a silent install by feature

Use the ADDSOURCE to include any of the features listed below.

Type the following according to platform:

IA32 platforms: setup /s /v"/qn ADDSOURCE=Driversi32,BACSi32,BASPi32,SNMPi32,CIMi32"

AMD/EM64T platforms: setup /s /v"/qn ADDSOURCE=Driversa64,BACSa64,BASPa64,SNMPa64,CIMa64"

The following command-line statement installs only the Broadcom drivers according to platform:

IA32 platforms: setup /s /v"/qn ADDSOURCE=Driversi32"

AMD64 platforms: setup /s /v"/qn ADDSOURCE=Driversa64"

NOTE: The Broadcom device drivers are a required feature and are always installed, even if you do not specify

ADDSOURCE.

To perform a silent install from within a batch file

To perform a silent install from within a batch file and to wait for the install to complete before continuing with the next command line, type the following: start /wait setup /s /w /v/qn

To perform a silent install to force a downgrade (default is NO) setup /s /v" /qn DOWNGRADE=Y"

Modifying the Driver Software

To modify the driver software

1. In Control Panel, double-click Add or Remove Programs .

2. Click Broadcom Drivers and Management Applications , and then click Change .

3. Click Next to continue.

4. Click Modify, Add, or Remove to change program features. This option does not install drivers for new adapters. For information on installing drivers for new adapters, see Repairing or Reinstalling the Driver Software .

5. Click Next to continue.

6. Click on an icon to change how a feature is installed.

7. Click Next .

8. Click Install .

9. Click Finish to close the wizard.

10. The installer will determine if a system restart is necessary. Follow the on-screen instructions.

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Repairing or Reinstalling the Driver Software

To repair or reinstall the driver software

1. In Control Panel, double-click Add or Remove Programs .

2. Click Broadcom Drivers and Management Applications , and then click Change .

3. Click Next to continue.

4. Click Repair or Reinstall to repair errors or install drivers for new adapters.

5. Click Next to continue.

6. Click Install .

7. Click Finish to close the wizard.

8. The installer will determine if a system restart is necessary. Follow the on-screen instructions.

Removing the Device Drivers

When removing the device drivers, any management application that is installed is also removed.

NOTE: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 provide the Device Driver Rollback feature to replace a device driver with one that was previously installed. However, the complex software architecture of the NetXtreme II device may present problems if the rollback feature is used on one of the individual components. Therefore, we recommend that changes to driver versions be made only through the use of a driver installer.

To remove the device drivers

1. In Control Panel, double-click Add or Remove Programs .

2. Click Broadcom Drivers and Management Applications , and then click Remove . Follow the onscreen prompts.

3. Reboot your system to completely remove the drivers. If you fail to reboot your system, you will not be able to successfully install the drivers.

Using the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver

The NetXtreme II, based on its advanced functionalities, uses a software architecture that includes a Virtual Bus Device (VBD) to extend functionalities beyond basic network connectivity. Microsoft, however, does not currently support this architecture when loading an operating system through its Windows Deployment Services (WDS), which was previously known as Remote

Installation Services (RIS), or for the deployment agent used in the Automated Deployment Services (ADS). Therefore, a separate driver was created to accommodate these Microsoft deficiencies. This driver is known as the NetXtreme II monolithic driver, but it is sometimes referred to as the "RIS" driver.

The NetXtreme II monolithic driver was developed to work only for the text mode portion of a WDS legacy installation and to establish connectivity with a deployment agent for ADS. It is not intended to be used as a driver loaded in the running state of an operating system. The exception to this would be when used for the Windows Preinstallation Environment (WinPE).

For WDS, this driver is used similarly to any other network adapter driver for supporting network connectivity after the PXE boot to the WDS server. When placed in the I386 or AMD64 directory (depending on the version of the operating system being deployed), the monolithic driver is called to establish that there is driver support for the NetXtreme II adapter included in the WDS legacy image.

For ADS, the driver is placed in the PreSystem directory on the server running ADS to establish connectivity with the deployment agent on remote systems with NetXtreme II adapters when booting from PXE.

While Windows PE 2005 natively supports the VBD architecture, it was found that using the "minint" switch in the startnet.cmd file does not. The minint switch performs a limited scan of the system bus to identify network devices only and, therefore, does not support the VBD architecture. Since only network connectivity is required in Windows PE, the only supported driver is the monolithic driver for the NetXtreme II adapter in this environment as well. Place the b06nd.inf file in the INF directory within the Windows PE image, and place the appropriate driver file (b06nd51a.sys for x64-based builds or b06nd51.sys for x86-based builds) in the driver's directory. If Windows PE is deployed as a flat image from a RIS or WDS server, you must also place both the b06nd.inf and the appropriate driver file in the I386 or AMD64 directory containing the image. If the RIS or WDS server is running Windows 2000 Server and deploying an x86 WinPE image, you may need to apply the following modification to the b06nd.inf file located in the I386 directory as follows: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/umwindrv.htm[9/26/2012 3:28:57 PM]

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1. Locate [Manufacturer] header within the file.

2. Review the line below it which reads: %brcm% = broadcom, ntx86, ntamd64, ntia64 or equivalent.

3. Modify that line to read: %brcm% = broadcom.ntx86, ntamd64, ntia64. The change made replaces the comma and space after "broadcom" with a period.

4. Save the file.

5. Restart the RIS service (binlsvc) or WDS services (wdsserver).

Inserting the NetXtreme II Monolithic Driver in a WinPE 2.0 Image

The Microsoft Windows Server 2008 method of inserting the NetXtreme II monolithic driver in a WinPe 2.0 image is different from the Windows Server 2008 R2 method, as discussed below.

By default, the monolithic driver is not included in the boot.wim and install.wim files that come with either the Microsoft

Windows Server 2008 CD or the Windows Server 2008 R2 CD. Microsoft's Windows Automated Installation Kit (AIK) allows you to modify the default boot.wim and install.wim files, and create WinPE 2.0 images to include the NetXtreme II monolithic driver in the Windows Server installation.

To insert the monolithic driver into a WinPE 2.0 boot image (Windows Server 2008)

To insert Broadcom's NetXtreme II monolithic driver in a WinPE 2.0 image, download AIK from http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/default.aspx and install .

After installing AIK, copy the latest monolithic driver to a directory on the local hard drive of the system you installed the AIK.

Follow the procedure below to insert the monolithic driver into a WinPE 2.0 boot image.

1. From All Programs, open Windows AIK and select Windows PE Tools Command prompt.

2. At the command prompt, run the copype.cmd script. The script requires two arguments: hardware architecture and destination location.

copype.cmd <arch> <destination>

For example: copype x86 c:\VistaPEx86

NOTE: The directory structure c:\VistaPEx86 is used throughout this procedure.

3. Mount the base image to a local directory so that you can add or remove packages by typing: imagex /mountrw c:\VistaPEx86\winpe.wim 1 c:\VistaPEx86\mount

4. Place the monolithic driver and inf file in c:\drivers\x32\ by typing: peimg /inf=c:\Drivers\x32\b06nd.inf c:\VistaPEx86\mount\windows

AIK inserts the driver into the WinPE 2.0 image.

5. To complete the customization of the image, prepare the image for deployment, type: peimg /prep c:\VistaPEx86\mount\windows

6. When asked to continue and have the program prepare the image for deployment, type: yes

7. To commit the changes to the original image file (Winpe.wim), type: imagex /unmount c:\VistaPEx86\mount /commit

8. To replace the default Boot.wim file in the \ISO directory with your new custom image, type: copy c:\VistaPex86\winpe.wim c:\VistaPEx86\ISO\sources\boot.wim

To add a device driver to an offline Windows PE image (Windows Server 2008 R2)

This procedure demonstrates how to use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) tool to add a device driver (.inf) to an offline Windows PE image. Before running a DISM command, first mount the Windows PE image.

1. Mount the base image by using the DISM tool to a local Windows PE directory. For example:

Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:c:\winpe_x86\winpe.wim /index:1 /MountDir:c:\winpe_x86\mount

NOTE: The directory structure c:\winpe_x86 is used throughout this procedure.

2. Add the .inf file to the base image by using the dism command with the /Add-Driver option. For example Driver.inf is the Broadcom driver, evnd.inf is the driver for the 10 Gbps devices, and b06nd.inf is the driver for the 1 Gbps devices.

Dism /image:<path_to_image> /Add-Driver /Driver:c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows\driver.inf

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3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each additional device driver.

4. Unmount the image after modifying it.

dism /unmount-wim /Mountdir:c:\winpe_x86\mount /commit

5. After unmounting the image, burn it to the designated media.

To create a bootable CD-ROM

1. On your technician computer, at the command prompt, create an .iso file by typing: oscdimg -n -bc:\VistaPEx86\etfsboot.com c:\VistaPEx86\ISO C:\VistaPEx86\VistaPEx86.iso

2. Burn the iso image to a CD.

Configuring the Speed/Duplex Setting for the NetXtreme II Monolithic

Driver

Since the typical environment where the NetXtreme II monolithic driver is used does not provide the means to configure advanced network adapter properties, the driver file (b06nd.inf) was modified to include a section that allows it to be configured for a specific speed and/or duplex. This provides a more robust connection to the network as it allows the adapter to match the settings of its link partner (e.g., a switch, router, etc.).

To manually configure the speed and duplex

1. Open the b06nd.inf file with a text editor like Microsoft Notepad or WordPad.

2. Perform a search on the file for "Registry parameters" to locate the section that will allow you to configure the adapter speed/duplex.

3. Once located, notice the following information shown.

[params_utp] hkr, , req_medium, 2, "0"

[params_fiber] hkr, , req_medium, 2, "65283"

These make up two separate sections that can be configured: one for standard RJ-45 copper interfaces (params_utp) and one for fiber devices (params_fiber).

1. As described in the file, replace the value above in quotation marks under the correct section, depending upon the network adapter in your system. The available values are shown below.

Options for copper interfaces:

Auto (1 Gbps is enabled when that speed is supported) = "0"

10 Mbps Half Duplex = "65794"

10 Mbps Full Duplex = "258"

100 Mbps Half Duplex = "66050"

100 Mbps Full Duplex = "514"

Options for fiber interfaces:

Auto (1 Gbps is enabled when that speed is supported) = "0"

1 Gbps Full Duplex = "771"

Auto with 1 Gbps Fallback = "33539"

Hardware default = "65283"

An example is provided in the file showing how to configure a copper interface for a 10 Mbps Full Duplex connection. The example is shown below.

hkr, , req_medium, 2, "258"

Viewing or Changing the Properties of the Adapter

To view or change the properties of the Broadcom network adapter

1. In Control Panel, click Broadcom Control Suite 4 .

2. Click the Advanced section of the Configurations tab.

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Setting Power Management Options

You can set power management options to allow the operating system to turn off the controller to save power or to allow the controller to wake up the computer. If the device is busy doing something (servicing a call, for example) however, the operating system will not shut down the device. The operating system attempts to shut down every possible device only when the computer attempts to go into hibernation. To have the controller stay on at all times, do not click the Allow the computer to turn off the device to save power check box.

NOTE: Power management options are not available on blade servers.

NOTES:

The Power Management tab is available only for servers that support power management.

To enable Wake on LAN (WOL) when the computer is on standby, click Allow the device to bring the computer out of standby box.

If you select Only allow management stations to bring the computer out of standby , the computer can be brought out of standby only by Magic Packet .

CAUTION! Do not select Allow the computer to turn off the device to save power for any adapter that is a member of a team.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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iSCSI Protocol: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

iSCSI Protocol: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

iSCSI Boot iSCSI Crash Dump iSCSI Offload

iSCSI Boot

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet adapters support iSCSI boot to enable network boot of operating systems to diskless systems. The iSCSI boot allows a Windows or Linux operating system boot from an iSCSI target machine located remotely over a standard IP network.

For both Windows and Linux operating systems, iSCSI boot can be configured to boot with two distinctive paths: non-offload

(also known as Microsoft initiator) and offload (Broadcom's offload iSCSI driver or HBA). Configuration of the path is set with the HBA Boot Mode option located on the General Parameters screen of the iSCSI Configuration utility. See Table 1 for more information on all General Parameters screen configuration options.

Supported Operating Systems for iSCSI Boot

The Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet adapters support iSCSI boot on the following operating systems:

Windows Server 2008 32-bit and 64-bit (supports offload and non-offload paths)

Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit (supports offload and non-offload paths)

Linux RHEL 5.5 and later, SLES 11.1 and later (supports offload and non-offload paths)

SLES 10.x and SLES 11 (only supports non-offload path)

iSCSI Boot Setup

The iSCSI boot setup consists of:

Configuring the iSCSI Target

Configuring iSCSI Boot Parameters

Preparing the iSCSI Boot Image

Booting

Configuring the iSCSI Target

Configuring the iSCSI target varies by target vendors. For information on configuring the iSCSI target, refer to the documentation provided by the vendor. The general steps include:

1. Create an iSCSI target.

2. Create a virtual disk.

3. Map the virtual disk to the iSCSI target created in step 1.

4. Associate an iSCSI initiator with the iSCSI target.

5. Record the iSCSI target name, TCP port number, iSCSI Logical Unit Number (LUN), initiator Internet Qualified Name

(IQN), and CHAP authentication details.

6. After configuring the iSCSI target, obtain the following:

7. Target IQN

8. Target IP address

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10. Target LUN

11. Initiator IQN

12. CHAP ID and secret

Configuring iSCSI Boot Parameters

Configure the Broadcom iSCSI boot software for either static or dynamic configuration. Refer to Table 1 for configuration options available from the General Parameters screen.

Table 1 lists parameters for both IPv4 and IPv6. Parameters specific to either IPv4 or IPv6 are noted.

NOTE: Availability of IPv6 iSCSI boot is platform/device dependent.

Table 1: Configuration Options

Option

TCP/IP parameters via

DHCP

Description

This option is specific to IPv4. Controls whether the iSCSI boot host software acquires the IP address information using DHCP (Enabled) or use a static IP configuration (Disabled).

IP

Autoconfiguration iSCSI parameters via

DHCP

CHAP

Authentication

Boot to iSCSI target

DHCP Vendor ID

Link Up Delay

Time

This option is specific to IPv6. Controls whether the iSCSI boot host software will configure a stateless link-local address and/or stateful address if DHCPv6 is present and used (Enabled). Router Solicit packets are sent out up to three times with 4 second intervals in between each retry. Or use a static IP configuration (Disabled).

Controls whether the iSCSI boot host software acquires its iSCSI target parameters using DHCP (Enabled) or through a static configuration (Disabled). The static information is entered through the iSCSI Initiator

Parameters Configuration screen.

Controls whether the iSCSI boot host software uses CHAP authentication when connecting to the iSCSI target. If CHAP Authentication is enabled, the CHAP ID and CHAP Secret are entered through the iSCSI

Initiator Parameters Configuration screen.

Controls whether the iSCSI boot host software attempts to boot from the iSCSI target after successfully connecting to it. When the option is enabled, the iSCSI boot host software immediately attempts to boot form the iSCSI target. If set to disabled, the iSCSI boot host software does not attempt to boot from the iSCSI target and control returns to the system BIOS so that the next boot device may be used. The One

Time Disabled option is used when you want to do a remote install of the OS to an iSCSI target. As the option is named, it is set to disable on the first boot, then changes to enabled on subsequent reboots to indicate that iSCSI boots from the iSCSI target.

Controls how the iSCSI boot host software interprets the Vendor Class ID field used during DHCP. If the

Vendor Class ID field in the DHCP Offer packet matches the value in the field, the iSCSI boot host software looks into the DHCP Option 43 fields for the required iSCSI boot extensions. If DHCP is disabled, this value does not need to be set.

Controls how long the iSCSI boot host software waits, in seconds, after an Ethernet link is established before sending any data over the network. The valid values are 0 to 255. As an example, a user may need to set a value for this option if a network protocol, such as Spanning Tree, is enabled on the switch interface to the client system.

Use TCP

Timestamp

Target as First

HDD

LUN Busy Retry

Count

IP Version

HBA Boot Mode

Controls if the TCP Timestamp option is enabled or disabled.

Allows specifying that the iSCSI target drive will appear as the first hard drive in the system.

Controls the number of connection retries the iSCSI Boot initiator will attempt if the iSCSI target LUN is busy.

This option specific to IPv6. Toggles between the IPv4 or IPv6 protocol. All IP settings will be lost when switching from one protocol version to another.

Set to disable when the host OS is configured for software initiator mode and to enable for HBA mode.

This option is available on NetXtreme II adapters.

MBA Boot Protocol Configuration

To configure the boot protocol

1. Restart your system.

2. From the PXE banner, select CTRL+S . The MBA Configuration Menu appears (see Broadcom Boot Agent ).

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3. From the MBA Configuration Menu, use the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW to move to the Boot Protocol option. Use the LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to change the Boot Protocol option to iSCSI .

NOTE: For iSCSI boot-capable LOMs, the boot protocol is set via the BIOS. See your system documentation for more information.

4. Select iSCSI Boot Configuration from Main Menu .

NOTE: If iSCSI boot firmware is not programmed in the NetXtreme II network adapter, selecting iSCSI Boot

Configuration will not have any effect.

iSCSI Boot Configuration

Static iSCSI Boot Configuration

Dynamic iSCSI Boot Configuration

Static iSCSI Boot Configuration

In a static configuration, you must enter data for the system's IP address, the system's initiator IQN, and the target parameters obtained in Configuring the iSCSI Target . For information on configuration options, see Table 1 .

To configure the iSCSI boot parameters using static configuration

1. From the General Parameters Menu screen, set the following:

TCP/IP parameters via DHCP : Disabled. (For IPv4.)

IP Autoconfiguration : Disabled. (For IPv6, non-offload.) iSCSI parameters via DHCP : Disabled

CHAP Authentication : Disabled

Boot to iSCSI target : Disabled

DHCP Vendor ID : BRCM ISAN

Link Up Delay Time : 0

Use TCP Timestamp : Enabled (for some targets such as the Dell/EMC AX100i, it is necessary to enable Use

TCP Timestamp )

Target as First HDD : Disabled

LUN Busy Retry Count : 0

IP Version : IPv6. (For IPv6, non-offload.)

HBA Boot Mode : Disabled

2. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

3. From the Main menu, select Initiator Parameters .

4. From the Initiator Parameters screen, type values for the following:

IP Address (unspecified IPv4 and IPv6 addresses should be "0.0.0.0" and "::", respectively )

Subnet Mask Prefix

Default Gateway

Primary DNS

Secondary DNS iSCSI Name (corresponds to the iSCSI initiator name to be used by the client system)

NOTE: Carefully enter the IP address. There is no error-checking performed against the IP address to check for duplicates or incorrect segment/network assignment.

5. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

6. From the Main menu, select 1st Target Parameters .

NOTE: For the initial setup, configuring a second target is not supported.

7. From the 1st Target Parameters screen, enable Connect to connect to the iSCSI target. Type values for the file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/iscsi.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:03 PM]

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IP Address

TCP Port

Boot LUN iSCSI Name

8. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

9. A second iSCSI boot adapter can be configured for redundancy in the event the primary adapter fails to boot. To configure the secondary device parameters, select Secondary Device Parameters from the Main menu (see

Configure Parameters for a Secondary Adapter ). Otherwise, go to step 10.

10. Select ESC and select Exit and Save Configuration .

11. Select F4 to save your MBA configuration.

Dynamic iSCSI Boot Configuration

In a dynamic configuration, you only need to specify that the system's IP address and target/initiator information are provided by a DHCP server (see IPv4 and IPv6 configurations in Configuring the DHCP Server to Support iSCSI Boot ). For

IPv4, with the exception of the initiator iSCSI name, any settings on the Initiator Parameters, 1st Target Parameters, or 2nd

Target Parameters screens are ignored and do not need to be cleared. For IPv6, with the exception of the CHAP ID and

Secret, any settings on the Initiator Parameters, 1st Target Parameters, or 2nd Target Parameters screens are ignored and do not need to be cleared. For information on configuration options, see Table 1 .

NOTE: When using a DHCP server, the DNS server entries are overwritten by the values provided by the DHCP server.

This occurs even if the locally provided values are valid and the DHCP server provides no DNS server information. When the

DHCP server provides no DNS server information, both the primary and secondary DNS server values are set to 0.0.0.0. When the Windows OS takes over, the Microsoft iSCSI initiator retrieves the iSCSI Initiator parameters and configures the appropriate registries statically. It will overwrite whatever is configured. Since the DHCP daemon runs in the Windows environment as a user process, all TCP/IP parameters have to be statically configured before the stack comes up in the iSCSI

Boot environment.

If DHCP Option 17 is used, the target information is provided by the DHCP server, and the initiator iSCSI name is retrieved from the value programmed from the Initiator Parameters screen. If no value was selected, then the controller defaults to the name: iqn.1995-05.com.broadcom.<11.22.33.44.55.66>.iscsiboot

where the string

11.22.33.44.55.66

corresponds to the controller's MAC address.

If DHCP option 43 (IPv4 only) is used, then any settings on the Initiator Parameters, 1st Target Parameters, or 2nd Target

Parameters screens are ignored and do not need to be cleared.

To configure the iSCSI boot parameters using dynamic configuration

1. From the General Parameters Menu screen, set the following:

TCP/IP parameters via DHCP : Enabled. (For IPv4.)

IP Autoconfiguration : Enabled. (For IPv6, non-offload.) iSCSI parameters via DHCP : Enabled

CHAP Authentication : Disabled

Boot to iSCSI target : Disabled

DHCP Vendor ID : BRCM ISAN

Link Up Delay Time : 0

Use TCP Timestamp : Enabled (for some targets such as the Dell/EMC AX100i, it is necessary to enable Use

TCP Timestamp)

Target as First HDD : Disabled

LUN Busy Retry Count : 0

IP Version : IPv6. (For IPv6, non-offload.)

HBA Boot Mode : Disabled

2. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

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NOTE: Information on the Initiator Parameters and 1st Target Parameters screens are ignored and do not need to be cleared.

3. A second iSCSI boot adapter can be configured for redundancy in the event the primary adapter fails to boot. To configure the secondary device parameters, select Secondary Device Parameters from the Main menu (see

Configure Parameters for a Secondary Adapter ). Otherwise, go to step 4.

4. Select Exit and Save Configurations .

Configure Parameters for a Secondary Adapter

A second iSCSI boot adapter can be optionally configured for redundancy in the event the primary adapter fails to boot.

To configure the iSCSI boot parameters for a secondary adapter

1. From the iSCSI Boot Main Menu screen, select Secondary Device Parameters .

2. From the Device List , select the adapter that will be used as the secondary adapter.

3. From the Secondary Device Parameters screen, set the following:

Use Independent Target Portal: Enabled (or Disabled if MPIO mode is not required)

Use Independent Target Name : Enabled

Configure Secondary Device : Invoke

4. Configure the secondary adapter parameters.

NOTE: The IP addresses for the primary and secondary adapters must be in two different subnets.

5. Select ESC and select Exit and Save Configuration .

6. Select F4 to save your MBA configuration.

Enabling CHAP Authentication

Ensure that CHAP authentication is enabled on the target.

To enable CHAP authentication

1. From the General Parameters screen, set CHAP Authentication to Enabled.

2. From the Initiator Parameters screen, type values for the following:

CHAP ID (up to 128 bytes)

CHAP Secret (if authentication is required, and must be 12 characters in length or longer)

3. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

4. From the Main menu, select 1st Target Parameters .

5. From the 1st Target Parameters screen, type values for the following using the values used when configuring the iSCSI target:

CHAP ID (optional if two-way CHAP)

CHAP Secret (optional if two-way CHAP, and must be 12 characters in length or longer)

6. Select ESC to return to the Main menu.

7. Select ESC and select Exit and Save Configuration .

Configuring the DHCP Server to Support iSCSI Boot

The DHCP server is an optional component and it is only necessary if you will be doing a dynamic iSCSI Boot configuration setup (see Dynamic iSCSI Boot Configuration ).

Configuring the DHCP server to support iSCSI boot is different for IPv4 and IPv6.

DHCP iSCSI Boot Configurations for IPv4

DHCP iSCSI Boot Configuration for IPv6

DHCP iSCSI Boot Configurations for IPv4

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The DHCP protocol includes a number of options that provide configuration information to the DHCP client. For iSCSI boot,

Broadcom adapters support the following DHCP configurations:

DHCP Option 17, Root Path

DHCP Option 43, Vendor-Specific Information

DHCP Option 17, Root Path

Option 17 is used to pass the iSCSI target information to the iSCSI client.

The format of the root path as defined in IETC RFC 4173 is:

"iscsi:"<servername>":"<protocol>":"<port>":"<LUN>":"<targetname>"

The parameters are defined below.

Table 2: DHCP Option 17 Parameter Definition

Parameter Definition

"iscsi:"

A literal string

<servername>

The IP address or FQDN of the iSCSI target

":"

Separator

<protocol>

The IP protocol used to access the iSCSI target. Currently, only TCP is supported so the protocol is 6.

<port>

The port number associated with the protocol. The standard port number for iSCSI is 3260.

<LUN>

<targetname>

The Logical Unit Number to use on the iSCSI target. The value of the LUN must be represented in hexadecimal format. A LUN with an ID OF 64 would have to be configured as 40 within the option 17 parameter on the DHCP server.

The target name in either IQN or EUI format (refer to RFC 3720 for details on both IQN and EUI formats). An example IQN name would be "iqn.1995-05.com.broadcom:iscsi-target".

DHCP Option 43, Vendor-Specific Information

DHCP option 43 (vendor-specific information) provides more configuration options to the iSCSI client than DHCP option 17. In this configuration, three additional suboptions are provided that assign the initiator IQN to the iSCSI boot client along with two iSCSI target IQNs that can be used for booting. The format for the iSCSI target IQN is the same as that of DHCP option 17, while the iSCSI initiator IQN is simply the initiator's IQN.

NOTE: DHCP Option 43 is supported on IPv4 only.

The suboptions are listed below.

Table 3: DHCP Option 43 Suboption Definition

Suboption Definition

201

203

First iSCSI target information in the standard root path format

"iscsi:"<servername>":"<protocol>":"<port>":"<LUN>":"<targetname>" iSCSI initiator IQN

Using DHCP option 43 requires more configuration than DHCP option 17, but it provides a richer environment and provides more configuration options. Broadcom recommends that customers use DHCP option 43 when performing dynamic iSCSI boot configuration.

Configuring the DHCP Server

Configure the DHCP server to support option 17 or option 43.

NOTE: If using Option 43, you also need to configure Option 60. The value of Option 60 should match the DHCP Vendor

ID value. The DHCP Vendor ID value is BRCM ISAN, as shown in General Parameters of the iSCSI Boot Configuration menu.

DHCP iSCSI Boot Configuration for IPv6

The DHCPv6 server can provide a number of options, including stateless or stateful IP configuration, as well s information to the DHCPv6 client. For iSCSI boot, Broadcom adapters support the following DHCP configurations: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/iscsi.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:03 PM]

iSCSI Protocol: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

DHCPv6 Option 16, Vendor Class Option

DHCPv6 Option 17, Vendor-Specific Information

NOTE: The DHCPv6 standard Root Path option is not yet available. Broadcom suggests using Option 16 or Option 17 for dynamic iSCSI Boot IPv6 support.

DHCPv6 Option 16, Vendor Class Option

DHCPv6 Option 16 (vendor class option) must be present and must contain a string that matches your configured DHCP

Vendor ID parameter. The DHCP Vendor ID value is BRCM ISAN, as shown in General Parameters of the iSCSI Boot

Configuration menu.

The content of Option 16 should be <2-byte length> <DHCP Vendor ID>.

DHCPv6 Option 17, Vendor-Specific Information

DHCPv6 Option 17 (vendor-specific information) provides more configuration options to the iSCSI client. In this configuration, three additional suboptions are provided that assign the initiator IQN to the iSCSI boot client along with two iSCSI target

IQNs that can be used for booting.

The suboptions are listed below.

Table 4: DHCP Option 17 Suboption Definition

Suboption Definition

201

First iSCSI target information in the standard root path format

"iscsi:"[<servername>]":"<protocol>":"<port>":"<LUN>":"<targetname>"

203 iSCSI initiator IQN

NOTE: In Table 4 , the brackets [ ] are required for the IPv6 addresses.

The content of option 17 should be <2-byte Option Number 201|202|203> <2-byte length> <data>.

Configuring the DHCP Server

Configure the DHCP server to support Option 16 and Option 17.

NOTE:

The format of DHCPv6 Option 16 and Option 17 are fully defined in RFC 3315.

Preparing the iSCSI Boot Image

Windows Server 2008 R2 and SP2 iSCSI Boot Setup

Linux iSCSI Boot Setup

Windows Server 2008 R2 and SP2 iSCSI Boot Setup

The Windows Server 2008 R2 and the Windows Server 2008 SP2 support booting as well as installing in either the offload or non-offload paths.

The following procedure is to prepare to install and boot the Windows Server 2008 R2 and SP2 iSCSI Boot image in either the offload or non-offload path. The procedure below references the Windows Server 2008 R2 but procedure is common to both the Windows Server 2008 R2 and SP2.

CD/iso needed:

Windows 2K8 R2 x64 slipstreamed with KB974072

USB drive:

Place drivers on USB stick: evbd.sys, vbd.sys, ois.sys

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iSCSI Protocol: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Bindview.exe (see KB976042)

Procedure:

1. Remove any local hard drives on the SUT.

2. Load the latest Broadcom MBA and iSCSI boot images onto NVRAM of the AUT.

3. Configure SUT's BIOS to have the Broadcom MBA as the first bootable device, and the CDROM as the second device.

4. Configure the iSCSI Target, with sufficient disk space to hold new O/S installation, to allow connection from the SUT.

5. Boot up system. At PXE banner, press Ctrl+S to enter PXE menu.

6. At PXE menu, set Boot Protocol to iSCSI.

7. Enter iSCSI target parameters.

8. Set HBA Boot Mode to Enabled or Disabled.

9. In General Parameters, set Boot to Target parameter to One-Time Disabled.

10. Save settings, and reboot system.

11. SUT should connect to target, and then boot to DVDROM device.

12. Boot to DVD and begin installation.

13. Answer all the installation questions with appropriate answers. (such as Operating System you want to install, accept the license terms, etc.).

14. When the Where you want to install Windows?

dialog window appears, select Load Drivers. Plug in USB device, which contains drivers, into SUT.

a. If HBA Boot Mode is Enabled: load evbd/vbd and ois drivers.

b. IF HBA Boot Mode is Disabled: load evbd/vbd and ndis drivers.

15. Target Drive should be seen. This is a drive connected via the iSCSI boot protocol, located in the remote iSCSI target)

Select Next to proceed W2K8R2 installation.

16. A few minutes after the W2K8R2 DVD installation process starts, there will be a system restart follows.

17. After a reboot, W2K8R2 installation routine should start and continue on. (Completing installation).

18. Then there will be another system restart follows, check and verify the SUT is able to boot to the desktop.

19. After W2K8R2 is booted up, load all drivers and run Bindview.exe.

a. Select: All Services.

b. Under WFP Lightweight Filter you should see Binding paths for the AUT. Right click and disable them. When done close out.

20. Verify the OS and system is functional, and able to pass traffic by pinging a remote system's IP, etc.

21. Test and verify iSCSI boot remains functional over both NDIS and OIS path in both IPv4 and all IPv6 protocols.

Linux iSCSI Boot Setup

Linux iSCSI boot is supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.5 and later and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 PS1 and later in both the offload and non-offload paths. SLES 10.x and SLES 11 support only the non-offload path.

There are two methods to set up Linux iSCSI boot:

Local hard drive installation

Remote DVD installation

Local hard drive installation

1. Install Linux OS on your local hard drive and make sure open-iscsi initiator is up to date.

2. Make sure all Runlevels of network service are on.

3. Make sure 2, 3, and 5 Runlevels of iscsi service are on.

4. Update uIP. You can get uIP package from Broadcom CD. This step is not needed for SuSE 10.

5. Install linux-nx2 package on you linux system. You can get this package from Broadcom CD.

6. Install bibt package on you Linux system. You can get this package from Broadcom CD.

7. Delete all ifcfg-eth* files.

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8. Configure one port of network adapter to connect to iSCSI Target (see how to setup iSCSI target in corresponding section).

9. Connect to iSCSI Target.

10. Use DD command to copy local hard drive to iSCSI Target.

11. When DD is done, execute sync command a couple of times, logout then login to iSCSI Target again.

12. Run fsck command on all partitions created on iSCSI Target.

13. Change to /OPT/bcm/bibt folder and run the iscsi_setup.sh script to create the initrd images. Option 0 will create nonoffload image and option 1 will create offload image. Iscsi_script.sh script will create the non-offload image only on

SuSE 10 as offload is not supported on SuSE 10.

14. Mount the /boot partition on the iSCSI Target.

15. Copy the initrd images you created in step 13 from your local hard drive to the partition mounted in step 14.

16. On the partition mounted in step 14, edit grub menu to point to the new initrd images.

17. Unmount the /boot partition on the iSCSI Target.

18. (Red hat Only) To enable CHAP, you need to modify the CHAP section of the iscsid.conf file on the iSCSI Target. Edit iscsid.conf file with one or two way CHAP information as desired.

19. Shut down system and disconnect local hard drive. Now you are ready to iSCSI boot into iSCSI Target.

20. Configure iSCSI Boot Parameters including CHAP parameters if desired (see corresponding sections).

21. Continue booting into iSCSI Boot image and choose one of the images you created (non-offload or offload). Your choice should correspond with your choice in the iSCSI Boot parameters section. If HBA Boot Mode was enabled in the iSCSI

Boot Parameters section, you have to boot the offload image. SuSE 10.x and SLES 11 do not support offload.

Remote DVD installation

Installation using the remote DVD method can only be performed through the non-offload path. After completing the installation, the system can be setup to boot from either the non-offload or offload paths as described in the procedure below.

Starting with Red Hat 6.2 and SLES 11.2, installing through the offload path will be supported.

1. Get the latest Broadcom Linux driver CD.

2. Configure iSCSI Boot Parameters for DVD direct install to target by disabling Boot from target option on network adapter.

3. To set to the non-offload path, set HBA Boot Mode to Disabled in the NVRAM Configuration.

4. Change boot order as follows: a. Boot from the network adapter.

b. Boot from the CD/DVD driver.

5. Reboot the system.

6. System will connect to iSCSI target, then will boot from CD/DVD drive.

7. Follow the corresponding OS instructions.

a. Red Hat 5.5 - Type "linux dd" at "boot:" prompt and press enter b. Red Hat 6.0

c. SuSE 10 d. SuSE 11.1 choose "installation" and type withiscsi=1 netsetup=1 at boot option and choose YES for F6 driver option.

8. Follow the instructions to load the driver CD.

9. At the "networking device" prompt, choose the desired network adapter port and press OK .

10. At "configure TCP/IP prompt configure the way the system acquire IP address and press OK .

11. If static IP was chosen, you need to enter IP information for iscsi initiator.

12. (Red hat) choose to "skip" media testing.

13. Continue installation as desired. A drive will be available at this point. After file copying is done, remove CD/DVD and reboot system.

14. When system reboot, enable "boot from target" in iSCSI Boot Parameters and continue with installation until it is done.

15. Update iscsi initiator if needed. You need to remove existing one first.

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16. Make sure all runlevels of network service are on.

17. Make sure 2,3 and 5 runlevels of iscsi service are on.

18. For Red Hat 6.0, make sure Network Manager service is stopped and disabled.

19. Install uIP (not required for SuSE 10).

20. Install linux-nx2 package.

21. Install bibt package.

22. Remove ifcfg-eth*.

23. Reboot.

24. For SUSE 11.1, follow remote DVD installation workaround.

25. After system reboot, login and change to /opt/bcm/bibt folder and run iscsi_setup.sh script to create offload and nonoffload initrd images.

26. Copy the initrd images, offload and non-offload, to the /boot folder.

27. Change the grub menu to point to the new initrd images.

28. To enable CHAP you need to modify iscsid.conf (Red Hat only).

29. Reboot and change CHAP parameters if desired.

30. Continue booting into the iSCSI Boot image and select one of the images you created (non-offload or offload). Your choice should correspond with your choice in the iSCSI Boot parameters section. If HBA Boot Mode was enabled in the iSCSI Boot Parameters section, you have to boot the offload image. SLES 10.x and SLES 11 do not support offload.

SUSE 11.1 Remote DVD installation workaround

1. Create a new file called boot.open-iscsi with the content shown below.

2. Copy the file you just created to /etc/init.d/ folder and overwrite the existing one.

Content of the new boot.open-iscsi file:

#!/bin/bash

#

# /etc/init.d/iscsi

#

### BEGIN INIT INFO

# Provides: iscsiboot

# Required-Start:

# Should-Start: boot.multipath

# Required-Stop:

# Should-Stop: $null

# Default-Start: B

# Default-Stop:

# Short -Description: iSCSI initiator daemon root-fs support

# Description: Starts the iSCSI initiator daemon if the

# root-filesystem is on an iSCSI device

#

### END INIT INFO

ISCSIADM=/sbin/iscsiadm

ISCSIUIO=/sbin/iscsiuio

CONFIG_FILE=/etc/iscsid.conf

DAEMON=/sbin/iscsid

ARGS="-c $CONFIG_FILE"

# Source LSB init functions

. /etc/rc.status

#

# This service is run right after booting. So all targets activated

# during mkinitrd run should not be removed when the open-iscsi

# service is stopped.

# iscsi_load_iscsiuio()

{

TRANSPORT=`$ISCSIADM -m session 2> /dev/null | grep "bnx2i"`

if [ "$TRANSPORT" ] ; then

echo -n "Launch iscsiuio "

startproc $ISCSIUIO

fi

} iscsi_mark_root_nodes()

{

$ISCSIADM -m session 2> /dev/null | while read t num i target ; do

ip=${i%%:*}

STARTUP=`$ISCSIADM -m node -p $ip -T $target 2> /dev/null | grep "node.conn\[0\].startup" | cut d' ' -f3`

if [ "$STARTUP" -a "$STARTUP" != "onboot" ] ; then

$ISCSIADM -m node -p $ip -T $target -o update -n node.conn[0].startup -v onboot

fi

done

}

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# We only need to start this for root on iSCSI if ! grep -q iscsi_tcp /proc/modules ; then

if ! grep -q bnx2i /proc/modules ; then

rc_failed 6

rc_exit

fi fi case "$1" in

start)

echo -n "Starting iSCSI initiator for the root device: "

iscsi_load_iscsiuio

startproc $DAEMON $ARGS

rc_status -v

iscsi_mark_root_nodes

;;

stop|restart|reload)

rc_failed 0

;;

status)

echo -n "Checking for iSCSI initiator service: "

if checkproc $DAEMON ; then

rc_status -v

else

rc_failed 3

rc_status -v

fi

;;

*)

echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|status|restart|reload}"

exit 1

;; esac rc_exit

Booting

After that the system has been prepared for an iSCSI boot and the operating system is present on the iSCSI target, the last step is to perform the actual boot. The system will boot to Windows or Linux over the network and operate as if it were a local disk drive.

1. Reboot the server.

2. Select CTRL+S .

3. From the Main menu, select General Parameters and configure the Boot to iSCSI target option to Enabled .

4. To boot through an offload path, set the HBA Boot Mode to Enabled . To boot through a non-offload path, set the HBA

Boot Mode to Disabled .

If CHAP authentication is needed, enable CHAP authentication after determining that booting is successful (see Enabling CHAP

Authentication ).

Other iSCSI Boot Considerations

There are several other factors that should be considered when configuring a system for iSCSI boot.

Locally Administered Address

A user-defined MAC address assigned through the Locally Administered Address property of the Advanced section of the BACS

Configurations tab is not supported on iSCSI boot-enabled devices.

Virtual LANs

Virtual LAN (VLAN) tagging is not supported for iSCSI boot with the Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator.

Troubleshooting iSCSI Boot

The following troubleshooting tips are useful for iSCSI boot.

Problem : When switching iSCSI boot from the Microsoft standard path to Broadcom iSCSI offload, the booting fails to complete.

Solution : Install or upgrade the Broadcom Virtual Bus Device (VBD) driver to 5.0.x, along with the OIS driver, prior to switching the iSCSI boot path.

Problem : The iSCSI configuration utility will not run.

Solution : Ensure that the iSCSI Boot firmware is installed in the NVRAM.

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Problem : A system blue screen occurs when installing the Broadcom drivers through Windows Plug-and-Play (PnP).

Solution : Install the drivers through the Setup installer.

Problem : For static IP configuration when switching from Layer 2 iSCSI boot to Broadcom iSCSI HBA, then you will receive an IP address conflict.

Solution : Change the IP address of the network property in the OS.

Problem : After configuring the iSCSI boot LUN to 255, a system blue screen appears when performing iSCSI boot.

Solution : Although Broadcom's iSCSI solution supports a LUN range from 0 to 255, the Microsoft iSCSI software initiator does not support a LUN of 255. Configure a LUN value from 0 to 254.

Problem : The Xen hypervisor will not start when booting from an iSCSI image created with the RHEL 5.4 Xen kernel.

Solution : This is a known third-party issue. To work around this issue, disable the Xen hypervisor's EDD feature by editing the grub.conf file in the boot/grub folder to add the edd=off

switch to the end of the kernel line. For example, kernel /xen.gz edd=off

.

Problem : Unable to connect to an EqualLogic target using Windows Server 2008 and higher.

Solution : Add an exception to your firewall to allow ICMP echo requests.

Problem : The iSCSI target is not present as a disk when installing Windows Server 2008 R2 with a NetXtreme II 1G or 10G adapter.

Solution : See the resolution below.

First, install the Windows Automated Installation Kit (AIK) from Microsoft on the test machine where you are going to modify the OS media. Then delete the old network drivers in the boot.wim of the OS media by following the procedure below.

1. Create a temporary folder, such as D:\temp.

2. Create the following two subfolders in the temporary folder:

Win2008R2Copy

Win2008R2Mod

3. Copy all the contents from the DVD installation media into the Win2008R2Copy folder.

4. Open the Windows AIK command prompt in elevated mode from All program , and then run the following command: attrib –r D:\Temp\Win2008R2Copy\sources\boot.wim

5. Run the following command to mount the boot.wim image: dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:D:\Temp\Win2008R2Copy\sources\boot.wim /index:1

/MountDir:D:\Temp\Win2008R2Mod

6. The Boot.wim image was mounted in the Win2008R2Mod folder. Find all the instances of the files listed below in the subfolders of the Win2008R2Mod folder, and then delete them.

List of files to be deleted.

netevbda.inf

netevbda.pnf

evbda.sys

netbxnda.inf

netbxnda.pnf

bxnd60a.sys

bxvbda.sys

netbvbda.inf

netbvbda.pnf

To easily find all the instances of the files to be deleted, run the following command: dir /s D:\Temp\Win2008R2Mod\filename

7. Run the following command to unmount the Boot.wim image: dism /unmount-wim /Mountdir:D:\Temp\Win2008R2Mod /commit

8. Repeat steps 5 to 7 by keeping the index = 2 for the command in step 5.

9. Run the following command to create an .iso file: oscdimg -e -h -m -n -lWS08R2_x64 -bootdata:2#p0,e,b"c:\Program Files\Windows

AIK\Tools\PETools\amd64\boot\etfsboot.com"#pEF,e,b"c:\Program Files\Windows

AIK\Tools\PETools\amd64\boot\efisys.bin" D:\Temp\Win2008R2Copy D:\Temp\Win2008R2Mod.iso

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Note: The above command is a single continuous command.

1. Burn the Win2008R2Mod.iso file to a DVD.

2. Perform the installation by using the new DVD and provide the network controller drivers during installation. You will receive the iSCSI LUN to complete the installation.

iSCSI Crash Dump

If you will use the Broadcom iSCSI Crash Dump utility, it is important to follow the installation procedure to install the iSCSI

Crash Dump driver. See Using the Installer for more information.

iSCSI Offload

iSCSI offload is a technology that offloads iSCSI protocol processing overhead from host processors to the iSCSI host bus adapter to increase network performance and throughput while helping to optimize server processor utilization.

This section covers Broadcom's iSCSI offload feature for the NetXtreme II family of network adapters. For Linux iSCSI offload, see Linux iSCSI Offload .

iSCSI Offload Limitations

The bnx2i driver for iSCSI does not operate on a stand-alone PCI device. It shares the same PCI device with the networking driver (bnx2 and bnx2x). The networking driver alone supports layer 2 networking traffic. Offloaded iSCSI operations require both the networking driver and the bnx2i driver.

iSCSI operations will be interrupted when the networking driver brings down or resets the device. This scenario requires proper handling by the networking and bnx2i drivers, as well as the userspace iscsid daemon that keeps track of all iSCSI sessions. Offloaded iSCSI connections take up system and on-chip resources that must be freed up before the device can be reset. iscsid running in userspace is generally less predictable, as it can run slowly and take a long time to disconnect and reconnect iSCSI sessions during network reset, especially when the number of connections is large. Broadcom cannot guarantee that iSCSI sessions will always recover in every conceivable scenario when the networking device is repeatedly being reset. Broadcom recommends that administrator-administered network device resets, such as MTU change, ring size change, device shutdown, hot-unplug, and so forth, be kept at a minimum while there are active offloaded iSCSI sessions running on that shared device. On the other hand, link-related changes do not require device reset and are safe to be performed at any time.

To help alleviate some of the above issues, install the latest open-iscsi utilities by upgrading your Red Hat Network subscription.

Configuring iSCSI Offload

With the proper iSCSI offload licensing, you can configure your iSCSI-capable NetXtreme II network adapter to offload iSCSI processing from the host processor. The following process enables your system to take advantage of Broadcom's iSCSI offload feature.

Installing Broadcom Drivers and Management Applications

Installing the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator

Configuring Broadcom iSCSI Using BACS

Configure Microsoft Initiator to Use Broadcom's iSCSI Offload

Installing Broadcom Drivers and Management Applications

Install the Windows drivers and management applications. See Installing Windows Drivers and Management Applications.

Installing the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator

For Windows Server 2008 and later, the iSCSI initiator is included inbox. To download the iSCSI initiator from Microsoft, go to http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=18986 and locate the direct link for your system.

Configuring Broadcom iSCSI Using BACS

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The Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) is used to manage all of Broadcom's network adapters and advanced features.

For more information, see Using Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 4 .

1. Open BACS.

2. Select the Broadcom NetXtreme II C-NIC iSCSI adapter. If the C-NIC iSCSI adapter is not present, then select the VBD device and enable iSCSI offload by selecting iSCSI Offload Engine from the Resource Reservations area of the

Configuration tab. See Viewing and Configuring Resource Reservations .

3. Select the Configuration tab.

4. DHCP is the default for IP address assignment, but this can be changed to static IP address assignment, if this is the preferred method of IP address assignment.

NOTE: The IP address assignment method cannot be changed if the adapter was used for boot.

5. Select Apply and close BACS.

Configure Microsoft Initiator to Use Broadcom's iSCSI Offload

Now that the IP address has been configured for the iSCSI adapter, you need to use Microsoft Initiator to configure and add a connection to the iSCSI target using Broadcom iSCSI adapter. See Microsoft's user guide for more details on Microsoft

Initiator.

1. Open Microsoft Initiator.

2. Configure the initiator IQN name according to your setup. To change, click on Change.

3. Enter the initiator IQN name.

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4. Select the Discovery tab and click Add to add a target portal.

5. Enter the IP address of the target and click Advanced .

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6. From the General tab, select Broadcom NetXtreme II C-NIC iSCSI Adapter from Local adapter .

7. Select the IP address for the adapter from Source IP .

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8. Click OK to close Advanced setting and then OK to add the target portal.

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9. From the Targets tab, select the target and click Log On to log into your iSCSI target using the Broadcom iSCSI adapter.

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10. Click on Advanced .

11. On the General tab, select the Broadcom NetXtreme Ii C-NIC iSCSI adapter from Local adapter .

12. Click OK to close Advanced settings.

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13. Click OK to close the Microsoft Initiator.

14. To format your iSCSI partition, use Disk Manager.

NOTES:

No teaming support for iSCSI-enabled adapters is available at this point. MPIO handles all failover and link aggregation for iSCSI traffic.

Network teaming and MPIO are supported concurrently on different ports. Ports running iSCSI use MPIO and ports running LAN traffic use network teaming.

If a Broadcom network adapter has iSCSI offload enabled, the teaming software, BASP, will not allow the iSCSI offload enabled network port interface to be a part of a GEC or LACP (802.3ad) team, but SLB teams are allowed.

iSCSI Offload FAQs

Q : How do I assign an IP address for iSCSI offload?

A : Use the Configurations tab in Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS).

Q : What tools should be used to create the connection to the target?

A : Use Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator (version 2.08 or later).

Q : How do I know that the connection is offloaded?

A : Use Microsoft iSCSI Software Initiator. From a command line, type iscsicli sessionlist

. From Initiator Name , an iSCSI offloaded connection will display an entry beginning with "B06BDRV...". A non-offloaded connection will display an entry beginning with "Root...".

Q : What configurations should be avoided?

A : The IP address should not be the same as the LAN.

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Q : Why does the install fail when attempting to complete an iSCSI offload install using Windows Server 2008 R2 for BCM5709

(1 GbE) adapters?

A : There is a conflict with the internal inbox driver.

Event Log Messages

Table 5 lists the offload iSCSI driver event log messages.

Offload iSCSI (OIS) Driver

Table 5: Offload iSCSI (OIS) Driver Event Log Messages

Message

Number Severity

Message

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Initiator failed to connect to the target. Target IP address and TCP Port number are given in dump data.

The initiator could not allocate resources for an iSCSI session.

Maximum command sequence number is not serially greater than expected command sequence number in login response. Dump data contains Expected Command Sequence number followed by

Maximum Command Sequence number.

MaxBurstLength is not serially greater than FirstBurstLength. Dump data contains FirstBurstLength followed by MaxBurstLength.

Failed to setup initiator portal. Error status is given in the dump data.

The initiator could not allocate resources for an iSCSI connection

The initiator could not send an iSCSI PDU. Error status is given in the dump data.

Target or discovery service did not respond in time for an iSCSI request sent by the initiator. iSCSI

Function code is given in the dump data. For details about iSCSI Function code please refer to iSCSI

User's Guide.

Target did not respond in time for a SCSI request. The CDB is given in the dump data.

Login request failed. The login response packet is given in the dump data.

Target returned an invalid login response packet. The login response packet is given in the dump data.

Target provided invalid data for login redirect. Dump data contains the data returned by the target.

Target offered an unknown AuthMethod. Dump data contains the data returned by the target.

Target offered an unknown digest algorithm for CHAP. Dump data contains the data returned by the target.

CHAP challenge given by the target contains invalid characters. Dump data contains the challenge given.

An invalid key was received during CHAP negotiation. The key=value pair is given in the dump data.

CHAP Response given by the target did not match the expected one. Dump data contains the CHAP response.

Header Digest is required by the initiator, but target did not offer it.

Data Digest is required by the initiator, but target did not offer it.

Connection to the target was lost. The initiator will attempt to retry the connection.

Data Segment Length given in the header exceeds MaxRecvDataSegmentLength declared by the target.

Header digest error was detected for the given PDU. Dump data contains the header and digest.

Target sent an invalid iSCSI PDU. Dump data contains the entire iSCSI header.

Target sent an iSCSI PDU with an invalid opcode. Dump data contains the entire iSCSI header.

Data digest error was detected. Dump data contains the calculated checksum followed by the given checksum.

Target trying to send more data than requested by the initiator.

Initiator could not find a match for the initiator task tag in the received PDU. Dump data contains the entire iSCSI header.

Initiator received an invalid R2T packet. Dump data contains the entire iSCSI header.

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65

66

67

61

62

63

64

68

69

53

57

58

59

54

55

56

60

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39 iSCSI Protocol: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Error

Error

Target rejected an iSCSI PDU sent by the initiator. Dump data contains the rejected PDU.

Initiator could not allocate a work item for processing a request.

Error Initiator could not allocate resource for processing a request.

Information Initiator received an asynchronous logout message. The Target name is given in the dump data.

Error Challenge size given by the target exceeds the maximum specified in iSCSI specification.

52

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Error

Target CHAP secret is smaller than the minimum size (12 bytes) required by the specification.

Initiator CHAP secret is smaller than the minimum size (12 bytes) required by the specification.

Dump data contains the given CHAP secret.

FIPS service could not be initialized. Persistent logons will not be processed.

Initiator requires CHAP for logon authentication, but target did not offer CHAP.

Initiator sent a task management command to reset the target. The target name is given in the dump data.

Target requires logon authentication via CHAP, but Initiator is not configured to perform CHAP.

Target did not send AuthMethod key during security negotiation phase.

Target sent an invalid status sequence number for a connection. Dump data contains Expected Status

Sequence number followed by the given status sequence number.

Target failed to respond in time for a login request.

Target failed to respond in time for a logout request.

Target failed to respond in time for a login request. This login request was for adding a new connection to a session.

Target failed to respond in time for a SendTargets command.

Target failed to respond in time for a SCSI command sent through a WMI request.

Target failed to respond in time to a NOP request.

Target failed to respond in time to a Task Management request.

Target failed to respond in time to a Text Command sent to renegotiate iSCSI parameters.

Target failed to respond in time to a logout request sent in response to an asynchronous message from the target.

Initiator Service failed to respond in time to a request to configure IPSec resources for an iSCSI connection.

Initiator Service failed to respond in time to a request to release IPSec resources allocated for an iSCSI connection.

Initiator Service failed to respond in time to a request to encrypt or decrypt data.

Initiator failed to allocate resources to send data to target.

Initiator could not map an user virtual address to kernel virtual address resulting in I/O failure.

Initiator could not allocate required resources for processing a request resulting in I/O failure.

Initiator could not allocate a tag for processing a request resulting in I/O failure.

Target dropped the connection before the initiator could transition to Full Feature Phase.

Target sent data in SCSI Response PDU instead of Data_IN PDU. Only Sense Data can be sent in

SCSI Response.

Error

Error

Target set DataPduInOrder to NO when initiator requested YES. Login will be failed.

Target set DataSequenceInOrder to NO when initiator requested YES. Login will be failed.

Error Cannot reset the target or LUN. Will attempt session recovery.

Information Attempt to bootstrap Windows using iSCSI NIC Boot (iBF).

Error

Error

Booting from iSCSI, but could not set any NIC in Paging Path.

Attempt to disable the Nagle Algorithm for iSCSI connection failed.

Information If Digest support selected for iSCSI Session, will use Processor support for Digest computation.

Error

Error

After receiving an async logout from the target, attempt to relogin the session failed. Error status is given in the dump data.

Attempt to recover an unexpected terminated session failed. Error status is given in the dump data.

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70 Error

Error occurred when processing iSCSI logon request. The request was not retried. Error status is given in the dump data.

71

72 Error Unexpected target portal IP types. Dump data contains the expected IP type.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Executive Summary

Teaming Mechanisms

Teaming and Other Advanced Networking Properties

General Network Considerations

Application Considerations

Troubleshooting Teaming Problems

Frequently Asked Questions

Appendix A: Event Log Messages

Executive Summary

Glossary

Teaming Concepts

Software Components

Hardware Requirements

Teaming Support by Processor

Configuring Teaming

Supported Features by Team Type

Selecting a Team Type

This section describes the technology and implementation considerations when working with the network teaming services offered by the Broadcom software shipped with Dell's servers and storage products. The goal of Broadcom teaming services is to provide fault tolerance and link aggregation across a team of two or more adapters. The information in this document is provided to assist IT professionals during the deployment and troubleshooting of system applications that require network fault tolerance and load balancing.

Glossary

Table 1: Glossary

Item

ARP

BACS

BASP

DNS

G-ARP

Generic Trunking

(FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-

Draft Static

HSRP

ICMP

IGMP

Definition

Address Resolution Protocol

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

Broadcom Advanced Server Program (intermediate driver) domain name service

Gratuitous Address Resolution Protocol

Switch-dependent load balancing and failover type of team in which the intermediate driver manages outgoing traffic and the switch manages incoming traffic.

Hot Standby Router Protocol

Internet Control Message Protocol

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L4

LACP

Link Aggregation

(802.3ad)

LOM

MAC

NDIS

NLB

PXE

RAID

Smart Load

Balancing™ and

Failover

Smart Load

Balancing (SLB)

TCP

TOE

UDP

WINS

WLBS

IP

IPv6 iSCSI

L2

Internet Protocol

Version 6 of the IP Protocol

Internet Small Computer Systems Interface

Layer 2. Used to describe network traffic that is not offloaded, and where hardware only performs

Layer 2 operations on the traffic. Layer 3 (IP) and Layer 4 (TCP) protocols are processed in software.

Layer 4. Used to describe network traffic that is heavily offloaded to the hardware, where much of the

Layer 3 (IP) and Layer 4 (TCP) processing is done in the hardware to improve performance.

Link Aggregation Control Protocol

Switch-dependent load balancing and failover type of team with LACP in which the intermediate driver manages outgoing traffic and the switch manages incoming traffic.

LAN on Motherboard media access control

Network Driver Interface Specification

Network Load Balancing (Microsoft)

Preboot Execution Environment redundant array of inexpensive disks

Switch-independent failover type of team in which the primary team member handles all incoming and outgoing traffic while the standby team member is idle until a failover event (for example, loss of link occurs). The intermediate driver (BASP) manages incoming/outgoing traffic.

Switch-independent load balancing and failover type of team, in which the intermediate driver manages outgoing/incoming traffic.

Transmission Control Protocol

TCP Offload Engine. This is the hardware that is capable of handling stateful fastpath offloading of TCP and IP processing.

User Datagram Protocol

Windows name service

Windows Load Balancing Service

Teaming Concepts

Network Addressing

Teaming and Network Addresses

Description of Teaming Types

TOE Teaming

The concept of grouping multiple physical devices to provide fault tolerance and load balancing is not new. It has been around for years. Storage devices use RAID technology to group individual hard drives. Switch ports can be grouped together using technologies such as Cisco Gigabit EtherChannel, IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation, Bay Network Multilink Trunking, and

Extreme Network Load Sharing. Network interfaces on Dell servers can be grouped together into a team of physical ports called a virtual adapter.

Network Addressing

To understand how teaming works, it is important to understand how node communications work in an Ethernet network. This document is based on the assumption that the reader is familiar with the basics of IP and Ethernet network communications.

The following information provides a high-level overview of the concepts of network addressing used in an Ethernet network.

Every Ethernet network interface in a host platform, such as a computer system, requires a globally unique Layer 2 address and at least one globally unique Layer 3 address. Layer 2 is the Data Link Layer, and Layer 3 is the Network layer as defined in the OSI model. The Layer 2 address is assigned to the hardware and is often referred to as the MAC address or physical address. This address is pre-programmed at the factory and stored in NVRAM on a network interface card or on the system motherboard for an embedded LAN interface. The Layer 3 addresses are referred to as the protocol or logical address assigned to the software stack. IP and IPX are examples of Layer 3 protocols. In addition, Layer 4 (Transport Layer) uses port numbers for each network upper level protocol such as Telnet or FTP. These port numbers are used to differentiate traffic flows across applications. Layer 4 protocols such as TCP or UDP are most commonly used in today's networks. The combination of the IP address and the TCP port number is called a socket.

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Ethernet devices communicate with other Ethernet devices using the MAC address, not the IP address. However, most applications work with a host name that is translated to an IP address by a Naming Service such as WINS and DNS.

Therefore, a method of identifying the MAC address assigned to the IP address is required. The Address Resolution Protocol for an IP network provides this mechanism. For IPX, the MAC address is part of the network address and ARP is not required.

ARP is implemented using an ARP Request and ARP Reply frame. ARP Requests are typically sent to a broadcast address while the ARP Reply is typically sent as unicast traffic. A unicast address corresponds to a single MAC address or a single IP address. A broadcast address is sent to all devices on a network.

Teaming and Network Addresses

A team of adapters function as a single virtual network interface and does not appear any different to other network devices than a non-teamed adapter. A virtual network adapter advertises a single Layer 2 and one or more Layer 3 addresses. When the teaming driver initializes, it selects one MAC address from one of the physical adapters that make up the team to be the

Team MAC address. This address is typically taken from the first adapter that gets initialized by the driver. When the system hosting the team receives an ARP request, it selects one MAC address from among the physical adapters in the team to use as the source MAC address in the ARP Reply. In Windows operating systems, the IPCONFIG /all command shows the IP and

MAC address of the virtual adapter and not the individual physical adapters. The protocol IP address is assigned to the virtual network interface and not to the individual physical adapters.

For switch-independent teaming modes, all physical adapters that make up a virtual adapter must use the unique MAC address assigned to them when transmitting data. That is, the frames that are sent by each of the physical adapters in the team must use a unique MAC address to be IEEE compliant. It is important to note that ARP cache entries are not learned from received frames, but only from ARP requests and ARP replies.

Description of Teaming Types

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

Generic Trunking

Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad LACP)

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

There are three methods for classifying the supported teaming types:

One is based on whether the switch port configuration must also match the adapter teaming type.

The second is based on the functionality of the team, whether it supports load balancing and failover or just failover.

The third is based on whether the Link Aggregation Control Protocol is used or not.

Table 2 shows a summary of the teaming types and their classification.

Table 2: Available Teaming Types

Teaming Type

Smart Load Balancing and Failover (with two to eight load balance team members)

Switch-Dependent

(Switch must support specific type of team)

Link Aggregation Control

Protocol Support Required on the Switch

Load

Balancing Failover

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

Link Aggregation (802.3ad)

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-

Draft Static

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

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(when using secondary IP addresses). The team MAC address is selected from the list of load balance members. When the system receives an ARP request, the software-networking stack will always send an ARP Reply with the team MAC address. To begin the load balancing process, the teaming driver will modify this ARP Reply by changing the source MAC address to match one of the physical adapters.

Smart Load Balancing enables both transmit and receive load balancing based on the Layer 3/Layer 4 IP address and

TCP/UDP port number. In other words, the load balancing is not done at a byte or frame level but on a TCP/UDP session basis.

This methodology is required to maintain in-order delivery of frames that belong to the same socket conversation. Load balancing is supported on 2 to 8 ports. These ports can include any combination of add-in adapters and LAN on Motherboard

(LOM) devices. Transmit load balancing is achieved by creating a hashing table using the source and destination IP addresses and TCP/UDP port numbers.The same combination of source and destination IP addresses and TCP/UDP port numbers will generally yield the same hash index and therefore point to the same port in the team. When a port is selected to carry all the frames of a given socket, the unique MAC address of the physical adapter is included in the frame, and not the team MAC address. This is required to comply with the IEEE 802.3 standard. If two adapters transmit using the same MAC address, then a duplicate MAC address situation would occur that the switch could not handle.

NOTE: IPv6 addressed traffic will not be load balanced by SLB because ARP is not a feature of IPv6.

Receive load balancing is achieved through an intermediate driver by sending gratuitous ARPs on a client-by-client basis using the unicast address of each client as the destination address of the ARP request (also known as a directed ARP). This is considered client load balancing and not traffic load balancing. When the intermediate driver detects a significant load imbalance between the physical adapters in an SLB team, it will generate G-ARPs in an effort to redistribute incoming frames.

The intermediate driver (BASP) does not answer ARP requests; only the software protocol stack provides the required ARP

Reply. It is important to understand that receive load balancing is a function of the number of clients that are connecting to the system through the team interface.

SLB receive load balancing attempts to load balance incoming traffic for client machines across physical ports in the team. It uses a modified gratuitous ARP to advertise a different MAC address for the team IP Address in the sender physical and protocol address. This G-ARP is unicast with the MAC and IP Address of a client machine in the target physical and protocol address respectively. This causes the target client to update its ARP cache with a new MAC address map to the team IP address. G-ARPs are not broadcast because this would cause all clients to send their traffic to the same port. As a result, the benefits achieved through client load balancing would be eliminated, and could cause out-of-order frame delivery. This receive load balancing scheme works as long as all clients and the teamed system are on the same subnet or broadcast domain.

When the clients and the system are on different subnets, and incoming traffic has to traverse a router, the received traffic destined for the system is not load balanced. The physical adapter that the intermediate driver has selected to carry the IP flow carries all of the traffic. When the router sends a frame to the team IP address, it broadcasts an ARP request (if not in the ARP cache). The server software stack generates an ARP reply with the team MAC address, but the intermediate driver modifies the ARP reply and sends it over a particular physical adapter, establishing the flow for that session.

The reason is that ARP is not a routable protocol. It does not have an IP header and therefore, is not sent to the router or default gateway. ARP is only a local subnet protocol. In addition, since the G-ARP is not a broadcast packet, the router will not process it and will not update its own ARP cache.

The only way that the router would process an ARP that is intended for another network device is if it has Proxy ARP enabled and the host has no default gateway. This is very rare and not recommended for most applications.

Transmit traffic through a router will be load balanced as transmit load balancing is based on the source and destination IP address and TCP/UDP port number. Since routers do not alter the source and destination IP address, the load balancing algorithm works as intended.

Configuring routers for Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) does not allow for receive load balancing to occur in the adapter team. In general, HSRP allows for two routers to act as one router, advertising a virtual IP and virtual MAC address. One physical router is the active interface while the other is standby. Although HSRP can also load share nodes (using different default gateways on the host nodes) across multiple routers in HSRP groups, it always points to the primary MAC address of the team.

Generic Trunking

Generic Trunking is a switch-assisted teaming mode and requires configuring ports at both ends of the link: server interfaces and switch ports. This is often referred to as Cisco Fast EtherChannel or Gigabit EtherChannel. In addition, generic trunking supports similar implementations by other switch OEMs such as Extreme Networks Load Sharing and Bay Networks or IEEE

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In this teaming mode, the intermediate driver controls load balancing and failover for outgoing traffic only, while incoming traffic is controlled by the switch firmware and hardware. As is the case for Smart Load Balancing, the BASP intermediate driver uses the IP/TCP/UDP source and destination addresses to load balance the transmit traffic from the server. Most switches implement an XOR hashing of the source and destination MAC address.

NOTE: Generic Trunking is not supported on iSCSI offload adapters.

Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad LACP)

Link Aggregation is similar to Generic Trunking except that it uses the Link Aggregation Control Protocol to negotiate the ports that will make up the team. LACP must be enabled at both ends of the link for the team to be operational. If LACP is not available at both ends of the link, 802.3ad provides a manual aggregation that only requires both ends of the link to be in a link up state. Because manual aggregation provides for the activation of a member link without performing the LACP message exchanges, it should not be considered as reliable and robust as an LACP negotiated link. LACP automatically determines which member links can be aggregated and then aggregates them. It provides for the controlled addition and removal of physical links for the link aggregation so that no frames are lost or duplicated. The removal of aggregate link members is provided by the marker protocol that can be optionally enabled for Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) enabled aggregate links.

The Link Aggregation group advertises a single MAC address for all the ports in the trunk. The MAC address of the Aggregator can be the MAC addresses of one of the MACs that make up the group. LACP and marker protocols use a multicast destination address.

The Link Aggregation control function determines which links may be aggregated and then binds the ports to an Aggregator function in the system and monitors conditions to determine if a change in the aggregation group is required. Link aggregation combines the individual capacity of multiple links to form a high performance virtual link. The failure or replacement of a link in an LACP trunk will not cause loss of connectivity. The traffic will simply be failed over to the remaining links in the trunk.

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

This type of team is identical to the Smart Load Balance and Failover type of team, with the following exception—when the standby member is active, if a primary member comes back on line, the team continues using the standby member rather than switching back to the primary member. This type of team is supported only for situations in which the network cable is disconnected and reconnected to the network adapter. It is not supported for situations in which the adapter is removed/installed through Device Manager or Hot-Plug PCI.

If any primary adapter assigned to a team is disabled, the team functions as a Smart Load Balancing and Failover type of team in which auto-fallback occurs.

TOE Teaming

All four basic teaming modes support failover of traffic from a failed adapter to other working adapters. All four teaming modes also support bidirectional load-balancing of TCP/IP traffic. A primary difference between the modes is that the SLB modes use a Broadcom proprietary algorithm to control how both inbound and outbound traffic is balanced across the network interfaces in the team. This has several advantages. First, with Generic Trunking or Link Aggregation modes, the team of network adapters must be connected to a switch that is specifically configured to support that particular mode of teaming. Since there is a dependency between the switch and the host team configuration when Generic Trunking or Link

Aggregation is used, it can often lead to configuration difficulties, because both ends must be configured correctly and be synchronized. Second, with Generic Trunking or Link Aggregation modes, the switch decides how inbound traffic to the team is balanced across the adapters, while BASP only controls the balancing of outbound traffic. This is problematic for TOE environments, because in order for TOE to work, state information about a given TCP connection is stored in the hardware on a given offloaded adapter, but it is not stored in the hardware on every member of the team. So teaming and TOE cannot coexist if the teaming software cannot steer incoming TCP/IP traffic to the adapter that contains and updates the state information for a given TCP connection.

Because Broadcom's SLB modes can control how both outbound and inbound packets are balanced across the adapters, the

SLB modes are capable of ensuring that all offloaded TCP traffic for a given TCP connection goes in and out of a particular adapter. This architectural feature allows the SLB modes to also support load-balancing on adapters that have TOE enabled, since BASP is able to steer traffic on a particular TCP connection to the adapter hardware that contains offloaded state file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide information for that TCP connection. BASP can simultaneously use TCP offload in conjunction with the SLB modes of teaming.

Other teaming modes (Generic Trunking or Link Aggregation) can still be used on TOE capable devices, but if those other modes are enabled the TOE feature is disabled.

Since the TOE offloaded state is stored in only one member of a team, it might not be intuitive as to how BASP can support failover on TOE teams. When a TOE connection has been offloaded to a given adapter, and if that network interface fails in some way (that is, it loses its network link due to a cable disconnection), then BASP will detect the error and force an upload of the offloaded TCP state for each previously offloaded TCP connection on that adapter to the host. Once all of the previously offloaded state has been uploaded, BASP will rebalance the recently uploaded TCP connections and offload those connections evenly to the remaining members of the team. Basically, if there is a failure on a TOE-enabled adapter, any TCP connections that had been offloaded to that adapter are migrated to the remaining nonfailed members in the team.

For Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters, there are no specific setup requirements in order for TCP Offload Engine (TOE) to work with BASP. Once the individual adapters are configured to enable TOE, they can be added to a team and the offload is transparent to BASP. For information on configuring TOE, see Viewing and Configuring Resource Reservations .

Limitations of Teaming with Offloading

TOE is enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are configured for TOE.

TOE is only supported on SLB-type teams.

Each virtual BASP device advertises 1024 offload connections. If the number of virtual BASP devices in a team exceeds the number of active physical members, the maximum offload connections for each virtual device may be lower.

Software Components

Teaming is implemented via an NDIS intermediate driver in the Windows Operating System environment. This software component works with the miniport driver, the NDIS layer, and the protocol stack to enable the teaming architecture (see

Figure 2 ). The miniport driver controls the host LAN controller directly to enable functions such as sends, receives, and interrupt processing. The intermediate driver fits between the miniport driver and the protocol layer multiplexing several miniport driver instances, and creating a virtual adapter that looks like a single adapter to the NDIS layer. NDIS provides a set of library functions to enable the communications between either miniport drivers or intermediate drivers and the protocol stack. The protocol stack implements IP, IPX and ARP. A protocol address such as an IP address is assigned to each miniport device instance, but when an Intermediate driver is installed, the protocol address is assigned to the virtual team adapter and not to the individual miniport devices that make up the team.

The Broadcom supplied teaming support is provided by three individual software components that work together and are supported as a package. When one component is upgraded, all the other components must be upgraded to the supported versions. Table 3 describes the four software components and their associated files for supported operating systems.

Table 3: Broadcom Teaming Software Component

Software

Component

Miniport Driver

Intermediate Driver

Configuration User

Interface

Broadcom Name

Virtual Bus Driver (VBD)

Broadcom Base Driver

Broadcom Advanced Server

Program (BASP)

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

(BACS)

Network

Adapter/Operating System

BCM5708, BCM5709

BCM5708, BCM5709

BCM57710, BCM57711,

BCM57712

BCM57710, BCM57711,

BCM57712

Windows Server 2008 (NDIS

6.0)

Windows Server 2008 (NDIS

6.0)

Windows Server 2008 R2

(NDIS 6.0)

Windows Server 2008

Windows Server 2008 R2

System

Architecture

32-bit

64-bit

32-bit

64-bit

32-bit

64-bit

64-bit

32-bit, 64-bit

64-bit

Windows File

Name bxvbdx.sys

bxvbda.sys

evbdx.sys

evbda.sys

bxnd60x.sys

bxnd60a.sys

bxnd60a.sys

basp.sys

basp.sys

bacs.exe

Hardware Requirements

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Repeater Hub

Switching Hub

Router

The various teaming modes described in this document place certain restrictions on the networking equipment used to connect clients to teamed systems. Each type of network interconnect technology has an effect on teaming as described in the following sections.

Repeater Hub

A Repeater Hub allows a network administrator to extend an Ethernet network beyond the limits of an individual segment.

The repeater regenerates the input signal received on one port onto all other connected ports, forming a single collision domain. This means that when a station attached to a repeater sends an Ethernet frame to another station, every station within the same collision domain will also receive that message. If two stations begin transmitting at the same time, a collision occurs, and each transmitting station must retransmit its data after waiting a random amount of time.

The use of a repeater requires that each station participating within the collision domain operate in half-duplex mode.

Although half-duplex mode is supported for Gigabit Ethernet adapters in the IEEE 802.3 specification, half-duplex mode is not supported by the majority of Gigabit Ethernet adapter manufacturers. Therefore, half-duplex mode is not considered here.

Teaming across hubs is supported for troubleshooting purposes (such as connecting a network analyzer) for SLB teams only.

Switching Hub

Unlike a repeater hub, a switching hub (or more simply a switch) allows an Ethernet network to be broken into multiple collision domains. The switch is responsible for forwarding Ethernet packets between hosts based solely on Ethernet MAC addresses. A physical network adapter that is attached to a switch may operate in half-duplex or full-duplex mode.

To support Generic Trunking and 802.3ad Link Aggregation, a switch must specifically support such functionality. If the switch does not support these protocols, it may still be used for Smart Load Balancing.

NOTE: All modes of network teaming are supported across switches when operating as a stackable switch.

Router

A router is designed to route network traffic based on Layer 3 or higher protocols, although it often also works as a Layer 2 device with switching capabilities. The teaming of ports connected directly to a router is not supported.

Teaming Support by Processor

All team types are supported by the IA-32 and EM64T processors.

Configuring Teaming

The Broadcom Advanced Control Suite utility is used to configure teaming in the supported operating system environments.

The Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) utility is designed to run on 32-bit and 64-bit Windows family of operating systems. BACS is used to configure load balancing and fault tolerance teaming, and VLANs. In addition, it displays the MAC address, driver version, and status information about each network adapter. BACS also includes a number of diagnostics tools such as hardware diagnostics, cable testing, and a network topology test.

Supported Features by Team Type

Table 4 provides a feature comparison across the team types supported by Dell. Use this table to determine the best type of team for your application. The teaming software supports up to eight ports in a single team and up to four teams in a single system. The four teams can be any combination of the supported teaming types, but each team must be on a separate network or subnet.

Table 4: Comparison of Team Types

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Type of Team

Fault

Tolerance

Load

Balancing

Function

Number of ports per team (same broadcast domain)

Number of teams

Adapter fault tolerance

Switch link fault tolerance (same broadcast domain)

TX load balancing

RX load balancing

Requires compatible switch

Heartbeats to check connectivity

Mixed media (adapters with different media)

Mixed speeds (adapters that do not support a common speed(s), but can operate at different speeds)

Mixed speeds (adapters that support a common speed(s), but can operate at different speeds)

Load balances TCP/IP

Mixed vendor teaming

Yes

Yes

No

Yes b

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

SLB with

Standby a

2–8

8

Yes

SLB

2–8

8

Yes

Yes

Load balances non-IP

Same MAC address for all team members

Same IP address for all team members

Load balancing by IP address

Load balancing by MAC address

Allows TOE functionality to co-exist when all team members support TOE c

No

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

Switch-Dependent

Static Trunking

Independent

Dynamic Link

Aggregation

(IEEE

802.3ad)

Generic Trunking

2–8

8

Yes

Switch-dependent

Yes

Yes (performed by the switch)

Yes

No

Yes (switchdependent)

Link

Aggregation

2–8

8

Yes

Switchdependent

Yes

Yes (performed by the switch)

Yes

No

Yes

No No

Yes

Yes

Yes b

Yes (IPX outbound traffic only)

No

Yes

Yes

Yes (used for no-IP/IPX)

No (must be the same speed)

Yes

Yes b

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes No

Yes

Yes

Yes b

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No a

SLB with one primary and one standby member.

b Requires at least one Broadcom adapter in the team. c TOE functionality can only be achieved with SLB teams that consist of all Broadcom TOE-enabled adapters.

Selecting a Team Type

The following flow chart provides the decision flow when planning for Layer 2 teaming. For TOE teaming, only Smart Load

Balancing™ and Failover type team is supported. The primary rationale for teaming is the need for additional network bandwidth and fault tolerance. Teaming offers link aggregation and fault tolerance to meet both of these requirements.

Preference teaming should be selected in the following order: Link Aggregation as the first choice, Generic Trunking as the second choice, and SLB teaming as the third choice when using unmanaged switches or switches that do not support the first two options. if switch fault tolerance is a requirement, then SLB is the only choice (see Figure 1 ).

Figure 1: Process for Selecting a Team Type file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Teaming Mechanisms

Architecture

Types of Teams

Attributes of the Features Associated with Each Type of Team

Speeds Supported for Each Type of Team

Architecture

The Broadcom Advanced Server Program is implemented as an NDIS intermediate driver (see Figure 2 ). It operates below protocol stacks such as TCP/IP and IPX and appears as a virtual adapter. This virtual adapter inherits the MAC Address of the first port initialized in the team. A Layer 3 address must also be configured for the virtual adapter. The primary function of

BASP is to balance inbound (for SLB) and outbound traffic (for all teaming modes) among the physical adapters installed on the system selected for teaming. The inbound and outbound algorithms are independent and orthogonal to each other. The outbound traffic for a particular session can be assigned to a given port while its corresponding inbound traffic can be file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide assigned to a different port.

Figure 2: Intermediate Driver

Outbound Traffic Flow

The Broadcom Intermediate Driver manages the outbound traffic flow for all teaming modes. For outbound traffic, every packet is first classified into a flow, and then distributed to the selected physical adapter for transmission. The flow classification involves an efficient hash computation over known protocol fields. The resulting hash value is used to index into an Outbound Flow Hash Table.The selected Outbound Flow Hash Entry contains the index of the selected physical adapter responsible for transmitting this flow. The source MAC address of the packets will then be modified to the MAC address of the selected physical adapter. The modified packet is then passed to the selected physical adapter for transmission.

The outbound TCP and UDP packets are classified using Layer 3 and Layer 4 header information. This scheme improves the load distributions for popular Internet protocol services using well-known ports such as HTTP and FTP. Therefore, BASP file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide performs load balancing on a TCP session basis and not on a packet-by-packet basis.

In the Outbound Flow Hash Entries, statistics counters are also updated after classification. The load-balancing engine uses these counters to periodically distribute the flows across teamed ports. The outbound code path has been designed to achieve best possible concurrency where multiple concurrent accesses to the Outbound Flow Hash Table are allowed.

For protocols other than TCP/IP, the first physical adapter will always be selected for outbound packets. The exception is

Address Resolution Protocol (ARP), which is handled differently to achieve inbound load balancing.

Inbound Traffic Flow (SLB Only)

The Broadcom intermediate driver manages the inbound traffic flow for the SLB teaming mode. Unlike outbound load balancing, inbound load balancing can only be applied to IP addresses that are located in the same subnet as the loadbalancing server. Inbound load balancing exploits a unique characteristic of Address Resolution Protocol (RFC0826), in which each IP host uses its own ARP cache to encapsulate the IP Datagram into an Ethernet frame. BASP carefully manipulates the

ARP response to direct each IP host to send the inbound IP packet to the desired physical adapter. Therefore, inbound load balancing is a plan-ahead scheme based on statistical history of the inbound flows. New connections from a client to the server will always occur over the primary physical adapter (because the ARP Reply generated by the operating system protocol stack will always associate the logical IP address with the MAC address of the primary physical adapter).

Like the outbound case, there is an Inbound Flow Head Hash Table. Each entry inside this table has a singly linked list and each link (Inbound Flow Entries) represents an IP host located in the same subnet.

When an inbound IP Datagram arrives, the appropriate Inbound Flow Head Entry is located by hashing the source IP address of the IP Datagram. Two statistics counters stored in the selected entry are also updated. These counters are used in the same fashion as the outbound counters by the load-balancing engine periodically to reassign the flows to the physical adapter.

On the inbound code path, the Inbound Flow Head Hash Table is also designed to allow concurrent access. The link lists of

Inbound Flow Entries are only referenced in the event of processing ARP packets and the periodic load balancing. There is no per packet reference to the Inbound Flow Entries. Even though the link lists are not bounded; the overhead in processing each non-ARP packet is always a constant. The processing of ARP packets, both inbound and outbound, however, depends on the number of links inside the corresponding link list.

On the inbound processing path, filtering is also employed to prevent broadcast packets from looping back through the system from other physical adapters.

Protocol Support

ARP and IP/TCP/UDP flows are load balanced. If the packet is an IP protocol only, such as ICMP or IGMP, then all data flowing to a particular IP address will go out through the same physical adapter. If the packet uses TCP or UDP for the L4 protocol, then the port number is added to the hashing algorithm, so two separate L4 flows can go out through two separate physical adapters to the same IP address.

For example, assume the client has an IP address of 10.0.0.1. All IGMP and ICMP traffic will go out the same physical adapter because only the IP address is used for the hash. The flow would look something like this:

IGMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

ICMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

If the server also sends an TCP and UDP flow to the same 10.0.0.1 address, they can be on the same physical adapter as

IGMP and ICMP, or on completely different physical adapters from ICMP and IGMP. The stream may look like this:

IGMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

ICMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

TCP------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

UDP------> PhysAdatper1 ------> 10.0.0.1

Or the streams may look like this:

IGMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

ICMP ------> PhysAdapter1 ------> 10.0.0.1

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TCP------> PhysAdapter2 ------> 10.0.0.1

UDP------> PhysAdatper3 ------> 10.0.0.1

The actual assignment between adapters may change over time, but any protocol that is not TCP/UDP based goes over the same physical adapter because only the IP address is used in the hash.

Performance

Modern network interface cards provide many hardware features that reduce CPU utilization by offloading certain CPU intensive operations (see Teaming and Other Advanced Networking Properties ). In contrast, the BASP intermediate driver is a purely software function that must examine every packet received from the protocol stacks and react to its contents before sending it out through a particular physical interface. Though the BASP driver can process each outgoing packet in near constant time, some applications that may already be CPU bound may suffer if operated over a teamed interface. Such an application may be better suited to take advantage of the failover capabilities of the intermediate driver rather than the load balancing features, or it may operate more efficiently over a single physical adapter that provides a particular hardware feature such as Large Send Offload.

Types of Teams

Switch-Independent

The Broadcom Smart Load Balancing type of team allows two to eight physical adapters to operate as a single virtual adapter.

The greatest benefit of the SLB type of team is that it operates on any IEEE compliant switch and requires no special configuration.

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

SLB provides for switch-independent, bidirectional, fault-tolerant teaming and load balancing. Switch independence implies that there is no specific support for this function required in the switch, allowing SLB to be compatible with all switches. Under

SLB, all adapters in the team have separate MAC addresses. The load-balancing algorithm operates on Layer 3 addresses of the source and destination nodes, which enables SLB to load balance both incoming and outgoing traffic.

The BASP intermediate driver continually monitors the physical ports in a team for link loss. In the event of link loss on any port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team. The SLB teaming mode supports switch fault tolerance by allowing teaming across different switches- provided the switches are on the same physical network or broadcast domain.

Network Communications

The following are the key attributes of SLB:

Failover mechanism – Link loss detection.

Load Balancing Algorithm – Inbound and outbound traffic are balanced through a Broadcom proprietary mechanism based on L4 flows.

Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address - No.

Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes

Multivendor Teaming – Supported (must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a team member).

Applications

The SLB algorithm is most appropriate in home and small business environments where cost is a concern or with commodity switching equipment. SLB teaming works with unmanaged Layer 2 switches and is a cost-effective way of getting redundancy and link aggregation at the server. Smart Load Balancing also supports teaming physical adapters with differing link capabilities. In addition, SLB is recommended when switch fault tolerance with teaming is required.

Configuration Recommendations

SLB supports connecting the teamed ports to hubs and switches if they are on the same broadcast domain. It does not support connecting to a router or Layer 3 switches because the ports must be on the same subnet.

Switch-Dependent

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This mode supports a variety of environments where the adapter link partners are statically configured to support a proprietary trunking mechanism. This mode could be used to support Lucent's Open Trunk , Cisco's Fast EtherChannel (FEC), and Cisco's Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC). In the static mode, as in generic link aggregation, the switch administrator needs to assign the ports to the team, and this assignment cannot be altered by the BASP, as there is no exchange of the Link

Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) frame.

With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. Trunking operates on

Layer 2 addresses and supports load balancing and failover for both inbound and outbound traffic. The BASP driver determines the load-balancing scheme for outbound packets, using Layer 4 protocols previously discussed, whereas the team link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets.

The attached switch must support the appropriate trunking scheme for this mode of operation. Both the BASP and the switch continually monitor their ports for link loss. In the event of link loss on any port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team.

Network Communications

The following are the key attributes of Generic Static Trunking:

Failover mechanism – Link loss detection

Load Balancing Algorithm – Outbound traffic is balanced through Broadcom proprietary mechanism based L4 flows.

Inbound traffic is balanced according to a switch specific mechanism.

Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address – No

Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes

Multivendor teaming – Supported (Must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a team member)

Applications

Generic trunking works with switches that support Cisco Fast EtherChannel, Cisco Gigabit EtherChannel, Extreme Networks

Load Sharing and Bay Networks or IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation static mode. Since load balancing is implemented on Layer

2 addresses, all higher protocols such as IP, IPX, and NetBEUI are supported. Therefore, this is the recommended teaming mode when the switch supports generic trunking modes over SLB.

Configuration Recommendations

Static trunking supports connecting the teamed ports to switches if they are on the same broadcast domain and support generic trunking. It does not support connecting to a router or Layer 3 switches since the ports must be on the same subnet.

Dynamic Trunking (IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation)

This mode supports link aggregation through static and dynamic configuration via the Link Aggregation Control Protocol

(LACP). With this mode, all adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. The MAC address of the first adapter in the team is used and cannot be substituted for a different MAC address. The BASP driver determines the load-balancing scheme for outbound packets, using Layer 4 protocols previously discussed, whereas the team's link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets. Because the load balancing is implemented on

Layer 2, all higher protocols such as IP, IPX, and NetBEUI are supported. The attached switch must support the 802.3ad Link

Aggregation standard for this mode of operation. The switch manages the inbound traffic to the adapter while the BASP manages the outbound traffic. Both the BASP and the switch continually monitor their ports for link loss. In the event of link loss on any port, traffic is automatically diverted to other ports in the team.

Network Communications

The following are the key attributes of Dynamic Trunking:

Failover mechanism – Link loss detection

Load Balancing Algorithm – Outbound traffic is balanced through a Broadcom proprietary mechanism based on L4 flows. Inbound traffic is balanced according to a switch specific mechanism.

Outbound Load Balancing using MAC Address - No

Outbound Load Balancing using IP Address - Yes

Multivendor teaming – Supported (Must include at least one Broadcom Ethernet adapter as a team member)

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Dynamic trunking works with switches that support IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation dynamic mode using LACP. Inbound load balancing is switch dependent. In general, the switch traffic is load balanced based on L2 addresses. In this case, all network protocols such as IP, IPX, and NetBEUI are load balanced. Therefore, this is the recommended teaming mode when the switch supports LACP, except when switch fault tolerance is required. SLB is the only teaming mode that supports switch fault tolerance.

Configuration Recommendations

Dynamic trunking supports connecting the teamed ports to switches as long as they are on the same broadcast domain and supports IEEE 802.3ad LACP trunking. It does not support connecting to a router or Layer 3 switches since the ports must be on the same subnet.

LiveLink™

LiveLink™ is a feature of BASP that is available for the Smart Load Balancing (SLB) and SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) types of teaming. The purpose of LiveLink is to detect link loss beyond the switch and to route traffic only through team members that have a live link. This function is accomplished though the teaming software. The teaming software periodically probes (issues a link packet from each team member) one or more specified target network device(s). The probe target(s) responds when it receives the link packet. If a team member does not detect the response within a specified amount of time, this indicates that the link has been lost, and the teaming software discontinues passing traffic through that team member. Later, if that team member begins to detect a response from a probe target, this indicates that the link has been restored, and the teaming software automatically resumes passing traffic through that team member. LiveLink works only with TCP/IP.

LiveLink™ functionality is supported in both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows operating systems. For similar functionality in Linux operating systems, see the Channel Bonding information in your Red Hat documentation.

Attributes of the Features Associated with Each Type of Team

The attributes of the features associated with each type of team are summarized in Table 5 .

Table 5: Attributes

Feature

Smart Load Balancing™

User interface

Number of teams

Attribute

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS)

Maximum 8

Number of adapters per team Maximum 8

Hot replace Yes

Hot add

Hot remove

Link speed support

Frame protocol

Yes

Yes

Different speeds

IP

Incoming packet management BASP

Outgoing packet management BASP

LiveLink support

Failover event

Failover time

Yes

Loss of link

<500 ms

Fallback time

MAC address

Multivendor teaming

Generic Trunking

1.5 s b

(approximate)

Different

Yes

User interface

Number of teams

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS)

Maximum 8

Number of adapters per team Maximum 8

Hot replace Yes

Hot add

Hot remove

Yes

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Link speed support

Frame protocol

Different speeds a

All

Incoming packet management Switch

Outgoing packet management BASP

Failover event

Failover time

Loss of link only

<500 ms

Fallback time

MAC address

Multivendor teaming

Dynamic Trunking

User interface

1.5 s b (approximate)

Same for all adapters

Yes

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS)

Number of teams Maximum 8

Number of adapters per team Maximum 8

Hot replace

Hot add

Hot remove

Link speed support

Yes

Yes

Yes

Different speeds

Frame protocol All

Incoming packet management Switch

Outgoing packet management BASP

Failover event Loss of link only

Failover time <500 ms

Fallback time

MAC address

Multivendor teaming

1.5 s b

(approximate)

Same for all adapters

Yes a Some switches require matching link speeds to correctly negotiate between trunk connections.

b Make sure that Port Fast or Edge Port is enabled.

Speeds Supported for Each Type of Team

The various link speeds that are supported for each type of team are listed in Table 6 . Mixed speed refers to the capability of teaming adapters that are running at different link speeds.

Table 6: Link Speeds in Teaming

Type of Team Link Speed

SLB

Traffic Direction Speed Support

10/100/1000/10000 Incoming/outgoing Mixed speed

FEC

GEC

100

1000

Incoming/outgoing Same speed

Incoming/outgoing Same speed

IEEE 802.3ad

10/100/1000/10000 Incoming/outgoing Mixed speed

Teaming and Other Advanced Networking Properties

Checksum Offload

IEEE 802.1p QoS Tagging

Large Send Offload

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

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IEEE 802.1Q VLANs

Wake On LAN

Preboot Execution Environment

Before creating a team, adding or removing team members, or changing advanced settings of a team member, make sure each team member has been configured similarly. Settings to check include VLANs and QoS Packet Tagging, Jumbo Frames, and the various offloads. Advanced adapter properties and teaming support are listed in Table 7 .

Table 7: Advanced Adapter Properties and Teaming Support

Adapter Properties

Checksum Offload

IEEE 802.1p QoS Tagging

Large Send Offload

Supported by Teaming Virtual Adapter

Yes

No

Yes a

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

Jumbo Frames

Yes b, c

Yes b

IEEE 802.1Q VLANs

Wake on LAN

Yes c

No d

Preboot Execution environment (PXE) Yes e a All adapters on the team must support this feature. Some adapters may not support this feature if ASF/IPMI is also enabled.

b

Must be supported by all adapters in the team.

c d

Only for Broadcom adapters.

See Wake On LAN .

e

As a PXE sever only, not as a client.

A team does not necessarily inherit adapter properties; rather various properties depend on the specific capability. For instance, an example would be flow control, which is a physical adapter property and has nothing to do with BASP, and will be enabled on a particular adapter if the miniport driver for that adapter has flow control enabled.

NOTE: All adapters on the team must support the property listed in Table 7 in order for the team to support the property.

Checksum Offload

Checksum Offload is a property of the Broadcom network adapters that allows the TCP/IP/UDP checksums for send and receive traffic to be calculated by the adapter hardware rather than by the host CPU. In high-traffic situations, this can allow a system to handle more connections more efficiently than if the host CPU were forced to calculate the checksums. This property is inherently a hardware property and would not benefit from a software-only implementation. An adapter that supports Checksum Offload advertises this capability to the operating system so that the checksum does not need to be calculated in the protocol stack. Checksum Offload is only supported for IPv4 at this time.

IEEE 802.1p QoS Tagging

The IEEE 802.1p standard includes a 3-bit field (supporting a maximum of 8 priority levels), which allows for traffic prioritization. The BASP intermediate driver does not support IEEE 802.1p QoS tagging.

Large Send Offload

Large Send Offload (LSO) is a feature provided by Broadcom network adapters that prevents an upper level protocol such as

TCP from breaking a large data packet into a series of smaller packets with headers appended to them. The protocol stack need only generate a single header for a data packet as large as 64 KB, and the adapter hardware breaks the data buffer into appropriately-sized Ethernet frames with the correctly sequenced header (based on the single header originally provided).

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

The TCP/IP protocol suite is used to provide transport services for a wide range of applications for the Internet, LAN, and for file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file transfer. Without the TCP Offload Engine, the TCP/IP protocol suite runs on the host CPU, consuming a very high percentage of its resources and leaving little resources for the applications. With the use of the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter, the TCP/IP processing can be moved to hardware, freeing the CPU for more important tasks such as application processing.

The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter's TOE functionality allows simultaneous operation of up to 1024 fully offloaded TCP connections for 1-Gbps network adapters and 1880 fully offloaded TCP connections for 10-Gbps network adapters. The TOE support on the adapter significantly reduces the host CPU utilization while preserving the implementation of the operating system stack.

Jumbo Frames

The use of jumbo frames was originally proposed by Alteon Networks, Inc. in 1998 and increased the maximum size of an

Ethernet frame to a maximum size of 9000 bytes. Though never formally adopted by the IEEE 802.3 Working Group, support for jumbo frames has been implemented in Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters. The BASP intermediate driver supports jumbo frames, provided that all of the physical adapters in the team also support jumbo frames and the same size is set on all adapters in the team.

IEEE 802.1Q VLANs

In 1998, the IEEE approved the 802.3ac standard, which defines frame format extensions to support Virtual Bridged Local

Area Network tagging on Ethernet networks as specified in the IEEE 802.1Q specification. The VLAN protocol permits insertion of a tag into an Ethernet frame to identify the VLAN to which a frame belongs. If present, the 4-byte VLAN tag is inserted into the Ethernet frame between the source MAC address and the length/type field. The first 2-bytes of the VLAN tag consist of the IEEE 802.1Q tag type, whereas the second 2 bytes include a user priority field and the VLAN identifier (VID). Virtual LANs

(VLANs) allow the user to split the physical LAN into logical subparts. Each defined VLAN behaves as its own separate network, with its traffic and broadcasts isolated from the others, thus increasing bandwidth efficiency within each logical group. VLANs also enable the administrator to enforce appropriate security and quality of service (QoS) policies. The BASP supports the creation of 64 VLANs per team or adapter: 63 tagged and 1 untagged. The operating system and system resources, however, limit the actual number of VLANs. VLAN support is provided according to IEEE 802.1Q and is supported in a teaming environment as well as on a single adapter. Note that VLANs are supported only with homogeneous teaming and not in a multivendor teaming environment. The BASP intermediate driver supports VLAN tagging. One or more VLANs may be bound to a single instance of the intermediate driver.

Wake On LAN

Wake on LAN (WOL) is a feature that allows a system to be awakened from a sleep state by the arrival of a specific packet over the Ethernet interface. Because a Virtual Adapter is implemented as a software only device, it lacks the hardware features to implement Wake on LAN and cannot be enabled to wake the system from a sleeping state via the Virtual Adapter.

The physical adapters, however, support this property, even when the adapter is part of a team.

Preboot Execution Environment

The Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) allows a system to boot from an operating system image over the network. By definition, PXE is invoked before an operating system is loaded, so there is no opportunity for the BASP intermediate driver to load and enable a team. As a result, teaming is not supported as a PXE client, though a physical adapter that participates in a team when the operating system is loaded may be used as a PXE client. Whereas a teamed adapter cannot be used as a PXE client, it can be used for a PXE server, which provides operating system images to PXE clients using a combination of

Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) and the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP). Both of these protocols operate over IP and are supported by all teaming modes.

General Network Considerations

Teaming with Microsoft Virtual Server 2005

Teaming Across Switches

Spanning Tree Algorithm

Layer 3 Routing/Switching

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Teaming with Microsoft NLB

Teaming with Microsoft Virtual Server 2005

The only supported BASP team configuration when using Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 is with a Smart Load Balancing (TM) team-type consisting of a single primary Broadcom adapter and a standby Broadcom adapter. Make sure to unbind or deselect "Virtual Machine Network Services" from each team member prior to creating a team and prior to creating Virtual networks with Microsoft Virtual Server. Additionally, a virtual network should be created in this software and subsequently bound to the virtual adapter created by a team. Directly binding a Guest operating system to a team virtual adapter may not render the desired results.

NOTE: As of this writing, Windows Server 2008 is not a supported operating system for Microsoft Virtual Server 2005; thus, teaming may not function as expected with this combination.

Teaming Across Switches

SLB teaming can be configured across switches. The switches, however, must be connected together. Generic Trunking and

Link Aggregation do not work across switches because each of these implementations requires that all physical adapters in a team share the same Ethernet MAC address. It is important to note that SLB can only detect the loss of link between the ports in the team and their immediate link partner. SLB has no way of reacting to other hardware failures in the switches and cannot detect loss of link on other ports.

Switch-Link Fault Tolerance

The diagrams below describe the operation of an SLB team in a switch fault tolerant configuration. We show the mapping of the ping request and ping replies in an SLB team with two active members. All servers (Blue, Gray and Red) have a continuous ping to each other. Figure 3 is a setup without the interconnect cable in place between the two switches. Figure 4 has the interconnect cable in place, and Figure 5 is an example of a failover event with the Interconnect cable in place. These scenarios describe the behavior of teaming across the two switches and the importance of the interconnect link.

The diagrams show the secondary team member sending the ICMP echo requests (yellow arrows) while the primary team member receives the respective ICMP echo replies (blue arrows). This illustrates a key characteristic of the teaming software.

The load balancing algorithms do not synchronize how frames are load balanced when sent or received. In other words, frames for a given conversation can go out and be received on different interfaces in the team. This is true for all types of teaming supported by Broadcom. Therefore, an interconnect link must be provided between the switches that connect to ports in the same team.

In the configuration without the interconnect, an ICMP Request from Blue to Gray goes out port 82:83 destined for Gray port

5E:CA, but the Top Switch has no way to send it there because it cannot go along the 5E:C9 port on Gray. A similar scenario occurs when Gray attempts to ping Blue. An ICMP Request goes out on 5E:C9 destined for Blue 82:82, but cannot get there.

Top Switch does not have an entry for 82:82 in its CAM table because there is no interconnect between the two switches.

Pings, however, flow between Red and Blue and between Red and Gray.

Furthermore, a failover event would cause additional loss of connectivity. Consider a cable disconnect on the Top Switch port

4. In this case, Gray would send the ICMP Request to Red 49:C9, but because the Bottom switch has no entry for 49:C9 in its

CAM Table, the frame is flooded to all its ports but cannot find a way to get to 49:C9.

Figure 3: Teaming Across Switches Without an Interswitch Link file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

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The addition of a link between the switches allows traffic from/to Blue and Gray to reach each other without any problems.

Note the additional entries in the CAM table for both switches. The link interconnect is critical for the proper operation of the team. As a result, it is highly advisable to have a link aggregation trunk to interconnect the two switches to ensure high availability for the connection.

Figure 4: Teaming Across Switches With Interconnect file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

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Figure 5 represents a failover event in which the cable is unplugged on the Top Switch port 4. This is a successful failover with all stations pinging each other without loss of connectivity.

Figure 5: Failover Event

Spanning Tree Algorithm

Topology Change Notice (TCN)

Port Fast/Edge Port

In Ethernet networks, only one active path may exist between any two bridges or switches. Multiple active paths between switches can cause loops in the network. When loops occur, some switches recognize stations on both sides of the switch.

This situation causes the forwarding algorithm to malfunction allowing duplicate frames to be forwarded. Spanning tree algorithms provide path redundancy by defining a tree that spans all of the switches in an extended network and then forces certain redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state. At regular intervals, the switches in the network send and receive spanning tree packets that they use to identify the path. If one network segment becomes unreachable, or if spanning tree costs change, the spanning tree algorithm reconfigures the spanning tree topology and re-establishes the link by activating the standby path. Spanning tree operation is transparent to end stations, which do not detect whether they are connected to a single LAN segment or a switched LAN of multiple segments.

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is a Layer 2 protocol designed to run on bridges and switches. The specification for STP is defined in IEEE 802.1d. The main purpose of STP is to ensure that you do not run into a loop situation when you have redundant paths in your network. STP detects/disables network loops and provides backup links between switches or bridges.

It allows the device to interact with other STP compliant devices in your network to ensure that only one path exists between any two stations on the network.

After a stable network topology has been established, all bridges listen for hello BPDUs (Bridge Protocol Data Units) transmitted from the root bridge. If a bridge does not get a hello BPDU after a predefined interval (Max Age), the bridge assumes that the link to the root bridge is down. This bridge then initiates negotiations with other bridges to reconfigure the network to re-establish a valid network topology. The process to create a new topology can take up to 50 seconds. During this time, end-to-end communications are interrupted.

The use of Spanning Tree is not recommended for ports that are connected to end stations, because by definition, an end station does not create a loop within an Ethernet segment. Additionally, when a teamed adapter is connected to a port with

Spanning Tree enabled, users may experience unexpected connectivity problems. For example, consider a teamed adapter file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide that has a lost link on one of its physical adapters. If the physical adapter were to be reconnected (also known as fallback), the intermediate driver would detect that the link has been reestablished and would begin to pass traffic through the port.

Traffic would be lost if the port was temporarily blocked by the Spanning Tree Protocol.

Topology Change Notice (TCN)

A bridge/switch creates a forwarding table of MAC addresses and port numbers by learning the source MAC address that received on a particular port. The table is used to forward frames to a specific port rather than flooding the frame to all ports.

The typical maximum aging time of entries in the table is 5 minutes. Only when a host has been silent for 5 minutes would its entry be removed from the table. It is sometimes beneficial to reduce the aging time. One example is when a forwarding link goes to blocking and a different link goes from blocking to forwarding. This change could take up to 50 seconds. At the end of the STP re-calculation a new path would be available for communications between end stations. However, because the forwarding table would still have entries based on the old topology, communications may not be reestablished until after 5 minutes when the affected ports entries are removed from the table. Traffic would then be flooded to all ports and re-learned.

In this case it is beneficial to reduce the aging time. This is the purpose of a topology change notice (TCN) BPDU. The TCN is sent from the affected bridge/switch to the root bridge/switch. As soon as a bridge/switch detects a topology change (a link going down or a port going to forwarding) it sends a TCN to the root bridge via its root port. The root bridge then advertises a BPDU with a Topology Change to the entire network.This causes every bridge to reduce the MAC table aging time to 15 seconds for a specified amount of time. This allows the switch to re-learn the MAC addresses as soon as STP re-converges.

Topology Change Notice BPDUs are sent when a port that was forwarding changes to blocking or transitions to forwarding. A

TCN BPDU does not initiate an STP recalculation. It only affects the aging time of the forwarding table entries in the switch.It

will not change the topology of the network or create loops. End nodes such as servers or clients trigger a topology change when they power off and then power back on.

Port Fast/Edge Port

To reduce the effect of TCNs on the network (for example, increasing flooding on switch ports), end nodes that are powered on/off often should use the Port Fast or Edge Port setting on the switch port they are attached to. Port Fast or Edge Port is a command that is applied to specific ports and has the following effects:

Ports coming from link down to link up will be put in the forwarding STP mode instead of going from listening to learning and then to forwarding. STP is still running on these ports.

The switch does not generate a Topology Change Notice when the port is going up or down.

Layer 3 Routing/Switching

The switch that the teamed ports are connected to must not be a Layer 3 switch or router. The ports in the team must be in the same network.

Teaming with Hubs (for troubleshooting purposes only)

Hub Usage in Teaming Network Configurations

SLB Teams

SLB Team Connected to a Single Hub

Generic and Dynamic Trunking (FEC/GEC/IEEE 802.3ad)

SLB teaming can be used with 10/100 hubs, but it is only recommended for troubleshooting purposes, such as connecting a network analyzer in the event that switch port mirroring is not an option.

Hub Usage in Teaming Network Configurations

Although the use of hubs in network topologies is functional in some situations, it is important to consider the throughput ramifications when doing so. Network hubs have a maximum of 100 Mbps half-duplex link speed, which severely degrades performance in either a Gigabit or 100 Mbps switched-network configuration. Hub bandwidth is shared among all connected devices; as a result, when more devices are connected to the hub, the bandwidth available to any single device connected to the hub is reduced in direct proportion to the number of devices connected to the hub.

It is not recommended to connect team members to hubs; only switches should be used to connect to teamed ports. An SLB team, however, can be connected directly to a hub for troubleshooting purposes. Other team types can result in a loss of connectivity if specific failures occur and should not be used with hubs.

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SLB Teams

SLB teams are the only teaming type not dependant on switch configuration. The server intermediate driver handles the load balancing and fault tolerance mechanisms with no assistance from the switch. These elements of SLB make it the only team type that maintains failover and fallback characteristics when team ports are connected directly to a hub.

SLB Team Connected to a Single Hub

SLB teams configured as shown in Figure 6 maintain their fault tolerance properties. Either server connection could potentially fail, and network functionality is maintained. Clients could be connected directly to the hub, and fault tolerance would still be maintained; server performance, however, would be degraded.

Figure 6: Team Connected to a Single Hub

Generic and Dynamic Trunking (FEC/GEC/IEEE 802.3ad)

FEC/GEC and IEEE 802.3ad teams cannot be connected to any hub configuration. These team types must be connected to a switch that has also been configured for this team type.

Teaming with Microsoft NLB

Teaming does not work in Microsoft's Network Load Balancing (NLB) unicast mode, only in multicast mode. Due to the mechanism used by the NLB service, the recommended teaming configuration in this environment is Failover (SLB with a standby NIC) as load balancing is managed by NLB. The TOE functionality in teaming will not operate in NLB.

Application Considerations

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Teaming and Network Backup

Teaming and Clustering

Microsoft Cluster Software

High-Performance Computing Cluster

Oracle

Microsoft Cluster Software

Dell Server cluster solutions integrate Microsoft Cluster Services (MSCS) with PowerVault SCSI or Dell/EMC Fibre-Channel based storage, Dell servers, storage adapters, storage switches and network adapters to provide high-availability (HA) solutions. HA clustering supports all adapters qualified on a supported Dell server.

In each cluster node, it is strongly recommended that customers install at least two network adapters (on-board adapters are acceptable). These interfaces serve two purposes. One adapter is used exclusively for intra-cluster heartbeat communications.

This is referred to as the private adapter and usually resides on a separate private subnetwork. The other adapter is used for client communications and is referred to as the public adapter .

Multiple adapters may be used for each of these purposes: private, intracluster communications and public, external client communications. All Broadcom teaming modes are supported with Microsoft Cluster Software for the public adapter only.

Private network adapter teaming is not supported. Microsoft indicates that the use of teaming on the private interconnect of a server cluster is not supported because of delays that could possibly occur in the transmission and receipt of heartbeat packets between the nodes. For best results, when you want redundancy for the private interconnect, disable teaming and use the available ports to form a second private interconnect. This achieves the same end result and provides dual, robust communication paths for the nodes to communicate over.

For teaming in a clustered environment, customers are recommended to use the same brand of adapters.

Figure 7 shows a 2-node Fibre-Channel cluster with three network interfaces per cluster node: one private and two public. On each node, the two public adapters are teamed, and the private adapter is not. Teaming is supported across the same switch or across two switches. Figure 8 shows the same 2-node Fibre-Channel cluster in this configuration.

Figure 7: Clustering With Teaming Across One Switch file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

NOTE: Microsoft Network Load Balancing is not supported with Microsoft Cluster Software.

High-Performance Computing Cluster

Gigabit Ethernet is typically used for the following three purposes in high-performance computing cluster (HPCC) applications:

Inter-Process Communications (IPC): For applications that do not require low-latency, high-bandwidth interconnects

(such as Myrinet, InfiniBand), Gigabit Ethernet can be used for communication between the compute nodes.

I/O: Ethernet can be used for file sharing and serving the data to the compute nodes. This can be done simply using an

NFS server or using parallel file systems such as PVFS.

Management & Administration: Ethernet is used for out-of-band (ERA) and in-band (OMSA) management of the nodes in the cluster. It can also be used for job scheduling and monitoring.

In our current HPCC offerings, only one of the on-board adapters is used. If Myrinet or IB is present, this adapter serves I/O and administration purposes; otherwise, it is also responsible for IPC. In case of an adapter failure, the administrator can use the Felix package to easily configure adapter 2. Adapter teaming on the host side is neither tested nor supported in HPCC.

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Advanced Features

PXE is used extensively for the deployment of the cluster (installation and recovery of compute nodes). Teaming is typically not used on the host side and it is not a part of our standard offering. Link aggregation is commonly used between switches, especially for large configurations. Jumbo frames, although not a part of our standard offering, may provide performance improvement for some applications due to reduced CPU overhead.

Oracle

In our Oracle Solution Stacks, we support adapter teaming in both the private network (interconnect between RAC nodes) and public network with clients or the application layer above the database layer.

Figure 8: Clustering With Teaming Across Two Switches

Teaming and Network Backup

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Fault Tolerance

When you perform network backups in a nonteamed environment, overall throughput on a backup server adapter can be easily impacted due to excessive traffic and adapter overloading. Depending on the number of backup servers, data streams, and tape drive speed, backup traffic can easily consume a high percentage of the network link bandwidth, thus impacting production data and tape backup performance. Network backups usually consist of a dedicated backup server running with tape backup software such as NetBackup, Galaxy or Backup Exec. Attached to the backup server is either a direct SCSI tape backup unit or a tape library connected through a fiber channel storage area network (SAN). Systems that are backed up over the network are typically called clients or remote servers and usually have a tape backup software agent installed.

Figure 9 shows a typical 1 Gbps nonteamed network environment with tape backup implementation.

Figure 9: Network Backup without Teaming

Because there are four client servers, the backup server can simultaneously stream four backup jobs (one per client) to a multidrive autoloader. Because of the single link between the switch and the backup server; however, a 4-stream backup can easily saturate the adapter and link. If the adapter on the backup server operates at 1 Gbps (125 MB/s), and each client is able to stream data at 20 MB/s during tape backup, the throughput between the backup server and switch will be at 80 MB/s

(20 MB/s x 4), which is equivalent to 64% of the network bandwidth. Although this is well within the network bandwidth range, the 64% constitutes a high percentage, especially if other applications share the same link.

Load Balancing and Failover

As the number of backup streams increases, the overall throughput increases. Each data stream, however, may not be able to maintain the same performance as a single backup stream of 25 MB/s. In other words, even though a backup server can stream data from a single client at 25 MB/s, it is not expected that four simultaneously-running backup jobs will stream at

100 MB/s (25 MB/s x 4 streams). Although overall throughput increases as the number of backup streams increases, each backup stream can be impacted by tape software or network stack limitations.

For a tape backup server to reliably use adapter performance and network bandwidth when backing up clients, a network file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide infrastructure must implement teaming such as load balancing and fault tolerance. Data centers will incorporate redundant switches, link aggregation, and trunking as part of their fault tolerant solution. Although teaming device drivers will manipulate the way data flows through teamed interfaces and failover paths, this is transparent to tape backup applications and does not interrupt any tape backup process when backing up remote systems over the network. Figure 10 shows a network topology that demonstrates tape backup in a Broadcom teamed environment and how smart load balancing can load balance tape backup data across teamed adapters.

There are four paths that the client-server can use to send data to the backup server, but only one of these paths will be designated during data transfer. One possible path that Client-Server Red can use to send data to the backup server is:

Example Path: Client-Server Red sends data through Adapter A, Switch 1, Backup Server Adapter A.

The designated path is determined by two factors:

Client-Server ARP cache; which points to the backup server MAC address. This is determined by the Broadcom intermediate driver inbound load balancing algorithm.

The physical adapter interface on Client-Server Red will be used to transmit the data. The Broadcom intermediate driver outbound load balancing algorithm determines this (see Outbound Traffic Flow and Inbound Traffic Flow (SLB

Only) .

The teamed interface on the backup server transmits a gratuitous address resolution protocol (G-ARP) to Client-Server Red, which in turn, causes the client server ARP cache to get updated with the Backup Server MAC address. The load balancing mechanism within the teamed interface determines the MAC address embedded in the G-ARP. The selected MAC address is essentially the destination for data transfer from the client server.On Client-Server Red, the SLB teaming algorithm will determine which of the two adapter interfaces will be used to transmit data. In this example, data from Client Server Red is received on the backup server Adapter A interface. To demonstrate the SLB mechanisms when additional load is placed on the teamed interface, consider the scenario when the backup server initiates a second backup operation: one to Client-Server

Red, and one to Client-Server Blue. The route that Client-Server Blue uses to send data to the backup server is dependant on its ARP cache, which points to the backup server MAC address. Because Adapter A of the backup server is already under load from its backup operation with Client-Sever Red, the Backup Server invokes its SLB algorithm to inform Client-Server Blue

(through an G-ARP) to update its ARP cache to reflect the backup server Adapter B MAC address. When Client-Server Blue needs to transmit data, it uses either one of its adapter interfaces, which is determined by its own SLB algorithm. What is important is that data from Client-Server Blue is received by the Backup Server Adapter B interface, and not by its Adapter A interface. This is important because with both backup streams running simultaneously, the backup server must load balance data streams from different clients. With both backup streams running, each adapter interface on the backup server is processing an equal load, thus load-balancing data across both adapter interfaces.

The same algorithm applies if a third and fourth backup operation is initiated from the backup server. The teamed interface on the backup server transmits a unicast G-ARP to backup clients to inform them to update their ARP cache. Each client then transmits backup data along a route to the target MAC address on the backup server.

Fault Tolerance

If a network link fails during tape backup operations, all traffic between the backup server and client stops and backup jobs fail. If, however, the network topology was configured for both Broadcom SLB and switch fault tolerance, then this would allow tape backup operations to continue without interruption during the link failure. All failover processes within the network are transparent to tape backup software applications. To understand how backup data streams are directed during network failover process, consider the topology in Figure 10 . Client-Server Red is transmitting data to the backup server through Path

1, but a link failure occurs between the backup server and the switch. Because the data can no longer be sent from Switch #1 to the Adapter A interface on the backup server, the data is redirected from Switch #1 through Switch #2, to the Adapter B interface on the backup server. This occurs without the knowledge of the backup application because all fault tolerant operations are handled by the adapter team interface and trunk settings on the switches. From the client server perspective, it still operates as if it is transmitting data through the original path.

Figure 10: Network Backup With SLB Teaming Across Two Switches file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

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Troubleshooting Teaming Problems

Teaming Configuration Tips

Troubleshooting Guidelines

When running a protocol analyzer over a virtual adapter teamed interface, the MAC address shown in the transmitted frames may not be correct. The analyzer does not show the frames as constructed by BASP and shows the MAC address of the team and not the MAC address of the interface transmitting the frame. It is suggested to use the following process to monitor a team:

Mirror all uplink ports from the team at the switch.

If the team spans two switches, mirror the interlink trunk as well.

Sample all mirror ports independently.

On the analyzer, use an adapter and driver that does not filter QoS and VLAN information.

Teaming Configuration Tips

When troubleshooting network connectivity or teaming functionality issues, ensure that the following information is true for your configuration.

1. Although mixed-speed SLB teaming is supported by Dell, it is recommended that all adapters in a team be the same speed (either all Gigabit Ethernet or all Fast Ethernet). For speeds of 10 Gbps, it is highly recommended that all adapters in a team be the same speed.

2. If LiveLink is not enabled, disable Spanning Tree Protocol or enable an STP mode that bypasses the initial phases (for file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

Broadcom Teaming Services: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide example, Port Fast, Edge Port) for the switch ports connected to a team.

3. All switches that the team is directly connected to must have the same hardware revision, firmware revision, and software revision to be supported.

4. To be teamed, adapters should be members of the same VLAN. In the event that multiple teams are configured, each team should be on a separate network.

5. Do not assign a Locally Administered Address on any physical adapter that is a member of a team.

6. Verify that power management is disabled on all physical members of any team.

7. Remove any static IP address from the individual physical team members before the team is built.

8. A team that requires maximum throughput should use LACP or GEC\FEC. In these cases, the intermediate driver is only responsible for the outbound load balancing while the switch performs the inbound load balancing.

9. Aggregated teams (802.3ad \ LACP and GEC\FEC) must be connected to only a single switch that supports IEEE

802.3a, LACP or GEC/FEC.

10. It is not recommended to connect any team to a hub, as hubs only support half duplex. Hubs should be connected to a team for troubleshooting purposes only. Disabling the device driver of a network adapter participating in an LACP or

GEC/FEC team may have adverse affects with network connectivity. Broadcom recommends that the adapter first be physically disconnected from the switch before disabling the device driver in order to avoid a network connection loss.

11. Verify the base (Miniport) and team (intermediate) drivers are from the same release package. Dell does not test or support mixing base and teaming drivers from different releases.

12. Test the connectivity to each physical adapter prior to teaming.

13. Test the failover and fallback behavior of the team before placing into a production environment.

14. When moving from a nonproduction network to a production network, it is strongly recommended to test again for failover and fallback.

15. Test the performance behavior of the team before placing into a production environment.

16. Network teaming is not supported when running iSCSI traffic via Microsoft iSCSI initiator or iSCSI offload. MPIO should be used instead of Broadcom network teaming for these ports.

17. For information on iSCSI boot and iSCSI offload restrictions, see iSCSI Protocol .

Troubleshooting Guidelines

Before you call Dell support, make sure you have completed the following steps for troubleshooting network connectivity problems when the server is using adapter teaming.

1. Make sure the link light is ON for every adapter and all the cables are attached.

2. Check that the matching base and intermediate drivers belong to the same Dell release and are loaded correctly.

3. Check for a valid IP Address using the Windows ipconfig command.

4. Check that STP is disabled or Edge Port/Port Fast is enabled on the switch ports connected to the team or that LiveLink is being used.

5. Check that the adapters and the switch are configured identically for link speed and duplex.

6. If possible, break the team and check for connectivity to each adapter independently to confirm that the problem is directly associated with teaming.

7. Check that all switch ports connected to the team are on the same VLAN.

8. Check that the switch ports are configured properly for Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static type of teaming and that it matches the adapter teaming type. If the system is configured for an SLB type of team, make sure the corresponding switch ports are not configured for Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static types of teams.

Frequently Asked Questions

Question : Under what circumstances is traffic not load balanced? Why is all traffic not load balanced evenly across the team members?

Answer : The bulk of traffic does not use IP/TCP/UDP or the bulk of the clients are in a different network. The receive load balancing is not a function of traffic load, but a function of the number of clients that are connected to the server.

Question : What network protocols are load balanced when in a team?

Answer : Broadcom's teaming software only supports IP/TCP/UDP traffic. All other traffic is forwarded to the primary adapter.

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Question : Which protocols are load balanced with SLB and which ones are not?

Answer : Only IP/TCP/UDP protocols are load balanced in both directions: send and receive. IPX is load balanced on the transmit traffic only.

Question : Can I team a port running at 100 Mbps with a port running at 1000 Mbps?

Answer : Mixing link speeds within a team is only supported for Smart Load Balancing™ teams and 802.3ad teams.

Question : Can I team a fiber adapter with a copper Gigabit Ethernet adapter?

Answer : Yes with SLB, and yes if the switch allows for it in FEC/GEC and 802.3ad.

Question : What is the difference between adapter load balancing and Microsoft's Network Load Balancing (NLB)?

Answer : Adapter load balancing is done at a network session level, whereas NLB is done at the server application level.

Question : Can I connect the teamed adapters to a hub?

Answer : Teamed ports can be connected to a hub for troubleshooting purposes only. However, this practice is not recommended for normal operation because the performance would be degraded due to hub limitations. Connect the teamed ports to a switch instead.

Question : Can I connect the teamed adapters to ports in a router?

Answer : No. All ports in a team must be on the same network; in a router, however, each port is a separate network by definition. All teaming modes require that the link partner be a Layer 2 switch.

Question : Can I use teaming with Microsoft Cluster Services?

Answer : Yes. Teaming is supported on the public network only, not on the private network used for the heartbeat link.

Question : Can PXE work over a virtual adapter (team)?

Answer : A PXE client operates in an environment before the operating system is loaded; as a result, virtual adapters have not been enabled yet. If the physical adapter supports PXE, then it can be used as a PXE client, whether or not it is part of a virtual adapter when the operating system loads. PXE servers may operate over a virtual adapter.

Question : Can WOL work over a virtual adapter (team)?

Answer : Wake-on-LAN functionality operates in an environment before the operating system is loaded. WOL occurs when the system is off or in standby, so no team is configured.

Question : What is the maximum number of ports that can be teamed together?

Answer : Up to eight ports can be assigned to a team.

Question : What is the maximum number of teams that can be configured on the same server?

Answer : Up to eight teams can be configured on the same server.

Question : Why does my team loose connectivity for the first 30 to 50 seconds after the Primary adapter is restored

(fallback)?

Answer : Because Spanning Tree Protocol is bringing the port from blocking to forwarding. You must enable Port Fast or Edge

Port on the switch ports connected to the team or use LiveLink to account for the STP delay.

Question : Can I connect a team across multiple switches?

Answer : Smart Load Balancing can be used with multiple switches because each physical adapter in the system uses a unique Ethernet MAC address. Link Aggregation and Generic Trunking cannot operate across switches because they require all physical adapters to share the same Ethernet MAC address.

Question : How do I upgrade the intermediate driver (BASP)?

Answer : The intermediate driver cannot be upgraded through the Local Area Connection Properties. It must be upgraded using the Setup installer.

Question : How can I determine the performance statistics on a virtual adapter (team)?

Answer : In Broadcom Advanced Control Suite, click the Statistics tab for the virtual adapter.

Question : Can I configure NLB and teaming concurrently?

Answer : Yes, but only when running NLB in a multicast mode (NLB is not supported with MS Cluster Services).

Question : Should both the backup server and client servers that are backed up be teamed?

Answer : Because the backup server is under the most data load, it should always be teamed for link aggregation and failover. A fully redundant network, however, requires that both the switches and the backup clients be teamed for fault tolerance and link aggregation.

Question : During backup operations, does the adapter teaming algorithm load balance data at a byte-level or a sessionlevel?

Answer : When using adapter teaming, data is only load balanced at a session level and not a byte level to prevent out-offile:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/teamsvcs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:14 PM]

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Question : Is there any special configuration required in the tape backup software or hardware to work with adapter teaming?

Answer : No special configuration is required in the tape software to work with teaming. Teaming is transparent to tape backup applications.

Question : How do I know what driver I am currently using?

Answer : In all operating systems, the most accurate method for checking the driver revision is to physically locate the driver file and check the properties.

Question : Can SLB detect a switch failure in a Switch Fault Tolerance configuration?

Answer : No. SLB can only detect the loss of link between the teamed port and its immediate link partner. SLB cannot detect link failures on other ports.

Question : Where can I get the latest supported drivers?

Answer : Go to Dell support at http://support.dell.com

for driver package updates or support documents.

Question : Why does my team lose connectivity for the first 30 to 50 seconds after the primary adapter is restored (fall-back after a failover)?

Answer : During a fall-back event, link is restored causing Spanning Tree Protocol to configure the port for blocking until it determines that it can move to the forwarding state. You must enable Port Fast or Edge Port on the switch ports connected to the team to prevent the loss of communications caused by STP.

Question : Where do I monitor real time statistics for an adapter team in a Windows server?

Answer : Use the Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) to monitor general, IEEE 802.3 and custom counters.

Question : What features are not supported on a multivendor team?

Answer : TOE, VLAN tagging, and RSS are not supported on a multivendor team.

Appendix A: Event Log Messages

Windows System Event Log Messages

Base Driver (Physical Adapter/Miniport)

Intermediate Driver (Virtual Adapter/Team)

Virtual Bus Driver (VBD)

Windows System Event Log Messages

The known base and intermediate Windows System Event Log status messages for the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters are listed in Table 8 and Table 9 . As a Broadcom adapter driver loads, Windows places a status code in the system event viewer.

There may be up to two classes of entries for these event codes depending on whether both drivers are loaded (one set for the base or miniport driver and one set for the intermediate or teaming driver).

Base Driver (Physical Adapter/Miniport)

The base driver is identified by source L2ND . Table 8 lists the event log messages supported by the base driver, explains the cause for the message, and provides the recommended action.

Note: In Table 8 , message numbers 1 through 17 apply to both NDIS 5.x and NDIS 6.x drivers, message numbers 18 through 23 apply only to the NDIS 6.x driver.

Table 8: Base Driver Event Log Messages

Message

Number Severity

Message

1 Error

Cause

Failed to allocate memory for the device block. Check system memory resource

The driver cannot allocate memory from the operating system.

Corrective Action

Close running applications to free memory.

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2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Error

Error

Warning

Informational

Informational

Informational

Informational

Informational

Informational

Informational

Error

Error

Error usage.

Failed to allocate map registers.

The driver cannot allocate map registers from the operating system.

Failed to access configuration information. Reinstall the network driver.

The network link is down. Check to make sure the network cable is properly connected.

The driver cannot access PCI configuration space registers on the adapter.

The adapter has lost its connection with its link partner.

Network controller configured for 10Mb half-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 10Mb full-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 100Mb half-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 100Mb full-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 1Gb half-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 1Gb full-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 2.5Gb

full-duplex link.

Medium not supported.

Unable to register the interrupt service routine.

Unable to map IO space.

Unload other drivers that may allocate map registers.

For add-in adapters: reseat the adapter in the slot, move the adapter to another PCI slot, or replace the adapter.

Check that the network cable is connected, verify that the network cable is the right type, and verify that the link partner (for example, switch or hub) is working correctly.

The adapter has established a link.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The operating system does not support the IEEE 802.3

medium.

The device driver cannot install the interrupt handler.

The device driver cannot allocate memory-mapped I/O to access driver registers.

The driver has successfully loaded.

The NDIS layer has detected a problem sending/receiving packets and is resetting the driver to resolve the problem.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

Reboot the operating system, run a virus check, run a disk check (chkdsk), and reinstall the operating system.

Reboot the operating system; remove other device drivers that may be sharing the same

IRQ.

Remove other adapters from the system, reduce the amount of physical memory installed, and replace the adapter.

No action is required.

Run Broadcom Advanced Control Suite diagnostics; check that the network cable is good.

Error

Unknown PHY detected. Using a default PHY initialization routine.

The driver could not read the

PHY ID.

Replace the adapter.

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19

20

21

22

23

Error

This driver does not support this device.

Upgrade to the latest driver.

Driver initialization failed.

The driver does not recognize the installed adapter.

Error

Unspecified failure during driver initialization.

Informational

Error

Error

Network controller configured for 10Gb full-duplex link.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

Network controller failed initialization because it cannot allocate system memory.

Network controller failed to exchange the interface with the bus driver.

Insufficient system memory prevented the initialization of the driver.

The driver and the bus driver are not compatible.

Upgrade to a driver version that supports this adapter.

Reinstall the driver, update to a newer driver, run Broadcom Advanced Control

Suite diagnostics, or replace the adapter.

No action is required.

Increase system memory.

Update to the latest driver set, ensuring the major and minor versions for both NDIS and the bus driver are the same.

Intermediate Driver (Virtual Adapter/Team)

The intermediate driver is identified by source BLFM , regardless of the base driver revision. Table 9 lists the event log messages supported by the intermediate driver, explains the cause for the message, and provides the recommended action.

Table 9: Intermediate Driver Event Log Messages

System

Event

Message

Number

Severity

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Message

Informational

Error

Error

Error

Informational

Informational

Error

Event logging enabled for

Broadcom Advanced

Server Program driver.

Unable to register with

NDIS.

Unable to instantiate the management interface.

Unable to create symbolic link for the management interface.

Broadcom Advanced

Server Program Driver has started.

Broadcom Advanced

Server Program Driver has stopped.

Could not allocate memory for internal data structures.

8

9

10

Warning

Warning

Could not bind to adapter.

Network adapter is disconnected.

Cause

The driver cannot register with the NDIS interface.

The driver cannot create a device instance.

Another driver has created a conflicting device name.

The driver has started.

The driver has stopped.

Corrective Action

No action is required.

Unload other NDIS drivers.

Reboot the operating system.

Unload the conflicting device driver that uses the name Blf .

No action is required.

No action is required.

The driver cannot allocate memory from the operating system.

The physical adapter is not connected to the network (it has not established link).

Close running applications to free memory.

The driver could not open one of the team physical adapters.

Unload and reload the physical adapter driver, install an updated physical adapter driver, or replace the physical adapter.

The driver successfully opened the physical adapter. No action is required.

Check that the network cable is connected, verify that the network cable is the right type, and verify that the link partner (switch or hub) is working correctly.

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11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

The physical adapter is connected to the network (it has established link).

Error

Informational

Broadcom Advanced

Program Features Driver is not designed to run on this version of Operating

System.

Hot-standby adapter is selected as the primary adapter for a team without a load balancing adapter.

The driver does not support the operating system on which it is installed.

A standby adapter has been activated.

Informational

Warning

Network adapter is enabled via management interface.

Network adapter is disabled via management interface.

The physical adapter does not support the Broadcom

NIC Extension (NICE).

The driver has successfully enabled a physical adapter through the management interface.

The driver has successfully disabled a physical adapter through the management interface.

Informational

Informational

Network adapter is activated and is participating in network traffic.

Network adapter is deactivated and is no longer participating in network traffic.

A physical adapter has been added to or activated in a team.

The driver does not recognize the installed adapter.

Informational

The LiveLink feature in

BASP connected the link for the network adapter.

Informational

The LiveLink feature in

BASP disconnected the link for the network adapter.

The connection with the remote target(s) for the

LiveLink-enabled team member has been established or restored

The LiveLink-enabled team member is unable to connect with the remote target(s).

No action is required.

Consult the driver release notes and install the driver on a supported operating system or update the driver.

Replace the failed physical adapter.

Replace the adapter with one that does support NICE.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

Virtual Bus Driver (VBD)

Table 10: Virtual Bus Driver (VBD) Event Log Messages

Message

Number Severity

1

2

Message

Error

Informational

Failed to allocate memory for the device block. Check system memory resource usage.

The network link is down. Check to make sure the network cable is properly connected.

Cause

The driver cannot allocate memory from the operating system.

The adapter has lost its connection with its link partner.

3

4 Informational

Network controller configured for 10Mb half-duplex link.

Network controller

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been

Corrective Action

Close running applications to free memory.

Check that the network cable is connected, verify that the network cable is the right type, and verify that the link partner (for example, switch or hub) is working correctly.

No action is required.

No action is required.

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5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Informational configured for 10Mb

Informational

Informational

Informational

Network controller configured for 1Gb halfduplex link.

Informational

Error

Error

Error full-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 100Mb half-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 100Mb full-duplex link.

Network controller configured for 1Gb fullduplex link.

Unable to register the interrupt service routine.

Unable to map IO space.

Driver initialization failed.

manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The adapter has been manually configured for the selected line speed and duplex settings.

The device driver cannot install the interrupt handler.

The device driver cannot allocate memorymapped

I/O to access driver registers.

The driver has successfully loaded.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

No action is required.

Reboot the operating system; remove other device drivers that may be sharing the same

IRQ.

Remove other adapters from the system, reduce the amount of physical memory installed, and replace the adapter.

No action is required.

Unspecified failure during driver initialization.

Reinstall the driver, update to a newer driver, run Broadcom Advanced Control Suite diagnostics, or replace the adapter.

Error

Error

This driver does not support this device.

Upgrade to the latest driver.

This driver fails initialization because the system is running out of memory.

The driver does not recognize the installed adapter.

Insufficient system memory prevented the initialization of the driver.

Upgrade to a driver version that supports this adapter.

Increase system memory.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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NIC Partitioning: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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NIC Partitioning: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

Overview

Configuring for NIC Partitioning

Overview

NIC partitioning (NPAR) divides a Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet NIC into multiple virtual NICs by having multiple PCI physical functions per port. Each PCI function is associated with a different virtual NIC. To the OS and the network, each physical function appears as a separate NIC port.

NOTE: Link speed cannot be configured for 1 Gbps when NPAR is enabled.

The number of partitions for each port is from one to four; thus, making a dual-port NIC capable of a maximum of eight partitions. Each partition behaves as if it is an independent NIC port.

NOTE: On quad-port adapters with two 1G ports and two 10G ports, the 1G ports do not support NPAR.

Benefits of a partitioned 10G NIC include:

Reduced cabling and ports when used to replace many 1G NICs.

Server segmentation with separate subnets/VLANs.

High server availability with NIC failover and NIC link bandwidth aggregation.

Server I/O virtualization with a virtual OS and monolithic OS support.

Changes to the OS is not required.

SLB type teaming is supported.

Supported Operating Systems for NIC Partitioning

The Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet adapters support NIC partitioning on the following operating systems:

Windows Server 2008 family

Linux (Red Hat 5.5 and later, SLES 11 SP1 and later)

VMware ESX, ESXi 4.1, ESXi 5.0

Configuring for NIC Partitioning

NIC partitioning can be configured using Broadcom's Comprehensive Configuration Management (CCM) utility.

To configure a NIC for partitioning using the CCM utility

1. Select the NIC from Device List .

2. From the Main Menu , select Device Hardware Configuration .

3. Change the Multi-Function Mode to NPAR .

4. Configure the NIC parameters for your configuration based on the options shown in Table 1 .

Table 1 lists the configuration parameters available from the NIC Partitioning Configuration screen.

Table 1: Configuration Options

Parameter Description Options

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Flow Control Configures the Flow Control mode for this port.

TX Flow Control

RX Flow Control

TX/RX Flow Control

None

PF#0, PF#2, PF#4,

PF#6

PF#1, PF#3, PF#5,

PF#7

Reset Configuration to Default

Displays the physical function (PF) information regarding the partition(s) on port 0. Select to configure.

Displays the physical function (PF) information regarding the partition(s) on port 1. Select to configure.

Resets the NIC partition configuration to the factory default settings.

Table 2 describes the functions available from the PF# X screen.

Table 2: Function Description

Function Description Option

See Table 2 for configuration options.

See Table 2 for configuration options.

Ethernet

Protocol

Enables/disables Ethernet protocol.

Enable

Disable iSCSI

Offload

Protocol

Enables/disables iSCSI protocol.

Enable

Disable

FCoE

Offload protocol

Enables/disables FCoE protocol.

Enable

Disable

Bandwidth

Weight

Configures the weight or importance of a particular function. There are four functions per port and the weight is used to arbitrate between the functions in case of congestion.

Maximum

Bandwidth Configures the maximum bandwidth (in percentage) of the physical port link.

Network

MAC

Address iSCSI

MAC

Address

Displays the network MAC address.

Displays the iSCSI MAC address.

FCoE FIP

MAC

Address

FCoE

WWPN

Displays the FCoE MAC address.

FCoE World Wide Port Name.

FCoE

WWNN

FCoE World Wide Node Name.

The sum of all weights for the four functions are either 0 or

100.

Note: Ensure that the Network MAC Address and the iSCSI MAC Address are not the same.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Fibre Channel Over Ethernet: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Fibre Channel Over Ethernet: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

Overview

FCoE Boot from SAN

Configuring FCoE

Overview

In today's data center, multiple networks, including network attached storage (NAS), management, IPC, and storage, are used to achieve the desired performance and versatility. In addition to iSCSI for storage solutions, Fibre Channel over

Ethernet (FCoE) can now be used with capable Broadcom C-NICs. FCoE is a standard that allows Fibre Channel protocol to be transferred over Ethernet by preserving existing Fibre Channel infrastructures and capital investments by classifying received

FCoE and FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP) frames.

The following FCoE features are supported:

Receiver classification of FCoE and FIP frames. FIP is the FCoE Initialization Protocol used to establish and maintain connections.

Receiver CRC offload

Transmitter CRC offload

Dedicated queue set for Fibre Channel traffic

Data Center Bridging (DCB) provides lossless behavior with Priority Flow Control (PFC)

DCB allocates a share of link bandwidth to FCoE traffic with Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)

DCB supports storage, management, computing, and communications fabrics onto a single physical fabric that is simpler to deploy, upgrade, and maintain than in standard Ethernet networks. DCB technology allows the capable Broadcom C-NICs to provide lossless data delivery, lower latency, and standards-based bandwidth sharing of data center physical links. The DCB supports FCoE, iSCSI, Network-Attached Storage (NAS), Management, and IPC traffic flows. For more information on DCB, see Using Data Center Bridging (DCB) .

Supported Operating Systems

Windows

Windows 2008 SP2

Windows 2008 R2

For information on installing, upgrading, and uninstalling the drivers, see Windows Driver and Application Installation in this user guide.

Linux

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 11 SP1, kernel version 2.6.32.12-0.7-default

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 11 SP1, kernel version 2.6.32.36-0.5-default

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6, kernel version 2.6.32-71.el6.x86_64

For information on installing, upgrading, and uninstalling the drivers, see Linux Driver Software in this user guide.

FCoE Boot from SAN

This section describes the install and boot procedures for the Windows and Linux operating systems. The Windows procedure is a direct install to LUN. For Linux, the installation procedure is indirect because the drivers are not inbox and therefore not included in the INITRD image. The following section details the BIOS setup and configuration of the boot environment prior to file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/fcoe.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:33 PM]

Fibre Channel Over Ethernet: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide the OS install.

Preparing System BIOS for FCoE Build and Boot

Modify System Boot Order

The Broadcom initiator must be the first entry in the system boot order. The second entry must be the OS installation media.

It is important that the boot order be set correctly or else the installation will not proceed correctly. Either the desired boot

LUN will not be discovered or it will be discovered but marked offline.

Modifying the boot order can be accomplished through system BIOS configuration (accessed with F2 during POST). Below shows the system BIOS boot sequence menu for a Dell M710HD.

Specify Boot Protocol (if required)

NOTE: IMPORTANT: When running in NIC Partitioning (NPAR) mode, FCoE boot is only supported when the first function on each port is assigned an FCoE personality. FCoE boot is not supported when the FCoE personality is assigned to any other function.

On supported Dell platforms (Dell M710HD and Dell M915), the boot protocol must be configured through system BIOS

(accessible through F2 at POST).

For supported Dell platforms, modifications to the boot protocol made through CCM will not be persistent and are overwritten by the system BIOS setting upon each reboot.

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Prepare Broadcom Multiple Boot Agent for FCoE Boot

1. During POST, press CTRL+S at the Broadcom NetXtreme Ethernet Boot Agent banner to invoke the CCM utility.

2. Select the device through which boot is to be configured.

NOTE: IMPORTANT: When running in NIC Partitioning (NPAR) mode, FCoE boot is only supported when the first function on each port is assigned an FCoE personality. FCoE boot is not supported when the FCoE personality is assigned to any other function.

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3. Ensure DCB/DCBX is enabled on the device. FCoE boot is only supported on DCBX capable configurations. As such,

DCB/DCBX must be enabled, and the directly attached link peer must also be DCBX capable with parameters that allow for full DCBX synchronization.

4. For Dell 57712 NDC-based systems (for example, M710HD, M915), set the boot protocol through system BIOS configuration in the integrated devices pane as described above.

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Fibre Channel Over Ethernet: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

1. Configure the desired boot target and LUN. From the Target Information Menu, select the first available path.

2. Enable the Connect field. Enter the target WWPN and Boot LUN information for the target to be used for boot.

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3. Press ESC until prompted to exit and save changes.

4. Proceed to OS installation once storage access has been provisioned in the SAN.

Provisioning Storage Access in the SAN

Storage access consists of zone provisioning and storage selective LUN presentation, each of which is commonly provisioned per initiator WWPN. Two main paths are available for approaching storage access:

Pre-Provisioning

CTRL+R Method

Pre-Provisioning

With pre-provisioning, note the initiator WWPN and manually modify fabric zoning and storage selective LUN presentation to allow the appropriate access for the initiator.

The initiator WWPN can be seen at the bottom of the screen in the FCoE boot target configuration window.

The initiator WWPN can also be directly inferred from the FIP MAC address associated with the interface(s) planned for boot.

Two MAC addresses are printed on stickers attached to the SFP+ cage on your adapter. The FIP MAC ends in an odd digit.

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The WWPN is 20:00: + <FIP MAC>. For example, if the FIP MAC is 00:10:18:11:22:33, then the WWPN will be

20:00:00:10:18:11:22:33.

NOTE: The default WWPN is 20:00: + <FIP MAC>. The default WWNN is 10:00: + <FIP MAC>.

NOTE: In Dell FlexAddress configurations, the SAN/FIP MAC may be overridden by the blade chassis management system.

CTRL+R Method

The CTRL+R method allows you to use the boot initiator to bring up the link and login into all available fabrics and targets.

Using this method, you can ensure that the initiator is logged into the fabric/target before making provisioning changes, and as such, can provision without manually typing in WWPNs.

1. Configure at least one boot target through CCM as described above.

2. Allow the system to attempt to boot through the selected initiator.

3. Once the initiator boot starts, it will commence with DCBX sync, FIP Discovery, Fabric Login, Target Login, and LUN readiness checks. As each of these phases completes, if the initiator is unable to proceed to the next phase, MBA will present the option to press CTRL+R .

4. Once CTRL+R has been activated, the boot initiator will maintain a link in whatever phase has most recently succeeded and allow you time to make the necessary provisioning corrections to proceed to the next phase.

5. If the initiator logs into the fabric, but is unable to log into the target, a CTRL+R will pause the boot process and allow you to configure fabric zoning.

6. Once zoning is complete, the initiator will automatically log into all visible targets. If the initiator is unable to discover the designated LUN on the designated target as provisioned in step 1, CTRL+R will pause the boot process and allow you to configure selective LUN presentation.

7. The boot initiator will periodically poll the LUN for readiness, and once the user has provisioned access to the LUN, the boot process will automatically proceed.

NOTE: This does not preclude the need to put the boot initiator into one-time disable mode as described in One-

Time Disable .

One-Time Disable

Broadcom's FCoE ROM is implemented as Boot Entry Vector (BEV). In this implementation, the Option ROM only connects to the target once it has been selected by BIOS as the chosen boot device. This is different from other implementations that will connect to the boot device even if another device has been selected by the system BIOS. For OS installation over the FCoE path, it is necessary to instruct the Option ROM to bypass FCoE and skip to CD/DVD installation media. As instructed earlier, the boot order must be configured with Broadcom boot first and installation media second. Furthermore, during OS installation, it is required to bypass the FCoE boot and pass through to the installation media for boot. It is required to do this by disabling the FCoE boot ROM from booting, and not by simply allowing the FCoE ROM to attempt to boot and allowing the

BIOS to fail through and boot the installation media. Finally, it is required that the FCoE ROM successfully discover and test the readiness of the desired boot LUN in order for installation to proceed successfully. Failure to allow the boot ROM to discover the LUN and do a coordinated bypass will result in a failure to properly install the O/S to the LUN. In order to affect this coordinated bypass, there are two choices:

Once the FCoE boot ROM discovers a ready target LUN, it will prompt you to press CTRL+D within 4 seconds to Stop booting from the target . Press CTRL+D , and proceed to boot from the installation media.

From CCM, set the Option ROM setting under MBA settings to One Time Disable . With this setting, the FCoE ROM will load once and automatically bypass once the ready LUN is discovered. On the subsequent reboot after installation, the option ROM will automatically revert to Enable .

Wait through all option ROM banners. Once FCoE Boot is invoked, it will connect to the target, and provide a 4 second window to press CTRL+D to invoke the bypass. Press CTRL+D to proceed to installation.

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Windows 2008 R2 and Windows 2008 SP2 Installation

Since Broadcom FCoE drivers are not inbox for Windows 2008 R2 SP1 or Windows 2008 SP2, the EVBD and OFC drivers need to be loaded during installation. Go through the normal procedures for OS installation. When no disk devices are found,

Windows will prompt you to load additional drivers. At this point, connect a USB flash drive containing the full contents of the provided EVBD and OFC boot driver folders.

1. Load the EVBD driver first.

2. Then load the bxfcoe (OFC) driver.

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3. Select the boot LUN to be installed:

4. Continue with the rest of the installation. After installation is complete and booted to SAN, execute the provided

Windows driver installer and reboot. Installation is now complete.

NOTE: The boot initiator must be configured to point at the desired installation LUN, and the boot initiator must have successfully logged and determined the readiness of the LUN prior to starting installation. If these requirements file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/fcoe.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:33 PM]

Fibre Channel Over Ethernet: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide are not met, the devices will still show up in the drive list above, but upon proceeding with installation Read/Write errors will occur.

Linux Installation

The Linux Boot from SAN procedure is indirect and requires the OS to be first installed locally and then imaged to the target

LUN.

Configure the adapter boot parameters and Target Information (press CTRL+S and enter the CCM utility, as detailed in

Preparing System BIOS for FCoE Build and Boot .

SLES11 SP1 Installation

RHEL6.0 Installation

SLES11 SP1 Installation

1. Install SLES11 SP1 to a locally attached hard drive.

2. Use by-id for fstab options during installation.

3. Once installation is complete, install the Broadcom linux-nx2 driver package and ensure a connection to the desired

SAN boot LUN.

4. For multipathd/device-mapper configurations, enable multipath services by using the following commands: a. Set boot.multipath to run level B:

# chkconfig boot.multipath on b. Set boot.device-mapper to run level B

# chkconfig boot.device-mapper on c. Set multipathd to run levels 0-6

# chkconfig --level 0123456 multipathd on

5. For PowerPath configurations, no chkconfig changes are required.

6. Set network on: a. Set network to run levels 0-6:

# chkconfg --level 0123456 network on

7. Run fcoe_setup.sh to create FCoE INITRD and copy the created INITRD file to /boot:

# ./fcoe_setup.sh

# cp fcoe-initrd.img /boot

8. Create backups of '/boot/grub/menu.lst' and '/etc/fstab'.

9. Add a new boot entry to /boot/grub/menu.lst by pointing INITRD to the new INITRD that was created in step 7,

/boot/fcoe-initrd.img and modifying the root/resume parameters to point at the correct device names. For multipathd/device-mapper configurations, use the /dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-part... device names. For PowerPath configurations, use the /dev/emcpower*: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/fcoe.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:33 PM]

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10. Modify /etc/fstab to point to the same device paths for the root (/) and swap mount points.

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11. Now that the local drive is reconfigured to support FCoE boot. Copy the entire local hard drive contents to the SAN LUN via dd:

# dd if=<SOURCE> of=<DEST> bs=1MB where <SOURCE> is the local disk (e.g. /dev/sda) and <DEST> is the SAN LUN (e.g. /dev/sdc)

12. Restore '/boot/grub/menu.lst' and '/etc/fstab' files to their original contents by copying the backup files created above to their original filenames.

RHEL6.0 Installation

1. Install RHEL 6.0 to a locally attached hard drive.

2. Use Vol-Group option during installation (default).

3. Once installation is complete, install the Broadcom linux-nx2 driver package and ensure a connection to the desired

SAN boot LUN.

4. For multipathd/device-mapper configurations, enable multipath services by using the following commands:

# chkconfig --level 0123456 multipathd on

5. Set network services to start at all run levels:

# chkconfig --level 0123456 network on or

# chkconfig --level 0123456 NetworkManager on

6. Run fcoe_setup.sh to create FCoE INITRD and copy the created INITRD file to /boot:

# ./fcoe_setup.sh

# cp fcoe-initrd.img /boot

7. Create backups of '/boot/grub/menu.lst'

8. Add a new boot entry to /boot/grub/menu.lst by pointing INITRD to the new INITRD that was created in step 7,

/boot/fcoe-initrd.img.

9. Now that the local drive is reconfigured to support FCoE boot. Copy the entire local hard drive contents to the SAN LUN via dd:

# dd if=<SOURCE> of=<DEST> bs=1MB where <SOURCE> is the local disk (e.g. /dev/sda) and <DEST> is the SAN LUN (e.g. /dev/sdc)

10. Because the LVM drive drive/group/volume signatures are now identical between the local HDD and the SAN LUN, the local HDD must be removed prior to reboot and booting from SAN in order to prevent LVM discovery conflicts.

11. Restore '/boot/grub/menu.lst' its original contents by copying the backup files created above to their original filenames.

Booting from SAN After Installation

Now that boot configuration and OS installation are complete, you can reboot and test the installation. On this and all future reboots, no other user interactivity is required. Ignore the CTRL+D prompt and allow the system to boot through to the FCoE

SAN LUN.

At this time, if additional redundant failover paths are desired, you can configure those paths through CCM, and the MBA will automatically failover to secondary paths if the first path is not available. Further, the redundant boot paths will yield redundant paths visible through host MPIO software allowing for a fault tolerant configuration.

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Configuring FCoE

By default, DCB is enabled on Broadcom NetXtreme II FCoE-, DCB-compatible C-NICs. To enable/disable FCoE and DCB and to optimize DCB support for the various fabrics on the network, customize the ETS, PFC, FCoE, and DCBX parameters. For

Windows operating systems, use either Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) or Broadcom's Comprehensive Configuration

Management (CCM) utility to configure the DCB parameters. For Linux operating systems, use Broadcom's Comprehensive

Configuration Management (CCM) utility. See Using Broadcom Advanced Control Suite for more information on BACS.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Using Data Center Bridging (DCB): Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Using Data Center Bridging (DCB): Broadcom NetXtreme II

Network Adapter User Guide

Overview

DCB Capabilities

DCB Conditions

Overview

Data Center Bridging (DCB) is a collection of IEEE specified standard extensions to Ethernet to provide lossless data delivery, low latency, and standards-based bandwidth sharing of data center physical links. DCB supports storage, management, computing, and communications fabrics onto a single physical fabric that is simpler to deploy, upgrade, and maintain than in standard Ethernet networks. DCB has a standards-based bandwidth sharing at its core, allowing multiple fabrics to coexist on the same physical fabric. The various capabilities of DCB allow for LAN traffic (large number of flows and not latencysensitive), SAN traffic (large packet sizes and requires lossless performance), and IPC (latency-sensitive messages) to bandwidth share the same physical converged connection and achieve the desired individual traffic performance.

DCB includes the following capabilities:

Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)

Priority-based Flow Control (PFC)

Data Center Bridging Capability eXchange Protocol (DCBX)

DCB Capabilities

Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)

Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS) provides a common management framework for assignment of bandwidth to traffic classes. Each traffic class or priority can be grouped in a Priority Group (PG), and it can be considered as a virtual link or virtual interface queue. The transmission scheduler in the peer is responsible for maintaining the allocated bandwidth for each

PG. For example, a user can configure FCoE traffic to be in PG 0 and iSCSI traffic in PG 1. The user can then allocate each group a certain bandwidth. For example, 60% to FCoE and 40% to iSCSI. The transmission scheduler in the peer will ensure that in the event of congestion, the FCoE traffic will be able to use at least 60% of the link bandwidth and iSCSI to use 40%.

See additional references at http://www.ieee802.org/1/pages/802.1az.html.

Priority Flow Control (PFC)

Priority Flow Control (PFC) provides a link-level flow control mechanism that can be controlled independently for each traffic type. The goal of this mechanism is to ensure zero loss due to congestion in DCB networks. Traditional IEEE 802.3 Ethernet does not guarantee that a packet transmitted on the network will reach its intended destination. Upper-level protocols are responsible to maintain the reliability by way of acknowledgement and retransmission. In a network with multiple traffic classes, it becomes very difficult to maintain the reliability of traffic in the absence of feedback. This is traditionally tackled with the help of link-level Flow Control.

When PFC is used in a network with multiple traffic types, each traffic type can be encoded with a different priority value and a pause frame can refer to this priority value while instructing the transmitter to stop and restart the traffic. The value range for the priority field is from 0 to 7, allowing eight distinct types of traffic that can be individually stopped and started. See additional references at http://www.ieee802.org/1/pages/802.1bb.html.

Data Center Bridging eXchange (DCBX)

Data Center Bridging eXchange (DCBX) is a discovery and capability exchange protocol that is used for conveying capabilities and configuration of ETS and PFC between link partners to ensure consistent configuration across the network fabric. In order for two devices to exchange information, one device must be willing to adopt network configuration from the other device. For example, if a C-NIC is configured to willingly adopt ETS and PFC configuration information from a connected switch, and the file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/dcb.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:36 PM]

Using Data Center Bridging (DCB): Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide switch acknowledges the C-NIC's willingness, then the switch will send the C-NIC the recommended ETS and PFC parameter settings. The DCBX protocol uses the Link Level Discovery Protocol (LLDP) to exchange PFC and ETS configurations between link partners.

Configuring DCB

By default, DCB is enabled on Broadcom NetXtreme II DCB-compatible C-NICs. DCB configuration is rarely required, as the default configuration should satisfy most scenarios. DCB parameters can be configured through BACS. See Using Broadcom

Advanced Control Suite for more information on BACS.

DCB Conditions

The following is a list of conditions that allow DCB technology to function on the network.

If DCB is enabled on the interface, DCBX is automatically enabled and carried out automatically once a link is established.

If DCBX fails to synchronize with a compatible peer, the adapter will automatically fall back to default NIC behavior (no priority tagging, no PFC, no ETS).

By default, the port will advertise itself as willing, and as such, will accept all DCB settings as advertised by the switch.

If PFC is operational, PFC settings supersede link level flow control settings. If PFC is not operational, link level flow control settings prevail

In NIC Partitioned enabled configurations, ETS (if operational) overrides the Bandwidth Weights assigned to each function. Transmission selection weights are per protocol per ETS settings instead. Maximum bandwidths per function are still honored in the presence of ETS.

In the absence of an iSCSI or FCoE application TLV advertised through the DCBX peer, the adapter will use the settings taken from the local Admin MIB.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Using Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 4: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

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Using Broadcom Advanced Control Suite 4: Broadcom NetXtreme II

Network Adapter User Guide

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite Overview

Starting Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

Configuring Teaming

Configuring With the Command Line Interface Utility

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite Overview

Broadcom Advanced Control Suite (BACS) is an integrated utility that provides useful information about each network adapter that is installed in your system. BACS also enables you to perform detailed tests, diagnostics, and analyses on each adapter, as well as to view and modify property values and view traffic statistics for network objects.

Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP), which runs within Broadcom Advanced Control Suite, is used to configure teams for load balancing, fault tolerance, and virtual local area networks (VLANs). BASP functionality is available only on systems that use at least one Broadcom network adapter.

Starting Broadcom Advanced Control Suite

In Control Panel, click Broadcom Control Suite 4 , or click the BACS icon in the taskbar located at the bottom of the Windows desktop.

BACS Interface

The BACS interface is comprised of the following regions:

Explorer View pane

Context View selector

Context View pane

Menu bar

Description pane

By default, the Explorer View pane is docked and pinned on the left side of the main window, the Context View pane on the right, the

Context View selector below the menu bar, and the Description pane below the Context View pane. Drag the splitter between any two panes to vary the size of the panes.

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Explorer View Pane

You can dock and pin the Explorer View pane on the left side, right side, top, or bottom of the main window.

The Explorer View pane lists the objects that can be viewed, analyzed, tested, or configured by BACS. When an item is selected in the Explorer View pane, the tabs showing the information and options that are available for the item appear in the Context View pane.

The organization of this panel is designed to present the manageable objects in the same hierarchical manner as drivers and its subcomponents. This simplifies the management of various elements of the converged network interface controller (C-NIC). The top level of the hierarchy is the Host container, which lists all hosts managed by BACS. Below the hosts are the installed network adapters, with the manageable elements, such as physical port, VBD, NDIS, FCoE, and iSCSI below the adapters.

The icon next to each device in the Explorer View pane shows its status. An icon next to a device name that appears normal means the device is connected and working.

X. A red "X" that appears on the device's icon indicates the device is currently not connected to the network.

Greyed out. A device icon that appears greyed out indicates the device is currently disabled.

Context View Selector

The Context View selector appears below the menu bar and includes the filter and tab categories. Although you can expand and collapse the categories that appear on tabs in the Context View pane, you can alternatively display a category by selecting the box next to the category name.

Filter View

In a multiple-host environment using several C-NICs, there can be a large number of manageable elements per adapter that can be difficult and cumbersome to view, configure, and manage all elements. Use the filter to select a particular device function. Possible filter views include:

All

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NDIS view iSCSI view

FCoE view iSCSI Target view

FCoE Target view

Context View Pane

The Context View pane displays all the parameters that you can view for the object selected in the Explorer View pane. The parameters are grouped by tabs and categories, depending on the parameter type. The available tabs are Information, Configuration,

Diagnostics, and Statistics. Because the BACS interface is context-sensitive, only the parameters that apply to the selected object can be viewed or configured in the Context View pane.

Menu Bar

The following appear on the menu bar, but because the menu items are context-sensitive, not all items will be available at all times:

File menu

Team Save As: Saves the current team configurations to a file.

Team Restore: Restores any saved team configuration from a file.

Action menu

Remove Host: Removes the selected host.

Refresh Host: Refreshes the selected host.

View menu

Explorer View: Displays/hides the Explorer View pane.

Tool Bar: Displays/hides the tool bar.

Status Bar: Displays/hides the status bar.

Broadcom Logo: Displays/hides the Broadcom Logo on BACS to optimize the maximum viewable space.

Tools menu

Options: Used for configuring BACS preferences.

Teams

Create Teams: Creates new teams with either the Teaming Wizard or in Advanced mode.

Manage Teams: Manages existing teams with either the Teaming Wizard or in Advanced mode.

iSCSI menu

Discovery Wizard: Locates targets and helps to configure the HBA.

Manage Targets Wizard: Manages targets.

Manage iSNS Servers: Manages Internet Storage Name Service (iSNS) servers to allow discovery, management, and configuration of iSCSI devices.

Manage Discovery Portals: Manages iSCSI discovery portals.

Discovery Wizard

The Discovery Wizard is available from the iSCSI menu. Follow the prompts in the wizard to discover iSCSI targets via the

SendTargets method or the Internet Storage Name Service (iSNS) server.

Manage Targets Wizard

The Manage Targets Wizard is available from the iSCSI menu. Follow the prompts in the wizard to add and remove targets, and to login or logout of a target.

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The Manage iSNS Servers window is available from the iSCSI menu. From this window, you can add or remove Internet Storage

Name Service (iSNS) servers.

Manage Discovery Portals

The Manage Discovery Portals window is available from the iSCSI menu. From this window, you can add or remove iSCSI discovery portals.

Boot Configuration Wizard

The Boot Configuration Wizard is available by right-clicking a port. Follow the prompts in the wizard to configure the iSCSI boot parameters.

Hardware and Resource Configuration Wizard

The Hardware and Resource Configuration Wizard is used to configure properties for hardware resources. Follow the prompts in the wizard to configure hardware resources. You can preview the configuration before committing the changes.

Description Pane

The Description pane provides information, configuration instructions, and options for the selected parameter in the Context View pane.

Configuring Preferences

To enable or disable the BACS tray icon

BACS places an icon in the Windows taskbar when the program is installed. Use the Options window to turn this icon on or off.

1. From the Tools menu, select Options .

2. Select or clear Enable BACSTray (the option is enabled by default).

3. Click OK .

Setting the teaming mode

1. From the Tools menu, select Options .

2. Select Expert Mode if you do not need the assistance of the teaming wizard to create teams; otherwise, select Wizard

Mode .

3. Click OK .

Setting the Explorer View refresh time

1. From the Tools menu, select Options .

2. Select Auto to set the Explorer View refresh time to 5 seconds. Otherwise, select Custom and select a time, in seconds.

3. Click OK .

Connecting to a Host

You can add one or more Windows or Linux hosts to manage from BACS.

To add a local host

1. From the Active menu, click Add Host .

2. For both Windows and Linux hosts, do not change the default settings. The User name and Password are not required while connecting to the local host.

3. Select Persist if you want BACS to save the information for this host.

4. Click Ok . BACS can now be used to view information and manage the host.

To add a remote host

1. From the Active menu, click Add Host .

2. Type the remote host's name or IP address in the Host box.

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4. Select the HTTP scheme, or the HTTPS scheme for added security.

5. Type the Port Number value you used to configure the host, if it is different than the default value of 5985 .

6. Type the User name and Password .

7. Select Persist if you want BACS to save the information for this host. The host will appear in the Explorer Pane whenever you reopen BACS, and you will not need to enter the host IP address or host name when connecting to the host. For security reasons, you must enter the User name and Password every time.

8. Click OK .

Managing the Host

At the host level, you can view host information and configure parameters from the following tabs:

Information

Configuration

To view host information

Select the host in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Information tab to view host-level information.

Information Tab: Host Information

Host Name

Displays the name of the host.

OS Version Info

Displays the operating system, including the version.

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Displays the hardware architecture platform (for example, 32-bit or 64-bit)

Information Tab: iSCSI Initiator

The iSCSI Initiator section of the Information tab is available if iSCSI is enabled on the host.

Name

Displays the iSCSI initiator name in IQN format.

Portal List

Displays all iSCSI portal IP addresses configured on the selected host.

NOTE: Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

To configure the host

Select the host in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Configuration tab to configure host-level parameters.

Configuration Tab: System Management

Chimney Offload State

Enable or disable chimney offload at the host level, rather than at the device level, and then click Apply .

Configuration Tab: iSCSI Initiator

Name

The current IQN name is displayed. Click the IQN name to modify the host's iSCSI initiator name, and then click Apply .

Managing the Network Adapter

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The installed network adapters appear one level below the host in the hierarchical tree in the Explorer View pane. At the adapter level, you can view information and configure parameters from the following tabs:

Information

Configuration

Viewing Adapter Information

Select the network adapter in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Information tab to view adapter-level information.

Viewing Resource Information

The Resources section of the Information tab displays information about connections and other essential functions for the selected network adapter.

NOTE: Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Information Tab: Resources

Bus Type

The type of input/output (I/O) interconnect used by the adapter.

Bridge

The bridge type, which is the PCI-E to PCI-X bridge. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Bridge Lanes

The number of PCI-E lanes connected to the bridge. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

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The clock speed on PCI-E bus. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Slot Number

The slot number on the system board occupied by the adapter. This item is not available for PCI Express type adapters.

Bus Speed

The bus clock signal frequency used by the adapter. This item is not available for PCI Express type adapters.

Bus Width

The number of bits that the bus can transfer at a single time to and from the adapter. This item is not available for PCI Express type adapters.

Bus Number

Indicates the number of the bus where the adapter is installed.

Device Number

The number assigned to the adapter by the operating system.

Function Number

The port number of the adapter. For a single-port adapter, the function number is 0. For a two-port adapter, the function number for the first port is 0, and the function number for the second port is 1.

Interrupt Request

The interrupt line number that is associated with the adapter. Valid numbers range from 2 to 25.

Memory Address

The memory mapped address that is assigned to the adapter. This value can never be 0.

MSI Version

This is the Message Signaled Interrupts (MSI) version being used. The option MSI corresponds to the PCI 2.2 specification that supports 32 messages and a single MSI address value. The option MSI-X corresponds to the PCI 3.0 specification that supports

2,048 messages and an independent message address for each message.

Viewing Hardware Information

The Hardware section of the Information tab displays information about the hardware settings for the selected network adapter.

NOTE: Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Information Tab: Hardware

ASIC Version

The chip version of the Broadcom adapter (this information is not available for adapters made by others).

Firmware Version

The firmware version of the Broadcom adapter (this information is not available for adapters made by others). This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme adapters.

Bootcode Version

The version of the boot code. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Family Firmware Version

The global firmware version that represents all firmware on the device.

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Management Firmware

The firmware version installed on the system.

Vendor ID

The vendor ID.

Device ID

The adapter ID.

Subsystem Vendor ID

The subsystem vendor ID.

Subsystem ID

The subsystem ID.

iSCSI Boot Version

The version of the iSCSI Boot software initiator.

External PHY Firmware Version

The external PHY firmware version.

Configuring Adapter Parameters

Select the network adapter in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Configuration tab to configure adapter-level parameters.

Configuration Tab: NIC Partition

Number of Partitions

Displays the number of partitions. The value is 4 and cannot be changed.

Flow Control

The possible values are Auto, Tx Pause, Rx Pause, Tx/Rx pause, and Disable. The configuration is done at the port level and applies to all functions under the port.The flow control value is a default value for the port. The effective configuration can be different based on the switch port configuration and whether or not DCB/DCBX is enabled.

Link Speed

Configure the link speed. The default speed is 1Gb for 1Gb adapters and 10Gb for 10Gb adapters.

Configuration Tab: NIC Partition: Function

The following are configurable at the function level. When NIC partitioning is enabled, four functions are created under each port. The functions are numbered 0 to 7. All odd function numbers (1, 3, 5, 7) are created on one port and all even functions (0, 2, 4, 6) are created on the remaining port.

Ethernet/NDIS

Ethernet/NDIS capability is enabled for the function when False is deselected.

iSCSI iSCSI functionality is enabled for the function when False is deselected.

FCoE

FCoE functionality is enabled for the function when False is deselected.

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The possible values are from 0 to 100. The value is the percentage of the maximum link speed allowed for the function. For example, if 50 is configured, then the bandwidth usage of the function is restricted to 50% of the 10 Gbps, which is 5Gbps.

Minimum Bandwidth

The possible values are from 0 to 100. This parameter is only applicable when DCB is disabled on the adapter port. The value defines the weight assigned to the function when DCB is disabled and all functions try to transmit at the maximum link speed. During congestion, the weight value determines how much importance will be given by the transmit scheduler to the traffic emanating from this function.

Managing Ethernet Controller (Port)

From BACS, you can group various traffic classes in to priority group and allocate bandwidth to each priority group.

When the Ethernet controller is selected in the Object Explorer panel, following four tabs will be displayed in the context view panel:

Information Tab

Configuration tab

Statistics Tab

Diagnostic Tab

Viewing Port Level Information

Selecting Ethernet controller in the object explorer will allow user to view various types of information at the port level.

1. Select PortX (where X is either 0 or 1) below Adapter in the object explorer.

2. Various components of the port will be displayed below port in the object explorer. You can click on the "+" icon near Port to expand or collapse the tree below.

3. Select Information tab in the context view panel on the right side.

Viewing Vital Signs

The Vital Signs section of the Information tab has useful information about the network adapters that are installed in your system, such as the link status of the adapter and general network connectivity.

To view Vital Signs information for any installed network adapter, select the name of the adapter listed in the Explorer View pane, then click the Information tab.

NOTES:

Information about Broadcom network adapters may be more comprehensive than information about network adapters made by others.

Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

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MAC Address

A physical MAC (media access control) address that is assigned to the adapter by the manufacturer. The physical address is never all

0s.

Permanent MAC Address

The unique hardware address assigned to the network adapter.

iSCSI MAC Address

If an iSCSI network adapter is loaded onto the system, this parameter will display the iSCSI MAC address.

IPv4 DHCP

The IP address is from a DHCP server if the value is Enable.

IP Address

The network address associated with the adapter. If the IP address is all 0s, the associated driver has not been bound with Internet

Protocol (IP).

IPv6 DHCP

The IP address is from a DHCP server if the value is Enable.

IPv6 IP Address

The IPv6 network address associated with the adapter.

IPv6 Scope Id

Since local-use addresses can be reused, the Scope ID for link-local addresses specifies the link where the destination is located. The

Scope ID for site-local addresses specifies the site where the destination is located. The Scope ID is relative to the sending host.

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IPv6 Flow Info

The non-zero Flow Info is used to classify traffic flows. If Flow Info equals zero, then the packets are not a part of any flow.

Default Gateway

The default gateway value is the network address of the gateway that will be used by the management firmware for packets destined for hosts external to the local network segment.

Link Status

The status of the network link.

Up.

A link is established.

Down.

A link is not established.

Duplex

The adapter is operating in the indicated duplex mode.

Speed

The link speed of the adapter, in megabits per second.

Offload Capabilities

The offload capabilities supported by the adapter. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

TOE . TCP Offload Engine (TOE) allows simultaneous operation of up to 1024 fully offloaded TCP connections for 1-Gbps network adapters and 1880 fully offloaded TCP connections for 10-Gbps network adapters to the hardware.

iSCSI . iSCSI offload for block-level transfer of data.

LSO . Large Send Offload (LSO) prevents an upper level protocol such as TCP from breaking a large data packet into a series of smaller packets with headers appended to them.

CO.

Checksum Offload (CO) allows the TCP/IP/UDP checksums for send and receive traffic to be calculated by the adapter hardware rather than by the host CPU.

LiveLink IP Address

The network address of the LiveLink enabled adapter.

Local Connection

Identifies the module to which the blade server is attached.

Chassis SW . Chassis switch module

Chassis PHY . Pass-through module

None . No modules attached

BASP State

Information about the status of the BASP application. This information is displayed only when there is a team (see Configuring

Teaming ).

Viewing NIC Partitioning Information

The NIC Partitioning section of the Information tab displays information about the partitions for the selected network adapter.

To view NIC Partitioning for any installed network adapter, click the name of the adapter listed in the Explorer View pane, then click the Information tab.

NOTE: Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

NIC partitioning divides a Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet NIC into multiple virtual NICs by having multiple PCI physical functions per port. Each PCI function is associated with a different virtual NIC. To the OS and the network, each physical function appears as a separate NIC port. For more information on NIC partitioning, see NIC Partitioning: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide .

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Number of Partitions

The number of partitions for the port. Each port can have from one to four partitions with each partition behaving as if it is an independent NIC port.

Network MAC Address

The MAC address of the port.

iSCSI MAC Address

If an iSCSI adapter is loaded onto the system, the iSCSI MAC address will appear.

Flow Control

The flow control setting of the port.

Physical Link Speed

The physical link speed of the port, either 1G or 10G.

Relative Bandwidth Weight (%)

The relative bandwidth setting represents a weight or importance of a particular function. There are four functions per port and the weight is being used in order to arbitrate between the functions in case of congestion.

The sum of all weights for the four functions on a single port are either 0 or 100 .

A value of 0 for all functions means that each function will be able to transmit at 25% of the physical link speed, not to exceed the Maximum Bandwidth setting

A value for a function between 1 and 100 represent a percentage of the physical link speed and is used by an internal arbitration logic as a input value (weight). A higher value will cause this function to transmit relatively more data, compared to a function (on the same port) that has defined a lower value.

Maximum Bandwidth (%)

The maximum bandwidth setting defines an upper threshold value, ensuring that this limit will not be exceeded during transmission. The valid range for this value is between 1 and 100. The maximum bandwidth value is defined as a percentage of the physical link speed.

It is possible for the sum of all maximum bandwidth values across the four functions of a single port to exceed the physical link speed value of either 10 Gbps or 1 Gbps. This case is considered as oversubscription. In a case where oversubscription congestion occurs on transmit, the Relative Bandwidth Weight value comes into effect.

The Maximum Bandwidth setting is only valid in the context of Tx, but not Rx.

Testing the Network

The Network Test option on the Diagnostics tab lets you verify IP network connectivity. This test verifies if the driver is installed correctly and tests connectivity to a gateway or other specified IP address on the same subnet.

The network test uses TCP/IP to send ICMP packets to remote systems, then waits for a response. If a gateway is configured, the test automatically sends packets to that system. If a gateway is not configured or if the gateway is unreachable, the test prompts for a destination IP address.

NOTE: The network test option is not available on adapters that are grouped into a team (see Configuring Teaming ).

To run the network test

1. Click the name of the adapter to test in the Explorer View pane.

2. From the Select a test to run list, select Network Test .

3. To change the destination IP address, select IP address to ping , then click the browse button ( ...

). In the Network Test window, enter a Destination IP address, then click OK .

4. Click Run .

The results of the network test are displayed in the Status field.

Running Diagnostic Tests

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The Diagnostic Tests option on the Diagnostics tab lets you check the state of the physical components on a Broadcom network adapter. You can trigger the tests manually, or choose to have BACS continuously perform them. If the test are performed continuously, then the number of passes and fails in the Result field for each test increments every time the tests are performed.

For example, if a test is performed four times and there are no fails, the value in the Result field for that test is 4/0. However, if there were 3 passes and 1 fail, the value in the Result field is 3/1.

NOTES:

You must have administrator privileges to run diagnostic tests.

The network connection is temporarily lost while these tests are running.

Some tests are not supported on all Broadcom adapters.

To run the diagnostic tests once

1. Click the name of the adapter to test in the Explorer View pane and select the Diagnostics tab.

2. From the Select a test to run list, select Diagnostic Tests .

3. Select the diagnostic tests you want to run. Click Select All to select all tests or Clear All to clear all test selections.

4. Select the number of times to run the tests from Number of loops .

5. Click Run test(s) .

6. In the error message window that warns of the network connection being temporarily interrupted, click Yes . The results are displayed in the Result field for each test.

Control Registers

This test verifies the read and write capabilities of the network adapter registers by writing various values to the registers and verifying the results. The adapter driver uses these registers to perform network functions such as sending and receiving information.

A test failure indicates that the adapter may not be working properly.

MII Registers

This test verifies the read and write capabilities of the registers of the physical layer (PHY). The physical layer is used to control the electrical signals on the wire and to configure network speeds such as 1000 Mbit/s.

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EEPROM

This test verifies the content of the electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) by reading a portion of the

EEPROM and computing the checksum. The test fails if the computed checksum is different from the checksum stored in the EEPROM.

An EEPROM image upgrade does not require a code change for this test.

Internal Memory

This test verifies that the internal memory of the adapter is functioning properly. The test writes patterned values to the memory and reads back the results. The test fails if an erroneous value is read back. The adapter cannot function if its internal memory is not functioning properly.

On-Chip CPU

This test verifies the operation of the internal CPUs in the adapter.

Interrupt

This test verifies that the Network Device Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) driver is able to receive interrupts from the adapter.

Loopback MAC and Loopback PHY

These tests verify that the NDIS driver is able to send packets to and receive packets from the adapter.

Test LED

This test causes all of the port LEDs to blink 5 times for the purpose of identifying the adapter.

Analyzing Cables

The Cable Analysis option on the Diagnostics tab lets you monitor the conditions of each wire pair in an Ethernet Category 5 cable connection within an Ethernet network. The analysis measures the cable quality and compares it against the IEEE 802.3ab

specification for compliance.

NOTES:

You must have administrator privileges to run the cable analysis test.

The network connection is temporarily lost during an analysis.

This option is not available for NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapters.

This option is not available for all Broadcom network adapters.

This option is available for Broadcom NetXtreme II VBD drivers.

To run a cable analysis

1. Connect the cable to a port on a switch where the port is set to Auto and the Speed & Duplex driver settings are also set to

Auto .

2. Click the name of the adapter to test in the Explorer View pane.

NOTE: For Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters, select a VBD driver; for other adapters, select an NDIS driver.

3. From the Select a test to run list, select Cable Analysis .

4. Click Run .

5. In the error message window that warns of the network connection being temporarily interrupted, click Yes .

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Distance

The valid cable length in meters (except when the Noise result is returned).

Status

The result of the analysis for the indicated pair.

Good . Good cable/PCB signal paths, but no gigabit link.

Crossed . Pin short or crosstalk along two or more cable/PCB signal paths.

Open . One or both pins are open for a twisted pair.

Short . Two pins from the same twisted pair are shorted together.

Noise . Persistent noise present (most likely caused by Forced 10/100).

GB Link .

Gigabit link is up and running.

N/A . Algorithm failed to reach a conclusion.

Link

The link connection speed and mode.

Status

The status after the test is run, either completed or failed.

There are several factors that could have an effect on the test results:

Link partner . Various switch and hub manufacturers implement different PHYs. Some PHYs are not IEEE compliant.

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Cable quality . Category 3, 4, 5, and 6 may affect the test results.

Electrical interference . The testing environment may affect the test results.

Managing the LAN Device

The LAN function represents the Ethernet (NDIS) functionality available under the PCI Function. User can view current values of various NDIS driver parameters, configure NDIS driver parameters, view attached FCoE targets and LUN information by selecting

FCoE object in object explorer panel.

The available tabs for the NDIS function are as follows:

At the NDIS level, you can view parameters, configure parameters, and run tests from the following tabs:

Information

Configuration

Diagnostics

Statistics

Viewing NDIS Information

Select the NDIS driver in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Information tab to view NDIS-level information.

NOTES:

Information about Broadcom network adapters may be more comprehensive than information about network adapters made by others.

Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Viewing Driver Information

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Driver Status

The status of the adapter driver.

Loaded . Normal operating mode. The adapter driver has been loaded by Windows and is functioning.

Not Loaded . The driver associated with the adapter has not been loaded by Windows.

Information Not Available . The value is not obtainable from the driver that is associated with the adapter.

Driver Name

The file name of the adapter driver.

Driver Version

The current version of the adapter driver.

Driver Date

The creation date of the adapter driver.

Information Tab: Vital Signs

IP Address

The network address associated with the adapter. If the IP address is all 0s, the associated driver has not been bound with Internet

Protocol (IP).

IPv6 IP Address

The IPv6 network address associated with the adapter.

MAC Address

A physical MAC (media access control) address that is assigned to the adapter by the manufacturer. The physical address is never all

0s.

Permanent MAC Address

The unique hardware address assigned to the network adapter.

Offload Capabilities

The offload capabilities supported by the adapter. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

TOE . TCP Offload Engine (TOE) allows simultaneous operation of up to 1024 fully offloaded TCP connections for 1-Gbps network adapters and 1880 fully offloaded TCP connections for 10-Gbps network adapters to the hardware.

iSCSI . iSCSI offload for block-level transfer of data.

LSO . Large Send Offload (LSO) prevents an upper level protocol such as TCP from breaking a large data packet into a series of smaller packets with headers appended to them.

CO.

Checksum Offload (CO) allows the TCP/IP/UDP checksums for send and receive traffic to be calculated by the adapter hardware rather than by the host CPU.

Configuring the NDIS Driver

Select the NDIS driver in the Explorer View pane, and then select the Configuration tab to configure NDIS-level parameters. After making changes, click Apply to confirm the changes to all properties. Click Reset to return the properties to their original values.

Click Defaults to restore all settings to their default values.

NOTES:

Clicking Reset after clicking Defaults , but before clicking Apply , will purge all values.

Apply must be clicked to make changes go into effect.

Any changes to existing settings will be lost upon clicking Defaults .

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You must have administrator privileges to change the values for a property.

The list of available properties for your particular adapter may be different.

Some properties may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

If an adapter is included as a member of a team and you change any advanced property, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team's advanced properties are properly set.

Configuration Tab: Advanced

Ethernet@Wirespeed

Enables a Gigabit Ethernet adapter to establish a link at a lower speed when only two pairs of wires are available in the cabling plant.

The default setting for this property is Enabled.

Flow Control

Enables or disables the receipt or transmission of PAUSE frames. PAUSE frames allow the network adapter and a switch to control the transmit rate. The side that is receiving the PAUSE frame momentarily stops transmitting. By enabling TOE, network performance improves, but with the increased performance, TOE performance is more susceptible to packet loss when flow control is disabled. Enable flow control to reduce the number of packets lost.

NOTE: If Jumbo Packet is set to 5000 bytes or greater on network adapters that support 10 Gbps link speed, ensure that Flow

Control is set to Auto to prevent the system performance from performing at less than optimal levels. This limitation exists on a per-port basis.

Auto (default). Receive and transmit PAUSE frame functionality are optimized. This option indicates that the adapter automatically adjusts the flow control settings for optimal performance, and its purpose is not enabling auto negotiation of the flow control parameters.

Disable . Receive and transmit PAUSE frame functionality are disabled.

Rx Enabled . Receive PAUSE frame is enabled.

Rx & Tx Enabled . Receive and transmit PAUSE frame are enabled.

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Tx Enabled . Transmit PAUSE frame is enabled.

IPv4 Checksum Offload

Normally, the checksum function is computed by the protocol stack. When you select one of the Checksum Offload property values

(other than None), the checksum can be computed by the network adapter.

Rx Enabled .

Enables receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

Tx Enabled .

Enables transmit TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

Tx/Rx Enabled (default). Enables transmit and receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

None .

Disables checksum offload.

IPv4 Large Send Offload

Normally, the TCP segmentation is done by the protocol stack. When you enable the Large Send Offload property, the TCP segmentation can be done by the network adapter. The default setting for this property is Enabled. This property is only available for

Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

IPv6 Checksum Offload

Normally, the checksum function is computed by the protocol stack. When you select one of the Checksum Offload property values

(other than None), the checksum can be computed by the network adapter.

Rx Enabled .

Enables receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

Tx Enabled .

Enables transmit TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

Tx/Rx Enabled (default). Enables transmit and receive TCP/IP/UDP checksum offload.

None .

Disables checksum offload.

IPv6 Large Send Offload

Normally, the TCP segmentation is done by the protocol stack. When you enable the Large Send Offload property, the TCP segmentation can be done by the network adapter. The default setting for this property is Enabled. This property is only available for

Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Jumbo Packet

Enables the network adapter to transmit and receive oversized Ethernet frames that are greater than 1514 bytes, but less than or equal to 9000 bytes in length (9600 bytes for network adapters that operate at 10 Gbps). This property requires the presence of a switch that is able to process jumbo frames. This property is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Frame size is set at 1500 bytes by default. To increase the size of the received frames, raise the byte quantity in 500-byte increments.

NOTE: If Jumbo Packet is set to 5000 bytes or greater on network adapters that support 10 Gbps link speed, ensure that Flow

Control is set to Auto to prevent the system performance from performing at less than optimal levels. This limitation exists on a per-port basis.

LSO & Jumbo Frames

Enables the network adapter to transmit and receive oversized Ethernet frames that are greater than 1514 bytes, but less than 9000 bytes in length. This property requires the presence of a switch that is able to process Jumbo frames. This information is available for some Broadcom NetXtreme adapters and is not available for all Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Frame size is set at 1500 bytes by default by selecting the LSO Enabled, Jumbo Off option.

NOTE: Jumbo Frames and Large Send Offload (LSO) are mutually-exclusive properties.

Normally, the TCP segmentation is done by the protocol stack. When you enable the Large Send Offload (LSO) property, the TCP segmentation can be done by the network adapter.

Both Disabled . LSO & Jumbo frames are both disabled.

LSO Enabled, Jumbo Off (default). LSO enabled and jumbo frames disabled.

LSO Off, Jumbo 3000 . Frame size of 3000 bytes and LSO off.

LSO Off, Jumbo 4500 . Frame size of 4500 bytes and LSO off.

LSO Off, Jumbo 6000 .

Frame size of 6000 bytes and LSO off.

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LSO Off, Jumbo 7500 .

Frame size of 7500 bytes and LSO off.

LSO Off, Jumbo 9000 .

Frame size of 9000 bytes and LSO off.

Locally Administered Address

The Locally Administered Address is a user-defined MAC address that is used in place of the MAC address originally assigned to the network adapter. Every adapter in the network must have its own unique MAC address. This locally administered address consists of a 12-digit hexadecimal number.

Value .

Assigns a unique node address for the adapter.

Not Present (default). Uses the factory-assigned node address on the adapter.

The appropriate assigned ranges and exceptions for the locally administered address include the following:

The range is 00:00:00:00:00:01 to FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FD.

Do not use a multicast address (least significant bit of the high byte = 1).

Do not use all 0s or all Fs.

Do not assign a Locally Administered Address on any physical adapter that is a member of a team.

Do not assign a Locally Administered Address on any iSCSI boot-enabled device.

NOTE: In some cases, network devices will allow a different combination of hexadecimal and alphanumeric characters than what is entered, which could result in an invalid MAC address. If you assign an address, confirm the assigned address using the ipconfig utility at the DOS prompt.

Receive Side Scaling

Allows configuring network load balancing across multiple CPUs. The default setting for this property is Enabled.

Switch Configuration .

Allows configuring of the connected switch for the network adapters.

NOTE: Switch Configuration only applies to blade configurations.

SW_Config_10G (default). Sets the switch speed to 10 Gbit/s.

SW_Config_1G . Sets the switch speed to 1 Gbit/s.

Speed & Duplex

The Speed & Duplex property sets the connection speed and mode to that of the network. Note that Full-Duplex mode allows the adapter to transmit and receive network data simultaneously.

10 Mb Full . Sets the speed at 10 Mbit/s and the mode to Full-Duplex.

10 Mb Half . Sets the speed at 10 Mbit/s and the mode to Half-Duplex.

100 Mb Full . Sets the speed at 100 Mbit/s and the mode to Full-Duplex.

100 Mb Half . Sets the speed at 100 Mbit/s and the mode to Half-Duplex.

1 Gb Full . Sets the speed at 1000 Mb Full-Duplex mode only. Not available for 1 Gb ports.

10 GB Full . Sets the speed to 10 Gbit/s and the mode to Full-Duplex. Not available for 1 Gb ports.

Auto (default). Sets the speed and mode for optimum network connection (recommended).

NOTES:

Auto is the recommended setting. This setting allows the network adapter to dynamically detect the line speed of the network. Whenever the network capability changes, the network adapter automatically detects and adjusts to the new line speed and duplex mode. A speed of 1 Gbit/s is enabled by selecting Auto, when that speed is supported.

1 Gb Full Auto must be attached to a link partner that is also capable of a 1 Gb connection. Since the connection is limited to a 1 Gb connection only, the Ethernet@Wirespeed feature will be disabled. If the link partner supports a 1 Gb connection only, the Wake on LAN feature may not work. Additionally, management traffic (IPMI or UMP) in the absence of an operating system may also be affected.

10 Mb Half and 100 Mb Half settings force the network adapter to connect to the network in Half-Duplex mode. Note that the network adapter may not function if the network is not configured to operate at the same mode.

10 Mb Full and 100 Mb Full settings force the network adapter to connect to the network in Full-Duplex mode. The network adapter may not function if the network is not configured to operate at the same mode.

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1 Gb copper ports cannot be forced to 1 Gb.

Speed & Duplex (SerDes)

1 Gb Full . Forces the speed to 1 Gb Full based on a matching setting for its link partner.

Auto (default). Sets the speed to auto-negotiate with its link partner at the highest matching speed.

Auto with 1Gb Fallback Full . Sets the speed to auto-negotiate with its link partner, but if the attached link partner is forced at 1 Gbit/s, it will fall back to this mode.

Hardware Default . Sets the speed to negotiate according to the setting specified by the manufacturer (see manufacturer documentation for more information).

Wake Up Capabilities

Enables the network adapter to wake up from a low-power mode when it receives a network wake-up frame. Two types of wake-up frames are possible: Magic Packet™ and Wake Up Frame. This property is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme adapters.

Both (default).

Selects both Magic Packet and Wake Up Frame as wake-up frames.

Magic Packet . Selects Magic Packet as the wake-up frame.

None .

Selects no wake-up frame.

Wake Up Frame . Selects Wake Up Frame as the wake-up frame and allows the network adapter to wake the system when an event such as a ping or an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) request is received. This option works in conjunction with the operating system power mode saving and does not work if the Power Save setting does not enable WOL.

WOL Speed

Sets the speed at which the network adapter connects to the network while the network adapter is in Wake on LAN mode. By default, the WOL Speed property is set to Auto. This property is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme adapters.

10 Mb .

Sets the speed to 10 Mbit/s. This is the network speed when the system is in a standby mode awaiting a wake-up frame.

100 Mb .

Sets the speed to 100 Mbit/s.

Auto (default). Sets the speed for optimum network connection.

NOTES:

Wake on LAN is supported at 10 Mbit/s or 100 Mbit/s.

Wake on LAN is supported on only one adapter in the system at a time.

Priority & VLAN

Allows enabling both the prioritization of network traffic and VLAN tagging. VLAN tagging only occurs when the VLAN ID setting is configured with a value other than 0 (zero).

Priority & VLAN Enabled (default) . Allows for packet prioritization and VLAN tagging.

Priority & VLAN Disabled . Prevents packet prioritization and VLAN tagging.

Priority Enabled . Allows packet prioritization only.

VLAN Enabled . Allows VLAN tagging only.

NOTE: If an intermediate driver is managing the network adapter for VLAN tagging, the Priority & VLAN Disabled and

Priority Enabled settings should not be used. Use the Priority & VLAN Enabled setting and change the VLAN ID to 0

(zero).

VLAN ID

Enables VLAN tagging and configures the VLAN ID when Priority & VLAN Enabled is selected as the Priority & VLAN setting. The range for the VLAN ID is 1 to 4094 and must match the VLAN tag value on the connected switch. A value of 0 (default) in this field disables VLAN tagging.

Risk Assessment of VLAN Tagging through the NDIS Miniport Driver

Broadcom's NDIS 6.0 miniport driver provides the means to allow a system containing a Broadcom adapter to connect to a tagged

VLAN. On Windows XP systems, this support was only provided through the use of an intermediate driver (e.g., Broadcom

Advanced Server Program - BASP). Unlike BASP, however, the NDIS 6 driver's support for VLAN participation is only for a single

VLAN ID.

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Also unlike BASP, the NDIS 6.0 driver only provides VLAN tagging of the outbound packet, but does not provide filtering of incoming packets based on VLAN ID membership. This is the default behavior of all miniport drivers. While the lack of filtering packets based on VLAN membership may present a security issue, the following provides a risk assessment based on this driver limitation for an IPv4 network:

A properly configured network that has multiple VLANs should maintain separate IP segments for each VLAN. This is necessary since outbound traffic relies on the routing table to identify which adapter (virtual or physical) to pass traffic through and does not determine which adapter based on VLAN membership.

Since support for VLAN tagging on Broadcom's NDIS 6.0 driver is limited to transmit (Tx) traffic only, there is a risk of inbound traffic (Rx) from a different VLAN being passed up to the operating system. However, based on the premise of a properly configured network above, the IP segmentation and/or the switch VLAN configuration may provide additional filtration to limit the risk.

In a back-to-back connection scenario, two computers on the same IP segment may be able to communicate regardless of their VLAN configuration since no filtration of VLAN membership is occurring. However, this scenario assumes that the security may already be breached since this connection type is not typical in a VLAN environment.

If the risk above is not desirable and filtering of VLAN ID membership is required, then support through an intermediate driver would be necessary.

iSCSI Crash Dump

Crash dump is used to collect information on adapters that were booted remotely using iSCSI. To enable crash dump, set to Enable and reboot the system. If you perform an upgrade of the device drivers, re-enable iSCSI Crash Dump . If iSCSI Boot is configured to boot in the HBA path, then this parameter cannot be changed.

Number of Receive Descriptors

The number of receive descriptors with options of Default, Minimum, and Maximum. Receive descriptors are data segments that allow the network adapter to allocate receive packets to memory.

Number of Transmit Descriptors

The number of transmit descriptors with value options from 100 to 600 with 200 being the default value. Transmit descriptors are data segments that allow the network adapter to monitor transmit packets in the system memory.

RSS Queues

Allows configuring RSS queues from 1 to 4. Options are RSS 1 Queue, RSS 2 Queue, and RSS 4 Queue.

Interrupt Moderation

Enables interrupt moderation, which limits the rate of interrupt to the CPU during packet transmission and packet reception. The disabled option allows one interrupt for every packet transmission and packet reception. Enable is the default option.

Number of RSS Queues

Allows configuring RSS queues. For 1 Gbps network adapters, the RSS queue options are Auto (default), 2, 4, and 8. For 10 Gbps network adapters, the RSS queue options are Auto (default), 2, 4, 8, and 16.

Receive Buffers

The number of receive buffers. Receive buffers are data segments that allow the network adapter to allocate receive packets to memory. For 1 Gbps adapters, the range of valid receive buffers is 50 to 5000 in increments of 1 with 750 receive buffers as the default value.

Receive Buffers (0=Auto)

The number of receive buffers. Receive buffers are data segments that allow the network adapter to allocate receive packets to memory. For 10 Gbps adapters, the range of valid receive buffers is 0 to 3000 in increments of 50 with 0 receive buffers as the default value.

Transmit Buffers (0=Auto)

The number of transmit buffers. Transmit buffers are data segments that allow the network adapter to monitor transmit packets in the system memory. The range of valid transmit buffers is 0 to 5000 in increments of 1 with 250 transmit buffers as the default value.

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Enables and disables TOE offload when using the IPv4 protocol. The default is Enabled.

TCP Connection Offload (IPv6)

Enables and disables TOE offload when using the IPv6 protocol. The default is Enabled.

Pause on Exhausted Host Ring

For BCM57711 and BCM57712 network adapters, there are two possible scenarios that can trigger pause frames to be generated: a host ring buffer is exhausted or the on-chip buffers are depleted. With RSS enabled inside the system, it is possible to achieve better

Ethernet throughput if no pause frames are being generated in a case where a host ring buffer (of multiple RSS rings) is exhausted.

The default is Disabled.

Viewing Resource Information

The Resources section of the Information tab displays information about connections and other essential functions for the selected network adapter.

NOTE: Some information may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

Information Tab: Resources

Bus Type

The type of input/output (I/O) interconnect used by the adapter.

Adapters Supporting Remote PHY

The following properties are specific to blade servers using a NetXtreme II BCM5708S adapter that supports the Remote PHY feature.

Chassis PHY Ethernet@Wirespeed

This property is the same as Ethernet@Wirespeed , and is only available when the blade server is attached to a pass-through module.

Chassis PHY Flow Control

This property is the same as Flow Control , and is only available when the blade server is attached to a pass-through module.

Chassis PHY Speed & Duplex

This property is the same as Speed & Duplex (excludes 1 Gb Full Auto), and is only available when the blade server is attached to a pass-through module.

Chassis SW Flow Control

This property is the same as Flow Control , and is only available when the blade server is attached to a switch module.

Chassis SW Speed & Duplex

This property is the same as Speed & Duplex (SerDes), and is only available when the blade server is attached to a switch module.

Configuring System Settings

System Management on the Configurations tab allow you to view and change the values of the available properties for the system. The potentially available properties and their respective settings are described below.

Chimney Offload State

Enables TCP Offload Engine (TOE) for the entire system. On Windows Server 2008 operating systems, the options are Enable

(default) and Disable. For Windows Server 2008 R2, the options are Enable, Disable, and Auto (default). If Chimney Offload State is configured for Auto, then a 10 Gbps network adapter will have TOE enabled, but not for a 1 Gbps network adapter.

To enable TOE for individual network adapters, configure Chimney Offload State to Enable and also enable TCP Connection Offload

(IPv4) or TCP Connection Offload (IPv6) from the Advanced area of the Configuration tab.

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Viewing Statistics

The information provided on the Statistics tab allows you to view traffic statistics for both Broadcom network adapters and network adapters made by others. Statistical information and coverage are more comprehensive for Broadcom adapters.

To view Statistics information for any installed network adapter, click the name of the adapter listed in the Explorer View pane, then click the Statistics tab.

If any of the sections described below is not visible, then from the Context View tab on the right side of the window, select

Statistics and then select the name of the missing section.

Click Refresh to get the most recent values for each statistic. Click Reset to change all values to zero for the current BACS session.

NOTES:

Team statistics are not compiled for a Broadcom network adapter if it is disabled.

Some statistics may not be available for all Broadcom network adapters.

General Statistics

General Statistics show the transmitted and received statistics to and from the adapter.

Frames Tx OK

A count of the frames that were successfully transmitted. This counter is incremented when the transmit status is reported as

Transmit OK.

Frames Rx OK

A count of the frames that were successfully received. This does not include frames received with frame-too-long, frame check sequence (FCS), length, or alignment errors, nor frames lost due to internal MAC sublayer errors. This counter is incremented when the receive status is reported as Receive OK.

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Directed Frames Tx

A count of directed data frames that were successfully transmitted.

Multicast Frames Tx

A count of frames that were successfully transmitted (as indicated by the status value Transmit OK) to a group destination address other than a broadcast address.

Broadcast Frames Tx

A count of frames that were successfully transmitted (as indicated by the transmit status Transmit OK) to the broadcast address.

Frames transmitted to multicast addresses are not broadcast frames and are excluded.

Directed Frames Rx

A count of directed data frames that were successfully received.

Multicast Frames Rx

A count of frames that were successfully received and are directed to an active nonbroadcast group address. This does not include frames received with frame-too-long, FCS, length, or alignment errors, nor frames lost because of internal MAC sublayer errors. This counter is incremented as indicated by the Receive OK status.

Broadcast Frames Rx

A count of frames that were successfully received and are directed to a broadcast group address. This count does not include frames received with frame-too-long, FCS, length, or alignment errors, nor frames lost because of internal MAC sublayer errors. This counter is incremented as indicated by the Receive OK status.

Frames Rx with CRC Error

The number of frames received with CRC errors.

Initiator Login Statistics iSCSI login enables a connection for iSCSI use between the initiator and the target and is used to authenticate parties, negotiate the session's parameters, open security association protocol, and mark the connection as belonging to an iSCSI session.

Login Accept Responses

The number of login requests accepted by the target.

Login other failed Responses

The number of login requests that were not accepted by the target.

Login Redirect Responses

The number of responses that required further action by the initiator.

Login Authentication Failed Responses

The number of login requests that failed due to party authentication failure.

Login target authentication failure

The number of instances where the login could not authenticate the target.

Login target negotiation failure

The number of instances where the login could not negotiate the sessions parameters.

Normal logout command PDU

The number of normal logout commands issued by the initiator to remove a connection from a session or to close a session.

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The number of logout commands issued by the initiator for reasons other than to remove a connection from a session or to close a session.

Local Initiator login failures

The number of login failures likely caused by the initiator.

Initiator Instance Statistics

The statistics in this area pertain to all sessions.

Session digest errors

The number of sessions with errors due to an invalid payload or header.

Session connection timeout error

The number of sessions that were terminated due to any of the many timeout errors.

Session format error

The number of sessions with errors due to inconsistent fields, reserved fields not 0, non-existent LUN, etc.

Sessions failed

The number of failed sessions.

Custom

Custom statistics.

Total Offload iSCSI Connections

The total number of offloaded iSCSI connections.

Session Statistics

The statistics in this area only pertain to the named session.

Session Name

The name used for the session between the initiator and the target.

Session Id

The identifier used for the session between the initiator and the target.

Bytes sent

The number of bytes sent for the named session.

Bytes received

The number of bytes received for the named session.

PDU sent

The number of iSCSI PDUs sent for the named session.

PDU received

The number of iSCSI PDUs received for the named session.

Digest errors

The number of errors due to an invalid payload or header for the named session.

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The number of connection timeout errors for the named session.

Format errors

The number of errors due to inconsistent fields, reserved fields not 0, non-existent LUN, etc. for the named session.

IEEE 802.3 Statistics

Frames Rx with Alignment Error

A count of the frames that were not an integral number of octets in length and do not pass the FCS check. This counter is incremented when the receive status is reported as Alignment Error.

Frames Tx with one Collision

A count of the frames that were involved in a single collision and were subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is incremented when the result of a transmission is reported as Transmit OK, and the attempt value is 2.

Frames Tx with more than one Collision

A count of the frames that were involved in more than one collision and were subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is incremented when the transmit status is reported as Transmit OK, and the value of the attempts variable is greater than 2 and less than or equal to the attempt limit.

Frames Tx after Deferral

A count of the frames that were delayed being transmitted on the first attempt because the medium was busy. The frames involved in any collision are not counted.

Custom Statistics

NOTE: Custom statistics are available only for an enabled Broadcom network adapter.

Out of Recv. Buffer

The number of times the adapter ran out of Receive Buffer Descriptors. This information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters.

Frames size less than 64-byte with bad FCS

The number of frames with a size less than 64 bytes with bad FCS.

MAC Rx w/ Pause Command and Length = 0

MAC control frames with the pause command and a length equal to 0.

MAC Rx w/ Pause Command and Length greater than 0

MAC control frames with the pause command and a length greater than 0.

MAC Rx w/ no Pause Command

MAC control frames with no pause command.

MAC Sent X-on

MAC Transmit with X-on was on.

MAC Sent X-off

MAC Transmit with X-on was off.

Large Send Offload Transmit Requests

The number of times the adapter was requested to transmit a packet performing TCP segmentation.

Total Offload TCP Connections

The total number of offloaded TCP connections.

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Viewing and Configuring Resource Reservations

NOTES:

Resource Reservation information is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters and VBD drivers.

Not all offload technologies are available with all adapters.

The Resource Reservations section shows the number of connections allocated to an offload technology: TOE and iSCSI.

TCP Offload Engine (TOE) for accelerating TCP over 1 GbE and 10 GbE.

Internet Small Computer Systems Interface (iSCSI) offload for accelerating network storage access featuring centralized boot functionality (iSCSI boot).

You can also view the number of unlicensed resources and unallocated resources.

TOE and iSCSI can only be configured on certain adapters and require a license key. License keys are installed on the motherboard for use with LOMs and are preprogrammed in add-in NICs. TOE is a technology best suited for long-term TCP connections. TOE used in conjunction with applications that primarily deal with short-term connections may see suboptimal performance when compared to not using TOE. A short-term connection is a TCP connection that is established for only a few seconds at most, often less than one second. The overhead of establishing and tearing down the TCP connection with short-term connections may diminish the benefit that TOE provides. An example of an application that uses short-term connections is a web server that is not behind a load balancer.

TCP connections for HTTP sessions are very short-lived and last only long enough to serve up a web page, after which the TCP connection is terminated. On the other hand, the same web server behind a load balancer benefits greatly from TOE since the TCP connections are long-lived between the web server and the load balancer. In contrast, a backup application is very likely to benefit from TOE since backup applications establish long-term connections between the server and the client.

To view resource reservations

1. Click the name of the Broadcom NetXtreme II system device in the Explorer View pane.

2. From the Resource Reservations section, select the property you want to set.

3. Click Apply to confirm the changes to all properties. Click Reset to return the properties to their original values.

To configure resource reservations

1. Select Reserved Resources for the Offload Configuration setting. Reservations allocate the minimum number of connections per technology. See Table 1 for the maximum number of connections available for various configurations.

2. Click First Come First Served to allow connections on a first-come-first-served basis to any enabled offload technology (TOE or iSCSI) as long as resources are available. Otherwise, click Reserved Resources to set the maximum number of connections for each offload technology. This option is not available for 10 Gbps network adapters.

3. If allocating TOE connections, select the TCP Offload Engine (TOE) check box and slide the bar or enter a number in the value box. This is the maximum number of connections available for TOE offload.

4. If allocating iSCSI connections, select the iSCSI check box and slide the bar or enter a number in the value box. This is the maximum number of connections available for iSCSI offload.

5. After the configurations are complete, click Apply to save the settings or click Reset to revert back to the previous settings.

A chart of the resource allocations appears below the resource configurations.

6. If prompted, reboot the system.

Table 1: Maximum Number of Offload Connections

Offload First Come First Served Reserved Resources Maximum Number of Connections

TOE only Selected – 1024

TOE only – Selected 864 iSCSI only Selected iSCSI only –

Selected

Between 7 and 100

28

Configuring the IP Address for iSCSI Offload

For iSCSI-booted adapters, the Configurations tab is not available and you will not be able to perform this procedure.

To set the IP address of the iSCSI HBA for iSCSI offload

The iSCSI Management section of the Configurations tab allows you to set the IP address of the iSCSI HBA when using iSCSI protocol to offload network processing from the CPU to the Broadcom network adapter.

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1. Click the name of the Broadcom NetXtreme II iSCSI device in the SCSI controller section of the Explorer View pane.

2. Depending on the protocol you will be using, for IPv4 DHCP or IPv6 DHCP , select Enable (not available for iSCSI booted adapters) to set the IP address dynamically using a DHCP server. Or select Disable to set the IP address using a static IP address. Enter the IP Address , Subnet Mask , and Default Gateway .

3. Configure the VLAN ID for the iSCSI HBA by entering a number for VLAN ID . The value must be between 0 and 4094.

4. After the configurations are complete, click Apply to save the settings or click Reset to revert back to the previous settings.

Viewing Licenses

NOTES:

The Licenses section of the Configurations tab is only available for Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters and VBD drivers.

Not all offload technologies are available with all adapters.

The Licenses section shows the number of connections available for TOE and iSCSI offload technologies.

To view licenses

1. Click the name of the Broadcom NetXtreme II system device in the Explorer View pane.

Configuring Teaming

The teaming function allows you to group any available network adapters together to function as a team. Teaming is a method of creating a virtual NIC (a group of multiple adapters that functions as a single adapter). The benefit of this approach is that it enables load balancing and failover. Teaming is done through the Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP) software. For a comprehensive description of the technology and implementation considerations of the teaming software, refer to the "Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet

Teaming Services" section of your Broadcom network adapter user guide.

Teaming can be accomplished by either of the following methods:

Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard

Using Expert Mode

NOTES:

For further information regarding teaming protocols, see "Teaming" in your Broadcom network adapter user guide.

If you do not enable LiveLink™ when configuring teams, disabling Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) at the switch is recommended. This minimizes the downtime due to spanning tree loop determination when failing over. LiveLink mitigates such issues.

BASP is available only if a system has one or more Broadcom network adapters installed.

The TCP Offload Engine (TOE), Large Send Offload (LSO), and Checksum Offload properties are enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are configured for the feature.

If an adapter is included as a member of a team and you change any advanced property, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team's advanced properties are properly set.

If an adapter with a TOE key is included as a member of a team and you remove the TOE key, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team does not appear as a TOE-enabled team.

You must have administrator privileges to create or modify a team.

The load balance algorithm in a team environment in which members are connected at different speeds favors members connected with a Gigabit Ethernet link over members connected at lower speed links (100 Mbps or 10 Mbps) until a threshold is met. This is normal behavior.

In a GEC or 802.3ad type team, disabling the device driver(s) of a team member that has IPMI enabled may prevent a successful failover since IPMI maintains link with the attached switch.

Do not assign a Locally Administered Address on any physical adapter that is a member of a team.

Team Types

You can create four types of load balance teams:

Smart Load Balance and Failover

Link Aggregation (802.3ad) (TOE is not applicable)

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SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) – The Auto-Fallback Disable feature is configured for Smart Load Balance and Failover type teams in the Teaming Wizard.

NOTE: NetXtreme II network adapters with iSCSI enabled is supported only in an SLB team type.

Smart Load Balance and Failover

In this type of team, a standby member handles the traffic if all of the load balance members fail (a failover event). All load balance members have to fail before the standby member takes over. When one or more of the load balance members is restored (fallback), the restored team member(s) resumes the handling of the traffic. The LiveLink feature is supported for this type of team.

Link Aggregation (802.3ad)

In this type of team, you can dynamically configure the network adapters that have been selected to participate in a given team. If the link partner is not correctly configured for IEEE 802.3ad link configuration, errors are detected and noted. All adapters in the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. The outbound load balancing scheme is determined by the BASP driver. The link partner of the team determines the load balancing scheme for inbound packets. In this mode, at least one of the link partners must be in active mode.

NOTE: TOE is not applicable for Link Aggregation team type. NetXtreme II network adapters with iSCSI enabled is not supported for Link Aggregation team type.

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static

This type of team is very similar to the link aggregation type, in that all adapters in the team must be configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. This mode does not provide link aggregation control protocol (LACP) or marker protocol support. This mode supports a variety of environments where the link partners are statically configured to support a proprietary trunking mechanism. Trunking supports load balancing and failover for both outbound and inbound traffic.

NOTE: TOE is not applicable for Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static team type. NetXtreme II network adapters with iSCSI enabled is not supported for Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)/802.3ad-Draft Static team type.

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable)

This team is identical to Smart Load Balance and Failover, with the following exception: when the standby member is active, if a primary member comes back online, the team continues using the standby member rather than switching back to the primary member. This type of team is supported only for situations in which the network cable is disconnected and reconnected to the network adapter. It is not supported for situations in which the adapter is removed/installed through Device Manager or Hot-Plug

PCI. If any primary adapter assigned to a team is disabled, the team functions as a Smart Load Balancing and Failover type of team in which auto-fallback occurs. The LiveLink feature is supported for this type of team.

Standby Team Member and Auto-Fallback Disable Mode

You can designate one team member in an SLB type of team to be the standby member. The standby member does not actively send and receive normal network traffic while other adapters on the team are active. If all of the active adapters on the team fail or are disconnected, the standby member takes over the handling of the network activities.

In Auto-Fallback Disable mode, if a load balance member returns on line, the team continues using the standby member rather than switching back to using the load balance member. Consequently, the adapter that was initially designated a load balance member remains in an inactive state and becomes the new standby member.

LiveLink

LiveLink is a feature of BASP that is available for the Smart Load Balancing (SLB) and SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) type of teaming.

The purpose of LiveLink is to detect link loss beyond the switch and to route traffic only through team members that have a live link.

Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard

You can use the Broadcom Teaming Wizard to create a team, configure an existing team if a team has already been created, or create a VLAN.

1. Create or edit a team:

To create a new team, select Create a Team from the Team menu, or right-click one of the devices in the "Unassigned

Adapters" section and select Create a Team . This option is not available if there are no devices listed in the "Unassigned

Adapters" sections, which means all adapters are already assigned to teams.

To configure an existing team, right-click one of the teams in the list and select Edit Team . This option is only available if a team has already been created and is listed in the Team Management pane.

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NOTE: If you prefer to work without the wizard for now, click Expert Mode . If you want to always use Expert Mode to create a team, select Default to Expert Mode on next start . See Using Expert Mode .

2. To continue using the wizard, click Next .

3. Type the team name and then click Next . If you want to review or change any of your settings, click Back . Click Cancel to discard your settings and exit the wizard.

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4. Select the type of team you want to create. If the team type is an SLB type team, click Next . If the team type is not an SLB type team, then a dialog box appears. Verify that the network switch connected to the team members is configured correctly for the team type, click OK , and continue.

NOTE: NetXtreme II network adapters with iSCSI enabled is supported only in an SLB team type. To continue with the creation of non-SLB team types, first disable iSCSI by deselecting iSCSI Offload Engine from the Resource Reservations area of the Configurations tab.

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5. From the Available Adapters list, click the adapter you want to add to the team and then click Add . Remove team members from the Team Members list by clicking the adapter and then clicking Remove . Click Next .

NOTE: There must be at least one Broadcom network adapter assigned to the team.

NOTE: A team created with a single adapter will not have load balancing or failover capabilities.

The TCP Offload Engine (TOE), Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum Offload (CO) columns indicate if the TOE, LSO,

Jumbo MTU, and/or the CO properties are supported for the adapter. The TOE, LSO, Jumbo MTU, and CO properties are enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are configured for the feature. If this is the case, then the team offload capabilities appear on the bottom of the screen.

NOTES:

If an adapter is included as a member of a team and you change any advanced property, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team's advanced properties are properly set.

If an adapter with a TOE key is included as a member of a team and you remove the TOE key, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team does not appear as a TOE-enabled team.

Adding a network adapter to a team where its driver is disabled may negatively affect the offloading capabilities of the team. This may have an impact on the team's performance. Therefore, it is recommended that only driver-enabled network adapters be added as members to a team.

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6. If you want to designate one of the adapters as a standby member (optional), select Use the following member as a standby member , then choose the standby member from the list of adapters.

7. The Auto-Fallback Disable mode feature allows the team to continue using the standby member rather than switching back to the primary member if the primary member comes back online. To enable this feature, select Enable Auto-Fallback Disable mode . Click Next .

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8. If you want to configure LiveLink, select Yes , otherwise select No , then click Next .

9. Select the probe interval (the number of seconds between each retransmission of a link packet to the probe target) and the maximum number of probe retries (the number of consecutively missed responses from a probe target before a failover is triggered).

10. Set the Probe VLAN ID to allow for connectivity with probe targets residing on a tagged VLAN. The number set must match the VLAN ID of the probe targets as well as the port(s) on the switch to which the team is connected.

NOTE: Each LiveLink enabled team can only communicate with Probe Targets on a single VLAN. Also, VLAN ID 0 is equivalent to an untagged network. If the Probe VLAN ID is set to a value other than 0, then a VLAN must be created with an identical VLAN tag value (see Step 16.

).

11. Click the probe target at the top of the list, click Edit Target IP Address , type the target IP address in the IP Address box for one or all probe targets, and then click OK . Click Next .

NOTE: Only the first probe target is required. You can specify up to three additional probe targets to serve as backups by assigning IP addresses to the other probe targets.

12. Select a listed team member, click Edit Member IP Address , and then type the member IP address in the IP Address box.

Repeat for all listed team members and then click OK . Click Next .

NOTE: All of the member IP addresses must be in the same subnet as the subnet of the probe targets.

13. If you want to create a VLAN on the team, select Add VLAN , or if you want to change the settings of an existing VLAN, select

Edit VLAN , then click Next . If you do not want to create or edit a VLAN, select Skip Manage VLAN , then click Next , and continue with the wizard from the Finish screen (see Step 18.

of this procedure).

VLANs enable you to add multiple virtual adapters that are on different subnets. The benefit of this is that your system can have one network adapter that can belong to multiple subnets.

NOTE: VLANs can only be created when all team members are Broadcom adapters.

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14. Type the VLAN name and then click Next .

NOTE: The team name cannot exceed 39 characters, cannot begin with spaces, and cannot contain any of the following characters: & \ / : * ? < > |

15. To tag the VLAN, select Tagged and then click Next . Otherwise, click Untagged , click Next , and continue with the wizard to file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/bacs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:48 PM]

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of this procedure).

16. Type the VLAN tag value and then click Next . The value must be between 1 and 4094.

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NOTE: You can define up to 64 VLANs per team (63 VLANs that are tagged and 1 VLAN that is not tagged). Adding several

VLANS may slow down the reaction time of the Windows interface due to memory and processor time usage for each VLAN.

The degree to which Windows performance may suffer depends on system configuration.

18. To apply and commit the changes to the team, select Commit changes to system and Exit the wizard . To apply your changes but continue using the wizard, select Save changes and continue to manage more teams . Click Finish.

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NOTE: At any point in the Broadcom Teaming Wizard procedure, click Preview to get a visual representation of what the team will look like before committing any changes.

19. Click the team name in the Team Management pane to view the team's properties in the Information tab, transfer and receive data in the Statistics tab, and team customization options in the Configurations tab.

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Using Expert Mode

Use Expert Mode to create a team, modify a team, add a VLAN, and configure LiveLink for a Smart Load Balance and Failover and

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) team. To create a team using the wizard, see Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard .

To set the default Teaming Mode, select Options from the Tools menu. In the Options window, click the General tab, then select

Expert Mode or Wizard Mode (the default is Wizard Mode).

Creating a Team

NOTE: Enabling Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is not recommended for members of an SLB type of team.

1. From the Teams menu, select Create a Team , or right-click one of the devices in the "Unassigned Adapters" section and select Create a Team . This option is not available if there are no devices listed in the "Unassigned Adapters" sections, which means all adapters are already assigned to teams.

2. Click Expert Mode .

NOTE: If you want to always use Expert Mode to create a team, click Default to Expert Mode on next start .

3. Click the Create Team tab.

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NOTE: The Create Team tab appears only if there are teamable adapters available.

4. Click the Team Name field to enter a team name.

5. Click the Team Type field to select a team type.

6. Assign any available adapter or adapters to the team by moving the adapter from the Available Adapters list to the Load

Balance Members list. There must be at least one adapter in the Load Balance Members list.

7. You can assign any other available adapter to be a standby member by selecting it from the Standby Member list.

NOTE: There must be at least one Broadcom network adapter assigned to the team.

NOTE: A team created with a single adapter will not have load balancing or failover capabilities.

The TCP Offload Engine (TOE), Large Send Offload (LSO), and Checksum Offload (CO) columns indicate if the TOE, LSO, and/or the CO properties are supported for the adapter. The TOE, LSO, and CO properties are enabled for a team only when all of the members support and are configured for the feature. If this is the case, then the team offload capabilities appear on the bottom of the screen.

NOTES:

If an adapter is included as a member of a team and you change any advanced property, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team's advanced properties are properly set.

If an adapter with a TOE key is included as a member of a team and you remove the TOE key, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team does not appear as a TOE-enabled team.

Adding a network adapter to a team where its driver is disabled may negatively affect the offloading capabilities of the team. This may have an impact on the team's performance. Therefore, it is recommended that only driver-enabled network adapters be added as members to a team.

8. Type the value for Team MTU .

9. Click Create to save the team information.

10. Repeat steps 4.

through 9.

to define additional teams. As teams are defined, they can be selected from the team list, but they have not yet been created. Click the Preview tab to view the team structure before applying the changes.

11. Click Apply/Exit to create all the teams you have defined and exit the Manage Teams window.

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12. Click Yes when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be temporarily interrupted.

NOTES:

The team name cannot exceed 39 characters, cannot begin with spaces, and cannot contain any of the following characters: & \ / : * ? < > |

Team names must be unique. If you attempt to use a team name more than once, an error message is displayed indicating that the name already exists.

The maximum number of team members is 8.

When team configuration has been correctly performed, a virtual team adapter driver is created for each configured team.

If you disable a virtual team and later want to reenable it, you must first disable and reenable all team members before you reenable the virtual team.

When you create Generic Trunking and Link Aggregation teams, you cannot designate a standby member. Standby members work only with Smart Load Balancing and Failover and SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) types of teams.

For an SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) team, to restore traffic to the load balance members from the standby member, click the Fallback button on the Team Properties tab.

When configuring an SLB team, although connecting team members to a hub is supported for testing, it is recommended to connect team members to a switch.

Not all network adapters made by others are supported or fully certified for teaming.

13. Configure the team IP address.

a. From Control Panel , double-click Network Connections .

b. Right-click the name of the team to be configured, and then click Properties .

c. On the General tab, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) , and then click Properties .

d. Configure the IP address and any other necessary TCP/IP configuration for the team, and then click OK when finished.

Modifying a Team

After you have created a team, you can modify the team in the following ways:

Change the type of team

Change the members assigned to the team

Add a VLAN

Modify a VLAN (using Expert Mode)

Remove a team or a VLAN (using Expert Mode)

To modify a team

1. From the Team menu, click Edit Team , or right-click one of the teams in the list and select Edit Team . This option is only available if a team has already been created and is listed in the Team Management pane.

2. The wizard Welcome screen appears. Click Next to continue modifying a team using the wizard or click Expert Mode to work in Expert Mode.

NOTE: The Edit Team tab in Expert Mode appears only if there are teams configured on the system.

3. Click the Edit Team tab.

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4. Make the desired changes, and then click Update . The changes have not yet been applied; click the Preview tab to view the updated team structure before applying the changes.

5. Click Apply/Exit to apply the updates and exit the Manage Teams window.

6. Click Yes when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be temporarily interrupted.

Adding a VLAN

You can add virtual LANs (VLANs) to a team. This enables you to add multiple virtual adapters that are on different subnets. The benefit of this is that your system can have one network adapter that can belong to multiple subnets. With a VLAN, you can couple the functionality of load balancing for the load balance members, and you can employ a failover adapter.

You can define up to 64 VLANs per team (63 VLANs that are tagged and 1 VLAN that is not tagged). VLANs can only be created when all teams members are Broadcom adapters. If you try to create a VLAN with a non-Broadcom adapter, an error message is displayed.

To configure a team with a VLAN

1. From the Teams menu, select Add VLAN .

2. The Welcome screen appears.

3. Click Expert Mode .

4. On the Create Team tab of the Manage Teams window, click Manage VLAN(s) .

5. Type the VLAN name, then select the type and ID.

6. Click Create to save the VLAN information. As VLANs are defined, they can be selected from the Team Name list, but they have not yet been created.

7. Continue this process until all VLANs are defined, then click OK to create them.

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8. Click Yes when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be temporarily interrupted.

NOTE: To maintain optimum adapter performance, your system should have 64 MB of system memory for each of the eight VLANs created per adapter.

Viewing VLAN Properties and Statistics and Running VLAN Tests

To view VLAN properties and statistics and to run VLAN tests

1. Select one of the listed VLANs.

2. Click the Information tab to view the properties of the VLAN adapter.

3. Click the Statistics tab to view the statistics for the VLAN adapter.

4. Click the Diagnostics tab to run a network test on the VLAN adapter.

Deleting a VLAN

The procedure below applies when you are in Expert Mode.

To delete a VLAN

1. Select the VLAN to delete.

2. From the Teams menu, select Remove VLAN .

3. Click Apply .

4. Click Yes when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be temporarily interrupted.

NOTE: If you delete a team, any VLANs configured for that team are also deleted.

Configuring LiveLink for a Smart Load Balancing and Failover and SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) Team

LiveLink is a feature of BASP that is available for the Smart Load Balancing (SLB) and SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) type of teaming.

The purpose of LiveLink is to detect link loss beyond the switch and to route traffic only through team members that have a live link.

Read the following notes before you attempt to configure LiveLink.

NOTES:

Before you begin configuring LiveLink™, review the description of LiveLink. Also verify that each probe target you plan to specify is available and working. If the IP address of the probe target changes for any reason, LiveLink must be reconfigured. If the MAC address of the probe target changes for any reason, you must restart the team (see

"Troubleshooting").

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A probe target must be on the same subnet as the team, have a valid (not a broadcast, multicast, or unicast), statically-assigned IP address, and be highly available (always on).

To ensure network connectivity to the probe target, ping the probe target from the team.

You can specify up to four probe targets.

The IP address assigned to either a probe target or team member cannot have a zero as the first or last octet.

To configure LiveLink

1. From the Teams menu, select Edit Team .

2. Click Expert Mode (to configure LiveLink using the Teaming Wizard, see Using the Broadcom Teaming Wizard ).

3. In the Manage Teams window, click the Edit Team tab.

4. Select Enable LiveLink . The LiveLink Configuration options appear below.

5. It is recommended to accept the default values for Probe interval (the number of seconds between each retransmission of a link packet to the probe target) and Probe maximum retries (the number of consecutively missed responses from a probe target before a failover is triggered). To specify different values, click the desired probe interval in the Probe interval

(seconds) list and click the desired maximum number of probe retries in the Probe maximum retries list.

6. Set the Probe VLAN ID to correspond with the VLAN where the probe target(s) resides. This will apply the appropriate VLAN tag to the link packet based on the shared configuration of the attached switch port(s).

NOTE: Each LiveLink enabled team can only communicate with Probe Targets on a single VLAN. Also, VLAN ID 0 is equivalent to an untagged network.

7. Select Probe Target 1 and type the target IP address for one or all probe targets.

NOTE: Only the first probe target is required. You can specify up to 3 additional probe targets to serve as backups by assigning IP addresses to the other probe targets.

8. Select one of the listed team members and type the member IP address.

NOTE: All of the member IP addresses must be in the same subnet as the probe targets.

9. Click Update . Repeat these steps for each of the other listed team members.

10. Click Apply/Exit .

Saving and Restoring a Team Configuration

To save a configuration

1. From the File menu, select Team Save As .

2. Type the path and file name of the new configuration file , and then click Save .

The configuration file is a text file that can be viewed by any text editor. The file contains information about both the adapter and the team configuration.

To restore a configuration

1. From the File menu, select Team Restore .

2. Click the name of the file to be restored, and then click Open .

NOTE: If necessary, go to the folder where the file is located.

3. Click Apply .

4. Click Yes when the message is displayed indicating that the network connection will be temporarily interrupted.

5. If a configuration is already loaded, a message is displayed that asks if you want to save your current configuration. Click Yes to save the current configuration. Otherwise, the configuration data that is currently loaded is lost.

Note: The team may take a very long time to restore if the team is configured with multiple VLANs and each VLAN is configured with one or more static IP addresses.

Viewing BASP Statistics

The Statistics section shows performance information about the network adapters that are on a team.

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Click Refresh to get the most recent values for each statistic. Click Reset to change all values to zero.

Configuring With the Command Line Interface Utility

An alternate method to BACS for configuring Broadcom network adapters is with BACSCLI, which is a Broadcom utility that allows you to view information and configure network adapters using a console in either a non-interactive command line interface (CLI) mode or an interactive mode. As with BACS, BACSCLI provides information about each network adapter, and enables you to perform detailed tests, run diagnostics, view statistics, and modify property values. BACSCLI also allows you the ability to team network adapters together for load balancing and failover.

For a complete list of available commands and examples, see the BACSCLI ReadMe text file on the Dell-provided CD.

Supported Operating Systems

BACSCLI is supported on the following operating systems:

Windows Server 2008 (including Server Core)

Windows Server 2008 R2 (including Server Core)

Installation

On a system with Broadcom NetXtreme I and NetXtreme II network adapters, BACSCLI is installed when BACS is installed with the installer.

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User Diagnostics: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

User Diagnostics: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

Introduction

System Requirements

Performing Diagnostics

Diagnostic Test Descriptions

Introduction

Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics is an MS-DOS based application that runs a series of diagnostic tests (see Table 3 ) on the Broadcom NetXtreme II network adapters in your system. Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics also allows you to update device firmware and to view and change settings for available adapter properties. There are two versions of the

Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics: uxdiag.exe (for BCM5708/BCM5709 network adapters) and uediag.exe (for

BCM57710 network adapters).

To run Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics, create an MS-DOS 6.22 bootable disk containing the uxdiag.exe or uediag.exe file. Next, start the system with the boot disk in drive A. See Performing Diagnostics for further instructions on running diagnostic tests on Broadcom network adapters.

System Requirements

Operating System: MS-DOS 6.22

Software: uxdiag.exe (BCM5708/BCM5709), or uediag.exe (BCM57710)

Performing Diagnostics

At the MS-DOS prompt, type uxdiag

(for BCM5708/BCM5709 network adapters)

or uediag

(for BCM57710 network adapters) followed by the command options. The uxdiag command options are shown in Table 1 and the uediag command options are shown in Table 2 . For example, to run all diagnostic tests on adapter #1 except Group B tests:

C:\>uxdiag -c 1 -t b

NOTE: You must include uxdiag or uediag at the beginning of the command string each time you type a command.

Table 1: uxdiag Command Options

Command Options uxdiag uxdiag -c <devnum> uxdiag -fibp uxdiag -fipmi

<ipmi_image> uxdiag -fmba

<mba_image> uxdiag -fncsi

Description

Performs all tests on all Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters in your system.

Specifies the adapter (devnum) to test. Use all in place of a specific device number to test all adapters.

Allows tests to continue after detecting a failure.

uxdiag -cof uxdiag -F uxdiag -fbc

<bc_image>

Forces an upgrade of the image without checking the version.

Specifies the bin file to update the bootcode.

uxdiag -fib <ib_image> Specifies the bin file for iSCSI boot.

uxdiag -fibc Programs the iSCSI configuration block. Used only with -fib <ib_image>.

Programs the iSCSI configuration software. Used only with -fib <ib_image>.

Specifies the bin file to update IPMI firmware.

Specifies the bin file to update the MBA.

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<ncsi_image> uxdiag -fnvm

<raw_image> uxdiag -fump

<ump_image> uxdiag -help uxdiag -I <iteration num>

Specifies the bin file to update the NCSI firmware.

Programs the raw image into NVM.

Specifies the bin file to update UMP firmware.

Displays the Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics (uxdiag) command options.

Specifies the number of iterations to run on the selected tests.

uxdiag -idmatch uxdiag -log <file> uxdiag -mba <1/0> uxdiag -mbap <n> uxdiag -mbas <n> uxdiag -mbav <1|0>

Enables matching of VID, DID, SVID, and SSID from the image file with device IDs. Used only with

-fnvm <raw_image>.

Logs the test results to a specified log file.

Enables/disables Multiple Boot Agent (MBA) protocol.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable

Sets the MBA boot protocol.

0 = PXE

1 = RPL

2 = BOOTP

3 = iSCSI_Boot

Sets the MBA/PXE speed.

0 = Auto

1 = 10H

2 = 10F

3 = 100H

4 = 100F

6 = 1000F

Enables/disables MBA VLAN.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable uxdiag -mbavval <n> Sets MBA VLAN (<65536).

uxdiag -mfw <1/0>

Enables/disables management firmware.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable uxdiag -t

<groups/tests> uxdiag -T

<groups/tests>

Disables certain groups/tests.

Enables certain groups/tests.

uxdiag -ver uxdiag -wol <1/0>

Displays the version of Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics (uxdiag) and all installed adapters.

Enables/disables Magic Packet WOL.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable

Table 2: uediag Command Options

Command Options Description uediag Performs all tests on all Broadcom NetXtreme II adapters in your system.

uediag -c <device#> Specifies the adapter (device#) to test. Similar to -dev (for backward compatibility).

uediag -cof Allows tests to continue after detecting a failure.

uediag -dev <device#> Specifies the adapter (device#) to test.

uediag -F uediag -fbc

<bc_image>

Forces an upgrade of the image without checking the version.

Specifies the bin file to update the bootcode.

uediag -fbc1

<bc1_image> uediag -fbc2

<bc2_image> uediag -fl2b

<l2b_image>

Specifies the bin file to update bootcode 1.

Specifies the bin file to update bootcode 2.

Specifies the bin file for L2B firmware.

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uediag -fibc Programs iSCSI configuration block 0. Used only with -fib <ib_image>.

uediag -fibc2 uediag -fibp uediag -fipmi

<ipmi_image>

Programs iSCSI configuration block 1. Used only with -fib <ib_image>.

Programs iSCSI configuration software. Used only with -fib <ib_image>.

Specifies the bin file to update IPMI firmware.

uediag -fmba

<mba_image> uediag -fnvm

<raw_image> uediag -fump

<ump_image>

Specifies the bin file to update the MBA.

Programs the raw image into NVM.

Specifies the bin file to update UMP firmware.

uediag -help Displays the Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics (uediag) command options.

uediag -I <iteration#> Specifies the number of iterations to run on the selected tests.

uediag -idmatch

Enables matching of VID, DID, SVID, and SSID from the image file with device IDs: Used only with

-fnvm <raw_image>.

uediag -log <logfile> Logs the tests results to a specified log file.

uediag -mba <1/0>

Enables/disables Multiple Boot Agent (MBA) protocol.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable uediag -mbap <n> uediag -mbav <1/0>

Sets the MBA boot protocol.

0 = PXE

1 = RPL

2 = BOOTP

3 = iSCSI_Boot

Enables/disables MBA VLAN.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable uediag -mbavval <n> Sets MBA VLAN (<65536).

uediag -mfw <1/0>

Enables/disables management firmware.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable uediag -t

<groups/tests> uediag -T

<groups/tests> uediag -ver

Disables certain groups/tests.

Enables certain groups/tests.

uediag -wol <1/0>

Displays the version of Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics (uediag) and all installed adapters.

Enables/disable Magic Packet WOL.

1 = Enable

0 = Disable

Diagnostic Test Descriptions

The diagnostic tests are divided into four groups: Basic Functional Tests (Group A), Memory Tests (Group B), Block Tests

(Group C), and Ethernet Traffic Tests (Group D). The diagnostic tests are listed and described in Table 3 .

Table 3: Diagnostic Tests

Test

Description

Number Name

Group A: Basic Functional Tests

A1

A2

Register

PCI

Configuration

Verifies that registers accessible through the PCI/PCI-E interface implement the expected read-only or read/write attributes by attempting to modify those registers.

Checks the functionality of the PCI Base Address Register (BAR) by varying the amount of memory requested by the BAR and verifying that the BAR actually requests the correct amount of memory

(without actually mapping the BAR into system memory). Refer to PCI or PCI-E specifications for details on the BAR and its addressing space.

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A3

A5

Interrupt

MSI

Generates a PCI interrupt and verifies that the system receives the interrupt and invokes the correct

ISR. A negative test is also performed to verify that a masked interrupt does not invoke the ISR.

Verifies that a Message Signaled Interrupt (MSI) causes an MSI message to be DMA'd to host memory. A negative test is also performed to verify that when an MSI is masked, it does not write an MSI message to host memory.

A6 Memory BIST Invokes the internal chip Built-In Self Test (BIST) command to test internal memory.

Group B: Memory Tests

B1

B2

B3

TXP

Scratchpad

TPAT

Scratchpad

RXP

Scratchpad

B4

B5

B6

B7

B8

B9

B10

B11

B12

B13

B14

COM

Scratchpad

CP

Scratchpad

MCP

Scratchpad

TAS Header

Buffer

TAS Payload

Buffer

RBUF via

GRC

RBUF via

Indirect

Access

RBUF Cluster

List

TSCH List

CSCH List

RV2P

Scratchpads

B15

B16

B17

TBDC

Memory

RBDC

Memory

CTX Page

Table

B18 CTX Memory

Group C: Block Tests

C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

The Group B tests verify all memory blocks of the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter by writing various data patterns (0x55aa55aa, 0xaa55aa55, walking zeroes, walking ones, address, etc.) to each memory location, reading back the data, and then comparing it to the value written. The fixed data patterns are used to ensure that no memory bit is stuck high or low, while the walking zeroes/ones and address tests are used to ensure that memory writes do not corrupt adjacent memory locations.

CPU Logic and DMA

Interface

RBUF

Allocation

CAM Access

Verifies the basic logic functionality of all the on-chip CPUs. It also exercises the DMA interface exposed to those CPUs. The internal CPU tries to initiate DMA activities (both read and write) to system memory and then compares the values to confirm that the DMA operation completed successfully.

Verifies the RX buffer (RBUF) allocation interface by allocating and releasing buffers and checking that the RBUF block maintains an accurate count of the allocated and free buffers.

Verifies the content-addressable memory (CAM) block by performing read, write, add, modify, and cache hit tests on the CAM associative memory.

TPAT Cracker

Verifies the packet cracking logic block (i.e., the ability to parse TCP, IP, and UDP headers within an

Ethernet frame) as well as the checksum/CRC offload logic. In this test, packets are submitted to the chip as if they were received over Ethernet and the TPAT block cracks the frame (identifying the

TCP, IP, and UDP header data structures) and calculates the checksum/CRC. The TPAT block results are compared with the values expected by Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics and any errors are displayed.

FIO Register The Fast IO (FIO) verifies the register interface that is exposed to the internal CPUs.

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/userdiag.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:54 PM]

User Diagnostics: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

C6

C7

D2

D4

D5

D6

NVM Access and Reset-

Corruption

Core-Reset

Integrity

PHY

Loopback

LSO

EMAC

Statistics

RPC

Verifies non-volatile memory (NVM) accesses (both read and write) initiated by one of the internal

CPUs. It tests for appropriate access arbitration among multiple entities (CPUs). It also checks for possible NVM corruption by issuing a chip reset while the NVM block is servicing data.

Verifies that the chip performs its reset operation correctly by resetting the chip multiple times, checking that the bootcode and the internal uxdiag driver loads/unloads correctly.

C8

C9

DMA Engine

VPD

Verifies the functionality of the DMA engine block by performing numerous DMA read and write operations to various system and internal memory locations (and byte boundaries) with varying lengths (from 1 byte to over 4 KB, crossing the physical page boundary) and different data patterns

(incremental, fixed, and random). CRC checks are performed to ensure data integrity. The DMA write test also verifies that DMA writes do not corrupt the neighboring host memory.

Exercises the Vital Product Data (VPD) interface using PCI configuration cycles and requires a proper bootcode to be programmed into the non-volatile memory. If no VPD data is present (i.e., the VPD

NVM area is all 0s), the test first initializes the VPD data area with non-zero data before starting the test and restores the original data after the test completes.

C11 FIO Events

Verifies that the event bits in the CPU's Fast IO (FIO) interface are triggering correctly when a particular chip events occur, such as a VPD request initiated by the host, an expansion ROM request initiated by the host, a timer event generated internally, toggling any GPIO bits, or accessing NVM.

Group D: Ethernet Traffic Tests

D1

MAC

Loopback

Enables MAC loopback mode in the adapter and transmits 5000 Layer 2 packets of various sizes. As the packets are received back by Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics, they are checked for errors. Packets are returned through the MAC receive path and never reach the PHY. The adapter should not be connected to a network.

Enables PHY loopback mode in the adapter and transmits 5000 Layer 2 packets of various sizes. As the packets are received back by Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics, they are checked for errors. Packets are returned through the PHY receive path and never reach the wire. The adapter should not be connected to a network.

Verifies the functionality of the adapter's Large Send Offload (LSO) support by enabling MAC loopback mode and transmitting large TCP packets. As the packets are received back by Broadcom

NetXtreme II User Diagnostics, they are checked for proper segmentation (according to the selected

MSS size) and any other errors. The adapter should not be connected to a network.

Verifies that the basic statistics information maintained by the chip is correct by enabling MAC loopback mode and sending Layer 2 packets of various sizes. The adapter should not be connected to a network.

Verifies the Receive Path Catch-up (RPC) block by sending packets to different transmit chains. The packets traverse the RPC logic (though not the entire MAC block) and return to the receive buffers as received packets. This is another loopback path that is used by Layer 4 and Layer 5 traffic within the MAC block. As packets are received back by Broadcom NetXtreme II User Diagnostics, they are checked for errors. The adapter should not be connected to a network.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Specifications: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

Specifications: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

10/100/1000BASE-T and 10GBASE-T Cable Specifications

Interface Specifications

NIC Physical Characteristics

NIC Power Requirements

Wake On LAN Power Requirements

Environmental Specifications

10/100/1000BASE-T and 10GBASE-T Cable Specifications

Table 1: 10/100/1000BASE-T Cable Specifications

Port Type

10BASE-T

Connector Media

RJ-45 Category 3, 4, or 5 unshielded twisted pairs (UTP)

Maximum Distance

100m (328 feet)

100/1000BASE-T 1 RJ-45 Category 5 2 UTP 100m (328 feet)

1 1000BASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 5 balanced cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC 11801:2002 and

ANSI/EIA/TIA-568-B.

2 Category 5 is the minimum requirement. Category 5e and Category 6 are fully supported.

Table 2: 10GBASE-T Cable Specifications

Port Type

10GBASE-T

Connector

RJ-45

Media

Category 6 1

Category 6A

UTP

1 UTP

Maximum Distance

50m (164 feet)

100m (328 feet)

1 10GBASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 6 or Category 6A (augmented Category 6) balanced cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC 11801:2002 and ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.

Interface Specifications

Table 3: 10/100/1000BASE-T

Performance Specifications

Feature Specification

PCI Express Interface x4 link width

10/100/1000BASE-T 10/100/1000 Mbps

Table 4: 10GBASE-T Performance

Specifications

Feature Specification

PCI Express Interface x8 link width

10GBASE-T 10 Gbps

NIC Physical Characteristics

Table 5: NIC Physical Characteristics

NIC Type

BCM5708 PCI Express

NIC Length NIC Width

14.7 cm (5.79 inches) 6.4 cm (2.52 inches) file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/specs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:56 PM]

Specifications: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

BCM5709 PCI Express x4 low-profile 11.9 cm (4.7 inches) 6.9 cm (2.7 inches)

BCM57710/BCM57711/BCM57712 PCI Express x8 low profile 16.8 cm (6.6 inches) 5.1 cm (2.0 inches)

NIC Power Requirements

Table 6 shows the power requirements for the BCM5708C add-in NIC.

Table 6: BCM5708C NIC Power Requirements

Link NIC 3.3V Current Draw (A) NIC Power (W)

Idle (no link) 1.44

4.75

1 Gbit

100 Mbit

10 Mbit

1.97

1.60

1.62

6.50

5.28

5.35

Table 7 shows the power requirements for the BCM5709 add-in NIC.

Table 7: BCM5709C NIC Power Requirements

Link NIC 3.3V Current Draw (A) NIC Power (W)

Idle (no link) 1.01

1 Gbit 1.43

3.32

4.71

100 Mbit

10 Mbit

1.16

1.12

3.81

3.71

Table 8 shows the power requirements for the BCM57710/BCM57711/BCM57712 add-in NIC.

Table 8: BCM57710/BCM57711/BCM57712 NIC Power Requirements

Link

Idle (no link)

NIC 12V Current Draw (A) NIC 3.3V Current Draw (A) NIC Power (W) 1

0.60

0.28

8.12

Low power mode 0.50

10GBASE-T link 1.23

10GBASE-T traffic 1.24

0.35

1.79

1.95

7.16

20.67

21.32

Note: 1 Power, measured in watts (W), is a direct calculation of total current draw (A) multiplied by voltage (V). The maximum power consumption for the adapter will not exceed 30W.

Wake On LAN Power Requirements

Nominal power:

BCM957810A1006G: 3.0W

BCM957810a1008G: 4.5W

The tables below show the Wake On LAN power requirements for 1G adapters.

Table 9: BCM5708C Wake On LAN Power Requirements (Nominal Conditions)

100 Mbit Link 10 Mbit Link

NIC 3.3V Current (mA) NIC Power (W) NIC 3.3V Current (mA) NIC Power (W)

236 0.78

150 0.5

Table 10: BCM5709C Wake On LAN Power Requirements (Nominal Conditions)

100 Mbit Link 10 Mbit Link

NIC 3.3V Current (mA) NIC Power (W) NIC 3.3V Current (mA) NIC Power (W)

0 0.87

0 0.85

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/specs.htm[9/26/2012 3:29:56 PM]

Specifications: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Environmental Specifications

Table 11: BCM5708 Environmental Specifications

Condition

Temperature

Relative humidity

Operating Specification Storage Specification

0°C to 55°C (+32°F to +131°F) –40°C to +85°C (–40°F to +185°F)

5% to 85% (noncondensing)

40°C, 16 hour dwells at extremes

Up to 10,000 ft.

5% to 95% (noncondensing)

10°C/hour

Up to 35,000 ft.

Altitude

Shock 10g, 1/2 sine wave, 11 ms

Vibration, peak to peak displacement 0.005 in. max (5 Hz to 32 Hz)

Vibration, peak acceleration

0.25g (5 Hz to 500 Hz)

(Sweep Rate = 1 octave/min.)

60g, 1/2 sine wave, 11 ms

0.1 in. max (5 Hz to 17 Hz)

0.25g (5 Hz to 500 Hz)

(Sweep Rate = 1 octave/min.)

Table 12: BCM5709 Environmental Specifications

Parameter

Operating Temperature

Air Flow Requirement (LFM)

Condition

0°C to 55°C

0

Storage Temperature

Storage Humidity

–40°C to +65°C

5% to 95% condensing

Vibration and Shock IEC 68, FCC Part 68.302, NSTA, 1A

Electrostatic/Electromagnetic Susceptibility EN 61000-4-2, EN 55024

Table 13: BCM957810A1006G Environmental Specifications

Parameter

Operating Temperature

Air Flow Requirement (LFM)

Condition

0°C to 55°C

0

Storage Temperature

Storage Humidity

–40°C to +65°C

5% to 95% condensing

Vibration and Shock IEC 68, FCC Part 68.302, NSTA, 1A

Electrostatic/Electromagnetic Susceptibility IEC 801-2, 3, 4, 5

Table 14: BCM957810a1008G Environmental Specifications

Parameter

Operating Temperature

Air Flow Requirement (LFM)

Storage Temperature

Condition

0°C to 55°C

50

–40°C to +65°C

Storage Humidity

Vibration and Shock

5% to 95% condensing

IEC 68, FCC Part 68.302, NSTA, 1A

Electrostatic/Electromagnetic Susceptibility IEC 801-2, 3, 4, 5

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network

Adapter User Guide

FCC Notice

VCCI Notice

CE Notice

Canadian Regulatory Information (Canada Only)

Korea Communications Commission (KCC) Notice (Republic of Korea Only)

BSMI

Certifications for BCM95709SA0908G, BCM957710A1023G, E02D001, and BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

FCC Notice

FCC, Class B

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G

BCM95709A0906G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

The equipment complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: 1) The device may not cause harmful interference, and 2) This equipment must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

The equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the

FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation.

The equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If the equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.

Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.

Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.

Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for assistance.

Do not make mechanical or electrical modifications to the equipment.

NOTE: If the device is changed or modified without permission of Broadcom, the user may void his or her authority to operate the equipment.

FCC, Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operations is subject to the following two conditions: 1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and 2) This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC

Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This product generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the manufacturer's instruction manual, may cause harmful interference with radio communications. Operation of this product in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case you will be required to correct the interference at your own expense.

These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a non-residential installation.

However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference with radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, you are encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

Reorient the receiving antenna.

Relocate the system with respect to the receiver.

Move the system away from the receiver.

Plug the system into a different outlet so that the system and receiver are on different branch circuits.

Do not make mechanical or electrical modifications to the equipment.

NOTE: If the device is changed or modified without permission of Broadcom, the user may void his or her authority to operate the equipment.

VCCI Notice

Class B

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G

BCM95709A0906G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

The equipment is a Class B product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference from Information

Technology Equipment (VCCI). If used near a radio or television receiver in a domestic environment, it may cause radio interference. Install and use the equipment according to the instruction manual.

CAUTION! The potential exists for this equipment to become impaired in the presence of conducted radio frequency energy between the frequency range of 59–66 MHz. Normal operation will return upon removal of the

RF energy source.

VCCI Class B Statement (Japan)

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

This equipment is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for interference by Information

Technology Equipment (VCCI). If used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. Install and use the equipment according to the instruction manual.

VCCI Class A Statement (Japan)

CE Notice

Class B

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G

BCM95709A0906G

Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Canadian Regulatory Information (Canada Only)

Industry Canada, Class B

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G

BCM95709A0906G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

Notice : The Industry Canada regulations provide that changes or modifications not expressly approved by Broadcom could void your authority to operate this equipment.

Industry Canada, Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

Notice : The Industry Canada regulations provide that changes or modifications not expressly approved by Broadcom could void your authority to operate this equipment.

Industry Canada, classe B

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G

BCM95709A0906G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme à la norme canadienne ICES-003.

Avis : Dans le cadre des réglementations d'Industry Canada, vos droits d'utilisation de cet équipement peuvent être annulés si des changements ou modifications non expressément approuvés par Broadcom y sont apportés.

Industry Canada, classe A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

Cet appareil numérique de classe A est conforme à la norme canadienne ICES-003.

Avis : Dans le cadre des réglementations d'Industry Canada, vos droits d'utilisation de cet équipement peuvent être annulés si des changements ou modifications non expressément approuvés par Broadcom y sont apportés.

Korea Communications Commission (KCC) Notice (Republic of Korea

Only)

B Class Device

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95708A0804F

BCM95709A0907G file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

BCM95709A0906G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA

Note that this device has been approved for non-business purposes and may be used in any environment, including residential areas.

A Class Device

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709A0916G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1022G

BCM957710A1021G

BCM957711A1113G

BCM957711A1102G

Broadcom Corporation

190 Mathilda Place

Sunnyvale, California 94086 USA file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

BSMI

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Certifications for BCM95709SA0908G, BCM957710A1023G, E02D001, and BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

This section is included on behalf of Dell, and Broadcom is not responsible for the validity or accuracy of the information.

The BCM95709SA0908G Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller and the BCM957710A1023G, E02D001, and

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001) Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controllers have received the following regulatory compliance certifications:

FCC, Class A (USA)

VCCI, Class A (Japan)

CE, Class A (European Union)

Canadian Regulatory Information, Class A (Canada)

Korea Communications Commission (KCC) Notice (Republic of Korea)

FCC Notice

FCC, Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

512-338-4400

This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operations is subject to the following two conditions: 1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and 2) This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC

Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This product generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the manufacturer's instruction manual, may cause harmful interference with radio communications. Operation of this product in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case you will be required to correct the interference at your own expense.

These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a non-residential installation.

However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference with radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, you are encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

Reorient the receiving antenna.

Relocate the system with respect to the receiver.

Move the system away from the receiver.

Plug the system into a different outlet so that the system and receiver are on different branch circuits.

Do not make mechanical or electrical modifications to the equipment.

NOTE: If the device is changed or modified without permission of Dell Inc., the user may void his or her authority to operate the equipment.

VCCI Notice

Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

512-338-4400

This equipment is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for interference by Information

Technology Equipment (VCCI). If used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. Install and use the equipment according to the instruction manual.

VCCI Class A Statement (Japan)

file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

CE Notice

Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

512-338-4400 file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Canadian Regulatory Information (Canada Only)

Industry Canada, Class A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

512-338-4400

This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

Notice : The Industry Canada regulations provide that changes or modifications not expressly approved by Dell Inc. could void your authority to operate this equipment.

Industry Canada, classe A

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/regs.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:12 PM]

Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

512-338-4400

Cet appareil numérique de classe A est conforme à la norme canadienne ICES-003.

Avis : Dans le cadre des réglementations d'Industry Canada, vos droits d'utilisation de cet équipement peuvent être annulés si des changements ou modifications non expressément approuvés par Dell Inc. y sont apportés.

Korea Communications Commission (KCC) Notice (Republic of Korea Only)

A Class Device

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM95709SA0908G (5709s-mezz)

Broadcom NetXtreme II 10 Gigabit Ethernet Controller

BCM957710A1023G

BCM957711A1123G (E03D001)

E02D001

Dell Inc.

Worldwide Regulatory Compliance, Engineering and Environmental Affairs

One Dell Way PS4-30

Round Rock, Texas 78682, USA

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Regulatory Information: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

End of Dell-provided certification information. The remainder of this document conforms to the general Restrictions and

Disclaimers listed at the beginning of this user guide.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Back to Contents Page

Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User

Guide

Hardware Diagnostics

Checking Port LEDs

Troubleshooting Checklist

Checking if Current Drivers are Loaded

Running a Cable Length Test

Testing Network Connectivity

Microsoft Virtualization with Hyper-V

Removing the Broadcom NetXtreme II Device Drivers

Upgrading Windows Operating Systems

Broadcom Boot Agent

Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP)

Linux

Miscellaneous

Hardware Diagnostics

Loopback diagnostic tests are available for testing the adapter hardware. These tests provide access to the adapter internal/external diagnostics, where packet information is transmitted across the physical link (for instructions and information on running tests in an MS-DOS environment, see User Diagnostics ; for Windows environments, see Running Diagnostic Tests ).

BACS Diagnostic Tests Failures

If any of the following tests fail while running the diagnostic tests from BACS, this may indicate a hardware issue with the NIC or LOM that is installed in the system.

Control Registers

MII Registers

EEPROM

Internal Memory

On-Chip CPU

Interrupt

Loopback - MAC

Loopback - PHY

Test LED

Below are troubleshooting steps that may help correct the failure.

1. Remove the failing device and reseat it in the slot, ensuring the card is firmly seated in the slot from front to back.

2. Rerun the test.

3. If the card still fails, replace it with a different card of the same model and run the test. If the test passes on the known good card, contact your hardware vendor for assistance on the failing device.

4. Power down the machine, remove AC power from the machine, and then reboot the system.

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Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

5. Remove and re-install the diagnostic software.

6. Contact your hardware vendor.

BACS Network Test Failures

Typically, the BACS Testing the Network failures are the result of a configuration problem on the network or with the IP addresses. Below are common steps to perform when troubleshooting the network.

1. Verify that the cable is attached and you have proper link.

2. Verify that the drivers are loaded and enabled.

3. Replace the cable that is attached to the NIC/LOM.

4. Verify that the IP address is assigned correctly using the command "ipconfig" or by checking the OS IP assigning tool.

5. Verify that the IP address is correct for the network to which the adapter(s) is connected.

Checking Port LEDs

See Network Link and Activity Indication to check the state of the network link and activity.

Troubleshooting Checklist

CAUTION! Before you open the cabinet of your server to add or remove the adapter, review Safety

Precautions .

The following checklist provides recommended actions to take to resolve problems installing the Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter or running it in your system.

Inspect all cables and connections. Verify that the cable connections at the network adapter and the switch are attached properly. Verify that the cable length and rating comply with the requirements listed in Connecting the

Network Cables .

Check the adapter installation by reviewing Installation of the Add-In NIC . Verify that the adapter is properly seated in the slot. Check for specific hardware problems, such as obvious damage to board components or the PCI edge connector.

Check the configuration settings and change them if they are in conflict with another device.

Verify that your server is using the latest BIOS.

Try inserting the adapter in another slot. If the new position works, the original slot in your system may be defective.

Replace the failed adapter with one that is known to work properly. If the second adapter works in the slot where the first one failed, the original adapter is probably defective.

Install the adapter in another functioning system and run the tests again. If the adapter passed the tests in the new system, the original system may be defective.

Remove all other adapters from the system and run the tests again. If the adapter passes the tests, the other adapters may be causing contention.

Checking if Current Drivers are Loaded

Windows

See Viewing Vital Signs to view vital information about the adapter, link status, and network connectivity.

NetWare

To verify that the driver is loaded properly, type

LOAD BX2.LAN FRAME_ETHERNET_II NAME=BX2_1_EII

This command automatically verifies if the link is active. If the link is active, the command returns Link is up.

From the command line, type config

then press ENTER . The following status information is displayed: file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/trouble.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:19 PM]

Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Broadcom NetXtreme II Gigabit Ethernet Adapter Version:

Hardware Setting:

Node Address:

Frame Type:

Board Name:

LAN Protocol: ARP (see note)

LAN Protocol: IP Addr: (see note)

NOTE: The LAN protocol status is displayed after an IP address is assigned to the adapter.

Linux

To verify that the bnx2.o driver is loaded properly, run: lsmod

If the driver is loaded, a line similar to the one below is displayed, where size is the size of the driver in bytes, and n is the number of adapters configured.

Module Size Used by

BCM5708 size n

Running a Cable Length Test

For Windows operating systems, see Analyzing Cables for information on running a cable length test. Cable analysis is not available for NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapters.

Testing Network Connectivity

NOTE: When using forced link speeds, verify that both the adapter and the switch are forced to the same speed, or that at least one link partner is configured for auto-negotiation.

Windows

Network connectivity can be tested using the Testing the Network feature in Broadcom Advanced Control Suite.

An alternate method is to use the ping command to determine if the network connection is working.

1. Click Start , and then click Run .

2. Type cmd

in the Open box, and then click OK .

3. Type ipconfig /all

to view the network connection to be tested.

4. Type ping IP address

, and then press ENTER .

The ping statistics that are displayed indicate whether the network connection is working or not.

NetWare

Ping an IP host on the network to verify connection has been established.

From the command line, type ping IP address

, and then press ENTER .

The ping statistics that are displayed indicate whether or not the network connection is working.

Linux

To verify that the Ethernet interface is up and running, run ifconfig to check the status of the Ethernet interface. It is possible to use netstat -i to check the statistics on the Ethernet interface. See Linux Driver Software for information on ifconfig and netstat.

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Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Ping an IP host on the network to verify connection has been established.

From the command line, type ping IP address

, and then press ENTER .

The ping statistics that are displayed indicate whether or not the network connection is working.

Microsoft Virtualization with Hyper-V

Microsoft Virtualization is a hypervisor virtualization system for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2. This section is intended for those who are familiar with Hyper-V, and it addresses issues that affect the configuration of

NetXtreme II network adapters and teamed network adapters when Hyper-V is used. For more information on Hyper-V, see http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/hyperv.aspx.

Table 1 identifies Hyper-V supported features that are configurable for NetXtreme II network adapters. This table is not an allinclusive list of Hyper-V features.

Table 1: Configurable Network Adapter Hyper-V Features

Feature

IPv4

IPv6

IPv4 Large Send Offload (LSO)

(parent and child partition)

IPv4 Checksum Offload (CO) (parent and child partition)

Supported in Windows

Server 2008

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Supported in Windows

Server 2008 R2

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Comments/Limitation

IPv4 TCP Offload Engine (TOE) No*

IPv6 LSO (parent and child partition) No*

IPv6 CO (parent and child partition)

IPv6 TOE iSCSI offload

Jumbo frames

RSS

No*

No*

No*

No*

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

*When bound to a virtual network, OS limitation.

*When bound to a virtual network, OS limitation.

*When bound to a virtual network, OS limitation.

*When bound to a virtual network, OS limitation.

*OS limitation.

*OS limitation.

OS limitation.

NOTE: Ensure that Integrated Services, which is a component of Hyper-V, is installed in the guest operating system (child partition) for full functionality.

NOTE: If you encounter problems while using VM Chimney, Broadcom recommends that VM Chimney be disabled due to

OS stability issues.

Single Network Adapter

Windows Server 2008

When configuring a NetXtreme II network adapter on a Hyper-V system, be aware of the following:

An adapter that is to be bound to a virtual network should not be configured for VLAN tagging through the driver's advanced properties. Instead, Hyper-V should manage VLAN tagging exclusively.

Since Hyper-V does not support Jumbo Frames, it is recommended that this feature not be used or connectivity issues may occur with the child partition.

The Locally Administered Address (LAA) set by Hyper-V takes precedence over the address set in the adapter's advanced properties.

A TOE-enabled network adapter that is bound to a Hyper-V virtual network will report TOE as an offload capability in

BACS; however, TOE will not work. This is a limitation of Hyper-V. Hyper-V does not support TOE.

In an IPv6 network, a team that supports CO and/or LSO and is bound to a Hyper-V virtual network will report CO and file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/trouble.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:19 PM]

Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

LSO as an offload capability in BACS; however, CO and LSO will not work. This is a limitation of Hyper-V. Hyper-V does not support CO and LSO in an IPv6 network.

Windows Server 2008 R2

When configuring a NetXtreme II network adapter on a Hyper-V system, be aware of the following:

An adapter that is to be bound to a virtual network should not be configured for VLAN tagging through the driver's advanced properties. Instead, Hyper-V should manage VLAN tagging exclusively.

The Locally Administered Address (LAA) set by Hyper-V takes precedence over the address set in the adapter's advanced properties.

The LSO and CO features in the guest OS are independent of the network adapter properties.

To allow jumbo frame functionality from the guest OS, both the network adapter and the virtual adapter must have jumbo frames enabled. The Jumbo MTU property for the network adapter must be set to allow traffic of large MTU from within the guest OS. The jumbo packet of the virtual adapter must be set in order to segment the sent and received packets.

Teamed Network Adapters

Table 2 identifies Hyper-V supported features that are configurable for NetXtreme II teamed network adapters. This table is not an all-inclusive list of Hyper-V features.

Table 2: Configurable Teamed Network Adapter Hyper-V Features

Feature

Supported in

Windows Server

2008

Supported in Windows

Server 2008 R2

Comments/Limitation

Smart Load Balancing and Failover

(SLB) team type

Yes Yes

Multi-member SLB team allowed with latest BASP6 version.

Note: VM MAC is not presented to external switches.

Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad

LACP) team type

Generic Trunking (FEC/GEC)

802.3ad Draft Static team type

Failover

LiveLink

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Large Send Offload (LSO)

Checksum Offload (CO)

TCP Offload Engine (TOE)

Limited*

Limited*

Limited*

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

*Conforms to miniport limitations outlines in Table 1 .

*Conforms to miniport limitations outlines in Table 1 .

*Conforms to miniport limitations outlines in Table 1 .

– Hyper-V VLAN over an adapter

Hyper-V VLAN over a teamed adapter

Hyper-V VLAN over a VLAN

Hyper-V virtual switch over an adapter

Hyper-V virtual switch over a teamed adapter

Yes

Yes

Limited*

Yes

Yes

Hyper-V virtual switch over a VLAN Yes iSCSI boot No

Yes

Limited*

Yes

Yes

Yes

No*

Only an untagged VLAN.

*Remote boot to SAN is supported.

Windows Server 2008

When configuring a team of NetXtreme II network adapters on a Hyper-V system, be aware of the following:

Create the team prior to binding the team to the Hyper-V virtual network.

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Create a team only with an adapter that is not already assigned to a Hyper-V virtual network.

A TOE-enabled team that is bound to a Hyper-V virtual network will report TOE as an offload capability in BACS; however, TOE will not work. This is a limitation of Hyper-V. Hyper-V does not support TOE.

In an IPv6 network, a team that supports CO and/or LSO and is bound to a Hyper-V virtual network will report CO and

LSO as an offload capability in BACS; however, CO and LSO will not work. This is a limitation of Hyper-V. Hyper-V does not support CO and LSO in an IPv6 network.

To successfully perform VLAN tagging for both the host (parent partition) and the guest (child partition) with the BASP teaming software, you must configure the team for tagging. Unlike VLAN tagging with a single adapter, tagging cannot be managed by Hyper-V when using BASP software.

When making changes to a team or removing a team, remove the team's binding from all guest OSs that use any of the VNICs in the team, change the configuration, and then rebind the team's VNICs to the guest OS. This can be done in the Hyper-V Manager.

Windows Server 2008 R2

When configuring a team of NetXtreme II network adapters on a Hyper-V system, be aware of the following:

Create the team prior to binding the team to the Hyper-V virtual network.

Create a team only with an adapter that is not already assigned to a Hyper-V virtual network.

A BASP virtual adapter configured for VLAN tagging can be bound to a Hyper-V virtual network. However, the VLAN tagging capability through Hyper-V cannot be enabled with this configuration. Hyper-V VLAN tagging will only work if bound to an untagged BASP virtual adapter.

When making changes to a team or removing a team, remove the team's binding from all guest OSs that use any of the VNICs in the team, change the configuration, and then rebind the team's VNICs to the guest OS. This can be done in the Hyper-V Manager.

Removing the Broadcom NetXtreme II Device Drivers

Uninstall the Broadcom NetXtreme II device drivers from your system only through the InstallShield wizard. Uninstalling the device drivers with Device Manager or any other means may not provide a clean uninstall and may cause the system to become unstable. For information on uninstalling Broadcom NetXtreme II device drivers, see Removing the Device Drivers .

When removing the device drivers, Broadcom Advanced Control Suite is also removed as well as all other management applications.

If you manually uninstalled the device drivers with Device Manager and attempted to reinstall the device drivers but could not, run the Repair option from the InstallShield wizard. For information on repairing Broadcom NetXtreme II device drivers, see

Repairing or Reinstalling the Driver Software .

Upgrading Windows Operating Systems

This section covers Windows upgrades for the following:

From Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008

From Windows Server 2008 to Windows Server 2008 R2

Prior to performing an OS upgrade when a Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter is installed on your system, Broadcom recommends the procedure below.

1. Save all team and adapter IP information.

2. Uninstall all Broadcom drivers using the installer.

3. Perform the Windows upgrade.

4. Reinstall the latest Broadcom adapter drivers and the BACS application.

Broadcom Boot Agent

Problem : Unable to obtain network settings through DHCP using PXE.

Solution : For proper operation make sure that the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is disabled or that portfast mode (for Cisco) file:///T|/htdocs/NETWORK/BroadCom/71921/NetXtremeII/en/trouble.htm[9/26/2012 3:30:19 PM]

Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide is enabled on the port to which the PXE client is connected. For instance, set spantree portfast 4/12 enable.

Broadcom Advanced Server Program (BASP)

Problem : After deleting a team that uses IPv6 addresses and then re-creating the team, the IPv6 addresses from the old team are used for the re-created team.

Solution : This is a third-party issue. To remove the old team's IPv6 addresses, locate the General tab for the team's TCP/IP properties from your system's Network Connections. Either delete the old addresses and type in new IPv6 addresses or select the option to automatically obtain IP addresses.

Problem : Adding an NLB-enabled NetXtreme II adapter to a team may cause unpredictable results.

Solution : Prior to creating the team, unbind NLB from the NetXtreme II adapter, create the team, and then bind NLB to the team.

Problem : A system containing an 802.3ad team causes a Netlogon service failure in the system event log and prevents it from communicating with the domain controller during boot up.

Solution : Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 326152 ( http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326152/en-us ) indicates that

Gigabit Ethernet adapters may experience problems with connectivity to a domain controller due to link fluctuation while the driver initializes and negotiates link with the network infrastructure. The link negotiation is further affected when the Gigabit adapters are participating in an 802.3ad team due to the additional negotiation with a switch required for this team type. As suggested in the Knowledge Base Article above, disabling media sense as described in a separate Knowledge Base Article

938449 ( http://support.microsoft.com/kb/938449 ) has shown to be a valid workaround when this problem occurs.

Problem : The 802.3ad team member links disconnect and reconnect continuously (applies to all operating systems).

Solution : This is a third-party issue. It is seen only when configuring an 802.3ad team with greater than two members on the server and connecting an HP2524 switch, with LACP enabled as passive or active. The HP switch shows an LACP channel being brought up successfully with only two team members. All other team member links disconnect and reconnect. This does not occur with a Cisco Catalyst 6500.

Problem : A Generic Trunking (GEC/FEC) 802.3ad-Draft Static type of team may lose some network connectivity if the driver to a team member is disabled.

Solution : If a team member supports underlying management software (ASF/IPMI/UMP) or Wake-On-LAN, the link may be maintained on the switch for the adapter despite its driver being disabled. This may result in the switch continuing to pass traffic to the attached port rather than route the traffic to an active team member port. Disconnecting the disabled adapter from the switch will allow traffic to resume to the other active team members.

Problem : Large Send Offload (LSO) and Checksum Offload are not working on my team.

Solution : If one of the adapters on a team does not support LSO, LSO does not function for the team. Remove the adapter that does not support LSO from the team, or replace it with one that does. The same applies to Checksum Offload.

Problem : The advanced properties of a team do not change after changing the advanced properties of an adapter that is a member of the team.

Solution : If an adapter is included as a member of a team and you change any advanced property, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team's advanced properties are properly set.

Problem : The TOE offload capabilities of a team do not change after removing the TOE key from an adapter that is a member of the team.

Solution : If an adapter with a TOE key is included as a member of a team and you remove the TOE key, then you must rebuild the team to ensure that the team does not appear to be TOE-enabled.

Linux

Problem : On kernels older than 2.6.16 when 16 partitions are created on a server containing two BCM57711 network adapters, not all partitions would come up and an error indicating a shortage of space would display.

Solution : On architectures where the default vmalloc size is relatively small and not sufficient to load many interfaces, use vmalloc=<size>

during boot to increase the size.

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Troubleshooting: Broadcom NetXtreme II Network Adapter User Guide

Problem : Routing does not work for NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapters installed in Linux systems.

Solution : For NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapters installed in systems with Linux kernels older than 2.6.26, disable TPA with either ethtool (if available) or with the driver parameter (see disable_tpa ). Use ethtool to disable TPA (LRO) for a specific

NetXtreme II 10 GbE network adapter.

Problem : On a NetXtreme II 1 GbE network adapter in a CNIC environment, flow control does not work.

Solution : Flow control is working, but in a CNIC environment, it has the appearance that it is not. The network adapter is capable of sending pause frames when the on-chip buffers are depleted, but the adapter also prevents the head-of-line blocking of other receive queues. Since the head-of-line blocking causes the on-chip firmware to discard packets inside the on-chip receive buffers, in the case a particular host queue is depleted, the on-chip receive buffers will rarely be depleted, therefore, it may appear that flow control is not functioning.

Problem : A bnx2id error appears when installing SLES 10 SP3 SBUU build 36.

Solution : bnx2id is a user space component that needs to be compiled at the time the package is installed. See your OS documentation for properly installing a compiler.

Problem : How do I disable bnx2id service on a system that does not have iSCSI enabled?

Solution : Type service bnx2id stop

. Change the bnx2id runlevels to off using chkconfig

or via the GUI.

Problem : How do I rebuild the bnx2id daemon after installing a compiler?

Solution : Change the directory to /usr/src/netxtreme2version /current/driver and type make install_usr

.

Problem : Errors appear when compiling driver source code.

Solution : Some installations of Linux distributions do not install the development tools by default. Ensure the development tools for the Linux distribution you are using are installed before compiling driver source code.

Miscellaneous

Problem : When setting the Jumbo MTU property to 5000 bytes or greater and forcing Flow Control on network adapters that support a link speed of 10 Gbps, the system performance performs at less than optimal levels.

Solution : If Jumbo MTU is set to 5000 bytes or greater, ensure that Flow Control is set to Auto .

Problem : iSCSI Crash Dump is not working.

Solution : After upgrading the device drivers using the installer, the iSCSI crash dump driver is also upgraded, and iSCSI

Crash Dump must be re-enabled from the Advanced section of the BACS Configuration tab.

Problem : In Windows 2008 R2, if the OS is running as an iSCSI boot OS, the VolMgr error, "The system could not successfully load the crash dump driver," appears in the event log.

Solution : Enable iSCSI Crash Dump from the Advanced section of the BACS Configuration tab.

Problem : The Broadcom NetXtreme II adapter may not perform at optimal level on some systems if it is added after the system has booted.

Solution : The system BIOS in some systems does not set the cache line size and the latency timer if the adapter is added after the system has booted. Reboot the system after the adapter has been added.

Problem : Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is not functioning properly.

Solution : IPMI works only when LiveLink™ is disabled. See Configuring LiveLink for a Smart Load Balancing and Failover and

SLB (Auto-Fallback Disable) Team .

Problem : Cannot configure Resource Reservations in BACS after SNP is uninstalled.

Solution : Reinstall SNP. Prior to uninstalling SNP from the system, ensure that NDIS is enabled via the checkbox on the

Resource Configuration screen, available from the Resource Reservations section of the Configurations tab (see Viewing and

Configuring Resource Reservations ). If NDIS is disabled and SNP is removed, there is no access to re-enable the device.

Problem : The TOE status in the Vital Sign area of the BACS Information tab is inconsistent with the TOE status in the

Resource Reservations tab when the TOE key is physically removed.

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Solution : Reinstall the TOE key and navigate to the Resource Configuration screen from the Resource Reservations tab.

Disable TOE from the Resource Configuration screen prior to removing the TOE key. The TOE status should be consistent in both the Vital Sign tab and the Resource Reservations tab.

Problem : TOE performance is more susceptible to packet loss when flow control is disabled.

Solution : Enable flow control to reduce the number of packets lost.

Problem : A DCOM error message (event ID 10016) appears in the System Even Log during the installation of the Broadcom adapter drivers.

Solution : This is a Microsoft issue. For more information, see Microsoft knowledge base KB913119 at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/913119 .

Problem : Performance is degraded when multiple BCM57710 network adapters are used in a system.

Solution : Ensure that the system has at least 2 GB of main memory when using up to four network adapters and 4 GB of main memory when using four or more network adapters.

Problem : Remote installation of Windows Server 2008 to an iSCSI target via iSCSI offload fails to complete, and the computer restarts, repeatedly.

Solution : This is a Microsoft issue. For more information on applying the Microsoft hotfix, see Microsoft knowledge base article KB952942 at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/952942.

Problem : Performance drops when a BCM5709C network adapter is connected back-to-back to a switch, MTU = 9000, and

Tx and Rx Flow Control are enabled.

Solution : When enable_cu_rate_limiter is enabled, the device performs flow control in the catchup path to prevent catchup frames from dropping. The catchup path is used in processing iSCSI out-of-order PDUs. When enable_cu_rate_limiter is disabled, there is a potential for some drops of iSCSI out-of-order PDUs, which reduces performance. This feature does not work well when jumbo frame is enabled on any of the client devices. Enable_cu_rate_limiter should be set to disabled when jumbo frame is enabled.

Solution : The network adapter has shut down and an error message appears indicating that the fan on the network adapter has failed.

Problem : The network adapter was shut down to prevent permanent damage. Contact Dell Support for assistance.

Please read all Restrictions and Disclaimers .

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