MODULAR ABS SERIES SERVICE MANUAL

MODULAR ABS SERIES SERVICE MANUAL
MODULAR
ABS SERIES
MODULAR 1 UPGRADE
MODULAR 1 PLUS
MODULAR 2
000 700 080
SER
VICE
SERVICE
MANU
AL
MANUAL
MODULAR
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Modular Document Registration Issue 1.0 June 1998
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HALDEX BRAKE PRODUCTS LTD
MOONS MOAT DRIVE
MOONS MOAT NORTH
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WORCESTERSHIRE
B98 9HA
MODULAR
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MODULAR
NOTES ON THE USE OF THIS MANUAL
Preceding the Modular main
index sheet, this manual should
contain the document registration
form and an amendment record
sheet. Both of these documents
are intended to assist your
Company and Haldex Brake
Products Ltd in maintaining this
manual in an up to date
condition. Please follow the
instructions included on each
sheet to ensure that we are able
to give both yourself and your
company the best product
information support whenever the
need may arise.
For ease of reference each
section of this manual deals with
an individual aspect or
component part of the
MODULAR trailer ABS system.
To access the particular
information which you require,
initially refer to the Main Section
Index at the front of the manual
and select the appropriate item(s)
section.
Where cross references are
used, the first number refers to
the appropriate section number,
whilst the second number refers
to the sub-section concerned.
Example: In section 9.2
reference is made to section 7.4
which may be found in section
7.0 item 7.4.
In the case of figure numbers,
once again each of the section
figures is numbered in sequence
within its own section. Hence, in
order to avoid repetition, a
particular figure which appears in
one section may have relevance
to another section to which it is
cross referenced. i.e. In section
9.5 reference is made to figures
3.2 and 4.1 which will be found in
sections 3.0 and 4.0 respectively
annotated by the appropriate
figure number.
Each section has its own index
card at the front of the section,
listing sub-sections, which deal
with particular features of the
component or procedure
concerned.
Wherever necessary cross
references are made within each
sub-section which guide you to
related information.
Sections are numbered in
sequence, as are the
sub-sections.
Modular Document Registration Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
AMENDMENT RECORD
SHEET
From time to time it may be
necessary for Haldex Brake
Products Ltd to issue updates to
this manual.
If you have registered your
ownership of this manual using
the enclosed documentation you
will automatically receive section
updates and service bulletins the
receipt of which may be recorded
on this page as they are entered
into this manual.
AMENDMENT SECTIONS
AFFECTED
NUMBER
1
DATE
ENTERED
JUNE 1998
AMENDMENT SECTIONS
NUMBER
AFFECTED
DATE
ENTERED
26
2
27
3
28
4
29
5
30
6
31
7
32
8
33
9
34
10
35
11
36
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
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19
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20
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21
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22
47
23
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24
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25
50
Modular Section Amendments Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
1.0 INTRODUCTION
ISO 7638
1.1 GLOSSARY OF TERMS
BU
Refers to BLUE, the required
channel colour coding for modulators,
and sensors.See also RD and YE.
The electrical connection to the
trailer which provides a dedicated
ABS power supply.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display relevant to
the DDU display and Info Centre.
M
Refers to a modulator. i.e. the ABS
air control valve.
CHANNEL The electrical connection between
the ECU and modulator. The
number of ABS control channels is
equal to the number of
modulators fitted.
CONFIGURATION
The arrangement of ABS
components for any given installation.
EOLT
Computer software package for
'End-of-line' testing of ABS system
functions during trailer manufacture.
DDU
The hand held Diagnostic Display
Unit.
ECU
The Electronic Control Unit of the
anti-lock brake system.
EXCITER
A slotted or castellated steel ring
fitted in the hub or brake assembly
used in conjunction with the sensor
to generate electrical information
proportional to wheel speed.
INFO CENTRE
A device with a LCD display,
trailer mounted, which may
be used to recall information
from the memory of the ECU.
INTEGRATED SYSTEM
A Modular ABS installation where
the modulators and ECU are
mounted in one unit on a common
bracket, located over the centre of a
bogie. (See Fig 1.6,1.7 and 1.8).
Generally applicable to semi-trailers
and centre axle trailers.
ISO 1185
The 24N electrical connection to the
trailer from which power for the ABS
may be drawn from pin 4 using the
stoplamp circuit.
ISO 3731
The 24S electrical connection to the
trailer from which power for the ABS
may be drawn from pin 6 to provide
a permanent power supply.
MANIFOLD The central device on which
modulators of a two channel
system may be commonly
mounted, and pneumatically linked.
MODULAR ABS
The product name for one of
a range of trailer Anti-lock
Brake Systems produced by
Haldex Brake Products Ltd.
MODULATOR(S)
The pneumatic control
valve(s) of the anti-lock brake
system.
NON-INTEGRATED
An ABS system in which
the modulators are mounted
remotely from the ECU assembly.
Generally applicable to Full trailers.
RD
Refers to RED, the required channel
colour coding for modulators, and
sensors.
See also BU and YE
S
Refers to a sensor.
SENSOR
A magnetic device mounted in the
brake or hub assembly used in
conjunction with the exciter to
generate electrical information
proportional to wheel speed.
S1A
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
S2A
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
S3A
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
S1B
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
S2B
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
S3B
A sensor position displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre relative to the
position of that sensor on the
vehicle as shown in the
configuration diagrams in section
8.0.
SPLIT FRICTION
A road surface condition
where the tyres of wheels across the
same axle experience different
amounts of grip from one side of the
vehicle to the other.
PC INTERFACE
Computer hardware providing
a facility for linking a PC to the
ABS ECU.
YE
Refers to YELLOW, the required
channel colour coding for
modulators, and sensors.
See also RD and BU.
VDS
Computer software package for
collecting data from the
ABS ECU and storing to the PC.
2S1M
Two sensors and one modulator
(see configurations section 8.0).
2S2M
Two sensors and two modulators
(see configuration section 8.0).
4S2M
Four sensors and two modulators
(see configuration section 8.0).
1.2 DRIVER INFORMATION
MODULAR ABS is provided with a warning lamp
to indicate the ABS status.
The GREEN lamp if fitted, will be mounted on
the headboard of the trailer in the rear view
mirror line of vision. When the ABS is electrically
powered from the stop lamp circuit and no other
source the lamp operates only when the brake
pedal is pressed.
Under these circumstances when the vehicle is
moving at 6 m.p.h. (10km/h) or more and the
brakes are applied the green lamp should flash
briefly and then stay off.
If the vehicle is stationary and the brake pedal is
applied the green lamp should flash briefly, then
come on and stay on.
NOTE: At speeds above 6 m.p.h. (10km/h) when
the brakes are applied no lamp flash or a
permanently lit lamp indicates a system fault
which should be investigated.
A RED lamp will be fitted in the cab dashboard
when the ABS is powered by a dedicated
(ISO7638) or a supplementary (24S) power
supply from the ignition switch.
When the ignition is turned on the red lamp
should flash briefly and then come on until the
vehicle speed exceeds 6 m.p.h. (10km/h) then
the lamp should go out.
NOTE: For any single driving cycle, (ignition on
to ignition off). If there is no lamp flash when the
ignition is turned on, or if a permanently
illuminated lamp occurs after the vehicle has
exceeded 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h) at initial move off,
a system fault is indicated which should be
investigated.
If a red lamp (ABS2) is fitted in the cab this
becomes the primary indicator and the trailer
ABS will be permanently powered. In this case,
the green trailer lamp will only function if :
(a) on initial power up, if the brake pedal is
pressed before the ignition is switched on.
(b) during a fault event when the red lamp is
illuminated and the brake pedal is pressed.
Further information on lamp sequences may be
found in section 6.0.
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
1.3 BRAKING WITH ABS
In an emergency apply full force on the brake
pedal. The ABS will be activated immediately
you fully apply the brakes and will assist you to
retain steering control of your vehicle according
to the road surface conditions. DO NOT apply
and release the brakes by pumping the brake.
This is known as 'cadence braking' and can have
a detrimental effect on vehicle braking
1.4 ABOUT MODULAR ABS
The Haldex MODULAR ABS system employs
microcomputer technology to meet the high
standards demanded by manufacturers and
operators for modern trailer ABS.
MODULAR ABS conforms to all the
requirements of current and future planned
legislation for systems fitted to commercial
trailers. The design embodies ease of installation
and maintenance, with high performance
specifications. MODULAR ABS prevents wheel
lock during braking to maximise tyre grip and
provide optimum deceleration and stability.
1.5 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
MODULAR ABS may be fitted to trailers in
different configurations as required by the
manufacturer or operator.
The configurations conform to recognised
standards for wheel sensing and control as
explained in section 8.0.
1.6 WHEEL SPEED SENSING
MODULAR ABS employs exciters and sensors
mounted in the brake assembly (see Figs 1.5)
which provide an electrical output frequency
proportional to the wheel speed. This signal is
relayed to a microcomputer based Electronic
Control Unit (ECU).
Section 2.0 details exciter information and
section 3.0 sensor information.
1.7 CONTROL ELECTRONICS
The Electronic Control Unit (ECU) incorporates
two microcomputers which process information
from wheel speed sensors thereby calculating
wheel acceleration and deceleration. When a
wheel deceleration which would normally result
in a locked wheel is detected the ECU energises
the hold and dump solenoids in the modulator(s).
The hold solenoid isolates the signal line to the
modulator and prevents further pressure build up
above the relay piston.
The dump solenoid releases air pressure from
above the relay piston and thus from the brake
chamber.
Rapid operation of the hold and dump solenoids
adjusts the brake chamber pressure to the best
possible condition to maximise tyre to road grip.
Tyre to road grip will cause the wheel to recover
from the developing lock condition. During
recovery the wheel speed signal increases in
frequency causing the ECU to de-energise the
dump solenoid and switch the hold solenoid
rapidly in a series of pulses which progressively
re-applies the brakes. If the wheel then tends to
lock the ABS action will be repeated.
In the event of a fault occurring the ABS will be
switched off and a fault code stored in the ECU
memory for repair reference.
Fault codes will be retained in memory even if
power to the system is removed.
When the power supply to the ECU is restored
the fault code can be displayed on an "Info
Centre" (see Fig 9.1) or DDU (see Fig 3.2).
Reference to the diagnosis guide in section 10.0,
and the diagnostic code list in section 10.12 will
enable rapid location and repair of the fault.
1.8 SYSTEM PNEUMATICS
ABS operation is provided by solenoid controlled
pneumatic Stepping Relay Valves called
modulators which may have 2, 3 or 6 delivery
ports. The ABS configuration determines the
type of modulator fitted. (See section 5.0
Modulators and section 8.0 Configurations).
1.9 SYSTEM WARNING LAMPS
The system may be provided with a warning
lamp mounted on the trailer headboard visible to
the driver in the rear view mirror.
The headboard lamp is green and may be
duplicated by a red dashboard mounted warning
lamp in the cab of the towing vehicle. In the case
of cab mounted lamps reference should be made
to the vehicle manufacturer's handbook. Further
details may be found in section 6.0.
1.10 SYSTEM POWER SUPPLY
MODULAR ABS fitted to trailers may be
powered from different sources depending on the
supply which is available from the towing unit.
See section 7.0, and wiring diagrams section
12.0
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
1.10 COMPONENT LOCATION
The location of MODULAR components will vary
from one trailer type to another. Generally semi
trailers are equipped with units in which the ECU
and modulator(s) are mounted on a common
bracket. This is referred to as an "integrated
system" and is convenient where such an
assembly is mounted over the centre of an axle,
or axle group as in the case of semi-trailers and
Centre Axle Trailers. This type of installation on
a semi-trailer is shown in Fig 1.9.
In the case of Full trailers, it is not possible to
mount all the modulators in a single group at the
rear of the trailer as this would adversely affect
the ABS performance of the front axle due to the
required long pipe runs. Consequently this
system is not suitable for this type of trailer.
1.11 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
Information regarding routine maintenance of the
MODULAR system and of associated braking
systems is listed in section 13.0.
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
1.12 MULTIMETER READINGS
CHECKING
POSITION
MEASURE
BETWEEN
CORRECT
VALUE
REMARKS
Sensor output
A
B
0.2V AC Min.
Sensor 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B or 3A,3B
Sensor disconnected from ECU.
Wheel rotated at 1 rev/2 sec.
1.1
Sensor resistance
A
B
>1.0 <2.4 kohm
Sensor 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B or 3A,3B
Sensor disconnected from ECU.
1.1
Modulator Solenoid
resistance
B-
DS
>12 <20 ohm
Modulator cable disconnected .
from solenoid.
1.2
Modulator Solenoid
resistance
B-
HS
>12 <20 ohm
Modulator cable disconnected .
from solenoid.
1.2
Supply from
ISO 7638
1
4
>18 <32V
Ignition on.
Approx battery voltage
1.3
Supply from
ISO 1185 (24N)
1
4
>18 <32V
Brake applied, Ignition on
Approx battery voltage
1.3
Cable disconnected
1.4
Earth continuity
ECU/Modulator
Bracket and
Vehicle chassis
<5 ohms
COLAS Solenoid
resistance
+
>79 <96 ohms
-
A
Fig
B-
B
HS
DS
4
Sensor Connector - Fig 1.1
+
2
1
Solenoid Connector - Fig 1.2
3
Diagnostic Connector - Fig 1.3
-
COLAS Connector - Fig 1.4
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
SENSOR AND ADJUSTER
ASSEMBLY
CABLE GROMMET
SENSOR BRACKET
SENSOR CABLE
TO E.C.U.
AXLE SPINDLE
TORQUE PLATE
HUB ASSEMBLY
BRAKE SHOE
BRAKE DRUM
EXCITER
Fig 1.5 TYPICAL SENSOR AND EXCITER INSTALLATION
HOLD / DUMP
SOLENOIDS
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL
UNIT
MODULATOR
CONNECTION
THREAD SIZE
M27 x 1.0
ECU
CONNECTION
(19 PINS)
MODULATOR
(VALVE)
CONTROL PORT
Port No. 4
M16 x 1.5
MOUNTING
BRACKET
RESERVOIR PORT
Port No. 1
M22 x 1.5
DELIVERY PORT
Port No. 2
M16 x 1.5
Fig 1.6 ECU AND MODULATOR ASSEMBLY - MODULAR 1 UPGRADE
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
MOUNTING
BRACKET
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL
UNIT
HOLD / DUMP
SOLENOIDS
MODULATOR
CONNECTION
THREAD SIZE
M27 x 1.0
ECU
CONNECTION
(28 PINS)
MODULATOR
(VALVE)
CONTROL PORT
Port No. 4
M16 x 1.5
MOUNTING
BRACKET CLIP
DELIVER PORT
Port No. 2
M16 x 1.5
RESERVOIR
PORT
Port No. 1
M22 x 1.5
Fig 1.7 ECU AND MODULATOR ASSEMBLY - MODULAR 1 PLUS
MOUNTING
BRACKET
HOLD / DUMP
SOLENOIDS
ELECTRONIC
CONTROL
UNIT
ECU
CONNECTION
(28 PINS)
MODULATOR
CONNECTION
THREAD SIZE
M27 x 1.0
MODULATOR
(VALVE)
(BLUE CHANNEL)
MOUNTING
BRACKET CLIP
MODULATOR
VALVE
(YELLOW CHANNEL)
MANIFOLD
CONTROL PORT
Port No. 4
M16 x 1.5
(BOTH SIDES)
Fig 1.8 ECU AND MODULATOR ASSEMBLY - MODULAR 2
RESERVOIR
PORT
Port No. 1
M22 x 1.5
(BOTH SIDES)
DELIVER PORT
Port No. 2
M16 x 1.5
(BOTH SIDES)
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
THE DRIVER INFORMATION PLATE
ECU AND MODULATOR ASSEMBLY
Translation: With Grau ABS on the tractor or
trailer, at 10km/h or more, if ABS lamp is lit
then ABS is shut down and will not work
MODULAR 1 Upgrade shown for example
POSITIONS REFER
TO RH DRIVE
VEHICLES
ISO1185
ISO3731
POSITION MAY
VARY
ISO 7638
THE WARNING LAMP
THE SENSOR ASSEMBLY
Fig 1.9 COMPONENT LOCATION (2S1M SYSTEM SHOWN)
THE EXCITER
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
2.0 THE EXCITERS
The exciters will have 100 teeth or 80 teeth
dependant on the wheel and hub size (see Fig
2.1). They are shrunk onto the nose of the hub,
such that they are carried by the hub as it rotates
with the wheel. (See Fig 2.2). In certain
applications such as SAF axles the exciter may
be internally toothed and interference fitted into
the hub, outboard of the outer bearing. However
the principles involved, and instructions in this
manual still apply.
NOTE: THESE EXCITERS SHOULD ONLY BE
USED ON SYSTEMS WHICH ARE KNOWN TO
REQUIRE THE 100 OR 80 TOOTH TYPE.
INCORRECT APPLICATION WILL CAUSE
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION.
Fig 2.1. THE EXCITER (80 or 100 TEETH)
2.1 EXCITER MAINTENANCE
1. Generally the exciter requires no routine
maintenance. However it should be cleaned and
inspected for damage and checked for security
on the hub spigot whenever the drum or hub is
removed. Refer to axle manufacturer's
instructions.
2.2 EXCITER REPLACEMENT
In the event of an exciter being damaged it
should be replaced with an identical unit
observing the following procedure.
1. Remove the relevant hub from the stub axle.
2. Prise or drift the old unit off the hub assembly
or alternatively drill and split it.
CAUTION: During this operation observe
personal safety precautions and take care not to
damage the hub assembly .
3. Clean the spigot and abutment face of the hub
ensuring that they are free from burrs.
4. Replace the exciter by heating it evenly to a
minimum temperature of 120 degrees Celsius.
This may be achieved by using a hotplate or
oven which is thermostatically controlled. (see
Fig 2.3)
5. Whilst the exciter ring is hot place it over the
hub nose ensuring that it seats correctly onto the
location spigot machined on the hub.
6. When the exciter is correctly fitted there
should be either a zero or equal gap between the
shoulder of the machined hub and the back of
the exciter throughout 360 degrees of rotation
(see Fig 2.4).
Fig 2.2. THE HUB AND EXCITER ASSEMBLY
EXCITER RING
THERMOSTATICALLY
CONTROLLED HOTPLATE
Fig 2.3. HEATING THE EXCITER RING
Modular Section 2.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ZERO TO EQUAL GAP THROUGH
360 DEGREES OF ROTATION
HUB ASSEMBLY
CORRECTLY
LOCATED
EXCITER
MAXIMUM
RUNOUT
= 0.005" (0.125mm)
Fig 2.4. FITTING THE EXCITER TO THE HUB
2.3 FITTING THE HUB
1. Check the condition of the existing sensor
before re-fitting the hub and exciter assembly to
the stub axle.
2. The sensor should be wiped clean, and then
reset as detailed in sections 3.1 and 3.4.
3. The hub assembly with its new exciter may
now be fitted together with its bearings, to the
stub axle.
4. During the re-assembly process avoid rocking
the hub, and as soon as the hub centre nut can
be engaged on its thread, use it to pull the
assembly evenly onto the stub axle. This will
ensure that as the exciter teeth make contact
with the sensor, they will push the sensor back in
its housing without damage to the exciter teeth,
or the sensor. It also guarantees that an ideal
running condition will be set up between the
exciter and sensor, PROVIDED THAT THE
SENSOR WAS CORRECTLY RESET BEFORE
FITTING THE HUB.
5. If the sensor was not reset before assembling
the hub to the stub axle, set the hub centre nut to
the axle manufacturer's recommendations, then
push the sensor through its housing until it
contacts the exciter teeth.
6. Ensure that exciter teeth have not been
damaged during refitment of the hub to the stub
axle.
7. Rotate the hub several times to automatically
set the ideal running condition.
8. The sensor output should now be checked as
described in section 3.5.
Modular Section 1.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
3.0 THE SENSORS
The Modular sensor design incorporates a
permanent magnet and coil which are
environmentally sealed in a stainless steel
housing. The coil is connected to a moulded
flying lead which is terminated with a connector.
The sensors are secured in their housings on the
axle by a retaining clip which must always be
fitted to ensure system integrity (see Fig 3.1)
The sensor is bracket mounted in the axle
assembly with its magnetic pole in close
proximity to the exciter teeth, maximum 0.5mm
(0.020"). The teeth pass through the magnetic
field causing a change in magnetic flux density
which in turn generates an alternating voltage in
the sensor coil. The
frequency of the voltage generated is directly
proportional to wheel speed. It is this signal
which is monitored by the ECU to determine
changes in wheel speed.
SENSOR
HOUSING
RETAINING
CLIP
SENSOR
AXLE
Fig 3.1 THE SENSOR ASSEMBLY
3.1 SENSOR MAINTENANCE
1. The sensor requires no routine maintenance
but should be cleaned and inspected for
damage, wear and security prior to resetting
whenever the brake drums are removed.
Note: If sensor is removed from its housing
lightly grease the sensor with a lithium based
grease before installing back into the housing.
3.2 SENSOR WEAR CHECK
1. Remove the vehicle hub or the sensor from its
mounting and clean the end face of the sensor.
2. If the sensor casing is holed or damaged it
should be replaced. (See section 3.3 for
instructions on replacement).
3. If the sensor is serviceable refer to section
3.4. for adjustment.
3.3 SENSOR ASSEMBLY REPLACEMENT
1. The design of Modular sensors enable them to
be easily replaced if damaged. But before any
work is commenced ensure that all electrical
power is removed from the ECU.
2. When replacing a sensor always replace the
retaining clip, and ensure that the electrical
connections are clean, dry and correctly
assembled, the sensor should be disconnected
at the plug on its flying extension lead.
3. Remove the sensor from its housing together
with the retaining clip. The housing is not usually
replaced, unless it is damaged, however, a new
retaining clip should always be fitted with a new
sensor.
4. Clean the housing, removing any swarf or dirt.
5. Lightly grease the retaining clip with a lithium
based grease, and press it fully home into the
housing.
6. The sensor may be greased prior to assembly
and then pressed firmly into the retaining clip
until the sensor cable exit shoulder abuts against
the inboard face of the housing, ensure the cable
is not under tension or fouling the brake shoes or
return springs (see Fig 3.1).
7. Ensure that the sensor cable run is routed as
in the original installation and secure it with cable
ties every 150mm.
Note: Do not overtighten the cable ties, as the
brake hose will expand when the brakes are
applied, and the cable ties may shear the inner
conductor of the sensor cable.
3.4 SENSOR ADJUSTMENT (Resetting)
1. To set the sensor correctly follow the steps in
sensor assembly replacement, then refit the hub
assembly using the hub retaining nut to pull it
into place on the stub axle.
DO NOT ROCK THE HUB ASSEMBLY ONCE
THE EXCITER HAS CONTACTED THE NOSE
OF THE SENSOR AS THIS WILL CAUSE THE
SENSOR TO BE PUSHED TOO FAR BACK IN
ITS HOUSING.
2. Provided that the hub is drawn smoothly onto
the stub axle the sensor to exciter air gap will be
automatically set to the correct running
clearance as the components come into contact.
3. Setting the hub centre nut correctly to the axle
manufacturer's data will ensure sufficient output.
However it should be noted that the running
clearance between the sensor and exciter must
never exceed 0.5mm (0.020") at any point during
one complete revolution.
4. Carry out a sensor output check as detailed in
section 3.5.
5. Refit the brake drum and road wheels and
Modular Section 3.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
carry out the driver’s checks described in section
1.2. to ensure that the correct lamp sequence is
obtained but bear in mind the Important Note
referred to in section 6.5
3.5 CHECKING THE SENSOR OUTPUT
1. Before commencing sensor checks ensure
that the appropriate sensed wheels are jacked
clear of the ground and suitably propped
(observing all normal safety precautions) so that
the wheels are free to be rotated by hand with no
brake drag evident.
2. If necessary back off the brake adjustment
temporarily for this test, after which the brakes
should be readjusted to the manufacturer's
recommendations.
3. Sensor outputs may be checked by using a
Diagnostic Display Unit (DDU) plugged into the
ECU diagnostic which will be mounted on the
side of the trailer.
4. A suitable Multimeter as recommended in
section 14.5, the use of which is described in
section 3.5.C.
3.5.A USING THE DDU
1. Connect the DDU to its harness then locate
the diagnostic outlet socket mounted on the side
of the trailer marked "ABS TEST" and plug in the
DDU harness.
2. With the Modular system powered up rotate
the wheel of the sensor to be checked at a speed
of one revolution every two seconds (30 RPM)
and observe the DDU sensor indicator bar
appropriate to the wheel being rotated. (See Fig
3.2)
3. If a solid bar appears in the DDU display
window then the sensor output is satisfactory.
4. If the displayed bar flashes then the sensor
requires resetting.
EXTENSION CABLE
CONNECTS ABS
TEST
SOCKET
NUMERIC DISPLAY
CONFIGURATION
AND FAULT CODES
SENSOR
OUTPUT
DISPLAY
BARS
SENSOR
OUTPUT
DISPLAY
BARS
HAND HELD
DIAGNOSTIC DISPLAY UNIT
Fig 3.2 THE DDU DISPLAY
5. If there is no bar displayed then the sensor
requires either resetting (see section 3.4) or it is
damaged in which case it requires replacement.
However before replacing the unit check the
sensor resistance and continuity of its extension
cable to determine whether the fault lies in the
cable or the sensor. (See sections 3.7 and 3.8).
3.5.B USING THE INFO CENTRE
(Refer to relevant information in section 15.0).
1. Unclip cover from Info Centre and apply
vehicle power.
2. The display will switch on showing all
segments followed by the total distance reading.
3. Press button: Diagnostic code will be
displayed
4. Press button: Wheel speed sensor check
command will be displayed - WHL
5. Rotate one wheel only at 1 rev/2sec (30 RPM)
. for a minimum of 4 seconds
6. Stop the wheel from rotating.
7. Observe the display wheel 1A gives
S1A
8. Repeat procedure by rotating second sensed
wheel.
wheel 1B gives
S1B
9. If the display appears as above then the
sensor output is satisfactory. If there is no display
the sensor requires resetting or is damaged.
Check as in section 3.5.A. point 5.
3.5.C USING A MULTIMETER
NOTE: The meter should be set to AC Volts on a
scale range suitable for measuring low values.
i.e. 300 millivolt scale.
1. Disconnect the sensor at its extension lead
terminals.
2. Connect a suitable multimeter to the sensor
leads (see section 14.5 Service Information for
recommended types) .
3. Rotate the sensed wheel at a rate 1 rev/2sec
(30 RPM) and note the output on the meter.
4. Output should be not less than 0.3 Volts A.C.
with not more than 0.15 Volts A.C. variation
during one complete wheel revolution.
5. Excessive variation of the sensor output
indicates an exciter that is damaged, or that has
been incorrectly fitted.
6. If the output is less than 0.3 Volts A.C. the
sensor may require resetting (see section 3.4) or
if damaged, replacement with a new component.
(See section 3.3)
Before replacing a sensor check its resistance,
and the continuity of its extension cable to
Modular Section 3.0 Issue 1.0 June1998
MODULAR
determine whether the fault lies in the sensor or
its cable. (See section 3.7 and 3.8).
3.6 ADDITIONAL SENSOR CHECKS
If sensor outputs are found to be unsatisfactory
proceed as follows:
FLASHING DISPLAY on DDU or LOW METER
READING.
1. Reset the sensor as detailed in section 3.4
and check that the exciter is not damaged and is
running true (see section 2.1, 2.2 and Fig 2.4).
2. Check the running clearance between exciter
and sensor, which should not exceed 0.5 mm
(0.020") at any point during one complete
revolution.
3. Check the exciter face for dents or other
damage
NO BAR DISPLAY on DDU / INFO CENTRE or
NO METER READING.
The sensor is so far out of adjustment or
damaged as to not give an output, reset as
detailed in section 3.4. The sensor or its extension cable is open circuit, or extension cable
connections have an
excessively high resistance. Proceed as follows:
(section 3.7 and 3.8)
3.7 CABLE CONTINUITY
1. Unplug the sensor extension cable from the
sensor flying lead at the back of the brake dust
cover.
2. Bridge the pins of the extension lead plug at
the end of the cable using a suitable jump wire.
3. Disconnect the harness at the ECU and carry
out a continuity check of the cable as follows.
4. To test sensors connect the multimeter across
contact pins in the main loom connector as
detailed in section 4.0, Fig 4.6, 4.7 and 4.8.
The meter should show a full scale deflection.
5. If no continuity reading is obtained replace the
extension cable as detailed in section 3.9. If
however continuity is satisfactory then check the
sensor resistance.
3.8 SENSOR RESISTANCE
Carry out a sensor resistance check as follows:
1. Unplug the sensor extension cable from the
sensor flying lead at the back of the brake dust
cover.
2. Insert the multimeter probes into the sensor
connector socket and note the resistance, which
should fall in the range 980 ohms to 2.35
kohms.
3. If the result is outside the specified limits then
replace the sensor as detailed in section 3.3.
4. If however the resistance is satisfactory then
the sensor extension cable is at fault and should
be replaced as detailed in section 3.9.
3.9 SENSOR EXTENSION CABLE
REPLACEMENT
IMPORTANT NOTE: Cable replacement will
involve cutting out and replacement of part of
the ABS harness which is a one piece moulded
unit. The connection is made by a window type
in-line butt connector. The connectors are
protected by heat shrink tubing containing a
sealant. When heated the tubing shrinks and the
sealant melts. A watertight joint is formed when
the sealant solidifies on cooling. Heat should
only be applied with a suitable hot air gun, such
as Hellerman No. GHL 1550.
1. Disconnect sensor extension lead to be
replaced, from the sensor and remove any
retaining cable ties.
2. Cut the extension cable 200mm minimum
from the ECU moulded connection or where the
joint can be secured on a rigid area of the cable
installation. Do not secure the joint on the hose
or pipe going to the brake chamber.
3. Using wire strippers remove insulation on the
ABS harness sensor ext.cable.(see Fig 3.3)
7.50
6.50
24.00
20.00
Fig 3.3 DETAILS OF INSULATION REMOVAL
4. Using a crimp tool (recommended is Thomas
and Betts (Crimpex) ratchet No. WT2124Y)
place terminal in the jaws and insert the wire
until the insulation butts against the terminal
barrel. Make the crimp, ensuring the
connector has firmly gripped both the wire and
insulation. Check by pulling the connector.
5. Feed the heatshrink tubing over the new
sensor extension cable.
6. Join the extension cable onto the ABS
harness via the two in-line crimps using tool as in
point 4.
Modular Section 3.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
8. Secure the joint to a rigid area. (see Fig 3.4)
Sensor extension
cable joint
Power cables
Hose
Fig 3.4 POSITION OF SENSOR JOINT
9. Route the wiring as in the original installation
and connect as appropriate but note the
following:
a) Fit cable ties to support the cables at 150mm
intervals (do not overtighten) and refit any clips
originally used.
b) When securing cables along rubber brake
hoses, do not overtighten cable ties as this will
damage the cable/hose when pressure is applied
during brake application. It is always preferable
to attach one cable tie to the hose and one to the
cable and then loop the two together.
10. Carry out the driver's checks as described in
section 1.2. (Driver information) but with regard
to the Important Note in section 6.5.
Modular Section 3.0 Issue 1.0 June1998
MODULAR
4.0 THE ELECTRONIC CONTROL
UNIT (ECU)
The ECU of the MODULAR ABS system is
located on a mounting bracket in common with
the modulator valve. (See Fig 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4).
It has microcomputer controlled diagnostics
detection circuits which log diagnostics to a
memory that may be interrogated with a hand
held diagnostic display unit (the DDU see Figs
3.2 and 4.10) or the Info Centre (see Fig 4.10).
MODULAR 1 Plus or MODULAR 2
MODULAR 1 Upgrade
28 Pin Interface
connector
19 Pin Interface
connector
Fig 4.1 MODULAR SERIES ECU
The ABS ECU contains an AA size
Lithium / Thionyl Chloride Battery
that carries the following warning:
"Fire, Explosion and Severe Burn Hazard".
Under no circumstances should the battery be
re-charged, crushed or tampered with in any
way. The ECU should not be incinerated or
stored above 100°C. The ABS ECU may be
disposed of by landfill or re-cycled through a
specialist operator, if in doubt consult your local
authority for details or contact Haldex.
4.1 ECU FOR ADR REGULATIONS
To satisfy the ADR regulations for flammable
loads (i.e. trailers built to FL, EX/III specification)
a variant of a MODULAR 2 and its associated
INFO CENTRE (see section 9.0) is available
WITHOUT the powered odometer function.
Note: Hazardous load regulations do not permit
the fitting of battery powered equipment (spark
generators) to the rear of the firewall and so only
this variant of MODULAR must be used.
All other functions are as standard MODULAR 2
ECU. For reference of the component part
number refer to service parts in section 14.0.
This ECU must only be replaced by
its exact equivalent on ADR
vehicles.
4.2 DIAGNOSTICS
The ECU incorporates a diagnostic information
output centre which provides information
relevant to system configuration and diagnostic
status. It is used for system diagnosis when a
DDU or Info Centre is connected to the unit, at
the ABS TEST diagnostic connector, enabling
recovery of diagnostic codes.When connected
the DDU or the Info Centre may also be used to
test outputs from associated wheel sensors. (See
section 3.5) Therefore it is possible to view the
diagnostic code display from a remote position,
such as alongside the vehicle or from the tractor
unit cab when the vehicle is being driven.
NOTE: A DDU long extension lead (24m) is
available which facilitates dynamic testing. For
further information refer to section 10.4.
For further information on the Info centre refer to
section 9.0 and relevant product information in
section 15.0.
4.3 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
The electrical connections to the ECU include
power supplies, sensors, modulators and the
diagnostic output. These connections are
incorporated in a single ABS vehicle harness
which has an integrally moulded connector,
facilitating a single connection point for simplicity
and system integrity.For further information refer
to section 12.0 System Wiring.
4.3 ECU MAINTENANCE
The ECU requires no routine maintenance.
4.4 ECU REPLACEMENT
1. Locate the position on the trailer of the ECU
and modulator valve assembly on their common
mounting bracket.
2. Remove the ISO 7638, ISO 1185 (24N) and ISO
3731 (24S) connectors at the trailer coupling head
so that there is no electrical power connected to
the trailer.
Bail latch
1
ECU
ECU
Loom
connector
1
Fig 4.2 ECU BAIL LATCH REMOVAL
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
3. Press together the connector clips on the loom
connector, see Fig. 4.3 and pull the ECU away
from the connector housing.
ECU
Loom
connector
c: Ensure bail latch and loom clamp are fixed in
position see Fig. 4.6.
ECU Loom
Connector Clips
2
ECU
2
Fig 4.3 DISCONNECTION OF ECU
4. Remove the three retaining bolts securing the
ECU using a 8mm ring spanner and remove it from
the mounting bracket.
5. Fit New bail latch provided to new ECU by
hooking bail latch ends into locating holes on ECU
ensuring that the bail latch is the right way round
to clip over the socket see Fig. 4.4.
Fig 4.6 BAIL LATCH AND LOOM CLAMP
POSITIONING
d: Check earth continuty - ECU/Modulator Bracket
and Vehicle chassis to be <5 ohms.
7. On completion carry out the driver's checks
described in section 1.2. (Driver's information)
and in section 6.0.
Bail latch
locating hole
ECU
Fig 4.4 BAIL LATCH POSITIONING
6. Fit the new ECU in the reverse procedure to
the above noting the following.
a: Clip the loom connector onto the ECU
connector block ensuring that the both
connector clips engage fully. see Fig. 4.5.
b: Tighten the retaining bolts to 1.7 - 2.8Nm.
ECU
ECU
Loom
connector
Fig 4.5 ENGAMENT OF ECU AND LOOM
CONNECTOR
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
7
14
1
8
15
2
9
16
3
10
17
4
11
18
19
5
12
6
13
Contact Pin area
CONNECTION
Loom Connector (19 Way)
CONNECTOR (19 Way) PLUG
CONTACT PIN No. PIN No.
7 / RD
6 / BK
4 / YE
3/W
5 / BN
Plug
CONNECTOR TERMINAL
PIN No.
REFERENCE
ISO 7638
1
2
8
16
9
ISO 3731 (24S)
1
2
8
16
9
ISO 1185 (24N)
17
3
10
MODULATOR
SOLENOID
14
15
7
SENSOR 1A
6
13
Sensor Hi
Sensor Lo
SENSOR 1B
12
19
Sensor Hi
Sensor Lo
DIAGNOSTIC
SOCKET
4
11
5
18
2
1
3
1
2
3
4
Connector
(Headboard)
1
2
3
4
5
Battery positive permanent supply (B+P)
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
Battery negative (B-IGN)
Cab Lamp Return (B-)
Battery negative permanent supply (B-P)
6
1
2
-
Battery positive permanent supply (B+P)
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
Battery negative (B-IGN)
Cab Lamp Return (B-)
Battery negative permanent supply (B-P)
1
4
-
Battery negative (B-)
Battery positive (stoplamp) (B+)
Trailer Lamp Return (B-)
RD
BK
YE
Dump Solenoid
Battery negative (common) (B-)
Hold Solenoid
Battery positive (B+)
ECU Output
ECU Input
Battery negative (B-)
Fig 4.7 MODULAR 1 UPGRADE MAIN LOOM CONNECTOR CONTACT PIN DETAIL
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
20
21
22
Identification Key
12
4
14
24
5
15
6
25
16 7
26 17
8
27
28
18
19
Loom Connector (28 Way)
9
Plug
Connector
(Headboard)
Contact Pin area
CONNECTION
CONNECTOR (28 Way)
PLUG
CONTACT PIN No. PIN No.
CONNECTOR TERMINAL
REFERENCE
PIN No.
Battery positive permanent supply (B+P)
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
Battery negative (B-IGN)
Battery negative permanent supply (B-P)
Cab Lamp Return
ISO 7638
7
6
16
26
17
7 / RD
6 / BK
4 / YE
3 / BN
5/W
1
2
3
4
5
ISO 3731 (24S)
7
6
16
26
17
7 / RD
6 / BK
4 / YE
3 / BN
5/W
6
1
2
ISO 1185 (24N)
5
15
25
1
3
2
4
1
Battery positive (stoplamp) (B+)
Trailer Lamp Return
Battery negative (B-)
MODULATOR
SOLENOID
4
24
14
RD
BK
YE
Dump Solenoid
Battery negative (common) (B-)
Hold Solenoid
SENSOR 1A
12
22
Sensor Hi
Sensor Lo
SENSOR 1B
21
20
Sensor Hi
Sensor Lo
DIAGNOSTIC
SOCKET
9
19
8
18
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
27
28
1
2
3
4
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
Battery negative (B-IGN)
Cab Lamp Return
Battery positive (B+)
ECU Output
ECU Input
Battery negative (B-)
Negative
Positive
Fig 4.8 MODULAR 1 PLUS MAIN LOOM CONNECTOR CONTACT PIN DETAIL
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
20
21
22
10
11
25
Identification Key
12 2
13
3
14
4
23
24
1
15 5
16 6
26 17
7
27
28
18 8
19 9
Loom Connector (28 Way)
Contact Pin area
Plug
Connector
(Headboard)
PLUG
CONNECTOR TERMINAL
REFERENCE
CONTACT PIN No. PIN No. PIN No.
Battery positive permanent supply (B+P)
ISO 7638
7
7 / RD
1
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
6
6 / BK
2
Battery negative (B-IGN)
16
4 / YE
3
Battery negative permanent supply (B-P)
26
3 / BN
4
Cab Lamp Return
17
5/W
5
ISO 3731 (24S)
7
7 / RD
Battery positive ignition switched (B+IGN)
6
6 / BK
6
Battery negative (B-IGN)
16
4 / YE
1
26
3 / BN
Cab Lamp Return
17
5/W
2
Battery positive (stoplamp) (B+)
ISO 1185 (24N)
5
1
4
Trailer Lamp Return
15
3
Battery negative (B-)
25
2
1
Dump Solenoid
MODULATOR
4
RD
Battery negative (common) (B-)
SOLENOID
24
BK
Hold Solenoid
(Yellow Channel)
14
YE
Dump Solenoid
MODULATOR
3
RD
Battery negative (common) (B-)
SOLENOID
23
BK
Hold Solenoid
(Blue Channel)
13
YE
Sensor Hi
SENSOR 2A
1
Sensor Lo
10
Sensor Hi
SENSOR 3A
12
Sensor Lo
22
Sensor Hi
SENSOR 2B
2
Sensor Lo
11
Sensor Hi
SENSOR 3B
20
Sensor Lo
21
Battery positive (B+)
DDU SOCKET
9
1
ECU Output
19
2
ECU Input
8
3
Battery negative (B-)
18
4
Negative
SUSPENSION
27
Positive
CONTROLLER
28
CONNECTION
CONNECTOR (28 Way)
Fig 4.9 MODULAR 2 (2S/2M and 4S/2M) MAIN LOOM CONNECTOR CONTACT PIN DETAIL
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Preferred position
of Diagnostic
connector
Main Loom
assembly
Diagnostic
connector
Chassis
mounted
ABS
INFO
DDU
DDU Plug locates in
loom assembly
Diagnostic connector
ALTERNATIVE
ABS
INFO
Diagnostic
connector
INFO CENTRE
Fig 4.10 DIAGNOSTIC OUTLET SOCKET LOCATION
Modular Section 4.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
5.0 THE MODULATOR VALVE
The modulator comprises a relay type valve with a
solenoid block containing hold and dump control
solenoids mounted on the upper housing.
Modular 1 is designed as a 2S1M ABS system
and therefore will have only a single channel, i.e.
only one modulator valve electrically connected
to the ECU.
Single channel systems on multi-axle trailers
employ a single modulator which has six delivery
ports, one for each brake chamber.
Exceptions do occur though , e.g. single axle
trailers may have a single 2 port modulator in
some cases.
Modular 2 is designed as a 2S2M or a 4S2M ABS
system and therefore will have a two channel
system, i.e. two modulator valves electrically
connected to the ECU.
5.1 MODULATOR MAINTENANCE
The modulator valve requires no routine maintenance but should be periodically checked for
security, function and air leaks.
It is not possible to service the modulator or
solenoid block but, each of these items may be
replaced independently of the other with a new
guaranteed component.
Procedure :
1. Ensure that all electrical power sources are
removed from the ABS.
2. Release all air pressure from the
appropriate air reservoir.
3. Remove any cable ties securing the solenoid
cable between the solenoid and the ECU.
4. Unscrew the gland nut which secures the
solenoid electrical cable to its housing and
disconnect it from the solenoid.
5. Disconnect the signal line from port 4 of the
modulator valve.
6. Disconnect the reservoir supply from port 1 of
the modulator valve.
7. Disconnect the brake pipes from the
modulator delivery ports (numbered 2). It is
important that pipe positions are noted and
replaced in the same ports from which they were
removed.
8. Remove the three nuts securing the modulator
to the bracket and lower the modulator from its
mountings.
NOTE: When releasing the modulator mounting
nuts, avoid rotating the associated bolts which
also serve to hold the valve body sections
together.
9. Proceed to section 5.3 - If replacing solenoid
only.
Threaded connector
Should either the hold or dump solenoids be
suspected as faulty, they may be tested for the
correct values of resistance which should lie in
the range 12 to 20 ohms.
IMPORTANT: It is vital that only genuine
Haldex replacement parts are used as any
other make may result in defective braking
and/or ABS malfunction.
5.2 MODULATOR REPLACEMENT
The modulator is mounted on a bracket in common with the ECU, which is located beneath the
trailer over or near the bogie centre line.
The electrical connection to the solenoid is
achieved via a connector moulded to the cable
and is retained in the solenoid block by an M27
threaded knurled gland nut which secures the
cable connector to the valve.
This type may be removed from the solenoid
block, whenever it is necessary to access the
harness or ECU assembly.
Fig 5.1 MODULATOR VALVE WITH M27
THREADED CABLE CONNECTOR
10. Reverse this procedure to refit the new unit.
(See section 5.5).
Modular Section 5.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
5.3 FITTING THE MODULATOR ASSEMBLY
Refitting is the reversal of procedure 5.2 but noting
the following points:
1. Mount the modulator in the same orientation as
the original installation.
2. Always use new self locking nuts to secure the
modulator to its bracket.
3. Always connect the brake pipes to the same
ports (port 2) of the modulator as in the original
installation.
4. DO NOT USE PTFE TAPE, as this tends to
fragment and work its way into the modulator,
resulting in malfunctions due to blockage or
leakage.
5. Ensure correct location of the solenoid cable
connector and hand tighten the gland nut taking
care not to cross thread it.
6. Replace any cable ties as originally fitted, but
do not over tighten them as this may damage the
cable.
7. Reconnect the signal (port 4) and the reservoir
(port 1) lines, and charge the air system.
8. Carry out an air leakage check as detailed
below.
9. Carry out the Lamp sequence check as
described in section 1.2 (driver information).
SPECIAL NOTE: When undertaking any
pipework repairs where it is necessary to seal
fittings, always use a high quality liquid sealant.
Do not under any circumstances use PTFE tape
or similar sealants as shreds of this sealant type
may cause modulator malfunctions if they become
embedded in the ball valve or solenoid areas.
5.4 AIR LEAKAGE CHECKS
After modulator or solenoid remedial work carry
out a check for air leaks as follows:
To check a pipe fitting a water and soap solution
or suitable leak detector spray may be applied
and the area of suspected leakage inspected for
bubbles.
Brake Applied Check
1. Fully charge the air system.
2. Apply the footbrake and listen at the
modulator exhaust port for audible leakage.
If audible leakage is noted investigation and
remedial action is necessary.
5.5 SOLENOID OPERATION CHECK
1. Fully charge the air brake system.
2. Apply the footbrake and switch on the ignition
listening for the exhaust of air from each
modulator. There should be as many single brief
pulses of air as there are modulators. (See
section 8.0 configurations).
NOTE:
If there is no pulse then a fault exists which
may be an open circuit solenoid, open
circuit wiring or a fault at the ECU
connector.
In the case of a double pulse, there is a
wiring fault involving incorrect connection
between the dump and hold solenoids.
3. If a single pulse does not occur repeat 1 and 2
with an assistant observing each of the
modulators. Establishing which valve(s) are not
producing pulses will provide a start to fault finding
see section 10.0.
There should be no continuous audible leaks.
4. Finally carry out the Lamp sequence checks as
detailed in section 1.2. (driver information).
Brake Unapplied Check
1. Fully charge the air system.
2. Without applying the footbrake listen at the
modulator exhaust port (and manifold interfaces
where appropriate) for audible air leakage. If
audible leakage is noted investigation and
remedial action is necessary.
NOTE: It is important that before a leaking modulator is replaced it is confirmed that the leak is
within the unit itself and is not a leak from a pipe
fitting or a back feed from a ruptured spring brake
diaphragm.
Modular Section 5.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
6.0 MODULAR SYSTEM WARNING
LAMPS
The various powering options referred to in section
7.0 will have a corresponding combination of
warning lamps fitted to the vehicle. The towing
vehicle dash mounted lamp, operates when the
ABS is powered by the ISO 3731 (24S) or ISO
7638 wiring systems. If the ABS is powered
through only the ISO 1185 (24N) stop lamp
supply, then only the green trailer mounted lamp
will indicate the ABS operational status.
6.1 TRAILER MOUNTED LAMP (GREEN)
This lamp is mounted on the trailer head board
(see Fig 1.9) and is operated from the ISO 1185
connector when the ABS is powered only from
the stop lamp power supply. i.e. when the brake
pedal is pressed.
NOTE: If a permanent power source is available
to the ABS from the ISO 3731 or ISO 7638
connectors, then system integrity will be indicated
by a RED cab mounted warning lamp which
becomes the primary ABS status indicator, the
GREEN trailer lamp becomes the secondary
indicator and will only operate:
(a) If the brake pedal is pressed before the
ignition is switched on during initial power up.
(b) During a fault event when the red lamp is
illuminated and the brake pedal is then pressed.
In either of these cases the trailer lamp will
duplicate the red cab mounted lamp function.
At all other times the trailer lamp function remains
dormant.
Lamp Sequence: Vehicle Stationary.
With the trailer ABS powered solely from the ISO
1185 connector, when the brake pedal is pressed
the lamp will flash and then come on and stay on
until the brake pedal is released at which point the
lamp will go off.
NOTE: IF THE LAMP FAILS TO ILLUMINATE
THEN THE LAMP, LAMP CIRCUIT OR ABS
SYSTEM IS FAULTY.
Lamp Sequence: When the vehicle is moving
at a speed greater than 6mph (10km/h):
The lamp remains off until the brakes are applied
at which point the lamp will flash and remain off.
IF THE LAMP FAILS TO FLASH OR IF THE
LAMP IS ON AT SPEEDS ABOVE 6mph
(10km/h) WHEN BRAKING, THE ABS SYSTEM
OR LAMP CIRCUIT IS FAULTY.
6.2 DASHBOARD WARNING LAMP (RED)
This lamp configuration will be fitted to towing
vehicles which are equipped to provide a
permanent power supply to the trailer ABS
system via either the ISO 3731 (24S) or ISO 7638
electrical susies. In this event semi-trailer lamp
function which is powered from the stoplight circuit
will be secondary and the dash mounted lamp
becomes the primary indicator for the ABS
operational status.
Lamp Sequence:
At ignition switch on the lamp (red) will illuminate
for approximately 2.5 seconds, then go out for
1 second, and then come on and stay on until the
vehicle is driven at a speed above 6mph (10km/h)
when the lamp should go off and stay off.
IF THE LAMP FAILS TO FLASH OR IF THE
LAMP IS ON AT SPEEDS ABOVE 6mph
(10km/h), THEN THE ABS SYSTEM OR LAMP
CIRCUIT IS FAULTY.
6.3 CAB DASHBOARD LAMPS (RED and
AMBER)
This lamp configuration may be fitted to some
vehicles of European manufacture to suit
particular types of ABS. The function of the red
lamp is to indicate the operational status of the
ABS. The function of the amber lamp is to indicate
if ABS is fitted to the trailer. It is not however a
mandatory requirement and if you have a vehicle
with this lamp configuration you should refer to the
vehicle manufacturer's handbook for further
information.
6.4 MULTIPLE LAMP SEQUENCE
( GREEN and/or RED)
The Modular ABS series incorporates an auxiliary
lamp flash of three flashes.
The lamp will flash when the system is
powered up when at rest.
This lamp sequence relates to :1.
Service due - indicates that trailer or
system service distance has been reached. After
servicing the trailer or system the next service
distance must be reset by using :
Info Centre (see Section 9.0 additional product
information) or EOLT program (see Section 11.0)
Modular Section 6.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
2.
NON ABS fault - A fault with a device
connected to the ABS but not directly effecting
the ABS. A function group 'A-' code will be
generated. For example: a Reset-to-Ride height
valve (COLAS) has been connected to the ABS,
an 'A1' or 'RIDE A1' diagnostic code will be
generated. This type of diagnostic code can be
cleared by using :
DDU (see procedure in section 8.5)
Info Centre (see Section 15.0 additional product
information)
EOLT program (see Section 11.0)
3.
Odometer tyre scaling factor units
mismatch - Where the odometer units (miles or
km) do not match the service interval and current
recording.
This can be checked and corrected as necessary
by using the Info Centre (see Section 15.0
additional product information) or EOLT program
(see Section 11.0)
4.
Code 37 - An external device writing a 37
user display code to the ABS ECU to activate the
multiple light sequence. Can be cleared by using :
DDU (refer to Section 10.4, 10.5) or Info Centre.
(see Section 15.0 additional product information)
6.5 IMPORTANT NOTE:
SENSOR RELATED FAULTS
If a system fault occurs the warning lamp(s) will
be illuminated. The ECU stores coded diagnostic
information in a memory. If the diagnostic code
stored, is in the group 11 to 16 or 21 to 26. i.e.
Sensor related faults (see Diagnostic Codes in
section 10.12) then after repair, on initial power up
the lamp(s) will remain permanently illuminated
without the initial flash. This is due to the fact that
the ECU requires confirmation of satisfactory
sensor outputs before it will restore the correct
lamp sequence. The wheel(s) which had the
sensor fault(s) must now be rotated with the ECU
powered up, or the vehicle must be driven at a
speed greater than 6mph (10km/h) to confirm
sensor signal integrity. The ECU will restore the
correct lamp sequence. However the fault code
will remain in the memory and may subsequently
be misleading if other faults occur at a later date.
Therefore the memory should have its stored
faults erased immediately after undertaking
any repairs. (See section 10.4 and 10.5 for DDU
or section 15.0 additional product information for
Info Centre)
Modular Section 6.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
7.0 SYSTEM POWER SUPPLY AND
FUSES.
available power source in the following order of
priority:
7.1 POWER SUPPLY
1. MODULAR ABS will accept any source of
electrical power available from the tractor unit as
listed below.
(1st) ISO 7638 (Dedicated supply).
(2nd) ISO 1185 (24 N Stop lamp power supply).
(a) ISO 1185 (24 N Stop lamp power supply).
(1st) ISO 3731 (24 S Supplementary supply).
(2nd) ISO 1185 (24 N Stop lamp power supply).
(b) ISO 3731 (24 S Permanent ignition sourced
power supply).
(c )ISO 7638 (Dedicated ignition sourced
permanent power supply).
Any of these supplies will power the system on a
stand alone basis but trailers will be wired to
provide a combination of either:
ISO1185 (24N) plus ISO 7638
OR
ISO1185 (24N) plus ISO 3731 (24S)
This provides operational choices to suit the
majority of new and existing tractor units.
It should be noted that 24S with ISO 7638 is not
available as an option.
2. The power source provided by the tractor unit
will depend on its age, type of manufacture and
modifications carried out by the operator.
The MODULAR system will only draw current from
one power source at a time and will self select the
OR
7.2 System Fuses.
A 12 Amp in line ceramic fuse is fitted into pin 1 of
the ISO 7638 Connector. In the event of a wiring
short or other overload the fuse will blow resulting
in a permanent lamp indication.
There are two designs of connector, varying
according to manufacturer. (Type A = AMP,
Type B = Haldex).
Both replacement fuse types are provided in
Haldex service kit number 950 364 401.
Fuse Replacement kit
SERVICE KIT PART No. 950 364 401
CONTENTS:
FUSED PIN FOR Haldex ISO 7638 connector
FUSED PIN FOR A.M.P ISO 7638 connector
EJECTOR
RELIEF TUBE
INSTRUCTIONS
NOTE: The fused pin for A.M.P ISO 7638 cannot be
used to replace the fused pin of the Haldex ISO 7638.
Both fuses are supplied in the kit and are not
interchangeable.
Fig 7.1 FUSE SERVICE KIT CONTENT
Modular Section 7.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODAL
MODULAR
FUSE
IDENTIFICATION
LABEL
12 AMP
003
7554
09
YELLOW or 3
2 1
7
3
4 5 6
RED or 2
PURPLE or 1
(FUSED)
BLACK or Y/GN
WHITE or 4
RELIEF
TUBE
FEMALE CRIMP
TERMINAL
EJECTOR
RETAINING
BARBS
FUSED PIN No.1
Fig 7.2. ISO 7638 FUSE REPLACEMENT A.M.P CONNECTOR
Replacement of ISO 7638 Fuse
PROCEDURE:
Type A:
A.M.P. Connector (Black Cover) See Fig.7.2.
1. Disconnect the trailer from all power sources.
2. Remove the fasteners securing the ISO 7638
connector to the trailer headboard.
3. Pull the socket away from the headboard to
expose the cable gland.
4. Release the cable gland.
5. Unscrew the rear cover from the ISO 7638
connector and slide it away from the connector.
6. Pull back the gasket and gasket retainer,
covering the pin compartment to gain access to
the blade terminal of pin 1.
7. Disconnect the blade terminal from the fuse
assembly.
8. Push the relief tool (in the service kit) fully
home over the retaining barbs of pin 1.
9. Insert the ejector (in the service kit) into the
relief tool and push it fully home to eject the pin
from its housing.
10. Fit the replacement (fused pin 1) and
reassemble the connector (in reverse
procedure) ensuring correct location of all gaskets
and security of all gland nuts, and fittings.
Modular Section 7.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
SOCKET BODY
PIN HOUSING
CABLE GLAND NUT
BODY REAR COVER
CABLE
GASKET
SPIDER
FUSED PIN No.1
BLADE CONNECTOR
Fig 7.3. ISO 7638 FUSE REPLACEMENT HALDEX CONNECTOR
Type B:
Haldex Connector (Green Cover) See Fig.7.3.
1. Disconnect the trailer from all power sources.
2. Remove the fasteners securing the ISO 7638
connector to the trailer headboard.
3. Pull the socket away from the headboard to
expose the conduit and cable gland.
4. Unscrew the cable gland nut from the socket
body rear cover.
5. Unscrew the rear cover from the connector body
and slide it away from the connector.
6. Withdraw the spider and pin housing assembly
from the socket body, and disconnect the fused
pin blade connector.
7. Slide the cable gasket along the cables, away
from the spider to clear the fused pin blade.
8. Separate the spider and pin housings by prising
them apart to disengage the retaining barbs.
9. Pull pin 1 sideways out of the spider, and insert
the new fused pin into its housing in the same
orientation.
10. Re-assemble the connector in the reverse
procedure ensuring correct location of all gaskets
and security of all gland nuts, and fittings.
Modular Section 7.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
8.0 SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS
8.1 TERMINOLOGY (see also section 1.1)
S Refers to a sensor.
M Refers to a modulator.
S1A/S1B, S2A/S2B and S3A/S3B identify the left
and right hand of sensor pairs and the order in
which they are installed on the trailer.
Consider sitting on axle 1 with axle 2 behind you,
then sensor group "A" will always be to your left
and sensor group "B" will always be to your right.
You will note that for this to be true you will be
facing forwards for full trailers and backwards for
semi or centre axle trailers.
The configuration reference indicates component
quantities in the system. Hence a 2S1M system
will have 2 Sensors and 1 Modulator.
The sensor identity is relevant to the position in
which its output is displayed on the DDU or Info
Centre, when checking sensor function (see
section 3.5 and 6.0). The sensor identity varies
between different configurations dependant on the
number of axles and sensor pairs fitted.
NOTE: These identities should not be confused
with axle numbers, which differ between full
trailers and semi or centre axle trailers. (See
Figs 8.4 to 8.5).
ECU Refers to the electronic control unit of the
MODULAR ABS system.
Axle numbering:
Semi-Trailer and centre axle trailer axles are
numbered from the rear axle forwards hence
axle 1 is the rear axle.
Full trailers (Drawbars) have their axles
numbered from the front of the trailer rearwards so
that the front axle is number 1.
This numbering system caters for self steering
axles which will always be number 1.
If axle 1 is a self steer axle it must always be
controlled by the RED modulator channel
operating on a “select low” principal, i.e. the ABS
channel controlling that axle reacts to the first
locking wheel and controls both wheels of the
axle to that level of tyre to road grip.
It is not possible to provide individual wheel
control on self steer axles as split friction
conditions would result in vehicle instability due to
the differing tyre to road grip across the axle,
which would cause it to self steer.
8.2 CONFIGURATION
Sensor and modulator channels are colour coded
as follows.
RD = RED,
BU = BLUE,
YE = YELLOW
The RED channel sensing is always from
sensors identified as S1A and S1B.
This channel provides select low operation as
independant wheel control ABS cannot be applied
to self steer axles.
The BLUE channel sensing is always from
sensor(s) identified as S2A or S2A and S3A
together:
The YELLOW channel sensing is always from
sensor(s) identified as S2B or S2B and S3B.
MODULAR ABS is capable of controlling 1 or 2
channels of braking effort sensed by 2 or 4
sensors and may therefore be installed in a range
of different configurations:
Modular 1 Upgrade =
Modular 1 Plus =
Modular 2 =
2S1M
2S1M
2S2M or 4S2M
System equipment will depend on the type of
trailer, and the degree of ABS control specified
by the operator or trailer manufacturer. The
maximum number of control channels will be two,
determined by the number of modulator(s).
Modulator cable
connected to ECU:
Number of ABS
control channels:
Red (RD) only
Yellow (YE) & Blue (BU) only
1
2
Fig 8.1 NUMBER OF CHANNELS
Wiring diagrams are shown in section 12. The
number of wheel speed sensors connected to the
ECU may be 2 or 4 but the combination of
modulator solenoid cables and wheel speed
sensor cables will always be as shown in Fig 8.2
below.
Modulator cable
is connected to:
For 2S1M
RD
For 2S2M
BU+YE
For 4S2M
BU+YE
Sensors
connected
S1A+S1B
S2A+S2B
S2A+S2B+S3A+S3B
Fig 8.2 SENSOR AND SOLENOID CABLE
COMBINATIONS
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
8.3 CONFIGURATION CODES
NOTE:- Where sensed axles are also lift axles,the
sensors will be disabled when the axle is lifted,
these are indicated in brackets in Fig 8.3 below.
DDU
Code
Info Centre
Code
Function
CO
C1
C2
C3
2S1C
2S1C
2S2C
4S2C
2S/1M
2S/2M
4S/2M
4S/2M
CO
C1
C2
C3
Axle No.
Lifted
Sensors
Used
Modulators
Used
2 or 3
S1A S1B
S2A S2B
S3A S2A S2B S3B
(S3A) S2A S2B (S3B)
Red
Blue,Yellow
Blue,Yellow
Blue,Yellow
Fig 8.3 CONFIGURATION CODES
8.4 CONFIGURATION FAULTS
When the ECU is initially powered up, a system
configuration code is briefly displayed on the
DDU or Info Centre if attached, which should be
confirmed as correct for the particular installation,
by referring to the configuration codes listed in
Fig 8.3 above.
If a vehicle has its modulator piped incorrectly,
solenoid wiring interchanged between solenoids,
or sensor wiring interchanged between sensors
then it is possible that a correct configuration
code may be displayed but that poor ABS
performance is evident. This will occur due to
incorrect cross connection of sensors and
modulators at the ECU.
When the ECU receives a locking wheel signal it
attempts control of that wheel, but if sensors or
modulators are incorrectly connected either
electrically or in the case of the modulator
pneumatically, the wrong wheel will be controlled,
resulting in poor ABS and brake performance.
In such circumstances the MODULAR system
may generate a fault code indicating slow wheel
recovery group i.e. A fault code number such as,
41, 42, or 43. (see section 10.0)
In this event the configuration and wiring
diagrams should be checked against your
installation to ensure that the actual pipe work and
wiring conforms to the allowable configuration
details, (See section 12.0).
8.5 AUXILIARY CONFIGURATION CODE
Modular 1 Plus and Modular 2 ABS ECUs offer
extra features beyond the ABS, However these
features may or may not be used. In order to
provide the standard of electrical diagnostic
associated with ABS type product, the ECU
needs to know if a solenoid operated valve,
e.g. a Reset-to-Ride (COLAS) valve, should be
present.
The ECUs are supplied in a un-configured
condition, this means that when it is powered
after being installed on a vehicle it will check for
the presence of a solenoid operated valve and
configure to use one if it is present. If auxiliaries
are added later which require the use of features
which are already disabled by the first auto
configuration a fault code will be displayed.
For example: If a Colas valve has been added
since initial configuration the diagnostic code will
be :DDU display = A1
Info Centre display = RIDE A1
this will be seen by the ECU as a current fault.
Using the DDU the procedure to clear this
configuration is as follows:1. Apply power, allow display to settle to fault
code 'A1'
2. Read fault code, obtain 'CA' (or if no other
stored fault codes '00') and accept option by
pressing the button on DDU.
3. Wait approx 5 sec. after display has returned
to 'A1'.
4. Repeat reading and clearing of fault code as
above up to three times.
5. On the third time the 'CA' will have been
replaced by a 'CC'. Accept this option by
pressing and holding the button.
6. Remove power.
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
7. Apply power, the diagnostic display should
show the main 'C' configuration followed by the
configuration 'A1', then '07' .
The ECU is now re-configured.
8. Erase diagnostic code 'A1' from memory.
Using the Info Centre the procedure to clear the
configuration is detailed in the Additional
Information section 15.0.
8.6 CONFIGURATION AND FUNCTION CHECK
In the event of needing to identify the
configuration, match your trailer details to those
shown in Fig 8.4 or Fig 8.5 i.e. Type of trailer,
Number of axles, modulators and sensors fitted.
(see also Figs 8.1 and 8.2)
Having determined this information, Fig 8.4 or
Fig 8.5 can be used to determine the
configuration layout applicable to your trailer.
Having determined your trailer layout, refer to the
corresponding section diagram from
Fig 8.6 which shows the correct checkout
procedure in the order:
1. Lamp sequence.
2. Modulator blowdown check (see section 5.7)
3. Sensor output indication on DDU or Info Centre
when a wheel or wheels are rotated.
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Semi-Trailer
2S/1M
N2
N3
N3
N2
N4
N4
2S/2M
4S/2M
L
L
N4
L
N4
NOTES:
N1
N2
N3
N4
N5
N6
NOTE:
Details viewed from above.
2 Delivery port ABS valve assembly (preferred).
6 Delivery port ABS valve assembly.
3 Delivery port ABS valve assembly.
L = Axle which may be a lift axle.
For actuation recommendations consult
Haldex Brake Products Ltd. Technical Service.
The above diagrams illustrate the most common installations. For alternative configurations
consult Haldex Brake Products Ltd. Technical Service.
Fig 8.4 MODULAR SYSTEM SEMI TRAILER CONFIGURATION LAYOUTS
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Centre Axle
Trailer
2S/1M
N2
N3
N3
N2
N4
N4
2S/2M
4S/2M
L
N4
L
N4
NOTES:
N1
N2
N3
N4
N5
N6
NOTE:
Details viewed from above.
2 Delivery port ABS valve assembly (preferred).
6 Delivery port ABS valve assembly.
3 Delivery port ABS valve assembly.
L = Axle which may be a lift axle.
For actuation recommendations consult
Haldex Brake Products Ltd. Technical Service.
The above diagrams illustrate the most common installations. For alternative configurations
consult Haldex Brake Products Ltd. Technical Service.
Fig 8.5 MODULAR SYSTEM CENTRE AXLE TRAILER CONFIGURATION LAYOUTS
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Key
Modulator
Blowdown
M Modulator
O.K.
NOT O.K.
Fig 8.6 MODULAR 1 (2S/1M) SYSTEM CHECKOUT
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Key
Modulator
Blowdown
M Modulator
O.K.
NOT O.K.
Fig 8.7 MODULAR 2 (2S/2M) SYSTEM CHECKOUT
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
Key
Modulator
Blowdown
M Modulator
O.K.
NOT O.K.
Fig 8.8 MODULAR 2 (4S/2M) SYSTEM CHECKOUT
Modular Section 8.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
9.0 THE INFO CENTRE
The Info Centre is a side of trailer mounted
diagnostic unit used for read-out of odometer and
diagnostic codes, plus other information as
available from the ABS Electronic Control Unit
(ECU). (See Fig 9.1)
Functions:
Odometer:
Total distance
Trip distance
Service interval
Distance to next service
Tyre scale setting
Diagnostic
Display current diagnostic code
Display stored diagnostic codes
Sensor / cabling check
ECU
Information:
Serial number
Product type code
Configuration code
Auxiliary code
Re-Configure ABS ECU (adding
or removing COLAS)
Fig 9.1 INFO CENTRE
It is connected permanently to the ABS ECU's
diagnostic connection. While the ECU is powered
from the vehicle system. (stoplight or permanent
supply) information is transferred to the Info
Centre's memory, which can be recalled. Power is
supplied from the vehicle systems via the ECU
diagnostics connector. (see Section 12.0 - Wiring
diagrams)
The Info Centre comprises an LCD (Liquid Crystal
Display) (see Fig 9.2) and buttons marked up/down
( ) and right ( ). The
button accesses
the next main menu item, the
button is used
for sub menu items. For adjustment of settings a
watch adjustment style procedure is followed; Hold
down the
button for 2 seconds, the first digit
flashes and can then be increased by pressing the
button. The next digit is then selected, and
so on. It also has an internal battery which allows
display of information (including fault indication)
when the trailer is uncoupled and unpowered. It is
housed in a plastic enclosure provided with a cover
boot for environmental protection.
The Info Centre contains an AA size
Lithium / Thionyl Chloride Battery
that carries the following warning:
"Fire, Explosion and Severe Burn Hazard".
Under no circumstances should the battery be
recharged, crushed or tampered with in any way.
The Info Centre should not be Incinerated or stored
above 100°C. The ABS ECU may be disposed of by
landfill or recycled through a specialist
operator, if in doubt consult your local authority for
details or contact Haldex.
Fig 9.2 THE DISPLAY
The Legends are as follows:BATTERY:
- OFF =
OK
- ON = Internal ABS ECU battery failure.
Diagnostic functions and ECU information
available only.
LOCK:
- Incorrect ABS ECU connected to Info
Centre.
Odometer functions not available.
POWER: Vehicle Power
-ON = Vehicle Supply ON
-OFF = NO Vehicle supply
-FLASHING = Communications established
between Info Centre and ABS ECU.
BELLOWS: Air Suspension - Bogie load, Load apportioning, Height
control, Manual raise/lower
ODOMETER DISPLAY
- Total distance
- Trip distance
ADJUSTMENT ARROWS: Editing Mode
-ON = Indicates that information may be
changed by user.
SERVICE FUNCTION / SERVICE DUE:
-ON = Whilst displaying the odometer
value indicating service is due.
-FLASHING = Current ABS fault
Modular Section 9.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
9.1 INFO CENTRE FOR ADR REGULATIONS
To satisfy the ADR regulations for flammable loads
(i.e. Petrol tanker trailers) a variant of Info Centre
and its associated ECU (see section 4.0) is
available WITHOUT odometer
function.This is because hazardous load
regulations do not permit the fitting of battery
powered equipment (spark generators) to the rear
of the firewall and so only this variant of Info Centre
must be used.
c: Secure cable along the chassis or
appropriate support with cable ties at not more than
200mm intervals.
d: Mate cover to Info Centre and click into position
making sure both clips are fully engaged at top and
bottom. (see Fig 9.4)
Info Centre
cover
All other functions are as standard Info Centre .
For reference of the component part number refer
to service parts in section 14.0.
This Info Centre must only be
replaced by its exact equivalent on
ADR vehicles.
L
9.2 INFO CENTRE MAINTENANCE
The Info Centre requires no routine maintenance.
9.3 INFO CENTRE REPLACEMENT
1. Locate the position of the unit which should be
in an accessible area either in front, rearward of
the wheel gear.
2. Disconnect the Info Centre connections.
3. Cut away the cable ties securing the cable to
any appropriate supports.
4. Unclip the front cover to expose the two M6
mounting bolts and remove.
5. Fit the new Info Centre in the reverse procedure
to the above noting the following.
a: Tighten the retaining bolts to 12-15Nm.
b: Tighten nut on Info Centre socket and ensure
locking tab is located when mated with chassis
diagnostic connector. (see Fig 9.3)
Info Centre
socket
Fig 9.4 COVER CLIPS LOCATION
9.3 FUNCTION INSTRUCTION
Refer to Section 15.0 for the relevant product
information on various functions of the Info Centre
with and without vehicle power.
Diagnostic
connector
(chassis
mount)
Locking Tab
Fig 9.3 CHASSIS CONNECTION
Modular Section 9.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
10.0 FAULT FINDING WITH MODULAR
10.1 EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
The following tools are required to carry out the
complete schedule of diagnostic tests.
Trolley jack
Multimeter (see recommended units in Sec.14.0)
500 volt insulation tester
Switch test box (optional see Fig 10.1).
Diagnostic Display Unit (DDU) or Info Centre.
NOTE: A tractor unit may be used as an
alternative to a switch test box.
CAUTION : It is essential that normal safety
procedures are observed when working on vehicles
to ensure that they are correctly jacked and supported. Dangerous load carrying vehicles should
always be made safe before commencing remedial
work.
10.2 INITIAL DIAGNOSIS OF ABS FAULTS
Perform the following tests.
1. Apply electrical power to the trailer via the"24N"
connector while observing the anti-lock warning
lamp which should flash and then come on and
stay on. (See section 6.0 lamps).
2. If the lamp fails to illuminate check the lamp bulb
and electrical power supply.
3. If the lamp fails to flash but stays permanently
illuminated check the diagnostic display codes
including stored diagnostic codes using the
procedure in 10.3. (Also NOTE section 6.5)
4. If (1) above is satisfactory drive the vehicle at
above 6 m.p.h. (10 km/h). The anti-lock warning
lamp should extinguish. If it does not there is a
wheel speed sensing fault. Check the diagnostic
display code using the procedure in 10.4.
5. To test for correct valve blow down, fully charge
the air brake system, and turn off all electrical
power to the trailer. Apply the foot brake and set
the ignition switch to on.
There should be as many brief pulses of air as
there are ABS modulators. (See section 5.7and
Fig 8.6 to 8.8).
7. If the air pulse is incorrect check the diagnostic
display code using the procedure in 10.4. Note that
erroneous wiring of the modulator solenoid wiring
will produce two air pulses on the affected
modulator as the dump and hold solenoids are
electrically identical but have different pneumatic
functions.
8. When a wheel is rotated, and electrical power
is applied, all modulator blowdowns are inhibited
while the wheel is turning.
Note: It is recommended
that this circuit breaker
is of the type,
KLOCKNER MOELLER
FAZL6-1,
or
RS COMPONENTS 335-924
R
Fig 10.1 CIRCUIT DIAGRAM FOR OPTIONAL SWITCH TEST BOX
Modular Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
10.3 DIAGNOSTIC DISPLAY
The ECU has a memory which stores diagnostic
codes automatically. These stored codes are
retained in memory even when power is
disconnected from the ABS, and can be recalled
on a hand-held Diagnostic Display Unit (DDU) when
the power supply is restored.
Follow the appropriate procedure described in
section 10.4 for use with the DDU and section 15.0
(Additional information) using the Info Centre.
For wheel sensor output tests the DDU may be
used on a trailer which is static in the workshop or
dynamically on the road. The Info Centre can be
used on a trailer which is static in the workshop
only.
10.4 USING THE DIAGNOSTIC DISPLAY UNIT
(DDU)
1. Remove all electrical power from the trailer.
2. Connect the DDU cable to the trailer diagnostic
output connector. (See Fig 9.3).
3. Apply 24 volts to the anti-lock system.
4. At power up 88 is displayed briefly to confirm
LCD function, followed by a configuration code
and a diagnostic code which is displayed
constantly. Check that the configuration code
agrees with the system wiring by confirming that
the number of connected sensors and solenoids
are as shown in the configuration codes given in
section 8.3.
5. Refer to diagnostic codes in section 10.12 to
determine the cause of the fault.
Note that some codes generated confirm correct
system function.
6. Remove all electrical power and then repair
faults as necessary.
7. Clear the diagnostic memory as described in
10.5
NOTE: Faults which occur whilst the ECU is
powered up are logged in two memories. Any
attempt to erase the permanent memory unless
power has been removed since the fault occurred
will be unsuccessful as the temporary memory will
continuously re-write the fault to permanent
memory at each erasure attempt.
8. Remove electrical power from the ABS system
(the diagnostic display will be completely blank).
9. Disconnect the DDU cable from its connector.
10. Restore electrical power and carry out the
driver's checks for correct lamp sequence as
described in section 1.2 but with regard to the
Important Note at section 6.5.
10.5 READING STORED CODES ON THE DDU
1. Remove electrical power from the ECU.
2. Connect the Diagnostic Display Unit to its
connector on the trailer.
3. Apply power to the ECU.
4. Read the display on the DDU. This is the current
code which may or may not refer to a fault
5. Press the switch on top of the DDU for
approximately 5 seconds until the DDU display
changes.
6. Release the switch.
7. The DDU displays the code last entered.
8. Press the switch again for approximately 5
seconds until the DDU display changes.
This is the highest numerical fault code in
memory.
9. Release the switch, and press again to display
the next highest numerically recorded fault code.
Continue this sequence to step through the fault
code memory.
10. After five codes “CA” will be displayed. See 12.
below.
11. Release the switch.
ERASING FAULT CODES FROM MEMORY
USING THE DDU
12. The ”CA” display is an invitation to erase the
memory, pressing and holding the switch while it
is displayed will cause the memory to be erased.
The LCD will scan the codes as they are cleared.
13. If the switch is not pressed the next fault code
in the stored list will be displayed.
14. At the end of the fault code list "CA" will be
displayed again as a further invitation to erase all
stored faults. Successful erasure of the fault
codes will only be possible, if the fault causing the
code to be logged in memory has been repaired.
15. When all codes are cleared, release the button
briefly, then press and hold. After 5 seconds the
display will read "00" indicating that the memory is
empty.
PRESS BUTTON TO
ACCESS DIAGNOSTIC
CODES
CONNECTOR PLUGS
INTO ABS TEST
POINT
Fig 10.2 ACCESSING FAULT CODES USING
THE DDU
Using the INFO CENTRE see Section 15.0 for
relevant product information.
Moduar Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
10.6 INTERPRETATION OF FAULT CODES
1. When the vehicle is stationary and no fault is
present the diagnostic display will be 07.
2. This display will change when the vehicle is
driven at above 6 mph (10 km/h) and bars will
appear in the display window for left and right
sensors representing a sensor output which is
above the necessary minimum.
3. The number of bars which appear should be the
same as the number of wheels which have speed
sensors fitted.
4. The (DDU) displays “00” as a code which
indicates correct operation of the system, when
vehicle speeds exceed 6mph (10km/h).
5. When the vehicle stops the code returns to 07.
6. Flashing bars indicate that there are poorly
adjusted sensors or loose sensor connections.
7. Spinning individual wheels with the trailer jacked
up will cause the relevant bar to appear if the
sensor output is above the minimum.
8. Codes other than those described above can be
interpreted by using the diagnostic code table in
section 10.12.
10.7 ELECTRICAL TESTS OF SENSOR AND
SOLENOID WIRING
1. When the diagnostic code indicates that there is
a faulty power supply, wheel speed sensor or
modulator solenoid fault, the location of the fault
can be determined by continuity and resistance
tests and by reference to the appropriate wiring
diagram.
2. Test equipment may be connected to the main
ABS harness at the moulded ECU connector for
which a pin map is shown in Fig.4.7, Fig.4.8 and
Fig.4.9 .
10.8 POWER SUPPLY FAULTS
The correct power supply connections to the ECU
pins are shown in the pin map in Fig.4.6, Fig.4.7
and Fig.4.8 .
Supply voltages must be in the range 18 to 32 volts
maximum.
Code 90 indicates a voltage loss when a solenoid
is energised and the voltage at the ECU falls below
18 Volts.
1. Ensure that the electrical supply is satisfactory
under full electrical load conditions, i.e. there are
no high resistance connections present.
2. Establish if the voltage drop occurs when using
each of the power sources on their own, ISO7638,
ISO3731 (24S), ISO1185 (24N).
3. Check for loose connections in the wiring from
the source which produces the fault code.
NOTE: An inadequate power supply e.g.
discharged test batteries will cause code 90 to be
displayed.
Code 91 indicates that when using the ISO 7638
power source there is sufficient voltage coming
from pin 2 of the ISO 7638 connector but the
voltage coming from pin 1 is low or absent.
1. Check for broken wiring or blown fuses on both
the trailer and the towing vehicle or with the
workshop power supply if used. The voltage
measured on the ECU connector which goes to
ISO 7638 pin 1 should be between 18 Volts and 32
Volts when the voltmeter negative lead is on the
ECU connector which goes to ISO 7638 pin 4.
(See wiring Section 12)
Code 92 indicates that the power supply to the
ECU is above 32 volts and action must be taken to
reduce this over voltage.
1. Check the towing vehicle voltage regulator and
alternator system or the voltage output from the
test power supply in use.
2. The correct power supply connections to the
ECU supply pins are shown in the pin maps in
Fig.4.7, Fig.4.8 and Fig.4.9 .
10.9 WARNING LAMP FLASH INCORRECT
Permanently Illuminated Lamp
1. This may be caused by wiring shorts or by
faults which cause the ECU to permanently
illuminate the lamp. The latter may be due to a
system fault if the code displayed is not 07, or a
stored sensing system fault, if the code displayed
is 07.
2. Read the diagnostic code. If the code is 07
read the fault memory. Sensing system faults will
be stored if any were present the last time the
trailer was moved at a speed greater than 6mph
(10km/h).
3. Make any necessary repairs and clear the
memory. The lamp flash should now revert to
normal after vehicle speed has exceeded 6mph
(10km/h). IMPORTANT: See section 6.5.
If not there is a lamp wiring short circuit to battery
negative or chassis.
4. If the code is not 07 make the necessary
repairs as indicated by the diagnostic code until
the code becomes 07 at which time the lamp
sequence should revert to normal within the
provisions of section 6.5
NOW ERASE THE MEMORY.
5. If after completing the above process the lamp
is still permanently illuminated there is a short
circuit between the lamp negative side and battery
negative. The lamp negative goes directly to the
ECU. The ECU then switches this side to battery
negative to illuminate the lamp.
6. Measure the resistance of the relevant lamp wire
Modular Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
to battery negative and vehicle chassis to confirm
the short.
No Lamp Illumination
1. Check the lamp bulb and holder first.
2. Connect a test lamp temporarily across the
lamp terminals in the junction box, and cycle the
system.
3. The test lamp will operate correctly if the fault
lies downstream of the junction box. i.e. between
the trailer lamp and junction box.
If the lamp sequence is incorrect the fault lies
upstream of the junction box towards the ECU.
10.10 WHEEL SPEED SENSING
Codes 01 and 02 indicate that a wheel speed
sensor or its wiring is short or open circuit.
1. Disconnect the relevant sensor connector at
the extension lead plug and measure the
resistance between the 2 sockets in the connector
housing.
2. The ohmmeter reading should be between
980 ohms and 2.35 kohms.
3. The extension cable between the controller and
wheel has an in line connector. If an open circuit
is measured check that the connector is correctly
assembled.
4. Disconnect the harness from the ECU and
locate the appropriate pins for the cable to be
tested see Fig.4.7, Fig.4.8 and Fig.4.9 .
5. Using a 500 volt insulation tester measure the
insulation resistance between each sensor wire
and chassis. The insulation resistance must be
more than 10 megohms.
Codes 11 and 12 indicate that the output of a
wheel speed sensor is insufficient. The most likely
reason for this is that the sensor to exciter gap is
too great. Adjust the sensor as detailed in section
3.4.
Codes 21 and 22 indicate that there is an
intermittent loss of adequate sensor signal when
moving. The most likely causes are loose
connections, loose sensor bracket, broken sensor
retaining clip, a distorted exciter or intermittent
insulation failures of sensor cables (for which a
cable insulation test will be required).
10.11 MODULATOR SOLENOIDS
Codes 61 and 67 indicate that the solenoid or its
cable is open circuited.
1. Disconnect the solenoid cable at its connector
and measure the resistance.
2. The resistance should be between 12 ohms and
20 ohms.
Codes 71 and 77 indicate that a solenoid or its
cable is short circuited.
Codes 80 to 87 indicate that a solenoid or its cable
has a short circuit to battery positive.
1. Disconnect the harness connector from the
solenoid. Measure the resistance of the solenoids
with a multimeter at the modulator. Solenoid
resistance should be 12 to 20 ohms.
2. Disconnect the harness at the ECU and test at
the solenoid connector between each wire and
chassis with a 500 volt insulation tester. The
insulation resistance must be greater than
10 megohms.
Note:If an unlisted diagnostic code is displayed on
the DDU, then the ABS ECU is faulty and must be
changed.
NOTE: Wherever possible alternative
components may be substituted for existing ones
during fault finding, if the substituted component
eliminates the current diagnostic code then it may
be assumed that the component that was causing
the code to be displayed is at fault.
If the code cannot be eliminated then the ABS ECU
is at fault.
DIAGNOSTIC CODES.
Diagnostic codes are listed on the following pages
and are separated into groups covering numeric
codes, and alpha numeric codes, these are
followed by the configuration codes which will be
seen at power up of the ABS ECU.
Moduar Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
10.12 DIAGNOSTIC CODES FOR MODULAR ABS SERIES
Note: If a diagnostic code not listed below is displayed, the ECU is suspect and should be changed.
Refer to 10.5 for detailed diagnostic procedures. A diagnostic code list, as displayed on the DDU, is shown in
this section. For the Info Centre diagnostic code listing refer to relevant information in section 15.0.
CODE DISPLAYED
BLANK DISPLAY
No supply on ignition switched line.
Possible causes:
Fuse blown.
DDU / INFO CENTRE or cable fault.Open circuit B -
SENSOR BAR
Bar displayed = Sensor output O.K.
Bar not displayed = Sensor output too low
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
OA
OC
OE
System is O.K. vehicle is moving
1A Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
1B Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
2A Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
2B Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
3A Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
3B Sensor/wiring open or short circuit
System is O.K. vehicle is stationary
Retarder / Wiring open circuit
Retarder / Wiring short circuit
Reset to ride / Wiring open circuit
Reset to ride / Wiring short circuit
Warning lamp circuit fault
LOW SENSOR OUTPUT GROUP
11
12
13
14
15
16
1A Sensor system fault
1B Sensor system fault
2A Sensor system fault
2B Sensor system fault
3A Sensor system fault
3B Sensor system fault
Possible causes:
Sensor worn, maladjusted sensor, wiring open or short
circuit.
20
Incorrect exciter type.
Possible causes:
Exciter tooth count difrent each side of axle.
INTERMITTENT LOW SENSOR OUTPUT GROUP
21
22
23
24
25
26
1A Sensor system fault
1B Sensor system fault
2A Sensor system fault
2B Sensor system fault
3A Sensor system fault
3B Sensor system fault
Possible causes:
Loose sensor, connection, bracket or exciter.Damaged exciter.
Maladjusted sensor or worn sensor cable insulation.
Modular Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
CODE DISPLAYED
37
Lamp signalled by external device
ONE WHEEL WITH SLOW RECOVERY GROUP
40
41
42
43
Sensor wiring crossed across an axle
Slow recovery of one wheel of red channel
Slow recovery of one wheel of blue channel
Slow recovery of one wheel of yellow channel
Possible causes:
Slow brake release, foundation brake mechanical faults,
dry bearings, broken spring, restricted piping
Check for kinks and blockages etc.
Incorrect piping, wiring, modulator fault
OPEN CIRCUIT MODULATOR SOLENOID OR
SOLENOID WIRING GROUP
61
62
63
67
68
69
Hold solenoid circuit fault, red channel
Hold solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Hold solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, red channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
SHORT CIRCUIT ACROSS MODULATOR SOLENOID OR
SOLENOID WIRING GROUP
71
72
73
77
78
79
Hold solenoid circuit fault, red channel
Hold solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Hold solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, red channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
MODULATOR SOLENOID WIRING OR
SOLENOID SHORT TO B+ GROUP
80
81
82
83
87
88
89
Poor insulation in the modulator solenoid or wiring fault
Hold solenoid circuit fault, red channel.
Hold solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Hold solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, red channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, blue channel
Dump solenoid circuit fault, yellow channel
SUPPLY VOLTAGE GROUP
90
91
92
Supply voltage at ECU less than 18v when a solenoid is energised
Faulty supply from ISO 7638 Pin 1 or fuse blown
Supply voltage at the ECU greater than 32v
Moduar Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
CODE DISPLAYED
93
99
Internal ECU fault
Internal ECU fault
SYSTEM FUNCTION GROUP
A1
A2
Reset to ride height (COLAS)
Retarder
CONFIGURATION CODES
Figures in brackets indicate sensing is disabled when the axle is lifted.
Function
C0
C1
C2
C3
2S/1M
2S/2M
4S/2M
4S/2M
Axle Lifted
Sensors Used
Modulators Used
2 or 3
1A, 1B
2A, 2B
2A, 2B, 3A, 3B
2A, 2B, (3A), (3B)
Red
Blue, Yellow
Blue, Yellow
Blue, Yellow
SUNDRY ADDITIONAL CODES
CA
CC
CF
LO or HI
Erase stored fault
Clear Configuration
Sensors and Solenoid not connected
CF may alternate with code 90 meaning low voltage.
See code 90 for diagnosis.
Communication failure between ECU and DDU,
open or short circuit wiring
Modular Section 10.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
11.0 DIAGNOSTIC UTILITIES
11.1 PC Interface Kit
The PC interface Kit is comprised of the Interface
1 Pod, together with its connecting cables and a
transit case. The kit permits the connection of the
diagnostic port of the ABS controller to a serial
port on a PC.
The pod is provided with three LEDs to confirm
correct functioning of the units as follows:
Red: To indicate that 24V Power is connected.
Yellow: To indicate data is being transmitted by
the PC.
Green: To indicate data is being transmitted by
the ABS ECU.
INTERFACE 1 Pod
Supplied with the VDS software package, are
sample spreadsheet templates that show
examples of information that can be collected and
stored in your VDS system.
You can also create your own templates and
macros that will enable you to store information
specific to your business.
Full details of the VDS package are available in a
separate publication.
11.3 End-of-Line Test (EOLT)
EOLT offers the ability to execute tests on all of the
Modular and Modal ABS products. This is achieved
by collection and storing two types of data from the
ABS system. The first type is test data recorded
by the ABS system, example wheel speeds as
measured on a rolling road and system
configuration data. The second type is data entered
by the user.
Full details of the EOLT package are available in a
seperate publication.
POWER
PC
11.4 Minimum system specifications:
The minimum PC or Laptop specification to run
either of the diagnostic packages is as follows:
ECU
connection to
ABS ECU
via the
diagnostic connector
connection to PC
Fig 11.1 INTERFACE 1 POD
This kit provides the interface required by the two
communication packages: Vehicle Data System
(VDS) and End-of-Line Test (EOLT).
11.2 Vehicle Data System (VDS)
VDS offers the ability to capture operational data
from the ABS ECU and to store it on a PC. It is
then possible to manipulate the data using
common PC spreadsheets.
The data stored in the ECU is divided into two
sections. The first section is data recorded by the
ABS ECU during trailer highway operation and
includes ABS system status and vehicle mileage.
The second is information created by the user for
example service and maintenance records, such
as information related to the treatment of specific
loads, tyre wear statistics or other details that
would be useful to your business.
This data is stored inside the ABS ECU and will
remain intact even after electrical power is
removed from the trailer.
MS-DOS :
PC-AT or compatible.
RAM 640K
Hard Drive - 1Mb Free
Monitor EGA / VGA
MS Windows 3.11 or 3.1:
Processor - 286 or above
RAM 4 Megabytes (8 recommended)
Hard Drive - 20 Megabytes
Monitor EGA / VGA
MS Windows 95:
Processor - 486 or above
RAM 8 Megabytes
(16 recommended)
Hard Drive - 20 Megabytes
Monitor EGA / VGA
In addition to the above, a 3.5" diskette drive is
required for software installation and a vacant serial
port will be required to connect to the interface 1
pod.
MODULAR
12.0 SYSTEM WIRING DIAGRAMS
12.1 WIRING REPAIRS
1.Before undertaking maintenance or repairs on a
the MODULAR ABS system it is necessary to
understand the system configuration of the vehicle
being worked upon. (see section 8.0)
2.First read section 8.0 configurations and
determine the wiring diagram to suit your vehicle.
3.Proceed with maintenance and repairs
accordingly using the appropriate wiring diagram.
4.To maintain system reliability wiring repairs
must be of a high standard. The ECU relies upon
receiving low voltage signals from the sensors via
cables and connectors which should offer minimal
electrical resistance. It is particularly important
therefore that the recommended cable, connectors
and tools are used to ensure as low a resistance
as possible. All electrical connections must be
made as shown in the relevant wiring diagrams.
IMPORTANT: FAILURE TO OBSERVE THESE
RECOMMENDATIONS MAY LEAD TO A
SYSTEM MALFUNCTION.
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
MODULAR 1 UPGRADE
1A
5
3
2
8
1
ISO 1185
(24N)
7 7-1
6
4
ISO 7638
3
ISO 3731
(24S)
IDENT
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
IDENT
No.
7
7-1
8
9
1B
9
MODULAR 1 UPGRADE ABS
COMPONENT
PART No.
QTY
ECU
MODULATOR - 6 Port Assembly
Sensor Assembly
Main Loom assembly - Full function
ABS Label
Diagnostic Label
1
1
2
1
1
1
364 279 002
364 115 XXX
364 094 XXX
364 359 XXX
028 5108 09
028 5189 09
COMPONENT VARIATIONS
COMPONENT
PART No.
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Un-Fused
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Fused
ISO 1185 (24N) Cable assembly
PVC
ISO 3731 (24S) Cable assembly
PVC
QTY
364 357 XXX
1
364 362 XXX
1
364 370 XXX
1
364 373 XXX
1
Fig 12.1 MODULAR 1 UPGRADE WIRING VARIATIONS FOR SEMI TRAILER AND CENTRE AXLE.
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
COMMON
RIGHT
SENSOR
HOLD
DUMP
RD
1A
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
3 CORE
CABLE
6
13
ISO 7638
ABS
1
2
3 5
4
ISO 1185
(24N)
5 CORE
CABLE
FUSE
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
7 CORE
CABLE
PURPLE
RED
YELLOW
BLACK
WHITE
B+ RED
4
2x 4.0mm²
7
6
4
5
3
1
2
8
9
16
WHITE
RED
2
1
BLACK
3
ECU
17
3
10
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
YELLOW
BLACK
4
11
5
18
123 4
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
14
15
7
3 CORE CABLE
B- WHITE
1
5 CORE
CABLE
INFO
CENTRE
12
19
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1B
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSOR
DDU
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.2 MODULAR 1 UPGRADE WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (FUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
RIGHT
SENSOR
COMMON
HOLD
DUMP
RD
1A
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
3 CORE
CABLE
6
13
ISO 7638
ABS
5 CORE
CABLE
1
2
3 5
4
ISO 1185
(24N)
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
7 CORE
CABLE
RED
BLACK
YELLOW
WHITE
BROWN
RD
BK
YE
W
BN
B+ RED
4
2x 4.0mm²
1
2
8
9
16
WHITE
RED
2
1
BLACK
3
ECU
17
3
10
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
YELLOW
BLACK
4
11
5
18
123 4
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
14
15
7
3 CORE CABLE
B- WHITE
1
5 CORE
CABLE
INFO
CENTRE
12
19
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1B
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSOR
DDU
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.3 MODULAR 1 UPGRADE WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (UNFUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
COMMON
RIGHT
SENSOR
HOLD
DUMP
RD
1A
3 CORE
CABLE
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
6
13
5 CORE
CABLE
ISO 3731
(24S)
1
2
WHITE
BLACK
B-P
6
CAB LAMP
BLACK
B+P
BROWN
BLACK
B- WHITE
ISO 1185
(24N)
1
B+ RED
4
7 CORE
CABLE
5 CORE
CABLE
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
2x 4.0mm²
16
8
9
2
1
BN
YE
W
BK
RD
ECU
3 CORE CABLE
WHITE
RED
2
17
1
3
BLACK
3
10
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
3 CORE
CABLE
4
11
5
18
123 4
YELLOW
BLACK
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
14
15
7
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
INFO
CENTRE
12
19
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1B
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSOR
DDU
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.4 MODULAR 1 UPGRADE WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 3731 (24S) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
MODULAR 1 PLUS
5
1A
3
2
8
1
ISO 1185
(24N)
4
7 7-1
6
ISO 7638
3
ISO 3731
(24S)
IDENT
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
IDENT
No.
7
7-1
8
9
1B
9
MODULAR 1 PLUS ABS
COMPONENT
PART No.
QTY
ECU
MODULATOR - 6 Port Assembly
Sensor Assembly
Main Loom assembly - Full Function
ABS Label
Diagnostic Label
1
1
2
1
1
1
364 279 101
364 115 XXX
364 094 XXX
364 329 XXX
028 5108 09
028 5189 09
COMPONENT VARIATIONS
COMPONENT
PART No.
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Un-Fused
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Fused
ISO 1185 (24N) Cable assembly
PVC
ISO 3731 (24S) Cable assembly
PVC
QTY
364 357 XXX
1
364 362 XXX
1
364 370 XXX
1
364 373 XXX
1
Fig 12.5 MODULAR 1 PLUS WIRING VARIATIONS FOR SEMI TRAILER AND CENTRE AXLE.
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
RIGHT
SENSOR
COMMON
HOLD
DUMP
RD
+
1A
22
12
3 CORE
CABLE
10
1
4
24
14
ISO 7638
ABS
5 CORE
CABLE
FUSE
21
3 5
4
ISO 1185
(24N)
-
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
7 CORE
CABLE
PURPLE
RED
YELLOW
BLACK
WHITE
5 CORE CABLE
7
6
4
5
3
B+ RED
4
2 x 4.0mm²
7
6
16
17
26
WHITE
RED
2
1
25
BLACK
3
15
ECU
5
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
YELLOW
BLACK
9
19
8
18
123 4
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
27
28
3 CORE CABLE
B- WHITE
1
BLACK
BROWN
INFO
CENTRE
3
23
13
2
11
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
DDU
20
21
1B
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSOR
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.6 MODULAR 1 PLUS WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (FUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
COMMON
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
(COLAS)
HOLD
DUMP
RD
+
-
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1A
22
12
3 CORE
CABLE
10
1
4
24
14
ISO 7638
ABS
5 CORE
CABLE
21
3 5
4
ISO 1185
(24N)
RIGHT
SENSOR
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
7 CORE
CABLE
B- WHITE
1
B+ RED
4
BLACK
BROWN
RED
BLACK
YELLOW
WHITE
BLACK
5 CORE CABLE
RD
BK
YE
W
BN
2x 4.0mm²
7
6
16
17
26
3 CORE CABLE
WHITE
RED
2
1
25
BLACK
3
15
ECU
5
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
YELLOW
BLACK
9
19
8
18
123 4
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
27
28
INFO
CENTRE
3
23
13
2
11
20
21
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1B
DDU
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSOR
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.7 MODULAR 1 PLUS WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (UNFUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
(COLAS)
COMMON
RIGHT
SENSOR
DUMP
HOLD
RD
1A
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
+
-
22
12
3 CORE
CABLE
10
1
4
24
14
5 CORE
CABLE
ISO 3731
(24S)
ISO 1185
(24N)
2 1
6
BLACK
BROWN
WHITE
BLACK
B-P
CAB LAMP
BLACK
B+P
BROWN
BLACK
5 CORE CABLE
WHITE
RED
BLACK
7 CORE
CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
26
16
17
6
7
2
1
3
25
3 CORE
CABLE
9
19
8
18
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
5
15
1 2 34
YELLOW
BLACK
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
ECU
3 CORE CABLE
B+ RED
4
2x 4.0mm²
BN
YE
W
BK
RD
B- WHITE
1
27
28
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
INFO
CENTRE
3
23
13
2
11
20
21
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
1B
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
DDU
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEFT
SENSOR
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.8 MODULAR 1 PLUS WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 3731 (24S) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
MODULAR 2 - 4S/2M
5
3
3A
2A
2
8
1
ISO 1185
(24N)
4
7 7-1
6
ISO 7638
2B
ISO 3731
(24S)
3B
3
9
MODULAR 2 System Variation
4S/2M System as shown
2S/2M Delete 2 sensors (3A/3B)
IDENT
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
IDENT
No.
7
7-1
8
9
MODULAR 2
COMPONENT
PART No.
QTY
ECU
MODULATOR - 3 Port Assembly-LH
3 Port Assembly-RH
Sensor Assembly
Main Loom assembly - 2S/2M
Main Loom assembly - 4S/2M
ABS Label
Diagnostic Label
364 279 201
364 263 001
364 263 011
364 094 XXX
364 338 XXX
364 307 XXX
028 5108 09
028 5189 09
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
COMPONENT VARIATIONS
COMPONENT
PART No.
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Un-Fused - PUR
Power cable - ISO 7638 Socket
Fused - PVC
ISO 1185 (24N) Cable assembly
PUR
ISO 3731 (24S) Cable assembly
PUR
QTY
364 357 XXX
1
364 362 XXX
1
364 358 XXX
1
364 373 XXX
1
Fig 12.9 MODULAR 2 - 4S/2M WIRING VARIATIONS FOR SEMI TRAILER AND CENTRE
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
(COLAS)
COMMON
HOLD
DUMP
3A
BU
+
-
2A
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
10
1
3 CORE
CABLE
22
12
3
23
13
ISO 7638
ABS
5 CORE
CABLE
FUSE
2 1
3
45
ISO 1185
(24N)
RIGHT
SENSORS
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
BLACK
BROWN
PURPLE
RED
YELLOW
BLACK
WHITE
5 CORE CABLE
7
6
4
5
3
B- WHITE
B+ RED
WHITE
RED
BLACK
4
ECU
25
2
1
3
5
15
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
123 4
YELLOW
BLACK
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
7
6
16
17
26
3 CORE CABLE
7 CORE CABLE
1
27
28
2x 4.0mm²
3 CORE CABLE
14
24
4
YE
INFO
CENTRE
COMMON
HOLD
9
19
8
18
20
21
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2
11
DUMP
3B
2B
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
DDU
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSORS
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.10 MODULAR 2 - 4S/2M WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (FUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
(COLAS)
COMMON
HOLD
DUMP
3A
BU
-
+
RIGHT
SENSORS
2A
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
10
1
3 CORE
CABLE
22
12
3
23
13
ISO 7638
ABS
5 CORE
CABLE
B+P
B+IGN
B-P
CAB LAMP
B-P
2 1
3
45
BLACK
BROWN
RED
BLACK
YELLOW
WHITE
BROWN
5 CORE CABLE
RD
BK
YE
W
BN
B- WHITE
1
B+ RED
4
YELLOW
BLACK
7
6
16
17
26
WHITE
RED
2
1
25
BLACK
3
15
3 CORE CABLE
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
123 4
9
19
8
18
3 CORE CABLE
14
24
4
YE
INFO
CENTRE
COMMON
HOLD
20
21
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2
11
DUMP
3B
2B
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
DDU
ECU
5
4 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
2x 4.0mm²
3 CORE CABLE
7 CORE CABLE
ISO 1185
(24N)
27
28
MAIN
LOOM
CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSORS
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.11 MODULAR 2 - 4S/2M WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 7638 (UNFUSED) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
SUSPENSION
CONTROLLER
(COLAS)
COMMON
DUMP
RIGHT
SENSORS
HOLD
BU
+
3A
2A
2 CORE CABLE
0.75mm²
10
1
-
22
12
3 CORE
CABLE
5 CORE
CABLE
ISO 3731
(24S)
2 1
6
CAB LAMP
BLACK
B+P
BROWN
BLACK
B- WHITE
ISO 1185
(24N)
B+ RED
1
4
7 CORE
CABLE
YELLOW
BLACK
27
28
5 CORE CABLE
2x 4.0mm²
26
16
17
6
7
BN
YE
W
BK
RD
ECU
3 CORE CABLE
WHITE
2
25
RED
1
BLACK
3
5
15
FRONT
JUNCTION
BOX
2 CORE
CABLE
1mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
BLACK
BROWN
WHITE
BLACK
B-P
3
23
13
4 CORE CABLE 0.75mm²
3 CORE
CABLE
1 234
9
19
8
18
3 CORE CABLE
14
24
4
INFO
CENTRE
COMMON
HOLD
20
21
YE
2
11
DUMP
3B
2B
MAIN LOOM
CONNECTOR
2 CORE
CABLE
0.75mm²
DDU
P.C. INTERFACE
N1
N2
N3
N4
ABS MODULATOR
CONNECTOR
VIEWED ON WIRING
SIDE OF CONNECTOR
LEFT
SENSORS
LEGEND
The wheel speed sensors will be fitted to one axle only.
All wires are 1.5mm² unless specified.
Sensor cables to go to the left and right hand wheels of the sensed axle.
Left and Right hand is as if sat in the driver's seat facing forward.
The maximum cable length between ISO 1185 (24N) connector and the
front junction box is 1metre.
Fig 12.12 MODULAR 2 - 4S/2M WIRING DIAGRAM ISO 3731 (24S) AND ISO 1185 (24N) POWER
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June1998
MODULAR
ISO 7638
TO ECU
3 CORE
CABLE
1.5mm²
ISO 3731
(24S)
24V RELAY
YE
2.0mm² W
1.0mm² BK
1.0mm² BN
1
2
JUNCTION BOX
EXISTING
7 CORE
CABLE
6
85
ISO 1185
(24N)
RD
1
BN BN
W
RD
4
DIODE
50V/3A
W
RD
BK
YE
BK
2 CORE
CABLE
1.0mm²
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS
LAMP
(GREEN)
87
W
EXISTING
7 CORE
CABLE
30
86
87A
RD
TO ECU
EXISTING
7 CORE
CABLE
Key
BK = Black
BN = Brown
RD = Red
YE = Yellow
W = White
87A
ISO 1185
(24N)
4
87
86
1
85
6
ISO 3731
(24S)
30
2
1
TRAILER
MOUNTED
ABS LAMP
(GREEN)
B+ STOPLAMP
LAMP
TO ECU
B-
CIRCUIT DIAGRAM FOR REFERENCE ONLY
Fig 12.13 MODULAR 1M and 2M SYSTEMS WIRING DIAGRAM
ISO 3731 (24S), ISO 1185 (24N) AND ISO 7638 POWER SUPPLY
Modular Section 12.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
13.0 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
RECOMMENDATIONS
13.1 THE EXCITER
Refer to section 2.0
13.2 THE SENSOR
Refer to section 3.0.
13.3 THE ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNIT
The ECU requires no routine maintenance.
13.4 THE MODULATOR
Refer to section 5.0.
13.5 BRAKE SERVICING
Poor brake maintenance will affect the ABS
system performance. Pay particular attention to
seized cam shafts, expander assemblies, shoe
return springs, oval drums and correct brake
adjustment. When removing shoe assemblies
avoid damaging the exciter, the sensor and its
housing or cable. Always ensure that the sensor
is correctly reset, after brake shoe replacement
and prior to re-fitting the brake drum and wheel
assemblies. (See section 3.4).
13.6 BRAKE PIPING
Before undertaking maintenance or repairs of a
MODULAR ABS, it is necessary to understand
the configuration because pipework will vary from
one configuration to another (See section 8.0).
Ensure that before stripping out pipework from
modulator(s) and brake chambers that they are
clearly marked for replacement into the same
ports from which they were removed.
FAILURE TO OBSERVE THE CORRECT
PIPING CONNECTIONS AS IN THE ORIGINAL
INSTALLATION WILL RESULT IN POOR
BRAKE AND ABS PERFORMANCE, WHICH
MAY CAUSE THE ABS SYSTEM TO SWITCH
OFF (Fault codes group 41, 42 or 43 see section
8.4).
Should it be necessary to change a pipe in the
braking system it is essential that the replacement
is the same type and has the same bore size as
originally fitted. Ensure that the replacement
piping conforms to the specified standard for Air
Brake Systems. Nylon air tubing conforming to
SAE J844d or DIN 73378 (Metric Sizes) is the
only recommended tubing.
When replacing brake pipes or modulators
ensure that the correct pipe to valve port
connections are made as found before removal.
13.7 WHEEL BEARINGS
Incorrect adjustment may reduce sensor output
sufficiently to put the ABS warning lamp on above
6 mph (10 km/h). When refitting hubs, pull the hub
onto the stub axle using the bearing centre nut,
this will avoid rocking the hub and so eliminate
any possibility of accidentally knocking the sensor
out of adjustment.
13.8 WELDING
It is essential that the battery is disconnected or
the master switch turned off during electric
welding. Disconnect the wiring between the
tractor and the trailer.
13.9 ROLLER BRAKE TESTING
Roller brake testing is not affected by Haldex ABS
and may be undertaken in the normal manner.
13.10 ROAD SPRING REPLACEMENT
Do not cut the sensor cable when changing a road
spring. Always cut the cable ties around the ‘U’
bolts and then refit new cable ties after the replacement spring has been installed. Take care
not to damage the sensor cable and ensure that
when it is refitted it is not routed in such a manner
as to place it under undue tensile loading.
When refitting cable ties place them at
approximately 150mm apart and do not
excessively overtighten them, especially along
brake hose runs, as this may cause damage to
the cable conductors. Remember that when the
brakes are applied, the brake hose will expand
and thus tighten the cable tie, causing excessive
shearing forces to be imparted to the cable.
13.11 MAINTENANCE OF AIR SYSTEMS
Piping should be checked at regular intervals for
damage or restrictions e.g. pinched or kinked.
Ensure that the air reservoirs are regularly
drained as recommended by the vehicle
manufacturer.
No liquids should be introduced into the air
system except for anti-freeze compounds
approved by the vehicle manufacturer.
Modular Section 13.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
13.12 ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
Time or mileage
(whichever occurs first)
Component
Operation
Section
Number
When hubs are
removed
Exciter
Check for damage
2.0
Sensor
Check for wear
clean and re-adjust
3.0
Every 3 months
or 25,000 miles
(40,000 km)
Complete
system
Perform system
check out and air
leakage check
Annually or every
(100,000 miles
(160,000 km)
Complete
system
Perform system
1.2
check out and
5.6 + 5.7
air leakage check. Fig. 8.6 to 8.8
Check wiring and piping as applicable
security and integrity
Sensor
Check for wear
clean and re-adjust 3.0
Modulator
and Solenoid
Replace
Every five years
500,000 miles
(800,000 km)
1.2
5.6 + 5.7
Fig.8.6 to 8.8
as applicable
5.0
Fig 13.1 RECOMMENDED MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
Modular Section 13.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
14.0 FIELD SERVICE INFORMATION
Crane Fruehauf service guide.
14.1 SERVICE INFORMATION
ln the event of requiring further assistance your
local area Installation or Service centre will be
able to provide valuable help.
A list of these centres is to be found in Sections
14.7 to 14.9. A more comprehensive guide, which
includes service agencies throughout Mainland
Europe is available from
Haldex Brake Products Ltd at the address in
section 15.6.
14.5 SERVICE EQUIPMENT
1. Available from all Haldex Brake Products Ltd
installation, service, and parts centres listed on
the previous pages.
14.2 TELEPHONE SUPPORT
Haldex Brake Products Ltd provide in depth
technical assistance and advice via the Redditch
Head office, when telephoning please ask for
Technical Service Dept.
Telephone: 01527 499 600
Fax: 01527 499 576
14.3 ENGINEER'S CALLS
Should it be necessary arrangements can be
made for a Haldex Brake Products Ltd Field
Service Engineer to provide on site assistance at
a nominal charge. Contact details are as 14.2
above.
14.4 AGENCY SUPPORT AND DEFINITIONS
Haldex Brake Products Ltd employ the services of
agencies throughout the UK to act on their behalf
in providing localised service to customers using
Haldex ABS. These agencies fall into four
categories as follows:
INSTALLATION CENTRES - These agencies
provide a complete service to the customer
including primary installation of Haldex Brake
Products Ltd ABS, service and repair of existing
systems, and component part retail sales to the
end user.
2. MULTIMETER
METRIX MX570
3. TEST SWITCH BOX
May be used as an alternative to a towing vehicle
as a power switching facility. The switch box is
not supplied by Haldex but can be constructed
easily using the circuit diagram Fig 10.1.
4. SUNDRY ITEMS
Trolley Jack
Axle stands
8mm Hexagonal key spanner
5mm Hexagonal key spanner
3mm Hexagonal key spanner
2 X Male blade terminals (6.35mm)
500 Volt insulation tester
14.6 SERVICE REPLACEMENT PARTS
Service replacement parts are available from all
agents listed from section 14.7 through to
section 14.8 or in the case of International
Operations from the offices listed in section 14.9.
In order to assist you in determining the
appropriate replacement component required, a
selection of common spares is shown in the
following listing.
SERVICE CENTRES - Provide a service and repair
function for existing Haldex Brake Products Ltd
ABS systems and also component part retail
sales. (See section 14.7)
PARTS DISTRIBUTORS - Provide retail sales of
all component parts relating to Haldex Brake
Products Ltd ABS systems. (See Section 14.8).
TRAILER PARTS DISTRIBUTORS ONLY
Stockist and retail sales of component parts
specifically relating to trailers equipped with the
MODULAR series of equipment.(See Section 14.8
e.g. Crane Fruehauf).
Crane Fruehauf also provide a repair service from a
majority of depots which are also listed in the
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
SERVICE PARTS
DESCRIPTION
Electronic Control Unit
MODULAR 1 Upgrade ECU - 364 279 002
MODULAR 1 Plus ECU - 364 279 101
MODULAR 2 ECU - 364 279 201
MODULAR 2 ADR ECU - 364 279 202
PART NUMBER
VIEW
950 364 801
950 364 802
950 364 803
950 364 804
Modulator valve Assembly
6 Port - 364 115 021
3 Port - 364 263 001 - RH
3 Port - 364 263 011 - LH
950 364 047
950 364 806
950 364 807
Manifold - for 2S-4S/2M systems
950 364 075
ECU Loom Assembly
MODULAR 1 Upgrade - 2S/1M
c/w 4m Sensor ext. cables
950 364 417
MODULAR 1 Plus - 2S/1M
c/w 4m Sensor ext. cables and
Reset to Ride
950 364 418
MODULAR 2 - 2S/2M or 4S/2M
c/w 4m + 6m Sensor ext. cables
and Reset to Ride
950 364 419
ISO 7638 Socket Kit
Green cover - c/w Fuse
Black cover - w/o Fuse, crimp pins
Red cover - w/o Fuse, screw pins
Replacement fuse kit for fused
ISO 7638
950 364 072
950 364 402
950 364 420
950 364 401
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
DESCRIPTION
PART NUMBER
ISO 7638 Socket and cable Assy.
Fused L = 12m - PVC
Unfused L = 12m - PUR
950 364 421
950 364 422
ISO 7638 Socket / cable +
seprate connector
Fused L = 12m - PVC
Unfused L = 12m - PUR
950 364 423
950 364 424
VIEW
+
L
ISO 7638 Plug and cable Assy.
L = 12m - PVC
950 364 429
ISO 1185 (24N) Cable Assemsbly
For MODULAR 1 Upgrade and Plus
L = 12m - PVC
For MODULAR 2
L = 12m - PUR
950 364 425
950 364 426
ISO 3731 (24S) Cable Assemsbly
(All systems)
L = 12m - PVC
L = 12m - PUR
950 364 427
950 364 428
Green Warning Lamp
950 364 710
Bulb - (24v - 5w) Double pole
950 364 711
ABS Label
950 364 702
Diagnostic Connector Label
028 5189 09
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
DESCRIPTION
Exciter
ROR TM
ROR TE
BPW-9T
BPW-10T
100 Tooth
80 Tooth
100 Tooth
100 Tooth
100 Tooth
PART NUMBER
VIEW
018 5003 09
018 5004 09
018 5005 09
950 364 606
950 364 607
Sensor Kit - Angled
(inc. retaining clip)
Sensor Kit - Straight
(inc. retaining clip)
950 364 503
Sensor extension cable repair kit
(6.0m cable)
950 364 507
Diagnostic Display Unit (DDU)
c/w case and guide
2m Cable only
24m Cable only
905 027 001
Case only
042 5074 09
INFO Centre
1.2m Cable
0.4m Cable
1.2m Cable - ADR Version
0.4m Cable - ADR Version
364 317 001
364 317 011
364 385 001
364 385 011
Vehicle Data System Kit
c/w Instruction Manual
w/o Instruction Manual
950 364 812
950 364 814
950 364 506
003 8467 09
003 8433 09
VDS
'End-of-Line' Test Kit
c/w Instruction Manual
w/o Instruction Manual
950 364 813
950 364 815
EOLT
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
14.7 SERVICE CENTRES
Antilock Brake Systems Ltd
Sutton Coldfield
West Midlands
Tel: 0121 354 2856
B & T Services
Honeybourne
Tel: 01386 841021
H. Bowers Ltd
Stoke-on-Trent
Tel: 01782 599990
Button Repairs & Tpt. Services
Ipswich
Tel: 01473 612750
Cahil Motor Engineering
Newtownabby
Tel: 0232 853094
Chassis Developments Ltd
Leighton Buzzard
Tel: 01525 374151
Cumbria Auto Electrics Ltd
Carlisle
Tel: 0228 31707
MacKenzies (Cambuslang) Ltd
Glasgow
Tel: 0141 641 6419504
Truck Services of Grimsby
Grimsby
Tel: 01472 362929
H & F Moir
Aberdeen
Tel: 01224 790411
Frank Tucker (Commercial) Ltd
Exeter
Tel: 01392 833030
Montracon Trailers Ltd
Newtownabbey
Tel: 01232 848274
Woodwards S V S
St Hellens
Tel: 01744 20266
Noden Truck Centre
Rugby
Tel: 01788 579535
Prolek P.B. Auto Electrics
Mansfield
Tel: 01623 659311
Ring Road Garage Ltd
Buckingham
Tel: 01280 814741
Ripon Auto Electrics
Ripon
Tel: 01765 602253
CVBS Ltd
Brierley Hill
West Midlands
Tel: 0403 464 765
Scotmech Trucks Ltd
Aberdeen
Tel: 01224 898844
Dundee
Tel: 01382 451416
Dennison Commercial Ltd
Ballyclare
Tel: 019 603 52827
G.Stout Lube Services
Midlothian
Tel: 01968 673247
Hi-Power
Tallagh
Tel: 0001 525899
Tachograph (Chester) Ltd
Ellesmere Port
Tel: 0151 3552101
Husk (UK) Ltd
Dover
Tel: 0304 831222
Tanner Tachograph Ltd
Cardiff
Tel: 01222 225580
Longfield Road Motors Ltd
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Tel: 0191 2687648
Tramec
Bristol
Tel: 01179 822799
Lucas Services UK Ltd
Southampton
Tel: 01703 777111
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
14.8 PARTS DISTRIBUTORS
ABS Burton Ltd
Burton on Trent Tel: 01283 568037
Aldridge Tel: 01922 455751
All Spares Ltd
Bridgend Tel: 01656 663163
Bristol Tel: 0117 9381 144
Llanelli Tel: 01269 831177
Cullompton Tel: 01884 33810
Hereford Tel: 01432 263438
Artic Trailer Ltd
Stirling Tel: 01786 816 005
Falkirk Tel: 01324 613533
Artec Yorks Ltd
Sheffield Tel: 01246 415777
Liversedge Tel: 01924 401689
Hull Tel: 01482 581141
Malton Tel: 01653 698009
Aghabridge Ltd
Kent Tel: 01634 2949
Crane Fruehauf Ltd
For list of branches telephone
Dereham Tel: 01362 69535
Commercial Clutch Services Ltd
Birmingham Tel: 0121 328 4060
Commercial Equipment Ltd
Brierley Hill Tel: 01384 78151
CV Components
Inverness Tel: 01463 220232
CV Spares Ltd
Slough Tel: 01753 680404
Swindon Tel: 01793 5133519
Congleton Motor Factors Ltd
Congleton Tel: 01260 280400
Wirksworth Tel: 01629 823948
Derby Tel: 01332 385901
Stafford Tel: 01785 254634
Buxton Tel: 01298 26588
Chesterfield Tel: 01246 261666
Ashbourn Tel: 01335 346236
D B Wilson Ltd
Glasgow Tel: 0141 6470161
Digraph Trans Supplies Ltd
Awkworth Tel: 01602 322195
Doncaster Tel: 01302 726636
Derby Tel: 01332 380300
Leicester Tel: 01530 245756
Dingbro Ltd
Aberdeen Tel: 01224 682000
Elgin Tel: 01343 552888
Fraserbourgh Tel: 01346 51234
Inverness Tel: 01463 713133
Peterhead Tel: 01779 476551
Kirkalby Tel: 01592 650495
Montrose Tel: 01674 675311
Perth Tel: 01738 443388
Arbroath Tel: 01241 876414
D.M.H. Warrington Ltd
Warrington Tel: 01925 650601
Crewe Tel: 01270 582288
Manchester Tel: 0161 832 4427
E.M.S. Ltd
Northampton Tel: 01604 702552
East Kent Components Ltd
Dover Tel: 01304 204697
Ashford Tel: 01233 631951
Faversham Tel: 01795 537228
Edmunds Walker Ltd
For list of branches telephone
Straford-on-Avon Tel: 01789 414545
Fleet Factors
Middlesbrough Tel: 01642 465141
Stockton Tel: 01642 616333
Carlisle Tel: 01288 810050
Hexham Tel: 01434 600789
Sunderland Tel: 0191 567 1587
Gateshead Tel: 0191 490 0909
Leeds Tel: 0113 277 7400
Stallingborough Tel: 01482 227423
Hull Tel: 01482 227423
Birtley Tel: 0191 410 4437
Manchester Tel: 0161 223 0367
Enfield Tel: 0181 804 3995
Fleetweel plc
Cardiff Tel: 0122 378191
Newport Tel: 01633 841645
Swansea Tel: 01792 775111
Tiverton Tel: 01884 258797
Bristol Tel: 0117 982 6667
Frenco Service Replacements Ltd
Kidderminster Tel: 01562 754931
Banbury Tel: 01295 270711
Oxford Tel: 01865 772161
G.E. Middleton & Co Ltd
Manchester Tel: 0161 872 0923
HGV Truck & Trailer Parts
Boston Tel: 01205 365258
HB Commercials Ltd
Felixstowe Tel: 01394 675675
H & S Commercials Ltd
Wakefield Tel: 01924 279294
Bradford Tel: 01274 721630
Castleford Tel: 01977 603606
Hi-Way Components
Oldham Tel: 0161 652 0315
Hydrair
Blackburn Tel: 01254 889333
L.C. Davis & Sons Ltd
London Tel: 0181 648 7717
LCP Engineering Co Ltd
Gillingham Tel: 01634 575501
Canterbury Tel: 01227 766001
Ashford Tel: 01233 623113
Maidstone Tel: 0101622 672222
Purfleet Tel: 01708 891189
Tunbridge Wells Tel: 01892 535455
Brighton Tel: 01273 430730
Dartford Tel: 01322 557825
Gravesend Tel: 01474 320300
Merlin Components (London) Ltd
Barking Tel: 0181 591 6908
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
14.8 PARTS DISTRIBUTORS
Multitruck Components Ltd
Milton Keynes Tel: 01908 274400
Welwyn Garden City
Tel: 01707 393000
N.E.T.S. Ltd
Netton-le-Hole Tel: 0191 526 3753
Stockton-on-Tees Tel: 01642 613514
Carlise Tel: 01228 511312
Morecombe Tel: 01524 841057
Truckline
Bristol Tel: 0117 982 1321
Eastleigh Tel: 01703 617666
Manchester Tel: 0161 8725 457
Grays Tel: 01375 394949
Stockton Tel: 01642 607811
Doncaster Tel: 01977 671206
Woodheads / Partco Ltd
For list of branches telephone
Birmingham Tel: 0121 717 0071
A.J. Parsons & Sons Ltd
Shepton Mallett Tel: 01749 346161
Redruth Tel: 01209 219764
Launceston Tel: 01566 774341
Partic Motors Spares Ltd
Newark Tel: 01636 702479
Lincoln Tel: 01522 689 409
Nottingham Tel: 01155 976 0977
Peter Bassett
Buckingham Tel: 01280 817174
Port Brake Services Ltd
Ellesmere Port Tel: 0151 355 0226
Liverpool Tel: 0151 525 1558
Widnes Tel: 0151 495 1751
Stoke-om-Trent Tel: 01782 586667
Deeside Tel: 01244 541214
Winsford Tel: 01606 552550
Preston Tel: 01772 696668
Southern Comp. Grp Ltd
Dartford Tel: 01322 553330
Sittingbourne Tel: 01795 420087
Southern Trailer Parts Ltd
Reading Tel: 01118 932 3577
Transport Supplies (NI) Ltd
Belfast Tel: 01232 781230
Craigaven Tel: 01762 362 555
Truck and Trailer Specialists Ltd
Eastleigh Tel: 01703 644746
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
14.9 HALDEX - INTERNATIONAL
OFFICES
AUSTRIA
Graubremse Wien GesmbH
Tel: INT + 43 1865 16 40
Fax: INT + 43 1865 16 4027
SWEDEN
Haldex Brake Products AB
Tel: INT + 46 418 57700
Fax: INT + 46 418 24435
BELGIUM
Haldex NV
Tel: INT + 32 2725 3707
Fax: INT + 32 2752 4099
USA
Haldex Midland Corp.
Tel: INT + 1 816 891 2470
Fax: INT + 1 816 891 9447
BRAZIL
Haldex do Brasil Ind. e Com. Ltda
Tel: INT + 55 11 531 4159
Fax: INT + 55 11 531 9515
CHINA
Haldex International Trading
(Shanghai) Co. Ltd.
Tel: INT + 86 21 6289 4469
Fax: INT + 86 21 6279 0554
FRANCE
Haldex Europe S.A.
Tel: INT + 333 88 68 22 00
Fax: INT +333 88 68 22 09
GERMANY
Haldex Brake Products GmbH
Tel: INT + 49 177 934 91 70
Fax: INT + 49 711 934 91 740
GREAT BRITAIN
Haldex Ltd.
Tel: INT + 44 1 325 310 110
Fax: INT + 44 7 325 311 834
POLAND
Haldex Sp Zo.o.
Tel: INT + 48 438 43 4614/4516
Fax: INT + 48 438 433 689
SOUTH KOREA
Haldex Korea Ltd.
Tel: INT + 82 2 749 3650
Fax: INT + 82 2 749 3652
SPAIN
Midland Grau S/A
Tel: INT + 34 9 3573 1030
Fax: INT + 34 9 3573 0728
Modular Section 14.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
MODULAR
15.0 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
15.1 In the interests of product improvement and
development Haldex Brake Products Ltd reserve
the right to make product and publication
changes without prior notification to the customer.
15.2 Changes that are introduced may affect the
way in which components are maintained,
serviced, or repaired.
15.3 Haldex Brake Products Ltd operate a bulletin
service to ensure that operators of Haldex Brake
Products equipment are informed of such
changes whenever necessary.
In this respect this section of the manual should
be used to file relevant product information.
15.4 MODULAR ABS has several associated
products which are mentioned in the service
manual. Each product has its own literature in
which upgrades are issued with the improvement
of the product. This section of the manual should
be used to file relevant product information to
complement this service manual.
15.5 Additional copies of this or other SERVICE
MANUALS are available at a nominal cost direct
from Haldex Brake Products Ltd at the address
given below.
15.6 Questions concerning product or product
information should be directed to Haldex Brake
Products Ltd Technical Service Department who
will be pleased to assist you with your enquiries
and who may be contacted by writing to:
Haldex Brake Products Ltd,
Technical Service Dept.,
Moons Moat Drive,
Moon Moat North,
Redditch,
Worcestershire,
B98 9HA
or by
Telephone
Fax
INT +44 1527 499 600
INT +44 1527 499 576
To receive the services of section 15.3 and
15.4 please fill in the form at the front of this
manual if you have not already done so and
forward it to the address indicated.
Modular Section 15.0 Issue 1.0 June 1998
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