Chris King TechServiceManual

Chris King TechServiceManual
Technical Service Manual
for Shop Mechanics
rev. 10/04
Complete instructions for servicing all
Chris King headsets and hubs.
Includes answers to common technical questions
and use of the Chris King hub service tool.
King Cycle Group
2801 NW Nela Street; Portland, Oregon 97210
For technical questions, call 800.523.6008
www.chrisking.com
HEADSETS
This manual is intended for the mechanic who already possesses a familiarity with headset
installation technique and who is interested in the finer points of both proper headset set-up
and troubleshooting for best headset performance.
FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ten year warranty
Unparalleled quality, reliability, and reputation
In-house design and manufacturing - 100% made by Chris King in the USA
Available in all standard sizes and our new and exclusive Devolution™ size (to adapt 1-1/8”
forks to 1-1/4” frames).
Unique modular design offers affordable upgrades and outlasts changing fork trends
Exceptionally lightweight
Over 24 years of experience
PREPARATION
AND INSTALLATION
FRAME PREPARATION
Head tube preparation is one of the most important and
most often overlooked elements in headset setup and
performance. Especially with high end frames, it is often
assumed that if a frame is new or already has a headset
installed that the frame must have been properly
prepared at the factory. This is very often not the case.
We recommend a careful inspection of the headtube
facing and reaming before installation.
1. Ream and face the head tube as necessary to ensure
that the head tube is faced square and bored to the
proper dimensions. (See table 1 - next page.)
2. Using a small file, sand paper, or deburring tool,
carefully remove any sharp edges or burrs and
slightly round the inside edges of the head tube at
the top and bottom to prevent shearing metal from
the cups during installation. (See figure 1.)
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3
Figure 1 - deburr headtube
3. Clean to remove any chips, shavings, and/or cutting
oil.
4. The proper press fit should be with no more than
.1mm (.004") of interference. See table 1 for
correct headtube bore size.
Facing tolerances
Head tube Crown seat
bore
OD
OD
30.1mm 26.5mm
32.7mm 26.5mm
1-1/8"
33.9mm 30.1mm
1-1/4"
36.9mm 33.1mm
1-1/4" Devolution™ 36.9mm 30.1mm
table 1 - frame prep specs
1"
1" BMX
We recommend that the variation in parallelness of the end faces of the headtube not exceed
.075mm (.003”). Because facing tolerance is actually more complicated than just having the
faces parallel, there is really no accurate way for the average bike shop to measure it. We
recommend inking the faces of the headtube with a marker and using the facing tool to see
that it removes the ink evenly and completely all the way around. Be sure to use the center
guide in the opposing bore to ensure proper alignment. Cut metal as necessary until all of the
ink is removed.
Bore sizing
Most reamers are .2mm under the nominal cup size and we recommend that the head tube
bore be cut to .1mm under. The use of these reamers will produce varying finished bore sizes
depending on the properties of the material being cut, and how much reaming is performed.
With many materials you may net the correct bore size, however, on materials such as titanium
or hard aluminum, the reamer may cut a clean bore in its exact size or smaller. On the other
hand, if you face a lot of material while the reamer is in the bore, the reamed bore may become
oversized. Some manufacturers have included bushings that take the place of the reamer to
prevent continued reaming while facing. If these are available, they should be used.
Because the equipment necessary to determine exact bore sizes is not commonly found in
most bicycle shops, attentively pressing the cups is the most practical test. It shouldn’t be
necessary to “reef” on the press;— an exceedingly difficult cup press is an indication that the
head tube bore is undersized. If the bore is still undersized after reaming, it may be necessary
to use another method to achieve the proper size. (One trick we have used is to first press
cheap steel headset cups to smooth and stretch the bore slightly. Then, remove and press
our cups.) If the cups press in with little resistance or the bore otherwise appears oversized,
oversized cups are available directly from King Cycle Group.
Additional notes on head tube preparation
One aspect of preparation that is often overlooked is the chamfer on the inside of the head
tube bore (top and bottom) and the removal of any sharp edges or burrs. (See figure 1 - last
page.) We recommend a chamfer width of .25mm (.010”). A clean chamfer allows the cup to
be pressed without shaving metal and to sit flat against the tube face without cutting into the
small radius in the corner of the cup skirt. A cut in this area of the cup may cause cracks to
form over time.
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Rev. 10/04-A
FORK PREPARATION
1. Reaming and facing of the fork may be necessary,
but is not critical unless it is grossly out of square or
oversize. The crown race seat should be square to
the steerer tube and its outer diameter should not
exceed .1mm larger than the inner diameter of the
base plate. Most available reamers/facers are
adequate for these tolerances.
2. Clean to remove any chips, shavings, and/or cutting
oil.
3. The proper press fit should be with no more than
.1mm (.004") of interference. See table 1 above for
correct crown race seat size.
4. Slide the base plate, conical side up, onto the steerer
tube. With the beveled side of the base plate
installation adaptor against the base plate, use a
crown race setting tool to set the base plate. The
base plate installation adaptor helps to protect the
conical bearing contact surface on the base plate
from damage due to impact from the crown race
installation tool. (See figure 2.)
Figure 2 - setting the baseplate
Threadless forks - NoThreadSet™
Cut steerer tube and install star-nut
1. Insert fork into frame.
2. Remove o-ring from bearing cap and slide bearing
cap, then any spacers, and the stem over steerer
tube. Scribe a line flush with top of stem.
3. Remove stem and mark another line 3mm below the
first. Cut on the lower line with a hacksaw. Do not
use a pipe cutter. A pipe cutter will swell the end
of the tube, making installation of the bearing cap
and other tight fitting parts difficult.
When sizing the steerer tube it is important to make
sure it extends into the stem as far as possible without
Figure 3 - starnut installation tool
colliding with the stem cap. In fact, the steerer tube
may extend through the stem as long as adequate
spacers are placed between the stem and stem cap. This method has been very popular and
effective in BMX installations.
4. Remove all sharp edges from inside and outside of steerer tube. With a small file or
sandpaper, round outside edge of tube to avoid shearing the o-ring upon installation.
5. Thread star-nut onto installation tool.
6. With a soft hammer or mallet, drive star-nut straight into steerer tube until tool contacts top
of steerer tube. (See figure 3.)
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7. Unscrew tool from star-nut.
8. If installation tool is not available, thread bolt well into star-nut and use it to drive the star-nut
10-15mm below the top of the steerer tube.
9. Use extreme caution when cutting steerer tube and installing star-nut to avoid injury.
Threaded forks - GripNut™
Size and cut steerer
1.
2.
3.
4.
Insert fork into frame. Steerer tube should protrude 11-14mm above top of bearing cup.
Cut steerer tube if needed.
Remove all sharp edges from inside and outside of steerer tube.
Clean the steerer tube removing all metal chips, burrs and grease.
Threaded forks - 2Nut™
Size and cut the steerer tube
1. Insert fork into frame.
2. Thread adjusting nut onto fork. Advance down threads until it just touches the bearing.
3. To size the steerer tube length, make sure there are at least 5 full threads above the
adjusting nut available for the lock nut.
4. Cut steerer tube if needed.
5. Remove all sharp edges from inside and outside of steerer tube.
6. Clean the steerer tube removing all metal chips, burrs and grease.
INSTALLATION
Press the cups
We recommend using our headset installation adaptors
on the headset press. These adaptors help ensure that
pressure is applied evenly across the top of the cup
and not on the bearing and that the cups press straight
into the frame without damage from the tool.
We do not recommend for or against using anti-sieze,
grease, or Loc-tite™ while pressing in cups or base
plates—we leave this choice to the discretion of the
mechanic installing the headset.
Once the cups are pressed in, they should be seated
flatly against the head tube. If they do not sit flat, the
chamfer on the head tube bore may be inadequate and/
or may have sheered metal from the cup skirt. Remove
cups and properly prepare the frame accoring to the
above instructions.
6
Figure 4 - press adaptors
Rev. 10/04-A
If the frame has been properly prepared and the cups still do not sit flat,
a more serious problem could be that the head tube cup bores may not
be parallel to the head tube axis. Short of reworking the frame, little can
be done in this case.
Screw
Stem
cap
FINAL ASSEMBLY
Star
nut
Threadless Systems - NoThreadSet™
Bearing
cap
Final assembly and adjustment
1. Prior to installing the bearing cap on a threadless steerer tube, round
off the top of the steerer tube to avoid shearing the o-ring on the
inside of the bearing cap.
2. Re-install o-ring into bearing cap if it had been removed previously.
3. Apply a small amount of antisieze to conical bearing contact surface
on base plate.
4. Insert fork into frame.
5. Taking care not to shear o-ring, slide bearing cap (do not hammer),
any spacers, and then stem over steerer tube. Place any additional
spacers, then stem cap on top of stem. Apply a small amount of
antisieze to screw and insert screw through cap. Thread into starNoThreadSet™
nut, tighten to approx. 4-10 in.-lb. (max. 15 in.-lb.) to preload the
bearing. This assumes no resistance from the stem. If the stem is
tight, add the torque necessary to move the stem to the preload torque value.
6. Adjust alignment of stem and secure according to stem manufacturer’s specifications.
7. Check for a gap of approximately .4mm (.015”) between bearing cap and cup. This gap
should be even all of the way around. If the gap is uneven refer to the notes below and the
trouble shooting section “My headset seem to be adjusted correctly, but binds when the
bars are turned” below.
8. Check headset for proper adjustment. When properly adjusted, the fork will rotate smoothly
without play or restriction. Some settling may occur after 1st few rides; readjust if necessary.
Bearing
cups
Base
plate
NOTE: New seals will produce some resistance in rotation for the first 50-100 hours of use.
Avoid confusing this with rubbing or binding that may result from improper installation or
stems that are not properly faced.
Notes on threadless stems
•
•
We recommend using stems with a split clamp and either one or (preferably) two bolts.
It is important to check the bottom face of all threadless stems. Many are not square to the
steerer tube and may cause the bearing cap to sit unevenly or rub on the cups.
Threaded Systems - GripNut™
Assembly of GripNut™
1. Make sure the thread on the lock ring and the inside thread of the adjusting ring are
lubricated thoroughly with anti-seize compound or heavy grease. Also apply grease to the
tapered surfaces of the thread collet and lock ring. Do not apply grease to fork threads.
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2. Place the thread collet into the threaded hole of the adjusting ring,
positioning the key on the collet in the corresponding slot.
3. Screw the lock ring into the adjusting ring/collet assembly until the
collet has very little float inside the assembly.
Lock
ring
Thread
collet
Final assembly and adjustment
1. Thread complete GripNut™ assembly onto fork about 4-5 turns or at
the most an 1/8" prior to contacting the bearing.
2. Once the GripNut™ is positioned on the steerer tube, tighten the lock
ring into the adjusting ring until it feels as though the GripNut™ is
dragging as it turns on the threads of the fork.
3. Once you feel this drag, advance the entire GripNut™ as a unit down
to touch the bearing. Use headset wrenches on both the lock and
adjusting ring as necessary.
4. Adjust the preload on the bearing. Finish by holding the adjusting
ring in place and tightening the GripNut™ lock ring to 130-150 in.-lb.
TEST: Using both wrenches, try to turn the GripNut™ as a unit in the
loosening direction. It should be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to
turn. If it turns easily, continue to turn the entire unit 1/4 turn in the
loosening direction and re-torque. Test again.
Adjusting
ring
Bearing
cups
Base
plate
GripNut™
5. Check headset for proper adjustment. When properly adjusted, the
fork will rotate smoothly without play or restriction. Some settling may occur after 1st few
rides; readjust if necessary.
NOTE: New seals will produce some resistance in rotation for the first 50-100 hours of use.
Avoid confusing this with rubbing or binding that may result from improper installation.
Threaded Systems - 2Nut™
Final assembly and adjustment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Advance adjusting nut to preload bearing.
Thread lock nut down to just touch adjusting nut.
Holding the lock nut in position, back tighten the adjusting nut into the lock nut.
Finish torque lock nut to 130-150 in.-lb.
Check headset for proper adjustment. When properly adjusted, the fork will rotate smoothly
without play or restriction. Some settling may occur after 1st few rides; readjust if necessary.
NOTE: new seals will produce some resistance in rotation for the first 50-100 hours of use.
Avoid confusing this with rubbing or binding that may result from improper installation.
HEADSET
SERVICE
In general, headset service should be done at least every two years. In dry climates, service
intervals may be longer. In wet climates, service may be necessary as often as every 6 months.
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Rev. 10/04-A
You may service your Chris King headset while in the frame using a light solvent-based lubricant
(e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD-40™,) to flush the bearings. However, for those of you with the
correct tools for the proper removal and reinstallation of Chris King bearing cups, we have
found it easier and more effective to remove the cups and use a solvent tank.
Removal of the snap ring and seal
Take a pointed instrument, such as a penknife or dental
tool, insert it at the split in the snap ring, and lift the
pointed end out. (See figure 5.) Once the pointed end
is free, the remainder of the ring can be removed easily.
Lift out the inner seal. (See figure 6.) At this point the
bearing will be exposed.
Clean and re-grease the bearings and
replace the seal and snap ring
With a small brush (e.g., a tooth brush) clean the bearing
while rinsing with solvent. If the bearing has been
neglected and is frozen, let it soak for a few minutes.
Then, rotate the inner race back and forth to work it
free. Rinse in solvent and blow dry with an air hose to
remove any excess solvent. Test the bearing for
smoothness. If the bearing was frozen for too long it
may have become damaged or may be too rough and
need replacement. However, if the bearing has lost only
some of its silky smoothness, it may not be evident at
the handlebar once re-greased and reassembled. If
bearing replacement is necessary return cup(s) to us to
have a new bearing(s) installed.
Figure 5 - remove snap ring
Re-grease the bearings using Bullshot™ or any other
Figure 6 - remove seal
high quality waterproof grease. Carefully wipe off the
inner seal and re-install. Our seals are flat and symetrical
and can be inserted either side up. Finally, insert the pointed end of the snap ring into the
snap ring groove, working it around the bearing until the other end seats and a small gap is
noticed. Inspect the rest of the parts for any wear. At this time, you are ready to reassemble
the headset and adjust.
HEADSET
TROUBLESHOOTING
COMMON QUESTIONS
AND THE
LIKELY SOLUTIONS
Complete installation, service, and maintenance instructions are available on our web site
www.chrisking.com. We are also available to answer your technical service questions during
Rev. 10/04-A
9
business hours Monday through Friday at 800.523.6008.
My headset always rattles and it won’t tighten up when I
attempt an adjustment.
1. The steerer tube may be too long and interfering with the stem cap (threadless) or lock nut
(threaded).
Solution: Cut the steerer tube or install spacer(s) so that there is the necessary clearance.
My headset won’t adjust correctly. It’s either too tight or
too loose.
1. The bearings may be dirty or frozen.
Solution: Service the bearings.
2. The frame and/or fork may not be properly prepped. This can cause the top or bottom
pieces to rub on the cups or the steerer tube to rub on the inside of the bottom cup. This
is most commonly found on titanium and hard aluminum frames.
Solution: Properly ream and face the frame and/or fork and check for the proper head tube
bore size.
My headset seems to be adjusted correctly, but it binds
when the bars are turned.
1. The frame and/or fork may not be properly prepped. This can cause the top or bottom
pieces to rub on the cups or the steerer tube to rub on the inside of the bottom cup. This
is most commonly found on titanium and hard aluminum frames.
Solution: Properly ream and face the frame and/or fork and check for the proper head tube
bore size.
2. If it is a threadless system, the bottom face of the stem may not be perpendicular to the
bore thus causing the bearing cap to cock and rub the cup.
Solution: Face the bottom surface of stem square with steer tube.
3. If it is a threaded system, the threads on the steerer tube may not be straight.
Solution: Replace the steerer tube.
4. The bearings may be dirty.
Solution: Service the bearings.
My headset won’t stay tight—it just keeps coming loose.
A properly set up Chris King headset shouldn’t need adjustment more than once or twice a
year (depending on riding style). If your headset needs adjustment more often than once a
month, check for the following:
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Rev. 10/04-A
Threadless models - NoThreadSet™
1. The pinch bolt on the stem may not be tight enough or the clamp method may be inadequate.
We have found that stems with a split and one or two pinch bolts hold better with less
chance of distorting the steerer tube than internal wedge designs.
Solution: Tighten or replace the stem.
2. Steerer tube may not extend far enough into the stem.
Solutions: 1) If spacers are being used to elevate the stem, remove as necessary to lower the
stem to within 3mm of the top of the steerer tube; 2) Replace the steerer tube and be sure
to cut steerer tube to extend to within 3mm of the top of the stem (steerer tube must not
interfere with the stem cap).
3. Steerer tube may be pulling through the crown. This is more common with older suspension
forks.
Solution: Contact the fork manufacturer to determine the proper remedy for the steerer tube
pulling through the crown.
4. Demanding applications (such as trials, down-hill, and BMX) can generate strong leverage
on the handlebars and walk the stem up the steerer tube.
Solution: In this case it is best to extend the steerer tube through and above the stem. Spacers
may then be used on top of the stem to allow proper functioning of the stem cap. (We
learned this trick from the boys at GT BMX racing.)
Threaded models - GripNut™
1. GripNut™ may not be tight enough or may otherwise be improperly adjusted. If the lock
ring was too loose as the GripNut™ was tightened to adjust the preload on the bearing,
the collet will not clamp properly as the lock ring is tightened to hold the GripNut™ in place.
Solution: Readjust GripNut™ according to the above instructions.
2. The adjusting ring may be rubbing on top cup due to misalignment of either the cup or the
threads on the steerer tube.
Solution: For misaligned cups, face and ream the frame; for misaligned threads, replace the
steerer tube.
3. GripNut™ lock ring may be bottoming out on the top of the steerer tube.
Solution: Re-cut the steerer tube so that there is a gap of approximately 1mm below the inner
lip of the lock ring.
Threaded models - 2Nut™
1. The lock and adjusting nuts may not be locked together tight enough.
Solution: Tighten lock and adjusting nut together according to the above instructions.
2. Adjusting nut may be rubbing on the top cup due to misalignment of either the cup or the
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threads on the steerer.
Solution: For misaligned cups, face and ream the frame; for misaligned threads, replace the
steerer tube.
3. The threads on the fork steerer tube may be undersized (in pitch diameter). If this is the
case the adjusting nut will fit loosely on the threads.
Solutions: 1) Switch to a GripNut™ top assembly—the GripNut™ will clamp onto undersize
threads; 2) Replace steerer tube; 3) Regenerate the threads on the existing steerer tube
after wishing metal back.
4. The lock nut may not be threaded far enough onto the steerer tube. It should thread on a
minimum of four full turns to hold properly.
Solutions: 1) Switch to a GripNut™—the GripNut™ offers a shorter stack height; 2) Replace
steerer tube and cut long enough to allow adequate engagement on the lock nut.
My headset loosens over time.
Check all of the possible causes for “...loosens quickly,” as well as:
1. The head tube may be out of parallel. This can cause looseness due to premature wearing
of the conical bearing contact surfaces.
Solution: Properly ream and face the frame and/or fork. Check conical bearing contact
surfaces for excessive wear and replace if necessary.
2. Cups may be loose in the head tube. This can happen if the head tube bore is oversize or
if the material of the head tube is extremely soft and/or stretched out.
Solutions: 1) If the head tube is oversize, we may be able to provide cups with oversize skirts;
2) If the head tube material is soft and/or stretched, contact the frame manufacturer for
possible remedies.
3. The skirt of the headset cup or the head tube may be cracked.
Solutions: 1) Contact us to replace a cracked cup. Then, check the head tube bore for
proper size and ream if necessary. Additionally, the head tube bore chamfer may be
inadequate or absent—cut or file according to above instructions; 2) Contact frame
manufacturer regarding a cracked head tube.
My headset creaks and/or makes a ticking noise.
The following components are more often the cause of creaks and ticking noises than headsets:
• suspension fork
• steerer tube and crown - press-fit or clamped
• stanchion tubes
• fork brace bolts
• bars, stem, cables
• cracked head tube
If these components are not the source of the noise, check the following:
1. Improper reaming and/or facing (e.g., cups not parallel) can cause abnormal wear on the
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Rev. 10/04-A
conical bearing contact surfaces which can cause creaking and/or ticking noises.
Solution: check and properly ream and face head tube as necessary and check conical
bearing contact surfaces for excessive wear and replace if necessary.
2. The conical bearing contact surfaces on the base plate may be completely dry. If the bike
is ridden in extremely wet conditions, ridden or transported in the rain, or washed with high
pressure spray, the lubrication on these surfaces may have been washed away.
Solution: Lay a thin layer of antisieze on the conical contact surfaces.
3. The base plate may be loose on the crown race seat. This can result from a stretched base
plate or an undersized crown race seat.
Solutions: 1) Replace base plate; 2) Contact us for an undersized base plate.
4. The cup(s) may be loose in the frame.
Solution: Contact us for possible oversize cups.
5. The head tube bore may be “bell-mouthed”. The cups then press fit only at the innermost
ends.
Solutions: Contact us with an accurate measurement of the head tube and the extent of the
“bell” and we may be able to provide oversize cups that work in the head tube. If the
degree of bell-mouth is extremely pronounced, you may need to contact the frame
manufacturer for possible remedies.
6. The bearings may be dirty or seized.
Solution: Service the bearings.
7. On a NoThreadSet™, the bottom surface of the stem may be sliding on the bearing cap.
This can happen if the o-ring is sheared in installation.
Solution: Replace the o-ring and file the top of steerer tube to prevent shearing. Upon
reinstallation of the bearing cap, insert one of our scuff washers or lay a thin layer of
antisieze on the bottom of the stem where it touches the bearing cap.
8. The steerer tube may be undersize. Steerer tubes should be +.002/-.001mm (.001”) of the
nominal size. We often see them as much as .25mm (.010") undersize.
Solution: Replace the steerer tube.
9. Bottom surface of stem may not be flat.
Solution: Face bottom of the stem.
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HUBS
FEATURES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fve year warranty
Mountain, BMX, road, disc brake, and tandem hubs available
Exclusive patent pending RingDrive™ engagement system offers instant and positive
engagement and extremly high torque carrying capacity ideal for hard racing, tandems,
trials, etc.
Bearings are fully serviceable with just two 5mm hex wrenches
Strong and stiff 19.5mm axles
Wide spaced canted flanges for a strong wheel
In-house design and manufacturing - 100% made by Chris King in the USA
Unparalleled quality and reliability
Exceptionally lightweight
SET-UP
GETTING STARTED
AND
CAUTIONS
This service manual refers to all front hubs and rear hubs of build level 317 and higher. Please
contact King Cycle Group’s technical service department regarding special instructions for
servicing earlier build levels.
The following issues that are important to review before servicing and/or trouble shooting your
Chris King hub:
Adjust the preload on the bearings directly after building the
wheel
Spoke tension pulling out on the flanges can slightly loosen the preload adjustment on the
bearings. The hub(s) come pre-adjusted from the factory anticipating both spoke tension and
skewer compression. However, because of variations in wheel-building practices, a minor
adjustment should always be performed upon completion of the wheel build. Please see the
appropriate “adjustment” section and check the hub before using.
Chris king hubs feature adjustable bearing preload
The bearings should be kept in proper adjustment for optimum product performance. Do not
14
Rev. 10/04-A
allow the adjustment to become loose, as this may cause a loss of performance that could
lead to damage to the hubs.
Use steel quick releases for maximum rigidity
Our 19.5mm axle is one of the stiffest available. However, performance will be maximized with
the stiffest possible attachment to the frame or fork. Some Chris King hubs are designed to
be used in conjunction with quick-release skewers. It is recommended that the skewer develop
a minimum of 1100 lb. of clamping force when set. For best performance, use a steel skewer.
Titanium skewers are not recommended for use with either front or rear suspension.
Follow all torque recommendations
Follow all instructions and see attached schedule in appendix 3.
Use only the recommended bolts with our bolt-on hubs
Never use thread locking or mounting compounds
Thread locking compounds are not an acceptably reliable substitution for loose threads or
press fits in high performance componentry. All Chris King components are precisely
engineered to exacting tolerances to eliminate the need for thread locking compounds. Please
refer to the supplied torque specifications (appendix 3) for problems with chronic loosening.
Use only “spidered” cassettes with our aluminum drive shells
The aluminum drive shells of the rear hubs are softer than the steel shells, and should only be
used in conjunction with the newer “spidered”-style cassettes (e.g. Shimano XT™ or XTR™).
Avoid using “individual”-style cog sets with the aluminum drive shells.
General cautions
When using any Chris King product in conjunction with other manufacturers’ parts, be sure to
follow all manufacturers’ instructions and recommendations.
Do not attempt to modify your hub(s) to accept any type of bolt-on retention device.
BREAK-IN & WHEEL BUILDING
Break-in
Once your new hub is placed in service, some settling will occur. Check adjustment by clamping
wheel into frame or fork. Ride for 5-10 minutes, check for play or binding, and readjust if
necessary. Recheck after the first 5-10 miles of riding. Check cog lock ring on rear hubs after
the first 20 hours of use, and tighten if necessary. Continue monitoring for the first 60 hours of
use.
During the first 60 hours of use, expect some break-in drag. This is normal as the seals break
Rev. 10/04-A
15
in, and will soon diminish. If this causes chain sag in the rear while back-pedaling, increase
the p-tension (cage tension) on the rear derailleur.
The bearing grease is intentionally over packed and excess grease may seep at the bearing
seals during the break-in period.
Frame preparation
All Chris King hubs are designed to work with specific fork and drop out spacing. Do not
attempt to modify your hub to work with a spacing other than for which it was intended.
Check fork and frame drop outs to ensure they are parallel to each other. Use an approriate
tool such as those made by Park™ or Campagnolo™. Unparallel drop outs may be unsafe and/
or compromise the performance of your Chris King hub.
Wheel building - Classic hubs
Chris King Classic hubs are designed to work with 14 or 15 gauge spokes. Due to the
increased tension required by titanium spokes, titanium spokes should only be laced in a 3
cross pattern.
Dimensions for wheel building
CLASSIC
HUBS
Flange diameter
Wide front (mountain)
40.0mm
37.5mm
Narrow front (road)
40.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 130mm (drive side)
53.0mm
18.5mm
Rear 130mm (non drive)
44.0mm
38.5mm
Rear 135mm (drive side)
53.0mm
21.0mm
Rear 135mm (non drive side)
44.0mm
36.0mm
Rear 140mm (drive side)
53.0mm
23.5mm
Rear 140mm (non drive side)
44.0mm
33.5mm
(at hole centers)
Center to flange
Table 2 - Classic build specs
Wheel building - DiscGoTech™ hubs
Chris King DiscGoTech™ hubs are designed to work with 14 or 15 gauge spokes. Disc
brake wheels must be laced using a 3-cross lacing pattern. As the torque generated by
driving the cassette requires a crossed spokes, so does the additional torque on the non-drive
side flange generated by the braking action. Radial lacing your DiscGoTech™ hub is
considered outside of the intended use and will void your warranty. King Cycle
Group will not be responsible for damaged or distroyed hubs, any consequential damages, or
any resulting labor costs due to radial lacing your DiscGoTech™ hub.
The additional torque caused by the braking action on the front DiscGoTech™ hub requires
16
Rev. 10/04-A
that the hub be laced using a specific crossed lacing pattern. The front DiscGoTech™ should
be laced 3-cross with the rotor (left) side pulling spokes (braking direction) heads out/elbows
in. The final cross of the pulling spoke needs to be on the outside. As braking force is
applied, increased pulling spoke tension will pull the crossed spokes towards the center of
the hub and away from the caliper. Lace the wheel symetrically.
Installation and removal of the brake rotor adaptor
Mount the brake rotor according to manufacturer’s instructions. Rotor mounting bolts should
thread 8mm into the rotor adaptor and must not extend through the brake rotor adaptor or
contact the hub.
Rotor adaptors are available for accommodating various disc brake systems. These various
adaptors are offered in different widths to correctly position the rotors. Be sure to use the
adaptor designed for your brake system. Do not attempt to modify your adaptor to
work with rotors other than those for which they were designed.
Adaptor installation
1. Before installation, thoroughly clean
both the brake rotor adaptor and the
splines on the hub shell. Any debris
on the splines may not allow the rotor
to run true, inhibiting the performance
of the brake.
2. Place the adaptor onto the splines.
Figure 7 - install rotor adaptor
When snug, the adaptor should leave
an even gap approximately the width
of a piece of paper between the hub and the adaptor.
3. Insert the three bolts provided. In an alternating pattern, hand tighten adaptor bolts to pull
adaptor down evenly.
4. Finish torque to 28 in.-lb. Do not over tighten.
Adaptor removal
1. Remove the disc brake rotor if it covers the
three mounting bolts.
2. Remove the three adaptor fixing bolts.
3. To remove the rotor adaptor from the tapered
splines, pry between the adaptor and the hub
using two opposing plastic tire levers.(it
should pop off easily). Do not use metal
objects, such as screw drivers, to release
the adaptor.
Dimensions for wheel building
DISCGOTECH™
HUBS
Flange diameter
Front (drive)
53.0mm
31.5mm
Front (non drive)
53.0mm
23.0mm
Rear 135mm (drive side)
53.0mm
21.0mm
Rear 135mm (non drive)
53.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 140mm (drive side)
53.0mm
23.5mm
Rear 140mm (non drive side)
53.0mm
31.5mm
Rear 145mm (drive side)
53.0mm
26.0mm
Rear 145mm (non drive side)
53.0mm
29.0mm
(at hole centers)
™
Center to flange
Table 3 - DiscGoTech build specs
Rev. 10/04-A
17
Wheel building - BMX
Cautions
Chris King BMX hubs are supplied with 3/8”-16 x 1” socket cap axle bolts. Replacements can
be purchased at most high quality hardware stores. Use a bolt of grade 8 or equivalent. Under
no circumstance, should a quick release skewer be substituted for the axle bolts.
Do not use cogs other than KingKog™ BMX cogs. The drive shell of the rear hub has a unique
symmetrical spline, and is intentionally incompatible with current Shimano, and other after
market cogs. Use of other cogs including Shimano Uniglide™, may cause chain slippage, or
derailment, which could lead to bodily injury.
Installation and removal of the KingKog™
Chris king BMX hubs use a cassette style cog mounting system. Special splines and lock
rings have been designed to accept our premium quality steel or aluminum cogs. Cogs are
available in sizes from 12t to 20t. Using standard cassette tools you can easily remove and
change your cogs.
Cog installation
1. Select desired tooth-count Chris King KingKog™.
2. Slide cog onto drive shell spline. Cogs are symmetrical, and can be installed with either
side out.
3. Thread lock ring onto drive shell over cog.
4. Insert Shimano HG-style tool into lock ring, and tighten to 20 ft.-lb.
Cog removal
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using a chain whip, hold cog stationary from counterclockwise rotation.
Insert Shimano HG-style cassette tool into lock ring.
Loosen and remove lock ring by rotating it until it is free from drive shell.
Slide cog off of spline.
Dimensions for wheel building
BMX
HUBS
Flange diameter
Front (drive)
40.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 110mm (drive side)
53.0mm
27.0mm
Rear 110mm (non drive)
44.0mm
30.0mm
(at hole centers)
Center to flange
Table 4 - BMX build specs
18
Rev. 10/04-A
HUB
SERVICE
MAINTENANCE
SCHEDULE
Chris King Classic Hubs are designed to provide long life and high performance. Beyond an
occasional adjustment, the only maintenance necessary is cleaning, lubricating the RingDrive™
(see “Maintenance of the RingDrive™ & drive shell”, page 6), and re-lubricating the
bearings (see “Bearing service”, page 9). Riding conditions will determine how often to maintain
your hubs. As a beginning guideline, your hubs should be maintained every 6-12 months in
normal and dry conditions and every 3 months in wet or muddy conditions.
The bearings in your new Chris King hubs are of the highest quality available. However, all
bearings will settle and eventually wear with use. Since looseness or “play” in the bearing
assembly can develop as a result of wear, Chris King hubs have been designed with an
adjustable bearing preload mechanism and any normal play can be eliminated (see the
appropriate “...Adjustment” section).
RingDrive™ maintenance
Normal preventative maintenance of the RingDrive™ is simple and can be performed using
basic tools. (See “Maintenance of RingDrive™ & drive shell”, page 6.) In many cases, a minor
cleaning and reapplication of lubricant is all that may be necessary. Judging when to perform
this basic maintenance is determined by riding style and conditions. As a beginning guideline,
your hubs should be maintained every 6-12 months in normal and dry conditions and every 3
months in wet or muddy conditions.
Periodically (every one to two years) or if foreign debris is detectable in the grease and/or the
grease looks hard or dry, a complete servicing (removal and cleaning) of the RingDrive™ should
be performed. Complete service includes the removal of the RingDrive™ engagement
mechanism and requires the use of our Hub Service Tool. See your local Chris King dealer for
complete service or you may purchase a Hub Tool Service Kit from your dealer or directly from
Chris King Precision Components.
Lubrication
Normal conditions
In normal riding conditions (30°-110°F), our RingDrive™ grease is recommended for the bearings
and the RingDrive™. Do not substitute other brands of grease, as they may be too
sticky for the helix of the RingDrive™ inhibiting proper engagement.
Cold conditions
To ensure proper engagement in colder riding conditions (below 30°F) mix the grease in the
RingDrive™ area with 5-10 drops of Tri-flow™ or a quality 10w synthetic oil. Do not over fill.
If you plan to ride in sub-zero conditions, using oil only is the best set-up.
Rev. 10/04-A
19
Wet conditions
Riding in wet conditions necessitates more frequent service. Often this is as simple as removing
the axle and drive shell from the hub, removing any moisture from inside the hub shell, and
applying more grease to the needle bearing. This should not replace periodic complete
disassembly and maintenance, especially in extreme or prolonged wet conditions.
Note: Since it is nearly impossible to seal a hub from water and still have it spin freely, we have
designed our hubs to be able to operate normally with some water intrusion. Although the
bearings are stainless steel and will resist water induced corrosion, the lubricant will eventually
deteriorate, leading to premature bearing wear and possible failure. High-pressure spray
washing, transporting or riding the bicycle in the rain, or submersion in water while riding can
all lead to lubricant contamination by water. Be aware of these situations and service more
frequently when they occur.
In a pinch...
If Chris King RingDrive™ lube in not available, a quality 10w synthetic oil may be substituted.
Do not substitute other brands of grease, as they may be too sticky for the helix of
the RingDrive™. Running the hub on oil will cause the RingDrive™ to be more audible, yet
functionally no different.
If you have any additional questions, please call our Technical Services Department at
800.523.6008.
BASIC SERVICE
Front hubs
Disassembly of the
front quick-release
hub (See figure 7)
Figure 7 - typical front quick release hub
1. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of axle assembly.
2. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until assembly is
loose.
3. Loosen and unscrew adjusting cone and axle end until they are free from main axle.
4. Slide out main axle.
5. Both hub shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Further disassembly requires
specialized tools. Refer to “Complete
Assembly”.
Disassembly of the front
bolt-on hub (See figure 8)
1. Insert a 3/32” hex wrench into the
adjusting clamp pinch bolt, and
Figure 8- typical front bolt-on hub
20
Rev. 10/04-A
loosen.
2. With adjusting cone facing towards you, hold opposite end of axle stationary, and rotate
cone in a counter clockwise direction. After one complete revolution the adjusting cone
should be free from the axle.
3. Slide out axle.
4. Both hub shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed
Further disassembly requires specialized tools. Refer to “Complete Assembly”.
Service of the bearings
All of the bearings are stainless steel, so short term water
intrusion should not lead to any substantial damage. Judging
when to service the bearings is completely dependent on
the riding style and conditions.
1. Chris King sealed bearings have removable snap rings
that hold the rubber seals in place. (See figure 9.)
2. Carefully, using a small screwdriver, pick, or penknife,
Figure 9 - seal & snap ring
remove the snap ring by inserting tool into split of snap
ring. Gently work one end of the snap ring toward bearing
center until it is out of its groove. Follow the ring around with the tool until the snap ring is
completely dislodged.
3. Lift and remove exposed rubber seal to access the interior of the bearing.
4. Thoroughly flush the bearing with a light spray lubricant (e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD40™) and blow dry.
5. Wipe dirt and other contaminants from the seals and snap rings. Avoid cleaning the seals
with solvent, which could cause deterioration.
Note: some solvents, synthetic lubricants, and greases with high-pressure additives may attack
and damage seals and other nonmetallic materials. Minimize exposure to these substances
and thoroughly dry hub after cleaning.
6. Lay a bead of our RingDrive™ grease, filling the gap between the inner and outer races 3/
4 the way around bearing. Rotate the inner race to work grease throughout the ball area.
7. Replace rubber seal between inner and outer bearing race.
8. Insert one edge of snap ring into groove of outer bearing race. Press along entire groove
until snap ring is fully seated; a small gap should be visible between both ends of the snap
ring.
9. Turn inner race of bearing by hand to test for binding. If bearings do not run smooth, repeat
steps 1-9. Binding is often a result of improperly seated seals and/or snap rings.
Used snap rings and seals can be reinstalled unless warped, punctured, or otherwise damaged.
If damaged, replacement seals and snap rings are available from your local bike shop or
directly from Chris King precision components.
Reassembly of the front quick-release hub
1. Lightly grease main axle o-rings.
2. Insert main axle into hub shell.
Rev. 10/04-A
21
3. Thread adjusting cone along axle end until a small gap at the beginning of the threads
shows. (See figure 10.)
4. Thread axle end and adjusting cone onto the protruding
threads of main axle.
5. Lightly snug axle end and adjusting cone up to bearing.
6. Thread axle end into adjusting cone until it stops.
7. Proceed to “Adjustment of the front quick release hub”
(below).
Reassembly of the front bolt-on hub
1. Insert main axle into hub shell.
2. Thread adjusting clamp onto the protruding threads of
axle.
3. Snug adjusting cone up to bearing.
4. Proceed to “Adjustment of the front bolt-on hub” (below).
Figure 10 - adjusting cone
Adjustment of the front quick release hub
1. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of axle assembly.
2. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until assembly is
loose.
3. Hold hex wrenches stationary and adjust bearing preload with adjusting cone.
4. Advance adjusting cone until it just contacts bearing, then back off approximately 1/16
turn (this allows for axle compression while under skewer clamp pressure).
5. Once preload is set, tighten axle assembly to 110 in.-lb.
6. Double check adjustment by clamping wheel into fork with quick-release. Check for play
or binding, and readjust if needed.
NOTE: The back off amount during the adjusting cone setting allows for axle compression
generated as the skewer clamps the hub into the fork. It will very depending on how tight the
skewer is set to clamp. Since we’re on the subject of skewers, we recommend using a
skewer that can generate over 1100 lb. of force and setting it to do so. In this way, the extra
large axle of our hub can bring the most benefit to fork stability and steering crispness. Avoid
using skewers with titanium shafts if maximizing these benefits is desired.
Adjustment of the front bolt-on hub
1. Front bolt-on hubs feature special adjusting clamps which minimize over tightening or over
preloading of the bearings. Normal adjustment is accomplished by finger tightening adjusting
ring onto axle until it stops against bearing.
2. Once adjusting clamp is in position, tighten adjusting ring pinch bolt to 10 inch-pounds.
3. Double check adjustment by bolting wheel into fork. Check for play or binding, and readjust
if needed. Adjustment may be accomplished while bolted into fork.
22
Rev. 10/04-A
Rear hubs
Disassembly of the
rear quick-release
hub
The following instructions
assume that the drive shell is
facing to the right:
1. Remove
cogs
per
manufacturer’s instructions.
Figure 11 - disassemble main axle
2. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches
into both ends of axle
assembly. (See figure 11.)
3. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until assembly is
loose.
4. Loosen and unscrew adjusting cone and axle end until they are free from the main axle.
5. Remove main axle by pulling on drive side end of main axle.
6. Hold hub or wheel in one hand and pull drive shell out with the other.
7. Both hub shell and drive shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Further disassembly requires specialized tools. Refer to “Complete Assembly”.
Disassembly of the rear bolt-on hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing to the right:
1. Remove cog using a chain whip, and standard Shimano HG-style freewheel tool.
2. Insert a 3/32” hex wrench into adjusting clamp pinch bolt, and loosen.
3. With adjusting clamp facing towards you, hold opposite end of axle stationary, and rotate
cone in a counter clockwise direction. After one complete revolution the adjusting cone
should be free from the axle.
4. Slide out axle.
5 hold hub or wheel in one hand and pull drive shell with other.
6. Both hub shell and drive shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Further disassembly requires specialized tools. Refer to “Complete Assembly”.
Service of the bearings
All of the bearings are stainless steel, so short term water intrusion should not lead to any
substantial damage. Judging when to service the bearings is completely dependent on the
riding style and conditions.
1. Chris King sealed bearings have removable snap rings that hold the rubber seals in place.
2. Carefully, using a small screwdriver, pick, or penknife, remove the snap ring by inserting
tool into split of snap ring. Gently work one end of the snap ring toward bearing center until
it is out of its groove. Follow the ring around with the tool until the snap ring is completely
dislodged. (see figure 12, next page.)
Rev. 10/04-A
23
3. Lift and remove exposed rubber seal to access
the interior of the bearing.
4. Thoroughly flush the bearing with a light spray
lubricant (e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD-40™)
and blow dry.
5. Wipe dirt and other contaminants from the seals
and snap rings. Avoid cleaning the seals with
solvent, which could cause deterioration.
NOTE: Some solvents, synthetic lubricants, and
greases with high-pressure additives may attack and
damage seals and other nonmetallic materials.
Minimize exposure to these substances and
thoroughly dry hub after cleaning.
6. Lay a bead of our RingDrive™ grease, filling the
Figure 12 - remove snap ring
gap between the inner and outer races 3/4 the
way around bearing. Rotate the inner race to
work grease throughout the ball area.
7. Replace rubber seal between inner and outer bearing race.
8. Insert one edge of snap ring into groove of outer bearing race. Press along entire groove
until snap ring is fully seated; a small gap should be visible between both ends of the snap
ring.
9. Turn inner race of bearing by hand to test for binding. If bearings do not run smooth, repeat
steps 1-9. Binding is often a result of improperly seated seals and/or snap rings.
Used snap rings and seals can be reinstalled unless warped, punctured, or otherwise damaged.
If damaged, replacement seals and snap rings are available from your local bike shop or
directly from Chris King precision components.
Maintenance of RingDrive™ & drive shell
Inspection
Having removed the axle and drive shell (as instructed above), the RingDrive™ is accessible
through the large side of the hub shell. Visually inspect the hub’s interior. Under normal
conditions the grease should look moist and may have darkened slightly. A modest film should
coat the moving parts.
As with the rest of the hub, the RingDrive™ is designed to operate with some water
contamination. Water intrusion can usually be remedied with basic maintenance.
However, if foreign debris is detectable in the grease and/or the grease looks hard or dry, then
a complete removal and servicing of the RingDrive™ is necessary.
Basic maintenance
1. Take a clean, lint free rag and wipe any spent lubricant from inside the hub shell. Be
careful not to drag any dirt or debris from outside the hub into the interior area.
24
Rev. 10/04-A
2. Once the interior is clean in appearance,
locate the helical splines of the drive ring
about an inch inside the large bearing.
3. Using a soft toothbrush, pull the bristles
across the helix in an outward direction. Work
your way all the way around the inner
circumference to remove any small particles
that may be in the spline grooves.
4. Once completed, wipe the area directly in
front of the helix to remove any debris. This
method should be used to clean the helix on
the drive shell as well. (If compressed air is
available, blow across the helixes in line with
the spline grooves to remove any debris.)
With the interior wiped down and the helixes
brushed clean, a fresh application of lubricant
should be applied. The RingDrive™ is designed
Figure 13 - lube RingDrive™ teeth
to work with our specially formulated low shear
RingDrive™ grease. Do not substitute other
brands of grease, as they may be too sticky for the helix of the RingDrive™.
5. Lubricate by reopening a gap between the drive rings, and laying a bead of RingDrive™
grease on the teeth between them (see figure 13).
6. Let the rings spring back together and then wipe up any excess grease that squeezes
inward.
7. Apply a few drops of Tri-flow™ or a quality 10w synthetic onto both the helical splines of the
movable drive ring and the drive shell (see figure
14).
8. Before reinserting the drive shell into
RingDrive™ area of the hub, the helical
splines must be clean of any debris.
9. Reinsert the drive shell and complete the assembly
as per the instructions below.
RingDrive™ service
In addition to the basic maintenance of the RingDrive™,
a complete removal and servicing may be necessary.
Complete service requires our Hub Service Tool Kit
and, as a basic guideline, should be performed at
least once every 12 to 24 months. Check with your
local Chris King dealer for complete service or you
may purchase the tool kit at your dealer or directly
from Chris King Precision Components.
Rev. 10/04-A
25
Figure 14 - lube helical splines
In a pinch...
If you need to do a RingDrive™ service and don’t have the Hub Service Tool Kit or can’t make
it to a dealer, this method may be used for temporary results:
1. Remove the axle and drive shell to access the interior RingDrive™ area.
2. Push the drive ring with helical splines inward to open a gap, exposing the drive teeth and
flush the interior with a light solvent-based spray lubricant (e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD40™) until the area appears clean. Blow off any remaining solvent until completely dry.
3. If contamination is still apparent, repeat flushing and blow completely dry. A complete
service of both hub shell bearings should be performed at the same time.
4. Finish by performing the basic maintenance as instructed above.
5. After assembly, carefully hand test hub for smooth operation of the bearings and consistent,
positive engagement of the RingDrive™. If performance is not improved to original quality,
a complete RingDrive™ removal service must be performed.
Reinstallation of the drive shell assembly
1. Check the helical splines of the drive shell for any particles or debris before proceeding;
the drive shell must be clean before installing!
2. Apply several drops of Tri-Flow™ on the helical spline, O-ring, and tapered diameter directly
adjacent the O-ring.
3. Insert drive shell into hub shell, slowly. As the drive shell
enters the RingDrive™ area, it will want to mesh the helical
splines of the drive ring. As it begins to mesh, a slight
clockwise turning motion of the drive shell will help pull it
into the hub shell. Continue twisting as the drive shell
pulls itself into the hub shell. At the bottom of its inward
movement, an audible “click” or “pop” sound indicates
that it has found home and is fully seated. (The “click” or
“pop” is the spring retainer popping onto the drive shell
and the drive shell hitting the bearing, indicating the drive
shell is fully inserted.)
4. Test engagement by spinning drive shell in both directions.
If it does not engage, remove drive shell, check cleanliness
Figure 15 - main axle
and re-insert. Re-test.
5. The hub is now ready to have the axle installed.
Reassembly of the rear quick-release hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing
to the right:
1. Insert main axle through drive shell and completely into
hub. Axle should protrude slightly through the non drive
side bearing. (See figure 15.)
2. Thread adjusting cone along axle end until a small gap at
the beginning of the threads shows. (See figure 16.)
3. Thread axle end and adjusting cone onto the protruding
threads of main axle.
26
Figure 16 - adjusting cone
Rev. 10/04-A
4. Lightly snug axle end and adjusting cone up to bearing.
5. Thread axle end into adjusting cone until it stops.
6. Proceed to “Adjustment of the rear quick-release hub” below.
NOTE: To improve performance, the axles have been precisely matched with the needle bearings
in the drive shell. Be sure to combine only like numbered parts, (e.g., #4 axle with #4 needle
bearing race).
Reassembly of the rear bolt-on hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing to the right:
1. Lightly grease all o-rings and bearing contact surfaces.
2. Insert drive shell into the hub shell; turn in a clockwise motion while letting it pull itself in .
A distinctive click sound will indicate that the drive shell is firmly seated.
3. Insert main axle, small end first into drive shell. Continue until axle is through the hub and
large end is firmly seated in drive shell.
4. Thread adjusting clamp onto the protruding threads of axle.
5. Snug adjusting clamp up to bearing.
6. Proceed to “Adjustment of the rear bolt-on hub” (below).
Adjustment of the rear quick-release hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing to the right:
1. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of the axle assembly.
2. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until the assembly
is loose.
3. Hold hex wrenches stationary and adjust bearing preload with the adjusting cone. You
may use the hub cone adjusting tool if necessary.
4. Advance adjusting cone until it contacts bearing. The rear hub takes a slightly higher amount
of preload than “no play”, since some settling may occur while riding.
5. Once preload is set, tighten axle assembly together to 110 inch-pounds.
6. Check adjustment by clamping wheel into frame with quick-release. Ride for 5-10 minutes,
check for play or binding, and readjust as necessary. Double check adjustment after the
first 5-10 miles of riding.
NOTE: Correct adjustment of the rear hub is necessary for proper engagement of the
RingDrive™. If the hub is run loose, the RingDrive™ may not engage properly and could lead to
permanent damage of the internal parts.
Adjustment of the rear bolt-on hub
1. Rear bolt-on hubs feature special adjusting clamps which minimize over tightening or over
preloading of the bearings. Normal adjustment is accomplished by finger tightening adjusting
ring onto axle until it stops against bearing.
2. Once adjusting clamp is in position, tighten adjusting ring pinch bolt to 10 inch-pounds.
3. Double check adjustment by bolting wheel into frame. Check for play or binding, and
readjust if needed. Adjustment may be accomplished while bolted into frame.
Rev. 10/04-A
27
COMPLETE SERVICE
Introduction to the tool
The hub tool is designed to accommodate complete disassembly and reassembly of the
following Chris King hubs.
•
•
•
•
•
Classic Road and Classic Mountain - front and rear
Universal Disc - front and rear; all styles
ISO Disc - front and rear; all styles
BMX - front and rear
Single Speed and Single Speed Disc - front and rear
Note: The hub tool is not designed to work with our 20mm front hub, please contact King
Customer Service for assistance.
The tool is made up of 9 parts
1. T-handle. This is the main part of the pressing device. It is a long shaft with threads on one
end, and a bulbous end with a handlebar through it. We fondly call this piece “rosie”. It
has a steel strike piece in the top of the bulbous end that may be struck with a soft mallet.
2. Extension shaft. Once again a threaded shaft but much shorter. With a knurled section on
one end and small threads on the other,
it screws into the end of the t-handle.
3. Cone washer. This part is a steel
washer with one side shaped like a
cone. It goes on the small end of the
extension shaft before it is screwed into
the t-handle. Its function is to make split
rings expand (explained next).
4. Split rings. These are doughnut shaped
with an o-ring around the outside. They
have been precisely cut in half to allow
them to be expanded to a bigger
diameter. These are the pieces that get
behind the bearings to force them out
by their outer races. The big one is for
the RingDrive™ and large bearing in the
rear hub, the small one is for all the small
axle bearings in both front and rear hubs.
5. Knurled ring. This is the large round
part with a threaded hole. It can be
threaded onto either the extension shaft
or the T-handle. It is used to pull
bearings into their respective bores
upon assembly or to capture parts as
they are being tapped out.
6. Drive shell bushing. This is a tube
Figure 17 - function of the split ring
shaped part with one end bigger than
28
Rev. 10/04-A
the other. It is used when installing bearings into drive shells and for removing the needle
bearing from the BMX drive shell.
7. Spline driver. This is a socket shaped part with a 3/8” square hole in one end and a special
spline on the other. It is used with a ratchet or torque wrench to remove or replace the seal
ring in the mtn, road, and disk drive shells.
8. Cog spline wrench. This is a large ring shaped part with a splined hole to match the cog
spline on the outside of the drive shell. It has two flats about the outer diameter so it can
be located in a vice. It is used to hold the drive shell while torqueing on it.
Function of the expanding split rings
1.
2.
3.
4.
Slide the large split ring onto the small end of the extension shaft.
Follow it by the cone washer, pointed end first, onto the shaft next to the split ring.
Take this complete assembly and thread it into the hole in the threaded end of the T-handle.
As you screw it together, you will force the cone washer into the split ring. The split ring
will begin to expand; continue screwing until the cone has disappeared completely into the
split ring. (See figure 17.) With the cone washer clamping the split ring, fully expanded,
against the flange of the extension shaft the tool is ready to drive a bearing. When driving
bearings, the split ring should only be used in this fully expanded and clamped position.
5. Release by unscrewing the extension shaft from the T-handle. A hole is provided in the
end of the extension shaft for a 4mm (5/32”) hex key in the event it has become too tight to
turn with fingers.
Note: This tool set is designed only for working on Chris King hubs. It is not intended to be
used with any other parts or on any other hubs. Use other than that for which it is intended
may cause damage to the tool, other products, and/or bodily harm.
Front hubs
Disassembly of the front quick-release hub
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of axle assembly.
Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until assembly is loose.
Loosen and unscrew adjusting cone and axle end until they are free from main axle.
Slide out main axle.
Both hub shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Disassembly of the front bolt-on hub
1. Insert a 3/32” hex wrench into the adjusting clamp pinch bolt, and loosen.
2. With adjusting cone facing towards you, hold opposite end of axle stationary, and rotate
cone in a counter clockwise direction. After one complete revolution the adjusting cone
should be free from the axle.
3. Slide out axle.
4. Both hub shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed
Removal of the bearings
1. Setup extension shaft by placing small expanding split-ring, big end first, on the small
threaded end followed by cone washer, tapered end facing split ring.
Rev. 10/04-A
29
2. Thread knurled
ring, small end
first, onto the
opposite end of
extension shaft all
the way, then back
off exactly 1/2
turn.
3. Insert T-handle
through one side
of hub shell until
threaded
end
shows.
Figure 18 - remove front hub shell bearing
4. Thread extension
shaft into T-handle
without expanding split-ring.
5. Push knurled ring flush with hub shell. This will position the split-ring directly behind the
bearing.
6. While keeping extension shaft from rotating, fully expand small expanding split-ring by
turning the T-handle. (See figure 18.)
7. Capture bearing by threading knurled ring until it is snug against hub shell.
8. Using a mallet, tap T-handle to remove bearing from the hub shell.
9. Withdraw tool and, if necessary, repeat for the other side.
Service of the bearings
All of the bearings are stainless steel, so short term water intrusion should not lead to any
substantial damage. Judging when to service the bearings is completely dependent on the
riding style and conditions.
1. Chris King sealed bearings have removable snap rings that hold the rubber seals in place.
2. Carefully, using a small screwdriver, pick, or penknife, remove the snap ring by inserting
tool into split of snap ring. Gently work one end of the snap ring toward bearing center until
it is out of its groove. Follow the ring around with the tool until the snap ring is completely
dislodged.
3. Lift and remove exposed rubber seal to access the interior of the bearing.
4. Thoroughly flush the bearing with a light spray lubricant (e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD40™) and blow dry.
5. Wipe dirt and other contaminants from the seals and snap rings. Avoid cleaning the seals
with solvent, which could cause deterioration.
NOTE: Some solvents, synthetic lubricants, and greases with high-pressure additives may
attack and damage seals and other nonmetallic materials. Minimize exposure to these
substances and thoroughly dry hub after cleaning.
6. Lay a bead of our RingDrive™ grease, filling the gap between the inner and outer races 3/
4 the way around bearing. Rotate the inner race to work grease throughout the ball area.
7. Replace rubber seal between inner and outer bearing race.
30
Rev. 10/04-A
8. Insert one edge of snap ring
into groove of outer bearing
race. Press along entire
groove until snap ring is fully
seated; a small gap should
be visible between both
ends of the snap ring.
9. Turn inner race of bearing
by hand to test for binding.
If bearings do not run
smooth, repeat steps 1-9.
Binding is often a result of
improperly seated seals
and/or snap rings.
Figure 19 - press front hub shell bearings
Used snap rings and seals can be reinstalled unless warped, punctured, or otherwise damaged.
If damaged, replacement seals and snap rings are available from your local bike shop or
directly from Chris King precision components.
Reinstallation of the bearings
1.
2.
3.
4.
Insert small inner seal into bearing counterbore.
Place small hub bearing, black seal side first, onto bare T-handle.
Insert knurled ring, small end first, into opposite side of hub shell.
Pass T-handle with bearing through installation side of hub shell and thread into knurled
ring. Continue turning T-handle to press bearing until it is firmly seated. (See figure 19.)
Loosen T-handle, turn knurled ring 180° and tighten T-handle to press bearing again. (This
assures the bearing is seated flatly against the shoulder of the counterbore.)
5. Withdraw tool and, if necessary, repeat for the other side.
Reassembly of the front quick-release hub
1. Lightly grease main axle o-rings.
2. Insert main axle into hub shell.
3. Thread adjusting cone along axle end until a small gap at the beginning of the threads
shows. (See figure 20.)
4. Thread axle end and adjusting cone onto the protruding
threads of main axle.
5. Lightly snug axle end and adjusting cone up to bearing.
6. Thread axle end into adjusting cone until it stops.
7. Proceed to “Adjustment of the front quick-release hub”
(below).
Reassembly of the front bolt-on hub
1. Insert main axle into hub shell.
2. Thread adjusting clamp onto the protruding threads of
axle.
3. Snug adjusting cone up to bearing.
Rev. 10/04-A
31
Figure 20 - adjusting cone
4. Proceed to “Adjustment of the front bolt-on hub” (below).
Adjustment of the front quick-release hub
1. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of axle assembly.
2. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until assembly is
loose.
3. Hold hex wrenches stationary and adjust bearing preload with adjusting cone.
4. Advance adjusting cone until it just contacts bearing, then back off approximately 1/16
turn (this allows for axle compression while under skewer clamp pressure).
5. Once preload is set, tighten axle assembly to 110 in.-lb.
6. Double check adjustment by clamping wheel into fork with quick-release. Check for play
or binding, and readjust if needed.
NOTE: The back off amount during the adjusting cone setting allows for axle compression
generated as the skewer clamps the hub into the fork. It will very depending on how tight the
skewer is set to clamp. Since we’re on the subject of skewers, we recommend using a
skewer that can generate over 1100 lb. of force and setting it to do so. In this way, the extra
large axle of our hub can bring the most benefit to fork stability and steering crispness. Avoid
using skewers with titanium shafts if maximizing these benefits is desired.
Adjustment of the front bolt-on hub
1. Front bolt-on hubs feature special adjusting clamps which minimize over tightening or over
preloading of the bearings. Normal adjustment is accomplished by finger tightening adjusting
ring onto axle until it stops against bearing.
2. Once adjusting clamp is in position, tighten adjusting ring pinch bolt to 10 inch-pounds.
3. Double check adjustment by bolting wheel into fork. Check for play or binding, and readjust
if needed. Adjustment may be accomplished while bolted into fork.
Rear hubs
Disassembly of the rear quick-release hub
The following instructions
assume that the drive shell is
facing to the right:
1. Remove
cogs
per
manufacturer’s instructions.
2. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches
into both ends of axle
assembly. (See figure 21.)
3. Hold left hand stationary and
turn
right
hand
counterclockwise 1/4 turn
Figure 21 - disassemble main axle
until assembly is loose.
4. Loosen and unscrew
adjusting cone and axle end until they are free from the main axle.
32
Rev. 10/04-A
5. Remove main axle by pulling on drive side end of main axle.
6. Hold hub or wheel in one hand and pull drive shell out with the other.
7. Both hub shell and drive shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Disassembly of the rear bolt-on hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing to the right:
1. Remove cog using a chain whip, and standard Shimano HG-style freewheel tool.
2. Insert a 3/32” hex wrench into adjusting clamp pinch bolt, and loosen.
3. With adjusting clamp facing towards you, hold opposite end of axle stationary, and rotate
cone in a counter clockwise direction. After one complete revolution the adjusting cone
should be free from the axle.
4. Slide out axle.
5 Hold hub or wheel in one hand and pull drive shell with other.
6. Both hub shell and drive shell bearing assemblies can now be accessed.
Removal of the RingDrive™ mechanism and drive side bearing
1. Setup extension shaft by placing large expanding split-ring on the small threaded end
followed by cone washer, tapered end facing split ring.
2. Thread knurled ring, big end first, on to the opposite end of extension shaft 3 turns.
3. Insert T-handle through the non-drive side of the hub shell until it extends beyond the other
side.
4. Thread extension shaft in to T-handle without expanding split-ring.
5. Pull assembled tool towards non-drive side until knurled ring is bottomed in drive side
bearing.
6. While keeping the extension shaft from rotating, rotate T-handle to fully expand the large
expanding split-ring behind the spring retainer. (See figure 22.)
7. Lightly push tool towards the drive side until it stops, then rotate knurled ring until it again
bottoms on the drive side
bearing. (This will capture
all RingDrive™ parts and
bearing on the tool as they
are removed from the hub
shell.)
8. Using a mallet, tap Thandle to dislodge
RingDrive™ and bearing
from hub shell. (See
figure 23, next page.)
Disassembly of the
8/9 speed drive
shell assembly
1. Remove axle by pulling it
out from the seal side of
the drive shell.
Rev. 10/04-A
Figure 22 - capture whole RingDrive™ assembly
33
2. Use cog spline wrench to
hold drive shell in vise.
3. Unscrew seal ring with
spline driver.
4. Remove capture plate and
needle bearing cage.
5. Setup extension shaft by
placing small expanding
split-ring, big end first, on
the small threaded end
followed by cone washer,
tapered end facing splitFigure 23 - remove RingDrive™ assembly
ring.
6. Thread knurled ring,
small end first, on to
the opposite end of
extension
shaft
exactly 2-1/2 turns.
7. Insert the T-handle
through drive shell
from the helical
splined end.
8. Thread extension
shaft into T-handle
without expanding
split-ring.
9. Slide drive shell up
Figure 24 - remove drive shell bearing
against knurled ring
to position the splitring just behind the bearing; the step on the ring will center the end of the drive shell
10. Holding extension shaft stationary, screw T-handle into extension shaft to fully expand splitring. Then slide it up against the bearing and advance knurled ring to hold everything
snug. (See figure 24.)
11. Using a mallet, tap T-handle to dislodge the bearing. After about 1/4” of movement, the
bearing should slide freely down and out the bore of the drive shell.
Disassembly of the BMX drive shell assembly
1. Remove axle from drive shell.
2. Use cog spline wrench to hold drive shell, helical spline side up, in vise.
3. Set up extension shaft by placing small expanding split-ring, big end first, on the small
threaded end followed by cone washer, tapered end facing split ring.
4. Thread knurled ring, small end first, on to the opposite end of extension shaft all the way,
then back off exactly 5 turns.
5. Insert T-handle through drive shell from the helical splined end.
6. Thread extension shaft into T-handle without expanding split-ring.
7. Slide drive shell up against knurled ring to position the split-ring just behind the bearing;
the step on the ring will center the end of the drive shell.
34
Rev. 10/04-A
8. Holding the extension shaft stationary, screw T-handle into extension shaft to fully expand
split-ring. Then slide it up against bearing and advance knurled ring to hold everything
snug.
9. Using a mallet, tap T-handle to dislodge the bearing.
10. Remove extension shaft to remove tool.
Removal of BMX needle bearing
1.
2.
3.
4.
Slide drive shell bushing, big end first, onto shaft of T-handle.
Slide drive shell, needle bearing end first, onto shaft.
Thread knurled ring, small end first, onto shaft to capture all parts.
Continue threading T-handle into knurled ring to push needle into center of drive shell.
After the bearing moves about 1/2”, it should become free to move all the way through the
drive shell.
Removal of the non-drive side hub bearing
1. Setup extension shaft by
placing small expanding
split-ring, big end first, on
the small threaded end
followed by cone washer,
tapered end facing split
ring.
2. Thread knurled ring,
small end first, onto the
opposite end of extension
shaft all the way, then
back off exactly 1/2 turn.
3. Insert T-handle through
large side of the hub shell
Figure 25 - remove non-drive side bearing
until threaded end
shows.
4. Thread extension shaft into T-handle without expanding split-ring.
5. Push knurled ring flush with hub shell. This will position the split-ring directly behind the
bearing.
6. While keeping extension shaft from rotating, fully expand small expanding split-ring by
turning T-handle.
7. Capture bearing by advancing knurled ring until it is snug against hub shell.
8. Using a mallet, tap T-handle to remove bearing from hub shell. (See figure 25.)
Service of the bearings
All of the bearings are stainless steel, so short term water intrusion should not lead to any
substantial damage. Judging when to service the bearings is completely dependent on the
riding style and conditions.
1. Chris King sealed bearings have removable snap rings that hold the rubber seals in place.
Rev. 10/04-A
35
2. Carefully, using a small screwdriver, pick, or
penknife, remove the snap ring by inserting tool
into split of snap ring. Gently work one end of
the snap ring toward bearing center until it is out
of its groove. Follow the ring around with the
tool until the snap ring is completely dislodged.
(See figure 26.)
3. Lift and remove exposed rubber seal to access
the interior of the bearing.
4. Thoroughly flush the bearing with a light spray
lubricant (e.g., Bullshot™ aerosol or WD-40™)
and blow dry.
5. Wipe dirt and other contaminants from the seals
and snap rings. Avoid cleaning the seals with
solvent, which could cause deterioration.
Figure 26 - remove snap ring
NOTE: Some solvents, synthetic lubricants, and
greases with high-pressure additives may attack and damage seals and other nonmetallic
materials. Minimize exposure to these substances and thoroughly dry hub after cleaning.
6. Lay a bead of our RingDrive™ grease, filling the gap between the inner and outer races 3/
4 the way around bearing. Rotate the inner race to work grease throughout the ball area.
7. Replace rubber seal between inner and outer bearing race.
8. Insert one edge of snap ring into groove of outer bearing race. Press along entire groove
until snap ring is fully seated; a small gap should be visible between both ends of the snap
ring.
9. Turn inner race of bearing
by hand to test for binding.
If bearings do not run
smooth, repeat steps 1-9.
Binding is often a result of
improperly seated seals
and/or snap rings.
Used snap rings and seals
can be reinstalled unless
warped, punctured, or
otherwise damaged. If
damaged, replacement seals
Figure 27 - install non-drive side bearing
and snap rings are available
from your local bike shop or
directly from Chris king precision components.
Reinstallation of the non drive side bearing
1.
2.
3.
4.
Insert small inner seal into non-drive side bearing counterbore.
Place small hub bearing, black seal side first, onto bare T-handle.
Insert knurled ring, big end first, into drive side of hub shell.
Pass T-handle with bearing through non-drive side of hub shell and thread into knurled
36
Rev. 10/04-A
ring. Continue turning T-handle to press bearing until it is firmly seated. (See figure 27,
last page.) Loosen T-handle, turn knurled ring 180° and tighten T-handle to press bearing
again. (This assures the bearing is seated flatly against the shoulder of the counterbore.)
Reinstallation of the RingDrive™ mechanism and drive side
bearing
1. The non-drive side bearing should be in place before proceeding to install the RingDrive™
and bearing. (The tool operates best in this condition)
2. Insert spring retainer in hub shell with square stepped edge facing out. (See figure 29.)
Make sure the spring retainer has an o-ring installed before inserting.
(See figure 28 - last page.)
3. Insert drive spring. (See figure 30.)
4. Insert drive ring with the teeth facing out. (See figure 31.)
5. Lay a bead of RingDrive™ Grease onto ratchet face of drive ring.
6. Insert driven ring into the hub shell with the teeth facing the drive
ring. The splines on the outside of driven ring will engage the
matching splines of the hub shell as it is pushed in to expose the
counterbore for the bearing. (See figure 32.)
Figure 28 - o-ring
Figure 29 - spring
retainer
Figure 31 - drive
ring
Figure 30 - drive
spring
Figure 33 - press drive side bearing
Rev. 10/04-A
37
Figure 32 - driven
ring
7. Place the inner seal in the bearing counterbore on top of
driven ring.
8. Insert T-handle into hub shell from non-drive side until it is
bottomed on hub shell.
9. Place big hub bearing, black seal side first, onto big end of
knurled ring. Thread onto T-handle, bearing facing in, until
the bearing just starts into the counterbore. Continue by
turning the T-handle to pull the knurled ring and bearing into
the counterbore until firmly seated. (See figure 33, last page.)
Loosen T-handle, turn knurled ring 180° on bearing and tighten
T-handle to press bearing again. (This assures the bearing is
seated flatly against the shoulder of the counterbore.)
10. Remove tool.
11. Using finger, push on spring retainer to squish grease out
from between the drive rings.
12. Wipe excess grease from the helical splines of the drive ring.
The hub shell is now ready
for installation of the drive
shell assembly.
Figure 34 - drive shell
seal & bearing
Reassembly of the
8/9 speed drive shell
mechanism
1. Insert small inner seal into
big end of drive shell.
2. Insert drive shell bearing
into drive shell, tapered
side out. It should slide
most of the way down the
Figure 35 - press drive shell bearing
bore. (See figure 34.)
3. Place drive shell bushing,
small end first, onto bare T-handle.
4. Pass T-handle with bushing through big end of drive shell
until it contacts the bearing.
5. Thread knurled ring, big end first, onto T-handle. Advance
down until the small end of the drive shell nests into the
counterbore in the end of the knurled ring. Be careful not to
damage the small end of the drive shell. (See figure 35.)
6. Continue by holding the knurled ring and turning T-handle to
press bearing until it is firmly seated. Loosen T-handle, turn
knurled ring 180° on drive shell and tighten T-handle to press
bearing again. (This assures the bearing is seated flatly
against the shoulder of the counterbore). If the knurled ring
is too difficult to hold, the cog spline wrench may be placed
on the drive shell before the knurled ring is threaded onto the
Figure 36 - needle
T-handle in step 5. Place the cog spline wrench in a vice and
bearing
& capture plate
continue with step 6.
38
Rev. 10/04-A
7. Remove tools and insert capture sleeve, flat face out.
8. Insert needle race.
9. Insert needle bearing cage.
10. Insert capture plate. (See figure 36, last page.)
11. Thread seal ring in to drive shell.
12. Insert drive shell into cog spline wrench and hold in vice. Using the spline driver, torque
seal ring to 100 in-lb.
Reassembly of the BMX drive shell mechanism
1. Insert small inner seal into big end of drive shell.
2. Insert drive shell bearing into drive shell, tapered side out. It should slide most of the way
down the bore.
3. Place drive shell bushing, small end first, onto bare T-handle.
4. Pass T-handle with bushing through big end of drive shell until it contacts the bearing.
5. Thread knurled ring, big end first, onto T-handle. Advance down until the small end of the
drive shell nests into the counterbore in the end of the knurled ring. Be careful not to
damage the small end of the drive shell.
6. Continue by turning T-handle to press bearing until it is firmly seated. Loosen T-handle,
turn knurled ring 180° on drive shell and tighten T-handle to press bearing again. (This
assures the bearing is seated flatly against the shoulder of the counterbore.)
7. Remove drive shell from tool. Leave drive shell bushing in place, small end on first.
8. Place complete needle bearing onto T-handle shaft and slide down until it stops on the
drive shell bushing.
9. Place the drive shell, small end first, onto the T-handle shaft. Locate the bore over the
needle bearing.
10. Thread knurled ring, small end first, onto the T-handle. Advance down until it locates the
big end of the drive shell on it’s stepped face.
11. Continue by holding the knurled ring and turning T-handle to press bearing until the drive
shell bushing meets the drive shell. If the knurled is too difficult to hold, the cog spline
wrench may be placed on the drive shell before the knurled ring is threaded onto the Thandle in step 10. Place the cog spline wrench in a vice and continue with step 11.
12. Remove tools.
Reinstallation of the drive shell assembly
1. Check the helical splines of the drive shell for any particles or debris before proceeding;
the drive shell must be clean before installing!
2. Apply several drops of Tri-Flow™ on the helical spline, O-ring, and tapered diameter directly
adjacent the O-ring.
3. Insert drive shell into hub shell, slowly. As the drive shell enters the RingDrive™ area, it will
want to mesh the helical splines of the drive ring. As it begins to mesh, a slight clockwise
turning motion of the drive shell will help pull it into the hub shell. Continue twisting as the
drive shell pulls itself into the hub shell. At the bottom of its inward movement, an audible
“click” or “pop” sound indicates that it has found home and is fully seated. (The “click” or
“pop” is the spring retainer popping onto the drive shell and the drive shell hitting the
bearing, indicating the drive shell is fully inserted. Some pushing pressure on the drive
shell may be necessary to pop the spring retainer onto the end of the drive shell.)
Rev. 10/04-A
39
4. Test engagement by spinning drive shell in both directions.
If it does not engage, remove drive shell, check cleanliness
and re-insert. Re-test.
5. The hub is now ready to have the axle installed.
Reassembly of the rear quick-release rear
hub
1. Insert main axle through drive shell and completely into
hub. A click indicates that the main axle is in place.
2. Thread adjusting cone along axle end until a small gap at
the beginning of the threads shows. (See figure 37.)
3. Thread axle end and adjusting cone onto the protruding
threads of main axle.
4. Lightly snug axle end and adjusting cone up to bearing.
5. Thread axle end into adjusting cone until it stops.
6. Proceed to “Adjustment of rear quick-release hub” below.
Figure 37 - adjusting cone
Reassembly of the rear bolt-on hub
1. Insert main axle, small end first, through drive shell into hub. Continue until axle is through
the hub and large end is firmly seated in drive shell.
2. Thread adjusting cone onto the protruding threads of axle.
3. Snug adjusting cone up to bearing finger tight.
4. Proceed to “Adjustment of rear bolt-on hub” below
Adjustment of the rear quick-release hub
The following instructions assume that the drive shell is facing to the right:
1. Insert 5 mm hex wrenches into both ends of the axle assembly.
2. Hold left hand stationary and turn right hand counterclockwise 1/4 turn until the assembly
is loose.
3. Hold hex wrenches stationary and adjust bearing preload with the adjusting cone. You
may use the hub cone adjusting tool if necessary.
4. Advance adjusting cone until it contacts bearing. The rear hub takes a slightly higher amount
of preload than “no play”, since some settling may occur while riding.
5. Once preload is set, tighten axle assembly together to 110 in-lb.
6. Check adjustment by clamping wheel into frame with quick-release. Ride for 5-10 minutes,
check for play or binding, and readjust as necessary. Double check adjustment after the
first 5-10 miles of riding.
NOTE: Correct adjustment of the rear hub is necessary for proper engagement of the
RingDrive™. If the hub is run loose, the RingDrive™ may not engage properly and could lead to
permanent damage of the internal parts.
Adjustment of the rear bolt-on hub
1. Rear bolt-on hubs feature special adjusting clamps which minimize over tightening or over
preloading of the bearings. Normal adjustment is accomplished by finger tightening adjusting
40
Rev. 10/04-A
ring onto axle until it stops against bearing.
2. Once adjusting clamp is in position, tighten adjusting ring pinch bolt to 10 in-lb.
3. Double check adjustment by bolting wheel into frame. Check for play or binding, and
readjust if needed. Adjustment may be accomplished while bolted into frame.
BUILD LEVELS
AND THE
PURSUIT
OF
PERFECTION
Hub upgrades
Due to experience gained from riders and racers in the field our hubs have undergone several
minor revisions that have continued to improve their performance. Each significant improvement
is referred to as a new build level. The build level, or version, is designated by the first three
numbers of the serial number (e.g., A hub with a serial number 310xxxxx is considered a
version 310 hub.) Technical improvements added in each new build level are made available
to all Chris king customers where ever possible
HUB
TROUBLE SHOOTING
COMMON QUESTIONS
AND THE
LIKELY SOLUTIONS:
Complete installation, service, and maintenance instructions are available on our web site at
www.chrisking.com™. We are also available to answer your technical service questions during
business hours Monday through Friday at 800.523.6008.
Hub will not stay adjusted.
Front and rear:
When an adjustment is made, the axle end must be torqued to 110 in-lb. to lock the adjusting
cone’s position correctly. With less torque, the hub may seem locked, however, when clamped
in, the lock may loosen slightly allowing the adjusting cone to move.
Rear:
Break-in is a normal function of the rear hub. As the angular contact bearings settle in, this
causes a loosening effect on the preload setting. Expect to adjust preload directly after the
wheel build and a few more times as necessary to complete the break-in period. After that it
should be smooth sailing for months... If the axle lock is torqued correctly and loosening
persists, contact our technical service department for further help.
My hub creaks.
Due to the ability of noise to travel throughout a hollow frame, hub creaks are often confused
with bottom bracket and other creaks. Isolating the true source of the noise is essential to
effective trouble shooting.
1. The hub quick release may not be tight enough allowing the axle end to move in the
Rev. 10/04-A
41
dropout. In some cases, even if everything is properly tight, the axle may still move slightly
in the frame. A little anti-seize on the drop-out faces may help.
Solution: Inspect and tighten the quick release.
2. Some splined cog carriers fit loosely on our drive shells. Since both are made of aluminum,
they may creak under certain riding conditions (e.g., Water and dry dust.) Additionally, if
the lock ring is not tight enough, the cogs may move under load.
Solution: Apply a thin layer of grease or anti-seize to splines on the drive shell and check lock
ring and torque to manufacturers specifications.
3. We have found that on some carriers the cogs (e.g., XTR™ titanium,) creak at their attachment
points to the spider.
Solution: Apply a light oil to the rivets fixing the cogs to the spider.
4. The hub has been designed to allow the easy removal of the axle and drive shell. This
required having tapered bearing contact surfaces. These surfaces can go dry and may
then make noise under heavy load.
Solution: Check and apply grease or antisieze to the drive shell on the bearing contact taper
adjacent to the o-ring (about the middle of the outside of the drive shell.) And on the
adjusting cone on the bearing contact taper.
5. In rare cases, when the wheel has been built at very high tension, the large drive side
bearing can become loose and cause creaking.
Solution: Check to see if the bearing will slide out by hand. If this happens, we can supply an
oversized replacement bearing.
The rear hub has an engagement problem.
The ring drive is a high performance engagement system capable of high load and extremely
rapid engagement. It relies on the fine movement of the drive ring sliding on the helical spline
of the drive shell. It is important that this area remain clean and properly lubricated. Dirt,
debris, and/or drying lubricant may prevent it from functioning properly. Our hub is easy to
inspect and service using just two 5mm hex wrenches. Recent improvements have been
made to minimize abnormal sensitivity to engagement problems. Check the following for
possible causes of misengagement:
1. Is the hub preload adjusted correctly? A loose hub may cause the drive rings to not
engage properly.
Solution: Check and properly adjust hub as necessary.
2. With our first build version, 310, running the hub with loose preload can occasionally cause
internal rubbing, keeping the RingDrive™ from engaging properly.
Solution: Improved main axles (identified by a stepped diameter near the bearing contact
area,) are available through our upgrade program.
42
Rev. 10/04-A
3. On versions 310, 311, and 312, large variations in spring pressure were discovered. A
weak spring will make the RingDrive™ more sensitive to contamination. If in doubt, replace
the spring.
Solution: Upgraded springs are available through our upgrade program.
4. Beginning with version 314, the RingDrive™ was improved to run a special RingDrive™
grease instead of oil. This makes it quieter and coast quicker; it also gives it a much wider
working temperature range (down to -20°f) In certain rare conditions, hard water or stream
water intrusion into the hubs may cause early versions of the RingDrive™ grease to thicken
or break down. This will impair the movement of the drive ring on the helical spline.
Solution: Clean and re-grease with our most current RingDrive™ grease formula if used in
extremely wet conditions. Further improvements of our current RingDrive™ grease will be
available early to mid 1998. (Note: 20w non-detergent or synthetic oil may be substituted
in all versions in the RingDrive™ area.)
NOTE: In an ongoing effort to improve the water resistance of our hubs, versions beginning
with 316 are using stainless steel drive rings. These little gems have allowed for stiffer springs
and less sensitivity to different grease formulations. This upgrade is available through our
upgrade program.
SPECIFICATIONS
CLASSIC HUBS
Cassette compatibility: Shimano 7, 8, and 9 speed (for 7-speed use 4.5 mm spacer available
from Chris King Precision Components)
Total weight (front): 112g
Total weight (rear): Alloy drive shell: 263g; Steel drive shell: 311g
Axle diameter: 19.5 mm
Axle width (front): 100mm
Axle width (rear): 130mm, 135 mm, 140mm, or 145mm
Spoke hole diameter: 2.5 mm
Available hole drilling: 28, 32, and 36 — other drilling is available upon request
CLASSIC
HUBS
Flange diameter
Wide front (mountain)
40.0mm
37.5mm
Narrow front (road)
40.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 130mm (drive side)
53.0mm
18.5mm
Rear 130mm (non drive)
44.0mm
38.5mm
Rear 135mm (drive side)
53.0mm
21.0mm
Rear 135mm (non drive side)
44.0mm
36.0mm
Rear 140mm (drive side)
53.0mm
23.5mm
Rear 140mm (non drive side)
44.0mm
33.5mm
(at hole centers)
Center to flange
Table 2 - Classic build specs
Rev. 10/04-A
43
DISCGOTECH™
Cassette compatibility: Shimano 7, 8, and 9 speed (for 7-speed use 4.5 mm spacer).
Rotor compatibility: Coda/Cannondale, Hayes, Formula, Magura, and Sachs. Please call for
future updates on new compatibility.
Total weight w/o rotor adaptor (front): 148g
Total weight w/o rotor adaptor (rear): Alloy body: 277g; Steel body: 325g
Axle diameter: 19.5 mm
Axle width (front): 100 mm and 110mm; quick release, boly-on, or through-axle
Axle width (rear): 135 mm, 140mm, and 145mm
Spoke hole diameter: 2.5 mm
Available hole drilling: 28, 32, 36, 40 — other drilling is available upon request.
DISCGOTECH™
HUBS
Flange diameter
Front (drive)
53.0mm
31.5mm
Front (non drive)
53.0mm
23.0mm
Rear 135mm (drive side)
53.0mm
21.0mm
Rear 135mm (non drive)
53.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 140mm (drive side)
53.0mm
23.5mm
Rear 140mm (non drive side)
53.0mm
31.5mm
Rear 145mm (drive side)
53.0mm
26.0mm
Rear 145mm (non drive side)
53.0mm
29.0mm
(at hole centers)
Center to flange
Table 3 - DiscGoTech™ build specs
BMX
HUBS
Flange diameter
Front (drive)
40.0mm
34.0mm
Rear 110mm (drive side)
53.0mm
27.0mm
Rear 110mm (non drive)
44.0mm
30.0mm
(at hole centers)
Center to flange
Table 4 - BMX build specs
44
Rev. 10/04-A
BMX
Cassette compatibility: Chris King’s 12t-20t aluminum or stainless KingKogs™
Total weight w/o axle bolts (front): 120g
Total weight w/o axle bolts (rear): Alloy cog: 298g; Steel cog: 314g
Axle diameter: 19.5 mm
Axle width (front): 100mm
Axle width (rear): 110mm
Spoke hole diameter: 2.5 mm
Available hole drilling: 28, 32, 36, and 40 — other drilling is available upon request.
TORQUE
SPECS
HEADSETS
NoThreadSet™
1. Stem cap bolt = 4-10 in.-lb. (max. 15 in.-lb.)
GripNut™
1. Lock and adjusting rings = 130-150 in.-lb.
2Nut™
1. Lock and adjusting nuts = 130-150 in.-lb.
HUBS
Classic
1. Adjusting cones = 110 in.-lb.
DiscGoTech™
1. Rotor adaptor screws = 28 in.-lb.
2. Adjusting cones = 110 in.-lb.
BMX
1. Cog lock ring = 20 ft.-lb
2. Adjusting clamp bolt = 10 in.-lb.
Service tool
1. Drive shell seal ring = 100 in.-lb.
Rev. 10/04-A
45
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