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ELECTROLUX HOME PRODUCTS NORTH AMERICA
2003 Technical
Training Manual
:KLWH:HVWLQJKRXVH
Produced by Service Assistance Center
and Technical Information Department
5995382636
January 2003
SAFE SERVICING PRACTICES - ALL APPLIANCES
To avoid personal injury and/or property damage, it is important that Safe Servicing
Practices be observed. The following are some limited examples of safe practices:
1. DO NOT attempt a product repair if you have any doubts as to your ability to
complete it in a safe and satisfactory manner.
2. Before servicing or moving an appliance:
• Remove the power cord from the electrical outlet, trip the circuit breaker to the
OFF position, or remove the fuse.
• Turn off the gas supply.
• Turn off the water supply.
3. Never interfere with the proper operation of any safety device.
4. USE ONLY REPLACEMENT PARTS CATALOGED FOR THIS APPLIANCE.
SUBSTITUTIONS MAY DEFEAT COMPLIANCE WITH SAFETY
STANDARDS SET FOR HOME APPLIANCES.
5. GROUNDING: The standard color coding for safety ground wires is GREEN, or
GREEN with YELLOW STRIPES. Ground leads are not to be used as current
carrying conductors. It is EXTREMELY important that the service technician
reestablish all safety grounds prior to completion of service. Failure to do so will
create a hazard.
6. Prior to returning the product to service, ensure that:
• All electrical connections are correct and secure
• All electrical leads are properly dressed and secured away from sharp edges,
high-temperature components, and moving parts
• All non-insulated electrical terminals, connectors, heaters, etc. are adequately
spaced away from all metal parts and panels
• All safety grounds (both internal and external) are correctly and securely
connected
• All panels are properly and securely reassembled
ATTENTION!!!
This service manual is intended for use by persons having electrical and mechanical
training and a level of knowledge of these subjects generally considered acceptable in the
appliance repair trade. Electrolux Home Products cannot be responsible, nor assume any
liability, for injury or damage of any kind arising from the use of this manual.
© 2002 White Consolidated Industries
2
Electrolux Home Products
2003 Technical Training Manual Table of Contents
Safe Servicing Practices
2
Table of Contents
3
Service Assistance Center, TID, Frigidaire.com, ServiceBench.com
4
EHP Phone Numbers
5
Important Warranty Claim Information
6
New Servicer Provider Information Guide
7
Elux Express Shipment Program
7
Top TID Questions on:
Refrigerators
Freezers
Air Conditioners
Ranges (Serial numbers beginning with VF)
Ranges (Serial numbers beginning with NF)
Dishwashers
Washers/Dryers
8
14
16
18
21
23
27
Hot Product Updates
OTR microwave oven fault codes and diagnostics
Next Gen ranges service manual information
42
43
Cold Product Updates
Control kit 5303918282 doesn’t have the damper heater
Next Gen refrigerators service manual information
Control kit 5303918282 will not install in new SxS refrigerators
Frost and ice beads forming on evaporator cover of top mount refers
Gurgling sound when door opened or closed on top mount refers
Water dripping into food compartment on top mount refers
44
44
47
47
48
49
Wet Product Updates
Timer cycle chart confusing on tumble action washer
Laundry & Dishwasher products service manual information
50
51
Product Warranty Quick Reference Guide 1990 thru 2002 EHP Product LInes
52
Warranty Parts Recovery Program
64
3
Service Assistance Center
1-888-842-3660
Option 4
8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time Zone
In order to better serve our valued Home Service Providers, Electrolux Home Products has launched its
Service Assistance Center. One TOLL FREE call will take care of all your warranty questions, such as
claims, rate increases, in-warranty authorizations, and much more! Please keep in mind that we are not the
technical department, so all technical questions should be directed to the proper options for the product you
are servicing. The Territory Administrators are still a vital part of the Service Assistance Center, but to
ensure that our technicians have up to date knowledge and training on all Electrolux products, the Territory
Administrators will now be conducting Product Training in the field. Look for upcoming school schedules.
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Call 1-888-842-3660 and enter your 8-digit account number
followed by the pound (#) sign. Then press:
Option 1 for Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C, or Dehumidifiers
Option 2 for Range Products
Option 3 for Laundry or Dishwasher Products
The following documents can be found at http://www.frigidaire.com/tip
User Name: service
Password : tips
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Service Bulletins
Service Kits
Service Request Form
Service Provider Info Guide
Repair Tips
FAQ’s
Computer Based Training
Range Training Video
And now available at www.frigidaire.com are:
•
•
•
•
Wiring Diagrams
Installation Instructions
Owners Guides
Parts Catalogs
File Your Claims
Electronically at:
(ServiceBench Toll Free Number 1-877-424-3624)
4
EHP Phone Numbers:
ELECTROLUX HOME PRODUCTS, INC.
250 Bobby Jones Expressway
Augusta, Georgia 30907
Name
Reason For Call
Phone Number
FAX Number
Customer Assistance
Center
Concession
Any Consumer Issue
706-860-4110
706-651-7135
Credit Department
Balance on Account
Need Invoice
614-825-0849
614-781-9312
Damage Claim Center
Return Authorization
Damage Claims
Damage Allowances
800-456-4669
(Option # 1)
706-651-7715
Dealer Distributor
Allowances
800-456-4669
(Option # 1)
706-651-7715
National Locator
Parts, Service, Dealer, Manuals
800-444-4944
Parts Department
Order Parts
800-456-4407
706-869-9096
706-228-4598
Product Specialist (DDPS)
Product Exchange
800-456-4669
(Option # 2)
706-651-7135
Service Contract
NOTE: This information is
also available by logging on
to ServiceBench.com and
Frigidaire.com
Contract Status
Number
Type
Model/Serial Number
Expiration Date
Full Coverage
Deductible
706-651-7740
706-651-7735
Technical Information (TID)
Wiring Diagram
Technical Feedback
Territory Manager
Pay Increase
Technical
Specifications
888-842-3660
Warranty
Claim Status
Rejection Inquire
Wrong Amount
Warranty Payments
706-651-7740
NOTE: This information is
also available by logging on
to ServiceBench.com
5
706-651-7735
Important Warranty Claim Information:
Detailing Service Claim Information
Have you ever received a check from a customer and found out later they forgot to sign it? How do you handle this
situation? This check is not valid without a signature. I’m sure you have taken the time to return to the customer
for a signature or contact them and hope they will mail you another check with a proper signature. As you know,
this is a waste of productive time and creates frustration for you and/or your company employees. It is an embarassing
lesson to learn.
Factory engineers feel similar frustration when they receive service claim information stating only that the product
is “broke”, “defective”, “out”, or “don’t work” and then “repaired”, “replaced part”, “fixed”, or “works now”. Just as the
unsigned check is invalid for deposit, an incomplete complaint or service performed statement is invalid to determine what failed on the product. The Service Provider Information Guide you received when you signed on to
become an authorized Electrolux Home Products servicer has a section entitled “Filing Warranty Claims Electronically”. You are asked to explain the complaint as the customer reports it and asked to describe in detail what
service was performed. With proper detailed information, our factory engineers will be able to improve products and
make your job easier by providing our tech line with answers to help you with service problems encountered in the
field. Please take the time to detail your information.
Travel Payment Guidelines for Warranty Claims
Electrolux Home Products will pay a Travel Allowance of $0.50 per mile for miles traveled outside a 20 mile radius
of your service location. A 40 mile round trip is considered the EHP standard for an authorized service provider’s
coverage area.
For example: If you travel 60 miles round trip from your service location, calculate the mileage owed you and enter
it in the “Travel” field on the ServiceBench.com warranty claim form. (It is beneficial to add this information to the
comment section when submitting the claim.) The calculation for travel allowance would be:
60 miles - 40 miles (20 out and 20 back) = 20 miles X $.050 = $10.00
If servicing more than one product on the call, you may only request mileage on one of the claims. All travel
payment requests over $50.00 or travel payment requests considered by you as an “exception” will require preauthorization from your Territory Administrator or Service Assistance Center.
All travel or mileage allowance requests are subject to review and audit. If a customer’s address is a PO Box, you
must insert the physical address in the 2nd address field of the Servicebench.com warranty claim form and calculate
your mileage in the comment section and put the dollar ($) amount in the Travel field.
Scrapped, Sold “As Is”, or Scratch and Dent Products
If a product does not have a valid Model/Serial plate, or it is not legible, it does not carry any warranty. Nor can it
be serviced under an Electrolux Service Contract. This product may be a scrapped unit and Electrolux reserves
the right to reject payment on any claim submitted or previously paid on a product determined to be a
scrapped unit.
Products sold “As Is” by any dealer, distributor or any other source carry no manufacturer warranty and cannot be
covered under an Electrolux Service Contract. Electrolux reserves the right to reject payment on any claim
submitted or previously paid on a product determined to be sold “As Is”.
Electrolux may sell “Scratch and Dent” products to dealers or allow dealers to sell products designated as such.
These units carry a functional warranty only. If you are requested to service cosmetic damage from a known
Scratch and Dent dealer, you must collect payment from the dealer, not by filing a warranty claim. Electrolux
reserves the right to reject payment on any claim submitted or previously paid on a product determined
to be of “cosmetic” nature on units identified as a “Scratch and Dent” product.
6
New Service Provider Information Guide
The new Service Provider Information Guide is now available online at http://www.frigidaire.com/tip. This new guide
supercedes any previous Service Operating Guide. You will find information about filing claims with ServiceBench
and most of the information you'll need to know to have a better understanding about your relationship with Electrolux
Warranty and Service Agreements.
Elux Express Shipment Program for Part Distributors
Electrolux Home Products has been rated Best in Class for fulfilling parts/accessory orders from our Asheville, NC
facility. Our year-to-date fill rate to our Parts Distributors is 97.9%. If a Parts Distributor tells you it will take several
days (or weeks) to get a functional part for your (and our) customer, they are WRONG!
Each Parts Distributor location (branch) can now order up to ten different part numbers (line items) per day through
the ELUX EXPRESS part shipment program. These parts will be shipped 2nd day Air direct to the Parts Distributor
location. The parts will arrive within 2 business days with no shipping charges to the Parts Distributor. In effect,
Electrolux Home Products has suspended all freight charges on EMERGENCY 2nd day orders. However, if the
Parts Distributor has to ship the part from their location once they receive it, there may be added freight charges
and possibly additional day(s) delay in getting the part. But the Parts Distributor does not have to wait until he has
a stock order to provide you the part to satisfy our mutual customer.
Satisfying the customer is our top priority and as an Electrolux Authorized Servicer, it should be your top priority as
well. ELUX EXPRESS is the answer to receiving emergency Electrolux Home Products parts quickly in order to
satisfy the customer.
7
Top TID Questions on Refrigerators:
1. Problem:
Solution:
Freezing food in the fresh food compartment of Next Gen SxS refrigerators manufactured after
March of 2001.
Follow the steps...
Step 1
Check both the freezer and the food
compartment temperatures. (At the
mid-range setting, the freezer should be
between -1 and +3 F. The food
compartment should be +35 to +36 F.)
If the freezer is -10 F or
colder, set at mid range.
If the freezer is +8 F or
warmer, set at mid range,
Check the wattage
on the compressor.
If the wattage is
normal you have a
bad freezer control.
If the freezer control was set at midpoint and the
freezer temp is -10 F or colder, the freezer control
is defective and the air entering the food
compartment is so cold it is starting to freeze food
on the top shelf by the damper before the damper
has a chance to close. This should not cause the
food to freeze in the rest of the compartment. The
rear filter may freeze on rear filter models.
If the wattage is low or high you have a
problem with the sealed system. A
restriction, low refrigerant charge or
inefficient compressor. Use data sheet
provided with product for correct wattage
information.
NOTE: Keep in mind the temperature of the air coming through
the damper must be +15 F at the mid range to close the
damper. If the air temperature is +18 F the damper will not
close but the food in the food compartment will freeze.
8
If the food is freezing throughout the
complete food compartment, there is an
additional problem beside the freezer
control and will need to follow the
instructions for checking the food
compartment control system.
Step 2
If the freezer temperature is good but
the food compartment is too cold,
check the food compartment cold
control and the damper control
assembly.
Using an inspection mirror, look in the
air outlet grill at the back of the control
housing in the food compartment. See
if the damper door is open or closed. It
should be wide open or completely
closed.
If the damper door is all the way open
or closed and no obstructions are
holding the door open, follow
instructions in Step 3.
The damper control is
broken, or the door is
catching on the foam
block. Replace with
control assembly kit
5303918283.
If the door is
partially closed:
If the door is straight up and
down, but part way closed,
check for obstructions.
If the cap tube from the
freezer control is catching on
the door and not allowing it to
close, remove control housing
and reposition freezer control
cap tube in proper location.
If the damper door is at an
angle, the door hinge pin is
out of place. Replace with
control assembly kit
5303918283.
If there is ice in the
damper holding the
damper door open:
Check for air leaks allowing excess
moisture to enter the product.
Check the door seals for
good contact to the cabinet
and the door alignment
with the cabinet. Make all
necessary adjustments.
Check to see that
the door closers are
closing the doors.
Caution the customer to make
sure the food packages are not
keeping the doors from closing
all the way.
Also check to see that the door seal is tight in the
channel of the inner door panel. If the seal can be
pulled out of the channel easily, remove the seal and
run a bead of Silicone sealer in the channel and
reinstall the gasket.
NOTE: If there is ice in the damper door holding the damper door open, then there is an excess amount of moisture
entering the product and it is not all condensing on the evaporator coil. When the circulating air still contains a large
amount of moisture as it turns to go through the damper, it will slow down and allow the moisture to condense on
the damper door. This moisture will then collect and freeze at the bottom of the housing.
9
Step 3
If the damper has no ice or obstructions holding
it open, drop the front of the control housing by
removing the front and one side screw. This will
allow the control panel to drop down and hang
on the one rear screw and the wiring harness.
If the damper door is open, use a
jumper wire between the number 2
contact (Black Wire) on the food
compartment control and the number
3 contact (Pink Wire). This should
close the damper door.
If the damper motor opens
and closes the damper,
replace with control
assembly kit 5303918283.
If the damper motor will
not run, replace with
control assembly kit
5303918283.
If the damper door is closed, use a jumper
wire between the number 2 contact (Black
Wire) on the food compartment control and
the number 1 contact (Purple Wire). This
should open the damper door.
If the damper motor will
not run, replace with
control assembly kit
5303918283.
10
If the damper motor will open
and close the damper,
replace with control
assembly kit 5303918283.
2. Problem:
Solution:
Dispenser light comes on when the freezer door is opened and closed or the change filter light will
change from Green to Red, or the Cube and Crushed light will come on at the same time. Any one
of the above or a combination of all of the above. This can happen to any Next Gen SxS refrigerator
built between serial numbers LA109..... and LA151......
The control board will need to be replaced with a new control board. The control board is located in
the front face plate. Make sure you replace the control board, NOT the power board located in the
dispenser. The part numbers are as follows:
5304421828 will be replaced by 5304426002
5304422345 will be replaced by 5304426003
5304422029 will be replaced by 5304426004
5304421640 will be replaced by 5304426005
5304424418 will be replaced by 5304426008
5304422633 will be replaced by 5304426010
The original board numbers are listed in the part information for the models you are servicing.
NOTE: The control board is sensitive to static electricity discharge, the servicer should use a static
guard grounding device at all times when handling the board . After the board is replaced mark a
number 1 in the bottom of the dispenser ( under the sump ). The number 1 will indicate the control
board has been replaced.
3. Problem:
Solution:
Where is the wiring diagram and data sheet located on the Next Gen refrigerators?
In a plastic bag on the bottom of the refrigerator on the right hand side behind the toe grill.
4. Problem:
Solution:
The crisper cover is falling down on Next Gen SxS refrigerators.
Install a shim (p/n 240523101). To install the shim, remove the crisper cover. Using a punch push
the pin in the support through the support (see illustration below). Remove the front crisper cover
supports and place shim over support as shown in figure 1. Reinstall the support with the pin out,
then install the pin until it is flush with the front of the support. Reinstall the crisper cover.
SUPPORT PIN
SUPPORT
5. Problem:
Solution:
SHIM
Door on Next Gen SxS refrigerator is making a clicking sound when door is opened and closed.
First check to see that the screw holding the bottom cam in place on the lower hinge is in and tight.
If the screw is loose reinstall the screw using loc-tite on the thread. Next, check the upper cam to
see that it is tight in the door stop. If the cam is moving in the door stop replace the cam and door
stop.
11
6. Problem:
Solution:
Crisper cover will not stay on support in Top Mount refrigerators.
Order and install two cover extensions (p/n 240553701), one for each side of the crisper cover.
Remove the cover and slide the extensions into the steel support running through the front of the
cover (see Figure 1). Push the extension in with the open end toward the front until it rests against
the cover (see Figure 2). The extensions may be filed off if they are too wide and cover will not fit
in product.
Slide in steel bar in cover with
open end facing front of cover
End of extension may
be filed if too wide
Figure 1
7. Problem:
Solution:
1/4"
Figure 2
The food compartment light switch is catching on the inner door panel of Next Gen Top Mount
refrigerators.
First check to see if the unit has the new light switch installed (see Figure 1 below). The new switch
has a 3/8” wide actuator, the original switch had a 1/4” wide actuator. There is now a raised area
added to the inner door panel to add additional surface for the switch actuator to make contact (see
Figure 2 below). The raised area was added between January and May 2002, one production line
at a time. In some cases the food door may need to be raised, this can be accomplished by adding
a nylon washer or washers (p/n 240311301) to the post at the bottom food door hinge. Use caution
when adding over 2 washers because the food door could start to make contact with the door stop
on the freezer door (see Figure 3 below). Contact with the door stop can cause damage to the top
of the food door. If over two washers are needed to be added, you will also need to add a washer
to the bottom freezer door hinge pin to raise the freezer door.
3/8"
Raised area for
switch to contact
Freezer door stop
Figure 1
Figure 2
12
Figure 3
8. Problem:
Solution:
Next Gen SxS refrigerators are not defrosting correctly.
The ADC (Adaptive Defrost Control) was upgraded to aid in eliminating noise in the electrical line
from sending false signals to the board from the defrost limit switch. This part of the upgrade was
accomplished by the addition of two resistors. An upgraded ADC will have a yellow label on the relay
of the board. Older ADCs will have a white label on the relay of the board.
9. Problem:
Solution:
The evaporator fan motor on Next Gen SxS refrigerators is running slow or not at all.
The voltage coming out of the ADC is less than 95 VAC and this is causing the fan to run slow or
not at all. This voltage can be tested by checking the voltage between the Red/White wire on the
ADC and the Light Blue wire. The ADC was upgraded with a larger capacitor for the fan motor to
correct the problem. An upgraded ADC will have a yellow label on the relay of the board. Older
ADCs will have a white label on the relay of the board.
10. Problem:
There is a gurgling sound from the drain on Top Mount refrigerators when the door is opened and
closed.
The vacuum that is created as a result of opening and closing the door is released by pulling air up
the defrost water drain tube. The gurgling sound is a result of water being trapped in the drain tube.
First make sure the refrigerator is level side to side and front to back. If the product is level, you will
need to separate the rubber extension from the hard plastic tube coming out of the back of the
cabinet by the compressor. Try opening and closing the door again, if the noise goes away the
rubber extension is trapping the water and will need to be routed so there is no sag in the tube and
the end of the tube is up out of the water. If the noise is still present the water is trapped inside the
cabinet and an external drain kit (p/n 5303918261) will need to be installed. (This subject is also
covered under the Cold Products Updates, page 48.)
Solution:
13
Top TID Questions on Freezers:
1. Problem:
Solution:
Sealed system leaks in a chest freezer.
If there is a restriction that cannot be flushed free, call CAC to arrange an exchange. If there is a
leak, split the system and determine whether it is a high side or low side leak. If high side leak, install
external condenser kit. If low side leak, call CAC to arrange an exchange.
2. Problem:
Solution:
Frost along the edge and top of the breaker strip on chest freezers.
Adjust lid for optimum gasket seal.
3. Problem:
Solution:
Sealed system restriction in upright freezer that cannot be flushed.
In a frost-free freezer, replace the evaporator, heat exchanger, and compressor. In a manual defrost
freezer, replace heat exchanger and compressor.
4. Problem:
Solution:
Frost on light shield and/or the door panel.
Check condition of door seal and bottom door vent valves that may be sticking open.
5. Problem:
Drain Pan Kit (p/n 5303925444 that is mounted to the side of replacement compressors for all Frost
Free models (U11, U14, U17 and U20) is obselete. The old U-shaped drain pan is no longer being
produced.
A new Drain Pan Kit (p/n 5304428401) has been designed to use standard product components (a
new drain cup and heater) and is being used on all production for Frost Free freezers after March
2002. This new drain pan kit does not show up on the IPL parts information on the CD. Please see
Instruction Sheet below.
Solution:
DRAIN PAN KIT - P/N 5304428401
CONTENTS:
1 - Drain Pan Assembly
1 - Drain Hose
1 - Clip
1- Instruction Sheet
This kit provides the parts needed to replace a drain pan that was originally attached to the
compressor.
INSTRUCTIONS:
Remove and discard drain pan trap (see Figure 1). Attach one end of the drain hose to the drain
and the other end to the spout of the drain pan. Use clip to secure the hose to the shell bottom.
Using double back tape and screw on bottom of drain pan. Secure drain pan to side rail (see
Figure 2). Set largest locating boss of drain into largest hole in side rail.
CURRENT
Locate Drain Cup
in 13/16 dia. hole
REPLACEMENT
Drain
Drain Trap
Drain Hose
Drain
Drain
Drain Cup Assy
Drain Hose
Drain Clip
Figure 2
See drawings next page.
Figure 1
14
Condenser
Condenser
Evaporator
Evaporator
Drier
Oil Cooler
Drier
Suction Port
Suction Port
Discharge Port
Oil Cooler Ports
Discharge Port
Process Port
Process Port
Drain Pan Heater
Drain Pan Heater
WITH OIL COOLER
WITHOUT OIL COOLER
Hook up copper tubing using appropriate drawing.
6. Problem:
Solution:
Temperature alarm light is illuminated.
Check interior temperature. If cold enough, check sensor. If temperature is warm, check fan, door
seal, or possible sealed system problem.
7. Problem:
Solution:
Door is hard to open.
Wait an adequate time for interior pressure to equalize. Check bottom door vent valves for proper
operation.
8. Problem:
Solution:
Drain freezing on upright frost-free freezers.
Remove drain obstruction and pour hot water in drain. If drain trap is missing, replace on end of tube
on compressor mounted drain pan.
9. Problem:
Solution:
Requesting part numbers on all freezer models.
Call TID line @ 1-888-842-3660 for help finding the correct part or part numbers.
10. Problem:
Solution:
Sealed system leak in the wall of upright freezers.
Split the system and pressurize high side to verify condenser leak. If leak is found, order external
condenser kit.
15
Top TID Questions on Air Conditioners:
1. Problem:
Solution:
Unit freezing up.
Location of ice buildup is key information. Frost on startup is normal.
* Ice on evaporator (not frost):
a. Leak in system.
b. Low charge (not enough R-22).
c. Clogged capillary tube.
d. Wrong sized capillary tube.
e. Clogged strainer inside condenser coil.
f. Low fan speed from defective motor, defective capacitor, or incorrect wiring.
* Ice on suction line and evaporator:
a. Air filter dirty.
b. Too cold outside.
c. Too cold inside.
d. Indoor humidity too low
e. Indoor air recirculation.
f. Defrost control bulb not properly installed in evaporator fins or connected on back of control
board (electronic models).
* Ice on accumulator:
a. Water in system.
b. Screen touching stand pipe.
c. Suction line inserted too far into accumulator and touching screen causing restriction.
2. Problem:
Solution:
Unit short cycles and evaporator freezing up (15,000 BTU and larger).
* Unit is oversized for application.
* Defective thermistor/thermostat.
* Thermistor not connected to proper terminal on control board.
3. Problem:
Solution:
Electronically controlled unit has no power; control board won’t light up.
* Defective transformer.
* Compressor relay wired incorrectly.
* Unit experienced power surge.
* Motor shorted to ground.
4. Problem:
Solution:
Condensation buildup on the bottom of unit in customer’s home.
* Unit not installed properly.
* Cracked evaporator tray.
5. Problem:
Solution:
Condensation buildup on top of unit next to top rail.
* Scroll plate and scroll not installed or seated properly.
* Evaporator coil/bulkhead clip not seated properly causing air gap.
6. Problem:
Solution:
Fan motor running in reverse.
* Motor wired incorrectly.
* Motor failed internally.
* Defective capacitor.
7. Problem:
Solution:
Unit has three fan speeds but only one works.
* Check for broken wires.
* Defective switch, check HI/MED/LOW to power.
* Wrong fan motor.
16
8. Problem:
Solution:
Can’t locate model or serial numbers.
Every unit has a model and serial number. On most models it’s located on the right hand side of
the unit on the wrapper, or on the left side below the control panel on the inside of the unit (remove
front to locate). They are also on two separate white bar code tags on the front of the base of the
unit. Thru-the-wall unit trim kits may have to be removed sometimes to locate the serial plate on the
right hand side.
9. Problem:
Solution:
Thru-the-wall unit cycling off prematurely.
Not installed properly per the installation instructions. If using a 22" sleeve on a 18" unit make sure
you have followed the installation instructions and used the vertical divider provided with the kit.
10. Problem:
Solution:
Warranty claims not being paid and trying to contact Territory Administrator.
Contact the warranty department (706-651-7740) for warranty claim questions. Listen to all options
when calling the Tech line, then select proper option.
11. Problem:
Solution:
Received wrong part number from distributor.
Tech line will provide correct part number.
17
Top TID Questions on Ranges (with serial numbers beginning with VF):
1. Problem:
Solution:
What do the various “F” codes indicate on Electronic Oven Controls?
Refer to pages 19 and 20, VF Serial NUmber Range EOC Fault Codes.
2. Problem:
Solution:
What do the various “F” codes indicate on OTR microwave ovens?
Refer to page 42, Hot Product Updates.
3. Problem:
What causes discoloration/staining of manifold panel and control panel during self clean? Can the
stains be removed?
Infrequent and/or improper cleaning can be a major cause of this condition. Customers should preclean heavy spills or deposits and run the self clean cycle more often. Blocked oven vents and
damaged or defective door seals also create problems during the self clean cycle. Make sure the
door seal is properly installed and that it is pliable. Some times the stains on the panels can be
removed using a mild abrasive (Soft Scrub/Bon Ami, etc.).
Solution:
4. Problem:
Solution:
5. Problem:
Solution:
6. Problem:
Solution:
7. Problem:
Solution:
How do you reset the door latch to unlock when the door is open and the latch hook is in the way
preventing the door from closing?
With your finger, push in and hold the door light switch button or pushrod. This will allow the motor
to complete its rotation to the fully locked position. After the motor stops running, push the cancel
button on the EOC or turn the selector switch to “OFF” while still holding the light switch button in.
This should unlatch the hook.
Oven door locks at random times even when the customer is not cooking. It sometimes happens
when customer walks by the range or opens the door. What is the most likely cause?
On some models the oven door light switch can have an internal short that will send voltage to the
door latch lock motor. Disconnect the wire from door switch to terminal MDL on the EOC. This
disables the lock relay on the EOC. If the door latch motor continues to lock, replace the door light
switch. Remember to reconnect the MDL wire to the EOC.
What should the amp draw be through the oven glow bar igniter in order for the oven gas safety
valve to open?
The minimum amp draw should be 2.9. Some valves may open momentarily at a lower reading
but the igniter is considered faulty if the amp draw is less than 2.9.
Some electronic oven controls do not have a calibration feature to adjust for temperature variances.
How do you repair the product when the temperature is out of the acceptable range?
The problem is most likely the probe. Test the oven temperature with a good quality test meter.
When the oven temperature is at 350 deg, the resistance of the probe should be 1654 ohms ± 10.8
ohms. A higher resistance reading will result in the oven temp being too cool, and a lower reading
will result in the oven temp being too hot. If the resistance reading is higher than the specified level,
check the wire harness connector on the end of the probe. This connector is sometimes the
source of the problem. If the connector is suspected as the problem you can cut it out of the
harness and hard wire the connection with ceramic wire nuts. If the probe resistance is within the
specified limits, then replace the EOC.
18
8. Problem:
Solution:
On a gas oven the igniter glows and pulls the proper amps but oven burner will not light. The oven
gas safety valve has been replaced and still the oven burner will not light. What else could be the
problem?
On the gas pressure regulator there is a small spring loaded lever located on the back side. Often
times this lever has been inadvertently tripped during the installation or LP conversion process
resulting in no gas flow to the oven gas safety valve. The lever should be pointing in line with the
body of the regulator. Reset the lever and the oven should work.
Troubleshooting Range EOC’s (Electronic Oven Controls):
When an oven with an electronic control fails, it usually signals the failure with an “F” code. These “F” codes are
considered by many people to be an indicator as to positively which part in the circuit has failed (“F1” a defective
control, “F3” a defective oven probe, etc.). To the embarrassment of many servicemen who have believed this, they
have installed the indicated part only to find it did not correct the problem.
To troubleshoot an oven with an electronic oven control that is not operating:
1. Make sure electrical power is being supply to the control.
2. Disconnect power for 30 seconds. If fault returns when power is reconnected, go to the back of the control
and disconnect the multi-pin plug.
3. Check the wiring diagram to determine which two pins in the plug (not on the EOC) are connected to the
oven sensor.
4. With an Ohmmeter check the resistance between the two pins in the plug that are connected to the
sensor. At room temperature:
a. If the meter reads below 900 Ohms or above 1200 Ohms, remove the sensor from the oven and check
it for resistance. If the resistance of the sensor is the same as the reading at the plug, the sensor is
defective. If the resistance of the sensor reads between 900 & 1200 Ohms, the wiring between the
control and the sensor is defective.
b. If the meter reads between 900 Ohms & 1200 Ohms check the resistance between one of the pins
going to the sensor and chassis. If the meter reads infinity go to step c. If the meter shows continuity,
remove the sensor and check from one of its pins to the case of the sensor. If the meter reads
continuity, the sensor is defective. If the meter reads infinity, the wiring between the control and the
sensor is shorted to chassis of the range.
c. From the wiring diagram, determine which 3 wires (if automatic lock) or which 2 wires (if manual lock)
in the plug is from the door lock switch or switches. From the diagram determine which of the
switches are open or closed when the door in the unlocked position. With an Ohmmeter check to see
if the switch that is shown open is open and the switch that is shown closed is closed by checking the
proper pins in the plug.
5. If the above checks test good and the relay on the board for the selected function is not closing, replace the
control.
IMPORTANT NOTE:
If the oven problem is intermittent, you must do the above tests when the
oven is malfunctioning.
VF Serial Number Range EOC Fault Codes:
NOTE: Not all EOC’s will display every fault code listed. Some of the F-codes are found only on older products. For
example: F3 on current models can be an open or shorted probe and they will not display an F4, but on some older
models F3 indicates an open probe and F4 indicates a shorted probe.
F1 - Control Failure:
Shorted keypad. Internal checks may have corrupted control relay. Shorted or defective oven sensor (RTD). Check
sensor and sensor wiring. If wiring checks OK, power off for 30 seconds. If fault returns, replace control.
F2 - Oven temperature above specifications:
The oven temp has risen above 665 degrees F and the oven door is not locked or the oven temp has risen above 965
degrees F with the door locked. Test the door latch switch or switches, oven sensor (RTD), and electronic oven
control (EOC).
19
F3 - The oven sensor (RTD) is open/shorted:
Check for open wiring connections between the EOC and RTD, including the quick connect plug. If quick connect
plug is defective, remove from circuit and splice sensor leads with porcelain (hi-temp) wire nuts. Check resistance
of RTD using resistance table. If resistance test is correct and wiring is good replace EOC.
F4 - Shorted oven sensor (RTD):
Check for shorted wiring between EOC and RTD. Check resistance of RTD using resistance table. If resistance
test is correct and wiring is good, replace EOC.
F5 - The watchdog circuit is active when it should be disabled:
The microprocessor checked for operation of EOC relay after selection of Bake, Broil, or Clean operation and relay
failed test. Check for shorted keypad or pushbuttons binding in glass and stuck. If not, replace EOC.
F6 - No 60 Hz base:
Time base is required for time controlled cycling. Replace EOC.
F7 - Lock motor relay watchdog circuit active when it should be disabled:
The microprocessor checked for operation of the EOC lock relay after selection, and the relay failed the test.
Replace EOC.
F8/F9 - Problem with motor door latch assembly:
The EOC microprocessor has found the lock motor switches to be out of sequence or shorted. Test switches, lock
motor, and wiring. If found to be good and in proper sequence, replace EOC.
Oven Sensor (RTD) Resistance Scale:
Temperature (°F)
32 ± 1.9
75 ± 2.5
250 ± 4.4
350 ± 5.4
450 ± 6.9
550 ± 8.2
650 ± 9.6
900 ± 13.6
Resistance (ohms)
1000 ± 4.0
1091 ± 5.3
1453 ± 8.9
1654 ± 10.8
1852 ± 13.5
2047 ± 15.8
2237 ± 18.5
2697 ± 24.4
INFORMATIONAL NOTE: RTD = Resistance Temperature Detector (Oven Sensor)
20
Top TID Questions on Ranges (with serial numbers beginning with NF):
1. Problem:
Solution:
What do the various “F” codes indicate on Electronic Oven Controls?
Refer to page 22, NF Serial Number Range EOC Fault Codes.
2. Problem:
Solution:
Oven door cannot be unlocked.
30” Freestanding Electric Range - The door switch is installed behind the righthand bodyside
panel and is activated by the righthand door hinge. Disconnect range from power and remove the
righthand bodyside panel. First raise the main top and disconnect the lift and lock rod from the
bodyside. Then remove the two screws holding the bodyside to the rear panel. Lift the rear of the
bodyside to disengage it from the four shoulder screws that hold it to the range frame. You can
now access the door switch to see if oven door hinge is activating the switch. Reconnect power
and activate switch while pressing the clean pad. Continue to activate switch until clean cycle
begins and then press the Cancel/Clear pad (while still activating the switch). The door latch
should now unlock. Realign door hinge to properly activate switch or replace defective switch.
Wall Oven, Slide-in/Drop-In (Electric or Dual Fuel), 40” Freestanding Range (Electric or Dual Fuel)
- Try to cancel the self clean cycle. While doing a “Cancel”, push in on the oven door at the top
right side of the door panel to ensure the light switch plunger is depressed. Or try to start the selfclean cycle while pushing in on the top right side of the oven door. Once the self clean cycle has
begun (ventilation fan running), press the Cancel pad. If this doesn’t work, try unplugging the
range for about 5 minutes. Further diagnosis may be necessary by removing the back panel to
access the door lock motor and rod assembly. Check the door lock motor, door lock switches
(check each switch separately; in the fully locked or fully unlocked position, only one switch
should be closed at a time), and door switch. If components and wiring check OK, replace EOC.
3. Problem:
Solution:
Hot surface light stays on.
On products with separate hot surface lights in addition to separate indicator lights, the limiter
inside the element is defective. Replace element. On products with only one light that doubles as
the hot surface light and indicator light, it could be an element or a switch.
4. Problem:
Solution:
Ignitor keeps sparking.
Most of the time it is an ignitor switch out of position on the burner valve. They are supposed to be
snapped onto the shoulder of the valve. It could also be the humidity or spilled water passing
through the opening switch hole. Remove the knobs and look for a black rubber “umbrella” that
sits on top of the valve. It is there to prevent moisture entry into the ignitor switch. If missing,
replace it. If all switches appear to be positioned correctly and covered with the black rubber
“umbrella”, then one of them is stuck closed causing all ignitors to spark (switches are in parallel
so if one is activated, they all spark).
5. Problem:
Solution:
27” and 30” Electric Wall Ovens (single or double) has moisture dripping on the floor.
Moisture kit part numbers 27” Single Wall Oven
27” Double Wall Oven
903036-9010 (Black)
903035-9010 (Black)
903036-9011 (White)
903035-9011 (White)
30” Single Wall Oven
30” Double Wall Oven
903033-9010 (Black)
903034-9010 (Black)
903033-9011 (White)
903034-9011 (White)
Troubleshooting Range EOC’s (Electronic Oven Controls):
When an oven with an electronic control fails, it usually signals the failure with an “F” code. These “F” codes are
considered by many people to be an indicator as to positively which part in the circuit has failed (“F1” a defective
control, “F3” a defective oven probe, etc.). To the embarrassment of many servicemen who have believed this, they
have installed the indicated part only to find it did not correct the problem.
21
To troubleshoot an oven with an electronic oven control that is not operating:
1. Make sure electrical power is being supply to the control.
2. Disconnect power for 30 seconds. If fault returns when power is reconnected, go to the back of the control
and disconnect the multi-pin plug.
3. Check the wiring diagram to determine which two pins in the plug (not on the EOC) are connected to the
oven sensor.
4. With an Ohmmeter check the resistance between the two pins in the plug that are connected to the
sensor. At room temperature:
a. If the meter reads below 900 Ohms or above 1200 Ohms, remove the sensor from the oven and check
it for resistance. If the resistance of the sensor is the same as the reading at the plug, the sensor is
defective. If the resistance of the sensor reads between 900 & 1200 Ohms, the wiring between the
control and the sensor is defective.
b. If the meter reads between 900 Ohms & 1200 Ohms check the resistance between one of the pins
going to the sensor and chassis. If the meter reads infinity go to step c. If the meter shows continuity,
remove the sensor and check from one of its pins to the case of the sensor. If the meter reads
continuity, the sensor is defective. If the meter reads infinity, the wiring between the control and the
sensor is shorted to chassis of the range.
c. From the wiring diagram, determine which 3 wires (if automatic lock) or which 2 wires (if manual lock)
in the plug is from the door lock switch or switches. From the diagram determine which of the
switches are open or closed when the door in the unlocked position. With an Ohmmeter check to see
if the switch that is shown open is open and the switch that is shown closed is closed by checking the
proper pins in the plug.
5. If the above checks test good and the relay on the board for the selected function is not closing, replace the
control.
IMPORTANT NOTE:
If the oven problem is intermittent, you must do the above tests when the
oven is malfunctioning.
NF Serial Number Range EOC Fault Codes:
F1 - Control Failure:
Shorted keypad. Internal checks may have corrupted control relay. Shorted or defective oven sensor (RTD). Check
sensor and sensor wiring. On some models, the touch panel membrane, the ribbon connector from the timer to the
relay board (or misconnection), or the relay board itself could be defective.
F3 - The oven sensor (RTD) is open/shorted:
Check for open wiring connections between the EOC and RTD, including the quick connect plug. If quick connect
plug is defective, remove from circuit and splice sensor leads with porcelain (hi-temp) wire nuts. Check resistance
of RTD using resistance table. If resistance test is correct and wiring is good replace EOC.
F9 - Problem with motor door latch assembly:
The EOC microprocessor has found the lock motor switches to be out of sequence or shorted. Test switches, lock
motor, and wiring.
Oven Sensor (RTD) Resistance Scale:
Temperature (°F)
32 ± 1.9
75 ± 2.5
250 ± 4.4
350 ± 5.4
450 ± 6.9
550 ± 8.2
650 ± 9.6
900 ± 13.6
Resistance (ohms)
1000 ± 4.0
1091 ± 5.3
1453 ± 8.9
1654 ± 10.8
1852 ± 13.5
2047 ± 15.8
2237 ± 18.5
2697 ± 24.4
22
Top TID Questions on Dishwashers:
1. Problem:
Solution:
Spray arm is not turning.
Spray arms alternate and do not spray both arms at the same time. The arms alternate bottom to
center and this changing does not start until after the light wash or short wash cycles. On
mechanical timer models set the timer to the light wash cycle. After the second fill and the wash
motor starts, the detergent dispenser will open. After the dispenser opens, the spray arms will
start alternating. On the electronic models start the test cycle and see that the arms will change
bottom to center.
2. Problem:
Solution:
Clean light will not go out.
On dishwashers with mechanical timers, the timer needs to be turned one more notch for the light
to go out. When the dishwasher comes to the end of the dry cycle the timer will turn the clean light
on and the light will stay on until the customer turns the light off. This is covered in the customer’s
use and care manual. On Electronic model dishwashers the clean light comes on at the end of
the wash cycle to inform the customer the dishes are clean. The light will remain on until the door
is opened. After the door is opened and the door switch interrupts power to the control, the light
goes out. If the door switch does not open, the control will not allow the dishwasher to restart. If
the clean light stays on, you need to check the door switches to make sure they are both opening
properly.
3. Problem:
Solution:
Dishwasher is not draining properly.
The drain hose may not be installed properly. Dishwashers produced before January of 2002 need
to have the drain hose looped on the side of the tub to keep the drain pump full of water for priming.
(see Service Bulletin Vol. 99, #5, page 9). Dishwashers produced after January 2002 have a new
style drain pump with the drain check valve on the discharge side of the pump, so each time the
tub fills with water the pump will fill. (See Service Bulletin Vol. 22, #3, page 7.)
4. Problem:
Solution:
Dishes are not drying or are not dry at end of dry cycle.
Vent grate holes not opening properly. Steam pressure on the inside of tub opens the holes in the
vent grate during the dry cycle. If these holes do not open, the following checks need to be made:
*
*
*
Check the water temperature in the tub. The temperature needs to be 120°F to properly heat
the dishes before the dry cycle.
Check the setting of the rinse aid dispenser. Increasing the rinse aid will remove more water
from the dishes to allow them to dry faster.
Increased air flow can also be achieved by removing a 6” section from the center of the lower
door seal. See article in Service Bulletin Vol. 22, #7, page 7 for instructions on cutting seal.
Remember that drying dishes is more than air movement. For this reason it is necessary for all of
the above checks be performed so proper drying can be achieved. There is a new vent grate for
Tower Wash dishwashers and some Precision Wash models which have a convection dry system.
These model dishwashers have a honey comb style vent grate mounted in the inner door liner. The
new vent grate, p/n 154442001, is a louvered design which will allow more air movement out of the
dishwasher tub while in the dry cycle. It’s best to check the venting system before replacing the
vent grate. To replace vent grate see Service Bulletin Vol. 22, #9, page 7 for instructions.
5. Problem:
Solution:
White gritty residue on the dishes.
Grit can be caused by anything from undissolved detergent to instant potato or starchy foods. The
first item that needs to be checked is the water temperature. The water in the tub needs a
minimum of 120°F. The hot water is needed to dissolve the detergent and to loosen the food from
the dishes. Next be sure the proper amount of detergent is used according to the hardness of the
water. The best way to remove grit from the dishwasher and the dishes is to run a longer cycle.
The longer cycle will add a rinse. This extra rinse will rinse out most, if not all of the grit. The filter
should also be checked. If the filter is restricted, it can allow the water and food mixture to be
pulled into the sump around the outside edge of the filter creating the grit.
23
6. Problem:
Solution:
7. Problem:
Solution:
Dishes are not coming clean.
In most cases, this is a water and detergent problem. The first thing to determine is what does the
customer consider as “not clean”. Is the dishwasher having a problem removing food from the
dishes? Is it redepositing food back on the dishes? Or are the dishes/glasses coming out
cloudy?
*
If the dishwasher is not removing food from the dishes, it is a water and detergent problem.
You need to first check the water temperature. The water in the tub needs to be a minimum
of 120°F in the very first fill. The hot water is needed to dissolve the detergent and to start
removing the food from the dishes. If the food is not coming off, either the detergent is not
loosening the food (date code expired?) or the water is not hot enough to remove it.
*
If the dishwasher is redepositing the food back on the dishes, the food is getting pass the filter
some how. The water in the dishwasher is filtered 100% so check the filter to be sure it is not
plugged. Check under the filter for grease buildup that is not visible from the top. The pump
can warp a plugged filter during operation by creating a suction action which can cause the
outside edges of the filter to raise and allow food to be pulled into the pump. Check the filter
to ensure it has not been warped out of shape. Also, check the filter for cracks or holes which
could allow food to by-pass the filter.
*
If dishes/glasses are coming out cloudy they have not been rinsed properly and a detergent
film is still on them. Check the hardness of the water and advise the customer of the proper
amount of detergent to use. Also, be sure the dispenser is opening at the proper time in the
cycle. If the customer has good hot water and knows how much detergent to use based on
the hardness of their water, they will get clean dishes.
PF codes on electronic model dishwashers.
A PF or power failure code can show up in a number of ways. On some models with a display
window a PF will be displayed along with a row of flashing lights. On models without the display
window, only the lights will flash. The Precision wash dishwasher can have one of two different
control systems. The earliest system had three components in the system - a control board, a
keypad, and a transformer. There may be a display board but it should not give a PF code. The
current system has two components - a control board and a keypad assembly.
*
The three component system - With this system if a PF or flashing lights appear, the transformer
is working. Check the control to be sure there is 12VAC from the transformer by testing
between the black-white and the white-black wires come from the transformer. Next check the
control and the keypad. Check the ribbon going into the control from the keypad. Lift the lock
and remove the ribbon. Check the contacts on the inside of the connection block. They need
to be straight and not broken off. Next clean the ribbon contacts using a pencil eraser.
Reinstall the ribbon into the control and make sure the ribbon seats completely into the
connection, then lock the ribbon in place. Reapply power to the dishwasher and check
operation. If the dishwasher fails to start or a PF code or flashing lights reappear, you have a
circuit problem. This means that either the control or the keypad has failed. This design of
keypad does not provide a check for contact closing on the keypad by pressing a program
pad.
*
The two component system - checking the two component system was covered in the Service
Bulletin Vol. 21, #7, page 11. There are pictures on checking the transformer mounted on the
control and where to read for power input and transformer output power. Checking the keypad
assembly was also in Service Bulletin Vol. #2, page 8. It instructs you on which lines in the
ribbon to check for each function pad depressed. With this type of system you can check the
keypad to narrow down the cause of the power failure.
24
8. Problem:
Solution:
Timer stalling.
A thermostat is not closing. Servicers have called to see if we are having a problem with new
timers stalling after they have been replaced for this condition. The first check that needs to be
made on timer stalling calls is the thermostats. If the timer is stalling at the 6:00, 7:30, or 8:30
position on the dial, these are the locations of the heat delays. The following tests will aid in
determining which thermostat is causing the problem:
*
Check water temperature. If the water is not 120°F in the first fill this can cause the heat delay
to be extended for a longer period of time.
*
Check the heating element for continuity. The resistance should be 9 to 10 Ohms on the 24”
models and 23 to 25 Ohms on the 18” models.
*
Check the high limit thermostat at the left rear on the underside of the tub (24” models only).
This thermostat is normally closed, and should only open when there is excessive heat.
*
Check the control thermostats. They are normally open at room temperature and close at
specific temperatures.
Part Number
154227805
154227806
154227808
154227807
Closing Temperature
127°F+-5°F
137°F+-5°F
132°F+-5°F
147°F+-5°F
The length of time the timer will stay in a heat delay will depend on how hot the water is and how
long it takes the water to rise to the temperature to close the control thermostat. Due to the small
amount of water used in the Precision Wash dishwasher, the heated water will increase in
temperature about 1° every 4 minutes. This is why good hot water is needed at the first fill.
9. Problem:
Solution:
Leaking water in front of dishwasher.
The vent cover is not sealing on the inner door panel on both static and active vents. Replace the
vent cover. A new cover gasket has been increased in thickness down both sides and across
bottom to prevent leaks. When installing the new cover, do not over tighten the cover screws. This
can cause the cover to bow in the middle and the leak can return.
10. Problem:
Solution:
Dishwasher is not getting enough water.
This dishwasher uses very little water, only 1.2 gallons of water per fill. The water level in the
Precision wash model dishwasher will be at the bottom of the mounting bracket that holds the
heater to the tub. The location for easy reference is where the metal bracket and the plastic tub
meet. There are two ways to check and be sure you are getting enough water. The first is to
check the fill time which is 87 seconds on most models. The second way is to remove the fill tube
and direct the fill water into a bucket or pan capable of holding over 5 quarts. The amount of water
in the bucket after one complete fill cycle should be approximately 5 quarts.
25
11. Problem:
Solution:
The electronic dishwasher will not start.
This could have a number of causes depending on the model of the product:
*
Check voltage to dishwasher junction box and connections in junction box.
*
Touch pad not lighting.
Check voltage to control board.
Check ribbon from key pad to control.
Clean ribbon from key pad.
*
Touch pad lights but nothing operates.
Check door switches to make sure they are both opening and closing properly.
See Service Bulletin Vol. 21, #2, page 8 for test procedure for testing key pad assembly.
*
Touch pad lights but lights go out in a few seconds.
Check door switches to make sure they are both opening and closing properly.
See Service Bulletin Vol. 21, #2, page 8 for test procedure for testing key pad assembly.
*
PF shows in display.
There was a power failure.
Check ribbon connections.
26
Top TID Questions on Washers/Dryers:
1. Problem:
Solution:
Help with diagnosing circuitry.
This is a very difficult process to explain over the phone. The servicer must be capable of reading
schematic diagrams and timer cycle charts. All laundry products are shipped with Service Data
Sheets located inside console housings, behind louvered service panels, or front service panels.
These data sheets contain a wealth of service information that will aid the service technician in
diagnosing service problems. Additional service information such as installation instructions,
operating instructions, operational characteristics, and tear down instructions are available in the
following service manuals:
* 5995369211
Tumble Action Washer (with AC Motor)
* 5995271441
Tumble Action Washer (with DC Motor)
* 5995377099
Top Load Washer
* 5995373155
Electric/Gas Dryer
2. Problem:
Solution:
Water left in dispenser after wash cycle is completed on tumble action washer.
There is information in the customer’s Owner Guide under the dispenser operation that states,
“Note: From time to time you may see water in the bleach and fabric softner compartments. This
is a result of the siphoning action and is part of the normal operation of the washer.”
3. Problem:
Solution:
Timer not advancing in Auto Dry cycle on dryers.
How the auto dry cycle operates depends on whether the dryer has a regular timer control circuitry
or moisture sensor control circuitry.
* If the dryer has a regular timer control circuitry, the timer motor current flow in the auto dry
cycle is through a 4.4K Ohm resistor mounted on the timer between timer terminals TM and R. If
this resistor is open, the timer will not advance. Also check for an open wire between terminal R
on the timer and the high limit thermostat.
* If the dryer has moisture sensor control circuitry, there are sensor bars inside the dryer, just
behind the intake vent louver. During the auto dry cycle, capacitance is measured between these
sensor bars to determine the wetness of the clothes. An electronic moisture sensor control reads
this capacitance and determines how much resistance to be placed in the current flow circuit
through the timer motor. With no clothes in the dryer, disconnect the electrical plug from the
electronic moisture sensor control and measure the resistance between the two red wires in the
plug (you are checking the sensor bars for continuity). If the resistance is infinity (none), then the
electronic mositure sensor control is probably defective. If the resistance measurement shows
some continuity, then there is a short in the harness to the sensor bars or something is stuck
across the bars.
* For further information about the Auto Dry cycle, refer to the Electric/Gas Dryer service manual
p/n 5995373155.
4. Problem:
Solution:
Top load washer agitator popping (or snapping) noise.
The mechanism in the agitator must be dry to operate. A wet mechanism will exhibit a popping
sound when the upper portion of the agitator is turned CCW with respect to the lower portion of the
agitator. To ensure the mechanism remains dry, the mechanism cap and accompanying o-ring
must be properly seated.
*
To remove:
a. If water is present, drain water to below the bottom of the upper agitator section (auger).
b. Remove the softener cap.
c. Remove the mechanism cap by placing a cloth between the jaws of pliers and grasping
the handle on the cap. Pull upward firmly until the cap pops out.
d. Remove the agitator bolt in the center of the retainer plate above the mechanism.
e. Remove the agitator from the transmission drive block by pulling upward.
27
*
To reinstall:
a. Replace the agitator on the drive block and torque the bolt to 220 inch pounds.
b. Wipe the mechanism cap o-ring and sealing surface inside the upper agitator with a dry
cloth to remove any foreign material that might prevent a proper seal. DO NOT wash out
the agitator mechanism or contaminate with any liquid. Reinstall the mechanism cap by
placing one side of the cap under the plastic ridge at the level of the upper agitator
softener holes. Push the cap firmly downward using a padded instrument, such as a
rubber coated pliers handle or cushioned hammer handle, and work around the cap edge
using very light vertical blows until seated. Excessive force may crack the cap. A very
thin film of soap and water applied to the o-ring will ease the installation. DO NOT
contaminate the mechanism by allowing soap or other liquid to drip inside the upper
agitator before the cap is fully seated.
c. Inspect the cap for proper installation and the agitator for proper operation using visual and
functional tests listed below.
*
To inspect for proper cap installation, the integrity of the mechanism cap seal should be
inspected visually and by conducting a bubble test:
a. Visual inspection:
1. Make sure the o-ring is properly seated in the groove on the cap before installation.
2. Look for the black o-ring through the softener holes in the upper agitator. If any black
can be seen, the cap is not properly installed.
3. Check that the entire edge of the mechanism cap is under the four plastic ridges on
the inside of the upper agitator.
b. Bubble test:
1. Fill the machine to the highest water level and observe the periphery of the mechanism
cap as water covers the cap.
2. No repeating bubbles should be seen.
*
To inspect for proper agitator operation:
a. If the agitator is not installed in the washer, hold the upper portion in one hand and the
lower in the other. Twist the upper CCW and CW with respect to the base. The upper
portion should lock in the CCW direction without popping and rotate freely in the CW
direction.
b. If the agitator is installed in the washer, grasp the upper portion and twist it CCW until the
spin tub begins to move. Release and repeat several times. The upper portion should
lock without popping and rotate freely in the CW direction.
*
If the agitator is not working properly, check for the following:
a. If the upper portion is dragging or not indexing smoothly, inspect the mechanism area for
cracked, missing or broken parts. A powdery residue is normal and should not be removed.
Never wash out the upper portion without the mechanism cap properly installed. Three
cylindrical rollers should be visible around the edge of the retainer plate and a red bearing
should be seen when looking through the inspection hole. If any parts are missing or
cracked, replace the agitator assembly.
b. If the upper portion is making a popping sound, check the mechanism cap for proper
installation and leakage. Remove the cap and inspect the mechanism area for water
intrusion. If water is present, replace the agitator assembly and mechanism cap or
attempt a repair procedure.
c. To repair a wet mechanism, remove the cap and dry the mechanism area as thoroughly
as possible using a dry cloth. A heated air source such as a hair dryer can also be used
to improve results. Sprinkle talcum powder in the mechanism and work the agitator back
and forth. If the popping stops, replace the mechanism cap and conduct the visual and
bubble tests. If the popping does not stop, replace the agitator assembly.
28
5. Problem:
Dryer vent system is within factory specifications but clothes are not dry at end of cycle, long dry
times, top panel too hot, discoloration, etc.
Solution:
Air leakage in and around blower system. Install Kit # 134088800. Components of the Kit will
increase the amount of heated air being drawn through the dryer drum. Follow the instructions
below.
1. Disconnect dryer from electrical
source.
2. Remove dryer front panel.
3. Remove dryer drum.
4. Remove louvered rear access
panel.
5. For front console model, remove
top panel. For rear console model,
remove top panel from rear hinges
and hang on side of cabinet.
6. Remove two (2) top screws
securing heater housing assembly
to rear of dryer.
7. Gently move top of heater housing
assembly away from cabinet
approximately two inches.
8. From rear, insert the longer screw
Figure 1
through top left side hole in
cabinet. From front, install spacer
on screw (see Figure 1).
9. Move top of heater housing toward
cabinet and start screw into
housing. Do not tighten screw.
10. Repeat process for other side.
11. Remove two (2) bottom screws
securing heater housing assembly
to rear of dryer.
12. Repeat process to install spacers
in bottom of heater housing
assembly.
13. Tighten all four (4) screws.
14. Remove foam air duct seal from
air duct. Clean surface of duct,
removing all old residue of the seal
Figure 2
and glue.
15. Apply a small 1/4" bead of supplied
adhesive to air duct surface and
attach new air duct seal supplied
with Kit (see Figure 2).
16. Remove two (2) screws securing
lint trap cover to front cover, then
remove cover.
17. Using four (4) clips supplied with
Kit, secure air duct to inner ring of
front panel (see Figure 3).
18. Reinstall lint filter cover, drum, belt,
front panel, rear access panel, top
panel and related wiring.
19. Reconnect dryer to electrical
supply and test to ensure proper
Figure 3
operation.
29
6. Problem:
Very irritating squealing sound when top load washer is spinning or coasting to a stop after the
spin cycle.
Solution:
If snubber is dirty with foreign material (sand/dust or grit), clean the base. If the snubber is
damaged, replace it.
* The snubber is a ring that is located
between the convex (domed up) center
portion of the base and the domed down
center portion of the leg & dome
assembly. It has teflon strips at the
top and bottom edges that slide easily
on the base as well as the underside
of the leg and dome assembly. This
system makes the machine very stable
by providing isolation between the leg
& dome assy. which carries both the
inner and outer tubs, as well as the
main motor and transmission and the
base; which is of course connected to
the cabinet. This means that the
machine is capable of spinning out of
balance loads that washers made by
other manufacturers cannot.
6SODVK7XE
/HJ'RPH
$VVHPEO\
6QXEEHU
%DVH
* As simple as this system is, if one on the strips is bent or there is some foreign material on
the base in the snubber area, the result can be an extremely obnoxious scratching or squealing
sound. A very similiar sound can be produced when the belt is worn but the difference is that a
snubber noise can be produced during the spin cycle or when the cycle has finished and the spin
tub is coasting to a stop. A worn belt noise can only be produced while the motor is actively
engaged in spinning the spin tub. If it is discovered that the belt is worn and the base has black,
shredded belt residue then it may not be necessary to clean the snubber area (belt residue
generally will not cause a problem with the snubber). It will be necessary however, to find the
cause of the belt failure.
* The following procedure should be followed to diagnose and eliminate the squealing noise.
The base must be wiped whether the snubber is replaced or not. Any residue whether it is dust or
grit of any kind (other than belt residue as noted above) can cause the objectionable sound to
occur. To remove, examine and/or replace the snubber:
a. Remove the front service panel and place the timer in the spin cycle and start the machine.
You want to try to duplicate the complaint. Inspect the base for signs of any foreign material.
Lift the top panel up and over and lean it against the rear wall if possible. If it is not possible,
most consumers will assist if asked, do not be afraid to ask.
b. You will need a tool to raise the entire Leg & Dome Assembly (to which the main motor, tubs
and transmission are attached). The machine will not need to be disassembled; the springs
will not even be released. Some techs use a length of “two-by-four” to raise the assembly. A
pry-bar makes an excellent tool when combined with a block of wood to act as a fulcrum or
pivot point (see Figure 1). Before raising the assembly, pull forward on it so that when you do
raise it, the rear of the tub cover does not catch on the rear cabinet frame as it is being lifted.
c. Using your body weight, raise the assembly high enough to slide the snubber out (see Figure
2). You will need to inspect the snubber for defects or damage. It is a good idea to be prepared
with some sort of supports (like 3/4 inch pieces of wood) to slide between the lower edge of
the assembly and the base to help support it if it were to slide off of your pry-bar.
30
Figure 1
Figure 2
WARNING: YOU MUST MAKE SURE THAT YOU HAVE THE ASSEMBLY
SUPPORTED SECURELY. YOU WILL BE REACHING IN WITH YOUR
HAND TO WIPE OUT THE BASE WITH A CLOTH. BE VERY CAREFUL.
d. Inspect the snubber carefully. The teflon strips on upper and lower edges of the snubber must
be perfectly smooth and undamaged in any way. The example in Figure 3 shows the top strip
bent over. This would cause the distinctive “fingernails on blackboard” sound. Also note the
arrow on the side of the snubber. When reinstalling or replacing the snubber, the arrow must
be pointing upward.
e. As stated before, the base must be wiped out whether the snubber is replaced or not (see
Figure 4). A cloth wetted with denatured (camp stove) alcohol or rubbing alcohol will clean
any residue, such as soap, or fabric softener off of the base and will also cut any waxes or oils
that may have been missed by the factory, during assembly. An old cloth work glove would
work as well. Make sure that the snubber area is wiped out completely. NEVER OIL THE
BASE TO STOP NOISE. Oil (such as WD40 or silicone spray) may temporarily stop the
sound but will cause the assembly to slide too easily on the base and could cause damage to
the sides of the cabinet from being hit by the tub during an out-of-balance spin cycle. It could
also cause the machine to “walk” from its position and cause a “banging” sound.
f.
Before installing a new snubber, have it out of it's packaging, with arrow positioned upward,
and ready to be installed. While holding the assemby up, you will not have time to mess with
tearing it out of its bag. When the job is completed, make sure to test the machine in the spin
cycle to make sure that you were successful. Unbalance the tub with a few towels on one side
to test it. When the job is done, make sure to reposition the machine to its original position
and re-set the rear leveling legs.
Figure 3
Figure 4
31
7. Problem:
Solution:
Dryability complaints: Dryer will not dry the clothes within the time alloted by the timer.
This is the single most prevalent complaint that servicers encounter when servicing any brand of
dryer. For that reason, we will be dealing extensively with the problem and examining every factor
that may contribute to this problem.
* Examine the lint screen. If it has not been cleaned, and is packed with lint, you must question
the consumer to see that it has been cleaned every time the dryer is used. Remove the lint screen
and hold it up to the light and look through it. Are the holes in the screen blocked? It is possible
that the consumer is using too much fabric softener or that the Washer is impeded in some way
from rinsing out soap or fabric softener. Fabric softener sheets can also cause screen blockage.
* If it is an Electric Dryer, check to see that full power is available at the receptacle. The motor
will run and the drum will tumble if supplied with 110 volts (or 108V or 120V), but the heater
requires 220 volts (or 215V or 240V). If it is not heating, find out why. If it is a Gas Dryer, is the
burner igniting? Once ignited, does it continue to burn or does it immediately shut down? With the
door shut you can hear the burner ignite and then cycle off. Bear in mind that if the door is open it
will cycle on the flame switch at a much faster rate than normal. The blower will pull air from the
path of least resistance, namely the open door and not through the burner tube. This will cause
heat to pool in the burner area instead of being drawn through the drum, which then causes the
(bimetal) limit switch to open, thus cutting power to the coils in the valve and turning off the gas. In
either model, this ” short-cycling” can also be caused by a defective seal on the door, an improper
seal at the drum glide or drum seal, or the air duct seal between the fan cover located on the fan
housing and the duct that is mounted on the front panel, as well as a defective blower fan. The
result is that the load will take longer to dry.
* Test the temperature inside the drum. Hang the probe of any electronic or analog temperature
detector over the top of the door and let it hang in the air flow without being in contact with the door.
Set the machine to the regular cycle at the high heat setting and start it. At this setting, the
temperature should climb to about 155 degrees, at which time the control thermostat will open
(sometimes audibly) and the temperature should quickly lessen until it reaches about 115 degrees. The control thermostat will then close and the temps will again rise, repeating the process.
On electric models, if the vent is blocked or there is a problem with the door or fan seal (as
described previously) the temperature will climb to 210 degrees or more. This is because the
control thermostat located on the fan housing, cannot sense the rising temps in the drum because
of lack of air movement through the drum and fan housing. If the heated air is not being drawn
through the drum, it can only rise and build up in the heater area until it is sensed by the high-limit
thermostat mounted on the heater assembly which opens at about 210 degrees. This heat build
up can also result in the top panel getting extremely hot directly above the heater (typically right in
front of the control panel). If this condition is allowed to persist, the paint on the underside of the
panel above the heater will become discolored from the heat. If you suspect a venting problem,
inspect this area for discoloration. On gas models, a vent blockage will also cause the effects
noted above.
* Without removing the temperature probe, disconnect the vent tube or pipe from its connection
at the wall (or wherever) and allow the dryer to vent into the room. Test the temperature again. If the
machine begins to cycle at the normal temperatures described at the beginning of #3 above, you
have found the cause of the dryability complaint. Another thing you will notice is that when the
heater cycles off, the temperature will fall much more rapidly than it did when it was blocked.
* Now determine if the cause of the vent blockage is from a flexible vent hose being pinched
because the machine has been pushed too far back against the wall, or if the blockage is in the
wall (house-related service problem). A house-related service problem or an installation
correction is not covered under the factory warranty. Most dryability complaints can be
traced back to the vent blockage problem.
32
NOTE: The vent restriction problem will also cause a build-up of lint inside the cabinet of
the dryer. The fan will force lint out at the seams of the vent tube (inside the machine)
and into the cabinet. This can be a fire hazard. If you observe a large amount of lint
inside the cabinet, this could be an indicator of a vent restriction. If the dryer is operating
normally and you can find no fault with the venting system, or anything else, the fault
may lie elsewhere.
a. The dryer is overloaded because the Washer was overloaded. When the Washer spins
the clothes at the end of the wash and rinse cycles, the ability of the product to extract the
water from the load can be seriously hampered. Simply put, the wetter the load, the longer it
takes to dry. This, of course, is a customer education issue and must be considered.
b. If the Washer is in need of service, such as if the belt is worn, it may not be extracting the
water in the spin cycle as well as it once did. This degredation may have occured so gradually
that the consumer has not noticed it. Have the consumer load the washer (with clean towels
if necessary), agitate for a minute and then spin them. If there is a rubber smell or a squealing
sound or anything else out of the ordinary, investigate the cause.
c. If the dryer is located in a laundry room, closet or any other similarily small space,
examine the door to the room. If the door is of solid construction, and the consumer is in the
habit of closing the door when the machine is in operation, the appliance may be suffocating
for the lack of air. This could be tripping you up, as you will probably be testing the machine
with the door to the room open. To exhaust air to the outside, the dryer must pull air from the
room. If air cannot be pulled into the room because of the closed door, the vent is effectively
blocked. A minimum of 120 sq. in. (774.2 sq. cm) of opening, equally divided at the top and
bottom of the door is required. A louvered door with equivalent air openings for the full length of
the door is also acceptable.
d. If the dryer has been installed undercounter, this same lack of air supply may also be
present, especially if it is sitting on carpet.
* If all of the above checks OK, what else is there to check? The venting system in the house
may have been incorrectly designed. As unlikely as this may seem, the possibility cannot be
ignored, especially in homes or multi-family dwellings where the original venting system has been
altered or was non-existent. The following method is the most accurate method of determining if
the exhaust system is acceptable:
a. Connect an inclined or digital manometer between the dryer and the vent.
b. Set the heat setting to air fluff (cool down), start dryer and read the measurement.
c. The system backpressure must not be higher than 0.75 inches of water column. If the
system backpressure is less than 0.75 inches of water column, the system is acceptable. If
the reading is higher, the system is too restrictive and is unacceptable.
* The following chart can be used as an approximate guide in determining if the vent length from
the dryer vent hook-up to the final exit at the vent hood on the outside of the dwelling is within
acceptable tolerances. As stated previously, the most accurate method is to measure the
backpressure at the dryer with a manometer. In this way, all the variables can be factored in, such
as if the vent needs to be cleaned or if someone stepped on the vent pipe in the attic and crushed
it. This information conforms to all of our E-line (since Jan 1998) free standing and stackable dryer
models which develop 200 CFM of air flow. For further conditions and restrictions, see the Installation
Instructions supplied with the product.
33
MAXIMUM LENGTH
MAXIMUM LENGTH
of 4” (10.2cm) dia. rigid metal duct
of 4” (10.2cm) dia. flexible metal duct
VENT HOOD TYPE
Number
of
90s
µ
VENT HOOD TYPE
µ
Number
of
90s
0
60 feet
48 feet
30 feet
18 feet
0
1
52 feet
40 feet
22 feet
14 feet
1
2
44 feet
32 feet
14 feet
10 feet
2
3
32 feet
24 feet
not recommended
3
4
28 feet
16 feet
not recommended
4
* In the series of diagrams at the right, some
examples of typical vent installations are shown.
We discourage the use of flexible vinyl or foil
vent tubing in favor of the far superior rigid metal
pipe, or the flexible variety of metal pipe.
Unfortunately, most people use the flexible tubing
shown in diagrams D, E and F.
The advantages to the use of the metal pipe is
that it affords less resistance to the flow of air.
This means that it can dramatically reduce the
cost of operation. Not only will each load require
less energy to dry, they will dry faster. Over the
lifetime of the product, this could amount to a
substantial savings.
The vent will also need cleaned less often. In
example E, the low spot in the vent will tend to
accumulate lint which can build-up and
eventually restrict the air flow.
Moreover, the stovepipe style vent cannot be
crushed by pushing the machine too far back
against the wall.
34
A
C
E
B
D
F
*
Laundry Centers
The Laundry Centers push 180 CFM of air as compared to 200 CFM generated by the Freestanding
and Stackable Dryers. The system backpressure must not be higher than 0.75 inches of water
column. If the system backpressure is less than 0.75 inches of water column, the system is
acceptable. If the reading is higher, the system is too restrictive and is unacceptable, or the vent
needs to be cleaned, or someone may have stepped on the vent pipe in the attic and crushed it.
Use the following graph for Laundry Center dryers as an approximate guide in determining if the
vent length from the dryer vent hook-up to the final exit at the vent hood on the outside of the
dwelling is within acceptable tolerances.
MAXIMUM LENGTH
MAXIMUM LENGTH
of 4” (10.2cm) dia. rigid metal duct
of 4” (10.2cm) dia. flexible metal duct
VENT HOOD TYPE
VENT HOOD TYPE
Number
Number
of
µ
90s
0
1
2
3
µ
56 feet
56 feet
42 feet
30 feet
30 feet
22 feet
46 feet
34 feet
32 feet
46 feet
34 feet
32 feet
36 feet
28 feet
18 feet
22 feet
16 feet
10 feet
22feet
16 feet
10 feet
14 feet
10 feet
5 feet
8. Problem:
Solution:
of
90s
0
1
2
3
Odor complaints in Tumble Action Washers.
What has been observed is that residual FABRIC SOFTENER has been building up at the entrance
to the drain trap (located in the bottom of the outer tub assembly) that leads to the remote drain
pump.
* To check to see if this is happening, one of the
vanes must be removed to gain (limited) access. The
only vane that can be removed is the vane that is
located on top of the seam of the inner tub. In
production, the drum consists of a rectangular piece
of stainless steel that is rolled into a cylinder shape
and seamed together. Locate the vane on the seam
and remove the two screws to the right side of it.
Pull back (toward you) on the vane and swing it to
the left and remove. By turning the spin drum, the
area between the tubs can be accessed. The picture
on the right shows the view of the drain trap from
under the vane. If this is the source of the odor, you
will observe the inner ridges of this drain trap to be
covered with thick, globs of fabric softener. If this is
the case, a bottle brush (or a condenser coil brush)
can be used to clean it out. (For more information
on odor complaints, see Service Bulletin Vol. 99,
Issue #8, page 33.)
35
9. Problem:
Solution:
Boot replacement on tumble action washer.
Replacement of the BOOT on the Front Load Tumble Action Washer is to many technicians, a job
best avoided at all costs. Sooner or later you will be confronted by this job and with a little
preparation under your belt, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is easier than
anticipated. This article will show you how to do the job, what pitfalls to avoid and will include
some great tips.
(1) If the machine has a Dryer stacked on top of it or is positioned in such a way that it would be
too much bother to move, you will be better off leaving it where it is. However, if it is possible, it
would be easier to do this job if the machine could be leaned back against a wall (protect the wall
against being defaced though). By leaning it back, the tubs will hang back from the (non-removable)
front panel and you will have increased space to work. If leaning it back is not possible, then a 6
or 8 inch block of wood will be handy to use to wedge between the front panel and the tub to hold
the tub back out of the way.
(2) The boot is attached to a lip around the perimeter of the opening in the front panel and is glued
on in spots about three inches apart, all the way around. Use a razor blade as shown in Figure 1
to carefully slice the glued spots on the boot away from the front panel.
(3) Once the boot is loose from the front panel, push it into the opening of the tub and out of the
way as shown in Figure 2. At this point, if the machine is not leaning back, take your block of
wood and while pushing back on the tub through the opening, wedge the block between the front
panel and the tub about ten inches to the bottom - right of the opening. This will afford you more
space to work with the boot.
Figure 1
Figure 2
(4) You will now notice that the boot is still attached to the duct that is located just inside the front
panel at the upper left corner from the opening. This is where the water, soap, bleach and fabric
softener enter the tub. To remove (and later on, reattach) the clamp holding this in place on the
end of the duct you will have to make yourself a tool from a three inch piece of 3/8 inch soft copper
tubing.
(5) In Figure 3 you will see that the end of the tube is flattened somewhat so that it can be slipped
over the twisted ends of the clamp as shown in Figure 4. Twist the tube counterclockwise to slip
the clamp and set both the tool and the wire clamp aside. Pull the boot free from the duct.
36
Figure 3
Figure 4
(6) Using both hands, grab onto the boot at the top of the opening to the tub and pull downward
and toward you with slow steady pressure. As the boot is pulled free from the outer lip of the tub
(at the top), the coiled spring that holds the boot from the groove behind the lip around the opening
to the front shell will become visible. You can either continue pulling on the boot until it comes off
or you can hook the spring (with a piece of coat hanger fashioned into a hook) and pull it off and
then pull the boot off separately.
(7) Once the boot is off, examine the lip that extends around the entire perimeter of the front
opening of the front shell of the tub (the front shell and the rear shell are so named because when
bolted together, form the outer tub that surrounds the inner tub). The boot has a lip that will have
to be folded into the groove behind the lip on the front shell. To start this, examine the new boot
and locate the groove in front of the lip that corresponds to the similar lip and tab on the tub shell.
It will make this job a lot easier if you can obtain some liquid dishwashing soap from the consumer,
and sparingly lubricate this groove on the boot to make it easier to slip onto the lip of the shell (see
Figure 5). No soap is preferable to too much soap. Have a cloth handy to wipe the soap from your
fingers.
(8) Once the groove in the boot is lubed with soap, locate the arrow as shown in Figure 6 that is
located on the top of the boot (located to the right of the extrusion that slips over the duct). This
arrow must point up when the boot is installed.
Figure 6
Figure 5
37
(9) With the boot in one hand and the other hand spreading the lip and groove (on the boot near
the arrow), force the lip into the groove behind the lip at the top of the opening on the tub shell (see
Figure 7).
(10) With one hand holding the boot so it does not slip off, use the other hand to continue spreading
the lip and groove of the boot further to the right. In this way you continue this action 360 degrees
around until the boot is mounted onto the front shell (see Figure 8). Your fingers will take a beating
while you do this and may become quite tired. Don’t give up. Rest one hand at a time if needed.
Whatever you do, do not remove both hands until the boot is on (unless you want it to fall off and
then you get to start over with it).
Figure 7
Figure 8
(11) Now is the time to put the spring back on. Included in the BOOT KIT is a set of three spacers
(an example of which is shown in Figure 9 below). These spacers are to be used to hold the spring
in place in the groove on the outside perimeter of the boot. As it will take both hands to stretch this
spring into place, these spacers will prevent the spring from popping out when you let go of it to
use both hands to stretch it further around the boot. Begin by pushing the spring down into the
groove just forward from where the boot contacts the front shell at about the 12 o’clock position.
While holding it in place with one hand, Use the other to tightly wedge the spacer above it,
between the spring (in its groove) and the weight ring above it as shown in Figure 10.
Figure 9
Figure 10
38
(12) Working your way to the right, push the spring down into the groove. When you have placed
the spring about 90 degrees around the opening from the first spacer, the spring will begin to get
tight. Push in another spacer at that point (making sure to keep checking the first spacer, if it pops
out - the spring will pop out).
(13) Continue working your way around (while checking both spacers, you don’t want them to slip
out) until you reach 180 degrees from the first spacer. Install the third spacer.
(14) The spring will be extremely tight now as shown in Figure 11. Once you have gone more than
half way around, the spring will be easier to roll into the rest of the groove (so long as all three
spacers are holding tight). When you have the spring in place, make sure to remove the three
spacers before proceeding to step # 15.
Figure 12
Figure 11
(15) Replace the boot extrusion back onto the duct and pull it up over the ridge on the duct near the
top of the opening as shown in Figure 12. Reinstall the clamp in such a way that the clamp sits
between the ridges on the extrusion and above the ridge on the duct. Snap the clamp closed with
the copper tubing tool that you used previously.
(16) Before attaching the new boot to the front panel, clean the surface of the front panel with
alcohol or household cleaner. Also clean the flat surface of the new boot that will be contacting the
front panel. This step is needed to remove the mold release material used in the manufacturing
process and will allow the adhesive to stick.
(17) Remount the boot onto the front panel
as shown in Figure 13, making sure that the
boot is not wrinkled. If large wrinkles exist,
they may pool water in the boot and dribble
onto the floor when the door is opened. If
this is the case, pull it loose from the front
panel and remount it slightly more clockwise
or counter clockwise as needed.
(18) Using the adhesive supplied in the kit,
sparingly apply dots of glue under the edge
of the boot. Spot glue at the 12 o’clock, 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 o’clock positions around
the opening. Caution the consumer to wait a
couple of hours before using the washer to
allow the adhesive enough time to dry.
39
Figure 13
10. Problem:
Solution:
Cannot remove the knob from the timer on top load washers.
This timer was originally introduced around 12/96 and has a totally plastic body. The interior is not
accessible without breaking the case. The timer knob does not screw onto the shaft as with past
timers. It slides onto the shaft and is held in place by a locking rod that is inserted through the rear
of the timer. This “D” shaped rod (when pulled from the rear of the timer) spreads two retaining
fingers on the front shaft and then allows the knob to be pulled off.
Technicians may have a hard time grasping the rear rod with pliers. Instead, insert a flat tool such
as a pocket screwdriver along the round side of the rod and push behind the protruding ledge and
pry it out from the body of the timer. The tech could also insert a pointed object, such as a nail,
along the flat side of the shaft, then push it into the hole in the shaft and pry it out from the body of
the timer.
11. Problem:
Solution:
Top load washer shakes excessively, or “walks” during the spin.
This is an old problem that seems to reoccur with such frequency that it must be reviewed from
time to time. Unlike other manufacturer’s top load washers, ours has the best load balancing
capability available. This washer will not shutdown if the spin cycle is initiated with an out-ofbalance load. The tub is mounted on a “leg and dome assembly” which sits on a “snubber ring”
and is secured to a base by 3 main springs and 3 lesser springs. This allows the tub to move
independently of the base providing a greater range of movement. Even if the load is grossly outof-balance, the load will still spin to extract the water. Although, if the tub is so out of balance that
the outer tub contacts the sides of the cabinet, the washer will vibrate (and of course make lots of
noise) and will most likely walk from its installed position.
* The first place to start is with the floor where the washer is installed. It must be solid and
secure. If the washer is sitting on carpet it will bounce and vibrate and probably “walk”. The front
legs have rubber pads that grip the floor but will not grip carpeting very well. If it is sitting on a
surface with a mirror smooth finish (such as polished marble) the pads could slide. If the floor is
wet (for any reason) the pads will also slide. If the floor is wood make sure that it is solid. If the
floor is vibrating during the spin cycle (that is, if you are vibrating just standing next to the washer)
or if objects on shelves or pictures on walls are moving, this means the floor is flexing. This flexing
can cause the washer to bounce and if the rubber pads lose contact with the floor, it will “walk”.
* Check the position of the front legs. The more they are extended, the more vibration will
occur. The more vibration that occurs, the less contact the pads have with the floor and the greater
the likelihood that the washer will “walk”.
* The next thing to check is to see if the shipping bolt has been removed. This shipping bolt
secures the leg and dome assembly to the base which restricts movement of the entire tub, motor
and transmission assembly during shipment. If it is not removed, the washer will move very
energetically.
* Next remove the front service panel and inspect the notches that the 3 large main springs are
set into on the base. There are 3 locations:
a. On the front location, the large spring must be in the 2nd from the front notch.
b. On the left side location, the large spring must be in the 4th from the left notch.
c. On the right side, the large spring must be in the 3rd from the left notch.
* Next ask the customer to load the washer (if they have no dirty clothes, ask for clean towels).
All of these tests are best done with a full load to duplicate the conditions that produce the
objectionable behavior of the washer. If the base of the washer is knocking on the floor, then the
base is flexing and must be replaced.
40
* With the washer at rest, reset the rear leveling legs. Put your left hand on the left rear corner
of the cabinet under the console end cap and your right hand on the right rear corner of the cabinet
under the console end cap. Pull up and forward on the cabinet (never, ever pull on the console,
you may break off the mounting tabs on the end caps) and raise the rear leveling legs off the floor
and set it back down gently. This will produce a distinctive sound. If there is no sound, the leveling
assembly may be seized. Lubricate these assemblies from the inside of the cabinet at the left
and right rear corners with any good lubricant (make sure that you use just enough lubricant to do
the job as you do not want to get any on the legs or floor). Tilt the washer forward as descibed
above and grab one of the rear legs with your hand and work it in and out until it moves easily. Set
the washer down gently and repeat the leveling procedure and listen for the distinctive sound. Call
the customer into the room and demonstrate how to reset the rear leveling legs. Let them do it and
point out the distinctive sound. Inform the customer that this procedure must be performed
whenever the washer is moved, even if it is moved very little such as when it is moved for sweeping.
* In conclusion, some vibration is normal. An unbalanced load will vibrate more. You can
deliberately unbalance the load by wetting the load, placing all items to one side and put it in spin.
But even a very unbalanced load should not make the washer “walk”. If it is so unbalanced that the
tub hits the inside of the cabinet, this concussion can cause the rubber pads to break contact with
the floor and possibly cause the washer to “walk”. Also, never lubricate the snubber ring (to stop
“snubber squeal”). This will cause the complete tub assembly to slide back and forth during the
spin cycle which in turn will cause the tub to contact the cabinet sides.
41
Hot Product Updates:
PROBLEM:
Need OTR microwave oven fault codes and sensor diagnostic procedures.
SOLUTION:
Below is a list of the OTR microwave oven fault codes along with diagnostic procedures for the
humidity sensor. It is important to note that testing the microwave oven sensor with an ohm meter
can damage the sensor. THE ONLY PORTION OF THE SENSOR THAT SHOULD BE TESTED
WITH A METER IS THE HEATER (pins 3 & 4). The heater resistance is approximately 30 ohms.
* F0 - Humidity sensor problem (open or shorted) at start of cooking program. Press keypads 7
& 8 simultaneously and read sensor value showing in the display. Compare value to sensor “Quick
Test” values to determine if there is a problem.
* F3 - Shorted key panel (keypad/panel shorted for a period of over 60 seconds). You can test
this feature by holding in one of the keypads for over 60 seconds. F3 will display.
* F4 - Open humidity sensor during cooking process. Sensor was open for a period of over 60
seconds during the cooking process.
* F5 - Shorted humidity sensor during cooking process. Sensor shorted for a period of over 5
seconds during the cooking process.
*
Microwave Oven Sensor Quick Test - Sensor Cooking Diagnosis:
1. Simultaneously touch and hold keypads 7 & 8 and record the number showing in the
display.
2. If the number showing is between 15 and 185 then the reading is more than likely normal;
however you need to go one step further and verify by performing a “Sensor Detection
Test”.
3. If the number showing in the display is higher than 213 you more than likely have one or
more of the following problems: sensor failed open, sensor unplugged, wiring, or smart
board.
4. If the number showing in the display is less than 6 you more than likely have a shorted
sensor, or a defective smart board.
*
Microwave Oven Gas/Humidity Sensor Detection Test:
The Gas/Humidity sensor detects both humidity (steam) and hydrocarbons (food odors) during
sensor cooking modes.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Place 1/3 cup of water in the center of the microwave.
Push the VEGETABLE keypad (“FRESH VEGGIES” will scroll across the display).
Push START.
Simultaneously press keypads 7 & 8 and record the diagnostic number showing in the
display (eg: 42).
5. The unit will begin heating the water and will display “FRESH-VG” until it reaches humidity
“detection”. When humidity “detection” occurs, the control will beep and begin counting
down. At the end of the cycle the control will beep and the microwave will shut off.
6. Touch CLEAR /OFF
NOTE: If you successfully completed steps 1 through 6 with no problems, then the humidity
sensor is operating normally. However, if you encountered a problem during the test (TEST
FAILED), then suspect a problem in the sensor circuit (sensor, sensor wiring/connection, or
control smart board).
42
PROBLEM:
Need service information on the new Next Gen ranges.
SOLUTION:
There are three new range service manuals now available:
* Service Manual p/n 5995361523 is for the Next Gen 30” Electric Freestanding Ranges. It
contains information on the new electronic surface element control system as well as the five
different EOC (electronic oven control) systems - ES100, ES200, ES300, ES400, and ES450. It
also includes a structural disassembly section.
* Service Manual p/n 5995361531 is for the Next Gen 30” and 36” Gas Freestanding Ranges. It
contains information on LP conversions and gas related rules and regulations, the five EOC systems
described above, and a structural disassembly section.
* Service Manual p/n 5995362828 is for 30” and 40” Electric Freestanding Ranges with serial
numbers starting with NF. These ranges use similar EOC controls as those listed above, but the
range body is structurally different. There is also a section about models with a PRC Glass Touch
system (capacitance touch).
43
Cold Products Updates:
PROBLEM:
Control box kit 5303918282 doesn’t have the damper heater.
SOLUTION:
All 5303918282 control box kits are being subbed to part number 5303918283. A running change
has been made to the 5303918282 damper kit by adding the damper heater assembly to the kit.
Some shipments of the 5303918282 control box kits were delivered with the heater assembly
installed and some without. Please examine your current stock of the 5303918282 to determine
if your kits contain the required heater. Check for a yellow sticker that says HEATER ASSY as
indicated in the photo below. The damper heater is not available through the parts department as
a separate part for the older 5303918282 kits. It is a difficult job and should be installed at the
factory. However, if you feel you are capable of installing the damper heater, contact the Tech Line
and they can ship you the heater.
PROBLEM:
Need service information on the new Next Gen refrigerators.
SOLUTION:
There are two Next Gen refrigerator service manuals available as well as two Product Information
and Technical Guides (Service Date Sheets):
* Service Manual p/n 5995352423 is for the Next Gen Side by Side Refrigerators. It contains
information on the new cold control system, ADC (adaptive defrost control), ice maker, ice-n-water
dispensing system, and sealed system repairs. Product Information and Technical Guide p/n
5995374443 is for Next Gen Side by Side refrigerators built between June 2001 and March 2002.
* Service Manual p/n 5995345245 is for the Next Gen Top Mount Refrigerators. (NOTE: An
error was found on page 26 in this manual illustrating the air circulation. The following
page is the correction to that error.) Also, Product Information and Technical Guide p/n
5995355665 is for Next Gen Top Mount refrigerators built between October 1999 and May 2001.
44
SECTION D - AIR CIRCULATION
AUTOMATIC DEFROST MODELS
Principals Of Automatic Defrost Operation
Automatic defrost refrigerators operate on the principle
that moisture or frost transfers or migrates to the
coldest surfaces (evaporator) in the freezer
compartment. For example, a small amount of water
spilled from an ice cube tray in the freezer compartment
will freeze immediately. However, this ice in time will
evaporate and transfer to the colder surfaces of the
freezer evaporator coil.
Air Circulation Patterns
Automatic defrost models have a single evaporator in
the freezer compartment, and have forced air cooling
in the freezer and refrigerator compartments.
The “fin and tube” aluminum type evaporator is located
on the back wall of the freezer compartment. A
circulating fan (suction type) pulls air from the air return
in the freezer and refrigerator compartments up through
the evaporator surfaces from the bottom. The cold air
is forced into a fan cover and discharged into the freezer
and refrigerator compartments as shown in Figure D1.
Figure D1
Cold air for the refrigerator compartment flows from the
evaporator through an air duct located in front of the
evaporator cover and into the food compartment through
air ducts on the Control Box. Return air from the
refrigerator compartment flows through an opening on
each side of the control housing, located all the way to
the back next to the liner, through a 90° air return duct
and back to the evaporator.
Cold air for the freezer compartment flows from the
evaporator through an air discharge grill, around the
fan motor and into the freezer compartment. Return air
from the freezer compartment flows through the louvers
located on the back wall near the bottom of the freezer
compartment, just in front of the evaporator.
The air circulating fan operates only when the
compressor is running. During the defrost period, the
compressor and circulating fan do not operate. The
automatic defrost timer opens the electrical circuit to
the fan motor and compressor.
(This page replaces page 26 in Service Manual 5995345245, Next Generation Top Mounts, dated November 2000.)
45
(This page is left intentionally blank)
46
PROBLEM:
Control box kit, 5303918283, will not install in new SxS refrigerators
CAUSE:
Refrigerators with two pegs coming out the back of the control box (see Figure 1) and built after serial
number LA24400000 do not have the thimble in the side of the liner to accept the screw in the back
of the control box that was used on products built before serial number LA244.
SOLUTION:
Control Box kit, number 54003918283, requires a long screw in the back of the control box, behind
the damper that threads into a grommet in the side of the liner, to hold the control box tight against
the liner. (See Figure 2. ) The control box needs to touch the liner on the bottom to get a good seal
between the liner and the damper. New control boxes have two tabs coming out of the control box
that go into the opening in the liner, to hold the back of the control box in place. On refrigerators built
between September and the end of October, the liner will except either control box. Products built
after November 1 do not have the grommet in the side of the liner to except the screw to hold the
old control box. This is the reason the 5303918283 kit will not work on products built after November
1, 2002 (LA244). On products built after that date, the controls, damper and ADC should be ordered
separately and will not sub to the kit.
Post to hold back of
control box in place
Tabs to hold back of
control box in liner.
Grommet in liner to hold
post will be removed.
Figure 1
Figure 2
PROBLEM:
Frost and ice beads are forming on the evaporator cover of Top Mount Refrigerator models.
CAUSE:
Frost will form from air leaks or a door left open. Also, large amount of frost may form from heavy
use in a high humidity environment.
SOLUTION:
During heavy use in a high humidity environment, moisture will condense on the evaporator cover
before the fan can pull it all back to the evaporator. When the refrigerator goes through the defrost
cycle, the direct contact will allow the cover temperature to rise high enough to turn the frost to ice.
By adding an insulation pad, p/n 5316651102, between the evaporator and the evaporator cover, it
will stop a lot of the heat transfer from the evaporator to the cover during defrost. It will also help reduce
a lot of the noise from the defrost cycle and some of the refrigerant gurgling sound. To install the
insulation, remove the cover and cut the insulation to fit from the top of the evaporator down to the
top of the louvers in the evaporator cover. NOTE: Do not block the louvers in the bottom of the cover.
Tape the insulation to the back of the evaporator cover and reinstall the cover over the evaporator.
47
PROBLEM:
Gurgling sound when doors are opened and closed on Top Mount refrigerators
CAUSE:
When the doors are opened and closed, a vacuum is created inside the cabinet. This vacuum is
released by allowing air to be drawn up the defrost water drain tube. The gurgling is caused by water
being trapped in the drain line.
SOLUTION:
First make sure the refrigerator is level. Next, separate the flexible extension running to the drain
pan from the hard tube coming out of the cabinet. Open and close the doors again. If the noise has
stopped, there is water trapped in the flexible extension. This is caused by a sag in the tube or the
end of the tube laying in the defrost water pan. Remove the sag and /or tape the end of the tube up
so it will stay out of the water in the pan. If separating the drain line has no effect on the noise, the
water is trapped in the hard tube inside the cabinet. At this point, you can use the 5303918285 drain
tube and ice maker plug kit. The drain line extension, provided in the kit, has a built in trap that is
large enough so the air will not pull past the water in the trap. This will stop the sound, but it can
make the door harder to reopen after it is closed. If the customer feels the door is too hard to open
with this kit, the external drain kit, part number 5303918261, can be installed. This will bypass the
internal drain and stop the vacuum action by allowing air to be drawn up the drain line. The external
drain kit takes longer to install and it requires drilling a hole in the cabinet. This has created some
concern with customers. The installation of the drain tube with the trap does not require any change
to the cabinet.
PROBLEM:
Water dripping onto food compartment top shelf of top freezer model refrigerators.
CAUSE:
There can be two causes for this problem:
1. Defrost water is migrating forward from the drain and dripping out the diffuser.
2. Frost is collecting on the inside of the air duct and melting during defrost, causing it to drip
into the food compartment.
SOLUTION:
Defrost water migrating forward from the drain opening is a result of the foam block in the food
compartment control box not sealing to the liner, or not getting a tight fit between the control box
and the foam block. This allows water to run between the liner and the foam block or the control box,
and drip into the food compartment. (See Figures 1 and 2 on next page.)
Frost collecting inside of the air duct in front of the fan cover can be caused by air leaking into the
cabinet. This can come from the door seals, ice maker fill tube, and if the cabinet is not well sealed;
it can come up the defrost water drain. There is now a kit, part number 5303918285, that has a new
seal for the ice maker fill tube opening (only used on products without an ice maker) and a new drain
trap extension that has a trap in it to hold water. (See Figures 3,4, 5, and 6 on next page.) This kit
can be used to correct cabinet air leaks and ice maker fill tube air leaks. If the air leak is from the
door seal, it may not be of much help, so check the door seals. When checking the door seals, check
between the seal and the cabinet. Also pull the seal out of the channel in the door panel. The seal
should be difficult to pull out. If it comes out easy, the air leak can be between the door and the door
seal. If the gasket is loose in the channel, run RTV sealer in the channel and reinstall the gasket.
48
WATER CAN MIGRATE BETWEEN THE
LINER AND THE FOAM BLOCK OR
BETWEEN THE FOAM BLOCK AND THE
HOUSING
RUN A 3/8" STRIP OF PERMAGUM CORD
AROUND THE FOAM BLOCK MAKING SURE TO
SEAL THE OPENING BETWEEN THE BLOCK
AND HOUSING
Figure 1
Figure 2
NEW PLUG FOR
ICE MAKER FILL
TUBE OPENING
NEW DRAIN TUBE
WITH TRAP
Figure 3
TOP OF TRAP TUBE WILL TOUCH
BOTTOM OF CABINET
DISCONNECT EXTENSION FROM HARD
TUBE COMING OUT OF CABINET
BOTTOM OF TRAP IN TUBE WILL
TOUCH DRAIN PAN
Figure 4
Figure 5
REMOVE THE OLD FOAM PLUG
INSTALL NEW PLUG
Figure 6
49
Wet Product Updates:
PROBLEM:
Timer cycle chart confusing when checking input code voltage to speed control board when
operating.
SOLUTION:
The operational chart shown below will be in the upcoming CD Video for Tumble Action Washers.
This chart will help explain the timer/speed control board relationship on tumble action washers.
CYCLE
CYCLE
TIMER
TIME
PHASE
STEP
IN SEC.
ACTIVITY
DRUM
SPEED CONTROL
WAX
W ATER
W ATER
PRESSURE
VOLTAGE
VOLTAGE
RPM
INPUT CODES
MOTOR
VALVE
TEMP
SW ITCH
AT
AT FABRIC
BLEACH
SOFTENER
1 = 120 VAC
AND
0 = ZERO VOLTS
A B C D E
DRAIN
PUMP
BYPASS
SOLENOID SOLENOID
HEAVY
1
180
FILL & TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H.W,C
ON
0
0
WASH
2
110
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 0 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H.W,C
OFF
0
0
REG
3
400
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 0 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H,W,C
OFF
0
0
4
352
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 1 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H,W,C
OFF
0
0
5
50
DRAIN & FILL (SPRAY)
52
0 1 0 0 0
ON
RINSE FILL
C
ON
0
0
6
130
DRAIN AND
450
0 0 0 1 1
ON
OFF
ON
0
0
OFF
120 VAC
0
ON
0
0
OFF
120 VAC
0
ON
0
0
C
OFF
120 VAC
OFF
ON
0
0
W,C
OFF
0
120 VAC
ON
0
0
WASH
SHORT
WASH
IMPLUSE SPIN
RINSE 1
7
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
8
160
DRAIN AND
450
0 1 1 1 1
ON
OFF
RINSE 2
9
18
FILL & COAST
0
0 0 1 0 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
EX RIN
10
50
DRAIN TUMBLE
52
0 1 0 0 0
ON/OFF
OFF
11
110
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 0 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
C
IMPLUSE SPIN
FINAL
12
220
DRAIN & SPIN
450
0 1 0 0 1
ON
OFF
RINSE 3
13
110
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 0 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
EXTRACT
14
660
DRAIN AND SPIN
950
1 1 0 1 1
ON
OFF
15
145
C
RINSE
FINAL
SPIN
PAUSE
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
TUMBLE
52
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
CYCLE SIGNAL
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
GRAPHICS
16
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
0
OFF
17
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
0
52
1 0 0 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H,W,C
OFF
0
0
0
PERM
WASH
18
400
FILL THEN TUMBLE
PRESS
FINAL
19
352
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 1 1 0
OFF
WASH FILL
H,W,C
OFF
0
20
50
DRAIN & FILL
52
0 1 0 0 0
ON
RINSE FILL
C
ON
0
0
RINSE 1
21
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
C
OFF
120VAC
0
22
50
DRAIN & TUMBLE
52
0 1 0 0 0
ON
OFF
ON
0
0
RINSE 2
23
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
C
OFF
120VAC
0
EX RINSE
24
50
DRAIN TUMBLE
52
0 1 0 0 0
OFF/ON
OFF
ON
0
0
25
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
C
OFF
120VAC
0
ON
0
0
C
OFF
0
120VAC
26
220
DRAIN & SPIN
450
0 1 0 0 1
ON
OFF
RINSE 3
27
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
EXTRACT
28
500
DRAIN & SPIN
850
1 0 1 0 1
ON
OFF
ON
0
0
0
RINSE
FINAL
SPIN
950
29
145
PAUSE
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
TUMBLE
52
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
END CYCLE SIGNAL
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
0
GRAPHICS
30
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
OFF
31
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
0
FILL THEN TUMBLE
35
1 1 0 0 0
OFF
WASH FILL
OFF
0
0
0
0
HAND
WASH
32
609
H,W,C,
WASH
33
50
DRAIN & FILL
52
0 1 0 0 0
ON
RINSE FILL
C
ON
34
180
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 0 1 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
C
OFF
35
220
DRAIN & SPIN
450
0 1 0 0 1
ON
OFF
RINSE 2
36
110
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 0 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
EX RINSE
37
50
DRAIN & TUMBLE
52
0 1 0 0 0
OFF/ON
OFF
38
110
FILL THEN TUMBLE
52
1 1 0 1 0
OFF
RINSE FILL
39
430
DRAIN & SPIN
450
1 1 1 0 1
ON
RINSE 1
FINAL
EXTRACT
SPIN
120VAC
0
ON
0
0
C
OFF
120VAC
0
ON
0
0
C
OFF
0
120VAC
OFF
ON
0
0
0
650
40
145
PAUSE
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
TUMBLE
52
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
END CYCLE SIGNAL
0
1 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
ON
0
0
GRAPHICS
41
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
0
OFF
42
STOP
0
0 0 0 0 0
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
0
50
PROBLEM:
Need service information on laundry products.
SOLUTION:
There are three new laundry product service manuals now available:
* Service Manual p/n 5995369211 is for the Tumble Action Washer with the AC drive motor. It
contains operational information, troubleshooting information, and a structural disassembly section.
(The previous service manual p/n 5995271441 provided service information for the Tumble Action
Washer with the DC drive motor.)
* Service Manual p/n 5995373155 is for all 27” Gas and Electric Dryers. It also contains
operational and troubleshooting information as well as structural disassembly instructions.
* Service Manual p/n 5995377099 is for Top Load Washers with 2.7 and 3.0 cu. ft. tubs. It also
contains operational and troubleshooting information as well as structural disassembly instructions.
PROBLEM:
Need service information on dishwasher products.
SOLUTION:
There are two new dishwasher product service manuals now available:
* Service Manual p/n 5995355186 is for the 24” Built-in Dishwashers with Mechanical Timers
and having the Precision Wash System. It contains operational information, troubleshooting
information, structural disassembly, and Service Data Sheets.
* Service Manual p/n 5995371183 is for the 18” Dishwasher with Mechanical Timers having the
Tower Wash System. It contains operational and structural disassembly information as well as a
Tech Data Sheet.
51
PRODUCT WARRANTY QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
1990 - 2002 EHP PRODUCT LINES
PRODUCT
PAGE
Refrigerators
53-54
Food Freezers
54-55
Room Air Conditioners
56
Washers
57-58
Top Load
57
Tumble Action
58
Dryers
58
Laundry Centers
59
Dishwashers
60
Ranges
61-62
Free Standing
61
Over & Under
62
Gas & Electric Cooktops
62
Ovens
62-63
Microwave - Over the Range
62
Microwave - Countertop
63
Micro Wall
63
Wall
63
Range Hoods
63
NOTE: For detailed warranty information, please refer to the customer’s warranty supplied with
each product. Be aware that warranties supplied with each product may contain both USA and
Canadian versions. For products purchased and used in the USA, refer to the USA Warranty.
52
PRODUCT WARRANTY
QUICK REFERENCE
GUIDE
1990-2002
EHP PRODUCT LINES
PRODUCT
WARRANTIES
- 1990
TO 2001
Products / Brands
Product
Period
st
1 Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
REFRIGERATORS
Frigidaire
• Models without a
PureSource Ice &
Water Filter
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Models with a
PureSource Ice &
Water Filter
1996 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire Gallery /
Pro Gallery
• Models without a
PureSource Ice &
Water Filter
1995 - Mar 1999
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Models with a
PureSource Ice &
Water Filter
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire
Next Generation
(Models with script
logo versus blocked
style)
2001 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
1 year: Labor & full parts.
nd
2 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the ice maker and/or
ice and water dispenser on Through-the-Door dispenser models only
(parts and full labor).
nd
th
2 -5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
st
1 year: Labor & full parts.
st
1 year exclusion (On models with a PureSource Ice & Water
Filter): Original and replacement cartridges are warranted for 30 days
(parts only).
nd
2 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the ice maker and/or
ice and water dispenser on Through-the-Door dispenser models only
(parts and full labor).
nd
th
2 -5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
st
nd
1 & 2 years: On models from 1995 to models with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (LA911.., and earlier) parts
and full labor
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
st
nd
1 & 2 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the ice maker
and/or ice and water dispenser on Through-the-Door dispenser
models only (parts and full labor).
st
nd
Exclusion - 1 & 2 years (on models with PureSource Ice &
Water Filter): Original and replacement cartridges are warranted for
30 days (parts only).
nd
th
2 -5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only).
st
1 year: Labor & full parts.
st
1 year exclusion (On models with a PureSource Ice & Water
Filter): Original and replacement cartridges are warranted for 30 days
(parts only).
nd
th
2 -5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
USERS OF THIS CHART PLEASE NOTE: Many of the changes in the warranty coverage's are "DATE SPECIFIC"
according to the date of manufacture. The serial number of any product contains this manufacturing date and
follows the following format; "alpha character", "alpha character", "numeric", "numeric", "numeric". For
nd
example, the serial number LA952…, signifies that the product was made in the 52 week of 1999. The serial
th
number TH012…, means it was made in the 12 week of 2000.
53
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
REFRIGERATORS (Continued)
Gibson
1990 - 1997
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
1998 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Kelvinator*
Support Brands
Tappan
White Westinghouse
st
1 year: parts and full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing),
diagnosis & travel excluded.
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor.
st
nd
1 - 2 years: parts and full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing),
diagnosis and travel excluded.
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (parts only).
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
1 year: Labor & full parts.
nd
th
2 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing),
diagnosis and travel excluded.
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
1 year: Parts and full labor
st
rd
1 - 3 years: Covers food loss due to defects in materials and
workmanship. Covers food spoilage loss in excess of $5.00 per
occurrence, but not to exceed this maximum payment schedule:
Cumulative Maximum
Size-Cu. Ft.
0.5 to 9.9
$100.00
10.0 to 16.5
$150.00
16.6 to 21.5
$200.00
21.6 +
$250.00
nd
th
2 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (parts and productive labor, diagnosis and travel
excluded).
th
th
6 - 10 years (1995 or later models): Replace any defective
compressor (part only).
st
FOOD FREEZERS
Frigidaire
(non-Gallery models)
•
•
Frigidaire Gallery
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
st
•
1 - 2 years: On models from 1995 to March 1 , 1999 with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (LA911…, and earlier) Parts
and full labor
•
1 - 3 years: Food chart same as for Frigidaire non-Gallery models.
•
rd
th
3 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
•
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
st
th
nd
st
rd
th
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
54
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
FOOD FREEZERS (Continued)
Frigidaire Gallery
Gibson
Gibson
Kelvinator*, Tappan,
White Westinghouse*,
Multiflex Brands
Mar 1999 - Present
1990 - 1997
1998 - Present
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
Full Parts
& Labor
Full Parts
& Labor
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(LA911…, and earlier) Parts and full labor
•
1 - 3 years: Food Loss chart same as for Frigidaire non-Gallery
models.
•
2 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and full labor).
•
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
•
1 year: Parts and full labor
•
st
rd
1 - 3 years: Food Loss chart same as for Frigidaire non-Gallery
models.
•
2 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and productive labor, diagnosis and travel
excluded).
•
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
•
1
•
st
rd
1 - 3 years: Food Loss chart same as for Frigidaire non-Gallery
models.
•
3 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and productive labor, diagnosis and travel
excluded).
•
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
•
1 year: Parts and full labor
•
st
rd
1 - 3 years: Food Loss chart same as for Frigidaire non-Gallery
models.
•
nd
th
2 - 5 year: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing) or
Cabinet Liner (parts and productive labor, diagnosis and travel
excluded).
st
st
st
rd
nd
th
th
th
st
nd
th
th
th
st
nd
- 2 years: Parts and full labor
rd
th
th
th
st
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
55
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS
Frigidaire Gallery
Previous to Mar 99
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Frigidaire, Gibson
(all non-compact
models),
Kelvinator*, Tappan,
White Westinghouse
and Support Brands
1990 - 1998
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Gibson Compact
Models
1990 - 1998
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Gibson Heavy Duty,
Intermediate,
Slider/Casement &
Through the Wall
Models
1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
st
ND
1 - 2 years: On models with serial numbers effective March
st
1 , 1999 (JK911…, and earlier) Parts and full labor
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing), parts
and productive labor (diagnosis and travel excluded).
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
st
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(JK911…, and later) Parts and full labor
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing), parts
and productive labor (diagnosis and travel excluded).
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
1 year: Full parts and labor
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing), parts
and productive labor (diagnosis and travel excluded).
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Gibson brands only): Repair or replace any defective
parts of the Sealed System (compressor, condenser, evaporator,
drier and tubing), parts and full labor.
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
1 year: Full parts and labor
st
th
1 - 5 years: Provide a comparable model air conditioner if the
Sealed Refrigeration System fails (parts & full labor).
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
1 year: Full parts and labor
st
th
1 - 5 years: Provide a comparable model air conditioner if the
Sealed Refrigeration System fails (parts & full labor).
th
th
6 - 10 years: Replace any defective compressor (part only)
st
1 year: Full parts and labor
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace any defective parts of the Sealed
System (compressor, condenser, evaporator, drier and tubing), parts
and productive labor (diagnosis and travel excluded).
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
56
Product
Period
Products / Brands
st
1 Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
TOP LOAD WASHERS
Frigidaire
(non-Gallery
models)
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire Gallery
Models
1995 - Mar 1999
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Gibson
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
•
Kelvinator*, Tappan,
White
Westinghouse,
Support Brands
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
1 year: Parts and full labor
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
Exception: Transmissions on models with serial numbers
th
effective December 15 , 1999 (XC952…,) and newer are not field
serviceable, coverage is for part replacement only.
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).Parts and full
labor.
st
nd
1 - 2 years: On models with serial numbers previous to March
st
1 , 1999 (XC911…,) parts & full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).Parts and full
labor.
st
st
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(XC912…, and later) parts & full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only).
Exception: Transmissions on models with serial numbers
th
effective December 15 , 1999 (XC952…,) and newer are not field
serviceable, coverage is for part replacement only.
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).Parts and full
labor.
st
1 year: Parts and full labor.
nd
2 year: 1990 to 1995 models, Repair or replace all defective parts
only (labor not included).
nd
2 year: 1996 to 2000 models, coverage is for parts & full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only).
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).
st
1 year: Parts and full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Replace defective transmission (part only)
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
57
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
TUMBLE ACTION WASHERS
Frigidaire
(non-Gallery
models)
1995 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Gibson
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Frigidaire Gallery
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
1 year: Parts and full labor
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Replace any defective main motor, drive pulley or
motor controller (part only).
nd
th
2 - 25 years: (excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner wash
basket (part only).
st
nd
1 - 2 years: Labor and full parts. Exception - Gibson models
st
from 1990 - 1994 have 1 year full parts and labor only.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Replace any defective main motor, drive pulley or
motor controller (part only) Exception - Gibson models from 1990 nd
th
1994; parts covered from 2 - 5 years.
rd
th
3 - 25 years (excludes Alaska): Replace defective inner wash
basket (part only). Exception - Gibson models from 1990 - 1994;
nd
th
basket covered from 2 - 5 years.
st
nd
1 - 2 years: On models from 1995 to March, 1999, with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (XC911…, and earlier) parts
& full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Replace any defective main motor, drive pulley or
motor controller (part only).
rd
th
3 - 25 years: (excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner wash
basket (part only).
st
st
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(XC912…, and later) parts and full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Replace any defective main motor, drive pulley or
motor controller (part only).
nd
th
2 - 25 years: (excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner wash
basket (part only).
DRYERS
Frigidaire Gallery
Gibson
Frigidaire (non-Gallery),
Kelvinator*, Tappan,
White-Westinghouse
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 - 2 years: On models from 1995 to March, 1999, with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (XD911…, and earlier) parts
and full labor.
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(XD911…, and later) parts and full labor.
1990 - 1995
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
1 year: Parts and full labor
nd
2 year: All parts covered (labor excluded).
1996 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 - 2 years: Parts and full labor.
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: Parts and full labor
st
nd
st
st
st
st
st
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
58
nd
Products / Brands
Product
Period
st
1 Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
LAUNDRY CENTERS
Frigidaire Gallery
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire Gallery
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire (non-Gallery),
27" Gibson,
27" Support Brands
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
24" Frigidaire **,
24" Support Brands
1990 - 1998
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
st
nd
st
1 - 2 years: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 ,
1999 (XE912…, and later) parts & full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
Exception: Transmission on models with serial numbers
th
effective December 15 , 1999 (XE952…, and newer) are not field
serviceable, coverage is for part replacement only.
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).
st
1 year: Full parts & full labor..
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
Exception: Transmission on models with serial numbers
th
effective December 15 , 1999 (XE952…, and newer) are not field
serviceable, coverage is for part replacement only.
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).
st
1 year: Full parts & full labor.
st
nd
1 - 2 years: (Gibson models from 1996 to present) Labor and
full parts.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
Exception: Transmission on models with serial numbers
th
effective December 15 , 1999 (XE952…, and newer) are not field
serviceable, coverage is for part replacement only.
st
th
1 - 25 years: (In-Home, excludes Alaska) Replace defective inner
wash basket (parts & full labor, in-home service labor).
st
1 year: Full parts & full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Repair or replace defective transmission (part only)
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* * Not Produced in 1998 - 2000
59
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
DISHWASHERS
Frigidaire Gallery /
Gallery Pro Series
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Gibson
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
•
Frigidaire (non-Gallery)
Tappan,
Kelvinator,
White Westinghouse,
Support Brands
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
st
nd
1 - 2 years: On models from 1995 to March, 1999, with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (TH911…, and earlier) parts
& full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years (Electronic controls, Control Board, Relay Board,
Transformer & Nylon-Coated Racks): Replace listed defective
electronic parts - ribbon not included (part only). Replace defective
nylon-coated racks (part only) if the upper or lower rack rusts or peels
due to a manufacturing defect.
st
th
1 - 20 years (tub and door liner): Replace tub or door liner that
fails to hold water due to a manufacturing defect (part only).
st
st
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(TH912…, and later) parts & full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Electronic controls, Control Board, Relay Board,
Transformer & Nylon-Coated Racks): Replace listed defective
electronic parts - ribbon cable not included (part only). Replace
defective nylon-coated racks (part only) if the upper or lower rack
rusts or peels due to a manufacturing defect.
st
th
1 - 20 years (tub and door liner): Replace tub or door liner that
fails to hold water due to a manufacturing defect (part only).
st
1 year: Labor and full parts
nd
st
2 year (Gibson models manufactured after Nov. 1 , 1996
(TH644…, and later): Labor & full parts.
nd
st
2 year (excluding models manufactured after Nov. 1 , 1996
(TH644.., and later: Replace defective parts of water distribution
system (pump, motor, lower wash arm and internal soft/hard food
disposer on all models, plus the wash tower, upper spray arms with
associated supply tube and filter assembly on models with these
features. Not covered: Associated Inlet and Drain plumbing parts
(parts only; no labor).
rd
th
st
nd
th
3 - 5 years on models manufactured after Nov. 1 , 1996 (2 - 5
st
on models before Nov. 1 , 1996): Replace any nylon-coated racks
(part only) if they rust or peel due to a manufacturing defect.
rd
th
st
nd
3 - 10 years on models manufactured after Nov. 1 , 1996 (2 th
st
10 on models before Nov. 1 , 1996): Replace tub or door liner that
fails to hold water due to a manufacturing defect (part only).
st
1 year: Labor and full parts
nd
st
2 year (excluding models manufactured after Nov. 1 , 1996
(TH619.., and later: Replace defective parts of water distribution
system (pump, motor, lower wash arm and internal soft/hard food
disposer on all models, plus the wash tower, upper spray arms with
associated supply tube and filter assembly on models with these
features. Not covered: Associated Inlet and Drain plumbing parts
(parts only; no labor).
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Replace any nylon-coated racks (part only) if they rust
or peel due to a manufacturing defect.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (applies to Frigidaire branded Electronic Control
models produced prior to May 31, 1996 (TH619…, and earlier):
Replace any defective Electronic Controls, Control Board, Relay
board, Transformer (ribbon cable not included) part only.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Nylon-coated rack models; applies to all
st
Frigidaire, Non-Gallery models produced prior to May 31 , 1996
(TH619…, and earlier): Replace defective nylon-coated racks (part
only) if they rust or peel due to a manufacturing defect.
nd
th
2 - 20 years (Frigidaire branded "Ultra Power" models
st
produced prior to May 31 , 1996 only): Replace defective tub or
door liner (parts only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace defective tub or door liner (part only).
60
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
FREE STANDING RANGES
Gas & Electric
models -Frigidaire
(non-Gallery),
Kelvinator*, Support
Brands, Tappan,
White Westinghouse
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
Frigidaire Gallery
Gas & Electric
Ranges (includes
stand alone, Warm &
Serve Drawer
models)
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Soiled Element models- Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units): Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
•
1 - 2 years: On models from 1995 to March 1999, with serial
st
numbers previous to March 1 , 1999 (VF911…, and earlier) parts
& full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years (Soiled Element models- Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units): Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Gibson Electric models
(Smoothtops, Coil
Element) Gibson
Gas Models
•
•
1990 - 1997
Full Parts
& Labor
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
•
•
1998 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
st
nd
st
st
1 year: On models with serial numbers effective March 1 , 1999
(XC912…, or NF912…, and later) parts and full labor.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Soiled Element models- Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units): Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
st
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
th
2 - 5 years (Soiled Element models- Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units): Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: Replace any defective surface unit grates, top burner
and valves or oven thermostat, burner, and valves (parts only).
st
nd
1 - 2 years: Labor and full parts.
rd
th
3 - 5 years (Soiled Element models- Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units): Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: Replace any defective surface unit grates, top burner
and valves or oven thermostat, burner, and valves (parts only).
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
61
Product
Period
Products / Brands
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
OVER & UNDER RANGE
Tappan
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
•
2 year: Replace any defective part of the microwave oven section
(part only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only).
Note: Over-Under microwave models have not been produced
since 1997; from 1998 to present, the upper oven is a gas or
electric unit.
•
•
st
nd
GAS & ELECTRIC COOKTOPS
Frigidaire (non-Gallery)
Support Brands
White Westinghouse
Tappan
Frigidaire Gallery,
Pro Gallery
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: (Solid Element models - Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units) Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Parts
•
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
th
2 - 5 years: (Solid Element models - Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units) Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: On models from March 1999 (VF911…, or NF911…, and
later) parts and full labor.
rd
th
3 - 5 years: (Solid Element models - Glass Top, Seal & Surface
Heating Units) Replace any defective surface heating element,
deteriorated rubberized-silicone seal (upswept Freestanding models
only), or glass top that breaks due to thermal breakage (not customer
abuse). Parts only.
•
st
st
st
MICROWAVE OVENS (Over-the-Range Models)
Frigidaire (non-Gallery)
White Westinghouse*
Tappan
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Gallery Pro Series
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
2 year: In-Home Warranty - Replace any defective part in the
microwave oven (parts only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only)
st
nd
1 - 2 years: Labor and full parts.
rd
3 year: In-Home Warranty - Replace any defective part in the
microwave oven (parts only).
rd
th
3 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only)
st
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
2 year: In-Home Warranty - Replace any defective part in the
microwave oven (parts only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only)
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
* Not Produced in 1996 - 1997
62
Products / Brands
Product
Period
1st Year
Additional Coverage's or Exceptions
MICROWAVE OVENS (Countertop Models)
Frigidaire & Tappan
.6, .8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.3,
1.5 Cu. Ft. Models
1990 - Present
Tappan Reconditioned
Models
1990 - 1995
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
•
st
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
2 year: Carry-In Warranty - Replace any defective part of the
microwave oven section (part only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only).
st
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
2 year: Carry-In Warranty - Replace any defective part of the
microwave oven section (part only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only).
MICRO WALL OVENS
Frigidaire
Tappan
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
st
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
nd
2 year: Carry-In Warranty - Replace any defective part of the
microwave oven section (part only).
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only).
WALL OVENS
Frigidaire (non-Gallery)
Gas & Electric,
Tappan Gas & Electric,
White Westinghouse
Electric Models
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
Frigidaire Gallery / Pro
Gallery Gas & Electric
Models
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
•
1 - 2 years: Labor and full parts.
nd
th
2 - 10 years: Replace any defective magnatron tube (part only)
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
1995 - Mar 1999
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 - 2 years: Labor and full parts.
Mar 1999 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1 year: Labor and full parts.
1990 - Present
Full Parts
& Labor
•
1
st
st
nd
st
RANGE HOODS
Frigidaire Gallery
Support Brands
st
nd
st
std
year: Labor and full parts.
Limited Warranty - Alaskan Exclusion
(Applicable to ALL PRODUCTS/BRANDS LISTED IN THIS CHART for the time periods outlined): All of the coverage's of each
product warranty apply, plus any exclusions on the actual warranties (see *Normal Responsibilities of the Consumer). Not covered Costs of the technician's travel to the home and any costs for pickup and delivery of the appliance required because of service.
9-5-00 mcd
63
Warranty Parts Recovery Program
As part of an increased effort to drive supplier quality, EHP is implementing a Warranty Parts Recovery program
to collect failed component parts from the field for review and testing. The following list is provided to give the
service community a "heads up" as to which parts they may be required to return to the factory via prepaid shipping
labels. A sample of these service parts will have a prepaid Fed Ex shipping label and an instruction label included
in the packaging. Servicers are instructed to use the same box the part was packaged in to return the part to the
factory for testing. Simply apply the Fed Ex label and have part shipped at no cost direct to the factory. This
process has already been implemented in a limited capacity by our Dishwasher Product Line as well as in
Refrigeration. This new program is an expanded effort building upon their precedence.
Top Parts for Return
Part #
Item
Part #
Item
Part #
Item
240370304
Filter Cup Hsg
240352403
Ice Maker
5308002385
Snubber Ring
131686100
Washer Belt
316207502
EOC
131878400
Trans Assembly
5303279394
Water Seal Kit
5303918277
Ice Maker
316220805
Clock Overlay
5303935066
Ignitor
240531101
Water Valve
131878401
Trans Assembly
5304425594
Compressor
134149200
Controller Assy
154373301
Water Valve
240369701
Evap Fan Motor
5304426010
Control Board
134101800
Lid Lock
5304426004
Control Board
131560100
Motor, Main Drive
134051200
Drain Pump
218428101
Handle Door
316233900
Probe, Oven Temp
316220804
Clock Overlay
316021501
Element Switch
154362809
Control
154418301
Motor Assembly
131878402
Trans Assembly
316135701
Spark Module
131902700
Motor, Pulley
316222802
EOC
131553900
Heater, Hsg Assy
131192800
Screw, Lockplate
316251942
Main Top Assy
154361201
Latch Assembly
154408901
Timer
316021500
Element Switch
154361203
Latch Assembly
5303207418
Water Valve
154230101
Detergent Disp.
131802100
Timer Washer
Please be aware that all claims are subject to an
auditing process and fraud is punishable by law.
64
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