VLT 3000/3500 1-50 HP SM

Introduction

Section One

Section Two

Section Three

Section Four

Section Five

Section Six

Appendix

Table of Contents

Safety Precautions

Required Tools

○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

0 - 2

0 - 3

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Description of Operation

Sequence of Operation

○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

1 - 1

1 - 4

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Fault Indicators and Messages

Troubleshooting Tips

Troubleshooting Flowchart

○ ○ ○

Symptom/Cause Chart

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

2 - 1

2 - 5

2 - 6

2 - 9

Static Test Procedures

Dynamic Test Procedures

○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

3 - 1

3 - 6

Component Replacement Procedures

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

4 - 1

Current Limit Trips

Ground Fault Trips

Overcurrent Trips

Overvoltage Trips

Fault Memory

○ ○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

5 - 1

5 - 3

5 - 3

5 - 4

5 - 6

Spare Parts Tables

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

6 - 1

Component Locations

Block Diagrams

○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

○ ○

○ ○

7 - 1, 7 - 5

7 - 2, 7 - 6

0 - 1

VLT

®

Series Service Manual

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this manual is to provide technical information and instructions that will enable the user to identify faults and affect repairs on the following Danfoss

Series 3000 and 3500 Adjustable Frequency Drives:

VLT 3002-3022, 230V VLT 3502-3532, 230V

VLT 3002-3052, 380, 460V VLT 3502-3562, 380, 460V

The manual has been divided into five sections. The first section covers the description and sequence of operations. Section two covers fault messages and provides troubleshooting charts both in the form of flow and symptom/cause.

Section three describes the various tests and methods used to evaluate the drives' condition. Section four covers the removal and replacement of the various components. Section five discusses application-specific information.

ESD SAFETY

Electrostatic discharge. Many electronic components are sensitive to static electricity. Voltages so low that they cannot be felt, seen or heard can reduce the life, affect performance, or completely destroy sensitive electronic components.

When performing service, proper ESD equipment should be used to prevent possible damage from occurring.

Bob

0 - 2

VLT

®

Series Service Manual

!

WARNING:

FOR YOUR SAFETY:

The Adjustable Frequency Drive (AFD) contains dangerous voltages when connected to the line voltage. Only a competent technician should carry out the service.

1) DO NOT touch the electrical parts of the AFD when the AC line is connected. After the AC line is disconnected wait at least 15 minutes before touching any of the components.

2) When repairs or inspection is made the AC line must be disconnected.

3) The STOP key on the control panel does not disconnect the AC line.

4) During operation and programming of the parameters the motor may start without warning. Activate the STOP key when changing data.

TOOLS REQUIRED:

The following tools will be sufficient to troubleshoot and repair all units covered by this manual:

Digital multi-meter

Clamp-on ammeter

Analog voltmeter

Flat head screw drivers

Phillips screw drivers

Torx drivers - T10, T15, T20, T27

Socket 7mm

Pliers

Torque wrench

0 - 3

DESCRIPTION OF

OPERATION

Section One

Refer to the overall schematic in the Appendix.

This manual in not intended to give a detailed description of the unit's operation.

It is intended to provide the reader a general overview of the function of each of the unit's main assemblies. With this information, the repair technician should have a better understanding of the unit's operation and therefore aid in the troubleshooting process.

The VLT is divided primarily into three sections commonly referred to as: logic, interface, and power.

LOGIC SECTION

RAM

DATA

ADRESS

CONTROL

EPROM

EEPROM

VVC

POWER

The control card contains the majority of the logic section. The heart of the control card is a microprocessor which controls and supervises all functions of the unit's operation. In addition, a separate PROM contains the parameter sets which characterize the unit and provide the user with the definable data enabling the unit to be adjusted to meet the customer's specific application. This definable data is then stored in an EEPROM which provides security during power-down and also allows flexibility for future changes as needed. A custom integrated circuit generates the PWM waveform which is then sent on to the Interface/ILD

Card gate drive circuits.

KEYBOARD

DISPLAY

D

A

2

POWER

FEEDBACK

ANALOG

INPUTS

DIGITAL

INPUTS

1

D

A

1

1

ANALOG

OUTPUTS

DIGITAL

CHANNEL

RELAY

Also, part of the logic section is the keyboard/display mounted on the control card. The keyboard provides the interface between the digital logic and the human programmer. The LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) provides the operator/programmer with menu selection, unit status and fault diagnostic information. Programming is accomplished through the use of four of the eight keys available on the keyboard. The additional four keys provide various local controls, depending on the type of unit.

A series of customer terminals are provided for the input of remote commands such as: Run, Stop and Speed

Reference. Terminals are also provided to supply outputs to peripheral devices for the purpose o f monitoring and control. Two programmable relay outputs are also available to interface the unit with other devices.

In addition, the control card is capable of communicating via a serial link with outside devices such as a personal computer or a programmable logic controller.

The control card provides two voltages for use from the customer terminal strip. The 24VDC is used primarily to control functions such as: Start, Stop and Forward/

Reverse. The 24VDC is provided from a separate section of the unit's power supply and is delivered to the control card from the Interface/ILD Card via the two conductor ribbon cable.

1 - 1

Section One

LOGIC SECTION

A 10VDC supply is also available for use as a speed reference when connected to an appropriate potentiometer. These two voltage references are limited in the amount of available current they can provide (see specifications in Instruction

Manual). Attempting to power devices which draw currents in excess of that available may result in an eventual failure of the power supply. In addition, if the supply is loaded too heavily, sufficient voltage will not be available to activate the control inputs.

During the troubleshooting process it is important to remember that the control card can only respond to the commands it receives. It is also possible that due to a failure, the Control Card will not respond to control commands. For this reason it is necessary to isolate the fault to the control commands, control programming, or the drive itself. If, for example, the drive stops unexpectedly, the control commands should first be checked. This would include confirming that contact closures and analog input signals are present at the proper terminals of the drive.

Never assume that a signal is present because it is supposed to be. A meter should be used to confirm the presence of signals at the drive terminals.

Secondly, the programming of the drive should be confirmed to insure that the terminals used are set to accept the signals connected. Each digital and analog input terminal can be programmed to respond in very different ways. If there is a concern whether the remote controls are functioning correctly it is possible to take local control of the drive to confirm proper operation. A word of caution here: prior to taking local control, insure that all other equipment associated with the drive is prepared to operate. In many cases safety interlocks are installed which can only be activated through the use of a normal remote control start.

As there must be a command in order for the Control Card to respond, there may also be situations where the Control Card displays unknown data or that performance may be affected such as in the case of speed instability. In these cases the first thought may be to replace the Control Card. However, this type of erroneous operation is usually due to electrical noise injected onto control signal wiring. Although the Control Card has been designed to reject such interference, noise levels of sufficient amplitude can, in fact, affect the performance of the

Control Card. In these situations it is necessary to investigate the wiring practices used. For example, the control signal wiring should not be run in parallel with higher voltage wiring, including power, motor, and brake resistor leads. The reason being that voltages can be induced from one conductor onto another through capacitive or inductive coupling. This type of problem can be corrected by rerouting the wiring or through the use of shielded cable. When using shielded cable it is important to properly terminate the drain wire. The drain wire should be terminated only at the drive end of the cable. Specific termination points are provided on each unit. The opposite end of the shielded cable drain wire is then cut back and taped off to prevent it from coming in contact with other terminals or acting as an antenna.

1 - 2

LOGIC TO POWER

INTERFACE

INPUT LINE DRIVER (ILD)

CARD

Section One

The logic to power interface isolates the high voltage components of the power section from the low voltage signals of the logic section. This is accomplished by use of the Interface/ILD Card*. All communication between the control logic and the rest of the unit passes through the Interface/ILD Card. This communication includes: DC Bus voltage monitoring, line voltage monitoring, feedback from the current sensors, temperature sensing, and control of the gate drive firing signals.

The Interface Card contains a Switch Mode Power Supply (SMPS) which provides the unit with 24VDC,

±

13VDC, and 5VDC. The switch mode type supply is used due to its efficiency and linearity. Another benefit of the SMPS is that it uses the

DC Bus voltage as a power source. In the event of a power loss the power supply remains active for a longer period of time versus conventional power supplies.

During the troubleshooting process it is important to determine whether the

Interface Card is receiving or sending the signal that appears to be at fault. For example, the gate-drive signals are generated by the Interface Card. Conversely an over-temperature fault can result from the Interface Card receiving an "open" from the heatsink thermal switch. If the fault could stem from a signal received by the Interface Card, it is necessary to isolate the fault to either the signal source or the Interface/ILD card. It is critical to check all possibilities to avoid costly errors and long downtime. In any case, the Interface/ILD Card is relatively easy to change, so if it is suspect, a quick exchange will confirm a faulty board.

* The Input Line Driver (ILD) Card is used on VLT 3002-3004, 230V; VLT 3502-

3504, 230V; VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V, and VLT 3502-3511, 380V/460V.

All other units covered by this manual use the Interface Card.

POWER SECTION

RECTIFIER

The power section contains the Rectifier, the DC Capacitor Bank and the IGBT power components. Also included in the power section are the DC Bus Coils and the Motor Coils. During the troubleshooting process, extreme care is required when probing into the power section components. The DC Bus voltage can rise well over 700VDC on 460V units. Although this voltage begins to decrease upon removal of input power, it can take up to fifteen minutes to discharge the DC

Capacitor Bank to safe levels.

A fault in the power section will usually result in at least one of the customer provided line fuses being blown. Replacing fuses and re-apply power without further investigation is not recommended. The tests listed under Static Test

Procedures in Section Three should be performed to insure that there are no shorted components in the power section. It is recommended that the motor leads be disconnected from the unit prior to re-applying power. This precaution opens the path for short circuit currents through the motor in case a faulty component remains.

DC BUS

INVERTER

R

S

T

M

SIMPLFIED PWM POWER SECTION

1 - 3

Section One

SEQUENCE OF

OPERATION

VLT 3002-3004, 230V,

VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3502-3508, 380V/460V

When input power is first applied, the Rectifier Module converts the line voltage into a DC voltage. The rectified output is then connected to the DC Bus filter establishing a fixed DC Bus voltage. To limit the inrush charge current in the DC

Bus capacitors, three Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) resistors are added in series with the inputs of the Rectifier Module. NTC resistors decrease in resistance as temperature increases. Providing that the charging process proceeds normally, the power supplies will come up and provide the Control Card with low voltage control power. At this time the Control Card display will indicate that the unit is ready for operation.

Following a run command and a speed reference, the Control Card delivers three

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals to the ILD Card. The ILD Card in turn receives these three signals and creates the six individually isolated gate drive signals. These gate pulses are fed directly to the Insulated Gate Bi-polar Transistor

(IGBT) output power devices. The IGBTs are switched on and off to develop the

PWM waveform which is ultimately delivered to the motor. As the unit operates, the ILD Card monitors the unit's operational status. Currents and voltages out of specified limits or excessive temperatures will result in the ILD Card responding to the fault. The ILD Card sends the appropriate fault message to the Control Card and in virtually all cases causes the unit to trip. Section 2 of this manual describes the fault messages and provides direction in determining the cause and the solution for the fault.

Bus Coil

Rectifier

Module

+VDC

MOVs

NTCs

MOV

Bus

Capacitors

MOV

–VDC

VLT 3006-3032, 230V,

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3511-3562, 380V/460V

When power is first applied, the normally open Bus Contactor forces the input line current to flow through the Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) resistors. PTC resistors increase in resistance as the temperature increases. The

1 - 4

SEQUENCE OF

OPERATION

Section One

Bus

Contactor

PTC resistors are placed in series with the inputs of the Rectifier Module to limit the initial charge current of the DC Bus capacitors. The rectified line voltage is then applied to the DC Bus filter. As the DC Bus voltage increases, the Interface

Card power supplies energize. As the power supplies stabilize, the Interface Card sends a signal to the Relay Card to pull in the Bus Contactor. The Relay Card energizes the contactor coil with a short burst of a high amplitude, full-wave rectified voltage to pull in the Bus Contactor. The Relay Card then switches the Bus

Contactor coil voltage to a lower rectified holding voltage. As soon as the DC Bus

Contactor closes, the PTC resistors are effectively removed from the circuit and the DC Bus Capacitors quickly finish charging.

1

Providing that the charging process proceeds normally, the Interface Card power supplies will provide the Control Card with low voltage control power and the

Control Card display will indicate that the unit is ready for operation.

Following a run command and a speed reference, the Control Card delivers a

PWM signal (one per Phase) to the Interface Card. The Interface Card in turn receives these three signals and creates six individual isolated gate drive pulses.

From here the gate pulses are fed directly to the Insulated Gate Bi-polar Transistor

(IGBT) output power devices. The IGBTs are switched on and off to develop the

PWM waveform which is ultimately delivered to the motor.

As the unit operates, the Interface Card monitors the unit's operational status.

Currents and voltages out of specified limits or excessive temperatures will result in the Interface Card responding to the fault. The Interface Card sends the appropriate fault message to the Control Card and in virtually all cases causes the unit to trip. Section Two of this manual describes the fault messages and provides direction in determining the cause and the solution for the fault.

Rectifier

Module

Bus Coil

+VDC

MOVs

MOV

Bus

Capacitors

*

PTCs

–VDC

*

Only two PTC resistors

on some units

Bus Coil

1 The VLT 3511, 380/460V units have the Bus Contactor relay and PTC resistors mounted on the ILD Card.

1 - 5

FAULT INDICATORS

AND MESSAGES

Section Two

A variety of messages are displayed by the control card. Some messages indicate the operational status of the unit while others provide warnings of an impending fault. In addition, there are the alarm messages which indicate that the unit's operation has stopped due to a fault condition. In this section we will deal with only those messages which interrupt the unit's operation. A complete list of status messages can be found in the Instruction Manual. The particular type of status, warning, or alarm message will be indicated on the bottom line of the display.

STATUS MESSAGES

100.0%

REFERENCE.000000

CURRENT0LIM..000

CURRENT LIMIT

This message will flash in the display when the unit is operating above the current limit setting as recorded in parameter 209. Parameter 310 may be set to provide a fixed time delay after which the unit will trip.

REF FAULT

This message will flash in the display should any live zero signal be operating outside of its range. For example, 4-20mA has been selected as the speed reference. Should the current loop be broken, the display will flash "REF FAULT".

Parameters 414 and 415 may be used to select the unit's response to this condition.

NO 24 VOLT

This message will flash if the 24 volt power supply is missing or out of tolerance.

The 24 volt supply is used only for the customer's remote connections.

NO MOTOR

This message will flash if Motor Check has been activated in parameter 313, terminal 27 is enabled and no motor is detected.

2 - 1

Section Two

WARNING MESSAGES

100.0%

REFERENCE.000000

VOLTAGE0LOW.000.

VOLTAGE LOW

This message will flash when the DC Bus voltage has fallen below the lower limit.

This is an indication of low line voltage. This is only a warning message, however.

If the condition persists, it will result in a unit trip on "Under Voltage".

* Refer to table for specific value.

VOLTAGE HIGH

This message will flash when the DC Bus voltage has exceeded the upper limit.

This is an indication of high line voltage or regenerative energy being returned to the bus. This is only a warning message, however, if the condition persists, it will result in a unit trip on "Over Voltage".

* Refer to table for specific value.

INVERT TIME

This message will flash when the inverter ETR value has reached 98%. The inverter

ETR (Electronic Thermal Relay) begins counting up as soon as the output current exceeds 105% of the unit's continuous current rating. At an inverter ETR value of

100%, the unit trips on "Invert Time".

MOTOR TIME

This message will flash if Motor Thermal Protection has been activated in parameter

315, "Warning" has been selected as the Data Value, and the Motor ETR value has reached 98%. The Motor ETR value begins counting up if the motor is run at slow speed or if the motor is consuming more than 116% of the motor's nominal rated current as entered in parameter 107. At a Motor ETR value of 100%, the unit will respond based on the setting in parameter 315. If Trip has been selected, the unit will trip on "Motor Time".

OVERCURRENT

This message indicates at least one of the three output phases has reached the unit's peak current rating. During this time the control card attempts to initiate current limit. If the current rises too fast or the control card cannot control the condition by means of current limit, the unit will trip on "Over Current".

* DC BUS VOLTAGE LIMITS

VLT Rating

SMPS stop

SMPS start

Undervoltage trip, inverter stopped inverter enabled

Control Card undervoltage warning

Control Card overvoltage warning

(brake applied*, parameter 300)

Overvoltage trip, inverter stopped inverter enabled

* Only on VLT Series 3000 units.

VLT 3002-3052

VLT 3502-3562

230VAC 380VAC 460VAC

190

210

210

230

235

360

410

400

430

440

360

410

460

500

510

370

(395)

410

380

665

(705)

730

680

800

(845)

880

820

2 - 2

ALARM MESSAGES

ALARM

TRIP0LOCK000000

INVERTER0FAULT00

Menu

+

Data

Alarm On

Jog

Fwd

Rev

Stop

Reset

Start

Section Two

Alarm messages will be indicated by the following messages appearing in the display and the red Alarm LED will flash on the unit keypad. All alarm messages result in the unit's operation being interrupted and require a Manual or Automatic reset. Automatic reset can be selected in parameters 309 and 312. In addition, the message "Trip" or "Trip Locked" will be displayed. If "Trip Locked" is displayed, the only possible reset is to cycle power and then perform a manual reset. Manual reset is accomplished by means of the front panel push button or by a remote contact closure on the appropriate control terminal. Remedies listed with each alarm message give a basic description of the corrective action which can be taken to correct the fault condition. For a more detailed explanation, see the

Symptom/Cause Section and the Application Section. Also note the numbers in parenthesis by each alarm message. These are the codes which will appear in the

Fault memory, parameter 602.

INVERTER FAULT (1)

This message indicates a fault in the power section of the unit. This fault returns a "Trip Locked". Also see Testing The Inverter Section.

OVER VOLTAGE (2)

This message indicates the DC Bus voltage upper limit has been exceeded. This fault can be caused by high line voltage or regenerative energy being returned from the motor. To remedy this fault condition, reduce the line voltage or extend the Decel Ramp. This fault returns a "Trip". Also see Over Voltage Trips.

UNDER VOLTAGE (3)

This message indicates the DC bus voltage has fallen below the lower limit. To remedy this fault, increase the line voltage to the correct value for the unit rating.

This fault returns a "Trip". Also see Testing the Soft Charge Circuit.

OVER CURRENT (4)

This message indicates a short circuit on the output of the inverter. This fault may also be caused by the unit reaching it's peak current rating so rapidly that the unit can not respond with current limit. An example may be running the drive at speed and closing an output contactor connecting the drive to a high inertia load. To remedy this fault, check the output wiring and motor for short circuits. This fault returns a "Trip Locked". Also see Over Current Trips.

2 - 3

Section Two

ALARM MESSAGES

ALARM

TRIP0LOCK000000

GROUND0FAULT000

GROUND FAULT (5)

This message indicates a leakage to ground on the output of the inverter. To remedy this fault, check the output wiring and motor for ground faults. It is also necessary to ensure that the VLT has been properly grounded. This fault returns a

"Trip Locked". Also see Ground Fault Trips.

OVER TEMP (6)

This message indicates that the unit's heatsink temperature or the unit's internal ambient temperature has exceeded permissible limits. All units covered by this manual use a resetting thermal switch. The thermal switch is located on either the

ILD Card or is mounted on the heatsink of units which use the Interface Card. To remedy the fault, correct the over temperature condition. This fault returns a "Trip."

Also see Overtemp Trips.

INVERT TIME (7)

This message indicates the unit has delivered greater than 105% of the unit's continuous current rating for too long (inverse time function). Prior to this fault condition the "Invert Time" warning will be displayed. To remedy this fault, reduce the motor load to at or below the unit's continuous current rating. This fault returns a "Trip Locked". During the trip the counter will count down. Upon reaching 90%, the "Trip Locked" will change to "Trip".

MOTOR TIME (8)

This message indicates the motor has consumed greater than 116% of the value entered in parameter 107 (motor nominal current) for too long (inverse time function).

This fault may also be caused from running the motor at a low speed and high current for too long a period of time. This trip will only occur if the "Motor Thermal

Protection" has been activated in parameter 315. Prior to the trip the "Motor

Time" warning will be displayed. To remedy this fault, reduce the load on the motor or raise the motor's speed. This fault returns a "Trip Locked". During the trip the counter will count down. Upon reaching 0% the "Trip Locked" will change to "Trip".

CURRENT LIMIT (9)

This message will be displayed if the unit has run in current limit for a time which exceeds the setting in parameter 310. To remedy this fault, reduce the motor's load or verify that the correct settings have been entered in parameter 209 (Current

Limit) and parameter 310 (Current Limit Trip Delay). This fault returns a "Trip". See

Current Limit Trips.

MOTOR TRIP (15)

This message will be displayed if parameter 400 is set to "Thermistor" and motor thermistor connected between terminals 50 and 16 has increased to a resistance of 3K

. To remedy this fault remove the motor over temperature condition. This fault returns a "Trip". The Reset Button can be held to allow access to the parameters.

EXCEPT FAULT

This fault is usually the result of electrical noise caused by a poor earth ground connection to the VLT. This fault may also be seen if Adaptive Motor Tuning is attempted on a motor many times larger than the drive rating (parameter 106).

(This fault is accompanied by the PC address where an illegal value was found, also see page 4-1.)

2 - 4

GENERAL

TROUBLESHOOTING TIPS

Section Two

Prior to diving into a repair, here a few tips that if followed will make the job easier and may prevent unnecessary damage to good components.

1.

First and foremost respect the voltages produced by the drive. Always verify the presence of line voltage and bus voltage before working on the unit.

Also remember that some points in the drive are referenced to the negative bus and are at bus potential even though you may not expect it.

2.

Never power up a unit which has had power removed and is suspected of being faulty. If a short circuit exists within the unit, applying power is likely to result in further damage. The safe approach is to conduct the Static Test

Procedures. The static tests check all high voltage components for short circuits. The tests are relatively simple to make and can save money and downtime in the long run.

3.

The safest method of conducting tests on the drive is with the motor disconnected. In this way a faulty component that was overlooked or the unfortunate slip of a test probe will generally result in a unit trip instead of further damage.

4.

Following the replacement of parts, test run the unit with the motor disconnected. Start the unit at zero speed and slowly ramp the speed up until the speed is at least above 40 Hz. Monitor the phase to phase output voltage on all three motor terminals to check for balance (an analog voltmeter will work best here). If balanced the unit is ready to be tested on a motor. If not, further investigation is necessary.

5.

Never attempt to defeat fault protection devices within the drive. This will only result in unwanted component damage and may result in personal injury as well.

6.

Always use factory approved replacement parts. The unit has been designed to operate within certain specifications. Incorrect parts may effect performance and result in further damage to the unit.

7.

Read the instruction and service manuals. A thorough understanding of the unit is the best approach. If ever in doubt consult the factory or an authorized repair center for assistance.

2 - 5

Section Two

VLT 3002-3022, 230V

VLT 3002-3052, 400/500V

1)

Symptom

Motor operation unstable

2)

Is the output phase to phase voltage and current balanced?

YES NO

4)

Verify correct settings have been entered in Group 1

"Load & Motor"

5)

Symptom

Motor will not run

6)

Is there light in the display?

NO YES

3)

Test the inverter section, page 3-4

8)

Are fault messages displayed?

NO YES

7)

Is the correct line voltage present on the input terminals?

L1/R (91), L2/S (92), L3/T (93)

NO YES

See Item 18, page 2-8

See Item 11, page 2-7

VLT 3502-3532, 230V

VLT 3502-3562, 400/500V

See Item 12, page 2-7

See Diagnostics section,

"Alarm Messages".

2 - 6

Section Two

9)

Symptom

No information in display

10)

Is the correct line voltage present on the input terminals?

L1/R (91), L2/S (92), L3/T (93)

YES NO

14)

12)

Disconnect all control signal plugs on the control card.

Does the fault disappear?

NO YES

Is the DC Bus voltage OK? Should read 1.4 x the AC line V.

Measure the DC Bus voltage between terminal +VDC and –VDC.

– +

Also refer to pages 3-1 and 3-2.

11)

Check Input Disconnect and fusing.

If fuses are blown, check for a short circuit in the

Power Section.

13)

The fault may be caused by a short circuit in the control signals.

Check control wiring for proper connection.

– + 15)

Test the soft charge circuit, input rectifier, and DC Bus capacitors.

YES NO

16)

Replace the Interface/

ILD Card.

Does the fault disappear?

YES NO

17)

Replace the Control Card.

Does the fault disappear?

NO YES

Resume operation

Replace the

Relay Card

Resume operation

2 - 7

Section Two

18)

Motor stationary, info in display but no fault message displayed

CAUTION:

Prior to running in Local, insure all other equipment associated with the VLT is ready to function or has been isolated.

19)

Start VLT by pressing Start on the keypad.

20)

Is the display frozen, i.e., the display cannot be changed or is undefinable?

NO YES

22)

Is the motor connected correctly/

YES NO

23)

Try to run the VLT in local.

Refer to CAUTION at left.

Local control parameters.

On VLT Series 3000:

003 = Local

004 = Frequency reference change by means of + and –

On VLT Series 3500:

003 = keypad HOA

Press the Local/Hand key change speed by the + and –

Does the motor run?

YES NO

24)

Verify that the control signals are connected to the correct terminals and the appropriate parameter settings have been entered.

21)

Replace the Control Card, if this does not help, the fault might be electrical noise.

Check whether the following precautions have been taken:

• Have shielded cables been used?

• Are the shields correctly terminated?

• Is the unit properly grounded to earth?

Correct the motor wiring.

Insure motor overloads are reset and output contactor closed.

25)

Replace Control Card.

Does the motor run?

NO

26)

Replace Interface/ILD Card.

Does the motor run?

NO

27)

Consult factory.

2 - 8

Section Two

SYMPTOM/CAUSE CHARTS

SYMPTOM/CAUSE charts are generally directed towards the more experienced technician. The intent of these charts is to provide a range of possible causes for a specific symptom. In doing so, these charts provide a direction, but with limited instruction.

SYMPTOM

1.

Control Card Display Is Not Lit.

POSSIBLE CAUSES

Incorrect or missing input voltage

Incorrect or missing DC bus voltage

Remote control wiring loading the power supply

Defective Control Card

Defective Interface/ILD Card

Defective Relay Card

Defective or disconnected ribbon cables

2.

Blown Input Line Fuses Shorted Rectifier module

Shorted IGBT

Shorted DC Bus

Shorted brake IGBT

Mis-wired Dynamic Brake option

3.

Motor Operation Unstable

(Speed Fluctuating)

Start compensation set too high

Slip Compensation set too high

Improper current feedback

PID Regulator or Auxiliary Reference mis-adjusted

Control signal noise

4.

Motor Draws High Current But

Cannot Start. (May appear to rock back and forth.)

Start voltage set too high

Open winding in motor

Open connection to motor

One inverter phase missing. Test output phase balance.

2 - 9

Section Two

SYMPTOM/CAUSE CHARTS

SYMPTOM

5.

Motor Runs Unloaded But Stalls

When Loaded. (Motor may run rough and VLT may trip.)

POSSIBLE CAUSES

Current Limit set too low

One half of one inverter phase missing. Test output phase balance.

6.

Unbalanced Input Phase Currents

Note: Slight variations in phase currents are normal. Variations greater than 5% require investigation.

Input line voltage unbalanced

Faulty connection on input wiring

Fault in plant power transformer

Input Rectifier module faulty (open diode).

7.

Unbalanced Motor Phase Currents Open motor winding

Note: Slight variations in phase currents are normal. Variations greater than 5% require investigation.

Faulty motor connection

Fault in inverter section (see Symptom No. 6.)

2 - 10

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

All tests will be made with a meter capable of testing diodes. Use a digital VOM set on diode scale or an analog ohmmeter set on R x 100 scale. Before making any checks disconnect all input power, motor and brake option connections.

CAUTION:

Allow sufficient time for the DC Bus to fully discharge before beginning testing. The presence of bus voltage can be tested by setting your voltmeter for 1000VDC and reading the voltage at the labeled terminals shown in the drawings.

TESTING THE INPUT

RECTIFIER

–UDC

NTC

Resistors

+UDC

The purpose of making static tests on the input rectifier is to rule out failures in this device, either shorted or open diodes. Failure of the rectifier module will usually result in blown line fuses. It should be noted that blown input line fuses can also be the result of shorts in the IGBT module(s) or a damaged bus capacitor. See

Testing the Inverter Section and Testing the Bus Capacitors. For measurements where an open-circuit is expected the meter may show some initial continuity as the DC Bus capacitors charge up. This is normal and to be expected.

VLT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3502-3511, 380V/460V

1. Remove the Control Card to expose the ILD Card. Locate the UDC connector on the ILD Card (MK102). The red lead at the top side of the connector will be used for the (+UDC) test point and the black lead at the bottom of the connector will be the (–UDC) test point. The +UDC and –UDC fast-on terminals on the DC Card (as shown) can also be used.

2. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to (+UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead to terminals 91 (L1), 92 (L2), and 93 (L3) in turn. Each reading should be open.

3. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (+UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead to power terminals 91 (L1), 92 (L2), and 93

(L3) in turn. Each reading should show a diode drop.

4. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to the red lead (–UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead to power terminals 91 (L1), 92 (L2), and 93 (L3) in turn. Each reading should show a diode drop.

5. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to the

(–UDC) and the (+) meter lead to power terminals 91 (L1), 92 (L2), and 93

(L3) in turn. Each reading should show open. Test is complete.

Incorrect readings could indicate a faulty Rectifier Module. See Removal and

Replacement Instructions. If there is an open circuit reading when a diode drop reading is expected, see Testing the Soft Charge Circuit.

3 - 1

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

TESTING THE INPUT

RECTIFIER

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3516-3562, 380V/460V

Black Lead

–UDC

DC Bus

Capacitors

+UDC

Red Lead

1. Remove any plastic shields covering the DC Bus Capacitors and locate the

18 gauge red and black leads connected to the Bus Capacitor bus bars as shown. These leads indicate the positive (+UDC) and negative (– UDC) DC

Bus test points. The number and location of the bus capacitors will vary between units.

2. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to (+UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead in turn to the terminals (1/L1), (3/L2), and (5/L3) as labeled on the top side of the Bus Contactor. Each reading should be open.

3. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (+UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead in turn to the terminals (1/L1), (3/L2), and (5/

L3) on the top side of the Bus Contactor. Each reading should read a diode drop.

4. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to (–UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead in turn to the terminals (1/L1), (3/L2), and (5/L3) on the top side of the Bus Contactor. Each reading should show a diode drop.

5. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (–UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead in turn to the terminals (1/L1), (3/L2), and (5/

L3) on the top side of the Bus Contactor. Each reading should show open.

Test completed.

Incorrect readings indicate a faulty rectifier module. See Removal and Replacement

Instructions on page 4-4 If the rectifier module is shorted, it is important to inspect the Bus Charge Contactor. See page 3-3 for testing the soft-charge circuit.

Bus

Contactor

Balance

Resistors

3 - 2

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

TESTING THE SOFT-

CHARGE CIRCUIT

Black Lead

–UDC

NTC

Resistors

Red Lead

+UDC

Rectifier

Module

The purpose of the soft-charge circuit is to provide an initial high impedance current path for building up a charge on the Bus Capacitors. The size of the unit determines whether NTC resistors or PTC/Contactor combination are used.

VLT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3502-3511, 380V/460V

Measure the three NTC resistors (R303, R304, R305) located on the ILD Card.

The resistance should read about 10

- 20

at room temperature.

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3516-3562, 380V/460V

1. Inspect the Bus Charge Contactor. Remove the MK6 harness from the Relay

Card (see Appendix for component location) and check that the contacts measure open and the spring mechanism is functional. The armature resistance should be approximately 500

.

2. Check the resistance of the PTC resistors located on the Relay Card. At room temperature the resistance value should be about 30

.

3. Remove the Balance Resistors from the DC Bus capacitors. Use an ohmmeter to insure that the resistance values are correct, (18K

).

4. If all measurements are correct, re-install all components and proceed with dynamic tests.

Incorrect readings could indicate a damaged Bus Contactor, Relay Card, or problems with the DC Bus capacitors. If a balance resistor is damaged, replace the bus capacitors the resistor mounted across as well as any series connected

Bus Capacitors. See Replacing the Bus Contactor, replacing the Relay Card, and replacing the Bus Capacitors, page 4-4.

3 - 3

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

TESTING THE

INVERTER SECTION

The purpose of static testing the inverter section is to rule out failures in the IGBT power devices. If a short circuit is discovered during the testing, the particular module can be pinpointed by noting the output terminal indicating the short circuit.

When looking in units with multiple IGBT modules, the "U" phase is on the left,

"V" phase in the middle and the "W" phase is on the right.

NTC

Resistors

Black Lead

–UDC

Red Lead

+UDC

Rectifier

Module

V

LT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3502-3511, 380V/460V

1. Disconnect the motor leads from the unit. The low winding resistance within the motor will affect test measurements in the inverter section.

2. Remove the Control Card to expose the ILD Card. Locate the UDC connector on the ILD Card (MK102). The red lead at the top side of the connector will be used for the (+UDC) test point and the black lead at the bottom of the connector will be the (–UDC) test point. The +UDC and –UDC fast-on terminals on the DC Card (as shown) can also be used.

3. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to terminal (+UDC). Connect the negative

(–) meter lead to motor terminals 96 (U), 97 (V), and 98 (W) in turn. Each reading should be open.

4. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (+UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead to motor terminals 96 (U), 97 (V), and 98 (W) in turn. Each reading should show a diode drop.

5. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to (–UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead to motor terminals 96 (U), 97 (V), and 98 (W) in turn. Each reading should show a diode drop.

6. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (–UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead to motor terminals 96 (U), 97 (V), and 98 (W) in turn. Each reading should show open. Test is complete.

Incorrect readings indicate a damaged IGBT module. See Removal and

Replacement Instructions on page 4-3.

3 - 4

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

TESTING THE INVERTER

SECTION

Black Lead

–UDC

DC Bus

Capacitors

+UDC

Red Lead

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3516-3562, 380V/460V

1. Prior to making any measurements it is necessary to disconnect the motor leads from the unit. The low winding resistance within the motor will make it appear that there is a short circuit in the inverter section.

2. Remove any plastic shields covering the DC Bus capacitors and locate the

18 gauge red and black leads connected to the capacitor bus bars. These leads indicate the positive (+UDC) and negative (–UDC) DC Bus test points as shown.

3. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to the red lead to (+UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead in turn to motor terminals (T1/U), (T2/V) and (T3/

W). Each reading should be open.

4. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (+UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead in turn to motor terminals (T1/U), (T2/V), and

(T3/W). Each reading should show a diode drop.

5. Connect the positive (+) meter lead to (–UDC). Connect the negative (–) meter lead in turn to motor terminals (T1/U), (T2/V), and (T3/W). Each reading should shoe a diode drop.

6. Reverse the meter leads connecting the negative (–) meter lead to (–UDC) and the positive (+) meter lead in turn to motor terminals (T1/U), (T2/V), and

(T3/W). Each reading should show open. Test completed.

Incorrect readings indicate a damaged IGBT module. See Removal and

Replacement Instructions on page 4-4.

Bus

Contactor

Balance

Resistors

3 - 5

Section Three

STATIC TEST PROCEDURES

TESTING THE HEATSINK

THERMAL SWITCH

There are thermal switches included on all units covered by this manual. The smaller drives monitor the ambient temperature within the unit. The thermal switch is mounted on the ILD Card. All units with Interface Cards have a stand alone thermal switch mounted on the heatsink.

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3516-3562, 380V/460V

The heatsink temperature is sensed by a thermal switch. The thermal switch harness is connected to the top of the Interface Card at connector MK401. The switch will open when the heatsink temperature exceeds 100

°

C/212

°

F and will close when the heatsink temperature falls below 50

°

C/122

°

F. By unplugging the connector from the Interface Card, the thermal switch continuity can be checked.

DYNAMIC TEST

PROCEDURES

TESTING FOR OUTPUT

PHASE VOLTAGE

IMBALANCE

When testing phase imbalances, it is practical to measure both voltage and current.

A balanced voltage reading, but unbalanced current, indicates the motor is drawing uneven current. This could be caused by a fault in the motor windings or in the wiring connections between the drive and motor. When both voltage and current are unbalanced, it indicates a switching problem or a faulty connection within the unit itself. This can be caused by improper gate drive signals as a result of a faulty interface board. A faulty IGBT or loose wire connection between the IGBT and the output terminals may also be the cause.

NOTE: When monitoring output voltage an analog voltmeter should be used.

Digital meters are sensitive to the switching frequency and usually read erroneously.

1. Remove the motor leads from the output terminals of the unit.

2. Conduct the Inverter Test Procedure in Section Three.

3. If the Inverter Test Procedure proves good, power the unit back up. Initiate a

Run command with a speed reference greater than 40Hz.

4. Read the phase-to-phase output voltage. The actual value of the readings is of less importance than the phase-to-phase balance. This balance should be within 8 volts per phase.

5. If a greater-than-8-volt imbalance exists, measure the gate drive firing signals.

6. If the phase-to-phase output voltage is balanced, recheck motor and connections for faults. Consult the factory for additional assistance.

3 - 6

Section Three

DYNAMIC TEST

PROCEDURES

TESTING FOR CURRENT

FEEDBACK

GND

GND Test Point

A current sensor is in line with each phase of the output. These hall effect devices generate a current that is proportional to the current being drawn in each respective motor phase. The VLT relies on this feedback for proper output waveform control and for providing fault protection. Problems with the current sensors can cause unstable operation, over current trips, and ground fault trips.

A simple test of these signals can be made with a voltmeter. The measured voltage will be proportional to the current signal produced by each current sensor. At very light loads the AC voltage signal may be no more than 100mV to 300mV. The purpose of this test is to verify that all three sensors are functioning and that the signals are approximately equal when compared to each other.

1. Apply power to the unit. Leave the unit in stop mode.

2. Using a DC voltmeter, connect the negative (–) meter lead to the Control

Card test point labeled GND. Connect the positive (+) meter lead in turn to pins 4, 5, and 6 of the Control Card MK200 connector, (pin 1 of MK200 is on the lower side, closest to the MK201 connector). All three readings should be within 20 millivolts of zero.

3. Start the drive and bring the motor up to stable speed. Change the voltmeter to read AC voltage and measure the Same signals at pins 4, 5, and 6 of

MK201. All readings should be approximately equal.

Severe imbalances in the readings indicate a faulty current sensor or an uneven current draw by the motor. See "Testing for Output Phase Voltage Imbalance" on page 3-6. (The current sensors will vary with unit size. Consult Appendix drawings for assistance in finding component locations.)

Control Card

Ribbon Cables

10

9

8

7

14

13

12

11

20

19

18

17

16

15

4

3

6

5

2

1

+5V

+5V

+5V

+5V

INVOK

WP

VP

UP

SYNC

DISAB

COM

COM

COM

SIN

CR BW

CR BV

CR BU

VF B

+13V

–13V

FAULT LOGIC

PWM SIGNALS

SERIAL COMMUNICATION SIGNAL

RUN MODE LOGIC

COMMON FOR +13V, –13V, +5V

SAME AS "GND" TEST POINT

NOT USED

MOTOR CURRENT SIGNALS

DC BUS SIGNAL

2

1

+24V

COM1

SEPERATE CONTROL LOGIC

POWER SUPPLY

3 - 7

Section Three

TESTING GATE DRIVE

FIRING CIRCUITS

CAUTION: The gate firing signals are referenced to the negative DC

Bus and are therefore at Bus potential. Extreme care must be taken to prevent personal injury or damage to equipment. Oscilloscopes, when used, should be equipped with isolation devices.

The individual gate drive firing pulses originate on the Interface/ILD Card. These signals are then distributed to the individual IGBT's. An oscilloscope is the instrument of choice when observing waveforms; however, when a scope is not available, a simple test can be made with a DC voltmeter. When using a voltmeter, compare the gate pulse voltage readings between phases. A missing gate pulse or an incorrect gate pulse have a different average voltage when compared with the other pulse outputs. At very low frequencies (below 10Hz) the voltmeter reading will tend to bounce around as the pulses rise and fall. Above 10Hz the reading will stabilize. When using an oscilloscope, the test points remain the same, as shown. These tests must be made with the motor disconnected. The internal impedance of a meter or scope can induce problems to the IGBTs.

1. With power off, remove and re-install the Control Card as shown to allow easy access to the Interface/ILD Card.*

2. Measure the resistance at each of the six test points. Each test point should read approximately 2.2k

.

3. Apply power and run the unit up to 20Hz. Measure each of the six IGBT gate pulse signals.

4. If gate pulses are missing or the readings are inconsistent, remove power, remove the three IGBT gate wire harnesses from the Interface/ILD Card and measure the gate pulse signals directly at the Interface/ILD Card

Connectors.

There may be a slight DC shift in voltage readings between the positive and negative half IGBT gate signals.

3 - 8

Interface/ILD

Card

Mounting

Clips

Section Three

To Expose the Interface/ILD Card:

• Leaving the Ribbon Cables attached, remove the Control Card

• Mount the card by snapping the right side (edge) of the Control Card into the two (2) mounting clips.

GATE PULSE

PIN-OUTS

Gate pulses @ 20Hz, 10V/Div, 10mS/Div

3 - 9

Section Three

TESTING INPUT RECTIFIERS

Theoretically, the input current drawn on each of the three input phases should be equal. These currents will vary, however, due to variations in phase-to-phase input voltage and due to some single phase loads within the drive.

Given that the input phase voltages are equal, the input currents phase-to-phase should not vary more than 5%. Current imbalances in excess of 5% may indicate one of the diodes is not conducting properly. When the VLT is lightly loaded, it may not be possible to detect a current imbalance. If suspect, the modules should be statically tested. Refer to the Static Test procedures beginning on page 3-1.

3 - 10

COMPONENT

REPLACEMENT

PROCEDURES

REMOVING & REPLACING

THE CONTROL CARD

Section Four

NOTE: The Control Card comes mounted to a metal plate. When installed this plate sits in a slot provided on the left-hand side of the unit enclosure and is secured by two press-fit mounting clips attached to the right-hand side of the enclosure.

These mounting clips provide the earth ground connection for the Control

Card. If loose or damaged, the Control Card may experience electrical noise problems resulting in an "Except Fault" (see page 2-4).

REMOVAL

• Remove the two ribbon cables from plugs MK200 and MK201.

• Insert a screwdriver at the points indicated on the right side of the control card plate and pry upward.

• Lift the control card plate out and set aside.

REPLACEMENT

• Inspect Control Card mounting clips to ensure they are not loose or damaged.

• Insert the left side of the control card plate into the slot on the left side of the enclosure and slide the card down against the metal stop to ensure proper alignment with front cover.

• Reconnect the two ribbon cables to plugs MK200 and MK201.

• Firmly press down on the right side of the control card plate until it snaps into place.

4 - 1

Section Four

REMOVING & REPLACING

THE ILD CARD, DC CARD,

RECTIFIER CARD AND IGBT

VLT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3002-3008, 380V/460V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3502-3511, 380V/460V

ILD Card:

1. Remove the ground screw(s) on the ILD Card. The screws are located at the bottom and possibly at the top right on the board.

2. Remove all wire harnesses from the ILD Card. The three leads connecting the ILD Card to the motor coils may need to be removed from the Motor Coil side. The replacement ILD Card will show if these leads should be disconnected from the ILD Card or from the Motor Coils. Pay close attention to the orientation and routing of these wire leads.

3. Use the tip of a flat-head screw driver to release the ILD Card from the plastic mounting clips and lift the card upward.

4. To install, make sure that the Insulation Foil is in place.

5. Connect the ILD Card to Motor Coil wire leads.

6. Reverse the rest of the installation steps.

DC Card:

1. Remove the wires connecting the DC Card to the Bus Coil and the IGBTs.

2. Remove the mounting screws and the green/yellow ground lead.

3. Use the tip of a flat-head screw driver to release the DC Card from the plastic mounting clips and lift the card upward. This may require a little flexing of the side of the enclosure to accomplish.

4. Remove the wires connecting the DC Card to the rectifier module and remove the DC Card.

5. Reverse the steps above to replace.

Rectifier Module:

1. Remove the wire harness from the module terminals. Note the wire orientations.

2. Remove the two mounting screws and remove the module.

3. Clean the thermal grease from the enclosure heatsink and from underneath the Rectifier Module.

4. Install the wire harness to the module.

5. Apply silicon grease 3 mils thick to the entire base of the Rectifier Module.

6. Secure the Rectifier with the two screws. Torque to 12-14 LB-IN (1.5Nm).

4 - 2

Section Four

Six-Pack IGBT Module:

1. Remove all wire leads connected to the Six-Pack module.

2. Remove the mounting hardware and remove from the unit.

3. Clean the remaining heatsink compound from the enclosure heatsink and the Six-Pack module.

4. Apply silicon grease 3 mils thick to the entire base of the Six-Pack module.

5. Install the module and alternately tighten the mounting hardware to 21-23

LB-IN (2.5Nm).

6. Re-connect all wire leads to the Six-Pack Module.

IGBT Modules (VLT 3008, 380V/460V; VLT 3508-3511, 380/460V):

1. Remove all wire leads connected to the IGBT modules.

2. Remove the hardware holding the DC Link PCB to the IGBT Modules.

3. Remove the hardware which connects the Motor Coil to the IGBT lead on the module to be replaced.

4. Remove the two mounting screws and remove from the unit.

5. Clean the heatsink grease from the enclosure heatsink and underneath the

IGBT Module.

6. Apply silicon grease 3 mils thick to the entire base of the IGBT Module.

7. Install the module and tighten the mounting hardware to 21-23 LB-IN (2.5Nm).

8. Reverse the steps above to replace.

4 - 3

Section Four

REMOVING & REPLACING

THE INTERFACE CARD,

RELAY CARD, RECTIFIER,

AND IGBT

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380V/460V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3516-3562, 380V/460V

To gain access to some assemblies remove the Control Card (page 4-2). It may also be necessary to remove one of the enclosure cross support braces to gain access to components on some units.

Interface Card:

1. Remove all wire harnesses from the Interface Card.

2. Remove the ground screw from the top right-hand corner, (on units without

Interface Card ground wire).

3. Note in which enclosure slot the left side of the interface card was mounted. Use the tip of a flat-head screw driver to release the right side of the Interface Card from the plastic board supports and lift the board out of the unit.

4. Remove and inspect the Interface Card Insulation Foil, (not on 230V units).

5. Replace the Insulation Foil.

6. Slide the left-hand side of the Interface Card in the appropriate enclosure slot and snap the right-hand side of the plastic board supports. Make sure that all wire harnesses are accessible prior to seating the Interface Card.

7. Re-connect all wire harnesses and the ground screw.

Relay Card:

1. Remove all wire harnesses from the Relay Card.

2. Release the Relay Card from all plastic mounting clips and remove. Use the tip of a flat-head screw driver for the black plastic clips and needle nose pliers if white plastic stand-offs are used.

3. For units with the current sensors mounted on the Relay Card, note the wire labeling and orientation prior to moving the board. Remove the three leads connected to the drive side of the motor terminal strip and feed the leads back through the current sensors.

4. Reverse the steps above to replace.

4 - 4

Section Four

Rectifier Module:

1. Remove the five terminal screws from the module. Note the wire orientation and disconnect all wire leads.

2. Remove the two mounting screws securing the rectifier module to the heatsink and remove the module.

3. Clean the thermal grease from the enclosure heatsink and from underneath the Rectifier Module.

4. Apply silicon grease 3 mils thick to the entire base of the Rectifier Module.

5. Install the module and alternately torque the screws to 19-21 LB-IN (2.2Nm).

6. Replace all wire leads to the Rectifier Module terminals and torque the terminal hardware to 19-21 LB-IN (2.2 Nm).

IGBT Module:

1. Remove the HF Card (does not apply to 230V units).

2. Remove all hardware mounting the IGBT bus bars and the Clamp Capacitors.

3. Remove the remaining wire connecting the IGBT to the Motor Coil.

4. Remove the mounting screws on the IGBT and remove from the unit.

5. Clean the thermal grease from the enclosure heatsink and from underneath the IGBT Module.

6. Prior to installing the IGBT module, apply silicon grease 3 mils thick to the entire base of the module.

7. Install the module and lightly tighten the mounting screws. Tighten the mounting screws to a final torque of 19-21 LB-IN (2.2Nm).

8. Re-install the IGBT bus bars, clamp capacitors and Motor Coil lead. The

IGBT terminal hardware (including the 7mm HF Card standoffs) should be torqued to 27-29 LB-IN, (3.2 Nm).

9. Replace the HF Card and HF Card foil. The HF Card mounting screws should be tighten down to 12-14 LB-IN, (1.5Nm)

4 - 5

APPLICATIONS

CURRENT LIMIT TRIPS

UNSTABLE MOTOR

OPERATION

Section Five

Excessive loading of the VLT may result in "CURRENT LIMIT" trips. This is not a concern if the unit has been properly sized and intermittent load conditions cause anticipated operation in current limit. Nuisance current limiting and unstable motor operation can, however, be caused by improperly setting specific parameters.

The following parameters are those which are most critical to the VLT/Motor relationship.

100 - Load Type

103 - Motor Power

104 - Motor Voltage

105 - Motor Frequency

107 - Motor Current

108 - Motor Magnetizing Current

109 - Start Voltage

110 - Start Compensation (VLT 3000 only)

209 - Current Limit

PARAMETER 100

Load type is selected based on application demands. VLT Series 3000 drive can be set for both constant and variable torque applications. The VLT Series 3500 drive is specifically designed for variable torque applications. The available selections vary between these different series. An incorrect setting may provide an improper voltage to frequency (V/F) ratio to the motor with respect to load demand. For example, a constant torque (CT) load requires a higher V/F ratio at start-up than a variable torque (VT) load. If a VT mode of operation has been selected for a CT load, sufficient starting torque will not be available.

When a VLT Series 3000 unit is set for one of the variable torque modes, adjustments to parameters 109-113 will have no effect. The various VT modes have direct control over these parameters. When one of the CT Start/VT modes is selected on a VLT Series 3000 unit, the above mentioned parameters will have effect only until the reference has been reached. At this point the unit reverts to VT operation. It should be noted that parameters 110-113 do not exist in the VLT

Series 3500.

PARAMETERS 103, 104, 105, 107

These parameters, when incorrectly set, have an effect on other parameters as well as the unit's interpretation of the load. In setting these parameters enter the name plate data from the motor into the appropriate parameter. Use the conversion chart to change from HP to KW.

HP 1 2 3 5 7 10 15 20 30 40 50 60 75

kW 0.75 1.5 2.2 4.0 5.5 7.5 11 15 22 30 37 45 55

HP 100 125 150 200 250 300

kW 75 90 110 160 185 200

5 - 1

Section Five

PARAMETER 108

Motor Magnetization Current is the current required to maintain the magnetic field in the motor. Magnetization Current is factory set based on the motor power entered in parameter 103. This current value can also be found by running the motor without anything connected to the shaft and recording the current. Data charts in motor catalogs also contain this information.

PARAMETER 109

Start voltage is factory set based on the motor power entered in parameter 103.

In most cases the factory setting is sufficient; however, a slight increase in start voltage may be required for high inertia loads. High current at low speeds results in an increased voltage drop in the motor and hence the need for additional start voltage.

If multiple motors are connected to a single unit, it is usually necessary to increase the start voltage. Smaller motors have greater voltage drops at low frequencies so additional start voltage is usually required.

It is also possible to have start voltage set too high and result in start-up trouble.

The best rule of thumb is to start at the factory setting and make changes in small increments. Start and stop the unit to test the results.

PARAMETER 110 (VLT SERIES 3000 ONLY)

Start compensation is factory set based on the motor power entered in Parameter

103. In most cases the factory setting is sufficient, however, a slight increase in start compensation may be necessary with loads requiring high starting torques and loads with changing demands as speed increases.

If multiple motors are connected to a single unit, the start compensation must be set to zero.

It is also possible to have start compensation set too high, resulting in excessive current drawn at start up and motor instability.

PARAMETER 209

Current limit is factory set based on the motor size and voltage selected. Current limit settings which are too low may result in difficulty starting or premature trips.

Current limit will automatically reset to 160% of the value entered into parameter

107 unless this would exceed the maximum allowable value.

5 - 2

"GROUND FAULT" TRIPS

Section Five

Trips occurring from ground faults are usually the result of short circuits to earth ground either in the motor or the wiring to the motor. The VLT detects ground faults by monitoring all three phases of output current and looking for severe imbalances in those currents. When a "Ground Fault" trip occurs it is necessary to measure the resistance of the motor windings and wiring with respect to earth ground. The instrument normally used for this purpose is a Megohmmeter or commonly referred to as a "Megger". Many times these resistance readings are taken with a common Ohmmeter, which is actually incapable of detecting any shorts other than those that are virtually direct. A Megger has the capability of supplying higher voltages, typically 500 volts or more, which enables the Megger to detect breakdowns in insulation or higher resistance shorts which cannot be picked up through the use of an Ohmmeter. When using a megger, it is necessary to disconnect the motor leads from the output of the VLT. The measurements should then be taken so that the motor and all associated wiring and connections are captured in the test. When reading the results of the Megger test, the rule of thumb is any reading less than 500 Megohms should be suspect. Solid, dry wiring connections normally result in a reading of infinity.

Since the VLT monitors output current to detect ground faults, there is also the possibility that the current sensors and/or the detection circuitry in the VLT could also be the cause of a ground fault. Tests can be made on this circuitry to isolate the possibilities. Refer to the Dynamic Test procedures on "Testing for Current

Feedback" page 3-7. Consult the factory for additional assistance.

"OVERCURRENT" TRIPS

Trips due to "OVERCURRENT" can be caused by short circuits on the output of the unit or by instantaneous high currents occurring so rapidly that the unit's current limit cannot respond.

Short circuit trips are generally a result of a phase-to-phase short in the motor windings or in the wiring between the unit and the motor. Short circuit trips are easily diagnosed by removing the motor leads from the unit and performing a phase-to-phase resistance test on the motor leads. This resistance read in ohms will normally be quite low so it is important to have the ohmmeter set on its lowest resistance scale to avoid mis-interpreting the readings observed.

5 - 3

Section Five

"OVERCURRENT" TRIPS

Instantaneous overcurrent trips are caused by the current rising so fast on the output that the unit cannot respond. One example of this situation is in applications where the unit is running at speed and an output contactor is closed between the unit and the motor. At the point the contactor is closed, the motor is effectively seen as a short circuit to the unit. During this time the unit will attempt to gain control of the motor by employing current limit. If the current limit function is unable to limit the current to acceptable levels, the result will be an

"OVERCURRENT" trip. This example is not to imply that output contactors should not be used. In fact, that is quite the contrary as the VLT has been designed to withstand this type of operation without failure. The important consideration in applications such as this is that the unit is properly sized to handle the inrush currents.

A second example of instantaneous overcurrent is that experienced in applications with windmilling loads. A large fan has not yet been commanded to run; however, air movement is causing the fan to rotate. When the unit is started it must first drive the fan to zero speed and then begin the acceleration process from there.

The amount of current required may be so great and rise so rapidly that the current limit function cannot control the process. The result is an "OVERCURRENT" trip.

However, this situation can also be solved by a VLT feature, "Flying Start". With the flying start feature employed the VLT will interrogate the motor to determine its effective frequency and match the VLT output to that same frequency. Flying start results in a smooth start and full control of the load current.

"OVERVOLTAGE" TRIPS

DUE TO

REGENERATIVE

APPLICATIONS

Regenerative energy is created when the load overhauls the motor. This means that the motor is being forced by the inertia of the load to rotate at a speed greater than the command speed. When overhauling occurs, the motor acts as a generator and the voltage generated is returned to the DC capacitor bank in the unit.

Regeneration is most commonly found in applications with high inertia loads and medium to fast decel ramps. However, even an unloaded motor ramped down fast enough can cause regeneration to occur.

It is most common that regeneration is experienced during ramping, although loads such as flywheels will generate regenerative energy to some degree on every cycle.

Since the unit can absorb approximately 15 percent of the motor's rated power in regenerated energy, this phenomena will go unnoticed in most applications.

5 - 4

"OVERVOLTAGE" TRIPS

DUE TO

REGENERATIVE

APPLICATIONS

Section Five

When the energy returned, combined with the DC Bus voltage, exceeds the upper voltage limit, the unit responds in different ways to limit the voltage rise. If the returned energy is occurring during ramp down (to stop or to a lower speed), the unit will automatically adjust the decel ramp in an attempt to limit the voltage. In more severe instances, the ramp may even stop for periods of time to allow the voltage to dissipate. During these periods while regeneration is occurring, the words "HIGH VOLTAGE" can be observed flashing in the control card display. If the returned energy is returned at a high enough level and/or so fast that the unit cannot respond, the unit will trip on "OVERVOLTAGE".

To prevent a trip from occurring, one solution is to lengthen the decel ramp. Another solution is to release the motor using the "Motor Coast" function. The "Flying

Start" function is usually employed when using this method.

In very high inertia applications where a short decel time is required, the only solution may be that of adding a Dynamic Brake Option (only VLT Series 3000 units only).

The Dynamic Brake option combines a power IGBT, the electronics for controlling it and a resistor bank of sufficient wattage to dissipate the unwanted energy. The

Dynamic Brake option monitors the level of the DC Bus voltage. When the voltage level exceeds permissible limits, the IGBT is switched on and the excess DC Bus voltage is dissipated in the resistor bank.

Particular attention must be paid to the proper sizing of the resistor bank. Consult your local representative or the factory for assistance in selecting the appropriate

Dynamic Brake option and dynamic brake resistors for your application.

5 - 5

Section Five

FAULT MEMORY

The VLT stores faults which have occurred in its fault memory register. The register stores the last 8 occurrences on a first in first out basis. You can access the fault memory by calling up parameter 602. In doing so you can then scroll through the register using the Data key to view each fault code stored. The codes that are displayed correspond to the numbers in parenthesis printed next to the Alarm

Messages described on page 2-3.

In addition there are six more codes which may appear in parameter 602.

10) Trip Locked

Indicates a trip lock fault has occurred.

11) CT/OP Card Fault

Indicates a software fault has occurred in either the Control Card or an installed option card.

12) Ref Fit Timeout

Indicates the Reference Fault Timeout has occurred as controlled by

Parameters 414 and 415.

13) Adaptive Tune Fail

Indicates the Adaptive Tuning Process failed, initiated by parameter 106.

14) DC Supply Fault

Indicates one or more of the low voltage DC power supplies have fallen out of tolerance.

15) Motor Thermistor

Indicates the motor thermistor as selected in parameter 400 has caused the trip.

5 - 6

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3002 VLT 3003 VLT 3004

VLT 3502 VLT 3504

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 N/A 175H4539

ILD Card 175H7064 175H7065 175H7066

DC Bus Card 175H7018 175H7018 175H7019

Six Pack IGBT 175H7017 175H7017 175H7017

Recifier

Module 612L2026 612L2026 612L2026

Brake

Control Card * 175H7030 175H7030 175H7030

Brake IGBT * 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029

Top Fan IP54 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327

Insulator Foil 175H1415 175H1415 175H1415

* Only on VLT 3000

Section Six

6 - 1

Section Six

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3006-3022, 230V

VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3006 VLT 3008 VLT 3011 VLT 3016 VLT 3022

VLT 3508 VLT 3511 VLT 3516 VLT 3522 VLT 3532

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539

Interface

Card 175H5375 175H5376 175H5377 175H5379 175H5382

IGBT Module 175H5340 175H5340 175H5341 175H5341 175H4510

IGBT

Snubber Cap 175H0810 175H0810 175H0810 175H0831 175H0831

Recifier

Relay Card

612L9471 612L9471 612L9472 612L9473 612L9264

175H4481 175H4481 175H4481 175H4483 175H4485

Current Sensor N/A

Bus Charge

Contactor

N/A N/A N/A 175H1789

175H1761 175H1761 175H1761 175H1762 175H1762

Bus Contactor

Coil Cap 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852

Time Delay

Relay Module 047H0173 047H0173 047H0173 047H0173 047H0173

DC Cap

Resistor 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324

DC Bus

Capacitor 612B6762 612B6598 612B6708 612B6864 612B6864

Brake

Control Card * 175H5398 175H5398 175H5398 175H5398 175H5398

Brake IGBT * 175H5370 175H5370 175H5370 175H5371 175H4508

175H7305 175H7305 175H7305 175H7305 175H7305 MOV

24V Internal

Fan (IP54) N/A 175H0827 175H0827 175H0827 175H0827

Top Fan

(IP20)

24VDC 24VDC 24VDC 230VAC 230VAC

175H0827 175H0827 175H0827 175H0761 175H0761

Top Fan AC

(IP54) 175H0753 175H0753 175H0761 175H0761 175H1807

* Only on VLT 3000

6 - 2

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3002-3008, 380V

VLT 3502-3511, 380V

Section Six

VLT 3002 VLT 3003 VLT 3004 VLT 3006 VLT 3008

VLT 3502 VLT 3504 VLT 3508 VLT 3511

VLT 3505

Control Card

(VLT 3000) 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

ILD Card

ILD Card

(VLT 3504)

175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539

175H7067 175H7068 175H7069 175H7088 175H7087

175H7077

DC Card 175H7020 175H7020 175H7021 175H7022 175H7023

Six Pack IGBT 175H7017 175H7017 175H7017 175H7017 N/A

IGBT Module

DC Link

Recifier

Module

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

175H7016

175H1162

612L2026 612L2026 612L2026 612L2026 612L2026

Brake

Control Card * 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031

Brake IGBT * 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029

Top Fan IP54 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327

* Only on VLT 3000

6 - 3

Section Six

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3011-3032, 380

VLT 3516-3542, 380

VLT 3011 VLT 3016 VLT 3022 VLT 3032

VLT 3516 VLT 3522 VLT 3532 VLT 3542

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539

Interface Card

(VLT 3000)

Interface Card

(VLT 3500)

IGBT

(VLT 3500)

175H5386 175H5387 175H5388 175H5389

175H5392 175H5393 175H5394 175H5395

175H0266 175H0266 175H7005 175H7005

VLT 3000 IGBT 175H0266 175H0266 175H7005 175H0268

IGBT

Snubber Cap 175H0810 175H0810 175H0810 175H0810

Recifier 612L9261 612L9261 612L9262 612L9263

Relay Card 175H4712 175H4712 175H4712 175H4713

Pre-Series 7** 175H1099 175H1099 175H1099 175H1143

Bus Charge

Contactor 175H1761 175H1761 175H1761 175H1762

Pre-Series 7** 175H0841 175H0841 175H0841 175H0842

Bus Contactor

Coil Cap 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852

DC Capacitor 612B6762 612B6598 612B6708 612B6864

Brake

Control Card * 175H1572 175H1572 175H1572 175H1572

Brake IGBT * 175H7059 175H7059 175H7059 175H7060

MOV 175H4204 175H4204 175H4204 175H4204

24V Internal

Fan (IP54)

Top Fan

(IP20)

N/A

24VDC

175H0827 175H0827 175H0827

24VDC 24VDC 230VAC

175H0827 175H0827 175H0827 175H0765

Top Fan

(IP54) 400VAC 175H0668 175H0668 175H0668 175H0765

Fan Cap (IP20)

Fan Cap (IP54)

175H4487

175H4487 175H4487

HF Card (IP20) 175H7303 175H7303 175H7303 175H7303

HF Card (IP54) 175H7304 175H7304 175H7304 175H7304

DC Balance

Resistor 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324

Interface

Insulator Foil 175H1786 175H1786 175H1786 175H1784

* Only on VLT 3000

** Series included in unit serial number

Example: 0000 07 G000, Series 7

6 - 4

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3042-3052, 380V

VLT 3552-3562, 380V

VLT 3042 VLT 3052

VLT 3552 VLT 3562

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 175H4539

Interface Card

(VLT 3000)

Interface Card

(VLT 3500)

175H5390 175H5391

175H5396 175H5397

IGBT Module 175H0268 175H4100

Snubber Cap 175H0831 175H0831

Recifier 612L9264 612L9264

Relay Card 175H4714 175H4714

Pre-Series 7** 175H1143 175H1143

Current

Transducer 175H1789 175H1789

Bus Charge

Contactor 175H1762 175H1762

Pre-Series 7** 175H0842 175H0842

Bus Contactor

Coil Cap 175H2852 175H2852

DC Capacitor 612B6598 612B6708

Brake

Control Card* 175H1572 175H1572

Brake IGBT* 175H7061 175H7061

175H4204 175H4204 MOV

24V Internal

Fan (IP54) 175H0827 175H0827

Top Fan

(IP20) 400VAC 175H0765 175H0765

Top Fan

(IP54) 400VAC 175H0765 175H1808

Fan Cap (IP20) 175H4487 175H4487

Fan Cap (IP54) 175H4487 175H4487

HF Card (IP20) 175H7303 175H7303

HF Card (IP54) 175H7304 175H7304

DC Balance

Resistor 175H2324 175H2324

Interface

Insulator Foil 175H1784 175H1784

* Only on VLT 3000

** Series included in unit serial number

Example: 0000 07 G000, Series 7

Section Six

6 - 5

Section Six

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3002-3008, 460V

VLT 3502-3511, 460V

VLT 3002 VLT 3003 VLT 3004 VLT 3006 VLT 3008

VLT 3502 VLT 3504 VLT 3506 VLT 3508

VLT 3511

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

ILD Card

ILD Card

(VLT 3511)

DC Card

175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539

175H7072 175H7073 175H7074 175H7075 175H7076

175H7054

175H7024 175H7024 175H7025 175H7026 175H7026

Six Pack IGBT 175H7017 175H7017 175H7017 175H7017

IGBT Module N/A N/A N/A N/A

N/A

175H7016

DC Link

Recifier

Module

N/A N/A N/A N/A 175H1162

612L9351 612L9351 612L9351 612L9351 612L9351

Brake

Control Card* 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031 175H7031

Brake IGBT* 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029 175H7029

Top Fan IP54 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327 175H0327

Insulator Foil 175H1415 175H1415 175H1415 175H1415 175H1415

* Only on VLT 3000

6 - 6

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3011-3032, 460V

VLT 3516-3542, 460V

Section Six

VLT 3011 VLT 3016 VLT 3022 VLT 3032

VLT 3516 VLT 3522 VLT 3532 VLT 3542

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

175H7086 175H7086 175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 175H4539 175H4539 175H4539

Interface

Card 175H5378 175H5380 175H5381 175H5383

IGBT Module 175H5342 175H5342 175H5343 175H6251

IGBT

Snubber Cap 175H0810 175H0810 175H0810 175H0831

Recifier

Relay Card

612L9474 612L9474 612L9475 612L9476

175H4482 175H4482 175H4482 175H4484

Bus Charge

Contactor 175H1761 175H1761 175H1761 175H1762

Bus Contactor

Coil Cap 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852 175H2852

DC Capacitor 612B7095 612B7096 612B7098 612B7096

Brake

Control Card * 175H5399 175H5399 175H5399 175H5399

Brake IGBT * 175H5372 175H5372 175H5372 175H5373

175H7306 175H7306 175H7306 175H7306 MOV

24V Internal

Fan (IP54)

Top Fan

(IP20)

N/A

24VDC

175H0827 175H0827 175H0827

24VDC 24VDC 230VAC

175H0827 175H0827 175H0827 175H0761

Top Fan

(IP54)

Fan Start

Cap (IP20)

460VAC 460VAC 230VAC 230VAC

175H0754 175H0754 175H0761 175H0761

N/A N/A N/A 175H7327

Fan Start

Cap (IP54)

Fan Series

Cap (IP20)

Fan Series

Cap (IP54)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

175H7327 175H7327

N/A 175H7328

N/A N/A 175H7328 175H7328

HF Card (IP20) 175H7303 175H7303 175H7303 175H7303

HF Card (IP54) 175H7304 175H7304 175H7304 175H7304

DC Balance

Resistor 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324 175H2324

Interface

Insulator Foil 175H1785 175H1785 175H1785 175H1783

* Only on VLT 3000

6 - 7

Section Six

SPARE PARTS

VLT 3042-3052, 460V

VLT 3552-3562, 460V

VLT 3042 VLT 3052

VLT 3552 VLT 3562

Control Card

(VLT 3000)

Control Card

(VLT 3500)

Interface

Card

Relay Card

Bus Charge

Contactor

175H7086 175H7086

175H4539 175H4539

175H5384 175H5385

IGBT Module 175H6251 175H1371

IGBT

Snubber Cap 175H0831 175H0831

Recifier 612L9476 612L9477

175H4486 175H4486

175H1762 175H1762

Bus Contactor

Coil Cap 175H2852 175H2852

DC Capacitor 612B7097 612B7097

Brake

Control Card* 175H5399 175H5399

Brake IGBT* 175H4509 175H4509

MOV 175H7306 175H7306

24V Internal

Fan (IP54) 175H0827 175H0827

Top Fan

(IP20) 230VAC 175H0761 175H0761

Top Fan

(IP54) 230VAC 175H1807 175H1807

Fan Cap (IP20) 175H4487 175H4487

Fan Cap (IP54) 175H4487 175H4487

Fan Start

Cap (IP20)

Fan Start

Cap (IP54)

Fan Series

Cap (IP20)

175H7327 175H7327

175H7328 175H7328

175H7328 175H7328

Fan Series

Cap (IP54) 175H1855 175H1855

HF Card (IP20) 175H7303 175H7303

HF Card (IP54) 175H7304 175H7304

DC Balance

Resistor 175H2324 175H2324

Current

Transducer 175H1789 175H1789

Interface

Insulator Foil 175H1783 175H1783

* Only on VLT 3000

6 - 8

COMPONENT LOCATION

VLT 3002-3004, 230V VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3002-3008, 380/460V VLT 3502-3511, 380/460V

1.

Top Cover

2.

DC Coil

3.

DC Bus Capacitor

4.

DC Card

5.

ILD Insulator Foil

6.

Input Line Driver (ILD) Card

7.

Control Card

8.

Display Keypad

9.

Terminal Strip, 10-Position

10. Terminal Strip, 11-Position

11. Front Cover

12. Terminal Strip, 5 Position

13. Power Terminal Strip

14. Motor Terminal Strip

15. Bottom Cover

16. Bonding Plate

Appendix

17. Standoff, ILD Card to Ground

18. Motor Coil

19. Rectifier Module

20. Standoff, DC Card

21. IGBT Six-Pack Module

7 - 1

7 - 2

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only)

VLT 3002-3004, 230V

VLT 3502-3504, 230V

VLT 3002-3006, 460V

VLT 3502-3506, 460V

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only)

VLT 3008, 3508, 460V

7 - 3

Appendix

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only)

VLT 3511, 460V

7 - 4

COMPONENT LOCATION

VLT 3006-3022, 230V VLT 3508-3532, 230V

VLT 3011-3052, 380/460V VLT 3516-3562, 380/460V

1.

Top fan

2.

Top Cover

3.

Heat Sink Thermal Switch

4.

Interface Insulator Foil (not on 230V)

5.

Interface Card

6.

Brake Control Card Support (not on VLT 3500)

7.

Brake Control Card (not on VLT 3500)

8.

Control Card

9.

Display/Keyboard Unit

10. 10-Position Thermal Strip

11. 11-Position Terminal Strip

12. Front Cover

Appendix

13. 5-Position Terminal Strip

14. Safety Shield

15. Relay Card

16. LINE/MOTOR Terminal Strip

17. Rubber Grommet

18. Bus Contactor

19. Bottom Cover

20. BRAKE Terminal Strip (not on VLT 3500)

21. RFI Option

22. Balance Resistor

23. Motor Coil

24. DC Bus Capacitor

25. DC Coil

26. Brake IGBT (not on VLT 3500)

27. Clamp Capacitor

28. IGBT Module

29. MOV

30. Rectifier Module

7 - 5

Appendix

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only)

VLT 3006-3011, 230V

VLT 3506-3522, 230V

7 - 6

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only) VLT 3011-3022, 230V

7 - 7

Appendix

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only)

VLT 3011-3022, 460V

VLT 3516-3532, 460V

7 - 8

BLOCK DIAGRAM

(for reference only) VLT 3032-3052, 460V

7 - 9

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement