25 Owners Manual 2009 - Marlow
HUNTER OWNER’S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
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2-4
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6-9
10
Warranty Registration Form………………………………………
Hunter Warranty………………………………………….…………
Brief History………………………………………………………….
Glossary of Sailing Terms….………………………………………
Explanation of Symbols and Labels………………………………
GENERAL HANDLING AND OPERATION
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Safe Boating Tips…………………………………………………..
Preliminary Care and Inspection Worksheet…………………….
Pre-Departure Check List………………………………………….
Certification Details…………………………………………………
Float Plan……………………………………………………………
After Sailing Check List………………………………….…………
Docking and Anchoring…………………………………………….
Mast Raising and Lowering System………………………………
Launching and Retrieving Procedures……………………………
Getting Ready to Sail……………………………………………….
Cook Stove…………………………………………………………..
Toilet…….……………………………………………………………
Pumps…………….………………………………………………….
Water System Operation………………………………….……….
Outboard Engine and Motoring……………………………………
Electrical System……………………………………………………
Environmental Considerations…………………………………….
11-12
13A
13B
13C
14
15
16
17
18
19-21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
MAINTENANCE
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Instructions for Preparation for Bottom Painting………………...
Engine Maintenance…………………..……………………………
Electrical Systems………………………………………………….
Plumbing Systems………………………………………………….
Protecting Your Rigging……………………………………………
Trailer Maintenance………………………………………………..
General Care………………………………………………………..
General Hardware Maintenance………………………………….
Vinyl and Fabric Care………………………………………………
Electrolysis and Galvanic Protection……………………………..
Teak Care……………………………………………………………
Storage/Winterization ……………………………………………...
Lightning Warning ………………………………………………….
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HUNTER OWNER’S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
DESCRIPTION OF MODEL
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36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
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Profile with Rig and Sail Dimensions……………………………..
Dimensions, Capacities, etc……………………………………….
Deck Plan and Hardware………………………………………….
Deck Hardware and Listing………..………………………………
Interior Plan………………………..……………………………….
Running Rigging Deck Plan…….…………………………………
Mainsheet and Jibsheet Rigging………………………………….
Proper Cleat Knot…………………………………………………..
Boom Details and Layout………………………………………….
Reef Rigging and Instructions…………………………………….
Rigging Specifications……………………………………………..
Standing Rigging Layout and Strut Assembly…..………………
Spreader Details…………………………………………………….
Spinnaker Details………………………………………………….
Rudder Detail…………….………………………………………….
SYSTEMS AND CIRCUITS
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Potable Water System……………………………………………..
Bilge Pumping System……………………………………………..
Mast Wiring…………………………….……………………………
Electrical Schematics………………………………………………
Optional Waste System……………………………………………
Anchoring Arrangement……………………………………………
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56
HUNTER OWNER’S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONT’D)
EQUIPMENT MANUALS AND INFORMATION
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Warranty Registration
Marine Rigging Guide
VHF Radio (except where not provided)
Sail Maker Information
Mast Information
Bilge Pump
Toilet Manual
Stove Manual
Trailer Axle Service Manual
Tire Warranty Card
Drum Brake Service Manual
Brake Actuator Service Manual
Camper Canvas (Where Ordered)
Other:
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Welcome to
THE HUNTER MARINE FAMILY
Congratulations on your new sailing
yacht manufactured by Hunter Marine.
We have engineered and constructed
your boat to be as fine a yacht as any
afloat. In order to get the best performance and most enjoyment from your
boat you should be familiar with its various elements and their functions. For
your sailing pleasure and safety, please
take time to study this manual.
We stand behind the quality of your boat
with a warranty, which you should review. To insure the validity of your warranty, please complete the attached
card and send it to us within ten (10)
days of the purchase date. Section 15 of
the U.S. Federal Boat Safety Act requires registration of a boat’s first
owner. The warranty data should also
be recorded in the space below for your
own reference.
This manual has been compiled to help
you operate your craft with safety and
pleasure. It contains details of the craft;
equipment supplied or fitted, systems,
and information on operation and maintenance. Please read it carefully, and
familiarize yourself with the craft before
using it. If this is your first sailboat or
you are changing to a type of craft you
are not familiar with, please ensure that
you obtain proper handling and operating experience before you assume
command of the craft. Your dealer or
national sailing federation or yacht club
will be pleased to advise you of local
sea schools or competent instructors.
PLEASE KEEP THIS MANUAL IN A
SAFE PLACE AND HAND IT OVER TO
THE NEW OWNER IF YOU SELL THE
CRAFT.
You should also complete the warranty
cards for your engine, stove, head, electric water pump and other accessories.
These are enclosed in the manufacturers’ manuals that are packaged with
your owner’s manual.
OWNER INFORMATION CARD
HULL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER IS ON THE STARBOARD AFT SIDE OF THE HULL OR
TRANSOM. THIS NUMBER MUST BE GIVEN IN ALL NECESSARY CORRESPONDENCE.
HULL NO.
DATE DELIVERED TO OWNER
YACHT NAME
OWNER NAME
STREET ADDRESS
CITY
STATE/COUNTRY
ZIP CODE
HOME PORT
ENGINE MODEL
DEALER
SERIAL NO.
PROPELLER SIZE
PHONE
STREET ADDRESS
CITY
STATE/COUNTRY
ZIP CODE
PAGE
1
HUNTER
2009 LIMITED WARRANTY
CUSTOMER SERVICE / WARRANTY
The following warranties apply to all 2009 Model Year boats produced by HUNTER MARINE CORPORATION:
LIMITED ONE-YEAR WARRANTY
Hunter Marine warrants to the first-use purchaser and any subsequent owner during the warranty period
that any part manufactured by Hunter will be free of defects caused by faulty workmanship or materials
for a period of twelve (12) months from the date of delivery to the first-use purchaser under normal use
and service. During this period, Hunter will repair or replace any part judged to be defective by Hunter,
after it is reviewed by the selling dealership.
LIMITED FIVE-YEAR HULL STRUCTURE AND BOTTOM BLISTER WARRANTY
Hunter warrants to the first-use purchaser and any subsequent owner during the warranty period that the
hull of each boat will be free from structural defects in materials and workmanship for a period of five
(5) years from the date of delivery to the first-use purchaser under normal use and service.
This limited warranty applies only to the structural integrity of the hull and the supporting pan/grid or
stringer system. Hulls, pan/grid or stringers modified in any way or powered with engines other than the
type and size installed or specified by Hunter are not covered by this limited warranty. The obligation of
Hunter under this limited warranty is limited to the repair or replacement of hulls that it determines to be
structurally defective. This is your sole and exclusive remedy.
Hunter also warrants to the first-use purchaser and any subsequent owner during the warranty period
that the boat will be free from gel-coat blistering on underwater surfaces of the hull, excluding the keel
and rudder, for a period of five (5) years from the date of delivery to the first-use purchaser under normal use and service. During this period, Hunter will supply or reimburse an authorized Hunter dealer for
all of the parts and labor required to repair a blistered underwater surface of the hull. The labor cost reimbursement will be based on the Labor Allowance Schedule established by Hunter from time to time,
however if the repair is performed by a non-Hunter dealer, the repair cost must be authorized by Hunter
in advance and be based on a reasonable number of hours as determined by Hunter. Hunter will not pay
transportation, hauling, launching, bottom paint, storage, dockage, cradling rental, rigging and derigging, or other similar costs. It is recommended that the repair be done during a seasonal haul out for service or storage.
The following circumstances will void the bottom blister limited warranty:
(1) If the gel-coat has been sanded, sandblasted, or subjected to abrasion or impact.
(2) If the instructions provided in the Hunter Owner's Manual are not followed according to Hunter's required bottom preparation procedures.
PAGE 2
HUNTER
2009 LIMITED WARRANTY
RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO WARRANTIES
These limited warranties do not cover:
(1.)
Paint, window glass, Gelcoat, upholstery damage, plastic finishes, engines, engine parts, bilge
pumps, stoves, blowers, pressure water pumps, propellers, shafts, rudders, controls, instruments, keels
and equipment not manufactured by HUNTER. Any warranty made by the manufacturer of such items
will be, if possible, given on to the first use purchaser.
(2.)
Problems caused by improper maintenance, storage, cradling, blocking, normal wear and tear,
misuse, neglect, accident, corrosion, electrolysis or improper operation.
(3)
Boats used for commercial activities including charter.
THESE LIMITED WARRANTIES ARE YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES AND ARE
ESPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ANY AND ALL OTHER REMEDIES AND WARRANTIES EXPRESSED
AND IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, WHETHER ARISING BY LAW, CUSTOM, CONDUCT, OR USAGE
OF TRADE. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. IN THE
EVENT THAT IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE FOUND TO EXIST UNDER THE LAW OF A PARTICULAR STATE, NOTWITHSTANDING THE EXCLUSION CONTAINED HERIN, THE
DURATION OF ANY SUCH IMPLIED WARRANTY SHALL BE LIMITED TO THE DURATION
OF THE APPLICABLE LIMITED WARRANTY STATED HEREIN. THE PURCHASER
ACKNOWLEDGES THAT NO OTHER REPRESENTATIONS WERE MADE TO HIM OR HER
WITH RESPECT TO THE QUALITY OR FUNCTION OF THE BOAT. ANY ORAL STATEMENT
OR PRINTED MATERIAL ADVERTISING THE BOAT WHICH SPEAKS TO ANY
PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTIC OF THE BOAT OR ANY OF ITS COMPONENTS SHALL
BE CONSIDERED AND CONSTRUED AS AN ESTIMATED DESCRIPTION ONLY AND
SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS AN EXPRESS WARRANTY OR AS THE BASIS OF THE
BARGAIN FOR THE BOAT OR ANY OF ITS COMPONENTS.
ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES WHICH MAY BE
INCURRED ARE EXCCLUDED AND PURCHASER’S REMEDY IS LIMITED TO REPAIRS OR
REPLACEMENT OF ANY PART(S) JUDGED DEFECTIVE BY HUNTER MARINE. SOME
STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INDIRECT DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY
NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND YOU
MAY ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
PAGE 3
HUNTER
2009 LIMITED WARRANTY
WARRANTY REGISTRATION
These limited warranties shall not be effective unless the HUNTER Warranty Registration Form and
Pre-Delivery Service Record, which are furnished with each new boat, are filled out completely and returned to HUNTER within ten (10) days of delivery.
Return of the Warranty Registration Form to HUNTER, signed by both Dealer and Owner, is critical.
Warranty coverage cannot be initiated until the completed form is received at HUNTER.
All repairs and/or replacements will be made by an authorized Hunter dealer, or at the option of Hunter,
at the Hunter plant. If the repairs are of such a nature that the warranty work must be performed at the
HUNTER plant, transportation costs to and from the HUNTER plant shall be paid by the owner. The labor cost reimbursement will be based on a Labor Allowance Schedule established by HUNTER and
where not applicable, on a reasonable number of hours as determined by HUNTER. Any repairs and replacements must be approved in advance by an authorized HUNTER service representative.
TRANSFER OF LIMITED WARRANTIES
For 1995 and later hull numbers, the limited warranties will be transferred to a subsequent purchaser of the boat if:
(1) A notice of the transfer of ownership of the boat is given by the subsequent purchaser in writing to Hunter within thirty (30) days of the transfer.
(2) The notice shall include the name, address and telephone number of the subsequent purchaser, the date of purchase, the hull number and the name of the seller of the boat.
Hunter will mail to the subsequent purchaser notice of the expiration dates of the limited warranties. (see form letter, attached) The transfer of the ownership of the boat will not extend the expiration
dates of the limited warranties.
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION SURVEYS
During the first year of ownership, the first purchaser will receive two Customer Satisfaction Surveys the first (CSS#1) will be received shortly after taking delivery and focuses on the dealer's ability to sell
and commission the boat, and the Owner's initial satisfaction. The second survey (CSS#2), nine to ten
months into ownership, "measures" dealer service capability and allows the owner to evaluate most of
the boat's functional systems and characteristics. Both surveys are dependent upon receipt of the first
purchaser's Warranty Registration Form.
PAGE 4
SAMPLE FORM LETTER
March 12, 1997
Mr. John Smith
1456 Joy Street
Sarasota, FL 34266
Dear Mr. Smith,
Thank you for providing written notice of transfer of ownership. We are pleased you have selected a Hunter sailboat and we will make every effort to assure Hunter ownership will be a satisfying
experience for you.
Based on the information you have provided, we are pleased to notify you of the expiration dates
of the limited warranties.
• The limited one-year New Boat warranty expires (d)_____________________.
• The limited five-year Hull Structure and Bottom Blister warranty expires (d)___
____________________.
Should you require assistance at any time during ownership, we encourage you to contact your
Hunter dealer or to call us directly at 386-462-3077.
quired.
Please confirm the information at the bottom of the page and advise us if any corrections are re_____________________________________
Customer Service Manager
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Hull No: HUN_________________________ Model:___________________________
Telephone: (H)________________________(B)________________________________________
Date of Purchase:_______________________________________________________
Purchased From:
Name:___________________________________________________________
Address:_________________________________________________________
City/State_________________________________Zip_____________________
(
) Private Owner
(
) Dealer
HUNTER MARINE’S OWNER AND FOUNDER
WARREN R. LUHRS
BRIEF BACKGROUND
Warren Luhrs was born in East Orange,
New Jersey in 1944 into a family with an
established tradition in the maritime and
transportation industries. His greatgrandfather, Henry, was a railroad and
clipper-shipping pioneer in America,
while his great-uncle John helped build
the famous St. Petersburg to Moscow
railroad for Czar Alexander II.
Henry Luhrs owned shares in twentytwo different ocean-going vessels –
barks, brigs, and schooners - and was
the principal owner of the bark Sophia
R. Luhrs, named for his wife. He was
also a partner with Albert Sprout, who
managed the shipyard where the Sophia
R. Luhrs was built in Melbridge, Maine.
Warren Luhrs’ father Henry worked at a
small boat manufacturer in Morgan,
New Jersey, and later started his own
company, continuing the Luhrs’ family
sea tradition during the great depression. During World War II he repaired
boats and installed ice sheathing on
their bows for the Coast Guard.
After the War, Henry built 27-foot fishing
boats and in 1948 began to construct
custom-built pleasure craft. He then
turned to skiffs and in 1952 incorporated
as Henry Luhrs Sea Skiffs, where he
constructed lapstrake sea skiffs using
assembly-line techniques. Henry personally “shook down” his prototypes on
family trips up the Hudson River to Lake
Champlain.
The sea skiff is a class of boat that has
been very popular, owing to its seaworthiness. It features a sharp bow, which
reduces pounding in surf or
choppy seas, and a hull whose forward
section is rounded below the waterline
to increase stability in rough water or a
following sea. Such skiffs can either be
smooth sided or of a lapstrake construction.
Inspired by Henry Ford, Henry Luhrs’
aimed to give the average man the opportunity to enjoy the luxury of boating
by building an affordable and reliable
boat. He was both designer and engineer, and his progressive new models
exhibited his talent for innovation. He
successfully changed the line of the bow
from straight to curved at a time when
the industry trend was a straight square
effect, and he is believed to be the first
designer-builder to popularize a small
boat with a fly bridge.
In 1960, Luhrs acquired the Ulrichsen
Boat Company of Marlboro, New Jersey. It was here that Luhrs’ Alura fiberglass division was located. In 1965,
Henry sold his company to Bangor Arrostook Railroad, which was to become
the recreational conglomerate BangorPunta. It was also during this period that
Silverton of Tom’s River, New Jersey
was purchased by John and Warren
Luhrs.
Today, Warren R. Luhrs and his brother
John own the Luhrs Group of marine
manufacturers, which consists of Silverton Marine, Mainship Motor Yachts, and
Luhrs Fishing Boats with its Alura division, as well as Hunter Marine, which
exclusively manufactures sailboats.
In January of 1996, the Luhrs family
transferred a portion of the Luhrs Group
to its employees through an ESOP program.
PAGE
5
GLOSSARY OF SAILING TERMS
A
Aback: describes a sail when the wind
strikes it on the lee side.
Abaft: towards the boat’s stern.
Abeam: at right angles to the centerline of the boat.
Aft: at or near the stern.
Amidships: the center of the boat,
athwartships and fore and aft.
Anti-fouling: a poisonous paint compound used to protect the underwater
part of a hull from marine growths.
Apparent wind: The direction and
speed of the wind felt by the crew. It
is a combination of true wind and that
created by the movement of the boat.
Astern: behind the boat; to go astern
is to drive the boat in reverse.
Athwartships: at right angles to the
fore and aft line of the boat.
B
Back: when a wind backs, it shifts anticlockwise.
Back a sail: to sheet it to windward
so that the wind fills on the side that
is normally to leeward.
Backstay: a stay that supports the
mast from aft and prevents its forward
movement.
Ballast: extra weight, usually lead or
iron, placed low in the boat or externally on the keel to provide stability.
Ballast keel: a mass of ballast bolted
to the keel to increase stability and
prevent a keel boat from capsizing.
Batten: a light, flexible strip fed into a
batten pocket at the leech of the sail
to support the roach.
Beam: 1, the maximum breadth of a
boat; 2, a transverse member that
supports the deck; 3, on the beam
means that an object is at right angles to the centerline.
Bear away: to steer the boat away
from the wind.
Bearing: the direction of an object
from an observer, measured in degrees true or magnetic.
Beat: to sail a zigzag course towards
the wind, close-hauled on alternate
tacks.
Belay: to make fast a rope around a
cleat, usually with a figure-of-eight
knot.
Bend: 1, to secure a sail to a spar
before hoisting; 2, to moor a boat; 3,
a sleeping place on board.
Bight: a bend or loop in a rope.
Bilge: the lower, round part inside the
hull where the water collects.
Block: a pulley in a wooden or plastic
case, consisting of a sheave around
which a rope runs. It is used to
change the direction of pull.
Boot-topping: a narrow colored
stripe painted between the bottom
paint and the topside enamel.
Bottlescrew: see Rigging screw.
Broach: when a boat running downwind slews broadside to the wind and
heels dangerously. It is caused by
heavy following seas or helmsman’s
error.
Broad reach: the point of sailing between a beam reach and a run, when
the wind blows over a quarter.
Bulkhead: a partition wall in a boat
normally fitted athwartships
C
Caulk: to make the seams between
wooden planks watertight by filling
with cotton, oakum or a compound.
Cavitation: the formation of a vacuum
around a propeller, causing a loss in
efficiency.
Center-board: a board lowered
through a slot in the keel to reduce
leeway.
Center-line: center of the boat in a
fore and aft line.
Center of effort (COE): the point at
which all the forces acting on the sails
are concentrated.
Center of lateral resistance (CLR):
the underwater center of pressure
about which a boat pivots when
changing course.
Chain pawl: a short lug which drops
into a toothed rack to prevent the anchor chain running back.
Chain plate: a metal plate bolted to
the boat to which the shrouds or
backstays are attached.
Chart datum: reference level on a
chart below which the tide is unlikely
to fall. Soundings are given below
chart datum. The datum level varies
according to country and area.
Chine: the line where the bottom of
the hull meets the side at an angle.
Cleat: a wooden, metal or plastic fitting around which rope is secured.
Clevis pin: a locking pin through
which a split ring is passed to prevent
accidental withdraw.
Clew: the after, lower center of a sail
where the foot and leech meet.
Close-hauled: the point of sailing
closest to the wind; see also beat.
Close reach: the point of sailing between close-hauled and a beam
reach, when the wind blows forward of
the beam.
Close-winded: describes a boat able
to sail very close to the wind.
Coaming: the raised structure surrounding a hatch, cockpit, etc., which
prevents water entering.
Cotter pin: soft, metal pin folded back
on itself to form an eye.
Course: the direction in which a vessel is steered, usually given in degrees; true, magnetic or compass.
Cringle: 1, a rope loop, found at either end of a line of reef points; 2, an
eye in a sail.
D
Dead run: running with the wind blowing exactly aft, in line with the centerline.
Deviation: the difference between the
direction indicated by the compass
needle and the magnetic meridian;
caused by object aboard.
Displacement: 1, the weight of water
displaced by a boat is equal to the
weight of the boat; 2, a displacement
hull is one that displaces its own
weight in water and is only supported
by buoyancy, as opposed to a planning hull which can exceed its hull, or
displacement, speed.
Downhaul: a rope fitted to pull down
a sail or spar.
Draft: the vertical distance from the
waterline to the lowest point of the
keel.
Drag: 1, an anchor drags when it fails
to hole; 2, the force of wind on the
sails, or water on the hull, which impedes the boat’s progress.
Drift: 1, to float with the current or
wind; 2, US the speed of a current
PAGE
6
GLOSSARY OF SAILING TERMS
(rate UK); 3, UK: the distance a boat
is carried by a current in a given time.
Drogue: a sea anchor put over the
stern of a boat or life raft to retard drift.
Drop keel: a retractable keel which
can be drawn into the hull, when entering shallow waters and recovering
on to a trailer.
E
Eye of the wind: direction from which
the true wind blows.
F
Fair: well-faired line or surface is
smoother with no bumps, hollows or
abrupt changes in directions.
Fairlead: a fitting through which a line
is run to alter the lead of the line.
Fathom: the measurement used for
depths of water and lengths or rope. 1
fathom = 6 ft. or 1.83m.
Fid: a tapered tool used for splicing
heavy rope and for sail-making, often
hollow.
Fiddle: a raised border for a cabin table, chart table etc., to prevent objects
falling off when the boat heels.
Fix: the position of the vessel as plotted from two or more position lines.
Forestay: the foremost stay, running
from the masthead to the stemhead,
to which the headsail is hanked.
Freeboard: vertical distance between
the waterline and the top of the deck.
G
Genoa: a large headsail, in various
sizes, which overlaps the mainsail and
is hoisted in light to fresh winds on all
points of sailing.
Gimbals: two concentric rings, pivoted at right angles, which keeps objects horizontal despite the boat’s motion, e. g. compass and cooker.
Go about: to turn the boat through the
eye of the wind to change tack.
Gooseneck: the fitting attaching the
boom to the mast, allowing it to move
in all directions.
Goosewing: to boom-out the headsail
to windward on a run by using a
whisker pole to hold the sail on the
opposite side to the mainsail.
Ground tackle: general term used for
anchoring gear.
Guard rail: a metal rail fitted around
the boat to prevent the crew falling
overboard.
Gudgeon: a rudder fitting. It is the eye
into which the pintle fits.
Guy: a steadying rope for a spar; a
spinnaker guy controls the fore and aft
position of the spinnaker pole; the
foreguy holds the spinnaker pole forward and down.
Gybe: to change from one tack to another by turning the stern through the
wind.
H
Halyard: rope used to hoist and lower
sails.
Hank: fitting used to attach the luff of
a sail to a stay.
Hatch: an opening in the deck giving
access to the interior.
Hawes pipe: see Navel pipe.
Head-topwind: when the bows are
pointing right into the wind.
Headfoil: a streamlined surround to a
forestay, with a groove into which a
headsail luff slides.
Heads: the toilet.
Headway: the forward movement of a
boat through the water.
Heave-to: to back the jib and lash the
tiller to leeward; used in heavy
weather to encourage the boat to lie
quietly and to reduce headway.
Heaving line: a light line suitable for
throwing ashore.
Heel: to lean over to one side.
I
Isobars: lines on a weather map joining places of equal atmospheric pressure.
J
Jackstay: a line running fore and aft,
on both sides of the boat, to which
safety harnesses are clipped.
Jury: a temporary device to replace
lost or damaged gear.
K
Keel: the main backbone of the boat
to which a ballast keel is bolted or
through which the centerboard
passes.
Kicking strap: a line used to pull the
boom down, to keep it horizontal, particularly on a reach or run.
L
Lanyard: a short line attached to one
object, such as a knife, with which it is
secured to another.
Leech: 1, the after edge of a triangle
sail; 2, both side edges of a square
sail.
Leehelm: the tendency of a boat to
bear away from the wind.
Lee shore: a shore on to which the
wind blows.
Leeward: away from the wind; the direction to which the wind blows.
Leeway: the sideways movement of a
boat off its course as a result of the
wind blowing on one side of the sails.
Lifeline: a wire or rope rigged around
the deck to prevent the crew falling
overboard.
Limber holes: gaps left at the lower
end of frames above the keel to allow
water to drain to the lowest point of
the bilges.
List: a boat’s more or less permanent
lean to one side, owing to the improper distribution of weight, e.g., ballast or water.
Log: 1, an instrument for measuring a
boat’s speed and distance traveled
through the water; 2, to record in a
book the details of a voyage, usually
distances covered and weather.
Luff: the forward edge of a sail. To luff
up is to turn a boat’s head right into
the wind.
Luff groove: a groove in a wooden or
metal spar into which the luff of a
headsail is fed.
Lurch: the sudden roll of a boat.
M
Marlin spike: a pointed steel or
wooden spike used to open up the
strands of rope or wire then splicing.
Mast Step: the socket in which the
base of the mast is located.
Measured mile: a distance of one
nautical mile measured between
buoys or transits/ranges ashore, and
marked on the chart.
PAGE
7
GLOSSARY OF SAILING TERMS
Member: a part of the skeleton of the
hull, such as a stringer laminated into
fiberglass hull to strengthen it.
Meridian: an imaginary line encircling
the Earth that passes through the
poles and cuts at right angles through
the Equator. All lines of longitude are
meridians.
Mizzen: 1, the shorter, after-mast on a
ketch or yawl; 2, the fore and aft sail
set on this mast.
N
Navel pipe: a metal pipe in the foredeck through which the anchor chain
passes to the locker below.
Noon Sight: a vessel’s latitude can
be found, using a sextant, when a
heavenly body on the observer’s meridian is at its greatest altitude. The
sight of the sun at noon is the one
most frequently taken.
O
Off the wind: with the sheets slacked
off, not close-hauled.
On the wind: close-hauled.
Out haul: a rope used to pull out the
foot of a sail.
Overall length (OAL): the boat’s extreme length, measured from the
foremost past of the bow to the aftermost part of the stern, excluding bowspirt, self-steering gear etc.
P
Painter: the bow line by which a dinghy, or tender, is towed or made fast.
Pintle: a rudder fitting with a long pin
that fits into the gudgeon to form a
hinged pivot for the rudder.
Pitch: 1, the up and down motion of
the bows of a boat plunging over the
waves; 2, the angle of the propeller
blades.
Point of sailing: the different angles
from which a boat may sail; the boat’s
course relative to the direction of the
wind.
Port: the left-hand side of the boat,
looking forward (opp. of starboard).
Port tack: a boat is on a port tack
when the wind strikes the port side
first and the mainsail is out to starboard. A boat on the port tack gives
way to a boat on a starboard tack.
Position line/ Line of position: a line
drawn on a chart, as a result of taking
a bearing, along which the boat’s position must be, i.e. two position lines
give a fix.
Pulpit: a metal guard rail fitted at the
bows of a boat to provide safety for
the crew.
Pushpit: a metal guard rail fitted at
the stern.
Q
Quarter: the portion of the boat midway between the stern and the beam;
on the quarter means about 45 degrees abaft the beam.
R
Rake: the fore and aft deviation from
the perpendicular of a mast or other
feature of a boat.
Range: 1, see transit; 2, of tides, the
difference between the high and low
water levels of a tide; 3, the distance
at which a light can be seen.
Rating: a method of measuring certain dimensions of a yacht to enable it
to take part in handicap races.
Reach: to sail with the wind approximately on the beam; all sailing points
between running and close-hauled.
Reef: to reduce the sail area by folding or rolling surplus material on the
boom or forestay.
Reefing pennant: strong line with
which the luff or leech cringle is pulled
down to the boom when reefing.
Rhumb line: a line cutting all meridians at the same angle; the course followed by a boat sailing in a fixed direction.
Riding light to anchor light: an allaround white light, usually hoisted on
the forestay, to show that a boat under
50 ft. (15m.)is at anchor. It must be
visible for 2 mls. (3 km.).
Rigging screw: a deck fitting with
which the tensions of standing rigging,
e.g. stays, shrouds, etc. are adjusted.
Roach: the curved part of the leech of
a sail that extends beyond the direct
line from head to clew.
Run: to run with the wind aft and with
the sheets eased well out.
Running rigging: all the moving
lines, such as sheets and halyards,
used in the setting and trimming of
sails.
S
Scope: the length of rope or cable
paid out when mor anchoring.
Scuppers: 1, holes in the toe rail that
allow water to drain off the deck; 2,
drain cockpit through hull.
Seacock: a valve that shuts off an
underwater inlet or outlet passing
through the hull.
Seize: to bind two ropes together, or a
rope to a spar, with a light line.
Serve: to cover and protect a splice or
part of a rope with twine bound tightly
against the lay.
Serving mallet: tool with a grooved
head, used when serving a rope to
keep the twine at a constant and high
tension.
Set: 1, to hoist a sail; 2, the way in
which the sails fit; 3, the direction of
tidal current or steam.
Shackle: a metal link with a removable bolt across the end; of various
shapes: D, U.
Sheave: a grooved wheel in a block
or spar for a rope to run on.
Sheet: the rope attached to the clew
of a sail or to the boom, enabling it to
be controlled or trimmed.
Shrouds: ropes or wires, usually in
pairs, led from the mast to the chain
plates at deck level to prevent the
mast falling sideways; part of the
standing rigging.
Sloop: a single-masted sailing boat
with a mainsail and one head sail.
Spar: a general term for any wooden
or metal pole, e.g., mast or boom,
used to carry or give shape to sails.
Spindrift: spray blown along the surface of the sea.
Spinnaker: a large, light, balloon
shaped sail set when reaching or running.
Splice: to join ropes or wire by unlaying the strands and interweaving
them.
Split pin: see cotter pin.
Spreaders: horizontal struts attached
to the mast, which extends to the
shrouds and help to support the mast.
PAGE
8
GLOSSARY OF SAILING TERMS
Stall: a sail stalls when the airflow
over it breaks up, causing the boat to
lose way.
Stanchion: upright metal post bolted
to the deck to support guardrails or
lifelines.
Standing part: the part of a line not
used when making a knot; the part of
a rope that is made fast, or around
which the knot is tied.
Standing rigging: the shrouds and
stays that are permanently set up and
support the mast.
Starboard: right-hand side of a boat
looking forward (opp. of port).
Starboard tack: a boat is the starboard tack when the wind strikes the
starboard side first and the boom is
out to the port.
Stay: wire or rope which supports the
mast in a fore and aft direction; part of
the standing rigging.
Steerage way: a boat has steerage
way when it has sufficient speed to allow it to be steered, or to answer the
helm.
Stem: the timer at the bow, from the
keel upward, to which the planking is
attached.
Sternway: the backward, stern-first
movement of a boat.
Stringer: a fore and aft member, fitted
to strengthen the frames.
T
Tack: 1, the lower forward corner of a
sail; 2, to turn the boat through the
wind so that it blows on the opposite
sides of the sails.
Tacking: working to windward by sailing close-hauled on alternate courses
so that the wind is first on one side of
the boat, then on the other.
Tack pennant: a length of wire with
an eye in each end, used to raise the
tack of a headsail some distance off
the deck.
Tackle: a purchase system comprising of rope and blocks that is used to
gain mechanical advantage.
Tang: a strong metal fitting by which
standing rigging is attached to the
mast or other spar.
Tender of dinghy: a small boat used
to ferry stores and people to a yacht.
Terminal fitting: fitting at the end of a
wire rope by which a shroud or stay
can be attached to the mast, a tang or
a rigging screw/ turnbuckle.
Tide: the vertical rise and fall of the
oceans caused by the gravitational attraction of the moon.
Toe rail: a low strip of metal or molding running around the edge of the
deck.
Topping lift: a line from the masthead
to a spar, normally the boom, which is
used to raise it.
Topsides: the part of a boat’s hull that
is above the waterline.
Track: 1, the course a boat has made
good; 2, a fitting on the mast or boom
into which the slides on a sail fit; 3, a
fitting along which a traveller runs,
used to alter the angle of the sheets.
Transit: two fixed objects are in transit when seen in line; two transit give
position fix.
Traveller: 1, a ring or hoop that can
be hauled along a spar; 2, a fitting that
slides in a track and is used to alter
the angle of the sheets.
Trim: 1, to adjust the angle of the
sails, by means of sheets, so that they
work most efficiently; 2, to adjust the
boat’s load, and thus the fore and aft
angle at which it floats.
True wind: the direction and speed of
the wind felt when stationary, at anchor or on land.
Turnbuckle: see Rigging screw.
Waterline length (WL): the length of
a boat from stem to stern at the waterline. It governs the maximum speed of
displacement hull and effects a boats
rating.
Weather helm: ( opp. of lee helm).
Weather side: the side of a boat on
which the wind is blowing.
Wetted surface: the area of the hull
under water.
Whisker pole: a light pole used to
hold out the clew of a headsail when
running.
Winch: a mechanical device, consisting usually of a metal drum turned by
a handle, around which a line is
wound to give the crew more purchasing power when hauling taut a line,
e.g. a jib sheet.
Windage: those parts of a boat that
increase drag, e.g., rigging, spars,
crew, etc.
Windlass: a winch with a horizontal
shaft and a vertical handle, used to
haul up the anchor chain.
Windward: the direction from which
the wind blows; towards the wind
(opp. of leeward).
Y
Yawl: a two masted boat with a mizzen stepped aft of the rudder stock/
post.
U
Under way: a boat is under way when
it is not made fast to shore, at anchor
or aground.
Uphaul: a line used to raise something vertically, e.g., the spinnaker
pole.
V
Veer: 1, the wind veers when it shifts
in clockwise direction; 2, to pay out
anchor cable or rope in a gradual,
controlled way.
W
Wake: the disturbed water left astern
of a boat.
Waterline: the line along the hull at
which a boat floats.
PAGE
9
EXPLANATION OF SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
This manual contains safety precautions that must be observed when operating or servicing your boat.
Review and understand these instructions.
Denotes an extreme intrinsic hazard exists which would
result in high probability of death or irreparable injury if proper
precautions are not taken
Denotes a hazard exists which can result in injury or death if
proper precautions are not taken
Denotes a reminder of safety practices or directs attention to
unsafe practices which could result in personal injury or damage
to the craft or components
PAGE 10
SafetyTuneUp
maintenance and safety issues to all of our boat owners. Our goal is to have all owners enjoy
safe and trouble-free boating at all times.
Although this publication is not all-inclusive, it does cover some very important responsibilities
of boat maintenance and ownership. We ask that you insert this into your owner's manual or
boat log for quick and easy reference when using your boat. In addition, please go to
R E C O R D S
At Hunter Marine, we believe that it is appropriate to highlight some very important
encouraged to refer to the current edition of Chapman’s Piloting, Seamanship and Small Boat
CarbonMonoxideSafety
F O R
Carbon Monoxide Can Kill
R E TA I N
Handling, or U.S. Sailing’s Keel Boat Manual.
Y O U R
http://www .huntermarine.com for archived issues of this publication. You are also
This section is intended to provide educational information about carbon monoxide relative to
boats and boating. Carbon monoxide accumulation is affected by boat geometry, hatch,
window and door openings, ventilation openings, proximity to other structures and boats, wind
direction, boat speed, boat maintenance and a multitude of other variables. This section
discusses many of these and enables the boat owner to better understand some of the more
predictable effects. However, this information is limited in that it cannot cover all conceivable
variables. Therefore, the boat owner is cautioned not to exclusively rely on it to prevent the
accumulation of carbon monoxide.
What Is Carbon Monoxide?
Carbon monoxide is a highly poisonous gas formed by the combination of carbon and oxygen.
Commonly referred to as CO, its chemical formula, "C" for carbon and "O" for oxygen. CO is a
colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that by itself cannot be detected by human senses. CO
diffuses in the air much more rapidly than other gases that are detectable by the human
senses. The weight of CO is about the same as air so it does not rise or fall like other gases
but will distribute itself throughout the boat. CO is produced any time a material containing
carbon is burned. In boating, these materials include, but are not limited to, gasoline, diesel
fuel and propane. All carbon based fuels produce varying amounts of CO, depending on their
carbon content. Gasoline is high in carbon and therefore produces high levels of CO. Diesel
fuel is low in carbon and therefore produces lower levels of CO. However, the exhaust of all
engines and generators as well as any open flame device produce CO and the same
precautions should be taken regardless of the type of fuel.
How A Person Is Affected By Carbon Monoxide
When breathed, carbon monoxide is absorbed by the lungs and reacts with the blood
hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which reduces the oxygen carrying capacity of the
blood. The result is a lack of oxygen for the tissues with the subsequent tissue death and, if
prolonged, death of the individual. Carbon monoxide in high concentrations can be fatal in a
matter of minutes. Even lower concentrations must not be ignored because the effects of
exposure to CO are cumulative and can be just as lethal. Certain health related problems
and age increase the effects of CO. People, who smoke or are exposed to high
concentrations of cigarette smoke, consume alcohol or have lung or heart disorders are
particularly susceptible to an increase in the effects from CO. However, the health of all of
the boat’s occupants should be considered. Physical exertion accelerates the rate at which
the blood absorbs CO. The early effects of CO poisoning are easy to overlook because they
are similar to the effects of other boating related stresses such as eye strain, fatigue, sun
exposure, seasickness, or alcohol consumption. But as the concentration of CO in the air
increases, it has increasingly adverse effects on your health.
Symptoms Of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
One or more of the following symptoms can signal the adverse effects of carbon monoxide
accumulation. The order of this list is generally the sequence of symptoms. However, the number of
symptoms and the order of appearance may change for different people:
Watering And Itching Eyes
Flushed Appearance
Throbbing Temples
Inattentiveness
Inability To Think Coherently
Ringing In The Ears
Tightness Across The Chest
Headache
Drowsiness
Incoherence
Nausea
Dizziness
Fatigue
Vomiting
Collapse
Convulsions
2
What To Do When Someone Is Overcome By Carbon Monoxide
When someone falls victim to carbon monoxide poisoning, fast and responsive action is crucial. Know
the symptoms. The earlier the effects of CO are detected the better the chances for recovery. The
following list shows the sequence of events that must be done in an effort to revive a CO victim:
Evacuate, Ventilate, Investigate and
Take Corrective Action:
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Action Sequence
Move the person to fresh air.
Administer oxygen if available.
Contact medical help.
If the victim is not breathing, perform
artificial respiration per approved CPR
procedures until medical help arrives
and takes over. Prompt action can make
the difference between life and death.
Ventilate area.
Investigate the source of CO
and take corrective actions.
How Carbon Monoxide Can Enter Your Boat
Any device that burns fuel creates carbon monoxide. For example, a propane cook-top or a
space heater are both potential sources for CO. But the most serious danger comes from
the engines and generators aboard your own and neighboring boats. There are four basic
ways that CO from a running engine or generator can enter your boat:
The “Station Wagon Effect” results from the aerodynamics of deck cabins and
transoms. With the boat under way, the air flow over the top forms a low pressure
area behind the cabin or transom which can suck exhaust gasses into the cockpit
and the cabin.
Obstructions are principally a problem when boats are rafted together or tied to a
dock or seawall. Against an obstruction, exhaust gasses which normally dissipate
may instead be directed back to your boat. Beware of open windows, hatches, doors
and the location of the engine air intake. Exhaust contains particularly high
concentrations of CO when an engine is cold; so to protect yourself and your
neighbors, minimize the time spent getting underway. Pay particular attention to
potential obstructions when running a generator for long periods.
Infiltration of CO from a neighbor's exhaust can be a problem aboard any boat at any
time. Infiltration can happen any time your neighbors are running a generator or
engine, even when they are many slips away.
3
Leaks in your own exhaust system from the engine or generator can allow harmful
levels of CO to accumulate at a surprising rate. Good maintenance practices are
critical to avoid this.
There are many variables that can combine to affect the accumulation of carbon monoxide. Some of
these variables are: the presence of weather enclosures and covers, boat layout and configuration,
location of ports, hatches, windows, doors, and vents, proximity and types of structures and other boats,
wind speed and direction, speed of the boat, etc. Although it would be impossible to identify every
variable or combination of variables that may affect the accumulation of carbon monoxide, the boat
operator must remain aware at all times of the possibility of CO accumulation. The following additional
illustrations show how Carbon Monoxide Gas (CO) can accumulate in your boat while you are at the dock
or underway. Become familiar with these examples to prevent exposure to this poisonous gas.
Figure 1. Blocked hull exhaust outlets near a pier, dock,
seawall, bulkhead or any other structure can
cause excessive accumulation of Carbon
Monoxide gas with the cabin areas of your
yacht. Be certain hull exhaust outlets are not
blocked in any way.
4
Figure 2. Engine and generator exhaust from other vessels
alongside your yacht, while docked or anchored,
can cause excessive accumulation of Carbon
Monoxide gas within the cabin and cockpit areas
of your yacht. Be alert for exhaust from other
vessels.
Figure 3. When protective weather coverings are in place,
engine or generator exhaust from your yacht, while
docked and/or running, can cause excessive
accumulation of Carbon Monoxide gas within the
cabin and cockpit areas of your yacht. Always
provide adequate ventilation when the weather
coverings are in place and either the engine or
generator are running.
Figure 4. Engine or generator exhaust from your yacht while
underway at a slow speed can cause excessive
accumulation of Carbon Monoxide gas within the
cabin and cockpit areas of your yacht. A tail wind
can increase the accumulation. This is often
referred to as the “station wagon effect”. Always
provide adequate ventilation or increase your
speed if possible.
Dangers Of Carbon Monoxide In The Water
On many boats, carbon monoxide from your main engine or generator or those of another boat
can accumulate in high concentrations beneath the swim-platform. Carbon monoxide can also
accumulate between boats, boats and docks, and below docks and other structures.
Accumulations of carbon monoxide at or near the surface of the water can present the risk of
carbon monoxide poisoning to anyone swimming in or otherwise near the water surface.
Children are especially vulnerable, as they tend to playfully swim near swim-platforms and
docks where accumulations of carbon monoxide may be present. NEVER swim or allow others
to swim if a generator or engine is running. Never swim or allow others to swim while in a
marina or where other boats or structures are present.
How To Minimize The Accumulation Of Carbon Monoxide
Practice good inspection and maintenance habits.
Orient your boat to maximize the dispersion of CO.
Be certain hull exhaust outlets are not blocked or restricted in any way.
Be alert for exhaust gasses from other boats.
Always provide adequate ventilation when weather enclosures are in place and engine
or generator is running.
Be aware of the effects of your actions on other boats.
Be aware of the effects of the actions of others on your boat.
Provide adequate ventilation when open flame appliances are used in the cabin.
Preventative Maintenance
Frequent inspections and proper maintenance of the engine, generator, and exhaust systems as
well as other various areas of your boat are critical in preventing the accumulation of carbon
monoxide. It is the owner's responsibility to make sure that the entire boat is inspected and
maintained against CO.
The exhaust systems of your engine and generator are under constant attack from salt water,
gasses, vibration and normal wear. Inspect every exhaust system component often. Start with a
visual inspection. Check each joint for discoloration, carbon buildup, stains, water leaks or other
signs of damage. Inspect all metal parts for corrosion, discoloration or flaking. Check that all hose
clamps are in good condition and properly tightened. Carefully inspect all exhaust and cooling
hoses for signs of wear, dry rot, cracking, discoloration, chafing or swelling. If any of these
conditions exist, have the entire system inspected and corrected by a qualified technician before
starting the engine or generator.
Next, start the engine and generator one at a time. Follow the full run of the exhaust system,
listening and looking for leaks. While doing this, make sure there is adequate ventilation and that
your CO detector is on.
Other items to inspect are as follows: If your boat has access panels, check that the access panels
around the engine and exhaust are in place and fit snugly to minimize the opportunity for CO to
enter the cabin. There should be no large openings where CO could enter the cabin. Ensure that all
ventilation systems are in good working order, and not blocked or punctured. Check all sink drains
to ensure that they have a good water trap to prevent CO from coming in from the outside.
Finally, because poorly running engines produce excessive CO, make sure engine and generator are
tuned up. They should run smoothly and not produce black smoke. The fuel system and air filters
should be in good order.
5
Carbon Monoxide Detectors
If you carefully avoid potential CO accumulation and maintain your systems properly, you
have made great strides towards protecting yourself and others from the dangers of carbon
monoxide. Another important line of defense is a CO detector, used whenever you’re aboard
your boat. A detector is the only way to properly detect the presence of CO. There should be
a CO detector located in each living area of your boat. Use only those CO detectors that are
UL approved for marine use. RV and residential models won’t withstand the elements of the
boating environment. Most CO detectors require specific maintenance procedures to remain
accurate and functional. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for the installation, use and
maintenance of the CO detectors. Carbon Monoxide Detectors should be installed in all
boats and the operation of them should be known to all aboard.
If you would like to purchase a CO detector and receive a special purchase price, please
contact the Hunter Marine Customer Service Hotline at 800-771-5556.
6
If you need assistance, please feel free to contact
our Customer Service Hotline at 1-800-771-5556.
BoatingUnderTheInfluence
BUI is just as deadly as drinking and driving!
Did you know:
A boat operator is likely to become impaired more quickly than a driver, drink for drink?
The penalties for BUI can include large fines, revocation of operator privileges and serious
jail terms?
The use of alcohol is involved in about a third of all recreational boating fatalities?
Every boater needs to understand the risks of boating under the influence of alcohol or drugs
(BUI). It is illegal to operate a boat while under the influence of alcohol or drugs in every
state. The Coast Guard also enforces a federal law that prohibits BUI. This law pertains to
ALL boats (from canoes and rowboats to the largest ships) — and includes foreign vessels
that operate in U.S. waters, as well as U.S. vessels on the high seas.
Dangers of BUI
Alcohol affects judgment, vision, balance and coordination. These impairments increase the
likelihood of accidents afloat – for both passengers and boat operators. U.S. Coast Guard
data shows that in boating deaths involving alcohol use, over half the victims capsized their
boats and/or fell overboard.
Alcohol is even more hazardous on the water than on land. The marine environment – motion,
vibration, engine noise, sun, wind and spray – accelerates a drinker’s impairment. These
stressors cause fatigue that makes a boat operator’s coordination, judgment and reaction
time decline even faster when using alcohol.
Alcohol can also be more dangerous to boaters because boat operators are often less
experienced and less confident on the water than on the highway. Recreational boaters don’t
have the benefit of experiencing daily boat operation. In fact, boaters average only 110 hours
on the water per year.
Alcohol Effects
Alcohol has many physical effects that directly threaten safety and well-being
on the water.
When a boater or passenger drinks, the following occur:
Cognitive abilities and judgment deteriorate, making it harder to process information,
assess situations, and make good choices.
Physical performance is impaired - evidenced by balance problems, lack of coordination,
and increased reaction time.
Vision is affected, including decreased peripheral vision, reduced depth perception,
decreased night vision, poor focus, and difficulty in distinguishing colors (particularly red
and green).
Inner ear disturbances can make it impossible for a person who falls into the water to
distinguish up from down.
Alcohol creates a physical sensation of warmth - which may prevent a person in cold
water from getting out before hypothermia sets in.
As a result of these factors, a boat operator with a blood alcohol concentration above .10
percent is estimated to be more than 10 times as likely to die in a boating accident than an
operator with zero blood alcohol concentration. Passengers are also at greatly increased risk
for injury and death - especially if they are also using alcohol.
7
Estimating Impairment
This table gives a guide to average impacts of alcohol consumption. However, many factors,
including prescription medications and fatigue, can affect an individual’s response to alcohol,
and impairment can occur much more quickly as a result. There is NO safe threshold for
drinking and operating a boat, so do not assume you are safe just because you fall into the
“rarely” or “possibly” influenced categories.
APPROXIMATE BLOOD ALCOHOL PERCENTAGE
Drinks
Body Weight in Pounds
Influenced
100
120
140
160
180
200
220
240
1
0.04
0.04
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
2
0.09* 0.07* 0.06* 0.06* 0.05* 0.04
0.04
0.04
3
0.13
0.11
0.09* 0.08* 0.07* 0.07* 0.06* 0.06*
4
0.18
0.15
0.13
0.11
0.1
0.09* 0.08* 0.07*
5
0.22
0.18
0.16
0.14
0.12
0.11
0.1
0.09*
6
0.26
0.22
0.19
0.17
0.15
0.13
0.12
0.11
7
0.31
0.26
0.22
0.19
0.17
0.15
0.14
0.13
8
0.35
0.29
0.25
0.22
0.2
0.18
0.16
0.15
9
0.4
0.33
0.28
0.25
0.22
0.2
0.18
0.17
10
0.44
0.37
0.31
0.28
0.24
0.22
0.2
0.18
RARELY
POSSIBLY*
DEFINITELY
The asterisk ( * ) indicates estimated levels of impairment that could mean the individual is
possibly influenced.
Enforcement and Penalties
The Coast Guard and every state have stringent penalties for violating BUI laws. Penalties can
include large fines, suspension or revocation of boat operator privileges, and jail terms. The
Coast Guard and the states cooperate fully in enforcement in order to remove impaired boat
operators from the waters.
In waters that are overseen solely by the states, the states have the authority to enforce their
own BUI statutes. In state waters that are also subject to U.S. jurisdiction, there is concurrent
jurisdiction. That means if a boater is apprehended under Federal law in these waters, the
Coast Guard will (unless precluded by state law) request that state law enforcement officers
take the intoxicated boater into custody.
When the Coast Guard determines that an operator is impaired, the voyage may be
terminated. The vessel will be brought to mooring by the Coast Guard or a competent and unintoxicated person on board the recreational vessel. Depending on the circumstances, the
Coast Guard may arrest the operator, detain the operator until sober, or turn the operator over
to state or local authorities.
8
Tips For Avoiding BUI
Boating, fishing and other water sports are fun in their own right. Alcohol can turn a great day
on the water into the tragedy of a lifetime.
Consider these alternatives to using alcohol while afloat:
Take along a variety of cool drinks, such as sodas, water, iced tea, lemonade or non-alcoholic
beer.
Bring plenty of food and snacks.
Wear clothes that will help keep you and your passengers cool.
Plan to limit your trip to a reasonable time to avoid fatigue. Remember that it’s common to
become tired more quickly on the water.
If you want to make alcohol part of your day’s entertainment, plan to have a party ashore at
the dock, in a picnic area, at a boating club, or in your backyard…. Choose a location where
you’ll have time between the fun and getting back into your car or boat.
If you dock somewhere for lunch or dinner and drink alcohol with your meal, wait a reasonable
time (estimated at a minimum of an hour per drink) before operating your boat.
Having no alcohol while aboard is the safest way to enjoy the water — intoxicated passengers
are also at risk of injury and falls overboard.
Spread the word on the dangers of BUI. Many recreational boaters forget that a boat is a
vehicle - and that safe operation is a legal and personal responsibility.
(Source: uscgboating.org)
9
If you need assistance, please feel free to contact
our Customer Service Hotline at 1-800-771-5556.
RiggingMaintenance
As a sailing yacht owner the list of responsibilities that ensure the enjoyment and safety of you and
your family and friends may feel overwhelming at times. It may seem that you are expected to be "the
expert" at every turn in an arena where all you were looking for was some fun and relaxation.
One of the most important systems to get to know on your sailboat is the primary function of Sail
power. It involves five subsystems, which include: Sails, the spars (mast and boom), standing rigging
(furling systems included), running rigging and deck hardware.
When you purchase your sailboat, it is usually the case where all of these systems are intact and
ready to operate. This is a good thing, as your responsibility as an expert doesn’t seem so demanding
after all. You have hoisted and furled sails before and you understand the concept of having to reef or
"shorten" sail when conditions merit. So what else do I need to know about my primary power supply
while I am out on the water?
As with any power system there is going to be that vital concept of diligence, known as maintenance.
After owning your boat for a season or two, you may be asking yourself am I doing what I should to
keep my sail power system operating safely and at its optimum. The key to answering this question is
one simple word: Awareness!
The four subsystems which I’ll discuss (sails excluded) that help make up your sail-power system are
quite simple and logical in their design and the key to you maintaining them is being aware of what
they are and how they function.
10
Maintenance awareness should start with an overview of your mast and standing rigging and its
proper relation to your boat. This includes a proper rig tune and knowing the rigging pieces involved.
This overview can be best introduced by reading your Selden Mast "Hints and Advice" Rigging guide
for the Hunter keel boats which gives you a thorough background of how your rig was stepped and
tuned in relation to your boat. The guide should give you a vivid mental picture of how your boat was
set up originally by your dealer and presented to you in its current state. A photo log or notebook that
would record the current settings would be a good idea to add to your rigging guide.
Now that you have an overview or general picture of your mast and standing rigging, it is important for
you to become aware of the general conditions of these systems by conducting regular inspections. At
least once or twice a year, your personal inspections should help satisfy any safety or performance
issues that may have arisen during your sailing season. These inspections will also provide you with
more awareness of the systems and their function as well.
General items to look for during our inspection are signs of accelerated corrosion. It can usually
appear as excessive rust discoloration or oxidation, which can appear as a powder or flaking of a
metallic part. Routinely cleaning the deck level areas of your mast and rigging with fresh water will
help in preventing the corrosion problems you are looking for. Another item of inspection are your
fasteners and rigging screws which are threaded items that should still be intact and matching their
original condition. (It would be a good time to review your photo or notes log.) Also check that all
cotter pins, locking nuts and locking pins are still in place. It is a good practice during this inspection
to coat any threaded items or moving parts with a light lubricant to ensure that they will properly
function when you want them to.
A third inspection area related to your mast and rigging are your furling systems. It is best to become
aware of your furling systems by reviewing the particular manuals provided with the boat. Then you will
get to know the concept of its function and the vital points of inspection and lubrication before you
remove your sails. After removing your sails you will see that Selden furling systems for the Hunter
keel boats have several lubrication points that are described in your manuals and are easily
accessible during your inspection.
Your boat’s running rigging (halyards, sheets and control lines) and deck hardware are the remaining
areas to address during your maintenance awareness program. The same rule applies with first a
general overview of their function which is actually quite simple and logical, will make you the expert
in no time. Then a closer inspection several times a year would be prudent. Since these subsystems
are more dynamic than the mast and standing rigging, you should pay close attention to wear and
chafe of these materials. Any particular area that seems to be more worn than the remainder of the
piece being inspected should be addressed by replacement or a recommendation by a professional.
Part of your mast and rigging awareness, of course, involves everything aloft as well. If you are not
comfortable in going aloft to perform a routine inspection then hiring a professional using the same
timetable is the prudent thing to do. It would be advisable to at least perform an overview of going
aloft in case of an emergency where it would necessitate you having the awareness of you being able
to use a bosun’s chair and safely perform the task at hand. Then if the situation arose you would at
least have a comfort factor of what needed to be done.
So while you are out sailing, providing the enjoyment and relaxation which makes it such a great
sport, just remember to keep your eyes open and watch things work as this awareness will make you
the expert in no time.
11
HUNTER MARINE CORPORATION would like to thank Mr. Tom Sharkey, General Manager,
Selden Mast, Inc. for this article and his contribution to this edition of the Hunter Safety TuneUp.
RudderInformation
Dear Valued Hunter 450/456/460/466/46 Owner:
Seasoned offshore sailors understand and appreciate the fact that rudders are designed and
manufactured to protect the hull of the boat from serious under-water damage. Over the past several
years, we have received reports from some owners who have inadvertently lost their fiberglass
composite post rudders during boating activity. Our goal with this communication is to explain how this
loss might occur and to provide you with recommendations for enhanced maintenance options, plus
encourage ongoing safety education for captain and crew alike in the case of rudder loss.
By virtue of its design, whenever a boat runs aground, or when the rudder strikes or is struck by an
object, there is always a chance that the rudder post has been compromised or weakened to some
extent. This weakening may go undetected, and may only become evident after continued or extensive
use, possibly in adverse conditions.
While Hunter Marine’s limited warranty specifically does not warrant the rudder because of the
significant linkage to boat operation, it has always been Hunter Marine’s policy to examine rudder
stocks where there has been a rudder loss, whenever possible. Our goal in analyzing rudder loss is to
determine cause and continually seek methods of improvement in our approach to design and
manufacturing.
Specifically, Hunter Marine is aware of 16 rudders which have been lost on boats within your size
range, most of which had been in use for more than two years. We were able to review 13 of the 16 12
reported. Our research indicates that 11 were well within the design and manufacturing tolerances.
One rudder post may have had a manufacturing problem, while another was within the design tolerance
but did not meet Hunter’s internal tolerance specifications.
Another area in which we seek to assist our owners involves ongoing education. One of our key goals is
to continually educate owners about preparation for offshore sailing, including our strong safety
recommendation that the captain should learn how to sail without a rudder. We regularly publish
articles in our corporate publications, including Safety Tune Up and KnotLine about this topic, and other
safety issues. We highly recommend that our offshore owners in particular be appropriately prepared
for offshore sailing activities by bringing along appropriate equipment, including anchor lines and
anchors as well as other needed supplies. You should be well aware of equipment requirements which
allow you to recover in the case of unexpected rudder loss. Coast Guard recommendations and
Chapman’s Piloting are both excellent resources all captains should be familiar with and thoroughly
review in regards to this topic. We also highly encourage your participation in professional sailing
schools where safety techniques can be taught and mastered by captain and crew. Here’s a great
source for more information:
http://www.offshore-sailing.com/courses_content/learn_to_sail.htm
In an effort to better support our owners and to make routine maintenance inspections easier to spot
rudder problems, Hunter is now offering to replace our former composite rudder posts with stainless
steel rudder posts on boats in your size range. While both composite and stainless steel rudder posts
have their distinct advantages, we believe that stainless posts provide more obvious visibility of
damage and will thereby assist our owners in the troubleshooting process. This direct inspection will
allow you to replace a damaged post prior to your next use, versus not being able to readily note the
problem with the composite design. In a goodwill effort, we are making a retrofit stainless steel rudder
post available to you at a significantly reduced cost. If you are interested in purchasing such a rudder,
please inquire through our Customer Service Department by calling (800)771-5556. We will be pleased
to make arrangements to have the stainless steel option delivered to you for your installation.
We are also in the process of researching an affordably priced pre-manufactured emergency rudder
system and will advise you when this becomes available. In the meantime, there are some aftermarket
versions available at a reasonable cost. For information, visit: http://www.selfsteer.com/products/sos/index.php
Our research has shown that the SOS rudder system can be purchased for about half the cost of an
emergency life raft.
In closing, we want you to know that Hunter Marine remains committed to your total satisfaction,
boating safety and excellent sailing experience. We hope that this safety alert and precaution
encourages you to take the proper steps to be fully prepared to sail without a rudder in the case of a
loss, to anchor appropriately in adverse conditions, to have all required emergency equipment and
supplies, and to consider making the switch to a stainless post to enhance your inspection capability.
13
Have a great – and safe – sailing season!
RudderlessSailing
The rudder on a sailboat is extremely vulnerable to damage and is under extreme pressure at
all times when being used, including motor sailing. It also is exposed to any hazard that exists
in the sea and can be damaged by grounding or receive shock loads by hitting flotsam and
debris in the water. Whales and other sea life have been known to destroy rudder blades. It is
not uncommon for an anchor line to wrap around the rudder, and for the shock load from wave
action to apply enough pressure to overload the rudderstock. There are many ways a rudder
can become damaged or inoperable.
The operator of a sailing vessel should be able to diagnose the cause of steering loss, assess
the damage, and determine which course of action is appropriate in order to regain control of
his boat. The source of failure may not be obvious, and a systematic inspection of relevant
components may be necessary. Start by examining the wheel or tiller system that connects to
the rudderpost. In most instances, the problem is here because this area is subject to high
pressure and is normally mechanically fastened to the rudderpost. Check for cables that have
slipped off the sheaves, or pins that have dropped out of the link between the wheel and
rudderpost. It is good policy to always insert clevis pins "aircraft style", with the end of the pin
that the cotter pin fits into aiming down. This is so that if the cotter pin falls out, the clevis pin
still has a chance of not dropping out. In the case of a tiller boat, inspect the bracket that
connects the tiller to the rudderpost. This can work itself loose or become unbolted. If all the
mechanical parts seem to be functioning properly, one can assume that the problem lies in the
rudder blade or rudderpost. This situation is more difficult to repair. If this is the case, it will
likely be necessary to either sail as best as possible away from danger or, if in shoal
conditions, anchor until you have a chance to implement a jury rig.
However, the rudder is not the only factor involved in steering a boat, and there are several
alternate methods for controlling the trajectory of a vessel in the event of rudder dysfunction.
Knowledge of alternate steering methods is an important component of thorough sailing
knowledge, and should be part of any beginner’s training. Rudderless sailing is indeed
possible; in fact, many junior sailing programs devote a portion of their instruction to sailing
the boat without a rudder. This is learned through the study of the boat’s dynamic reaction to
sail trim. It is important to understand how a sailboat reacts to sail trim, as this is how you
will guide the boat. Not only can learning these skills help you out of a difficult situation, they
will advance your knowledge of sail trim and your ability as a sailor.
If you need assistance, please feel free to contact
our Customer Service Hotline at 1-800-771-5556.
14
Imagine a boat resting in the water with no sails rigged. Underwater, the keel or centerboard
acts as a fulcrum, called the Center of Lateral Resistance (CLR, indicated by dotted line in
illustrations on the top of the next page) somewhere near the center of the boat. If you were
to push against the bow from the starboard side, the boat would turn toward the port, rotating
on that fulcrum (figure 1). Conversely, if you push on the stern from the starboard side the
boat will turn toward the starboard side (figure 2).
These forces can be duplicated using the sails. With only the mainsail rigged, and the wind
blowing across the starboard side, the boat will turn toward the starboard side (figure 3). This
is because the position of the mainsail is generally aft of the CLR, and the wind causes the
mainsail to apply force behind that axis. With only the jib rigged and sheeted in, the same
force is applied forward of the axis, and the force of the sail will push the bow away, as if you
were pushing the bow with your hand (figure 4).
15
Figure 1
Figure 2
If both sails are up, sheeting out all the way on one or the other sail can provide the same
effect as if the other were the only sail. When the jib is sheeted out, it does not exert any
force, so it is as if it were not even there. Similarly, if the jib is sheeted in and the mainsail let
loose, the boat will behave as if force were being applied to the bow. Keeping these principles
in mind, it becomes evident that changing the trim of the sails can influence the trajectory of
the boat. In fact, this should be practiced.
Go sailing and lock off the rudder. Try making the boat go in the direction you want by applying
the sail trim as we described. If the bow needs to go downwind, trim it in and ease the main. If
the bow needs to go upwind, ease the jib and trim in the main. As you become accustomed to
how much trim is required (and this will vary from boat to boat), you should be able to steer a
course by making minor adjustments once you have the basic trim set up. It will take some
practice but it will make you a much better sailor.
16
Figure 3
Figure 4
To refine this method, we need to understand that a boat is designed so it will slowly head into
the wind if the helm is let go (A, fig 5). Accordingly, the mainsail should be eased so that the
jib can "blow" the bow back down to compensate. Also, a drag device can be easily improvised
to reduce the boat’s tendency to head-up into the wind. For example, a bucket can be tied off
the leeward side of the boat, creating a drag (B, fig 5), which reduces the boat’s tendency to
turn into the wind.
17
Figure 5
By adjusting the amount of drag (i.e. adding or removing buckets), an optimum combination can
be reached. Also, most sailboats when under power will automatically tend either to the port or
starboard when the engine is engaged, depending on many different variables from boat to
boat. Determine which way the boat turns with just the engine on, and this force can be used
to help steer the boat. The idea is to balance all the forces to keep the boat going straight
ahead. If you are able to practice and become comfortable with the necessary procedures
involved to successfully sail without a rudder, it should greatly boost your confidence in your
ability to handle unexpected situations. That is the essence of seamanship.
TrailerTuneUp
One of the most overlooked investments many boat owners have is their boats trailer. While most
owners only take a quick glance at the owner’s manual after taking delivery of their boat they do not
realize that trailer maintenance and setup is a crucial part of having a fun day on the water or in some
cases not making it to the boat ramp at all.
Within the trailers owners manual there is an inspection list with many items that will need to be
greased, inspected or tighten on a regular basis. In most cases the unseen items are what can turn
out to be the most troublesome. Rather than quote the owners manual word for word lets review the
most common maintenance items on your trailer and see how they could affect your weekend outing if
not properly attended to.
1. Wash your trailer: When washing the trailer do it systematically and take your time doing so. This is
an excellent time to visually inspect the under carriage, brake line fittings and brake drums, if equipped
on your trailer. As you work your way around the trailer use your free hand to lightly push or pull on
items such as trailer uprights, fenders or winch stands to check for tightness. Always be on the lookout
for loose fitting hardware. Remember a lot of bouncing and vibration takes place as your trailer moves
down the highway and this can loosen most types of fastening devises.
2. Tire pressure and tire wear: Just like your automobile tire pressure can be the difference between a
smooth or unpleasant ride to the boat ramp. The difference in a few pounds of air from one tire to the
next or from side to side can make a large difference in fuel economy and tire wear. If you have ever
wondered why your trailer seems to bounce down the road, chances are one or all of the tires are not
properly inflated. By checking the air pressure on a routine basis (monthly) you are one step closer to a
safe and worry free trip to the local boat ramp or the long awaited vacation resort a few hundred miles
away.
3. Proper lighting: This is one of the most important safety inspections you can make on your trailer.
How many times have you been motoring down the highway after sunset and notice just in front of you
a boat and trailer with the running lights flashing and flickering? And, this is just the ones that are
working. It is often taken for granted that if one taillight is working properly then the boat can be seen
by the driver following behind. The type of lighting failure described above is not only dangerous it is
easily and inexpensively resolved. To replace the running/brake light bulbs on your trailer probably cost
the average owner less that five-dollars to complete. To clean the light bulb sockets install the new
bulbs and clean the trailer light connector at the hitch probably takes less than thirty minutes to
complete from start to finish. The point being, it only takes a few minutes of preparation to travel safely
during the nighttime hours so why take the chance.
4. Tie down straps: A good start to any weekend outing is when a boat owner, his vehicle, boat and its
trailer all arrive at the same location and at the same time. One of the largest misconceptions in boat
towing that a boat by itself weighs enough to hold it securely on the trailer while riding down the
highway. Part of this assumption is true or that is until it becomes necessary to set the brakes in an
emergency situation and this is when the trailer becomes a launching pad for the boat rather than a
means of transporting it. Don’t be convinced that a boat tie down strap is only used to prevent a boat
from sliding backwards or from bouncing around on the trailer because this is far from the case. Check
your owner’s manuals (boat and trailer) for the correct tie-down locations on your boat and trailer.
18
5. Safety chains: Very few owners are aware that not only are safety chains required in most states they
should also be crossed under the trailer coupler for maximum performance. Safety chains and the use of
an emergency brake cable (supplied on most trailers with brakes) are the only means of controlling and
stopping your boat/trailer should it become detached from the vehicle while it is moving down the highway.
6. Trailer weight: One of the biggest misunderstandings most owners have is load capacity. For the most
part a boat’s trailer is only designed, specified and manufactured to carry your boat and a reasonable
amount of loose gear. They are not designed or intended to transport excess cargo such as, but not limited
to, gas grills, small fishing boats with outboard or an assortment of windsurfers. These are just a few
examples that come to mind. Trailers for the most part are built for a specific brand and model of boat. If
ever in doubt about your trailers carrying capacity a quick review of the manufacturers capacity label
located on the forward portion of the trailer will relieve any concerns you may have.
7. Tongue weight: I am sure at some point we have all seen a vehicle slowly and carefully moving down the
highway in an odd manner. In this particular case what you quickly begin to notice about this bizarre driving
style is that as the operator begins to accelerate the rear of the vehicle begins to sway back and forth.
When he slows down the rear of the vehicle settles down and the driver continues on at a slow pace. This,
not so uncommon event, is known to most Trailer Sailors as fish tailing. What most drivers don’t
understand is that this nerve-wrenching and dangerous means of transporting a boat is normally caused by
improper tongue weight. In most cases the type of swaying just described takes place when the boat or its
cargo has been set to far aft on the trailer therefore as is moves down the road it is attempting to lift the
rear of the vehicle off the ground. It is not set in stone for every boat trailer but the average tongue weight19
for a Hunter boat should be at or close to seven percent of the total boat weight. This can be accomplished
by moving the winch stand forward or aft on the trailer tongue to achieve the desired weight.
8. Wheel bearings: If there was ever an item that needed to be maintained to the letter it is the greasing
and annual maintenance of your trailers wheel bearings. For the Trailer Sailor, more weekends have been
spoiled by that unpleasant grinding sound coming from the center of the wheel hub on a trailer. Why?
Because it can only mean one thing and that is the bearings are dry of grease, over heating and about to
stop turning. What is even worse is this only happens at night on a lonely highway and during a holiday
weekend. The good news is it can be partially avoided by installing and using bearing buddies, if you do
not already have them, and following a diligent maintenance schedule. One of the few down falls with
bearing buddies is the inner/rear bearing may not receive the proper amount of lubrication if the bearings
are not packed properly in the beginning. This is why it is recommended that all bearing be removed,
cleaned and repacked (including the hub) on an annual basis. By following these simple suggestions you
will greatly improve your chances of trouble free travel and increased fuel mileage.
By following these simple recommendations we feel that your time spent traveling to and from your favorite
boating site or taking that annual family vacation can be made more pleasant and enjoyable for the
entire family.
WindlassFactAndFiction
Windlasses are often times viewed as the culprit whenever there has been a problem with the
anchoring system. All vertical and horizontal windlasses must have the same installation opportunity
to function as the manufacturer has intended for it to work. Unfortunately vessel manufacturers and
designers have space constraints that may cut into the perception that the consumer has regarding
the level of performance that is delivered from the system. The following information will answer
some of the myths and facts regarding anchoring systems.
All windlasses, no matter the manufacturer, must have a minimum amount of fall directly under the
windlass to accept the anchor rode paying off the gypsy, down into the anchor locker. The windlass
does not "stow" the rode into the anchor locker. Gravity and locker capacity play the major role in
capturing the rode and "stowing" the rode until it is needed to hold the boat during the anchoring
process. The conventional windlass installation/operation will work best when the windlass is sitting
over the widest and deepest portion of the locker. This will help gravity to stow the rode evenly as it
pays off the windlass. The locker layout does play a part in how well the rode will pay off the
windlass, as well.
The anchor rode must have available space in the locker. The incoming rode must leave the area
where the rode pays off the windlasses gypsy free and clear to keep it from piling up in front of the
windlass. Should there not be sufficient free space, the operator will have to "tend" the rode so that
there is space for the rode as it pays off the gypsy. If the rode is not tended to it will "pile up" on
itself directly in front of the windlass or underneath the mounting platform. Creating a "bottle neck",
jamming the rode as it is trying to pay off the gypsy. This will, of course, "trip" the circuit breaker
and damage the stripper. No matter what the rode length is, there must be free space for the rode
paying off the gypsy into the locker or in front of the windlass to allow for the oncoming rode, the
windlass cannot detect that the locker is full.
Whenever you alter your anchor rode, adding a longer tail scope of chain or ALL chain rode you
must be sure the extra length or size change will be adequate for the windlass that is installed. Just
because you can physically put a given length of rode into a locker does not mean that the windlass
will do the same. The trade off point is the windlass will do all of the "back breaking" work for you.
Simple rules to cross check your rode choice is to find the total weight of your rope, chain and
anchor. Multiply the total rode weight by 3. If your findings are less than the maximum pulling power
of the windlass you then have selected a rode that is matched to the capacity of the windlass.
Should you find that the total rode weight multiplied by 3 is greater than the maximum pulling power
of the windlass, you will have to replace the windlass as it will not provide you with the service you
are looking for. This method is telling you that the system is now mismatched. (You will find the max
pulling power information listed in your owner’s manual.)
A common problem discussed alot is rode jamming. Some of the reports refer to a "looping" in the
line that creates a jamming of the rode from underneath as the rode pays out. It is believed that a
common anchor swivel may prevent the "looping" of the anchor rode. Looping is a common action
that is part of the line falling over on itself as the line pays into the anchor locker. The line will rotate
clockwise during the recovery process, hesitate and then fall over itself and continue to rotate
counter clockwise until the rope repeats the hesitation; at which time the rope falls again over itself
as it lays in the locker. The "loops" are created when the rope changes direction as it pays into the
locker. The anchor swivel will not stop this action. The "looping" is increased when the lay of the 3strand nylon rope becomes tighter, or after it has been used in salt water over a period of time.
Saline builds up in the rope fibers over time and causes the rope to stiffen. However, a good fabric
softener rinse has been found to be very effective in lessening this problem. Depending on where
you cruise will determine the effect the salt water has on your rope. It has been found that some
fresh water lakes will "soften" the rope and cause it to jam.
20
Another cause for jamming is when the rode has been dumped into the locker. The "loops" appear as
part of the rode from the start. For example the "looping" found with a common garden hose. If the
rode was originally stowed removing the tangles and loops as the rode pays off into the locker, as
apposed to just dumping the rode into the locker. 3-Strand nylon has a bit of memory and will want to
retain the loops. This is brought on because during the twisting of the yarns to form the rope creates
the 3-strand construction. By loading the rode initially using the windlass, and working the ‘loops’ and
‘twists’ out as the rode is installed, will certainly lend to reducing added woes of the rode fouling itself at
the start. The addition of the anchor swivel will not completely rid you of you 3-strands woes, but it does
help and is worth the investment.
To dispel the "loops" the rode needs to be periodically taken completely out of the locker and manually
remove the twists and "loops". Again, an anchor swivel will not be a total "end all" to removing loops.
The "old salt’s tail" of dragging the anchor behind the boat or letting the anchor hang straight down at a
90 degree angle to the vessel in deep water just does not get the problem solved, in fact it delays and
wastes time and it is not safe.
The other issue to be aware of is that the 3-strand can be just too tight of a lay to properly perform in a
windlass installation and may have to be replaced. The rope will appear to be hard and stiff.
Even going to an all chain rode; you can find the exact same problem. The chain will twist and fall over
itself. The main cause is the point of contact where the rode crosses over the bow roller, and when the
rode changes direction as it travels around the windlasses gypsy. Yes, even chain will develop twists and
will periodically have to be laid out to manually remove the twist (It’s the best method, although not well
liked and it is the safest way).
We do not know why some vessels have more problems than others. It is reasonable to have 6 vessels
all-operating out of the same marina and one will have problems and the others will not. And yes the
bow roller wheel design will pay a big part in this process.
Summary:
The incoming rode must have somewhere to go. Clearing itself and making more room for the rode
entering behind it. The volume of the locker must match the length of rode being used.
21
Windlasses with control arms can require up to 12 or more inches of fall when being used with 3-strand
ropes. 8-Plaited rope is much more forgiving. With the entire rode in the locker, 8-plait rope requires as
little as 8 inches of fall.
Use the "Cross Check" method mentioned above to make sure your rode matches your windlasses
performance rating.
Always tie off to a strong point while at anchor. The windlass uses a clutch drive system and it could
creep out the anchor rode.
Always tie off the rode while the vessel is under way. You would not want to run over your anchor.
A windlass is a retrieval device. It is designed to recovery your anchor and rode. It is not a winch that is
manufactured to pull sustained high loads.
Damaged strippers are caused by:
Using a rope that is too soft
Too small of a diameter of rope.
Too long of an anchor rode fills the locker and as the windlass continues to operate jams
the rope into the stripper.
Too stiff of rope.
The rope passing through the deck can get hung up on the deck. In other words the passage
is not clean or smooth.
Not tying off while at anchor. The rope stretches wedges itself down in the bottom of the
gypsy and cannot strip itself out fast enough when the up button is pushed.
These are sound helpful hints to keep your anchoring experience a pleasant one, not a hateful one.
GeneralSafety
Safety Equipment
Federal law requires that you provide and maintain certain safety equipment on your boat. As
the boat owner, you are responsible for providing all required safety equipment. Consult the
United States Coast Guard and your state and local regulations to ensure your boat is in
complete compliance with all requirements concerning safety equipment on board. Additional
safety equipment may be recommended for your safety and the safety of your passengers.
You and your passengers should be aware of the availability and specific use of each piece of
safety equipment.
Minimum Recommended Safety Equipment
Required life saving equipment, including personal floatation and throwing devices
Required fire-extinguishing equipment
Required visual distress signal devices
First aid kit
Emergency position indicating radio beam (EPIRB)
Manual bailing device
Anchor with sufficient line/chain
Flashlight with fully charged batteries
Binoculars
Whistle
VHF radio
Navigational charts for your cruising area
Fog bell (boats over 39.4 feet)
Fire Safety
Fire safety is something that everyone who owns or operates a boat should practice. Each
year, boating fires and explosions kill and injure hundreds of boaters and cause millions of
dollars in property damage. While there is a greater chance of a fire or explosion on a boat
than on land, most of these accidents can be prevented. With a little effort on your part, fire
prevention and fire safety are very attainable goals.
As the owner of your boat, it is your responsibility to:
Have fire-fighting equipment inspected at regular intervals.
Replace fire-fighting equipment, if expired or discharged, with devices of equal
or greater fire-fighting capacity.
Inform members of the crew about the location and operation of all fire-fighting
equipment.
Inform members of the crew and guests about the location and operation of
all escape hatches.
Ensure that fire-fighting equipment is readily accessible.
Keep passageways to exits and escape hatches clear of obstructions.
Never allow the use of gas lights on board.
Never leave the boat unattended when cooking or heating appliances are in use.
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Fire Safety — Continued
Never modify any of the boat's systems (especially electrical, exhaust, fuel,
and ventilation).
Never handle fuel of any type when machinery is running or when cooking or
heating appliances are in use.
Follow proper fueling procedures.
Never smoke while handling fuel.
Keep machinery and bilge areas clean and free of debris.
Perform fire drills on a regular basis.
Fire Drills
Your strategy for fighting a boat fire will depend on many variables. Therefore, you should perform
fire drills under several different circumstances.
Discuss with your regular complement of crew, family and friends exactly how to fight a fire in the
engine room, the galley, the berthing area, and the helm station; then decide who should do
which jobs – and when.
Each person should know how the installed fire extinguisher system works and how to operate it.
Walk through the boat noting all the potential fire locations, and point out all the hand-portable
extinguishers.
Practice dismounting the extinguishers and then aiming for the base of the imaginary flames –
sweeping the jet from side to side. (However, if you actually squirt a CO2 extinguisher during this
"test run", it won’t reseal properly and will leak.) Check to see if any of the extinguishers weighs
less than it is supposed to, and have any light ones refilled or replaced. Focus on all of your
boat’s potential fire locations.
Periodically, call a fire drill and time everyone with a stopwatch. The first drill will probably help
you identify weak links. Discuss them and practice again right away, until you’ve improved your
response time. After everyone is comfortable in his or her role, change roles and practice again
– or practice with one less person to simulate an injury situation.
Generally, everyone on board who is physically able to grab an extinguisher and douse the fire
should be ready to do so. However, if the fire is inside a crowded space (such as the engine
room), perhaps only one person may be able to stand and aim an extinguisher at the fire. The
other person could stand nearby, holding backup extinguishers, ready to hand them to the
primary firefighter – or ready to take over the fight if the first person is exhausted or inhales
smoke.
If you’re offshore, anyone not fighting a fire should (a) shut down the fuel and air supply at the
helm station, (b) make the Mayday call on VHF or SSB radio, and (c) don PFDs as if abandoning
ship. If you’re drifting in the harbor, a non-firefighter could also turn up the loudhailer and notify
everyone nearby that the boat’s on fire.
If your boat is on fire in a marina slip, you might be able to put the fire out more safely while
standing on any of the docks surrounding it. If it is not an electrical fire, using multiple water
hoses from neighboring slips may help you put out the fire faster. Most marinas have a highvolume fire pump and hose mounted on the docks. During your fire drill, locate that hose and
learn how to operate it.
We hope that you’ll never have to confront an onboard fire – but if you do, follow these steps
and you’ll be prepared to deal with it swiftly, safely and successfully.
23
Maintenance For Safety
Maintaining the critical equipment and systems of your boat is essential to safety. The
following is a guideline for maintaining some of these systems.
The condition of your rigging, both standing and running, is paramount to your safety
and the performance of your vessel. It is imperative that all rigging be inspected and
checked by a qualified professional on a regular basis. Acid rain, airborne dirt and
salt spray can cause serious corrosion to your rig. It should be cleaned where
possible on a regular basis and all swages and fittings should be checked for cracks
and deterioration. Many insurance companies demand periodic checks by a reputable
rigging company. Be sure to check with your company or agent to make sure you are
covered in the event of a failure.
Running rigging should also be inspected and replaced on a schedule. To have a line
part under stress is dangerous to the crew and could jeopardize the integrity of the
entire rig.
Chainplates are under considerable loads and need to be checked regularly for any
separation, delamination or loosening during the season. If you suspect any
problems, contact your Hunter dealer or qualified technician immediately. Do not use
your boat, if there is a problem present. If a visual inspection is not easily done, call
Hunter Marine Customer Service at 800-771-5556 or 386-462-3077 for instructions.
Keep your bilge absolutely free of dirt and trash. Check frequently and clean out as
often as needed. Accumulations of dirt and debris can absorb oil and fuel. In addition
to creating a fire hazard, this may also clog limber holes and bilge pumps. Clogged
limber holes could result in water damage to equipment and corrosion of fuel tanks.
24
Limber hole
Inspect lifesaving equipment frequently. At least at the beginning and midway through
the boating season, check the condition of all lifesaving equipment. Replace any
equipment that is dated or questionable.
Check fire-extinguishing equipment regularly as recommended by the manufacturer.
Weigh the engine room fire extinguishers yearly to ensure that they are fully charged.
Have the entire fuel system inspected for signs of damage and wear. Visually inspect
the fuel lines inch by inch. Look for signs of corrosion of the fuel tanks. If any
deterioration is noticed have a qualified marine technician repair or replace
immediately.
Have a qualified marine electrician inspect your entire electrical system annually. This
should include the AC, DC, and bonding systems. Replace zinc anodes and damaged
wiring and equipment as needed.
Maintenance For Safety — Continued
Maintaining your engine and generator exhaust systems is critical to prevent flooding
and the infiltration of deadly carbon monoxide gases. Inspect your entire exhaust
system regularly for signs of leaking, breakage, cracking, and dry rotting of hoses.
Have a qualified marine technician inspect and repair the exhaust systems annually.
Each sink drain in your boat includes a water trap within the drain hose. The purpose
of the trap is to prevent deadly carbon monoxide gases from entering your boat
through the drain. Before you use your boat at the beginning of each season, run an
ample amount of water through your sink drains to ensure that the water traps are
full of water. This should also be done periodically throughout the boating season.
Check all keelbolts for rust or water intrusion. They should be tight and show no signs
of movement. The keel sump should also be kept clean and free of debris.
Check rudder bearings for signs of wear or leaks. Please refer to the owner’s manual
for the specific maintenance schedule.
Check all through hull seacocks for proper operation. All should be able to be opened
and closed easily. If any are difficult to operate, they should be disassembled,
greased and reassembled.
Check all stanchions and pulpits for cracks and integrity.
25
Is Your Boat As Safe As It Can Be?
If you can answer YES to the following questions, chances are that your boat is safely equipped and that
you operate it safely.
Do you carry legally required and other safety equipment aboard and do you know how to use it?
Before getting underway, do you review, with everyone on board, emergency procedures and
identify all safety equipment and exits?
If you carry a life raft aboard your boat, have you included its proper deployment as part of your
routine safety training?
Has at least one other crew member been trained?
Are you aware that it is illegal and dangerous to operate a boat while intoxicated?
Do you check local weather reports before departure, and keep a weather eye open during your
voyage?
Are your lifesaving equipment and fire extinguishers readily accessible at all times?
Do you avoid overloading your boat with people or gear?
Do you make sure you have good non-skid surfaces on deck and on the soles of shoes of
everyone on board?
Do you keep bilges clean and electrical contacts tight?
Do you guard rigidly against any fuel system leakage?
Have you requested a Coast Guard Auxiliary Courtesy Examination
for the current year?
Have you taken any safe boating or first-aid courses?
Before departing, do you leave a Float Plan so someone knows where you are boating and when
you are expected to return?
Are you familiar with the waters that you will be using: tides, currents, sand bars, navigation
aides and any hazards you may encounter?
Do you know your personal limitations and responsibilities?
If you are a non-swimmer, are you learning to swim?
Are you and your crew prepared for any emergency that could occur?
Do you know and obey the Rules Of The Road?
Do you know your fuel tank capacity and fuel consumption at various RPMs, and the cruising
range this gives?
Do you take maximum precautions when taking on fuel? Do you practice the “one-third rule” by
using one-third of the fuel going out and one-third to get back, keeping one-third in reserve?
When anchoring, do you allow adequate scope on your anchor line? Are you far enough away from
your neighboring boats?
If someone falls into the water do you know what to do?
Do you avoid relieving yourself over the side of the boat in a standing position? This is a common
cause of accidents resulting in drowning.
Whenever possible, do you, and those aboard your boat remain seated while underway?
(Source: Chapman Piloting, Seamanship & Small Boat Handling)
26
ProductRecallsandNotifications
This publication is distributed annually to all known Hunter owners. In it, many important product recalls
and notifications are highlighted from the past year. These recalls and notifications are generally safety
related and contain information that you need to be aware of. We also mail all recalls and notifications to
our dealers, customers, or both as they are released. Even though we make every effort to notify
everyone of these issues, it is strongly recommended that you visit our web site
(http://www .huntermarine.com/pr odNot/index.html ) frequently and check the "Product Safety
Notifications" section for current recalls and notifications that may pertain to your boat.
Hunter Recalls and Notifications
260/ 270 HULL TO DECK JOINT REPAIR
10/ 02
INLINE FUS E UPDATE
11/ 02
410 CHAINPLATE FIX
3/ 03
420 WIRING/ ELECTRICAL UPDATE
4/ 03
240/ 260/ 270 FUS E/ POWER S URGE PROTECTION
5/ 03
FIRE S UPPRES S ION S Y S TEM
7/ 03
FIRE S UPPRES S ION UPDATE
3/ 04
AUTOMATIC ENGINE S HUTDOWN PROCEDURE
3/ 04
S HORE POWER CONNECTION UPDATE
4/ 04
POWER S Y S TEM OPERATION INS TRUCTIONS
4/ 04
S WIM S EAT INFORMATION
5/ 04
33 HELM S EAT REINFORCEMENT
6/ 04
BALL VALVE DRAINING AND WINTERIZING
7/ 04
GROUND WIRE ON MAIN AC/ DC DIS TRIBUTION PANEL
9/ 04
33 FUEL VENT NOTIFICATION
01/05
TRAILER TUNE UP
02/05
33 BOW ROLLER NOTIFICATION
02/05
PRELIMINARY CARE/INSPECTION CHECKLIST
08/05
NEW BACK-UP RUDDER SYSTEMS AVAILABLE
11/05
27
If you no longer own your boat, please give this
memorandum to the purchaser and advise Hunter
Marine of the name and address of the purchaser.
Call 1-800-771-5556.
CUSTOMER HOTLINE: 800-771-5556
Hunter Marine Corporation • P.O. Box 1030 • Alachua, FL USA 32615
Phone: (386) 462-3077 FAX: (386) 462-4077
http://www.huntermarine.com • e-mail: customerservice@huntermarine.com
4/05
SAFE BOATING TIPS
BE PREPARED
Take a safe boating course. In the U.S.,
contact your local Boating Industry for details.
Carry all safety equipment required by the
laws that apply to your area. Requirements are generally available from the
Coast Guard or your local boating industry.
As the owner of the craft, obtaining
and maintaining necessary safety
equipment is your responsibility.
For more information about equipment required, contact local boating authorities
MINIMUM RECOMMENDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Required life saving equipment,
including life vests and throwables.
First Aid kit
Anchor with sufficient line and/or
chain
Flashlight with good batteries
Binoculars
Appropriate navigational charts
Flares
Noise emitting device
•
•
•
•
Sufficient food and water provisions
Sunglasses and block
Blanket
Oar(s)
The legally required on-board safety
equipment may vary by region or body
of water. Please check with local authorities prior to departure for a safety
examination.
LIFE JACKETS
A life jacket may save your life, but
only if you wear it. Keep jackets in a
readily accessible place – not in a
closed compartment or stored under
other gear. Remove them from any
packaging, and keep throwable floatation devices ready for immediate use.
It is very important that children, handicapped people, and non-swimmers wear
lifejackets at all times. Make sure all passengers are properly instructed in use of
life saving gear
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Approved fire extinguishers are required on most boats, local authorities
can provide details. All passengers
should know the location and operating procedure of each fire extin-
guisher. Fire extinguishers are normally classified according to fire type.
Be familiar with the type of fire extinguishers you have on board.
PAGE 11
SAFE BOATING TIPS
FLARES
Most boats operating on coastal waters are required to carry approved
visual distress signals, therefore check
with your local authorities as to which
types are required.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD; Pyrotechnic
signaling devices can cause injury and
property damage if not handled properly.
Follow manufacturer’s directions regarding the proper use of signaling devices.
DRUGS AND BOATING
Consumption of alcohol while boating
is not recommended. The combination
of noise, sun, wind, and motion act to
produce fatigue on the water, and can
exaggerate the effects of alcohol.
IMPAIRED OPERATION HAZARD
Operating any boat while is intoxicated or
under the influence of drugs is both dangerous and illegal. Impaired vision or
judgment on the water can lead to accidents and personal injury
BEFORE GETTING UNDERWAY
•
•
Leave a float plan (example included).
Perform a pre-departure checklist
(example included).
•
Check the weather. Do not venture out if the weather is, or will
be, threatening.
WHILE UNDERWAY
•
•
•
Keep a good lookout. Keep a
watch to the leeward under the
headsail. Keep away from swimmers, divers, and skiers.
Know and obey local boating laws.
Respect bad weather, and be prepared for quickly changing conditions.
COLLISION HAZARD
Use extra caution in shallow water or
where underwater/floating objects may be
present. Hitting an object at speed or severe angle can seriously injure people and
damage your boat
PAGE 12
Dear Hunter Owner,
Attached you will find a list of items and recommendations that we believe should be incorporated
into your own ongoing list of preventative maintenance items and safety check points. THIS LIST
SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A COMPLETE SERVICE MANUAL OR THE ONLY ITEMS ON
YOUR BOAT IN NEED OF ROUTINE MAINTENANCE, INSPECTION OR ATTENTION.
You will find that we address commonly found optional equipment items installed on Hunter boats,
as well as most standard equipment from Hunter Marine. Owner’s need to familiarize themselves
with individual equipment manuals on all such items, especially aftermarket purchases or optional
equipment installed by your dealer or Hunter Marine. This should insure that you are following the
manufacturer’s recommendations for proper maintenance and up-keep.
We strongly recommend that all owners complete a Power Squadron course followed with a
complementary boat inspection before leaving the dock. To locate a Power Squadron in your area
please visit < www.usps.org >.
Reviewing and familiarizing yourself with the Chapman’s Piloting Manual is also highly
recommended for every boat owner. This manual contains demonstrations for safety drills which
should be practiced routinely, dealing with adverse conditions, general boat handling and
recommended safety equipment. Our opinion is that no boat owner should operate a boat without
first reviewing this manual and without having ready access to it while sailing.
We hope that this list will be beneficial to you in your ongoing maintenance and upkeep. Safe
boating!
Thank You
Hunter Marine
PAGE 13A- 1
Preliminary care and maintenance checklist
A qualified Technician should be used if you are not completely
confident in your ability to make repairs or inspections.
Out of Water Inspection
Pre-launch inspection
____ Sacrificial zinc anodes installed
____ Propeller installed with keyway, nuts and cotter pin
____ Propeller shaft turns freely and without excess wobble
____ Struts and shaft log free of corrosion
____ Rudder swings easily & correct with wheel direction
____ Rudder and post inspected for cracks and/or concealed damage (may require removing
rudder)
____ Auxiliary tiller handle properly aligned, fits securely and operational
____ Backup rudder system complete and operational
____ All thru-hulls and valves below water line inspected for corrosion, labeled and closed
until after launch
____ Bottom paint in satisfactory condition
____ Hull freshly cleaned and waxed (free of gelcoat damage)
____ Mooring, safety lines and fenders onboard and in good condition
____ House & engine start batteries installed and filled with correct electrolyte levels
____ House & engine start battery boxes secured
____ All battery terminals clean and wires secured
____ Engine block & transmission drains closed
____Speed / Depth transducers in place. Speed paddle wheel rotates smoothly
____ Hose clamps on all systems below water line tight
____ Keel bolts tight and clean
____ Exhaust hose attached and secured
____ Boat is free of internal and external water leaks above water line (Failure to stop water
intrusion could result in permanent damage or deterioration of structural coring materials,
internal wiring and cause mildew and molding)
PAGE 13A- 2
Mast Assembly
____ Review manufacturers manual for maintenance and up-keep
____ Spreaders securely fastened
____ Mast and spreaders free of corrosion and stress cracks
____ Standing rigging and pins inspected for wear, tear, corrosion and cracking
____ External wiring secured for anchor, steaming and deck lights
____ Electronic wind indicator installed per manufacturers recommendation
____ Manual wind indicator installed on masthead
____ VHF antenna installed and connected
____ Headsail furling system installed inspected per manufacturers recommendation
____ Running rigging inspected for wear and tear
____ Mast step stand-up blocks secured and operational
____ Main Sail, jib sail and flaking system inspected for wear and tear (non-furling mast). In-mast
system checked for smooth operation and overall condition of sails
____ Specified pre-bend and diagonal tensions attained in mast. See owners manual
____ Mast to deck wiring properly sealed with drip loop
Anchor System and Ground Tackle
____ Anchor windlass inspected per manufacturers recommendation
____ Anchor secured in bow roller assembly
____ Spare anchor onboard and accessible. See Chapman’s Manual for recommendations on
anchors, anchor lines and drogues
____ Anchor line pays out and retrieves into anchor locker without difficulty
____ Bitter end of anchor line secured
____ Anchor rode inspected and free of abrasions
____ Anchor chain shackle lock-wired at pin after secured to anchor and corrosion free
____ Anchor locker hatch secures properly with anchor and line in place
____ Anchor locker free of debris inside
____ Anchor locker drains open
Fuel System
____ Tank fuel level indicator functioning properly
____ Fuel clean and treated with engine manufacturers recommended additives
____ Primary and secondary filters cleaned or replaced
____ Fuel tank supply valves open
____ Fuel tank vent clear from tank to atmosphere (hose has anti-siphoned loop in place at
hull or deck side)
Steering System
____ Inspect and service steering system according to manufacturer’s recommendation
____ Clean and grease autopilot drive chains
____ Ensure compass light is operational
PAGE 13A- 3
Primary Pumps Functional
____ Manual bilge pumps
____ Electric bilge pumps and float switches (discharge hose has anti-siphon loop in place
to prevent back flow under sail)
____ Macerator pumps
____ Fresh water pumps
____Toilet flush pumps
____ Shower sump pumps
____ High water bilge alarm pump
Illumination and small electrical components check
____ Bow light
____ Cabin lights
____ Stern light
____ Deck light
____ Instrument lamps
____ Masthead light
____ Chart light
____ Anchor light
____ Courtesy lights
____ Reading lights
____ Distribution panel lights
____ Smoke detectors operational
____ CO detectors operational (one per cabin recommended)
____ Engine & generator room blower operational
____ Auto fire suppression system operational (engine compartment)
____ Shore power cord and adapter plug operational. See manufacturer’s manual for complete
details
____ 110 or 220 VAC outlets operational – Ground fault circuits functioning
____ 110 or 220 VAC inverter/battery charging systems functioning properly
____ Cockpit control systems operational
Fresh Water Systems
____ Hot water heater drains shut
____ All spigots and hose bibs shut
____ All tanks flushed clean and free of debris and antifreeze
____ Water heater tank and lines flushed of antifreeze
____ All water lines and components purged of air and checked for leaks
____ Sinks and drains checked for leaks and adequate flow
____ Cockpit shower operational
____ Fresh water filters clean
____ Tank water level indicator systems operating – labeling and tank valve selection correspond
PAGE 13A- 4
Head and Holding Tank Systems
____ Vent clear from tank to atmosphere
____ Filled with fresh water and test pumped with macerator
____ Toilets flush to holding tanks properly
____ Waste level indicating system properly functioning
____ No leaks at any hose fitting within the system
Galley Systems
____ Gas bottle filled installed and connected to regulator. Inspect Gas system for leaks after 3
minutes. Should a leak be detected, immediately close the main valve, exit boat and seek
professional assistance for a thorough inspection.
____ Stove and oven operational. Refer to manufacturer’s manual for proper operation and
trouble shooting.
____ Gimbal latch secure and operational
____ LPG stowage locker drain open and tank storage area free of debris.
____ Microwave operational
____ Refrigerator operational and proper temperature attained
____ Freezer operational and proper temperature attained
____ USCG waste disposal-warning poster onboard or in owner’s package
____ Icebox drains to sump or bilge properly
____ Icebox drain plugs installed
Topside Inspection
____ Swim seats / ladders / gates operational
____ Swim seat latch operating correctly
____ Cockpit hatches operate properly (adjustments should be made with boat in water)
____ Canvas properly cleaned and installed
____ Cockpit cushions cleaned and installed
____ Lifeline fittings tight and secure
____ Rubrail sealed secured to hull
____ Sliding hatches drains free of debris
____ Companionway drop-ins fit properly in companionway and stowage rack
____ Load bearing hardware sealed and securely fastened. This includes but is not limited to
chainplates, winches and handrails
____ Traveler arch sealed and securely fastened. Stainless Steel models should be properly
grounded, see owners manual for details
____ Plexiglas hatches, ports, windscreens and windows adjusted and cleaned. Cleaners and
polishers specifically for Plexiglas can be purchased from most marine supply stores
____ External teak cleaned and oiled (Teak decking cleaned with mild soap and water)
____ External railings cleaned with soap and water then hand polished using automotive wax
____ All deck fill caps seal properly and have retainer chains intact (except Waste Pump-out)
____ Dorade vents or sealing caps installed
____ Topside surface clean and free of gelcoat damage
PAGE 13A- 5
Interior Inspection
____ Drop-in hatches for bunks and floors in place and fit securely
____ Interior steps and grab rails secured
____ Bilges clean and free of debris
____ Opening port and hatch screens in place
____ Blinds / privacy curtains, shades and interior cushions cleaned, installed and secured
____ All doors open / shut / latch properly
____ Insure all wires and connection on distribution panels are tight (should be
professionally inspected)
____ Television / VCR operational
____ Stereo / Tape / CD operational
____ Chapman’s Manual onboard and readily available
____ Safety gear onboard readily available and up to date. See Chapman’s Manual and US
Coast Guard website at < www.uscg.mil >for details.
____ Boat owner’s manual onboard
PAGE 13A- 6
In Water Inspection
Dockside inspection of Engine, Pre-start sequence and operating system
____ Review engine manual for maintenance requirements and proper starting procedure
____ Propeller shaft properly aligned (per engine manual)
____ Shaft to engine coupling bolted and properly torque (per engine manual)
____ All engine mounting bolts in place and properly torque (per engine manual)
____ Crankcase oil at full mark (per engine manual)
____ Transmission fluid / oil at full mark (per engine manual)
____ Coolant mix ratio proper – heat exchanger and expansion tanks full (per engine
manual)
____ Seawater intake valve open and no leaks
____ Air bled from fuel lines and system
____ No fuel leaks at any fittings
____ Throttle linkages smooth and operational
____ Shutdown system operational
____ USCG Oil Discharge warning poster in place
____ Exhaust elbows and hoses tight
____ Starting sequence and alarms correct
____ Oil pressure acceptable (per engine manual)
____ Coolant temperature acceptable (per engine manual)
____ Alternator DC output at rated rpm (per engine manual)
____ Correct Idle rpm (per engine manual)
____ Water discharged with exhaust
____ Hour meter operational
____ Fuel level indicators operational
____ Throttle cable tension set properly
____ Shifter operation correct
____ Neutral safety start switch operational
____ No inboard exhaust gas leaks
____ No fuel / oil / water leaks on engine
____ Shaft packing / Drip free Seal adjusted and locknuts tight. One to three drips per minute with
shaft turning on traditional packing assembly
____ Engine box installed and secured
Dockside inspection of Generator,
Pre-start sequence and operating system
____ Review and follow manufacturer’s manual for maintenance and up-keep
____ Seawater strainer water-tight and clean
____ No leaks in fuel system - Fuel filters clean
____ Lube oil at full mark
____ Coolant level full – proper mix ratio with water (per generator manual)
____ Seawater discharge overboard with exhaust gas
____ No inboard water or exhaust gas leaks
____ Proper voltage output to distribution panel (per generator manual)
____ Ship / Shore power transfer panel function properly
____ Starter battery box secured
____ Starter battery cable connections clean and tight
____ Starting battery electrolyte level proper
PAGE 13A- 7
Climate Control System
____ Review and follow manufacturers manual for maintenance and up-keep
____ Seawater strainer water tight and clean
____ Seawater pump air purged and operational
____ Seawater flow adequate fwd and aft
____ Fwd system functions properly in all modes of operation
____ Aft system functions properly in all modes of operation
____ No seawater leaks in system components and lines
____ No condensation leaks to deck or liner
____ Air return/intake filters clean and clear
____ 110 or 220 VAC 30 amp shore power wired correctly at dock
____ Remote control units and display features operate correctly
____ Condensation drains open
Dockside Pre-sail inspection
____ Standing rigging tuned statically – all fittings pinned and secured (re-check after sailing)
____ Genoa installed and furling system operational
____ Main sail installed and operates smoothly
____ Main sail flaking system properly adjusted
____ All reefing points attained properly
____ Topping lift and outhaul operational
____ Sheets / Blocks / Winches operate correctly and easily under load
____ Genoa Car travels freely full length on tracks port and starboard
____ All line stoppers operational and labeled
____ Calibrate all electronic equipment and compass to geographical area.
____ VHF operational
____ Battery negative to keel ground voltage check. Mast and arch must be installed for this
check. This will verify no wires have shorted out to your keel/lighting ground system.
digital multimeter required.
____ Dockside water connection operable and free of leaks
____ Complete safety package onboard and up-to date (see Chapman’s manual and US
Coast Guard rules and regulations)
____ Secure and evenly distribute all loose equipment and weight
____ Complementary onboard inspection made by local Power Squadron
Date of inspection: _____________________________
Inspection made by
_____________________________
PAGE 13A- 8
(Several copies may be required to complete each of the following categories)
Chapman’s Piloting recommended operating techniques, maintenance inspections
and safety points for my particular boat length and type of sailing
PAGE 13A- 9
Recommendations made by manufacturers of original equipment for
proper maintenance and up-keep
PAGE 13A- 10
Power Squadron recommendations for maintenance and safe boating
PAGE 13A- 11
Local sailing club or marina’s recommendations for maintenance and up-keep
PAGE 13A- 12
List of onboard safety equipment and location
(A copy should be posted onboard at all times)
PAGE 13A- 13
Spare parts list
PAGE 13A- 14
Dates of practice drills and onboard safety inspections
PAGE 13A- 15
MY PERSONAL PREFERENCES FOR MAINTENANCE ITEMS & SAFETY GEAR
PAGE 13A- 16
PRE-DEPARTURE CHECKLIST
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Check bilge for extra water
Check weather conditions and tides
Check food supply
Foul weather gear
Linen, sleeping bags
Fuel
Water
Sunscreens and sunglasses
Tools
Docking and anchor gear
Check radio operations
Navigation charts and instruments
Float plans to a friend or Coast Guard (see next page)
Fuel for stove
Cooking and eating utensils
Check battery water level
Oil level, tight Vp-belts
Check for loose electrical connections in engine compartment
Secure tools or any loose equipment in engine compartment so as
not to get fouled in engine
AC systems off; electrical cord stowed
Doors and drawers secured
Check steering lock to lock
Check mast for rigging irregularities and tightness
Halyards and sheets are clear and ready to run
No lines or other obstructions near propeller or bow
Anchor ready to run
Check lifelines for tightness
Turn on fuel and waterlines
Stow all loose gear
Open engine cooling water intake thru-hull valve
PAGE 13B
CE CERTIFIED
Your Hunter has been manufactured in the United States and has been certified by the
IMCI to be in compliance with the relevant parts of the Recreational Craft Directive
94/25/EC from the European Parliament. The CE mark means your craft meets or
exceeds the applicable current International Organization for Standardization (ISO)
standards and directives as stated on the CE certificate supplied with your craft. The
builder’s plate, affixed to your boat, describes various parameters involved in the design
of your boat. Please refer to it regularly when operating your boat.
Following are the Design Categories, established by the Recreation Craft Directive,
which is to be considered a guideline of use application as per the Directive’s criteria.
Hunter Marine Corporation does NOT establish these criteria, and the category indicated
is only a reference to the assigned category. The safety of the captain and crew of any
vessel is not measurable by such categories, and you should not interpret these
categories as an indication of your safety in such condition. The skill of your captain and
crew, together with proper preparation, appropriate safety equipment for the given
conditions and a well maintained vessel are critical to safe sailing.
CE CRAFT DESIGN CATEGORIES
Category A – “Ocean”: Craft designed for extended voyages where
conditions may exceed wind force 8 (Beaufort Scale) and include significant
wave heights of 4m, for vessels that are largely self-sufficient.
Category B - “Offshore”: Craft designed for offshore voyages where
conditions include winds up to and including wind force 8 and significant wave
heights up to and including 4m may be experienced.
Category C – “Inshore”: Craft designed for voyages in coastal waters,
large bays, estuaries, lakes and rivers, where conditions up to and including wind
force 6 and significant wave heights up to and including 4m may be experienced.
Category D – “Sheltered Waves”: Craft designed for voyages on small
lakes, rivers and canals, where conditions up to and including wind force 4 and
significant wave heights up to and including 0.5m may be experienced.
For additional information, contact
International Marine Certification Institute (IMCI)
Treves Centre, rue de Treves 45
1040 Brussels, Belgium
FX: (32) 2238-7700
NMMA CERTIFIED
Your Hunter has been judged by the National Marine Manufacturers Association
(NMMA) to be in compliance with the applicable federal regulations and
American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) standard and recommended practices
in effect at the time of manufacture.
For additional information, contact:
National Marine Manufacturers Association
200 E. Randolph Dr., Suite 5100
Chicago, IL 60611
PH: (1) 312-946-6200 FX: (1) 312-946-0388
PAGE 13C
FLOAT PLAN
1. Name of person reporting and telephone number:
2. Description of boat
NAME
TYPE
MAKE
LENGTH
REGISTRATION#
HULL COLOR
STRIPE COLOR
DECK COLOR
OTHER DISTINGUISHING MARKS
3. Number of Persons aboard
NAME
AGE
PHONE #
AGE
PHONE #
AGE
PHONE #
H.P.
FUEL CAPACITY
ADDRESS
NAME
ADDRESS
NAME
ADDRESS
4. Engine
TYPE
5. Safety equipment
PFDs
Flares
Food
Water
6. Radio
TYPE
Mirror
Flashlight
EPIRB
Raft/Dinghy
FREQUENCIES
7. Trip Expectations
DEPARTURE TIME
DATE
DESTINATION
RETURN DATE
8. Automobile:
LICENSE #
STATE
COLOR
9. If not returned by-
FROM
NO LATER THAN
MAKE
PARKED AT
Contact the Coast Guard orCALL -
AT-
PAGE 14
AFTER SAILING CHECK LIST
When leaving your Hunter at
the dock for more than a short
time, it is a good idea to review
the following checklist to make
sure everything is in order. This
will help protect the various
parts of your boat and add to
their attractiveness and usable
life.

Flake or furl mainsail and cover, or remove and bag.

Remove and stow all portable deck hardware such as snatch blocks, winch
handles, etc.

Secure the boom to the topping lift and set it firmly amidships with the mainsheet purchase. (It is a good idea to rig a line from the steering wheel or tiller
to a convenient cleat to keep the rudder from swinging back and forth with the
motion of the water or employ the wheel brake if so equipped.

Attach the shackle ends of all halyards to convenient fittings and take up
slack. Find a location leading away from the mast to keep the halyard from
slapping the mast.

Coil and stow all lines in line lockers.

Cover the winches and steering pedestal when leaving the boat for several
days or more.

Close all fuel lines and seacocks.

Switch off the electrical system.

Pump out the bilge.

Check air vents, secure ports and hatches, swab the deck, and clean deck
stainless, particularly if you have operated in saltwater.

Make a final check of mooring lines, chafing gear, fenders, etc.
PAGE 15
SAFE BOATING TIPS
DOCKING
Docking your boat should be handled
carefully to avoid potential damage. Under normal wind and water conditions,
the following considerations should be
made:
1. Whenever possible, your approach
should be made against the prevailing
wind and current to assist in stopping
the boat. Where these conditions are
contrary, the strongest should be used
to determine approach.
2. Approaching the dock: dock lines
should be at ready, loose gear stowed
and decks cleared. Determine the direction of the wind and current and when
you decide which side of the boat will be
against the dock, rig dock lines and
fenders on the appropriate side. One
dock line should be attached to the bow
cleat, another to the stern cleat opposite
the side that will lie against the dock.
NOTE: If the boat is to lie against a
piling, rig a fender board across two
or more pilings.
3. Tying up: attach bow and stern lines
to dock, hauling boat in with fenders
against dock. Rig crossing spring lines
to limit motion forward and aft. Be sure
to allow some slack in all lines to compensate for tidal activity if present.
Never use bow rail, stern rail, or stanchions to secure a vessel, even for brief
periods. For other types of moorings, or
for abnormal wind or water conditions,
consult an approved boating guide.
ANCHORING
Your Hunter comes with an on-deck
anchor well and a Danforth type anchor as standard equipment. The
anchor is selected to suit the size
and weight of your boat under normal anchoring conditions, and provides its best holding characteristic
in muddy or sandy bottoms.
When anchoring, pay particular attention to the slope of your anchor
rode (i.e., the relationship between
the depth of the water and the length
of the rode). A good rule of thumb is
to allow a scope of about 7:1 (a rode
seven times as long as the vertical
distance from the bow to the bottom). A helpful aid is to mark the
rode every 20 feet or so with knots or
other types of indicators. Before
dropping anchor, make sure the bitter end is secured to the cleat in the
anchor well.
Also, be sure to consider wind direction, currents, mean low tide depths
and other local conditions when anchoring, as well as the positions of
any boats already anchored nearby.
Anchoring in unusual water
and/or weather conditions will require additional precautions.
Consult an approved guide for
suggestions.
To weigh anchor, motor or sail (under main only) forward slowly. When
at a point directly above the anchor,
a quick tug should free it from the
bottom. Take care not to damage the
topsides when hauling.
PAGE 16
MAST RAISING & LOWERING SYSTEM
WARNING: MAKE SURE THAT THE MAST AND
RIGGING IS CLEAR OF ALL OVERHEAD
ELECTRICAL CABLES WHEN BEING RASIED
OR LOWERED OR MANEUVERED ABOUT THE
LAUNCH
AREA.
CONTACT
WITH
AN
ELECTRICAL CABLE CAN CAUSE SEVERE
INJURY OR DEATH.
1. Confirm that all standing rigging and spreaders
are connected to the spar as per the drawings in this
owner’s manual. The spreader retaining pins should
be installed and pinned, the spreader tip tightened in
the correct location and all black rubber retainer
plugs installed in the rigging terminals on the mast.
These plugs prevent the shrouds from falling out of
the mast when the mast is lowered. All halyards
should be installed and the mast light installed.
2. Confirm that the white “boots” are installed over
each shroud turnbuckle and that the turnbuckles are
attached to the chain plate “U” bolts with the cotter
pins located inboard. The boots must be forced
down over the turnbuckle toggles to prevent the
turnbuckles binding on the “U” bolts and bending
during the stepping process.
3. Untie the mast from the bow pulpit and support
crutch, and slide the mast aft on the support crutch
roller until the base of the mast is over the mast
step. At this point the mast will be balanced on the
roller only, so do not let go of the mast base. The
mast struts remain attached during this procedure.
4. Remove the stainless steel mast step pin from the
mast step casting, being careful not to lose the
boom vang strap.
5. Push the mast base down until the retaining pin
holes in the base align with the corresponding holes
in the step, and reinstall the stainless steel retaining
pin, being careful to reinstall the boom vang strap at
this time. Install the split ring to the retaining pin.
6. Open the anchor locker and attach the lower end
of the mainsheet tackle (the end with the jam cleat)
to the “U” bolt inside the locker.
7. Connect the mast raising tube to the pin in front of
the spar.
8. Holding the pole in a vertical position, connect the
jib halyard shackle to the aft loop at the top end of
the pole. Tension the halyard by pulling it from the
exit at the line stopper (make sure that the jib halyard is being tensioned, and not the main halyard)
until the mast raising pole is angled aft approximately 10 degrees. Lock down the line stopper and
securely cleat the halyard to the black plastic cleat
on the side of the deck outboard of the line stopper.
9. While still holding the mast raising pole at the ten
degree aft angle, connect the upper end of the
mainsheet tackle to the forward loop at the end of
the mast raising pole and take out the slack through
the jam on the lower block of the mainsheet.
10. Check to make sure that the forestay is not
twisted around the jib halyard, that the upper and
lower shrouds are not twisted around each other
and are outside the life lines, that the turnbuckles
are vertical on the “U” bolts, the spar is clear of all
overhead electrical wiring, all shrouds, mast raising
bridles and forestays are properly attached to the
spar, all shackles on the mainsheet and jib halyards
are properly closed, the jib cleat is properly cleated
to the spar, no one is standing in the cockpit or under the mast and, in all respects, the mast is ready
to raise.
11. Pull on the mainsheet tackle to raise the spar
making sure that the mainsheet always runs
through, and is being held by the jam cleat. With the
mast struts installed, the mast is prevented from
moving side to side, so you can rest between pulls
and it is not necessary to have anyone pushing the
spar up from behind as you are pulling on the tackle,
although this will reduce the load on the tackle and
speed up the process. The load on the tackle will be
at a maximum at the beginning of the raising process and will reduce progressively as the spar is
raised, reducing to almost nothing when the spar is
up. With the anchor locker open, the bow of the boat
has limited space in which to work, so be careful
and watch your footing. There is no need to hurry.
PAGE 17A
MAST RAISING & LOWERING SYSTEM
12. When raised, leave the mainsheet jammed and
tensioned. Take the forestay forward and connect to
the forward of the two holes in the stemhead fitting.
13. Connect mast wiring plug to deck fitting at starboard base of spar.
14. Refer to GETTING READY TO SAIL.
MAST LOWERING
1. Remove sails, boom vang and boom.
2. Install mast support crutch to transom, if not already done.
3. Install mast raising pole.
7. Loosen forestay turnbuckle and remove forestay
from stemhead fitting.
8. Check for overhead electrical cables, make sure
that no one is standing in the cockpit or under the
spar, and confirm that the spar is in all respects
ready to lower.
9. Allowing the mainsheet to hook around the bow
mooring cleat, unjam the mainsheet and, holding the
mainsheet tail in one hand, ease tension on the
mainsheet tackle while pushing the spar aft with
your other hand. Retaining the deflection of the
mainsheet around the cleat, ease the mainsheet further until the spar begins to hinge aft.
10. Continue lowering the spar, remembering that
the load on the tackle will increase as the spar is being lowered, until the spar rests in the mast crutch.
4. Attach jib halyard shackle to upper spliced eye at
forward end of mast raising pole.
5. Tension jib halyard (again confirming that it is the
jib halyard being tensioned and not the main halyard—check the color coding) so that the pole angles up at the front end approximately 10 degrees.
Secure halyard to cleat on side of deck, and lock
down the line stopper.
6. Attach bottom end of mainsheet to “U” bolt in anchor locker and top end to bottom loop at end of
mast raising pole. Tension mainsheet tackle so jib
halyard takes the load. Make sure mainsheet is
jammed and for extra security secure to bow mooring cleat.
11. Disconnect the mast raising pole, mast electrical
wiring and uncleat halyards aft so the spar can slide
forward.
12. Remove mast step pin and disconnect mast
base from step while restraining bottom end of mast
and retaining boom vang strap. Replace pin, vang
strap and cotter pin.
13. Slide mast forward on mast crutch roller until
base of mast rest in bow pulpit. Secure mast in
place at pulpit and at mast crutch. Take slack out of
shrouds and secure forestay forward.
PAGE 17B
LAUNCHING & RETRIEVING PROCEDURES
LAUNCHING
1. Extend the trailer tongue, if necessary, by lowering the forward support wheel, chocking the main
wheels, unplugging the electrical connection, removing the tongue positioning pin and cotter pin and
sliding the tongue out to its full extended length and
reinstalling the pin and cotter pin. This can be done
with the vehicle still connected to the trailer, using
the vehicle to slowly move the extension while a
second person watches the trailer, but should at all
times be done with the trailer on level ground.
Whether the tongue needs extending will depend on
the slope of the launch ramp and the depth of water
available when the boat is backed in. In the majority
of cases, for launching, the tongue may not need extending.
2. Remove any and all tie down straps and ropes
securing the boat to the trailer, as well as any lines
securing the rudder in the upright position or on centerline. The only attachment of the boat to the trailer
should be the strap from the bow eye to the trailer
winch.
3. The spar can be raised before or after launch,
depending on the time available before and the
docking facilities available after launch. Beware of
nearby power lines before raising spar.
4. Attach the necessary bow and stern mooring lines
and fenders if necessary. Do not lower the fenders
over the side until the boat is clear of the trailer.
5. Initially slacken the trailer winch and familiarize
yourself with its gear switch action and return the
winch to the locked position.
6. Load all loose gear and provisions aboard by
lowering the swim ladder in the transom.
7. Back the boat and trailer down the ramp until the
back wheels of the vehicle are just clear of the water, Retrieve the bow and stern lines as necessary.
Loosen the trailer winch and bow strap.
8. Once the boat is floating free, push the boat clear
of the trailer guides to the available dock, maintaining control with the mooring lines.
9. Slowly pull the empty trailer out of the water, being careful that boat and people stay clear.
10. Park the trailer and vehicle and return to the
boat.
PAGE 18A
LAUNCHING & RETRIEVING PROCEDURES
RETRIEVING
1. Raise rudder.
2. Back trailer into water. Extend trailer tongue if
needed.
3. Maneuver boat between trailer guides and up to
the winch.
4. Connect bow strap and with winch in correct gear,
winch boat up and snug against bow stop.
6. Slowly pull boat from water until the weight of the
boat is on the trailer.
7. Confirm alignment on trailer. Put trailer back in
water if necessary to realign boat.
8. Make sure that rudder is pinned or tied in upright
position so that the tip doesn’t drag on ground.
9.De-rig and unstep mast if not already done. Beware of nearby power lines when lowering mast.
5. Center boat between upright aft trailer guides.
10. Tie boat to trailer, and secure mast.
PAGE 18B
GETTING READY TO SAIL
NOTE: The mast may be raised while the boat is
on the trailer or after the boat is launched. However, if the mast is raised after launching, make
sure (on water ballast models) that the ballast
tank is full before the mast is raised. Also make
sure that all halyards and reefing lines are installed using the messenger lines already run in
the spar.
1. After the rig has been raised, attach the forestay
turnbuckle to the most forward position of the two
holes in the stem fitting. Turnbuckle should be about
¾ open. Confirm that the upper and lower shrouds
are supporting the spar.
2. Remove the mast-raising pole. The mast crutch
may be left on the transom or removed, as you prefer.
3. Return the mainsheet to its aft position, attaching
the block with the jam the “U” bolt at the front end of
the cockpit. Install the forward end of the boom to
the gooseneck fitting on the mast. Tie the bottom
end of the topping lift rope (the other end is fixed to
the top of the mast) to the casting at the bottom of
the boom, which is immediately above the mainsheet “u” bolt in the cockpit.
4. Attach the jam block of the boom vang to the
stainless steel bail on the mast step with the small
shackle provided. The block should be oriented so
that the line exits the vee jam on the bottom aft side.
Attach the upper block of the vang to the eye on the
boom.
5. If not already done on the H25, lead the main and
jib halyards from the exits in the spar, through the
sheaves molded into the mast base (main halyard
through the aft sheave), around the deck organizer
blocks to the inner of the two jams on the house top.
6. Using the main halyard, center the rig in the middle
of the boat by first jamming the halyard in a position
so that the halyard shackle just contacts a known
point on the toe rail adjacent to the spar on the port
side. Transfer the halyard to the starboard side and
applying the same amount of tension, see if the
shackle contacts the corresponding position on the
starboard toe rail. If the shackle falls short, ease the
port upper shroud turnbuckle and tension the starboard, always maintaining some tension on each
shroud so they are not slack. If the shackle overshoots the mark on the toe rail, ease the starboard
upper shroud turnbuckle and shorten the opposite
side until the halyard shackle does contact both
points on the opposite toe rail uniformly.
7. After the rig is centered, set the amount of mast
rake to approximately one degree of aft angle. This
can be measured by hanging a weight, such as an
adjustable wrench from the main halyard shackle and
adjusting the halyard so the wrench is suspended
immediately above the boom. With the boat level, this
wrench when hanging from the main halyard above
the gooseneck should be 6” (15cm) from the aft face
of the mast. Adjust the forestay turnbuckle as necessary to achieve this position.
8. Tension the upper shrouds uniformly, alternately
taking six turns on one, then the other, until the upper
shrouds are tight. The upper shrouds maintain tension on the forestay. The tighter the shrouds are, the
tighter the forestay will be and the less forestay “sag”
there will be. A turnbuckle is tensioned by turning the
center portion counter clockwise and loosened by
turning it clockwise. The upper swage on the wire
should be held with pliers, vice grips, or wrench to
prevent it from turning as the turnbuckle rotates.
ELECTROCUTION HAZARD
Make sure that the mast and rigging are clear of all overhead electrical
cables when being raised or lowered or maneuvered about a launching
area. Contact with an overhead electrical cable can cause severe injury
or death.
PAGE 19
GETTING READY TO SAIL
9. Tension the lower shrouds until the mast appears straight when sighted up the trailing edge,
using the bolt rope slot as a guide. If the mast appears to bow to one side, ease the lower shroud
on that side and tension the shroud on the opposite side until the mast appears straight.
10. Once the mast is straightened transversely,
sight up the mast from the side to see if there is
any fore and aft bend. The mast should be bowed
forward at the spreaders by approximately 2’
(5cm). Ease or tension the lower shrouds uniformly until this slight amount of bend is achieved.
When finished, the lower shroud should be slightly
less tight than the main shrouds. If you sail in a
predominately heavy air region, slightly more mast
bend, in the 3” to 4” (4-10cm) range may be desirable in order to flatten and depower the main
sail.
11. After tuning the rig, install cotter pins in all
turnbuckles to prevent them from backing off while
sailing.
12. Install the battens in the mainsail and install
the mainsail onto the boom from the forward end.
Remove the stop pin in the mast and install the
luff slides into the track on the back of the spar.
Reinstall the stop pin to prevent the slides from
falling back out again.
13. Install the out haul rope (the shorter of the
two) in the boom with the messenger line provided
and lead from the sheave at the back of the boom
through the lower cringle at the back of the sail
and aft to the end of the casting.
14.Install reefing line (the longer of the two) in the
boom with the messenger line provided and lead
from the sheave through the upper cringle at the
back of the sail and then down to the sliding eye
on the bottom of the boom. Pull enough slack into
the reef line so that the sail can be fully raised unimpeded by the reef line. Tie the mainsail onto the
boom with the sail ties provided.
sheets inside the shrouds to the lead blocks on the
cabin top and aft to the jams or winches on the
house top. Tie figure eight knots in the end of the
sheets to prevent them from running back through
the jams. Shackle the bottom of the jib to the aft of
the two holes in the stemhead fitting and hank the
jib onto the forestay. Bunch and tie to prevent it
blowing overboard before it is ready to hoist.
16. Attach jib and main halyards to their respective
sails.
17. Lower the rudder blade, if depth of water permits, to full down position. If water depth does not
permit this before leaving the dock or ramp, make
sure the rudder is lowered before raising sail. The
rudder must be down to achieve the correct balance
for the proper helm loading. A rudder, which is not
lowered, will load up excessively in severe conditions preventing the helmsman from responding to
puffs and thus allowing the boat to “round up”. The
cleat is provided to retain the blade in the upright
position for the launch, retrieval and trailering. Helm
“feel” can be fine tuned by adjusting the fore and aft
angle of the rudder in the down position.
18. Install the tiller extension to the tiller (if not already installed from factory).
19. Raise sails, beginning with the main and then
the jib while powering into the wind. Remember to
lower the centerboard before you raise sail and confirm that the water ballast is full and sealed. Once
each halyard, beginning with the main, is tensioned
by the winch, the halyard can be pushed down into
its respective jam and the halyard removed from the
winch, freeing the winch for the next halyard and, in
the case of the H25, ultimately for the jib sheets.
However, care should be taken not to inadvertently
pull the halyards out of the jams, since the sails will
lower rapidly if this is done. When the sails are
raised, the boat can be laid off and the engine
turned off and tilted upward to clear the water.
20. Once the main is sheeted in and you are sailing
upwind, confirm the main topping lift position. The
15. Install the jib sheet onto the jib as illustrated in
the owner’s manual (page 42A) and lead the
PAGE 20
GETTING READY TO SAIL
main should be capable of sheeting in hard without the topping lift being tight. With the main
sheeted in hard, the topping lift should have eight
to ten inches of sag and should be adjusted accordingly. When at dock or at mooring, the topping lift can be readjusted to raise the boom to a
comfortable height above the cockpit.
21. Final conformation of the mast tune as well as
finer tuning, if you desire it, will take place when
sailing by sighting up the spar while going upwind
in about ten to twelve knots of breeze. The mast
should maintain its 2” (5cm) fore and aft bend, but
should also still appear straight transversely with
the leeward main shroud still retaining its tension
and not going noticeable slack.
If the leeward rigging does go slack when sailing,
apply more tension uniformly to both shrouds by
first tightening the leeward rigging three half turns
and then after tacking, tension the new leeward
rigging the same amount. Continue this procedure, as necessary until the leeward upper
shrouds no longer appear slack and forestay sag
has been reduced. Removal and reinstallation of
the turnbuckle cotter pins will be necessary to make
these fine tuning adjustments.
22. Once the upper shrouds are tensioned, again
sight up the spar to make sure that the middle of the
spar at the spreaders is not falling to leeward or
bending to weather. Adjust and uniformly retension
the lower shrouds as necessary.
NOTE: Standing rigging will stretch slightly when
initially loaded. Therefore, the rigging may have to
be further tensioned slightly after a few sails in a
strong breeze to compensate for this initial stretch.
Once the mast is tuned and initial stretch is taken
out, the rig should need retuning only at the beginning of each season.
23. After a day of sailing, the sails should be lowered while again powering into the wind, with the jib
lowered first and then the main.
PAGE 21
COOKING STOVE
Carefully read and understand the manufacturer’s instructions prior to operating your stove.
Save the instructions for review, and also to
pass on to any subsequent owners.
Use only the fuel recommended by the manufacturer, and store the fuel in an approved container.
Do not smoke while working with fuel.
Immediately clean up any spilled fuel.
EXPLOSION/FIRE/ASPHYXIATION HAZARD
• Open flame cooking appliances consume
oxygen. This can cause asphyxiation or
death.
• Maintain open ventilation.
• Liquid fuel may ignite, causing severe
burns.
• Use fuel appropriate for type of stove.
• Turn off stove burner before filling.
• Do not use stove for comfort heating.
• Use special care with flames or high temperatures near urethane foam. Once ignited, it burns rapidly, producing extreme
heat, releasing hazardous gasses and
consuming a large amount of oxygen.
TOILET
•
•
•
Do not add holding tank deodorant
to the top fresh water tank
Avoid adding holding tank deodorant
through bowl. Use tank on rear of
bottom tank. Slide valve must be
opened fully before adding deodorant through bowl, and avoid spilling
or splashing deodorants on slide
valve seals or bowl. Rinse off any
spilled or splashed deodorant immediately.
Atmospheric pressure and temperature changes may cause pressure
Your Hunter 25 comes standard with a portable,
self-contained marine toilet. Please refer to the
manufacturers instructions to familiarize yourself
with the correct operation of your toilet.
Be sure to keep your toilet secure by connecting it
to supplied hold down brackets. Add a holding
tank deodorant to the lower unit of the tank, which
is the holding tank. The upper unit is the fresh water tank for flushing.
Empty the holding tank at an approved permanent toilet facility by first removing the holding
tank, ensuring that the valve is closed, and carrying by the built-in handle. Rinse with fresh water
and reassemble.
FOR OPTIONAL H-25 MARINE HEAD, SEE PG
58A & B FOR WASTE SYSTEM DRAWINGS
PAGE 22
PUMPS
All pumps should be checked frequently to insure proper operation. This is an especially important regular maintenance item since a properly operating pump could save your vessel
from serious damage.
Run pump only as long as necessary to
remove water. Dry running can damage the
pump motor
SINKING HAZARD – Ensure proper bilge
pump operation
Inspect all bilge pump hoses for chafing and dry
rot. See that all hose clamps are tight. Check that
the bilge pump impeller area is clean and free of
obstructions. Inspect electrical wiring for corrosion. Ensure that the float switch functions properly.
WATER SYSTEM OPERATION
Your Hunter is equipped with a manual pump
water system, incorporating a water tank and a
level actuated manual pump. After sitting for
some time, the pump will need a few strokes to
prime the system. Be aware of the quality of the
water on board, if you are using it for drinking or
washing. Periodically, flush the water tank to keep
it clean. When storing your boat for the winter,
empty the water tank, and pump the lines dry.
PAGE 23
WARNING
California Proposition 65
Diesel engine exhaust and some
of its constituents are known to
cause cancer, birth defects, and
reproductive harm in the State of
California.
WARNING
California Proposition 65
Battery posts, terminals, and
related accessories contain lead
and lead compounds; chemicals
known to the State of California to
cause cancer and reproductive
harm.
Wash hands after handling!
OUTBOARD ENGINE AND MOTORING
As the outboard is an option on your Hunter,
you have numerous choices of brands available
to you. This motor should be between 8hp and
10hp for the H25. An engine owner’s manual
should be supplied with your outboard motor.
This manual will contain technical specifications, running instructions and a maintenance
schedule on lubricants and other important
functions. For longer engine life, follow the routine maintenance schedule recommended by
the manufacturer.
Run the engine at a low speed for about three
minutes for warm-up operation before cruising,
permitting the oil to circulate throughout the machine. Otherwise, the life of the engine will be
shortened greatly. During warm-up operation,
confirm that cooling water is discharged from its
check port.
Under power (without sails up) your boat may
be maneuvered with the rudder only, or in tight
turning situations, you can shorten your turning
radius by turning the outboard in the same direction as the rudder. This directs the propulsion forces in a complementary direction to the
way the rudder is steering the boat. The engine
will generate some “prop walk” which will exert
force to push the transom relative to the direction of the rotation of the propeller. You can test
your prop walk direction by putting the boat in
reverse while you are parallel to the dock, and
see if the stern swings toward or away from the
dock.
If cooling water is not discharged, and operation continues, the engine will be overheated,
causing mechanical troubles
When fueling your engine, be sure to use fresh
fuel. Fuel that has been in a tank too long can
form gum and varnish, which can affect performance. Use oil as recommended by the manufacturer. Two stroke engines require a special oil to
be either mixed with gasoline or injected from a
remote tank. This lubrication is essential for the
operation of the engine.
•
•
•
•
EXPLOSION/FIRE HAZARD
Store flammable material in safety
approved containers. Keep containers in an area designed for that purpose. Never store in an unvented
space.
Observe no-smoking while fueling
Fill to less than the capacity of the
tank. Allow for fuel expansion.
Inspect fuel system regularly for
leaks.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Your DC power source is a 12v battery, just as
with your automobile, and it must be charged
regularly. Some outboard motors include a
small alternator, which will assist in recharging
you battery. Otherwise you must use a battery
charger. Perform regular visual inspections to
insure proper water level and inspect terminals
for corrosion. If your boat sits for long periods
without use, it is a good idea to remove the battery(s)
And connect them with a trickle charger to keep
them fully charged and ready for use.
•
•
Carefully follow safety instructions included with battery
Always charge battery in a ventilated location
PAGE 24
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS
FUEL AND OIL SPILLAGE
The spilling of fuel or oil into our waterways contaminates the environment and is dangerous to wildlife. Never discharge or dispose of fuel or oil into the
water. It is dangerous and unlawful. Two common
types of accidental discharge are overfilling the fuel
tank and pumping contaminated bilge water into the
sea.
EXPLOSION/FIRE/POLLUTION HAZARD:
Fill fuel tank to less than rated capacity. Overfill
forces fuel out the tank vents, which can cause explosion fire, or environmental pollution. Also allow
for fuel expansion
DISCHARGE AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE
Waste means all forms of garbage, plastics, recyclables, food wood, detergents, sewage, and even
fish parts in certain waters. We recommend that you
bring back everything you take out with you for
proper disposal ashore.
Your marine holding tank (if so equipped) must, in
many areas, be pumped out by an approved pumpout facility normally found at marinas.
EXHAUST EMISSIONS
Hydrocarbon exhaust emissions pollute our water
and air. Keep your engine properly tuned to reduce
emissions and improve performance and economy.
ANTI-FOULING PAINTS
The use of anti-fouling paints is common for
boats kept in water. Be aware of environmental
regulations that may govern your paint choice.
These regulations may affect which paint may
be used, and also the application or removal.
Contact your local boating authorities for more
information
EXPLOSION/FIRE/HAZARD:
Ventilate when painting or cleaning.
Ingredients may be flammable and/or explosive.
CLEANING CHEMICALS
Cleaning chemicals should be used sparingly
and not discharged into waterways. Never mix
cleaners and be sure to use plenty of ventilation
in enclosed areas. Do not use products that
contain phosphates, chlorine, solvents, nonbiodegradable or petroleum-based products.
Common households cleaning agents may
cause hazardous reactions. Fumes can last for
hours, and chemical ingredients can attack
people, property and the environment.
PAGE 25
INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION
FOR BOTTOM PAINTING
WARNING!
Do not use any sanding, sandblasting or other
abrasive preparation of the bottom, as this will
void your hull blistering warranty. See the war-
ranty information at the beginning of this manual.
BOTTOM PAINTING
Choose a bottom paint system that suits the environment in your area.
Follow the procedure recommended by the
manufacturer of the paint, while making sure not
to void the Hunter Hull Blistering Warranty. The
procedure for preparing and painting the bottom
varies between paint manufacturers, but should
always include dewaxing, etching and sometimes priming of the surface.
EPOXY BARRIER COAT
Sanding of the gel coat bottom surface will be
permitted should a customer wish to have an
epoxy barrier coat applied to the hull, (example
Interlux Interprotect 1000, 2000, West System
or VCTar). This will not void the Five-Year Blister Warranty.
Hunter Marine refers to epoxy barrier coatings
as mentioned above, not epoxy primer paints.
If an epoxy barrier coat is applied to a Hunter
vessel, it must be registered with the Warranty
Department prior to application of the product. If
the dealer applies bottom paint only, sanding
will not be allowed and the no sanding system
must be used.
Cleaning agents and paint ingredients may be
flammable and/or explosive, or dangerous to
inhale. Be sure to use adequate ventilation,
and appropriate safety clothing.
(gloves, safety glasses, respiration, etc)
PAGE 26
ENGINE MAINTENANCE
Follow the fuel and lubrication requirements in
the engine manual provided by the manufacturer. Check oil levels prior to starting, and use
lubricants as recommended by the engine
manufacturer. Always check fuel lines and connections for possible leaks, which may create a
dangerous situation.
If you use your outboard in salt water, wash
down the exposed drive unit after every use to
limit corrosion. Also, it’s a good idea to attach a
water hose to a flushing device on an outboard
and completely flush out the raw water cooling
system. Regularly check the propeller and drive
unit for any damage or other signs of serious
wear. Propeller damage will reduce performance, as well as contribute to other potential
engine problems.
EXPLOSION/FIRE HAZARD
• Fuel system connections that are
too loose or too tight can leak, resulting in fuel loss, environmental
pollution and explosion or fire hazards.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
The electrical system is a 12-volt, negative
ground installation. On a weekly basis, the
owner should inspect batteries, terminals and
cables for signs of corrosion, cracks, and elec-
trolyte leakage. Battery terminals are to be kept
clean and greased. Refer to specific instructions
on batteries, wiring diagrams, and electronics.
PLUMBING SYSTEM
All pumps should be checked frequently to insure proper operation. This is an especially important regular maintenance item since a properly operating pump could save your vessel
from serious damage.
that the bilge pump impeller area is clean and
free of obstructions.
Inspect electrical wiring for corrosion. Ensure
that the float switch functions properly.
Inspect all bilge pump hoses for chafing and dry
rot. See that all hose clamps are tight. Check
PAGE 27
PROTECTING YOUR RIGGING
No matter how good your rigging is, without
careful inspection and proper maintenance it is
subject to fatigue, wear, discoloration, and
therefore, product failure. Remember: regular
inspection and cleaning will increase the life of
your investment and secure your rigging. We
suggest the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Always rinse your rigging with fresh water after sailing, especially salt-water sailing. Salt
can create corrosion pits, causing cracks
and deterioration.
Clean with a water-soluble chlorine-free detergent. Nonabrasive cleansers are best for
hard white vinyl coated cables.
Inspect rigging for stains. Rust stains may
indicate stress cracks or corrosion. Remove
stains with synthetic or brass pads. Never
use steel wool pads.
•
•
Look for broken wires - a sign of fatigue
in rigging. Replace standing rigging if
wires are broken.
Never mix stainless steel and galvanized
metals on cable, fittings, pins, cotter
keys, etc. If mixing dissimilar metals,
electric currents may conduct between
metal causing rapid deterioration
After unstopping, make sure to release
all standing rigging to avoid bending,
crushing and kinking.
Store rigging in a dry place. Never store
in a plastic bag, which can cause corrosion.
PAGE 28
TRAILER MAINTENANCE
BEFORE USING YOUR TRAILER
1.
Check all bolts and nuts for
tightness, including the lug nuts
for the wheels.
2.
Check to insure that all lights
are working properly.
3.
Always maintain the tires’ recommended air pressure.
4.
tires spin-balanced by a qualified tire service center.
5.
When the trailer has been
hitched to your vehicle, remove
the two-speed winch handle before departing.
6.
Always check hitch and safety
chain connection and boat tie
downs prior to departing.
For improved tire life, have your
PROTECTING AND MAINTAINING YOUR TRAILER
1.
Before launching your boat, we
recommend that the light harness be disconnected from your
vehicle with enough time to allow bulbs to cool. This will
greatly extend the life of your
bulbs.
2.
This trailer has a galvanized
frame, however, some parts including the brakes, axles, hubs,
springs, U bolts, and plates are
not galvanized. Most of these
parts have been sprayed with a
high gloss black rust resistant
paint, plus a clear coating. After
launching, (especially in salt
water locations), rinse your
trailer, including the painted
components. As a continuing
measure to protect your trailer,
you should from time to time,
refinish and repaint surfaces
that show signs of rusting.
3.
Periodically and regularly check
your wheel bearings for sufficient grease and tightness. The
more launching you do, the
more likely for the need to regrease these bearings.
Proper maintenance and care will help insure more trouble free trailering for you.
IMPORTANT: Be sure to thoroughly familiarize yourself with the trailering
regulations in your state and in any others through which you will be traveling
with your boat. Regulations vary from state to state regarding the trailering of
sailboats, governing both the width of the load and the length of mast overhang at the rear of the trailer. Special permits may be required, and other
regulations may apply. Consult your local authorities for more information.
PAGE 29
GENERAL CARE
CLEANING FIBERGLASS SURFACES
Fiberglass surfaces should be cleaned regularly.
Normal accumulations of surface dirt can be removed
simply by occasional rinsings with water. If you operate your boat in salt water, more frequent rinsing will
be required. To remove stubborn dirt, grease or oil,
use a mild detergent and a soft brush. Rinse with
fresh clean water. Avoid the plexiglass companionway slider, windshield, deck hatches and fixed ports
when using a deck brush, since these surfaces can
scratch.
It is a good idea to wax the fiberglass once or twice a
year to maintain a deep, glossy appearance. Your lo-
cal marine supply should be able to provide an appropriate wax.
EXPLOSION/FIRE HAZARD
Cleaning agents and paint ingredients
may be flammable and/or explosive,
and dangerous to inhale. Be sure to use
adequate ventilation, and appropriate
safety clothing (gloves, safety glasses,
respirator, etc.)
CLEANING ACRYLIC
Use only mild soap and water to clean acrylics. Do
not use products containing solvents such as ammonia, which is found in many window cleaners.
Use care when cleaning acrylic.
Dry cloth and many glass cleaners will
scratch. Solvents will attack the surface.
SAIL CARE
Sunlight is a sail’s worst enemy, so cover the
mainsail when not in use. An ultraviolet guard, fitted down the leech of a roller headsail will protect
the exposed part from the weathering effect of the
sun and from dirt and grit.
Mildew, can be prevented by storing sails dry and
by hand washing twice a season. Check all sails
regularly for chafe, particularly where they chafe on
deck fittings or rigging, at reef points, batten sleeves
and the foot of the headsail. Sail batten pockets
should be inspected on a regular basis.
To stow the mainsail, start at the leech and flake it
onto the boom, left and right, in about 18-in. (46 cm)
folds, while pulling the leech aft. Secure with a sail tie
and continue to the luff. Lash to the boom with sail
ties or shock cord.
GENERAL HARDWARE MAINTENANCE
Check all fittings regularly to be sure screws are
tight. Occasionally lubricate (use silicone lubricants)
all moving parts on such fittings as blocks, turnbuckles and cam cleats, as well as the locking pins
of snatch blocks, track slides, spinnaker poles, etc.
Inspect cleat and fairleads for roughness and
smooth with fine-grained emery paper if necessary.
Also, replace any missing or damaged cotter pins in
turnbuckles and shackles, and either tape them or
use them or use protective covers manufactured for
that purpose. Grease winches a minimum of once
yearly.
WINCH MAINTENANCE
Follow the maintenance instructions prescribed by
winch manufacturer. We recommend a minimum of
an annual cleaning and light greasing.
PAGE 30
ACRYLIC CARE
As in all plastics scratching must be avoided…
• Acrylic
is much softer than glass and therefore can scratch. Also, certain chemicals
can damage the product. These chemicals will either dull the finish or cause crazing
and eventually crack the acrylic.
• Do
not use paper towels when cleaning (use a cotton cloth instead)
• Do
not clean with ammonia based chemicals such as, 409, Windex, solvents, paint
thinner (use soapy water only)
What should I do if the paint chips off?
1. Lightly sand affected area to a feathered edge.
2. Mask off area to prevent over spray.
3. Spray with an acrylic lacquer.
What should I do if my acrylic part scratches
• Some
minor scratches and scuffs in the surface of the material are repairable
• Buff out with a fine polish, (such as 3M finesse-it-II, or Mequiars #17 clear plastic
polish). This should remove most minor scratches.
What if I have a deeper scratch?
1. Sand the scratch with a 400 grit sand paper.
2. Once the scratch is removed wet sand with a 600 grit sand paper.
3. Buff out using 3M super duty rubbing compound and a high speed bonnet buffer.
4. Buff out with a fine polish, (such as 3M finesse-it-II, or Mequiars #17 clear plastic
polish), and a high speed bonnet buffer.
Although Spartech Marine uses the finest cast acrylics which are more scratch and
chemical resistant than others, care must still be taken.
What If I have to reinstall the part?
• Always
use a hand held screw driver or a battery operated driver with a clutch; this
will prevent the part from chipping or cracking.
WINDSCREEN CARE
As in all plastics scratching must be avoided
•
Do not scrape on the windscreen
•
Use a soft clean cloth (cotton towel) and soapy water to clean
•
Paper towels can cause scratching
•
Do not use any ammonia based products (Windex)
•
Do not use any chemicals such as paint thinner or solvent cleaners
What should I do if the paint chips off the windscreen?
1. Lightly sand affected area to a feathered edge.
2. Mask off area to prevent over spray.
3. Spray with an acrylic lacquer.
What should I do if my windscreen scratches?
• Some
• Buff
minor scratches and scuffs in the surface of the material are repairable.
out with a fine polish, 3M finesse-it-II, or Mequiars #17 clear plastic polish.
This should remove most minor scratches.
What if I have a deeper scratch?
1. Sand the scratch with a 400 grit sand paper.
2. Once the scratch is removed wet sand with a 600 grit sand paper.
3. Buff out using 3M super duty rubbing compound and a high speed bonnet buffer.
4. Buff out with a fine polish, (such as 3M finesse-it-II, or Mequiars #17 clear
plastic polish), and a high speed bonnet buffer.
Although Spartech Marine uses the finest cast acrylics which are more scratch and
chemical resistant than others, care must still be taken.
VINYL
These patterns, like all upholstery fabrics and
vinyl, require a regularly scheduled cleaning
program. A thorough cleaning should be administered on a daily, weekly or monthly basis
depending on use and exposure to dirt and/or
staining agents. It is important to begin treatment of a stain as soon as possible after a
spill. It is important that efforts begin immediately after a spill to remove any potential staining agent. It is advisable to clean these products as soon as the first signs of dinginess occur, otherwise, delaying clean up will require a
much greater effort to restore the product to its
original appearance.
Regular cleaning requires the use of a mild
cleaner such as Murphy’s Oil soap and water.
In situations where the vinyl has not been
washed regularly and there is a build up of dirt,
stronger vinyl cleaners such as Simonize’s Tuff
Stuff or Turtle Wax’s vinyl/fabric cleaner are
recommended. We do not recommend the use
of any other cleaners. The use of cleaners
other than those recommended may result in irreparable damage to the product.
In order for the above listed cleaning solutions to
work effectively on stubborn stains, please allow
time for the cleaning solution to soak in thoroughly. Be sure to remove the cleaning solution
before it has time to dry. Regardless of the type
of cleaner used, it is necessary to finish up with a
thorough rinse using fresh water on a clean
sponge or rag. A soft bristled nylon or natural fiber brush can be used to remove built-up dirt
and staining agents.
Finally, please remember that all our fabric grain
vinyls require a greater cleaning effort to maintain than comparable smooth grain vinyls. These
products will provide an attractive and durable alternative to conventional fabrics and vinyls if
properly maintained. One must realize that the
proper installation and use of our fabric grain vinyls require additional attention to the establishment and maintenance of a well thought out
cleaning program.
FABRIC CARE
Vinyl: Clean with mild soap and water. Wipe
with vinyl or upholstery cleaner monthly, and
especially before and after storage.
Leather: Mild soap water. Blot dry. Do not
scrub as this will stretch and scratch. Wipe
with leather cleaner/oil to preserve and help
prevent cracks before and after storage.
Fabric: Blot dry. Do not machine wash. Use
only mild soap and water. Wipe with a clean
white cloth. If stain persists, dry clean. Be sure
to treat cleaned surfaces with scotch guard.
Stretched or loose covers may be steam
cleaned. If foam is removed, it will restuff more
easily if wrapped with thin plastic.
Storage: Cover with airflow fabric to reduce
dust buildup. Do not use plastic, as this will
cause cushions to sweat and mildew.
Cushions: If wet, prop cushions vertically to
promote airflow around each cushion. Cushions
can be cleaned by most dry cleaners. Dry clean
only.
PAGE 31
ELECTROLYSIS AND GALVANIC PROTECTION
Salt water allows electric current to flow from
anodic to cathodic material. For any two metals
from two components, their relative positions in
the galvanic rating table, will determine which
loses material (the anode) and which remains
largely undisturbed (the cathode). The distance
between the two metals on the galvanic table
determines the rate of wear. Thus a sacrificial
zinc anode is often fitted to the underwater
area of a boat to attract any destructive currents away from bronze or steel propeller
shafts, for example.
It is not enough to know that your boat does
not suffer from electrolysis; a newcomer in the
adjacent marina berth may start a too-friendly
association with metal components on it. An
easy place to fit an anode is on the propeller
shaft, or covering the propeller nut. The anode
should not be painted; this would render it ineffective.
To prevent electrolysis in seawater, the difference between the voltages of the two adjacent
metals should not exceed 0.20 V. For example,
zinc and carbon steel used together risk corrosion, while lead and active stainless steel are
compatible. Metals with a high voltage corrode
faster and need a larger area to diffuse the electrochemical reaction.
PAGE 32
TEAK CARE
Teak wood is a high quality, extremely durable
wood with a high oil content. In order to help
you protect the original beauty of your teak interior, we have sealed the wood with a 3 to 4
coat system of high quality Seafin Teak Oil,
manufactured by Dalys. This material is penetrating oil that dries to a low sheen to seal and
protect the wood from moisture and weathering.
It creates a durable, nonslip surface to repel water and resist wear. It won’t chip, peel or blister. It
reduces work and maintenance cost because it
is easy to repair and maintain and repair. With
proper maintenance it will outlive urethane varnish on interior and even exterior surfaces.
MAINTENENCE
When oiled surfaces require renewing, simply
wipe the surface area free of loose dirt, dust or
other contaminants. Dampen a cloth with the
Seafin Teal Oil and wipe on. Let stand for 5-15
minutes, then polish dry. If your dinette table has
an epoxy finish, clean with furniture polish.
REPAIRS
When woodwork is damaged from scrapes or
abrasions that go into or thru the finish, take
the following steps:
1. Take 180 to 200 grit wet/dry sand paper to
smooth out rough spots.
2. Wipe clean of dust and dirt with a clean rag.
Note: before applying oil, wood surface must
be dry.
3. Wipe or brush on oil, allow to penetrate 5-15
minutes while surface is still wet.
4. Sand until smooth with 400A wet/dry sandpaper.
5. Wipe dry with a clean rag. Allow 8-12 hours
drying time.
6. Apply second coat, sand, and repeat procedure.
This procedure may be repeated as many times
as needed to bring damaged area back to its
original finish. If you have trouble with getting the
same sheen, you may use a soaked and rung
out cloth to apply a very light coat to get an even
sheen.
PAGE 33
STORAGE/WINTERIZATION
IMPORTANT
Winter storage is recommended to be done in one of the following three ways, either: 1) by
blocking the boat via a cradle 2) with chained stands on level ground; or 3) by storing the
boat in the water with a bubbler system to prevent icing. Damage to your boat, including engine misalignment caused by twisting, is not covered by the warranty.
SAILS
Sails should be properly folded and stowed in a dry,
well-ventilated place. Many sailboat owners send
their sails back to the sail manufacturer at the end of
each season. The sail maker will check the stitching
and sailcloth for wear and store the sails until the
start of the next season.
ELECTRICAL
Remove battery from boat (Refer to Engine Manual)
and charge. It is a good idea to also remove the
electronics (radio, radar, etc) and store in a safe
place.
CUSHIONS
Cushions should be removed and stored at home if
possible. If not, prop them vertically to promote air
flow around each cushion. Dry clean only!
HATCHES
Tenting the deck during storage will help prevent ice
from forming and damaging hatches and deck fittings. The installation of a passive vent will help with
ventilation while the boat is in storage.
WATER SYSTEM
Open a faucet and allow the pump to empty the
tank. Then add approximately two gallons (7.6L) of
non-toxic anti-freeze solution to the tank and repeat
the pumping out procedure.
A second method is to disconnect the hoses at the
pump, allowing them to drain. Find the lowest point
in the system and disconnect the fitting. Open all
faucets to allow the lines to drain. If possible, use a
short of hose on the faucet to blow through the lines
to clear all water. A diluted solution with baking soda
will help freshen the system.
WATER SYSTEM
Open valve and drain fully leave valve open during
lay-up time.
TOILET AND HOLDING TANK
Drain and flush toilet. Using non-toxic anti-freeze in
a 50/50 mixture with water, pump through toilet and
into holding tank.
OUTBOARD ENGINE
Take it home and store it in a safe place. Be very
careful storing the gas tank as the gasoline is very
flammable. Refer to Engine Manual for specific
maintenance schedule.
INBOARD ENGINE
Winterizing Fresh Water Cooled Diesel Engines
1. Drain crankcase and transmission and refill with
fresh lubricant as specified in Engine Manual.
2. Drain and clean all fuel filters and change elements, gaskets, and seals. Bleed all air from fuel
systems.
3. Start engine and bring up to operating temperature.
4. Close the sea cock, remove the raw water pickup
hose from the raw water pump and immerse one
end into a 5-gallon (19L) bucket of anti-freeze solution. Start engine and run till anti-freeze solution
comes out exhaust stack or until bucket is empty.
Attach the raw water pickup hose to the raw water
pump. Tighten all clamps. NOTE: This procedure
bypasses the sea strainer to prevent anti-freeze
from crystallizing in sea strainer, which warranty
will not over.
5. Loosen water pump and alternator belts to lessen
tension on belts during winter.
6. For engines equipped with a hand crank: pull
compression release levers and turn engine slowly
with the hand crank. Slowly pour about 2 ounces of
engine oil into the intake pipe or manifold while hand
cranking the engine. This will allow for a thin coat of
oil on the valves and upper cylinder. DO NOT USE
starter to turn engine or serious engine damage may
result.
7. Tape the openings of the intake and exhaust
manifolds with duct tape to help prevent corrosion of
the upper cylinder during lay-up.
8. Scrape all rust or corrosion from exposed metal
parts and surfaces. Scrub all metal surfaces with detergent and rinse thoroughly. Paint any bare metal.
9. Place a dust cover over engine. Do not leave the
engine exposed to rain and sea breeze.
10. Disconnect the battery cables; remove the battery from the boat. Clean the terminal ends and battery with a solution of baking soda and water, and
PAGE 34A
STORAGE/WINTERIZATION (CONT.)
then rinse thoroughly with clean water. Apply a light
coat of grease on the terminal end of the battery and
cables. Store the battery in a cool dry place. Use a
trickle charger to keep battery charged. Do not
charge battery near any open flame or a confined
area.
CAUTION: Wear safety goggles and rubber
gloves to protect your skin.
Winterizing Raw Water Cooled Diesel Engines
1. Drain crankcase and transmission and refill with
fresh oil as specified in the engine manual. Change
oil filters.
2. Close seacock, remove raw water pickup hose
from water pump, attach 4-foot (1.2m) length of
hose to water pump and immerse in a 5-gallon (19L)
bucket of biodegradable anti-freeze solution. Remove hose from engine or manifold that leads to exhaust elbow. Attach about a 4-foot length of hose
and immerse one end in the bucket of biodegradable anti-freeze solution. Start engine and run until
water begins to warm up (about 3-5 min.) and the
thermostat opens. Stop engine. Replace hose that
leads to exhaust elbow. Star engine and let run till
water comes out exhaust pipe. Stop engine, remove
hose from water pump to bucket, attach hose from
seacock to water pump and tighten all hose clamps.
NOTE: this procedure bypasses the sea strainer
to prevent anti-freeze from crystallizing sea
strainer, which warranty will not cover.
3. Loosen water pump and alternator to lessen tensions on belts during winter.
4. Drain and clean all fuel filters and change elements, gaskets and seals. Bleed all air from fuel
systems.
5. Pull compression release lever and turn engine
slowly with hand crank. Slowly pour about 2 ounces
of engine oil into the intake pipe or manifold while
engine is turning.
DO NOT USE the starter to turn engine or serious
engine damage may result.
6. Tape the openings of the intake and exhaust
manifolds with duct tape to help prevent corrosion of
the upper cylinder during lay-up.
7. Scrape all rust or corrosion from exposed metal
parts and surfaces. Scrub all metal surfaces with detergent and rinse thoroughly. Paint any bare metal.
8. Place a dust cover over engine. Do not leave engine exposed to rain and sea breeze.
9. Disconnect the battery cables; remove the battery
from the boat. Clean the terminal ends and battery
with a solution of baking soda and water and rinse
thoroughly with lean water. Apply a light coat of
grease on the terminal end of the battery and cables. Store the battery in a cool dry place. Use a
trickle charger to keep battery charged. Do not
charge battery near any open flame or in a confined
area.
CAUTION: Wear safety goggles and rubber
gloves to protect your eyes and skin.
DEPARTURE FROM THE BOAT
The check list for leaving a boat unattended is very
important because items overlooked often will not be
remembered until you are far from the boat and corrective actions are impractical or impossible. Primary choices for this list are items relating to the
safety and security of the unattended craft: turning
off fuel valves, properly setting electrical switches,
pumping out bilge and leaving the switch on automatic (or arrange for periodic pumping out). It is
recommended that the power be turned off when
leaving the boat. Other departure checklist items
are securing ports, windows, hatches and doors.
ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
Routine maintenance checklists should include
items based on how much the boat is used (usually
in terms of engine hours) and on calendar dates
(weekly, monthly or seasonal checks). Typical of the
former are oil level checks and changes, and oil and
fuel filter changes.
On a calendar basis the lists should note such matters as electrolyte levels in storage batteries, pressure gauges on dry chemical fire extinguishers, and
all navigation lights. Check the operation of automatic bilge alarms or pump switches by running water into the boat. Periodically close and open
sea cocks several times to ensure their free and
easy operation in case they are needed in an emergency. Equipment and supplies carried on board for
emergencies should be inspected for any signs of
deterioration.
PAGE 34B
BALL VALVE DRAINING AND WINTERIZING INSTRUCTIONS
To winterize, the vessel must be out of the water.
Close the valve and loosen the hose at its upper end opposite the valve.
Open the valve to drain hose and valve.
Remove the drain plug on the side of the valve to drain water from the valve body.
Open and close valve until liquids have been drained from valve body.
Replace and tighten plug. Reattach and tighten hose.
Check open and close operation of valve and all connections at spring re-commissioning
and before re-launch.
Check for leaks during re-launch.
2' 0"
3700 lbs
239 sq. ft.
25' 0"
8' 6"
23' 5"
9' 6"
31' 8"
DRAFT ………………..………….……………………........................
DISPLACEMENT …………………...…………..……........................
SAIL AREA (ACTUAL W/ STANDARD SAILS)…….........................
I………………………………………………………….......................
J ……………………………………………………….........................
P………………………………………………………….....................
E………………………………………………………….....................
MAST HEIGHT (FROM WATERLINE)……………….......................
WATER CAPACITY………………………………….........................
10 U.S. gal.
HOLDING TANK CAPACITY (PORTA-POTTY)……………............ 2.8 U S gal.
HOLDING TANK CAPACITY (OPT. MARINE HEAD)…………….........…
13 U.S. gal
FUEL TANK CAPACITY ...................………………........................ OPTIONAL W/ OUTBOARD
BATTERY CAPACITY……………………………….........................
DEALER SUPPLIED
ELECTRICAL VOLTAGES………………………….........................
SEE ELECTRICAL DRAWINGS
OPT. OUTBOARD ENGINE………………………….....................................
UP TO 10 H.P.
MAXIMUM LOADING…………………………………........................ 8 PEOPLE
24' 6"
22' 1"
8' 5 1/2"
LENGTH OVERALL (LOA)………………………….........................
LENGTH OF WATERLINE (LWL)………………….........................
BEAM (MAX)………………………………………….........................
HUNTER 25
DIMENSIONS, CAPACITIES, ETC.
PAGE 37
7.5 kw
840 kg
(INCLUDING LUGGAGE)
37.9 liters
10.5 liters
49.2 liters
22.2 sq.m
7.62m
2.59m
7.39m
2.896m
9.65m
.61m
1678 kg
7.47m
6.72m
2.58m
DECK HARDWARE LIST
ITEM QTY
1
2
3
4
5A
5B
5C
6
7
8
9A
9B
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17A
17B
18
19
20
21
22A
22B
23
24
25
26A
26B
26C
27
28
29
30
31
32
33A
33B
34
35
36
37
38
39A
39B
39C
39D
40
41
42
43
1
1
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
2
2
1
4
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
DESCRIPTION
BOW RAIL
BOW ROLLER (OPTIONAL)
HINGE
ANCHOR DEAD END U-BOLT
ANCHOR LOCKER LATCH
STRIKER PLATE
EYE STRAP (CHROME)
FRONT HATCH
ANCHOR LOCKER LID
PORT FWD WINDOW
PORT FORWARD WINDSHIELD
STRBD FORWARD WINDSHIELD
STERN RAILS
THREE PRONG PLUG
MAST BASE
FWD STANCHION
HALYARD CHEEK BLOCKS
JIB LEAD BLOCKS
STBD FWD WINDOW
CHAINPLATES
CHAINPLATE BACKUP PLATES
CLAM CLEATS
PAD-EYE
XA/2 SHEET STOPPER
XA/1 SHEET STOPPER
SLIDER RETAINER
SLIDER RETAINER
BOW LIGHT
HALYARD WINCHES
STERN LIGHT
WHITE HATCH
TRIM RING
SCREEN
RUDDER STOPS
TILLER ARM
ENGINE MOUNTING BRKT.
RUDDER ASSEMBLY
SWIM LADDER
6" FOUR HOLE CLEATS
SEAHOOD
SEAHOOD SUPPORT LEGS
PORT LIGHT-SMOKE
PORT LIGHT-FROSTED
GAS TANK ACCESS
STRUT BRACKETS
MAINSHEET U-BOLT WITH NUTS
HATCH BOARDS
HATCH BOARD HASP
STBD. HATCH BOARD TRACK
PORT HATCH BOARD TRACK
C-WAY SLIDER
MAINSHEET ASSEMBLY
BUNGEE CORD 20"
RUBBER BUMPERS
DWG#
COMMENTS
H23B2022 HUNTER
SEA DOG
#1167
3/8" SS U-BOLT
S.S.
S.S.
FOR BUNGEE CORD
H23A2415 FIBERGLASS
H23A2417 SAME AS H23.5
H23B2028 3/8" U-BOLTS
1/4" X 3/4" S.S.
EASY LOCK DOUBLE
EASY LOCK SINGLE
STBD. SIDE
PORT SIDE
BI-COLOR #62246B
LEWMAR 6A
#62243B
#927-2100
#926 GREY ENT.
#GS927-28
RONSTAN
S.S.
GLASS PART
S.S.
N. FLA. GLASS & MIRROR
N. FLA. GLASS & MIRROR
GLASS PART
24030002 MADE BY HUNTER
3/8" S.S.
CHROME
KING STARBOARD
KING STARBOARD
SCHAEFFER35-03
FOR DECK HATCHES
PAGE 39
REEFING INSTRUCTIONS
IF THE WIND STRENGTH BUILDS TO THE
POINT WHERE THE BOAT HEELS EXCESSIVELY OR UNCOMFORTABLY, YOU MAY
REDUCE THE SAIL AREA BY TAKING IN A
REEF. REEFING IS EASIEST WHEN DONE ON
A STARBOARD TACK (WHEN THE WIND IS
BLOWING FROM THE STARBOARD SIDE)
SINCE THE JIB SHEET IS ON THE PORT SIDE,
AND THE HALYARD WINCH IS THEN FREE.
HOWEVER, REEFING CAN BE DONE ON
EITHER TACK.
1. FEATHER THE BOAT INTO THE
SLIGHTLY TO REDUCE THE HEEL.
WIND
2. EASE THE TENSION ON THE MAINSHEET.
3. MAKE SURE THE STARBOARD WINCH IS
FREE BY EITHER PUTTING THE BOAT ON A
STARBOARD TACK OR BY TAKING THE JIB
SHEET AND JAMMING IT IN THE JIB SHEET
JAM CLEAT BEFORE REMOVING IT FROM
THE WINCH.
4. TRANSFER THE MAIN HALYARD TO THE
WINCH, AND TAKE UP FULL TENSION OF
THE HALYARD BETWEEN THE WINCH AND
THE SHEET STOPPER. THEN UNLOCK THE
MAIN HALYARD SHEET STOPPER.
5. LOWER THE MAIN HALYARD UNTIL THE
FORWARD REEF CRINGLE ON THE SAIL CAN
BE SECURED BY INSERTING THE REEF
HOOK THRU LOCATED ON THE BOOM
GOOSE NECK THROUGH THE CRINGLE.
6. RETENSION THE MAIN HALYARD UNTIL ALL
THE SLACK OR WRINKLES ARE REMOVED
FROM THE LUFF.
7. TIGHTEN THE REEF LINE AT THE FORWARD
END OF THE BOOM BY PULLING THE LINE
DOWN THROUGH THE SHEAVE AND JAM
UNTIL THE AFT REEFING CRINGLE IS
AGAINST THE BOOM AND THE LINE CANNOT
BE TENSIONED ANY FURTHER. THE MAINSHEET AND VANG MAY HAVE TO BE LOOSENED TO BE ABLE TO ACHIEVE THE
PROPER TENSION.
8.
JAM THE REEF LINE AT THE
GOOSENECK. RETENSION THE VANG
AND MAINSHEET ACCORDINGLY. REJAM THE MAIN HALYARD AND TRANSFER THE JIB SHEET BACK TO THE
WINCH IF NECESSARY.
9. IF THE WIND CONTINUES TO INCREASE, YOU MAY DROP THE JIB
COMPLETELY AND LASH IT TO THE
DECK USING A SAIL TIE. THIS WILL
ALLOW YOU TO SAIL ON A REEFED
MAIN ALONE. IN SOME CASES, YOU
MAY FIND IT MORE EFFECTIVE TO
DROP THE JIB FIRST, INSTEAD OF /
BEFORE YOU TAKE IN A REEF. IT MAY
ALSO BE EASIER TO TAKE IN A REEF
BY TEMPORARILY LOWERING THE JIB
DURING THE REEFING PROCESS.
SHAKING OUT A REEF
1. TRANSFER MAIN HALYARD TO THE
WINCH AS EXPLAINED ABOVE.
2. EASE THE MAIN HALYARD DOWN
ENOUGH TO REMOVE THE FORWARD
REEF CRINGLE FROM THE REEF HOOK
ON THE BOOM GOOSENECK.
3. UNJAM THE REEF LINE AT THE
FORWARD END OF THE BOOM.
4. RAISE MAIN HALYARD USING THE
WINCH. WHILE DOING SO, ENSURE
THE REEFING LINE CONTINUES TO
RUN THROUGH THE SAIL REEF CRINGLE AND THE FORWARD BOOM JAM.
5. TENSION THE MAIN HALYARD AND
REJAM
6. ADJUST THE SHEET AND VANG AS
NECESSARY.
PAGE 45
PAGE 46A-1
STD
STD
STD
OPT
OPT
3
4
5
6
7
12
11
10
9
STD
STD
STD
STD
STD
STD
2
8
STD
1
OPT/STD
TOPPING LIFT
CENTERBOARD LINE 3
CENTERBOARD LINE 2
CENTERBOARD LINE 1
VANG
SPINNAKER HALYARD
SPINN. SHEET
JIB SHEET
REEFING LINE
MAINSHEET
JIB HALYARD
MAIN HALYARD
ITEM
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
QUANTITY
1/8" PVC
5/16" (8mm)
5/16" (8mm)
3/8" (9.5mm)
5/16" (8mm)
3/8" (9.5mm)
3/8" (9.5mm)
3/8" (9.5mm)
5/16" (8mm)
3/8" (9.5mm)
5/16" (8mm)
5/16" (8mm)
LINE SIZE
LS
LS
XLS
LS
XLS
LS
LS
TRACER
LS
LS
XLS
LINE TYPE
WHITE
WHITE
WHITE
WHITE
WHITE
BLACK
BLACK FLECK
RED FLECK
GREEN FLECK
BLUE FLECK
RED
BLUE
COLOR
EYE
EYE
EYE
SMALL EYE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
SMALL EYE
BARE
BARE
END 1
RUNNING RIGGING SPECIFICATIONS
7.6 m
2.4 m
0.9 m
2.2 m
5.9 m
22.25 m
14.6 m
9.75 m
11.3 m
17.0 m
22.25 m
22.9 m
LENGTH
25 ft
8 ft
3 ft
7.25 ft
19 ft
73 ft
48 ft
32 ft
37 ft
56 ft
73 ft
75 ft
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
BARE
END 2
PAGE 46A-2
5
4
3
2
1
STD
STD
STD
STD
STD
OPT/STD
RD1
D2
V1
D1
FORESTAY
ITEM
2
2
2
2
1
QUANTITY
5/32" (4mm) 1x19
5/32" (4mm) 1x19
5/32" (4mm) 1x19
5/32" (4mm) 1x19
5/32" (4mm) 1x19
WIRE SIZE
EYE
FORK
TOGGLE FORK
T-BALL
T-BALL
UPPER END
2.83m
3.55m
4.7m
4.617m
8.46m
LENGTH
STANDING RIGGING SPECIFICATIONS
9' 4"
11' 8"
15' 5"
15' 1 1/2"
27' 9"
TURNBUCKLEw/JAW TOGGLE
EYE
TURNBUCKLEw/JAW TOGGLE
TURNBUCKLEw/JAW TOGGLE
TURNBUCKLEw/JAW TOGGLE
LOWER END
PAGE 48B
SPREADER TIP
PIN FIXES RD-1
VIEW IS OF PORT SIDE LOOKING AFT
RD-1 MARINE EYE
COTTER PIN FOR
SPREADER TIP
PIN
D-2 MARINE EYE
SPREADER TIP DETAILS
Hunter
V-1 JAW TOGGLE
COTTER PIN FOR
SPREADER TIP
PIN
SPREADER TIP
PIN FIXES V-1
AND D-2
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