iX Series Inverter - Jacks Small Engines
®
Diagnostic
Repair
Manual
iX Series Inverter
models:
iX800
iX1600
iX2000
Portable generators
Foreword
SAFETY
Read This Manual Thoroughly
Throughout this publication, DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION
blocks are used to alert the mechanic to special instructions
concerning a particular service or operation that might be
hazardous if performed incorrectly or carelessly. Observe them
carefully. Their definitions are as follows:
This SERVICE MANUAL has been written and published by
Generac to aid our dealers' mechanics and company service
personnel when servicing the products described herein.
fter this heading, read instructions that, if not strictly complied
A
with, will result in serious personal injury, including death.
fter this heading, read instructions that, if not strictly complied
A
with, could result in serious personal injury, including death.
fter this heading, read instructions that, if not strictly complied
A
with, might result in minor or moderate injury.
Four commonly used safety symbols accompany the DANGER,
WARNING and CAUTION blocks. The type of information each
indicates follows:
 if not followed, could endanger personal safety and/or
This symbol points out important safety information that,
property of others.

This symbol points out potential explosion hazard.

This symbol points out potential fire hazard.

This symbol points out potential electrical shock hazard.
These “Safety Alerts” alone cannot eliminate the hazards that
they signal. Strict compliance with these special instructions plus
“common sense” are major accident prevention measures.
It is assumed that these personnel are familiar with the servicing
procedures for these products, or like or similar products
manufactured and marketed by Generac. That they have been
trained in the recommended servicing procedures for these
products, including the use of common hand tools and any
special Generac tools or tools from other suppliers.
Generac could not possibly know of and advise the service
trade of all conceivable procedures by which a service might
be performed and of the possible hazards and/or results
of each method. We have not undertaken any such wide
evaluation. Therefore, anyone who uses a procedure or tool not
recommended by Generac must first satisfy themselves that
neither his nor the products safety will be endangered by the
service procedure selected.
All information, illustrations and specifications in this manual
are based on the latest product information available at the time
of publication.
When working on these products, remember that the electrical
system and engine ignition system are capable of violent and
damaging short circuits or severe electrical shocks. If you intend
to perform work where electrical terminals could be grounded
or touched, the battery cables should be disconnected at the
battery.
Any time the intake or exhaust openings of the engine are
exposed during service, they should be covered to prevent
accidental entry of foreign material. Entry of such materials will
result in extensive damage when the engine Is started.
During any maintenance procedure, replacement fasteners must
have the same measurements and strength as the fasteners
that were removed. Metric bolts and nuts have numbers that
indicate their strength. Customary bolts use radial lines to
indicate strength while most customary nuts do not have
strength markings. Mismatched or incorrect fasteners can
cause damage, malfunction and possible injury.
NOTE: Special NOTES appear in bold type throughout this
publication. While not pertaining to safety, they emphasize
procedures, circumstances or specifications that require
special attention.
REPLACEMENT PARTS
When servicing this equipment, it is extremely important that all
components be properly installed and tightened. If improperly
installed and tightened, sparks could ignite fuel vapors from fuel
system leaks.
Table of Contents
Specifications...................................................................... 2
Section 4 – Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests.............. 15
Section 1 – Generator Fundamentals.................................... 6
Test 1 – Check Engine RPM................................... 19
Magnetism.............................................................. 6
Test 2 – Test Sub Coil of Stator.............................. 19
Electromagnetic Fields............................................. 6
Test 3 – Test Main Coil of Stator............................. 19
Electromagnetic Induction........................................ 6
Test 4 – Test DC Circuit Breaker............................. 20
Electrical Units......................................................... 6
Test 5 – Test DC Rectifier....................................... 20
Ohm's Law.............................................................. 7
Test 6 – Test DC Coil on Stator............................... 20
A Simple AC Generator............................................ 7
Test 7 – Test Recoil Function.................................. 21
What is an “iX” Inverter Unit?................................... 8
Test 8 – Test Engine Function................................. 21
iX Inverter System Overview.................................... 8
Test 9 – Check Spark............................................. 21
Why Variable Speed Control?................................... 8
Test 10 – Check Spark Plug................................... 21
Section 2 – Measuring Electricity......................................... 9
Test 11 – Check Fuel Pump.................................... 22
Meters..................................................................... 9
Test 12 – Check Carburetion.................................. 22
The VOM................................................................. 9
Test 13 – Check Engine Compression.................... 23
Measuring AC Voltage.............................................. 9
Test 14 – Test Ignition Trigger Assembly................. 23
Measuring DC Voltage.............................................. 9
Test 15 – Test Ignition Coil..................................... 24
Measuring AC Frequency......................................... 9
Test 16 – Test Fuel Shutoff Switch.......................... 24
Measuring Current................................................... 9
Test 17 – Check Choke Assembly.......................... 25
Measuring Resistance............................................ 10
Test 18 – Test Stepper Motor................................. 25
Section 3 – Major Components.......................................... 11
Test 19 – Test Oil Level Switch............................... 25
Introduction........................................................... 11
Test 20 – Test Ignition Coil Winding........................ 26
UNIT Identification................................................. 11
Test 21 – Test FlexPower Switch............................ 26
Internal Major Engine Components......................... 12
Section 5 – Disassembly................................................... 27
Internal Major Electrical Components..................... 13
Disassembly.......................................................... 27
Operational Analysis.............................................. 14
Section 6 – Electrical Data................................................. 36
Electrical Formulas............................................................ 38
Page 1
Specifications – iX800
A
H
M Internal - Not Shown
Receptacles
A
2x5-15R
Circuit Breakers
M
Internal Overload Protection
Other Features
H
FlexPower
Recommended Oil
S A E 30
1 0 W-30
S y n t he ti c 5 W-3 0
Page 2
Product Series
iX800
A/C Rated Output Watts:
800
A/C Maximum Output Watts:
850
A/C Voltage
120
A/C Frequency
60
Rated 120 VAC Amperage
6.6
Max 120 VAC Amperage
7.0
Engine Displacement
38cc
Engine Type
4-stroke OHV
FlexPower
Yes
Low Oil Shutdown Method
Level
Fuel Tank Capacity (Gal)
0.5
Run Time at 50% (Hours)
3.6
Length (L)
18 inches
Width (W)
10 inches
Height (H)
15 inches
Unit Weight – Dry (lbs)
29
Spark Plug Type
NGK CR7HSA
Spark Plug Gap
0.030 inch
Oil Capacity
0.18 qt.
Specifications – iX1600
Product Series
iX1600
A/C Rated Output Watts
1600
A/C Maximum Output Watts
1650
A/C Voltage
120
A/C Frequency
60
Rated 120 VAC Amperage
13.3
Max 120 VAC Amperage
13.75
Engine Displacement
99cc
Engine Type
4-stroke OHV
FlexPower
Yes
Low Oil Shutdown Method
Level
Fuel Tank Capacity (Gal)
0.8
Run Time at 50% (Hours)
4.9
Length (L)
21 inches
Width (W)
11 inches
Height (H)
18 inches
Unit Weight – Dry (lbs)
43.5
Spark Plug Type
NGK BPR7HS
Spark Plug Gap
0.030 inch
Oil Capacity
0.63 qt.
B
A
H
M Internal - Not Shown
Receptacles
A
2x5-15R
B
1x12VDC
Circuit Breakers
M
AC Internal Overload Protection
DC 5 Amp Circuit Breaker
Other Features
H
FlexPower
Recommended Oil
SAE 30
10W- 30
S y nt het ic 5W- 30
Page 3
Specifications – iX2000
Product Series
iX2000
A/C Rated Output Watts:
2000
A/C Maximum Output Watts:
2200
A/C Voltage
120
A/C Frequency
60
Rated 120 VAC Amperage
16.6
Max 120 VAC Amperage
18.3
Engine Displacement
126cc
Engine Type
4-stroke OHV
FlexPower
Yes
Low Oil Shutdown Method
Level
Fuel Tank Capacity (Gal)
1.0
Run Time at 50% (Hours)
4.7
Length (L)
22 inches
Width (W)
12 inches
Height (H)
18 inches
Unit Weight – Dry (lbs)
50
Spark Plug Type
NGK BPR6ES
Spark Plug Gap
0.030 inch
Oil Capacity
0.63 qt.
B
A
H
M Internal - Not Shown
Receptacles
A
(2) 5-20R 120V
B
1x12VDC
Circuit Breakers
M
AC Internal Overload Protection
DC 5 Amp Circuit Breaker
Other Features
H
FlexPower
Recommended Oil
S A E 30
10W- 30
S y nt het ic 5W- 30
Page 4
NOTES
Page 5
Section 1
Generator Fundamentals
Magnetism
Magnetism can be used to produce electricity and electricity
can be used to produce magnetism.
Much about magnetism cannot be explained by our present
knowledge. However, there are certain patterns of behavior
that are known. Application of these behavior patterns has led
to the development of generators, motors and numerous other
devices that utilize magnetism to produce and use electrical
energy.
See Figure 1. The space surrounding a magnet is permeated
by magnetic lines of force called “flux”. These lines of force
are concentrated at the magnet's north and south poles. They
are directed away from the magnet at its north pole, travel in
a loop and re-enter the magnet at its south pole. The lines of
force form definite patterns which vary in intensity depending
on the strength of the magnet. The lines of force never cross
one another. The area surrounding a magnet in which its lines
of force are effective is called a “magnetic field”.
Like poles of a magnet repel each other, while unlike poles
attract each other.
Figure 2. The Right Hand Rule
Electromagnetic Induction
An electromotive force (EMF) or voltage can be produced in a
conductor by moving the conductor so that it cuts across the
lines of force of a magnetic field.
Similarly, if the magnetic lines of force are moved so that they
cut across a conductor, an EMF (voltage) will be produced in
the conductor. This is the basic principal of the revolving field
generator.
Figure 3, below, illustrates a simple revolving field generator.
The permanent magnet (Rotor) is rotated so that its lines of
magnetic force cut across a coil of wires called a Stator. A
voltage is then induced into the Stator windings. If the Stator
circuit is completed by connecting a load (such as a light bulb),
current will flow in the circuit and the bulb will light.
Figure 1. Magnetic Lines of Force
Electromagnetic Fields
All conductors through which an electric current is flowing
have a magnetic field surrounding them. This field is always at
right angles to the conductor. If a compass is placed near the
conductor, the compass needle will move to a right angle with
the conductor. The following rules apply:
• The greater the current flow through the conductor, the stronger the magnetic field around the conductor.
• The increase in the number of lines of force is directly
proportional to the increase in current flow and the field is
distributed along the full length of the conductor.
• The direction of the lines of force around a conductor can
be determined by what is called the “right hand rule”. To
apply this rule, place your right hand around the conductor
with the thumb pointing in the direction of current flow. The
fingers will then be pointing in the direction of the lines of
force.
NOTE: The “right hand rule” is based on the “current flow”
theory which assumes that current flows from positive to
negative. This is opposite the “electron” theory, which
states that current flows from negative to positive.
Page 6
Figure 3. A Simple Revolving Field Generator
Electrical Units
AMPERE
The rate of electron flow in a circuit is represented by the
AMPERE. The ampere is the number of electrons flowing past a
given point at a given time. One AMPERE is equal to just slightly
more than 6.25 x 1018 electrons per second.
Section 1
Generator Fundamentals
With alternating current (AC), the electrons flow first in one
direction, then reverse and move in the opposite direction. They
will repeat this cycle at regular intervals. A wave diagram, called
a “sine wave” shows that current goes from zero to maximum
positive value, then reverses and goes from zero to maximum
negative value. Two reversals of current flow is called a cycle.
The number of cycles per second is called frequency and is
usually stated in “Hertz”.
A definite and exact relationship exists between VOLTS, OHMS
and AMPERES. The value of one can be calculated when the
value of the other two are known. Ohm's Law states that in
any circuit the current will increase when voltage increases but
resistance remains the same, and current will decrease when
resistance Increases and voltage remains the same.
VOLT
AMPERES = The VOLT is the unit used to measure electrical PRESSURE,
or the difference in electrical potential that causes electrons to
flow. Very few electrons will flow when voltage is weak. More
electrons will flow as voltage becomes stronger. VOLTAGE may
be considered to be a state of unbalance and current flow as
an attempt to regain balance. One volt is the amount of EMF
that will cause a current of 1 ampere to flow through 1 ohm of
resistance.
Conductor of a
Circuit
OHM - Unit measuring resistance
or opposition to flow
-
+
AMPERE - Unit measuring rate of
current flow (number of electrons
past a given point)
VOLT - Unit measuring force or
difference in potential
causing current flow
If AMPERES is unknown while VOLTS and OHMS are known,
use the following formula:
VOLTS
OHMS
If VOLTS is unknown while AMPERES and OHMS are known,
use the following formula:
VOLTS = AMPERES x OHMS
If OHMS is unknown but VOLTS and AMPERES are known, use
the following:
=
OHMS
VOLTS
AMPERES
A Simple AC Generator
Figure 6 shows a very simple AC Generator. The generator
consists of a rotating magnetic field called a ROTOR and
a stationary coil of wire called a STATOR. The ROTOR is a
permanent magnet which consists of a SOUTH magnetic pole
and a NORTH magnetic pole.
Figure 4. Electrical Units
OHM
The OHM is the unit of RESISTANCE. In every circuit there
is a natural resistance or opposition to the flow of electrons.
When an EMF is applied to a complete circuit, the electrons
are forced to flow in a single direction rather than their free
or orbiting pattern. The resistance of a conductor depends on
(a) its physical makeup, (b) its cross-sectional area, (c) its
length, and (d) its temperature. As the conductor's temperature
increases, its resistance increases in direct proportion. One (1)
ohm of resistance will permit one (1) ampere of current to flow
when one (1) volt of electromotive force (EMF) is applied.
STATOR
ROTOR
MAGNETIC FIELD
Ohm's Law
VOLTS
(E)
AMPS
(I)
OHMS
(R)
Figure 5. Ohm's Law
Figure 6. A Simple AC Generator
As the MOTOR turns, its magnetic field cuts across the
stationary STATOR. A voltage is induced into the STATOR
windings. When the magnet's NORTH pole passes the STATOR,
current flows in one direction. Current flows in the opposite
direction when the magnet's SOUTH pole passes the STATOR.
This constant reversal of current flow results in an alternating
current (AC) waveform that can be diagrammed as shown in
Figure 7.
The ROTOR may be a 2-pole type having a single NORTH and
a single SOUTH magnetic pole. The 2-pole ROTOR must be
turned at 3600 rpm to produce an AC frequency of 60 Hertz.
Page 7
Section 1
Generator Fundamentals
CURRENT
VOLTAGE
(+)
0
180
360
(-)
ONE CYCLE
Figure 7. Alternating Current Sine Wave
3. AC voltage is delivered to the Inverter Assembly from
the Stator which maintains voltage to the 120 VAC
receptacles.
4. AC voltage is delivered to the bridge rectifier from the
DC Charge Coil for the 12VDC outlet available for battery
charging (if equipped).
5. AC voltage is delivered to the Inverter Assembly from the
sub coil for inverter operation.
6. AC voltage is delivered to the LED module for ignition
spark to the magneto.
What is an “iX” Inverter Unit?
The iX portable is a computer controlled generator that uses
an inverter to create a superior sine wave and maintain a
steady frequency. These units are different from conventional
generators in that the performance of the engine and AC
generator are more accurately matched over a wide range of
power needs. The iX computer controlled generator provides
greater efficiency of both the engine and the generator while
maintaining electrical output within an acceptable voltage range.
The frequency is controlled by the inverter and is maintained at
a steady 60 Hz signal throughout the load range.
Computer controlled generator units have the ability to operate
the engine over a wide range of speeds while conventional
generators will deliver correct AC frequency and voltage only
at a fixed RPM.
Unlike conventional AC generators, the iX unit can match engine
speed to load requirements. This provides several advantages,
as follows.
• Smaller engines can be used to produce more power than
on a conventional generator, since they can be allowed to
run at a higher speed.
• When the load is reduced, the engine can run at slower than
the conventional speeds. This improves fuel economy and
reduces engine noise.
• The iX unit can be operated closer to its peak power point at
all times, because output voltage and current are a function
of engine speed. This allows for a much more compact
generator design.
Why Variable Speed Control?
Most electrical loads will operate satisfactorily only within a
relatively small voltage band. In order to provide useful voltage
at larger load currents, it is necessary to increase engine
speed.
In conventional AC generators, some form of voltage regulation
is needed to provide correct voltage in the full range of load
current. This is often accomplished by regulating excitation
current to the Rotor (field) which then regulates the strength
of the Rotor’s magnetic field. The voltage induced into the
Stator windings is proportional to the strength of the Rotor’s
magnetic field.
The iX inverter generators use a Rotor having a fixed, permanent
magnetic field. The strength of this magnetic field is fixed and
cannot be regulated.
The output voltage of an iX inverter will tend to droop with
increasing electrical loads. The inverter maintains a constant
AC output voltage by increasing engine and Rotor speed as the
load current increases to offset this inherent voltage droop.
LED
MODULE
IGNITION WINDING
BRIDGE
RECTIFIER
DC CHARGE WINDING
ENGINE
ROTOR
STATOR
MAIN WINDING
SUB COIL WINDING
INVERTOR
MODULE
iX Inverter System Overview
Figure 8 is a block diagram of the iX system. The major elements
of the system are represented in the diagram. Operation of the
system may be described briefly as follows:
1. The engine is directly coupled to a permanent magnet type
Rotor, so the Rotor runs at the same speed as the engine.
2. As the Rotor turns, its magnetic field cuts across the
Stator windings to induce a voltage into the Stator.
Page 8
STEPPER
MOTOR
Figure 8. Inverter Block Diagram
Section 2
Measuring Electricity
Meters
Devices used to measure electrical properties are called meters.
Meters are available that allow one to measure (a) AC voltage, (b)
DC voltage, (c) AC frequency, and (d) resistance in ohms. The
following apply:
• To measure AC voltage, use an AC voltmeter.
• To measure DC voltage, use a DC voltmeter.
• Use a frequency meter to measure AC frequency in “Hertz”
or “cycles per second”.
• Use an ohmmeter to read circuit resistance, in “Ohms”.
The VOM
1. Always read the generator's AC output voltage only at the
unit's rated operating speed and AC frequency.
2. The generator's Voltage Regulator can be adjusted for
correct output voltage only while the unit is operating at
its correct rated speed and frequency.
3. Only an AC voltmeter may be used to measure AC voltage.
DO NOT USE A DC VOLTMETER FOR THIS PURPOSE.
*DANGEROUS VOLTAGES. CONTACT WITH HIGH VOLTAGE
DANGER! GENERATORS PRODUCE HIGH AND
TERMINALS WILL RESULT IN DANGEROUS AND
POSSIBLY LETHAL ELECTRICAL SHOCK.
A meter that will permit both voltage and resistance to be read
is the “volt-ohm-milliammeter” or “VOM”.
Some VOMs are of the “analog” type (not shown). These meters
display the value being measured by physically deflecting a
needle across a graduated scale. The scale used must be
interpreted by the user.
“Digital” VOMs (Figure 9) are also available and are generally
very accurate. Digital meters display the measured values
directly by converting the values to numbers.
NOTE: Standard AC voltmeters react to the AVERAGE value
of alternating current. When working with AC, the effective
value is used. For that reason a different scale is used on
an AC voltmeter. The scale is marked with the effective or
“rms” value even though the meter actually reacts to the
average value. That is why the AC voltmeter will give an
incorrect reading if used to measure direct current (DC).
Measuring DC Voltage
A DC voltmeter or a VOM may be used to measure DC voltages.
Always observe the following rules:
1. Always observe correct DC polarity.
a. Some VOMs may be equipped with a polarity switch.
b. On meters that do not have a polarity switch, DC
polarity must be reversed by reversing the test leads.
2. Before reading a DC voltage, always set the meter to a
higher voltage scale than the anticipated reading. If in
doubt, start at the highest scale and adjust the scale
downward until correct readings are obtained.
3. The design of some meters is based on the “current flow”
theory while others are based on the “electron flow”
theory.
a. The “current flow” theory assumes that direct current
flows from the positive (+) to the negative (-).
b. The “electron flow” theory assumes that current
flows from negative (-) to positive (+).
NOTE: When testing generators, the “current flow” theory
is applied. That is, current is assumed to flow from positive
(+) to negative (-).
Measuring AC Frequency
VOM’s may also measure the frequency of an AC voltage (if
equipped). The iX Inverter will produce AC frequencies that are
exactly 60Hz. Since the inverter module controls the frequency,
their will not be any direct relation to the speed of the engine
and the output of the unit.
Measuring Current
Figure 9. Digital VOM
Clamp-on
Measuring AC Voltage
An accurate AC voltmeter or a VOM may be used to read the
generator's AC output voltage. The following apply:
To read the current flow, in AMPERES, a clamp-on ammeter
may be used. This type of meter indicates current flow through
a conductor by measuring the strength of the magnetic field
around that conductor. The meter consists essentially of
a current transformer with a split core and a rectifier type
instrument connected to the secondary. The primary of the
Page 9
Section 2
Measuring Electricity
current transformer is the conductor through which the current
to be measured flows. The split core allows the instrument to
be clamped around the conductor without disconnecting it.
In Figure 12 the control wire to a relay has been removed. The
meter is used to connect and supply voltage to the relay to
energize it and measure the amperes going to it.
Current flowing through a conductor may be measured safely
and easily. A line-splitter can be used to measure current in a
cord without separating the conductors.
1.00 A
BATTERY
-
+
RELAY
Figure 12. A VOM as an In-line meter
Measuring Resistance
Figure 10. Clamp-On Ammeter
The volt-ohm-milliammeter may be used to measure the
resistance in a circuit. Resistance values can be very valuable
when testing coils or windings, such as the Stator and Rotor
windings.
When testing Stator windings, keep in mind that the resistance
of these windings is very low. Some meters are not capable
of reading such a low resistance and will simply read
CONTINUITY.
Figure 11. A Line-Splitter
NOTE: If the physical size of the conductor or ammeter capacity does not permit all lines to be measured simultaneously,
measure current flow in each individual line. Then, add the
individual readings.
In-Line
Alternatively, to read the current flow in AMPERES, an in-line
ammeter may be used. Most Digital Volt Ohm Meters (VOM)
will have the capability to measure amperes.
This usually requires the positive meter test lead to be
connected to the correct amperes plug, and the meter to be
set to the amperes position. Once the meter is properly set
up to measure amperes the circuit being measured must be
physically broken. The meter will be in-line or in series with the
component being measured.
Page 10
If proper procedures are used, the following conditions can be
detected using a VOM:
• A “shor t-to-ground” condition in any Stator or Rotor
winding.
• Shorting together of any two parallel Stator windings.
• Shorting together of any two isolated Stator windings.
• An open condition in any Stator or Rotor winding.
Component testing may require a specific resistance value
or a test for INFINITY or CONTINUITY. Infinity is an OPEN
condition between two electrical points, which would read as
no resistance on a VOM. Continuity is a CLOSED condition
between two electrical points, which would be indicated as very
low resistance or “ZERO” on a VOM.
Section 3
Major Components
Introduction
The unit components and the major internal components of
the generator are discussed in this section. Unit identification
is broken down into two basic categories; items located that
are visual from the outside and items located on the electrical
control panel. The internal major components are grouped into
two separate categories; mechanical and engine related items
and electrical items.
20. Ground (Earth) Connection Lug: Grounding point for the
generator; consult state and local electrical codes before
use (floating ground).
21. 120 VAC Receptacles: Two (2) receptacles for connecting
accessories.
1
13
5
4
1. Carrying Handle: Lift the generator by this handle only.
2
4
3
UNIT Identification
2
5
2. Spark Plug Cover: Allows access to the engine spark plug.
3. Fuel System Primer: Used to prime the fuel system for
starting.
4. Fuel Cap Pressure Valve: Allows air to enter the fuel tank
to equalize pressure.
6
5. Fuel Tank Cap: Access to fuel tank for filling.
6. Control Panel: location of generator controls and output
receptacles.
7
6
7
7. Air Intake Slats: Allows for cooling air to enter the
housing.
8
8. Muffler: Lowers engine exhaust noise.
9. Choke: Cold engine starting aid
13
8
10. Left Side Service Cover: Allows access to air filter, fuel
filter and oil fill.
11. Vent Hoses: Allow venting of the carburetor.
12
12. Fuel Shutoff: Controls fuel supply to the carburetor.
11
13. Starter Rope: Pull rope for starting engine.
10
911
Control Panel
10
9
Figure 13. Unit Identification
14. Low Oil Level LED (yellow): Lights up when oil level is
below safe operating level and the engine shuts down.
15. Overload LED (red): Lights up if the generator experiences
a load greater than the rated output, low voltage, overheats
or the powered circuit experiences a short. TheiX1600
output is
iX2000
stopped even though the engine keeps running.
14
16. Ready LED (green): Indicates output from the generator
unless there is a low oil or overload condition. 15
17. 12 VDC Plug (if equipped): Connection for re-charging
16
12VDC automotive-style batteries while generator is in
operation.
iX1600
iX2000
iX800
14
iX800
16
15
16
15
16
15
14
14
17
17
18. FlexPower™ Switch: This switch slows the engine speed
when the load is reduced to save fuel and engine wear.
18
18
19. 12 VDC Circuit Breaker (if equipped): Overload protection
for the 12 VDC charging system.
19 20
19 20Figure
21
14.21Control Panel Identification
Page 11
Section 3
Major Components
Internal Major Engine Components
Engine
A 4 stroke engine attached to the rotor creates the mechanical
energy necessary to maintain current flow at the receptacles.
Ignition Coil
The ignition coil provides spark for the engine. Spark timing
is determined by LED module and the Trigger Assembly (Hall
Effect Sensor).
Ignition Shutoff Switch
The ignition shutoff switch is mechanically connected to the
fuel shutoff valve. The internal contacts of the ignition shutoff
switch are open when the fuel shutoff valve is in its ON position.
The contacts are closed when the fuel shutoff valve is in its OFF
position. When the contacts are closed it completes a path to
ground to the LED module that will inhibit spark and shutdown
the engine.
IGNITION SHUTOFF
SWITCH
IGNITION COIL
Figure 17.
Low Oil Level Switch
Figure 15. Ignition Coil
The low oil level switch is a float type switch located inside
the engine on the bottom of the crank case casting. When the
internal contact is closed it completes a path to ground to the
LED module that will inhibit spark and shutdown the engine.
Trigger Assembly (Hall Effect Sensor)
The trigger assembly is located directly underneath the stator.
The stator sends timing pulses to the trigger assembly,
depending on the position of the engine, to determine the
correct timing for spark. This voltage is delivered to the LED
module.
SWITCH OPEN
SWITCH CLOSED
Figure 18.
Carburetor
TRIGGER ASSEMBLY
Figure 16. The Trigger Assembly
Page 12
The carburetor provides a sufficient air/fuel mixture to the engine
to maintain the required speed. A stepper motor incorporated
in the carburetor allows the engine to run at variable speeds.
The speed of the engine is maintained by the inverter which
will increase or decrease speed to maintain the output current
necessary for loads.
Section 3
Major Components
Fuel Pump
The mechanical fuel pump is located on the exterior of the plastic
housing around the engine and is accessible by removing the
side panels. Changes in pressure from the crankcase actuates
a diaphragm inside the pump which then supplies fuel to the
carburetor.
STEPPER MOTOR
INVERTER
CARBURETOR
FUEL PUMP
Figure 19.
Stepper Motor
The Stepper Motor consists of a motor along with a gear and
cam arrangement which allows motor movement to change the
engine carburetor throttle setting. The Motor is controlled by
output signals from the inverter assembly, which calculates the
number of steps the stepper needs to take and generates the
required signals to the Motor. The inverter signals the Motor
to actuate in response to changes in AC output voltage. Thus,
in response to decreasing AC output voltages, the Motor will
increase the throttle setting and engine speed will increase.
Conversely, increasing AC output voltages will cause the Motor
to decrease throttle setting and engine speed will decrease.
Figure 20.
LED Module
The LED module receives inputs from the inverter assembly to
monitor an Overload condition. It also illuminates the Green
Ready light when unit is producing voltage and ready to accept
load. An AC voltage is delivered to the module from the stator
for firing of the ignition coil. The module determines when to
deliver spark to the ignition coil by receiving timing pulses from
the trigger assembly and fires the coil using the voltage from
the stator winding.
Recoil Assembly
The recoil assembly connected directly to the crank shaft of
the engine and allows the engine to spin over when pulled and
reach a speed that allows the engine to maintain that speed.
Internal Major Electrical
Components
Inverter Module
The inverter module receives voltage from two windings in
the stator and produces a sine wave where the voltage is
120 VAC and the frequency is 60 Hz. It is also responsible
for maintaining the correct engine speed needed to maintain
current flow to the connected loads.
Figure 21.
Page 13
Section 3
Major Components
Permanent Magnet Rotor
Operational Description
Sixteen permanent magnets have been affixed to the Rotor. The
Rotor and Hub are balanced at the factory as an assembly and
must be replaced as an assembly.
1. The iX inverter units are computer controlled generators
that use an inverter to create a superior sine wave and
maintain a steady frequency of 60 Hz. The PERMANENT
MAGNET ROTOR is directly coupled to the ENGINE and
rotates at the same speed as the engine.
Stator
The stator has 4 separate windings that provide AC voltage
to several different components. The DC Coil provides AC
voltage to the bridge rectifier where 12 VDC is provided for
charging. The Main Coil provides voltage to the inverter which
provides the 120 VAC to the receptacles. The Sub Coil provides
operating voltage to the Inverter for operation. Finally, the
Ignition winding provides AC voltage to the LED module which
triggers the ignition coil to fire at the correct position.
Operational Analysis
General
Figure 22, below is a block diagram of the iX inverter generator.
The diagram is intended only for the purpose of illustrating
generator operation. Refer to the actual wiring diagram for
wiring interconnections.
2. As the ROTOR turns, its magnetic field cuts across a
number of STATOR windings, to induce a voltage into
those windings as follows:
a. The MAIN COIL WINDING provides the AC voltage
necessary for the inverter to supply rated output voltage
to the receptacles.
b. The SUB COIL WINDING provides the AC voltage
needed to operate the Inverter.
c. The DC COIL WINDING provides the AC voltage
necessary to provide the DC Charging outlet with 12
VDC.
d. The IGNITION WINDING provides the voltage needed for
the LED module to fire the ignition coil.
3. While the unit is running it continues to monitor the current
on the receptacles and make the needed adjustments to
the engine speed by changing the output signals to the
STEPPER MOTOR to either increase or decrease engine
speed based on load demand.
TRIGGER
ASSEMBLY
LED
MODULE
OUTLET
IGNITION
COIL
MAGNETIC
FIELD
IGNITION WINDING
BRIDGE
RECTIFIER
DC CHARGE WINDING
ENGINE
ROTOR
STATOR
MAIN WINDING
SUB COIL WINDING
INVERTOR
MODULE
MAGNETIC
FIELD
STEPPER
MOTOR
Figure 22. iX Inverter Operating Diagram
Page 14
OUTLETS
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Problem 1 – No AC Output
IS THE OVERLOAD
LIGHT ON WHILE
ENGINE IS RUNNING?
IS THE GREEN STATUS
LIGHT ON WHILE
ENGINE IS RUNNING?
OFF
ON
REMOVE RECEPTACLE PANEL AND
VERIFY CONNECTIONS OF
RECEPTACLES AND WIRING
OFF
BAD
BAD
ON
GO TO
“PROBLEM 6”
IS THE LOAD
CONNECTED?
GOOD
TEST 1 –
CHECK
ENGINE RPM
REPAIR OR REPLACE
COMPONENT
GOOD
TEST 3 – TEST
MAIN COIL OF
STATOR
TEST 2 – TEST
SUBCOIL OF
STATOR
NO
YES
GOOD
REPLACE
INVERTER
MODULE
GOOD
BAD
REPLACE
INVERTER
MODULE
DISCONNECT THE LOAD,
THEN RESTART THE
ENGINE AND CHECK THE
AC OUTPUT AGAIN
BAD
CHECK HARNESS FOR
GOOD CONNECTIONS
GOOD
BAD
REPLACE
STATOR
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
Problem 2 – No DC Output
TEST 1 –
CHECK
ENGINE RPM
TEST 4 – CHECK
THE DC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
GOOD
REPLACE DC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
GO TO
“PROBLEM 6”
CHECK HARNESS FOR
GOOD CONNECTIONS
GOOD
TEST 5 – TEST
DC RECTIFIER
GOOD
BAD
BAD
BAD
REPLACE
STATOR
GOOD
GOOD
BAD
REPAIR OR
REPLACE WIRE
REPLACE DC
RECTIFIER
TEST 6 – TEST
DC COIL ON
STATOR
BAD
REPLACE
INVERTER
MODULE
Page 15
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Problem 3 – Overload Light is On
IS THE LOAD
CONNECTED?
YES
DISCONNECT THE LOAD, THEN RESTART THE
ENGINE AND CHECK THE AC OUTPUT AGAIN
NO
GO TO “PROBLEM 1, TEST 2”
Problem 4 – Engine Will Not Pull Start
TEST 7 –
TEST RECOIL
FUNCTION
BAD
REPLACE
GOOD
TEST 8 – TEST
ENGINE
FUNCTION
GOOD
VISUALLY INSPECT FOR OBSTRUCTIONS
THAT WOULD CAUSE BINDING OF THE
RECOIL ONCE INSTALLED
BAD
VISUALLY INSPECT EXTERNAL
COMPONENTS FOR A FAILURE
THAT WOULD CAUSE THE
ENGINE TO BE SIEZED
AN INTERNAL ENGINE FAILURE
HAS POSSIBLY OCCURRED
NOTHING
FOUND
BAD
REPLACE COMPONENT
Problem 5 – Flex Power Feature is Not Responding
TEST 21 – TEST
FLEX POWER
SWITCH
BAD
REPLACE
SWITCH
Page 16
GOOD
REPLACE
INVERTER
MODULE
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Problem 6 – Engine Will Not Start
CHECK FUEL
QUALITY AND
SUPPLY
GOOD
CHECK FUEL
SHUTOFF
VALVE
BAD
TEST 17 –
CHECK CHOKE
ASSEMBLY
GOOD
OFF
GOOD
TEST 9 –
CHECK
SPARK
GOOD
BAD
BAD
REPLENISH FUEL
SUPPLY
TURN ON
TEST 15 –
TEST
IGNITION
COIL
GOOD
TEST 14 – TEST
TRIGGER
ASSEMBLY
GOOD
BAD
BAD
GOOD
REPLACE CHOKE
TEST 16 – TEST
FUEL SHUTOFF
SWITCH
OFF
IS “LOW OIL”
LIGHT ON?
BAD
ON
REPLACE
REPLACE
IGNITION COIL
GO TO “PROBLEM 8”
GOOD
CHECK OIL
LEVEL
BAD
TEST 20 –
TEST
IGNITION
WINDING
GOOD
BAD
REPLENISH OIL
REPLACE LED MODULE
REPLACE STATOR
REPAIR OR REPLACE
TEST 10 –
CHECK
SPARK PLUG
BAD
GOOD
TEST 13 – CHECK
ENGINE
COMPRESSION
BAD
GOOD
GOOD
REPLACE
ENGINE
TEST 12 –
CHECK
CARBURETOR
GOOD
TEST 11 –
CHECK FUEL
PUMP
BAD
BAD
REPLACE
CARBURETOR
REPLACE FUEL
PUMP
CONTACT TECHNICAL
SERVICE
Page 17
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Problem 7 – Engine Hunts / Erratic Idle or Will Not Come Up to Speed
IS THE UNIT
PRODUCING
AC POWER?
IS THE ENGINE
RUNNING
ERRATICALLY?
YES
TEST 17 –
CHECK CHOKE
ASSEMBLY
YES
NO
NO
GO TO “PROBLEM 1”
REPLACE
INVERTER
MODULE
GOOD
TEST 18 – TEST
STEPPER
MOTOR
TEST 11 –
CHECK FUEL
PUMP
GOOD
BAD
BAD
REPLACE CHOKE
ASSEMBLY
REPLACE FUEL
PUMP
TEST 12 –
CHECK
CARBURETOR
TEST 9 –
CHECK
SPARK
GOOD
BAD
BAD
BAD – ENGINE MISS
APPARENT
REPLACE
STEPPER
MOTOR
REPLACE
CARBURETOR
TEST 14 – TEST
TRIGGER
ASSEMBLY
BAD
REPLACE
GOOD
REPLACE
LED
MODULE
GOOD
TEST 15 – TEST
IGNITION COIL
BAD
Problem 8 – Unit Shuts Down for Low Oil
CHECK OIL
LEVEL
BAD
REPLENISH OIL
Page 18
GOOD
TEST 20 – TEST
OIL LEVEL
SWITCH
BAD
REPLACE
ENGINE
GOOD
REPLACE
LED
MODULE
REPLACE
IGNITION
COIL
GOOD
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Test 1 – Check Engine RPM
Tools Required
Small Engine Tachometer
Procedure
1. With the engine running connect the engine tachometer
according to the manufactures instructions and record the
engine RPM.
Results
1. If the engine rpm was 3000 ±200 rpm it is running within
rated specs, refer back to flow chart.
2. If the engine rpm was outside the range of 3000 ±200
rpm, go to Problem 7.
Test 2 – Test Sub Coil of Stator
1 – GRAY
2 – EMPTY
3 – ORANGE
4 – GRAY
5 – ORANGE
6 – ORANGE
2
3
4
5
6
Figure 24. C4 Connector Pin Locations, Male Side
5. Set VOM to measure resistance.
6. Disconnect the C4 connector. On the female side of
the connector connect one meter test lead to Pin 1 and
connect the other meter test lead to Pin 4. Measure and
record the resistance.
Results
Procedure
1. Stop the engine.
1. The resistance measured between Pin 1 and Pin 4 should
be as follows:
2. Drain the fuel from the tank.

1
asoline is highly flammable and explosive. You can
G
be burned or seriously injured when handling fuel.
Keep heat, sparks, and flame away. Wipe up spills
immediately. Be careful not to touch the muffler while
it is HOT.
3. Remove the electrical box assembly and back window
and upper enclosure half.
4. Take out the C4 connector.
Note: Do not remove the harness of the control panel.
C4 CONNECTOR
iX 800
0.5 Ohms
iX 1600
0.7 Ohms
iX 2000
0.3 Ohms
2. If the resistance measured is between the specified
values, refer back to flow chart.
3. If the resistance reading is outside the tolerance, replace
stator.
Test 3 – Test Main Coil of Stator
Procedure
1. Stop the engine.
2. Drain the fuel from the tank.
 be burned or seriously injured when handling fuel.
Gasoline is highly flammable and explosive. You can
Keep heat, sparks, and flame away. Wipe up spills
immediately. Be careful not to touch the muffler while
it is HOT.
3. Remove the electrical box assembly and back window
and upper enclosure half.
4. Take out the 6 pin connector
Figure 23. C4 Connector Pin Locations, Male Side
Note: Do not remove the harness of the control panel.
5. Set VOM to measure resistance.
Page 19
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
6. Disconnect the C4 connector. On the female side of
the connector connect one meter test lead to Pin 3 and
connect the other meter test lead Pin 5, measure and
record the resistance.
7. Repeat Step 6 between the following test points:
• Pin 3 and Pin 6
• Pin 6 and Pin 5
Results
1. The resistance measured between the all tests points
should be as follows:
iX 800
2.1 Ohms ± 0.3 Ohms
iX 1600
TBA ± 0.3 Ohms
iX 2000
2.5 Ohms ± 0.3 Ohms
2. If the resistance measured is within the specified values,
refer back to flow chart.
Results
1. If CONTINUITY is measured across the circuit breaker,
refer back to flow chart.
2. If the circuit breaker reads open, replace the DC circuit
breaker and re-test.
Test 5 – Test DC Rectifier
Procedure
1. With the electrical panel still exposed remove the wires on
the DC rectifier and mark the location of each wire on the
rectifier.
2. Set VOM to the Diode test feature (marked on most meters
by the diode symbol
).
3. Connect the meter test leads according to the chart below
and record the results.
3. If the resistance reading is outside the tolerance, replace
the stator.
1
2
3
4
Test 4 – Test DC Circuit Breaker
Procedure
1. Remove the electrical panel so that the DC circuit breaker
is exposed and remove both wires from the breaker.
Ensure that the breaker is reset from the front of the panel
and is not tripped.
(+) Test Lead
(-) Test Lead
1
1
2
3
4
INFINITY
INFINITY
INFINITY
INFINITY
INFINITY
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
2
CONTINUITY
3. Connect one meter test lead to one side of the breaker
and the other meter test lead to the other side of the
breaker and measure resistance. CONTINUITY should be
measured.
3
CONTINUITY
INFINITY
4
CONTINUITY
CONTINUITY
INFINITY
CONTINUITY
Results
1. If the meter indicated the correct readings at all test points
refer back to flow chart.
DC BREAKER
2. If the meter indicated any reading other than what was
specified, replace the rectifier.
Test 6 – Test DC Coil on Stator
Procedure
DC BRIDGE RECTIFIER
1. Locate the two white wires coming from the stator. One
of them will be located on the DC circuit breaker and the
other one will be located on the rectifier.
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
Figure 25. DC Breaker and DC Bridge Rectifier
Page 20
3. Connect one meter lead to one wire and the other meter
lead to the other wire. Measure and record the resistance.
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Results
2. Attach the high tension lead to the spark tester terminal.
1. The resistance measured between the all tests points
should be as follows:
3. Ground the spark tester clamp by attaching it to the
cylinder head (see Figure 26).
iX 1600
0.2 Ohms
iX 2000
0.3 Ohms
2. If the resistance measured is within the specified values,
refer back to flow chart.
3. If the resistance reading is outside the tolerance, replace
the stator.
4. Attempt to pull start the engine. If spark jumps the tester
gap, the ignition system is working properly.
Note: The fuel shutoff switch should be in the closed position
Note: It may take several start attempts before a good
spark is noticed in the tester
Test 7 – Test Recoil Function
Procedure
1. Attempt to pull start the engine and make the following
observations while doing so.
• Does the cord pull easily and smoothly?
• Does the cord return with no assistance?
• Does the engine turn over as the cord is pulled?
Results
If the recoil did not perform as the observations are stated
above, possible problems that could be present are:
• The engine could be seized.
• The recoil could have become detached from the flywheel.
• The recoil mechanism could be broken and not retracting
properly.
Test 8 – Test Engine Function
Figure 26.
Results
1. Refer back to flow chart
Test 10 – Check Spark Plug
Procedure
PROCEDURE
1. Remove the recoil and front cover assembly.
Remove spark plug. Clean with a commercial solvent. DO
NOT BLAST CLEAN SPARK PLUG. Replace spark plug if badly
fouled, if ceramic is cracked, or if badly worn or damaged.
Refer to specifications in the front of this manual for proper
replacement spark plugs and spark plug gaps.
2. Remove the spark plug from the unit.
3. Attempt to turn the engine over by hand.
Results
1. If the engine can not turn over freely with the spark plug
removed, the engine has suffered some type of internal
failure that has seized it and is inhibiting it from running.
2. Refer back to flow chart.
Test 9 – Check Spark
PROCEDURE
A commercially available spark tester may be used to test the
engine ignition system.
Figure 27. Setting Spark Plug Gap
1. Disconnect the spark plug lead from the spark plug.
Page 21
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
NORMAL
MISFIRES
CARBURETOR
FUEL PUMP
PRE-IGNITION
DETONATION
Figure 28. Spark Plug Conditions
RESULTS
1. Clean and regap or replace sparks plug as necessary.
2. Refer back to the Flow Chart.
Test 11 – Check Fuel Pump
Procedure
1. Open up the side panel that exposes the carburetor and
fuel pump.
2. Carefully remove the fuel line from the filter on the inlet
side of the carburetor.
 be burned or seriously injured when handling fuel.
Gasoline is highly flammable and explosive. You can
Keep heat, sparks, and flame away. Wipe up spills
immediately.
3. Using a suitable container to catch fuel, slowly pull on
the recoil cord and turn the engine over. Fuel should flow
from the fuel line. If fuel does not flow, verify that fuel
is available to the pump. If fuel is available to the pump
inspect the fuel filter and pulse line.
RESULTS
1. If fuel does not flow, replace the fuel pump.
2. If fuel flow has been verified proceed to Test 12.
Page 22
Figure 29.
Test 12 – Check Carburetion
Before checking the carburetor, be sure the fuel tank has an
ample supply of fresh, clean gasoline. Check that all shutoff
valves are open and fuel flows freely through the fuel line. Make
sure the choke operates properly. If the engine will not start,
remove and inspect the spark plug.
If the spark plug is wet, look for the following:
• Over choking.
• Excessively rich fuel mixture.
• Water in fuel.
• Intake valve stuck open.
• Needle/float stuck open.
If the spark plug is dry look for the following:
• Leaking carburetor mounting gaskets.
• Intake valve stuck closed.
• Inoperative fuel pump.
• Plugged fuel filter(s).
• Varnished carburetor
• Check that the choke is working properly.
1. Remove the fuel line at the carburetor and ensure
that there is an adequate amount of fuel entering the
carburetor.
2. Remove the float bowl and check to see if there is any
foreign matter in the bottom of the bowl.
3. Remove the plastic float to gain access to the needle.
4. Remove the needle so it can be cleaned.
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
5. Use a suitable carburetor cleaner to clean the carburetor
before reassembly.
6. After cleaning the carburetor, blow dry with compressed
air and reassemble.
Note: The shelf life of gasoline is about 30 days. Proper
procedures need to be taken so that the fuel doesn’t varnish over time. A fuel stabilizer should be used at all times
in order to ensure that the fuel stays fresh.
RESULTS
1. If carburetor is varnished, clean or replace. Refer to back
to Flow Chart.
Test 14 – Test Ignition Trigger
Assembly
Procedure
1. Remove the electrical panel so that the LED module is
exposed and disconnect the J1 connector.
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
3. Locate Pin 3 on the J1 connector. Connect one meter
test lead to Pin 3 and the other meter test lead to engine
ground. Measure and record the resistance.
Test 13 – Check Engine Compression
Discussion
Most engine problems may be classified as one or a combination
of the following:
• Will not start.
• Starts hard.
• Lack of power.
• Runs rough.
• Vibration.
• Overheating.
• High oil consumption.
Figure 30. J1 Connector on LED Module
Check Compression
To check engine compression, remove the spark plug. Insert an
automotive type compression gauge into the spark plug hole.
Crank the engine until there is no further increase in pressure.
The highest reading obtained is the engine compression
pressure.
Minimum allowable compression
pressure cold engine
60 psi
If compression is poor, look for one or more of the following
causes:
• Loose cylinder head bolts.
• Failed cylinder head gasket.
• Burned valves or valve seats.
• Insufficient valve clearance.
• Warped cylinder head.
• Warped valve stem.
• Worn or broken piston ring(s).
• Worn or damaged cylinder bore.
• Broken connecting rod.
• Worn valve seats or valves.
• Worn valve guides.
Table 1. J1 Connector Pin Chart
Location
Function
Pin 1
Ignition Coil
Wire Color
Blue
Pin 2
Low Oil Switch
Yellow
Pin 3
Trigger Assembly
White
Pin 4
Ground
Pink
Pin 5
Ignition Winding
Red
Pin 6
Fuel Shutoff Switch
Gray
Pin 7
Inverter
Purple
Pin 8
Inverter
Yellow
Pin 9
Inverter
White
Pin 10
Inverter
Green
Results
1. If the meter reading is within ± 5 ohms of the correct
resistance, refer back to flow chart.
iX 800
30 Ohms
iX 1600
30 Ohms
iX 2000
129 Ohms
2. If the meter did not indicate the correct resistance, replace
trigger assembly.
Page 23
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
Test 15 – Test Ignition Coil
Procedure
1. Open up the electrical panel so that the control panel
wiring is exposed.
2. Disconnect the J1 connector and disconnect the ignition
coil boot from the spark plug.
3. Set VOM to measure resistance.
4. Connect one meter test lead to ground and connect
the other meter test lead to Pin 1 on the J1 connector.
Measure and record the resistance.
Figure 32.
Figure 31.
5. Connect one meter test lead to the spark plug wire and
connect the other meter test lead to engine ground.
Measure and record the resistance.
Results
1. Refer to the following chart. If the correct values were
measured in Steps 4 and 5, refer back to flow chart.
Pin 1 to Ground
1.7 Ohms ± 0.5 Ohms
Spark Plug to Ground
12.5K Ohms ± 2K Ohms
Test 16 – Test Fuel Shutoff Switch
Procedure
1. Open up the electrical panel so that the control panel
wiring is exposed.
2. Set fuel shutoff valve to the CLOSED position.
3. Disconnect the J1 connector from the LED module.
4. Set VOM to measure resistance.
5. Connect one-meter test lead to J1 Pin 6 and the other test
lead to ground. Measure and record the resistance.
6. Set fuel shutoff valve to the OPEN position
2. If the incorrect values were measured in Steps 4 and 5,
inspect ignition coil connector for bad connection. If the
connection is verified good, replace ignition coil.
3. If the incorrect value was measured in Step 5 then inspect
the ground connection on Pin 2 of the C2 connector going
to the ignition coil.
7. Repeat Step 5.
Fuel Shutoff Valve Position
Fuel Shutoff Switch Reading
CLOSED
OPEN (INFINITY)
OPEN
CLOSED (CONTINUITY)
Results
1. If INFINITY was measured when the shutoff valve was
CLOSED, and CONTINUITY was indicated when the valve
was OPEN, refer back to flow chart.
2. If CONTINUITY to ground was not measured when the
valve was in the OPEN position, verify the mechanical
Page 24
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
connection between the valve and the switch.
mechanical connection is good, replace switch.
If
3. If the meter read CONTINUITY when the shutoff valve was
in either the open or closed position, verify mechanical
connection between the valve and the switch. If
mechanical connection is good replace shutoff switch.
Note: A fuel shutoff switch that does not read INFINITY
when the fuel shutoff valve is in the closed position will
cause a no spark condition.
Test 17 – Check Choke Assembly
Procedure
1. If the generator is surging it may have a carburetion
problem. A lean condition can cause erratic RPM. Slowly
slide the choke to see if surging stops. If it does stop,
carburetion should be checked.
2. Verify the mechanical connection to the carburetor and
that the choke is functioning properly.
Results
1. If the choke is functioning correctly, refer back to flow
chart.
2. If the choke is not functioning correctly, replace the choke
assembly.
d. Pin 2 and Pin 3 – approximately 50 ohms should be
measured.
e. Pin 2 and Pin 4 – INFINITY should be measured.
f. Pin 3 and Pin 4 – INFINITY should be measured.
Results
1. If the values in steps 3a through 3f are good, refer back to
flow chart.
2. If any one of the values in steps 3a through 3f tested bad,
replace stepper motor.
iX1600, iX2000 Procedure
1. Disconnect the C3 connector (Stepper motor) from the
Inverter module.
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
3. Connect a VOM test leads across the following test points
a. Pin 1 to Pin
measured.
b. Pin 2 to Pin
measured.
c. Pin 3 to Pin
measured.
d. Pin 4 to Pin
measured.
1
Test 18 – Test Stepper Motor
iX800 Procedure
5 – approximately 195 ohms should be
5 – approximately 195 ohms should be
5 – approximately 195 ohms should be
2
3
1 – RED
2 – ORANGE
3 – WHITE
1. Disconnect the J2 connector (Stepper Motor) from the
Inverter module.
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
5 – approximately 195 ohms should be
4
5
4 – YELLOW
5 – BLUE
Figure 34. C3 Connector Female Side, iX1600, iX2000
Results
1 – PINK
2 – YELLOW
3 – BLUE
4 – ORANGE
1
2
3
4
Figure 33. C3 Connector Female Side, iX800
3. Connect VOM test leads across the following test points:
a. Pin 1 and Pin 4 – approximately 50 ohms should be
measured.
b. Pin 1 and Pin 3 – INFINITY should be measured.
c. Pin 1 and Pin 2 – INFINITY should be measured.
1. If the values in steps 3a through 3d are good, refer back
to flow chart.
2. If any one of the values in steps 3a through 3d tested bad,
replace stepper motor.
Test 19 – Test Oil Level Switch
Procedure
1. Verify that the engine is filled with the appropriate amount
of oil.
2. Locate the low oil shutdown wire on the engine and isolate
it from the rest of the harness.
3. Set VOM to measure resistance.
Page 25
Section 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Tests
4. Connect one meter lead to the wire that runs through the
plastic engine housing to the oil level switch and the other
test lead to engine frame ground. Measure and record the
resistance.
Results
1. Refer to the following chart. If the meter reading is within
± 0.2 ohms, refer back to flow chart.
Results
iX 800
0.8 Ohms
iX 1600
0.5 Ohms
1. If oil level was good and the meter indicated an open
circuit, check for a short to ground on the wire between
the low oil level switch and the LED module.
iX 2000
0.7 Ohms
2. If oil level was good and the meter indicated a closed
circuit to ground, replace the engine.
Test 21 – Test FlexPower Switch
Procedure
Test 20 – Test Ignition Coil Winding
Procedure
1. Remove the electrical panel so the components are
exposed.
2. Disconnect the J1 Connector.
3. Set VOM to measure resistance.
4. Connect one meter lead to Pin 5 of the J1 connector and
the other meter test lead to ground. Measure and record
the resistance. Refer to Table 1 on Page 23.
1. Disconnect the orange and brown wires from the
FlexPower switch (FPS).
2. Set VOM to measure resistance.
3. Set FPS to “ECO” position.
4. Connect one meter test lead to Pin 1 and the other meter
test lead to Pin 2. Measure resistance and record results.
5. Set FPS to “HIGH” position.
6. Repeat Step 4. Measure resistance and record results.
3
1
2
1 – ORANGE
2 – BROWN
3 – EMPTY
Figure 36. FlexPower Switch Test Points
Test Points
Pin 1 to Pin 2
Figure 35. J1 Connector on LED Module
ECO
HIGH
INFINITY
CONTINUITY
Results
1. If INFINITY was measured in Step 4 and CONTINUITY in
Step 5, replace inverter module.
2. If either CONTINUITY was measured in Step 4 or INFINITY
in Step 5, replace FPS switch.
Page 26
Section 5
Disassembly
Discussion
During the process of tearing the unit apart it is critical to make
special notes as to the way the different parts are located
inside. There is no room for error when putting the unit
back together. When re-assembling the unit, it is good to be
proactive and always thinking about the next step to eliminate
back tracking. It is also a good idea to continually re-check
what parts are left for reassembly to ensure that no parts are
forgotten during the process.
Disassembly
Muffler Removal
1. Drain all fuel and oil from unit.
2. Remove four (4) Phillips screws located on the black
exhaust cover.
Figure 38.
3. Remove the rubber muffler gasket and note orientation of
the seal before removing.
5. Remove the retaining clip underneath the fuel fill cap
cover.
Enclosure Removal
4. Remove one (1) flat head screw holding the service
access panel.
Figure 39.
6. Remove four (4) Phillips screws holding the control panel
to the housing.
Figure 37.
The following items are able to be serviced and replaced at
this point:
• Fuel Pump
• Stepper Motor
• Carburetor
• Air Filter
Figure 40.
Page 27
Section 5
Disassembly
7. Disconnect the connectors and ground wires and remove
control panel.
8. Remove one (1) Phillips screw to remove the fuel shutoff
knob.
9. Remove one (1) Phillips screw from recoil access area.
10. Remove three (3) Phillips screws located on the handle.
(two on iX 800)
11. Carefully orient the assembly so that the side with the
access cover is facing down. See Figure 38.
12. Remove two (2) Phillips bolts on the underside of the
plastic housing.
13. The side with the spark plug access should be facing up
at this point, remove this half of the enclosure.
• Lower and Upper Enclosures
• Ignition Coil
• Recoil Assembly
Engine Housing Removal
19. Remove one (1) Phillips screw from the fuel pump
housing.
20. Remove two (2) 8 mm nuts from the carburetor plastic
intake assembly and remove the fuel pump and the
carburetor as one assembly and isolate the fuel hose from
the fuel shutoff valve.
Note: Keep the two spacers with the housing once it has
been removed.
21. Remove ten (10) Phillips screws around the top and
bottom seams of the housing. There are two different
sizes of screws. Make note of which one is which for
reassembly.
22. Isolate the wiring harness from the housing and remove
the low oil plug and pull the wire through for removal.
23. Separate the two housings to expose the engine.
Figure 41.
14. Disconnect the fuel tank by removing the hose clamp and
removing the hose from fuel shutoff valve.
15. Remove one (1) Phillips screw from the fuel shutoff valve
so it is isolated from the enclosure.
Note: Make note of the orientation of the fuel shutoff valve
for re-assembly.
16. On the iX 1400, iX 1600 and iX 2000 disconnect
connectors and remove inver ter. On the iX 800 the
inverter is connected to the fuel shutoff switch and can
not be removed.
17. Feed the recoil cord through the lower enclosure piece.
18. The engine assembly should be able to be lifted out of the
unit and set aside.
Time to reach this point: 15 minutes
The following items are able to be serviced and replaced at
this point
• Inverter Assembly
• Fuel Shutoff Valve
• Fuel Shutoff Switch
Page 28
Figure 42.
Time to reach this point: 25 minutes
The following items are able to be serviced at this point
• Engine
• Rotor
• Stator
• Low Oil Switch
• Fan
• Trigger Assembly
The following items are able to be replaced at this point
• Low Oil Switch
• Trigger Assembly
Section 5
Disassembly
Rotor/Stator Removal
24. Remove the 8mm bolt in the center of the recoil jaw.
Figure 45.
Figure 43.
25. Remove two 8mm bolts from the starting jaw seat.
26. Remove the fan.
27. Remove the 15mm nut in the center of the rotor by
inserting the socket wrench first and install a steering
wheel puller over the socket wrench as shown in Figure
41. Use an adjustable wrench to counter the torque from
the socket to break the nut free.
29. Remove two (2) 8mm bolts holding stator to engine
casting.
30. Remove stator.
• Time to reach this point: 45 minutes
• The following items are able to be replaced at this point
• Engine
• Stator
• Rotor
Reassembly Notes
• The above procedure should be reversed to re-assemble unit
• Order of reassembly
1. Engine
2. Stator
3. Rotor
4. Engine Housing
5. Fuel Pump
6. Carburetor
7. Place Engine Housing in lower Enclosure
Note: Be sure to locate all harnesses and fuel lines to
ensure they will not be obstructed during the reassembly
process. The stepper motor harness must be able to reach
the inverter
8. Fuel Shutoff Switch
Note: Test Fuel Switch for correct orientation before putting
the two halves together.
9. Fuel Tank
Figure 44.
28. With the nut removed install the steering puller with the
center bolt tight against the center shaft and remove the
rotor assembly
10. Inverter
11. Upper Enclosure
12. Retaining Clip below fuel cap
13. Receptacle panel
Page 29
Section 5
Disassembly
Exploded View – iX800
Page 30
Section 5
Disassembly
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
1
1
ENGINE ASSY.
39
2
DAMPING RING, POTHOOK
80
3
SCREW, M4X12
2
1
SUPERCHARGED CAP ASSY,
FUEL TANK
40
2
STUD BOLT
81
1
CASING, ENGINE UPPER
41
1
GASKET, POTHOOK
82
4
42
1
POTHOOK
SCREW, TAPPING, CROSS,
RECSD, P/HEAD(ST4.2X13)
43
2
PIN, HOLLOW FIXED POSITION
83
1
PUMP ASSY. FUEL
84
1
GASPIPE, FUEL PUMP
85
1
OUTLET PIPE, FUEL PUMP
86
1
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST4.8X19
87
1
SHELL, LOWER
3
1
FUEL FILLER INLET RUBBER RING
4
8
CLAMP, FUEL HOSE
5
1
CUP, FUEL FILTER
6
1
TANK, FUEL
7
4
SHOCK ABSORBER BLOCK
8
2
SCREW, CROSS RECESSED PAN
HEAD, M6X120
9
1
COVER, UPPER SHELL
10
1
SHELL, UPPER
11
2
SCREW, CROSS RECESSED PAN
HEAD, M6X14
12
8
LOCK SLICE/SCREW CLIP
13
2
ALIGNMENT PIN
14
4
FEET, VIBRATION MOUNTS
15
4
BOLT, HEX, FLANGE FACE (M6X12)
16
1
LOWER CASING, ENGINE
17
2
BOLT, HEX, FLANGE FACE (M5X16)
18
4
WASHER
19
4
SLEEVE, DAMPING/VIBRATION
MOUNTS
20
1
44
1
BLOCK, CARBURETOR CUSHION
45
2
SEAL GASKET, CARBURETOR (IN)
46
1
CARBURETOR REGULATING
ASSY.
47
1
SEAL GASKET, CARBURETOR (IN)
88
1
SWITCH, IGNITION ON/OFF
48
1
FILTER ADAPTER BOX
(BREATHER)
89
1
COVER, SWITCH
90
2
SCREW, TAP/CRS/
RECSD(ST4.8X19)
49
1
TUBE, BREATHER
50
2
CIRCLIP, ADAPTER
91
1
SWITCH/VALVE. FUEL
51
1
SLEEVE, FILTER ADAPTER
92
1
PIPE, OUTLET
52
2
ALIGNMENT PIN, ADAPTER BOX
93
1
PIPE, INLET, FUEL PUMP
53
3
NUT, HEX FLANGE FACE
94
1
SCREW, TAP,CRS,RECD(ST6.3X16)
54
1
STARTER ASSY.
95
1
KNOB, ON/OFF FUEL SWITCH
55
3
SAFEGUARD TUBE
96
1
CONNECTION-PEG, GROUNDED
56
3
REC. PAN HEAD SCREW/WASHER
ASSY.(M5X12)
97
1
COVER, LOWER SHELL
98
1
SEAL, LOWER SHELL COVER
57
1
HANDLE PANEL
99
1
SCREW(M6X14)
58
1
RECESSED HEAD BOLT &
WASHER ASSY.
100
6
SCREW, TAP/CRS/REC/(ST4.2X16)
1
WASHER, FLAT
KEY, WOODRUFF--3X5X13
21
1
STATOR ASSY.
59
1ea
HANDLE, RECOIL ASSY
101
22
2
BOLT, HEX, FLANGE FACE (M5X25)
59a
1ea
STARTER HANDLE HOOD
102
1
SHIM, MUFFLER
CORD, RECOIL ASSY
103
1
MUFFLER ASSY.
2
BOLT, HEX, FLANGE FACE(M6X50)
23
1
FLYWHEEL ROTOR ASSY.
24
1
NUT, HEX FLANGE
FACE(M10x1.25-8)
25
1
FAN
26
1
SEAT, STARTING JAW
27
2
BOLT, HEX , FLANGE FACE(M6X14)
28
1
JAW, STARTING
29
1
WASHER (6)
30
1
BOLT, HEX, FLANGE FACE(M6X18)
31
1
32
2
60
1
61
1
INVERTER
104
66
1
FRAME, FRONT PANEL
105
3
WASHER, FLAT
PANEL, IC
106
1
BOLT, HEX (M5X70)
1
GASKET, RUBBER, BACK WINDOW
67
1
68
1
ADAPTER SLEEVE, RESPIRATOR
107
69
1
IGNITER (WITH INDICATOR)
108
1
WINDOW, BACK
BACKOIL ASSY. RESPIRATOR
109
4
SCREW, PH RECESSED M5X20
1
SEAL COVER, OIL SENSOR
70
1
71
4
SCREW, CROSS RECESSED PAN
HEAD (M5X12)
110
111
3
GASKET, SHAFT
COWLING & INLET COVER ASSY.
72
7
WASHER, FLAT(5)
112
1
O-RING
SCREW, CROSS RECESSED PAN
HEAD TAPPING
73
1
SWITCH, FLEXPOWER
113
1
DIPSTICK/COVER, OIL
74
1
IC SCREEN
114
2
NUT, HEXAGONAL
75
2
NUT, I TYPE HEX.(M4)
115
1
76
8
WASHER, FLAT, M4
SPRING WASHER, STANDARD
TYPE
77
8
WASHER, LOCK, M4
116
1
PANEL ASSY., CONTROL
78
6
SCREW, CROSSED RECESSED
PAN HEAD
79
1
OUTLET ASSY 120V
33
1
COIL, IGNITION
34
1
SLEEVE, RUBBER (HIGH VOLTAGE)
35
2
SPONGE, AIR FILTER
36
1
COVER, AIR FILTER
37
1
ALIGNMENT PIN
38
2
WASHER
Page 31
Section 5
Disassembly
Exploded View – iX1600
Page 32
Section 5
Disassembly
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
1
1
ENGINE
38
1
GASKET, CARBURETOR (B) OUT
74
1
FILTER, FUEL
2
1
CAP ASSY., FUEL TANK
39
1
75
1
PIPE, FUEL PUMP OUTLET
3
1
COVER, FUEL FILLER PORT
BLOCK, CARBURETOR SPACER
(CUSHION)
76
1
GASPIPE, FUEL PUMP
CARBURETOR, SEAL GASKET
A (OUT)
77
1
PIPE-B, FUEL PUMP INLET
REGULATING ASSY. CARBURETOR
78
1
PUMP ASSY., FUEL
1
SCREW, PAN HEAD , RECESSED,
40
1
4
1
CUP, FUEL FILTER
5
1
TANK, FUEL
6
4
BLOCK, SHOCK ABSORBER
42
1
GASKET, CARBURETOR IN
79
7
1
COVER, LOWER SHELL
43
2
NUT, HEX/ FLANGED, M5
80
10
CLAMP, FUEL HOSE
8
1
SHELL, LOWER
WASHER, FLAT
81
1
CASING, UPPER ENGINE
9
8
CLIP, SCREW
45
2
SPACER, FILTER CASE LINER
82
4
10
4
FEET, VIBRATION MOUNTS
SCREW, TAPPING-PAN HEAD
RECESSEDST4.2X16
46
1
CASE ASSY., FILTER
11
5
RECESSED PAN HEAD SCREW,
ST6. 3X19
83
1
SLEEVE, RESPERATOR ADAPTOR
47
2
SPRING CLIP
84
1
SHIM, MUFFLER
48
1
FILTER, ADAPTER SLEEVE
85
1
MUFFLER ASSY.
86
3
BOLT, HEX HEAD, FLANGED,
M6X55
87
1
RUBBER SEAL, BACK WINDOW
88
1
WINDOW, BACK (EXHAUST
COVER)
12
2
ALIGNMENT PIN
13
2
BOLT, HEX, W/ FLANGE M6X12
14
1
CASING, LOWER, ENGINE
15
4
16
41
44
1
2
49
STARTER, RECOIL ASSY.
50
1
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/WASHER,
M5X12
WASHER
51
1
INVERTER ASSY
4
SLEEVE, DAMPING
52
1
FRAME, FRONT PANEL
17
1
SEAL COVER, OIL SENSOR
353
1
PLATE ASSY, CONTROL
89
4
18
1
KEY, WOODRUFF, 3X5X13
54
4
19
1
STATOR ASSY.
SCREW, PAN HEAD, RECESSED,
M5X25
SCREW, RECESSED PAN HEAD/
M5X20
90
1
RETAINING CLIP, SHELL
20
2
BOLT, HEX, W/ FLANGE M5X30
55
4
WASHER, FLAT 5
91
1
BAFFLE, THERMAL
56
2
SCREW, PAN HEAD RECESSED,
M6X120
57
1
SEAL COVER, LOWER SHELL
1
3
NUT, HEX/ FLANGED, M5
58
1
SCREW, M6X14
2
1
IGNITION .LED INDICATOR
59
1
COVER, UPPER SHELL
3
1
RECTIFIER 1010A
60
1
SCREW, PAN HEAD M4X12
4
1
BOLT, IGNITION APPARATUS
61
1
SWITCH, FUEL ON/OFF
5
1
BOLT, HEX, WITH FLANGE
62
3
SCREW, PAN HEAD, RECESSED,
M6X14
6
1
BOLT, HEX, WITH FLANGE
1
CONTROL PLATE ASSEMBLY
21
1
FLYWHEEL/ROTOR ASSY.
22
1
NUT, HEX/FLANGED M10X1.25-8
23
1
FAN
24
1
JAW SEAT, STARTING
25
5
BOLT, HEX, FLANGED, M6X16
26
1
COUPLER, STARTING JAW
27
1
BOLT, HEX/FLANGED, M8X14
28
1
COVER ASSY, COWLING AND
INLET
29
1
PLUG, RUBBER
30
1
O-RING, RUBBER, 20X1.8
31
1
COIL, IGNITION
32
2
TAPPING SCREW, RECESSED
PAN/HD STR. 8X14
33
1
PIN, MOUNTING (POTHOOK
PILLAR)
CONTROL PLATE ASSEMBLY
63
1
SHELL, UPPER
7
64
1
SWITCH, IGNITION, ON/OFF
8
2
WASHER, FLAT
COVER, SWITCH
9
1
SCREW, RECESSED PAN HEAD
1
12VDC PLUG ASSY.
65
1
66
2
SCREW, RECESSED PAN HEAD/
ST4.2X9.5 TAPPING
10
11
1
SWITCH, FLEXPOWER
67
1
VALVE, FUEL
12
1
120V OUTLET ASSY.
68
1
HOSE, OIL DISCHARGE
13
3
NUT, I- TYPE HEX
1
SHIELD, PIPE SPRING
34
1
POT HOOK
69
14
3
WASHER, SPRING, STANDARD
35
1
CLEANER, AIR
70
1
HOSE, FUEL PUMPI OIL INJ.
15
3
WASHER, FLAT, M4
36
1
COVER, AIR FILTER
71
1
O-RING
16
1
PEG, GROUND CONNECTION
SCREW, PAN HEAD, TAPPING
STR.8X32
72
1
COVER, OIL W/DIPSTICK
17
1
DECAL, CONTROL PLATE
73
2
STUD/BOLT
37
6
Page 33
Section 5
Disassembly
Exploded View – iX2000
Page 34
Section 5
Disassembly
ITEM
QTY.
1
1
2
1
3
1
DESCRIPTION
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
ENGINE ASSEMBLY
38
1
CARBURETOR ASSY.
CAP, FUEL FILLER
39
1
GASKET, CARBURETOR (IN)
COVER, FUEL FILLER PORT
40
6
NUT, HEX. WITH FLANGE, M6
4
1
CUP, FUEL FILTER
41
2
SPACER, OIL SPLASH COVER
5
1
TANK, FUEL
42
1
OIL SPLASH SUB-ASSY.
6
4
BLOCK, SHOCK ABSORBER
43
2
CLIP, SPRING
7
1
COVER, UPPER SHELL
44
1
AIR TUBE
8
1
SHELL, UPPER
45
1
HANDLE , RECOIL ASSY.
ITEM
QTY.
DESCRIPTION
75
1
HOSE, FUEL PUMP OIL INJECTION B
76
1
FUEL PUMP ASSY.
77
1
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST4.8X19
78
1
WRAPPER, ENGINE, UPPER
79
6
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST4.2X13
80
1
REDUCER
81
1
GASKET, MUFFLER
82
1
MUFFLER ASSY.
9
8
CLIP, SCREW
46
1
CORD, RECOIL ASSY.
10
4
SHOCK ABSORBER, FOOT OF
CHASSIS
47
1
STOP, HANDLE
83
2
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE,
M6X60
48
1
RECOIL ASSY.
11
5
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST6, 3X19
84
1
SEAL, EXHAUST COVER
49
1
INVERTER SUB ASSY
85
1
COVER, EXHAUST
50
1
BRACE, CONTROL PANEL
86
4
SCREW, CROSS PAN HEAD, M5X20
51
1
CONTROL PANEL W/ DECAL
87
1
CLIP, RETAINING, CHASSIS
52
4
SCREW, CROSSED PAN HEAD,
M5X25
88
1
O-RING, RUBBER
53
4
WASHER
89
2
WASHER
90
10
CLIP, HOSE, FUEL
91
1
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE,
M6X80
12
2
MOUNTING PIN, BOTTOM
13
5
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE
M6X12
14
1
WRAPPER, SIDE
15
4
GASKET
16
4
REDUCER RING, VIBRATION
17
1
KEY, WOODRUFF, 3X5X13
18
1
STATOR ASSY.
55
1
SEAL, COVER
19
4
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE
M5X30
56
1
SCREW, M6X14
92
1
SCREW, PHILIPS W/WASHER,
M5X12
57
1
COVER, UPPER SHELL
20
1
FLYWHEEL ROTOR ASSY
93
2
PIN, GUIDE, A
58
1
SCREW, CROSS PAN HEAD, M4X12
21
1
NUT, HEX SCREW, W/ FLANGE
94
2
PIN, GUIDE, B
59
1
SWITCH, FUEL ON/OFF
95
2
WASHER/ GASKET, HOOK
60
3
SCREW, CROSS PAN HEAD, M6X14
96
1
SCREW, PHILIPS
61
1
SHELL, UPPER
97
1
BOLT, HEX WITH FLANGE
98
2
NUT, M4
22
1
FAN BLADES
54
2
SCREW, CROSSED PAN HEAD,
M6X130
23
1
SEAT, STARTING JAW
24
3
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE
M6X16
62
1
SWITCH, IGNITION, ON/OFF
1
COVER, SWITCH
25
1
JAW, STARTER
63
99
8
WASHER, LOCK, M4
26
1
COVER
64
2
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST4,2X9.5
100
8
WASHER, FLAT, M4
27
1
RUBBER SET, HIGH PRESSURE
65
1
VALVE, FUEL
101
1
OUTLET, 120 VAC 20 AMP
1
HOSE, OIL DISCHARGE
102
1
DISPLAY, LED
2
CLAMP, HOSE
103
1
DIODE, RECTIFIER
68
1
HOSE, FUEL PUMP OIL INJECTION A
104
1
PANEL, FRONT
69
1
O-RING
105
2
WASHER, STAR LOCK M6
106
2
SCREW M4X12
107
1
SWITCH, FLEXPOWER
108
1
BREAKER, DC CIRCUIT
109
1
HOLDER, DC COMPONENTS
110
1
RECEPTACLE, 12 VDC
28
1
IGNITION COIL
66
29
2
SCREW, PHILIPS, ST4. 8X22
67
30
1
MOUNTING PIN, TOP
31
1
HOOK
32
1
AIR CLEANER
33
1
COVER, AIR FILTER
34
6
70
1
DIPSTICK
71
2
STUDS
BOLT, HEX HEAD W/FLANGE,
M5X16
72
1
FILTER, GAS
35
1
GASKET, CARBURETOR, (OUT B)
73
36
1
SPACER
74
37
1
GASKET, CARBURETOR, (OUT A)
1
1
HOSE, FUEL PUMP
HOSE, FUEL PUMP AIR
Page 35
Page 36
GRAY
IGNITION WINDING
1
GRAY
3
2
4
ORANGE
ORANGE
SUB COIL WINDING
GRAY
C4
5
MAIN COIL WINDING
ORANGE
J2 1 2 3 4
LOW OIL
LEVEL
SWITCH
6
2
5
4
1
3
C5
SPARK
PLUG
FUEL
SHUTOFF
SWITCH
1
C1
3
5
4
2
BROWN
WHITE
C1
6
ORANGE
RED
RED
2
IGNITION
COIL
C2 1
GREEN
WHITE
YELLOW
PURPLE
GRAY
RED
YELLOW
WHITE
YELLOW
BLUE
TRIGGER
ASSEMBLY
J1
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
FLEX POWER SWITCH
LED MODULE
STEPPER
MOTOR
2
J3
INVERTER
ASSEMBLY
RED
ORANGE
PINK
YELLOW
1
LOW OIL
LIGHT
OVERLOAD
LIGHT
STATUS
LIGHT
AC RECPTACLES
Section 6
Electrical Data
iX800
GRAY
IGNITION WINDING
1
GRAY
3
ORANGE
2
4
ORANGE
SUB COIL WINDING
GRAY
C4
5
MAIN COIL WINDING
ORANGE
DC COIL WINDING
INVERTER
ASSEMBLY
WHITE
WHITE
LOW OIL
LEVEL
SWITCH
6
2
5
4
1
3
C5
SPARK
PLUG
FUEL
SHUTOFF
SWITCH
1
C1
3
5
4
2
BROWN
WHITE
C1
6
ORANGE
RED
RED
DC CIRCUIT BREAKER
RED
2
IGNITION
COIL
C2 1
GREEN
WHITE
YELLOW
PURPLE
GRAY
RED
PINK
WHITE
YELLOW
BLUE
TRIGGER
ASSEMBLY
J1
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
FLEX POWER SWITCH
DC
RECTIFER
BLACK
LOW OIL
LIGHT
OVERLOAD
LIGHT
STATUS
LIGHT
AC RECPTACLES
DC CHARGE OUTLET
LED MODULE
STEPPER
MOTOR
C3 1 2 3 4 5
RED
ORANGE
PINK
YELLOW
BLUE
RED
Section 6
Electrical Data
iX1600 and iX2000
Page 37
Electrical Formulas
TO FIND
KNOWN VALUES
1-PHASE
KILOWATTS (kW)
Volts, Current, Power Factor
ExI
1000
KVA
Volts, Current
ExI
1000
AMPERES
kW, Volts, Power Factor
kW x 1000
E
WATTS
Volts, Amps, Power Factor
Volts x Amps
NO. OF ROTOR POLES
Frequency, RPM
2 x 60 x Frequency
RPM
FREQUENCY
RPM, No. of Rotor Poles
RPM x Poles
2 x 60
RPM
Frequency, No. of Rotor Poles
2 x 60 x Frequency
Rotor Poles
kW (required for Motor)
Motor Horsepower, Efficiency
HP x 0.746
Efficiency
RESISTANCE
Volts, Amperes
E
I
VOLTS
Ohm, Amperes
IxR
AMPERES
Ohms, Volts
E
R
E = VOLTS
Page 38
I = AMPERES
R = RESISTANCE (OHMS)
PF = POWER FACTOR
NOTES
NOTES
Page 40
Part No. 0H5039
Printed in USA
Rev. A 04/30/10
©2010 Generac Power Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Specifications are subject to change without notice
No reproduction allowed in any form without prior written consent from Generac Power Systems, Inc.
Generac Power Systems, Inc.
S45 W29290 Hwy. 59
Waukesha, WI 53189
1-888-GENERAC (1-888-436-3722)
generac.com
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