SERVICE MANUAL.v3

Add to My manuals
48 Pages

advertisement

SERVICE MANUAL.v3 | Manualzz

Bulletin No. SPSDO165-18

April 2004

18 Speed

TRANSMISSION

Service Manual

MODELS:

PSDO165–18

PSDO185–18

PSDO205–18

PRO-SHIFT-18-Speed Transmission

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section I General Information

Specifications .................................................................................................................................................... 3

Torque Specifications ........................................................................................................................................ 4

Driver Instructions ............................................................................................................................................. 5

Section II Maintenance

Air Line Piping Diagram ........................................................................................................................................... 7

Filter Regulator ....................................................................................................................................................... 8

Lubrication ............................................................................................................................................................... 9

Section III General Disassembly .................................................................................................

10

Section IV Shift Lever Disassembly ............................................................................................

12

Section V Electrical Harness .......................................................................................................

13

Section VI Range Case Disassembly

Case Exploded Drawing ........................................................................................................................................ 14

Gears Exploded Drawing ....................................................................................................................................... 15

Disassembly .......................................................................................................................................................... 17

Section VII Main Case Disassembly

Main Case Exploded Drawing ............................................................................................................................... 22

Clutch Housing Exploded Drawing ........................................................................................................................ 23

Main Case Gears Exploded Drawing ..................................................................................................................... 24

Disassembly .......................................................................................................................................................... 27

Section VIII Countershaft Disassembly & Reassembly.............................................................

31

Section IX Cleaning & Inspection Procedures ............................................................................................................. 32

Section X Main Case Reassembly ............................................................................................................................... 33

Section XI Range Case Reassembly ........................................................................................................................... 37

Section XII Shift Lever Reassembly ............................................................................................................................. 41

Section XIII Troubleshooting ........................................................................................................................................ 42

2

SAFETY FIRST

Carefully read this service manual before beginning any work on your Spicer transmission.

Throughout this literature, you will see symbols that warn of potential physical danger or product damage if the accompanying instructions aren’t followed. Here are the symbols and their meanings.

This symbol indicates a potentially hazardous situation. If the instructions aren’t followed, the result could be death or serious injury.

This symbol indicates that you must do something in order for the transmission to function properly. For example, you must use only one gasket underneath the shift tower. If it is eliminated, or more than one gasket is used, binding can occur. This would prevent proper shifting of the transmission and could damage the unit.

;;;;;

This symbol indicates that you must NOT do something in order to avoid damaging the transmission. For example, you must not use sealant underneath the shift tower. Using sealant underneath the tower will prevent proper interlock functioning and could damage the unit.

Be sure you understand all procedures and instructions in this manual before you begin working on your

Spicer Transmission. If you have any questions, contact your Spicer Transmission representative.

General Safety Precautions

Use a hoist whenever lifting the

transmission or shaft assemblies. Using a hoist can help prevent muscle strain or other possible injuries.

Always wear safety glasses when working on the transmissions to help prevent possible eye injury due to small parts (such as snap rings) or metal chips that may fly up unexpectedly during a tear down or rebuild.

Be careful when picking up gears or

other sharp components. If you aren’t careful, you could cut your hands. Consider wearing heavy cloth gloves or covering sharp objects with shop towels before picking them up.

When draining the transmission prior to working on it, be careful to let the unit

cool down first. Otherwise, hot transmission fluid could cause burns.

The information in this service manual was current at the time of publication.

This information is subject to change at any time without notice.

3

GENERAL

INFORMATION

SECTION I

PS D O 205 - 18 A

PRO SHIFT

DOUBLE

OVERDRIVE

TORQUE CAPACITY

RATIO GROUP

NUMBER OF GEARS

PSDO1065-18A PSDO1085-18A PSDO205-18A

GEAR RATIOS

Ratio

1.20

1.00

0.84

0.70

15.64

2.95

2.47

2.06

1.74

1.45

14.89

12.41

10.40

8.66

7.32

6.09

5.05

4.21

3.54

13.03

3.72

3.10

Gear

12 th

13 th

14 th

15 th

16 th

17 th

18 th

Rev. 1

Rev. 2

Rev. 3

Rev. 4

7 th

8 th

9 th

10 th

11 th

1 st

2 nd

3 rd

4 th

5 th

6 th

%Step

20%

19%

20%

18%

20%

21%

20%

19%

20%

20%

19%

20%

18%

20%

21%

20%

19%

4

SPECIFICATIONS

Ratio Coverage

Length

Weight

Input Shaft

End Yoke

Clutch Housing

Clutch

Oil Capacity

Speedometer

PTO Openings

PTO Drive Gears

21.3:1

95 cm

365 kg

50.8 mm x 10 Spline

SPL-250, 1810, 1710

SAE #1

Spicer 15.5”

13.9 litres

Electronic

8 bolt left & 6 bolt rightside

Both sides, 52 teeth 6 pitch gear. Both gears turn at .57 or

.70 of engine speed.

SHIFT PATTERN

R1 R2

R3 R4

3 4

11 12

7 8

15 16

1 2 5 6

13 14

9 10

17 18

GENERAL

INFORMATION

Part Name

Cap Screw or Nut

Nut

SECTION I

TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS FOR NUTS AND CAP SCREWS

Nominal Wrench Torque (ft. lbs)

Thread Size (Dia.) Non Locking Type Locking Type

Inches mm Min Max

(Bonded Nylon Patch)

Min Max

.250

6 7 10 10 13

.312

13 17 20 24

.375

.438

10 25

40

32

50

.500

.562

.625

.750

1.250

1.375

1.750

12

14

60

90

120

200

80

115

150

250

34

52

60

78

80

112

150

240

400

550

550

41

62

80

98

100

137

180

290

450

600

600

PTO Aperture

Cover Cap Screws

Cap Screw

Cap Screw with

Gasket 97-324-2

Cap Screw with

Gasket 22P22

.375

.438

.438

10

20

20

15

25

25

16

36

29

24

41

34

5

GENERAL

INFORMATION

How to shift the Spicer PRO-Shift 18

Speed Transmission

Fig. 1

R1 R2

R3 R4

3 4

11 12

7 8

15 16

1 2 5 6

13 14

9 10

17 18

Starting vehicle from a stop

1. (a) With the gear shift lever in neutral,

(b) Clutch pedal depressed,

(c) And brakes set,

(d) Start the engine. Allow it to build to maximum air pressure.

Starting in 1

st

Gear

2. (a) With the clutch pedal fully depressed to engage the clutch brake (see “Clutch Brake”)

(b) Position the range and splitter selector to low.

Move the gear shift lever into 1 st gear position.

SPLITTER

SELECTOR

Fig. 2

High

High

Low

Low

RANGE

SELECTOR

3. (a) Release the trucks parking brakes and trailer parking brakes where applicable.

(b) Release the clutch pedal gradually to full position.

(c) Depress the throttle to start the vehicle moving.

4. Normal shift sequence is shown in the shift pattern

(Figure 1). When the lever is moved, use normal double clutch techniques. When a shift is desired, depress the clutch pedal and move the lever to neutral. Engage the clutch, allowing the engine to

SECTION I

6

drop so engine and drive line speeds are matched.

Depress the clutch pedal and move the lever into gear. Engage the clutch and accelerate as conditions permit.

5. On splitter shifts, do not move the lever from its position. With torque on the drive line, merely push the splitter selector and use a single clutch application just enough to break torque. To let the engine speed drop. Engage the clutch and apply the throttle.

6. When the shift requires both splitter and lever position change, select the splitter just as the shift lever enters neutral. Complete a normal double clutch operation. The air shift will be completed automatically as the lever is moved to the next gear position.

7. The shifting from 10 th

to 11 th

gear requires a range change as well as a splitter change. The range selector can be preselected while the lever is still in the 5 th

stick position. The range change will only happen in neutral and it is synchronized. The splitter change (to low) and the lever change to the

2 nd

stick position requires the same as described above in point 6.

8. WARNING The splitter selector should not be changed without following a breaking of the torque applied to the transmission (push in the clutch) – preselection will wear the splitter parts. The range selector can be preselected.

Downshifing

Downshifting is actually just the reverse of upshifting.

(see “Double Clutching: Downshifting”).

Clutch Brake

The clutch brake used with this unit is designed for stopping gear rotations so you can shift into 1 st and reverse gears. The last one inch of clutch pedal travel activates the clutch brake. So on shifts other than 1 st or reverse from a stop, only depress the clutch pedal enough to release the clutch. Depressing the pedal to the floorboard will activate the clutch brake and could cause gear hang-up or hard shifting.

When selecting a starting gear, if you have a butttooth condition, gradually release the clutch so the drive gear can rotate to align the gear clutching teeth to complete the shift.

GENERAL

INFORMATION

Double Clutching

Upshifting: The normal double clutching technique is suggested. When you want to shift, depress the clutch and move the lever to neutral. Engage the clutch and allow the engine RPM to drop so engine speed and drive line speed match. Depress the clutch and move the lever into gear. Engage the clutch and accelerate as conditions permit.

Downshifting: Downshifting is the reverse of upshifting. As the engine approaches the shift point (start the downshift approximately 50-100 RPM above the shift point), depress the clutch and move the lever to neutral. Engage the clutch and raise the engine RPM until the engine and drive line speeds are equal

(normally, governed speed). Depress the clutch, then shift into the next low gear. Engage the clutch.

Skip Shifting

Experienced drivers sometimes want to skip some of the ratios. This is acceptable. However, you should do this only when operating conditions allow. Your speed, the load, and the road type and condition should be considered.

SECTION I

;;;;;

;;;;;

;;;;;

;;;;;

Reminders

Double clutch when shifting. This will help components match speed better during shifts and will help ensure proper engagement.

Downshift through all gear speeds when you

are slowing down. Chassis and trailer brake life can be increased by doing this.

Do not force the shift since this can cause damage to clutch collars and clutching teeth.

Use steady force on the shift lever to complete shifts.

Do not coast in neutral. The vehicle could lose

RPMs during coasting and you may not be able to shift back into the proper gear.

Do not downshift at road speeds that are too

fast. This could prevent proper gear engagement and could damage clutching teeth.

Do not tow vehicles without first pulling the

axles or disconnecting the driveshaft. If you tow the vehicle without doing this, you can damage drive train components because the system lubrication is inadequate when the vehicle is towed.

7

MAINTENANCE

AIR LINE PIPING DIAGRAM

SECTION II

8

MAINTENANCE

Filter Regulator

The 18 speed uses a filter regulator preset at 50-55 lbs.

Use only petroleum-based solvents to

clean parts. Other types of solvents could damage filter components and affect proper operation.

;;;;;

Blow air through the filter (inside and outside) to dislodge surface contami-

nants. Otherwise, these contaminants could affect proper filter operation and lead to equipment damage.

Do not disassemble the regulator section

(9): It is not field-repairable.

If it is damaged, replace it.

1. Clean or replace the filter element (7) every 6-12 months, or whenever slow shifting is encountered.

The element should be replaced after three cleanings. If regulator malfunction is indicated, replace the entire unit.

2. To service the filter section, shut off the air pressure. Unscrew the bowl (1) and remove the

O-ring (2). Unscrew the stud (4). Remove the louver (5), upper gasket (6), element (7), and lower gasket (8) from the stud. Do not disassemble the regulator section (9).

3. After cleaning, inspect the parts carefully. Replace any damaged parts.

4. Reassemble the unit by first installing the element

(7) on the stud (4), so that the large end of the internal taper (thinnest wall section) is toward the hax on the stud. Torque the stud to 5-10 lbs. inch.

5. Apply a wipe coat of Dow Corning DC7 Silicone

Grease (or equivalent) to the O-ring (2) seating surfaces on the regulator (9) and bowl (1). Apply a light, even coat of Molykote “G” (or equivalent) to the bowl threads. Torque the bowl to 5-10 lbs.

inch. If the drain valve (3) was removed, reinstall it and torque it to 10-15 lbs. inch.

9

SECTION II

MAINTENANCE

Lubrication

CAUTION: To ensure proper lubrication and operating temperatures in this unit, the proper lubricants must be used. Correct oil levels must be maintained. Spicer recommends using only lubricants produced by reputable, well-known suppliers. If you want to use a lubricant not specified below, please contact your local truck dealer to determine whether the lubricant is suitable for your purposes.

Recommended Lubricants

The lubricants listed below are recommended for use in all Spicer mechanical transmissions.

Viscosity

SAE 50

Type

HEAVY DUTY MOTOR OIL

According to specifications

MIL-2104D or

MIL-I-46152B, API SF/CD

(MIL-2104B and C or 46152 are also acceptable)

SYNTHETIC MOTOR OIL

According to specifications

MIL-L-2104D or

MIL-46152B, API-SF/CD

PURE MINERAL OILS FOR

GEAR TYPES R and O

Contains corrosion and oxidation inhibitors

API-GLI

CD SAE 50

SAE 90

SECTION II

Oil Changes

Depending on the oil used and the vehicle application many factors will influence oil change periods. Please contact your lubricant supplier for the replacement intervals or contact your local Spicer agent.

Refilling

First remove all dirt around the filler plug. Then refill the transmission with new oil. Use the grade recommended for the existing season and prevailing service. The lubricant should be level with the oil fill plug located on the right side of the transmission case.

;;;;;

Overfilling

CAUTION: Do not overfill the transmission.

This usually results in oil breakdown due to excessive heat and aeration from the churning action of the gears. Early breakdown of the oil will result in heavy varnish and sludge deposits that plug up oil ports and build up on splines and bearings.

10

GENERAL

DISASSEMBLY

Important Procedure

To locate and correct transmission troubles, a systematic procedure should be followed.

Road test whenever possible. Mechanics usually get seconded or third-hand reports of trouble experienced with the unit. These reports do not always accurately describe the actual conditions. Sometimes symptoms seem to indicate trouble in the transmission, while actually the problem is the axle, driveshaft, universal joints, engine or clutch. This is especially true of noise complaints. Therefore, before removing the transmission or related components to locate trouble, road test to check the possibility of trouble in other closely associated units. Road testing is most effective when the mechanic drives the vehicle. However, riding with the driver can be informative.

Check Functioning Prior to Disassembly

If a remote control is used, a careful check of the remote and connecting linkages (and their adjustment) must be made. The remote unit must be in good working order if the transmission is expected to shift satisfactorily.

Many times, the answer to the trouble is apparent when the unit is inspected prior to disassembly. But this evidence is often lost when the parts are separated. If possible, check the unit prior to disassembly.

Bear in mind that a careful inspection of the unit should be made as each disassembly step is performed.

SECTION III

Inspect Thoroughly During Disassembly

It is poor practice to disassemble a unit or the complete transmission as quickly as possible without examining the parts. The mechanic may completely disassemble a unit and fail to find the cause of the trouble, unless he examines the parts. After the transmission is disassembled, check the lubricant for foreign particles. This is a source of trouble often overlooked during the disassembly.

Repair or Replace Worn Parts

Many times the parts or critical adjustments causing the trouble are not replaced or corrected because the mechanic only inspects and replaces parts that have failed completely. All pieces should be carefully examined because broken parts are often just the result – not the cause – of the problem. All parts that are broken or worn and no longer meet specifications should be replaced.

Also, parts that are worn to the extent that they do not have a long service life remaining should be replaced.

Replacing these parts now will avoid another tear down on the unit in the near future. Also at this time, make the recommended changes or modifications to bring the transmission up to date and increase the service life of the unit.

11

GENERAL

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION III

9

Read this section before starting the detailed disassembly procedures.

Follow procedures closely to ensure proper transmission operation.

Rebuild Facilities

A suitable holding fixture or overhaul stand with a hole for the input shaft is desirable.

For easier working conditions, table height should be

28-30 inches. A light chain hoist should be used to handle the mainshaft and counter shafts during removal and reassembly procedures.

Cleanliness

Transmissions should be steam cleaned prior to disassembly. Seal all openings before steam cleaning to prevent entry of dirt and water, which can damage serviceable parts.

Dirt is abrasive and will cause premature wear of bearings and other parts. Spicer suggests that mechanics have a wash tank available to clean parts just prior to reassembly.

Bearings

When a transmission is removed at relatively low mileage, bearings should be removed with pullers designed for this purpose. Wrap the bearings to keep out dirt. Clean, inspect, and lubricate all bearings just prior to reassembly. If accumulated mileage is over

150,000 miles, we suggest that all bearings be replaced. If bearings are worn or damaged, always replace them regardless of mileage.

Push sleeve over end of shaft

Install bearing cap assembly after red sleeve is in place

Install seal dry

;;;;;

End Yokes and Flanges

Do not hammer on end yokes and flanges to remove or install them. It is not only destructive to the yoke or the flange itself, but can also cause serious internal transmission damage. Hammering destroys or mutilates the pilot diameters and warps or bends the flange. Hammering on end yokes will close-in the bearing bores or misalign yoke lugs.

This will result in early failures of journal needle bearings.

Serious damage can be done internally to bearings, thrust faces and washers by hammering on external parts. In most designs, when the yoke/flange lock nuts are tightened and secure, the internal bearings and gears are in proper location. When the yoke/flange is driven on the shaft, however, two conditions can exist.

(a) If the bearing fit is tight on the shaft, usually the bearings will brinell as they must absorb the pounding force.

(b) If the bearing fit is loose, the shaft will keep moving inward until it is stopped by the internal parts.

These conditions must be prevented.

Power Take-Offs

Refer to your owner’s manual, installation procedures, and safety precautions when installing any PTO on your transmission.

Front Bearing Retainer

9

When installing the front bearing retainer and seal in the transmission, use the red plastic sleeve to prevent serious damage to the

oil seal. Failure to use the seal sleeve will void the warranty.

12

Hydrodynamic lip

Seal must be installed so that

Hydrodynamic lip faces toward inside of transmission

Remove seal cardboard shipping tube or plastic installation sleeve just prior to installing bearing cap assembly to transmission

SHIFT LEVER

DISASSEMBLY

Shift Lever Disassembly

1. Cut the tie-down straps and lift the boot off the lever.

2. Holding the lever in a vise, remove the tower snap ring.

3. Pull the lever, the upper and lower plastic sockets and the two opposing springs from the tower.

Bolt

Breather

Washer

SECTION IV

Shift Pattern Insert

Nut

Washer

Shift Knob

Castellated Nut

Upper Lever

Pin

Upper Lever

Isolator Assembly

Snap Ring

Upper

Socket

Lower Lever

Lower

Socket

Opposing Disk

Springs

Tower

Gasket

13

ELECTRICAL

HARNESS

SECTION V

14

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

15

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

16

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

17

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

1.Remove wiring harness from gear position switches 4.Remove three gear position switches and back-up light switch

2.Remove wiring harness from shift solenoids 5.Remove detent balls and springs

3.Remove all air lines and necessary fittings

(note: it is not necessary to mark lines for reassembly since a schematic is provided on page 7)

18

6.Remove interlock retaining bolts, plate and interlock

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

7.Remove the overdrive shift fork reversing mechanism

9.Using a chain hoist, carefully place the transmission on a workbench that has a hole to accommodate the input shaft

8.Remove two clutch housing bolts from the inside of the bell housing before placing the transmission on end

10.Remove the rear bearing retainer and speedometer gear

19

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

11.Remove air filter regulator, bracket, range and splitter valves

14.Remove the range and splitter piston retaining nuts and pistons

12.Remove the rear countershaft bearing retainer shims

15.Remove all the range case bolts, then thread two of the case bolts into the threaded holes provide and draw tight to split the range case from the main case

13.Remove the range and splitter piston housings

20

16.Using a chain hoist, lift the range case from the unit

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VI

17.Remove range fork and synchronizer 20.Remove range countershafts

18.Use an 1 ½” socket to remove the synchronizer ring

21.Using a plastic mallet, remove output shaft from range case assembly REPLACE HAMMER

19.Using a puller, remove the high-range gear and synchronizer

21

22.Using a press, remove inner output bearing and low range gear from output shaft

RANGE CASE

DISASSEMBLY

23.Remove rear countershaft bearing retainers

24.Remove rear main shaft bearing retainers

SECTION VI

22

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VII

23

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

DOWEL

PIN

SECTION VII

RETAINER

CLUTCH

24

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

C/S 4

TH

GEAR

SECTION VII

C/S 3

RD

GEAR

C/S 5

TH

GEAR

C/S 1

ST

GEAR

C/S 2

ND

GEAR

25

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VII

5

TH

GEAR

3

RD

GEAR

4

TH

GEAR

26

2

ND

GEAR

1

ST

GEAR

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION X

27

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VII

1.Remove bolts joining the main case to the clutch housing. After removing all the bolts, thread two of the case bolts into the threaded holes provided in the main case and draw tight to split the main case from the clutch housing

3.Use a slide hammer with a 3/8" 16 thread adapter to remove the reverse idler shaft

2.Using a chain hoist, lift the main case from the clutch housing.

(Be extremely careful not to catch the case on the shift fork rods and the oil spry tube as you remove the main case)

4.Remove the reverse idler gear, caged needle bearing and spacer

28

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VII

5.Install an “A-frame lifting fixture” and use a chain hoist to remove the shaft assembly

7.Place countershaft and mainshaft assembly into “countershaft/mainshaft” assembly fixture

8.Remove the lifting tool and slide the countershafts apart

6.Remove shift fork and rail assembly

29

9.Remove tapered bearing, thrust washer and reverse gear

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

SECTION VII

10.Remove mainshaft

13.Remove 5 th

gear and 4 th

/5 th

clutch collar and 4 th

gear

11.Remove 1 st

gear and 1 st

/ reverse clutch collar 14.Remove splitter clutch gear and shift collar

12.Remove 2 nd

gear, 2 nd

/3 rd

gear clutch collar and 3 rd gear

30

15.Remove 3 retaining bolts from OPTI-LUBE pump

MAIN CASE

DISASSEMBLY

16.Remove OPTI-LUBE distribution tube

SECTION VII

17.To remove the input shaft and bearing cap, remove the four cap retaining bolts. Pull the shaft from the housing. It may be helpful to place 2 bolts in the threaded bearing cap holes. Tightening the bolts will draw the bearing cap from the housing. Tap the input shaft out of the bearing cap. To disassemble the input shaft assembly, remove the snap ring, press the bearing off the shaft

31

COUNTERSHAFT

DISASSEMBLY & REASSEMBLY

SECTION VIII

1.This view of the countershaft shows the direction of the gears. The gears are secured with three keys, with the exception of reverse. This gear is part of the shaft,

All gears can be pressed off one at a time towards the front of the countershaft

2.If a straight edge is placed between the teeth

(painted here to show the timing marks) every gear on the countershaft will be in line

32

CLEANING & INSPECTION

PROCEDURES

Cleaning

;;;;;

Prior to reassembly, wash all parts thoroughly.

S Use a petroleum-based solvent. Refer to the solvent manufacturer’s saftey precautions to prevent personal injury or transmission damage.

Do not use water or steam to clean

internal components. If you do, it could cause corrosion of these components.

Do not use gasoline to clean parts. Gasoline can explode, causing serious physical injury.

Dry the parts immediately with compressed air. Coat them with lubricant if they are to be reassembled immediately. If the parts are to be stored, coat them with a rust inhibitor and wrap them to keep contamination out.

Inspect parts thoroughly for wear or damage. Parts damaged or worn from previous service must be replaced to insure maximum rebuild life. Suggested inspection procedures include the following.

Inspection

Clutch Collars

Both the internal and external teeth must have sharp edges. Check for chipped or broken teeth, or teeth with rounded corners. Also, examine fork slots for wear. Replace collars if any of these conditions exist.

Gears

Examine for broken or cracked operating and clutching teeth. Also, check for any unusual wear patterns. If any of the preceding exists, replace the gear. If a gear is replaced, also replace the mating gear.

SECTION IX

Thrust Washers

Check for flatness or excessive face wear, cracks, scoring, or signs of heat damage. Replace if any of these conditions exists.

Snap Rings

New snap rings are recommended with every rebuild.

Mainshaft

Check for signs of twisting or misalignment. Also, check for worn or damaged splines. Replace the shaft if any of these conditions exists.

Remote Control

Check the shift fingers, bushing bores and rods for excessive wear or scuffing. Replace springs, bearing races, boots and seals. Clean all reusable parts thoroughly and apply a light coat of grease to the pivot points when reassembling.

Bearings

New bearings are recommended with every rebuild.

(See “General Disassembly-Bearings” for further information)

Housings

Inspect the housing sections for cracks. If cracks exist, replace that section of the housing. Also, inspect the shift bar support bracket for cracks or worn slots.

Replace if either of these conditions exists.

33

MAIN CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION X

1.Install the input shaft 4.Install OPTI-LUBE pump with 3 bolts and torque to 38

– 42 ft.lbs.

2.Apply Loctite 515 to front bearing retainer and install.

Torque bolts to 38 – 42 ft. lbs.

5.Install countershafts, splitter clutch gear and shift collar into “countershaft / mainshaft” assembly fixture.

Continue building mainshaft assembly by placing 5 th gear and 4 th / 5 th clutch collar and 4 th gear into fixture

3.Install OPTI-LUBE spray distribution tube and torque bolts to 38 – 42 ft.lbs.

34

MAIN CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION X

6.Install 2 nd gear, 2 nd / 3 rd gear clutch collar and 3 rd gear 9.Install tapered bearing, thrust washer and reverse gear

7.Install 1 st gear and 1 st / reverse clutch collar 10.Install shift fork and rail assembly

8.Install mainshaft

35

11.Install the reverse idler gear, caged needle bearing and spacer

MAIN CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION X

12.Attach the “A-Frame Lifting Fixture” and use a chain hoist to lower the gear assembly into the clutch housing.

(Be careful to line up the OPTI-

LUBE pump drive gear)

14.Install the case bolts and torque them to 78 – 98 ft.lbs.

15.Install rear mainshaft bearing retainer and torque bolts to 38 – 42 ft.lbs.

13.Using a chain hoist, lower the main case onto the clutch housing.

(Be extremely careful not to catch the case on the shift fork rods and the oil pray tube)

36

16.Install rear countershaft bearing retainers and torque bolts to 38 – 42 ft.lbs.

MAIN CASE

REASSEMBLY

17.Measure front countershaft end play by prying the countershaft up and down with a large screwdriver thru the PTO opening. (End play should be .001 – .008)

Adjust end play by adding, or subtracting shims under the rear countershaft

SECTION X

37

RANGE CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION XI

1.Install range countershafts and high range gear making sure to align the timing marks

;;;;;

4.Install output shaft assembly into range case assembly.

Install inner output bearing spacer and using the proper driver install the outer output bearing.

(Do not heat bearing)

2.Install high range synchronizer race, clutch gear, washer and bolt. Torque bolt to 380 – 400 ft. lbs.

5.Using a chain hoist lift the range case and attach to main case with case bolts, torque to 38-42 ft. lbs.

;;;;;

3.Install cage needle bearing, low range gear, and thrust washer. Install inner output bearing to the output shaft.

(Do not heat bearing)

38

6.Install range and splitter pistons and retaining nuts and torque to 29 – 45 ft.lbs.

RANGE CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION XI

7.Install range and splitter piston housings and bolts torque to 29 – 45 ft.lbs.

10.Install air filter regulator, bracket range and splitter valves

OUTPUT BEARING CAP

8.Install range countershaft rear bearing retainers and shims range countershafts must have a .003 – .007 of endplay

DISTANCE A

The output bearing cap is installed next. To shim the output bearing cap, measure the distance from the end of the case to the bearing cup (A)

DISTANCE B

9.Install rear bearing retainer and shims (refer to diagram).

Install speedometer gear

39

BEARING ASSEMBLY

RANGE CASE

Next, measure from the face of the range case to the end of the pilot (B). Subtract the two figures and shim accordingly. You can be within four thousandths of an inch, so select the shims that will give you the amount closest to what is required

RANGE CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION XI

13.Install the overdrive shift fork reversing mechanism

11.Install the speedometer gear and end yoke, or flange. Torque to 550 – 600 ft.

lbs.

12.Using a chain hoist carefully place the transmission in a horizontal poition on a work bench. Install two clutch housing retaining bolts.

Torque to 78 – 98 ft. lbs.

40

14.Install the interlock, plate and retaining bolts. Torque to 52 – 92 ft. lbs.

RANGE CASE

REASSEMBLY

SECTION XI

15.Install the detent balls, springs and torque plugs to

25 – 41 ft. lbs.

18.Install wiring harness and attach to shift solenoids

16.Install the three gear position switches and back-up light switch. Torque to 25 – 41 ft. lbs.

19.Attach wiring harness to gear position switches

17.Install all airlines and fittings. (see schematic on page 7)

41

SHIFT LEVER

REASSEMBLY

Shift Tower Assembly

1. Place the two opposing springs and the lower socket into the shift tower.

2. Place the lever through the tower and support it in a vise.

3. Install the upper socket. Once the socket clears the groove, install the snap ring.

4. Seat the boot properly and secure it with two tiedown straps.

5. When the tower is installed onto the transmission housing, one single gasket must be in place under the tower assembly for proper gear selection. Failure to use any gasket or using more than one gasket under the tower may cause binding and damage to the unit.

Bolt

Breather

Washer

SECTION XII

Shift Pattern Insert

Nut

Washer

Shift Knob

Castellated Nut

Upper Lever

Pin

Upper Lever

Isolator Assembly

Snap Ring

Upper

Socket

Lower Lever

Lower

Socket

Opposing Disk

Springs

Tower

Gasket

42

TROUBLESHOOTING

Noisy Operation

Noise is usually a very elusive problem, and is generally not the fault of the transmission. Mechanics should road test the vehicle to determine if the driver’s complaint of noise is actually in the transmission.

In numerous instances where drivers have insisted noise was coming from the transmission, investigations revealed it was caused by one of the following conditions:

(a) Fan out of balance or blades bent

(b) Defective vibration dampers

(c) Crankshaft out of balance

(d) Flywheel out of balance

(e) Loose flywheel mounting bolts

(f) Rough engine idle producing rattle in gear train

(g) Clutch assembly out of balance

(h) Loose or broken engine mounts

(i) Power take-off engaged

(j) Worn universal joints

(k) Driveshaft out of balance

(l) Universal joint angles out of phase or at excessive angles

(m) Center bearings in drive line dry, not mounted properly

(n) Wheels out of balance

(o) Tire treads humming or vibrating at certain speeds

(p) Air leaks on suction side of induction system, especially with turbo-chargers

Mechanics should try to locate and eliminate noise by means other than a transmission removal or an overhaul. However, if the noise appears to be in the transmission, try to determine what position the gearshift lever is in when the noise occurs. If the noise is evident in only one gear position, the problem is generally traceable to the operating gears. Next, try to categorize the noise into the following classifications:

43

SECTION XIII

(a) Growling, humming and grinding. These noises are caused by worn, chipped, rough or cracked gears. As gears continue to wear, the grinding noise will be noticeable particularly in gear position that throws the greatest load on the worn gear.

A lack of lubricant or use of improper lubricant can also result in growling and grinding noises. This is because there is insufficient lubricant to cool and cover the gears, which allows metal-to-metal contact.

(b) Hissing, thumping and bumping. Hissing noises can be caused by bad bearings. As bearings wear and retainers start to break up etc., the noise could change to a thumping or bumping.

(c) Gear whine. This is usually caused by lack of backlash between mating gears. Improper PTO shimming is the big offender here.

(d) Vibration. Todays improved highways mean entire powertrains are cruising at higher RPMs. These higher speeds mean damage caused by driveline vibration is more obvious than in the past.

When the maximum RPM of a shaft is reached, it begins to bow. A resonant hum can be heard, and a vibration will be set up. This type vibration can cause gear seizures, broken synchronizer pins, bearing failures, brinelling and corrosion.

During acceleration and deceleration, the shaft may pass through half-critical vibration (half the maximum

RPM of the shaft). A whine or boom may be heard at this point.

(e) Metallic rattles. These noises within the transmission usually result from a variety of conditions. Engine torsional vibrations are transmitted to the transmission through the clutch.

In heavy-duty equipment, clutch discs with vibration dampers are not used, so a rattle – particularly in neutral – is common with diesel equipment.

In general, engine speeds should be 600 RPM or above to eliminate objectionable rattles and vibration during the idle. A defective or faulty injector would cause a rough or lower idle speed, and possibly a rattle in the transmission. A rattle can also be caused by excessive backlash between the PTO input gear and the transmission output gear.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Noise in Neutral

Possible Causes:

(a) Misalignment of transmission

(b) Worn flywheel pilot bearing

(c) Worn or scored countershaft bearings

(d) Sprung or worn countershaft

(e) Excessive backlash in gears

(f) Scuffed gear tooth contact surface

(g) Insufficient lubrication

(h) Use of incorrect grade of lubricant

Noise in Gear

Possible Causes:

(a) Rough, chipped, or tapered sliding gear teeth

(b) Noisy speedometer gears

(c) Excessive end play of countershaft gears

(d) Refer to conditions listed under “Noise in Neutral”

Oil Leaks

Possible Causes:

(a) Oil level too high

(b) Wrong lubricant in unit

(c) Seals defective, wrong type or omitted from bearing cap

(d) Transmission breather omitted or plugged internally

(e) Cap screws loose, omitted or missing from remote control, shifter tower, bearing caps, PTO or covers

(f) Oil drain-back openings in bearing caps or case plugged with varnish or dirt

(g) Gaskets shifted or squeezed out of position, broken gaskets with pieces still under the shift tower

(h) Cracks or holes in castings

(i) Loose drain plug

(j) Oil leakage from engine

(k) Loose speedometer adaptor or connections

SECTION XIII

Walking or Jumping Out of Gear

If the units are walking out of gear, it could be caused by:

(a) External interference, such as the floorboard opening, preventing full engagement, or

(b) An internal malfunction, such as worn clutching teeth, allowing the transmission to shift out of position

If a remote control is being used, make sure it is functioning properly before the transmission is blamed for the problem. Note whether the unit walks out of gear under drive while pulling a load, or on a coast load. Also, notice whether the gear hop occurs on smooth roads or only on rough roads. Items that would prevent full engagement of gears are:

(a) Improperly positioned forward remote control, which limits full travel forward and backward from the remote neutral position

(b) Improper length shift rails or linkage that limits travel of forward remote from neutral position

(c) Loose bell cranks, sloppy ball and socket joints

(d) Shift rails, cables, etc., too spongy or flexible, or not secured properly at both ends

(e) Worn or loose engine mounts if forward unit is mounted to frame

(f) Forward remote mount too flimsy, or loose on the frame

(g) Set screws loose at remote control joints, on shift forks inside remote

(h) Shift fork pads or grove sliding gear or collar worn excessively

(i) Transmission and engine out of alignment either vertically or horizontally

A few items, which could move the gear or shaft out of proper position, particularly on rough roads are:

(a) Use of heavy shift level extensions

(b) Broken shift rail poppet springs

(c) Worn shift rail poppet notches

(d) Bent or sprung shift rails

(e) Excessive end-play in drive gear or countershaft, caused by worn bearings or retainers

(f) Worn or missing thrust rings

44

TROUBLESHOOTING

Hard Shifting

An improperly operating clutch will interfere with the proper shifting of gears in any transmission. It is also important that the hydraulic, air or similar release mechanism is in proper working order. If full and complete clutch release is being made, the following could be a few of the possible causes of hard shifting complaints:

(a) No lubricant in remote control unit. (Note: The forward remote is isolated and is often overlooked. Many remote controls used on transmissions and auxiliaries require separate lubrication)

(b) No lubrication in, or grease fittings on, u-joints or swivels of remote controls

(c) Lack of lubricant or wrong lubricant used, causing build up of sticky varnish and sludge deposits on splines of shaft and gears

(d) Badly worn or bent shift forks

(e) Improper adjustment on shifter linkage

(f) Sliding clutch gears tight on splines of shaft

(g) Clutch teeth burred over, chipped or badly mutilated because of improper shifting

(h) Binding or interference of shift lever with other objects or rods inside the cab of near the remote control

(i) Clutch dragging

(j) Free running gears seized or galled on either the thrust face or diameters

Sticking in Gear

(a) Clutch not releasing. Also check remote units such as hydraulic or air assist. Note: on some units employing a full air control for clutch release, air pressure of approximately 60 lbs or more must be secured before the clutch can be released. Do not leave these vehicles parked in gear

(b) Sliding clutch gears tight on splines

(c) Chips wedged between or under splines of shaft and gear

(d) Improper adjustments, excessive wear or lost motion in shifter linkage

SECTION XIII

Bearing Failures

The service life of most transmissions, main and auxiliary, is governed by the life of the bearings. The majority of bearing failures can be attributed to vibration and dirt. Some other prominent reasons for unit bearing failures are:

(a) Fatigue of raceways or balls

(b) Wrong type or grade of lubricant

(c) Lack of lubricant

(d) Broken retainers, brinelled races and fretting caused by vibration

(e) Bearings set up too tight or too loose

(f) Improper installation resulting in brinelled bearings

(g) Improper fit of shafts or bore

(h) Acid etching due to water in lube

(i) Vehicle overload or too large and engine for the transmission resulting in overload

Dirt

More than 90% of all ball bearing failures are caused by dirt, which is always abrasive.

Dirt may enter the bearings during assembly of units, or may be carried into the bearings by the lubricant while in service. Dirt also may enter bearings through seals, the breather or even dirty containers used for addition or change of lubricant.

Softer material, such as dirt or dust, usually forms abrasive paste or lapping compounds within the bearings. The pressure between the balls and raceways makes a perfect pulveriser: The rolling motion tends to entrap and hold the abrasives. As the balls and raceways wear, the bearings become noisy. The lapping action tends to increase rapidly as the fine steel from the balls and rollway adds to the lapping material.

Hard, coarse material, such as metal chips, may enter the bearings during assembly from tools such as hammers, drifts, and power chisels. It may also be created within the unit during service from raking teeth. These chips produce small indentations in ball and races. When these hard particles jam between the balls and races, it may cause the inner race to turn on the shaft, or the outer race to turn in the housing.

45

TROUBLESHOOTING

Fatigue

All bearings are subject to fatigue and must be replaced eventually. Your own operating experience will dictate mileage replacement of bearings showing only normal wear.

Corrosion

Water, acid and corrosive materials formed by deterioration of lubricant, will produce a reddish-brown coating and small etched holes over outer and exposed surfaces of the race. Corrosive oxides also act as lapping agents.

Shaft Fits

Bearing fits on rotating shafts are usually specified as tight. Excessive looseness – even .001" – under a load, produces a creeping or slipping of the inner race on the rotating shaft. The result is that the surface metal of the shafts scrub or wear off. The force causing the inner race to rotate disappears when the bearing fits properly.

Installation and Removal of Bearings

Improper installation or removal of bearings, especially hammering the bearing on the shaft with offcenter blows, can result in brinelling. Since such damage is seldom visible, it does not become known until after failure or complete disassembly. The correct drivers (preferably under an arbor press) and pullers should be used.

Removing bearings is more difficult than installing them. In most cases, it is necessary to remove the bearing by pulling on the outer race, which can damage the balls or races. Therefore, it is a good idea to replace bearings during an overhaul, to prevent problems. However, if a bearing is not going to be replaced, avoid removal during low mileage rebuilds.

Interchangeability

All ball bearings, whether manufactured here or abroad, are interchangeable in regard to standardized dimensions, tolerances, and fits. However, for a given shaft size there are standard bearings for light, medium or heavy duty service.

SECTION XIII

Numbers and symbols stamped on inner and outer races of bearings designate size and type. Note that the numbering systems of different bearing manufacturers have not been standardized. Consult interchangeable tables and use the proper bearings for replacement parts.

Clutch Troubleshooting

Faulty clutch operation interferes with proper shifting of gears in any transmissions. The two following paragraphs describe the most common problems encountered with clutches.

(a) If the clutch slips or does not engage properly, first check the internal clutch adjustment. If adjustment does not remedy the situation, check for weak pressure springs, lack of free pedal, and worn or oily clutch facings and binding release mechanism.

(b) If the clutch drags or does not release properly, check the internal clutch adjustment. Some other causes for clutch drag are: an intermediate plate sticking on drive pins or drive lugs: the pressure plate not retracing; a distorted or warped driven disc; worn splines on the main drive gear of the transmission; a damaged clutch release bearing; or the bushing in the release sleeve dragging on the transmission; a damaged clutch release bearing; or the bushing in the release sleeve dragging on the transmission drive gear.

Backup Lights

If the backup lights do not function, check the following:

(a) Continuity of the switch with the ball fully depressed

(b) Electrical plug connection

(c) Wiring

46

47

23382 Commerce Drive

Farmington Hills, MI 48335

Phone: +1 (800) 401 - 9866

+1 (865) 329 - 5090

Fax: +1 (419) 470 - 8222 [email protected]

www.ttcautomotive.com

18 Speed

TRANSMISSION

advertisement

Related manuals