5088_6088_7088_Productivity_Guide
5088/6088/7088 series Combine productivity guide
FEATURING
• Enhanced Productivity Features
• Safety
• Controls and Operations
• Service Inspections
• Controls and Instruments
• Maintenance
• Combine Adjustments
• Advanced Farming Systems (AFS)
• Storage
General information
CONTENTS
General Information...............................................2-3
Enhanced Productivity Features..............................4-7
Safety...................................................................8-9
Service Inspections................................................. 10
Controls and Instruments...................................11-20
Maintenance.....................................................21-26
Combine Adjustments........................................27-36
Advanced Farming Systems (AFS).......................37-40
Storage.............................................................41-42
2
With over 30 years of rotary combine industry leadership,
Case IH continues to provide superior combine performance
and excellence. Case IH has developed the most efficient,
reliable and productive harvesting machines throughout the
world - combines with which all other combines are compared
and none are equal.
Now, in 2009, Case IH introduces the new 88 Series Axial-Flow®
Combines. While bringing new innovation to the Axial-Flow
lineup, Case IH adheres to the core principals that were
established for the Axial-Flow combines 32 years ago, and
have been the benchmarks in all subsequent combine design.
• Simplicity • Grain Savings • Matched Capacity • Grain Quality
• Crop Adaptability
• Resale Value
General information
Our goal is to ensure that we meet or exceed our customer’s
expectations and deliver unmatched productivity, reliability
and performance. We will not abandon these principles, just
as Case IH has never abandoned our commitment to keeping
our customers number one.
The AFX rotor delivers the most crop and harvesting flexibility of
any threshing/separating system. Gentle grain-on-grain threshing,
and the flexibility of multiple rotor, concave and separator grate
configurations makes the Axial-Flow at home in the corn and
beans of the Midwest, sunflowers, cereal and oil grains, rice and
hard-threshing grass seed.
with 290, 330 and 375 maximum horsepower engines, and
the muscle to work grain heads up to 36 feet, draper headers
to 40 feet, and 12 row corn heads in the best yielding crops
and toughest conditions. High yields will not bog down your
combine productivity with 250 (5088) or 300 (6088/7088)
bushel grain tanks with 2.5 and 3.0 bushel per second
unloading rates.
In addition to more power and capacity, we will introduce
you to numerous productivity-enhancing features of the
new 88 Series. This all adds up to greater value for your
combine dollar, and more profit for your farming operation.
The new 88 Series combines use the refined “re-timed” rotor,
with enhanced throughput in green, tough operating conditions.
As the years have gone by, innovations like the AFX rotor,
Cross-Flow cleaning fan, AFS precision farming technology,
“smart” controls for headers, operator environment, engines,
and a host of other systems have been instrumental in
Axial-Flow leadership. When Case IH has recognized the
opportunity to improve, we have taken up the challenge, and
continued to give our customers more with each new model.
Our 5088 and 6088 are direct replacements for the 2577 and
2588 in Class 5 and Class 6 respectively. The new 7088 now
offers Case IH customers two choices in Class 7 power and
productivity. This new family of Axial-Flow combines brings
more power and capacity to the field than their predecessors,
3
Enhanced productivity features
Feeder
The 88 Series feeder faceplate is increased in size to allow
header compatibility with larger 7010, 8010 and new 20
Series Axial-Flow combines.
A simple, reliable and field proven belt drive system drives
both the header and feeder.
• The feeder width is 45.5 inches, with three-strand/two-
slat serrated feeder chain to ensure positive crop feeding
(see figure 4.1)
• High performance, electro-hydraulic reverser with positive gear-to-gear engagement
• Feeder chain slat serrations are rolled, not stamped, for optimum material flow without sacrificing grain quality
• Lift feeder clutch switch and pull to rear to engage reverser
88 Series has a new feeder reverser system (see figure 4.3).
• Only engages when reversing is required
A new spring-loaded feeder chain tensioning system maximizes
feeder chain tension accuracy (see figure 4.2).
Optional two-speed header drive.
• Greater convenience, ease of adjustment for the operator
• Select speed with in-cab shift lever
• 5088 uses two 2½ inch feeder lift cylinders and the 6088 and 7088 uses two 3-inch feeder lift cylinders
Same single-lever header latching system as used on the
7120/8120/9120 combines (see figure 4.4).
• 3-inch cylinders can be installed on 5088 for larger header
applications, such as draper headers over 35 feet
• Case IH hydraulic multi-coupler enables fast and easy
header hydraulic hook-ups
• A third cylinder option is no longer required for larger headers
• Single lever header latching system
• Provides improved header-to-ground speed matching
• Single point electrical connector
4
Figure 4.1
Figure 4.3
Figure 4.2
Figure 4.4
Enhanced productivity features
Cleaning System
Expansive Axial-Flow 88 Series cleaning system assures
maximum capacity in each class size (see figure 5.1).
• 5088 - 7,947 sq. in. (5.1 m²)
• 6088 - 7,947 sq. in. (5.1 m²)
• 7088 - 7,947 sq. in. (5.1 m²)
An optional in-cab sieve adjust feature is available all models
• Compatible with Automatic Crop Settings feature
• Also includes ground level adjustment switch bank
• New lower sieve viewing doors
Clean Grain System and Grain Tank
Clean Grain elevator system has been redesigned in several
key areas for increased elevator capacity:
• Clean grain cross auger diameter increased 1/2 inch
Figure 5.1
• Redesigned clean grain elevator inlet and inclined
delivery auger
• Clean grain elevator capacity rated at 3,450 bu./hr.
(a 15% increase over the 2588)
• New, longer unloading tube lengths (up to 24 feet) with
added component material thickness provide greater reach for larger headers
• Ground level chain adjustment
• All 88 Series have quick-foldable (no tools required!) grain
tank extensions for roading, transporting and storage
• New single lever bubble up auger folding design
• Optional electric folding grain tank and delivery auger,
controlled by in-cab switch in cab headliner. Closes
completely to keep grain tank clean (see figure 5.2).
Residue Management
Figure 5.2
Full surround spreader curtain provides improved spreading
performance (see figure 5.3).
• Channels material into the larger diameter spreaders
• Curved bats for improve material spread
• Windrow formation board incorporated into the rear
spreader
• Easy, no-tools needed 2-speed spreader belt drive system
Figure 5.3
5
Enhanced productivity features
Cooling System Air Screen
Stationary air screen uses a hydraulically-powered revolving
evacuation wand (see figure 6.1).
• Wand rotates at 35 rpm
• Material is positively pulled away from the stationary screen
and deposited down and to the back of the combine
• Optional internal brush and an engine air screen guard
Rotor Drive
Several improvements to the rotor drive assure reliable
performance under high-power, demanding conditions (see
figure 6.2).
• 5088 uses the same torque sensing belt width and 24˚
ramp angle as the 2588
• 6088 and 7088 use a wider 3-inch belt and enhanced 30˚
sheave ramp angle
Figure 6.1
• Improves horsepower transfer to the rotor gearbox
Heavy-duty three-speed rotor drive gear case
6088/7088 torque sensing units have additional features:
• Shaft size increased
• Bushing width increase
• Cam followers now have “captured” slides instead of rollers
(5088 rotor drive system is same as 2588)
Service Access
Rear ladder has been re-designed for easier operation, strength
and safer access to rear service deck (see figure 6.3).
• Access to engine service and check points such as fuel fill, air cleaner and fluid levels is easier
• Large swing-up side panels assist in easy maintenance and
service of the combine
Figure 6.2
• Easy access to all sides of the machine
• Side panels have quick-release latch design and gas strut or truss rod to hold panels open
• Transport locking mechanism to keep side panels secured during road transportation
• Optional under panel service lights
• Radiator access door swings open wide for easy access to radiator and coolers
Figure 6.3
6
Enhanced productivity features
Controls
Operator Convenience
• New multi-function propulsion lever (common with 20 Series)
Outstanding visibility and safety features include:
• New A-Post instrumentation with increased functionality
and performance
• Stadium lighting for outstanding visibility when harvesting
at night (see figure 7.1)
• Fully-portable AFS Pro 600 full-color touch-screen display
• Optional HID Lighting - 2 and 6 HID lighting packages give unprecedented clarity and visibility during nighttime operations, both ahead of the cutter bar and behind
• Yield logging/mapping
• Automatic Crop Settings (ACS) option allows the operator
to preset the machine for up to 60 crop conditions (must
have in-cab sieve adjustment option)
• AccuGuide auto guidance with up to sub one-inch accuracy
• Optional rotating beacons are available
Three new seating choices are available. All use standard airride seat suspension.
• Heated red leather
• Sewn cloth bucket
• Standard cloth seat
Figure 7.1
7
Safety
Safety
Harvest is the culmination of a full year of hard work and
great investment. We know harvest “windows of opportunity”
are not always as wide as you would like, with weather and
crop conditions having the final say on when the crop gets into
the bin. Make sure you spend every available day harvesting,
instead of recuperating because poor judgment resulted in
an accident. Observe all Safety Instructions in the combine
Operator's Manual, and these specific safety rules, for a safe
and profitable harvest season.
• Be sure you re-read the Operator’s Manual to review all
safety instructions
• Be sure you read and understand the safety messages on
all decals on your combine
• Set the parking break, turn off the engine and remove the
key before leaving the cab for cleaning, adjusting or
lubricating
• Solidly block or lower the feeder cylinder safety stand
before working on or under the header. Keep ladders,
steps and platforms free of trash and mud accumulations.
• Never start or move the combine until you are sure
everyone is out of the way
• Never start the combine until the operator is familiar with
all controls. This rule applies even if an experienced
operator/trainer is present. Waiting until a quick decision
is required to prevent an accident is not a good learning
experience.
• Always put the shift lever in neutral before starting the engine
• Do not allow riders (except during training)
• Never enter the grain tank or engine compartment when
the engine is running
• Many of the combine systems are electrically actuated. Unlike mechanical linkages that have a distinct and
visible outcome when shifted or adjusted, activity such as
unplugging an actuator may result in unexpected component movement. This accents the need to stop the
combine engine before performing any service operation.
• Always stop your combine engine when refueling. Do not
smoke while refilling the fuel tank.
• Always keep all guards and shields in place
• Drive at moderate speeds in the field and on the road.
Keep the combine in gear when going down hill.
• Use extreme caution when removing the radiator cap to avoid contact with hot pressurized coolant. Allow the engine to cool before opening the system. If the cap must be removed while the system is hot, protect hands with a thick layer of rags to absorb spilled coolant. Do not wear gloves that can become soaked with hot fluid
and will burn skin before gloves can be removed.
8
• Be sure everyone is clear of the area before unloading grain
– flowing grain can trap an adult in 10 seconds or less
• Dress appropriately when performing service work. Do
not wear loose clothing that can become entangled with
the machine.
• Always engage feeder cylinder safety stand before working
under feeder or header
• When transporting on the highway, double check bridge and overhead power line clearances. Remove and transport
wide headers lengthwise to promote the safest possible conditions.
• Take frequent breaks to maintain maximum attention
• Be alert. If you’re constantly alert, you’ll be in a better position to handle emergencies.
Safety
Fire Prevention
Few things could ruin an otherwise rewarding harvest more than a devastating combine fire. Spending some time each day
keeping the combine clean and well-maintained is the best way to preserve harvest as a good memory, instead of something
you would rather forget.
By nature, mature crops are dry and dirty, and are sources of considerable debris that can accumulate on harvesting equipment.
During busy harvest-time, operators may not like taking the time to clean the combine daily. The most appropriate cleaning
time is at the end of the day. Any debris that may be near a hot surface, or is possibly already a smoldering pile, is removed
before it becomes a problem.
• Attempts to perform only major, time-consuming cleanings on a less-frequent basis will likely require MORE TIME in
the course of the harvest season, than to make a proactive commitment to devote a few minutes to cleaning on a daily basis. Cleaning time is also a good time to perform a basic visual machine inspection.
Some additional “food for thought.” Modern, high-productivity combines are powerful machines, and along with power comes
heat. Fire cannot start without heat and fuel. You cannot remove the heat from the engine, hydraulics and other hard-working
systems, but you can remove the fuel source by keeping your combine clean.
Areas requiring special attention to keep combustible debris away from high heat are:
• The engine, specifically the exhaust manifold, turbocharger, muffler and exhaust pipe
• Hydrostatic pump, motor and hydraulic lines and tubes
• Brakes
• Electrical components
• Engine drives and all moving parts
• Batteries and battery cables
• Straw spreader drive gear compartments
Equip your combine with at least two fire extinguishers – one near the cab and another where it can be reached from the ground.
• It’s a good idea to have at least one water-charged extinguisher on your combine. However, use a water extinguisher only
on crop debris. Water applied to an oil fire may tend to spread the flames.
• Watch for fuel or hydraulic fluid leaks. Correct any fuel or hydraulic fluid leak immediately. Clean the machine thoroughly after any hydraulic fluid or fuel leaks or spills. Residual hydraulic fluid or fuel mixed with trash creates a very combustible
mixture. This can make an accidental machine fire much harder to control.
think safe. work safe.
be safe.
9
Service inspections
Take Full Advantage of its Capabilities
Have you, or did someone you know purchase a new combine in the last few years and continue to use it in much the same way
as the machine it replaced? Many times operators do not fully realize and take advantage of modern features. As a result of not
fully utilizing new features, the owner may not be receiving all the value from the money spent.
Many of the items suggested in this booklet can be completed by the owner when preparing for the season or the operator when
starting a new field. Other adjustments, service procedures or repairs might be more effectively completed by your dealer’s trained
service technicians.
Maintenance Choices, Be Prepared for demanding Conditions
Ask your Case IH dealer about Customized Maintenance Inspections. It is
a proactive way to be sure your combine and header will operate with the
best possible performance when you need it.
Customized Maintenance Inspections include a visual and functional
inspection of your combine. They can be used as a pre-season or as a
post-season tune-up.
Benefits include:
• Increased productivity
• Documented maintenance
• Service by Case IH trained
technicians
• Less downtime during the season
• Lower operating costs
• Service with Genuine Case IH lubricants, filters and parts
• Improved fuel economy
The combined advantages of Customized Maintenance Inspection services should result in a lower cost of ownership and
higher resale values.
Documented Service Promotes High Resale Value
When you schedule your equipment for
annual maintenance inspection services, your
Case IH dealership places an annual Certified
Maintenance decal on your equipment
after each inspection, distinguishing your
commitment to keep your machines running
in top condition. Not only does annual
maintenance support your productivity in
the field, each decal symbolizes completed
service—which may increase the resale value
of your equipment.
Because Case IH technicians use Customized
Maintenance Inspection checklists for each
inspection, you can rest assured the service
is thorough and nothing is overlooked.
2008
2007
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CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Propulsion Control Lever
The propulsion control lever on 88 series combines is the same
as 20 Series Axial-Flow combines (see figure 11.1). The lever
handle includes switches to operate:
• Header raise/lower and tilt
• Reel raise/lower, fore-and-aft position
• Unloader swing and drive
• NEW–Header resume button enables header “Auto” modes
including tilt if equipped. Toggles between header set
positions 1 and 2.
5. Press “Resume” when entering down corn at opposite
end, header lowers to Set Point 2
6. Press “Shift+Resume” to enter Headland Mode at end of
field. Header raises, acre counter stops, tilt centers, etc.
7. Press “Resume” when re-entering row, header goes back
to last active Set Point “2”
Continue operation in same way at each headland to
automatically raise, then return header to last-used height
setting when re-entering field.
• Quick-stop button stops the header, feeder and unloading
auger with one pulse on the yellow button on the top of the
handle. (To re-start drives, cycle control switches
momentarily to the “off” position, then back “on.”)
Shift button on the back of the propulsion lever handle allows
the operator to select secondary features (see figure 11.2).
• “Shift” plus header tilt right-left adjusts the edge offset
of AccuGuide® assisted steering when enabled. “Nudges”
a set distance each time button is pushed to adjust all
guidance lines.
• “Shift” plus reel fore-and-aft controls draper header
fore-and-aft tilt
• “Shift” plus header Resume applies headland mode by
raising the header, disabling the acre counter, self centering Terrain Tracker® and turning on the side “row
finder” lights
Figure 11.1
• “Resume” returns header to last active set point, re-starts
acre counting, auto tilt
• “Double-clicking” shift button engages AccuGuide®
Example Headlands Mode and Header Height Set Point in
Corn Head Application
• Set Point 1 at normal header height for standing corn
• Set Point 2 for down corn at one end of field
1. Enter row, activate Set Point 2 for down corn
2. Press “Resume” when leaving down corn area, entering
standing corn, operate at Set Point 1
3. Press “Shift+Resume” to enter Headland Mode at end of
field. Header raises, acre counter stops, tilt centers, etc.
4. Press “Resume” when re-entering row, header goes back
to last active Set Point 1
Figure 11.2
Header Operating Modes-Combines with Ground Height and Pressure Sensors
Mode
Header Position
Working Setting
RTC (return-to-cut)/manual
Off ground, height sensors not touching
Feeder position
Auto height
Off ground, height sensors touching
Height above ground
Pressure float
On ground-grain/draper only
Ground pressure
11
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Right Hand Console
Several control switches and adjustment knobs on the right
console are used for a multitude of combine separator or
header control adjustment (see figure 12.1). Some specific
controls are:
• Reel Speed Selector—select Manual or Automatic
• Reel Speed Control—direct reel speed control in “Manual,”
reel speed/ground speed offset in “Automatic”
• Minimum reel speed—sets minimum reel speed when in
Automatic
• Auto Header Height Adjustment switch—change header
height when in Automatic control
Figure 12.1
• Auto Header Height Set control—sets header height
positions Setting 1 and Setting 2
• Field/Road Mode switch—road mode disables separator,
feeder, reel drive/position, unloader drive/swing; enables
transport speed
• In-cab sieve adjustment—allows electronic remote
adjustment of upper and lower sieve clearance
• Concave clearance
• Cleaning fan rpm
• Rotor rpm
Combine and header setting values are displayed on the A-Post
RCD monitor while adjustments are being made.
• Settings can be displayed during operation on the A-Post
Custom LCD or RCD monitors
A-Post Displays
The instrument panel A-Post display is made up of five basic
segments (see figure 12.2).
• Three analog type gauges
Figure 12.2
• Warning indicator lamps
• Shaft speed, digital rpm and mph and header height
indicator
• Reconfigurable LCD
Engine Oil Pressure Low
• Control keypad
Engine Oil Pressure
Analog Gauges
Coolant Temperature High
The analog gauges include (see figure 12.3):
• Oil pressure gauge
Coolant Temperature
• Low oil pressure warning light
• Coolant temperature gauge
Fuel Level Low
• High coolant temperature warning light
• Fuel level gauge
• Low fuel level warning light
12
Fuel Level
Figure 12.3
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Warning Lamp Array
• Engine pre-heat
Warning lamp array provides operators with reminders of
critical and non-critical conditions requiring operator attention
(see figure 13.1). All warning lamps are illuminated on startup
for a 1-2 second test. Indicators are displayed for:
• Battery charge warning
• Engine warning–non-critical fault conditions
• Laser alarms (sounds continuously while alarm condition is present)—Shut Down Alarm
• Stop engine–critical engine conditions (low engine oil
pressure, high coolant temperature, high intake manifold
temperature; engine shuts down within 30 seconds of
warning)
• Combine malfunction
• Header malfunction
• Grain tank full
Warning indicators are supplemented by four types of
audible alarms.
• Klaxon alarm (sounds two times in succession)—
Alarms or Errors
• Chime alarm (sounds once unless otherwise noted)—
Normal Machine Functions
• High tone alarm (sounds three times in succession)—
Grain Tank Full
• Park brake
• Water in fuel
!
• Coolant level low (not used)
Engine System Fault
• Intake manifold high temperature (2 levels)
Stop Engine Warning
!
Park Brake On
!
• Automatic lube on
• Hydraulic fluid low-level indicator
• Hydraulic fluid temperature high
• Unloader auger on
• Trailer/header turn signals on
• Air filter restriction
!
Combine System Fault
Header/Reel System Fault
Water in Fuel
Intake Manifold Temp High
Lube System Fault
Hydraulic Fluid Level Low
Unloader Auger On
Hydraulic Oil Temp High
Trailer/Header Turn Signals On
Unloader Tube Out
Battery Charging Fault
Air Filter Restriction
• Unloader out
Engine Preheat On
Grain Tank Full
Figure 13.1
Custom LCD Display
The custom LCD display is divided into three sections:
• Shaft speed monitor
• Tachometer
• Header position monitor
Shaft Speed Monitor
Icons illuminate when combine separator component speed
drops below set levels (see figure 13.2). Monitored speeds are:
• Feeder
• Rotor
• Clean grain elevator
Rotor
• Beater or chopper
• Sieve shaker
• Residue spreader
• Tailings elevator
• Cleaning fan
Shaft Speed Monitor
Grain Elevator
Beater/Chopper
Sieve Shaker
Feeder
Cleaning Fan
Spreader
Tailings Elevator
Figure 13.2
13
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Tachometer Display
Tachometer
Cleaning Fan Speed
The upper line displays (see figure 14.1):
Engine Speed
• Cleaning fan speed
• Engine rpm
Rotor Speed
The upper left button (A) on the keypad toggles between the
display values (see figure 14.2).
Ground Speed
An engine speed alarm is incorporated into the display. If the
(1) feeder is engaged (2) engine speed falls below alarm set
value, but (3) rpm stays above 1800 rpm; the alarm sounds,
and the display value flashes. If any of these conditions
changes, the alarm will stop. (Alarm level is set at the Set-up
Alarm Screen.)
Figure 14.1
A
B
The second line displays:
• Rotor rpm
• Ground speed
The upper right button (B) on the keypad toggles between the
display values.
i
The third line is the Header Position Monitor (see figure 14.3).
The header position (A) and current header-operating mode (B)
are displayed.
Figure 14.2
Header Position Monitor
Manual—Activating Raise/Lower Switches—(A) = Feeder
Position (B) = Momentary arrow in direction of movement
Return to Cut (RTC)— (A) = Feeder position (B) = Constant
Up arrow
A
B
Auto Height Control— (A) = height above ground (B) = Constant
Up and Down arrows
Up arrow on constantly
- Return to cut
Both arrows on constantly
- Auto Height
Down arrow on constantly
- Pressure Float
Figure 14.3
Pressure Float— (A) = percent ground pressure (B) = Constant
Down arrow
RCD (Reconfigurable LCD Display)
The RCD is divided into four screen sections capable of
displaying four separate and independent pieces of information
(see figure 14.4).
• Operator can select numerous control and monitor screens
to be displayed
• Other information such as alarm, abort or error messages,
notifications or service reminders my take priority over and
temporarily replace selected monitor or adjustment displays
A 12-button keypad is used to control operator-selected
displays (see figure 14.5). Four of the 12 buttons are used for
screen navigation.
Figure 14.4
Increase
Setting
Enter
Cancel
• Enter button number
• “Increase” setting value button
• “Decrease” setting value button
• Cancel or exit button
The remaining eight function selection buttons are used to
change display and adjustment screens
14
i
Decrease
Setting
Figure 14.5
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Harvest 1
Harvest 2
% Engine Power
% Engine Power
Rotor Grain Loss
Total Grain Loss
Sieve Grain Loss
Header Lateral Tilt
Tailings Volume
Not Used in NA
Monitor screens are displayed by default when no other information is being requested by the user. Any of the navigation
buttons, “Enter,” “Up,” “Down” or “Cancel” can be used to toggle between the two Harvest Screens.
Concave Clearance, Sieve Opening and Road
Mode screens are displayed when corresponding
right hand console switches are activated.
• Clearance adjustments are displayed live while the operator changes settings, and
for 2.5 seconds after the switch is released
• Clearance settings can also be displayed
on Combine info screens
Concave Clearance
Upper Sieve Opening
Lower Sieve Opening
Road Mode
RCD Navigation (see figure 14.5)
• Use
• Use
• Use
• Use
• Use
the designated function selection key to display the desired screen
the same key to scroll through and select the individual changeable item
“Up” and “Down” keys to adjust changeable item settings or values
“Enter” key to save new settings
“Cancel” to return to the previous screen
15
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
* Enter/Cancel Screen
Enter/Cancel Screen will display if data has been changed and a key is pressed attempting to move
to another changeable item. Screen prompts user to either Save or Cancel previous entries before
changing to new item.
Used for Custom LCD
Service Reminder Screen:
(Hours to Next Service)
Coolant Filter
Engine Oil & Filter
PTO Fluid Change
Gear Case Fluid Change
Engine Fuel Filter
Hydraulic Fuel & Filter
Coolant & Conditioner
Selection Menu Screens
(Accessed by pressing Service
Key within 5 seconds of startup)
Set Up Menu
Alarms
Machine Specs
Service Intervals
Machine Configuration
Calibration Menu*
Machine Calibration
Header Calibration
Diagnostic Menu
Error History
Erase error history
Troubleshooting Menus
Revision Level Menu
Software/Firmware versions
Area Change Screen:
Zero Area
Header Width
Area Counter “off” Height
Hours Screen:
Engine Hours
Separator Hours
Separator “Trip” Hours
Speaker Volume
Backlight Brightness
Grain Scan Change Screen:
Rotor Loss Sensitivity
Sieve Loss Sensitivity
Seed Size
Tailings Sensitivity
Combine Info Screen:
Concave Position
Upper Sieve Opening
Lower Sieve Opening
Total Area
Electrical Power
Flex Pressure
Feeder Speed
Beater/Chopper Speed
Sieve Shaker Speed
Spreader Speed
Clean Grain Elevator Speed
Tailings Elevator Speed
Chaff Spreader Speed (Option)
Header Sensitivity Change Screen:
Height Sensitivity
Tilt Sensitivity
Tilt Balance (1000 & 2000 Headers only)
Header Type Menu (press “Enter”)
Auger/Draper
Platform Type
Reel Position
Reel Drive
Corn Head
Corn Head Platform Type
Hydraulic Stripper Plates
Reel Drive (3rd party)
Pickup Head Screen
* Numerous calibration screens allow the operator to calibrate electronic controllers and system components so they accurately correspond to
physical positions and conditions. Calibration procedures are automated, and require operator intervention to start and end the processes. The
Operator’s Manual provides instructions for the correct calibration of various systems such as concaves and sieve clearances and operating rpm
for fan, rotor, etc. Consult your Case IH dealer.
Two types of changeable item highlighting:
• Reverse Video - value of item can be changed directly by pressing “increase” or “decrease” keys
Reverse
Video
• Rectangle around perimeter of cell–another set of selections (submenu) are
available for this item
• Use designated function selection key to move rectangle to desired selection
• Press “Enter” key to access next selections**
• Final selections will be directly changeable Reverse Video
** Some functions have another level of selections (rectangle). Examples are: Header Type; Selection
Menu items - i.e. Set-Up, Calibration, Diagnostic, Revision Level
16
Rectangle
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Quick Reference Card
A Quick Reference Card is included with your Operator’s Manual. It is a handy tool for step-by-step help when navigating the
A-Post displays (see figure 17.1).
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O
l
r
Figure 17.1
17
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Automatic Climate Control
The Automatic Temperature Control system can be used in
several ways to provide the operator with optimal cab
environmental control (see figure 18.1).
• The climate control switch is pressed to turn on the
automatic climate control function. A letter (A) is shown
in the display when automatic climate control is enabled.
If the switch is pressed a second time, the function is
turned off.
• The de-fog control switch is pressed to turn the de-fog
function on. A de-fog icon is shown in the display when de fog is enabled. Pressing the button again turns de-fog off.
• The temperature control knob is turned clockwise to
increase temperature, and counter-clockwise to decrease
temperature. Automatic temperature control is achieved when the dial is placed in the solid blue or red bands. The
display indicates the desired cab temperature based on the
adjustment of the temperature control (see figure 18.2).
B
A
A. Blower Control
B. Left Climate Control Switch - Right-De-fog Switch
C. Temperature Control
A
• If the knob is turned completely in either direction,
the system will operate in either maximum heat (red) or
maximum cool (blue) mode, with no automatic control
• The blower control is infinitely adjustable, and is turned
clockwise to increase blower speed. When the automatic
mode is enabled, the blower speed will increase and
decrease as necessary to maintain consistent temperature.
If the blower control is adjusted while in automatic mode,
the blower speed will be constant, and the system will
attempt to maintain constant temperature. However, the
limited blower speed may prevent even temperature control.
C
Figure 18.1
B
C
A. Digital Temperature Setting
B. De-fog Mode Indicator
C. Automatic Mode Indicator
Figure 18.2
• Cycling the climate control switch will return the blower to
automatic control
• A “Service Manual” symbol in the display indicates a
system problem requiring attention
Automatic Crop Settings (ACS)
The Automatic Crop Settings feature, or ACS, is available on
combines equipped with the AFS Pro 600 display, and incab sieve adjustment options. With ACS, working condition
settings for various crops can be stored and recalled for later
use. ACS provides automatic adjustment of the cleaning fan
speed, rotor speed, concave position, upper sieve opening and
lower sieve opening.
Figure 18.3
• Refer to the Pro 600 Operator's Manual for specific screen
navigation procedures
To use ACS for the first time, the system must be enabled in
the Pro 600. In the combine set up screen (see figure 18.3).
• ACS enable screen is selected. Select “On” to enable ACS,
which will remain enabled unless intentionally disabled.
Create a new Pro 600 layout, including Crop Type, Work
Condition and Machine Settings selections.
18
Figure 18.4
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Automatic Crop Settings ACS (cont.)
• Touch the Crop Type cell and select the applicable crop in
the existing list of Work Conditions (see figure 18.4)
• Default settings are the factory settings for the selected
Crop Type. Default settings cannot be overwritten.
Adjustments to factory settings must be saved to a new
condition name.
• Touch the Work Condition cell (see figure 19.1). Select
an existing Work Condition or touch “New” to create a
new condition (see figure 19.2). A keypad will be
displayed to name new conditions or edit existing
conditions (see figure 19.3).
Figure 19.1
• Selecting none will disable ACS
Three buttons in the AFS Pro 600 Machine Setting window
will control the ACS system once Crop Type and Work
Condition are set (see figure 19.4).
• “Work Conditions Save” ➀ saves the current machine
settings to the currently selected Crop Type and Work
Condition
• The “Save” button will be grayed out and inactive if the
Work Condition is “Default” or if the current machine
settings are the same as the currently selected condition
Figure 19.2
• “Work Conditions Set/Recall” ➁ applies machine settings
for the currently selected Work Condition
• Selection will not be active if machine settings match the
selected Work Condition
• Use "Save/Recall" to activate previous or default settings
when starting a new Crop Type or Work Condition
• “Work Condition Info Show” ➂ displays current machine
settings compared to Work Condition setting values
• Allows operator to evaluate deviations from current
condition setting values
Figure 19.3
• Operator may choose to create a new condition to save current settings for future use
Warning Icons
Three different warning icons may appear in the status
warning area in the upper left corner of the screen (see
figure 19.5).
• “Cannot reach machine setting” ➀ may be displayed
when the machine component cannot meet the setting
request. Examples would be rotor speed outside the
currently selected rotor speed range, or sieve settings that
cannot be achieved due to debris between the sieve fingers.
➀
➁
➂
IMPORTANT—Machine settings will not be Saved or Applied unless
operator presses Button ➀ (Save), or Button ➁ (Set/Recall) after
creating or changing Work Condition
Figure 19.4
• “Shift Rotor Gear Down” ➁ or “Shift Rotor Gear Up”
➂ icons indicate the rotor has reached the maximum or
minimum speed for the selected rotor gearbox range, and a
range shift is necessary.
➀
➁
➂
Figure 19.5
19
CONTROLS AND INSTRUMENTS
Using ACS
The engine must be running and the separator on to apply ACS settings.
• Mechanical settings change at the same rate as when right-hand console switches are activated manually
• Settings can be monitored on the A-Post display while the condition is being applied. Setting displays function the same as
when making manual settings using console switches.
• All rpm settings are adjusted to high-idle, threshing speed, therefore displayed rpm may differ if the condition is applied at
a lower engine rpm
• Any time a condition is requested that matches current settings, the condition will be grayed out and inactive
Up to 60 different Work Conditions can be stored by the ACS system. Operators are encouraged to create new Work Conditions
as necessary when harvest conditions that are likely to repeat are encountered, and saving machine settings for later use will be
convenient and efficient.
Examples of harvest conditions in which new Work Conditions may be created are:
• Changing moisture conditions for crop maturity or time of day
• Changing settings due spot conditions such as weed infestations or wet areas
• Crop varieties with significantly different threshing or separating characteristics
Starting a new crop with default settings is a common method of machine set up. As the machine settings are fine-tuned, the
operator should use the “Show Info” button to compare current settings to the default condition.
• If settings vary greatly from default, consider creating a new condition that may be treated as the starting condition or
“default” for future use. Remember, factory default settings cannot be overwritten.
20
Maintenance
During harvest time, it is easy to get in a hurry and perhaps neglect one or two “minor” maintenance items. Before long, more
items may start to seem “minor,” in an effort to get to the field a few minutes sooner. Then, a breakdown may be a reminder
that no maintenance item is “minor.” Not only will the repair be more costly than maintenance, it will be much more timeconsuming. Be sure to follow all the maintenance recommendations in your Operator's Manual, and enhance your combine
productivity all season long.
ENGINE COMPARTMENT
18
4
3
2
C
Figure 21.1
Refer to Table 23.1
ROTOR DRIVE
14
G
6
15
H
16
7
Refer to Table 23.1
Figure 21.2
21
Maintenance
5
17 24
21
23
10
27
J
D
28
1
A
22
B
25 13
26
9 11
12
Figure 22.1
Refer to Table 23.1
30
32
F
29
E
I
31
Refer to Table 23.1
8
20
33
19
12
Figure 22.2
➀Machine must be parked on level ground, with header lowered when checking hydraulic oil level.
➁Engine oil must meet or exceed API Service category CI-4. Refer to Operator’s Manual for the correct viscosity for local temperature and operating conditions.
➂Use only heavy-duty, low silicate coolant. Automotive anti-freeze may not be low silicate, and should NOT be used. Mix ethylene glycol and clean water in 50/50 ratio for
best protection. Change coolant and coolant conditioner filter every 2000 hours.
➃The air filter should be serviced when the Air Filter Restriction Indicator illuminates. Frequently perform a visual inspection of joints, clamps and gaskets in the air
induction system. Follow Operator’s Manual filter service procedures to assure reliable air filtration.
➄Apply ONLY two pumps of grease.
➅Lubricate chains with Case IH Chain and Cable Lube (M20832) or SAE 30 or heavier engine oil. Avoid excessive lubrication in severe dirty conditions. Lubricate chains
after operation while chains are warm, allowing lubricant to freely flow into the chain joints and bushings. Do not lubricate tailings, feeder or clean grain elevator chains
that run in grain.
➆Pump until grease comes out of rear seal.
➇Check daily for the first week of initial use. Re-torque front wheels to 1000 ft lb, rear wheels to 302-363 ft lb (non-powered) or 406-450 ft lb (powered). See specific
instructions in Operator’s Manual for initial tightening procedure when wheels are re-mounted.
➈Refer to tire inflation/header size chart in Operator’s Manual.
➉Change/service fuel filters at specified interval, or when power loss is observed. Change the fuel tank vent filter every 600 hours.
22
Maintenance
Service Interval
Check
Lube Change
AR=As Required
AR
AR
AR
600 ➉
10
10
10 ➀
REF
Description
1
Air Filter
2
Fuel Filter
3
Alternator Screen
Lubricant
➃
300
4
Engine Oil Level
AKCELA No.1 Engine Oil ➁
1200
5
Hydraulic Reservoir Level
AKCELA Hy-Tran
10
6
Rotor Driven Pulley
AKCELA 251H EP ➆
10
7
Rotor Driven Pulley Cam Bearings-2
AKCELA 251H EP
8
Rock Trap-Empty
Moisture Sensor (if equipped)
10
10
50
9
10
100
10
Grain Elevator Drive Chain-Oil
Chain Lube ➅
10
50
11
Tailings Elevator Drive Chain-Oil
Chain Lube ➅
10
12
Chaffer Hanger Bearing (RH & LH)
AKCELA 251H EP
10
13
Tailings Delivery Auger Bearing
AKCELA 251H EP
50
14
Rotor Speed Control Bushings, Front
AKCELA 251H EP
50
15
Rotor Drive Pulley
AKCELA 251H EP
50
50
16
Rotor Speed Control Bearing, Rear
AKCELA 251H EP ➄
2000
17
Coolant Level
Ethylene Glycol Mix ➂
18
Auxiliary Pump Tensioner Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
19
Tire Pressure
50
50 ➈
50
20
Rock Trap Drive Chain
21
Fuel System Water Separator-Drain
50
22
Steering Axle Ball Joints-2
AKCELA 251H EP
50
23
Straw Chopper Idler Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
24
Straw Spreader Idler Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
25
Cleaning Unit Idler Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
26
Cleaning Fan Pulley
AKCELA 251H EP
50
27
Fan Drive Belt Tightener Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
28
Feeder Engage Idler Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
29
Header Jackshaft Belt Idler Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
50
30
Unloader Drive Tensioner Arm
AKCELA 251H EP
31
Feeder Reverser
50 ➉
50
50
100 ➇
32
Unloader & Auger Drive Chains
33
Wheel Nut & Bolt Torque
Chain Lube ➅
Chain Lube ➅
100
100
NA
100 Hour Lubrication & Maintenance
Per Operator’s Manual
300
300
NA
300 Hour Lubrication & Maintenance
Per Operator’s Manual
600
600
NA
600 Hour Lubrication & Maintenance
Per Operator’s Manual
1200
1200
NA
1200 Hour Lubrication & Maintenance
Per Operator’s Manual
GEARBOX SERVICE
Service Interval
Check
Lube Change
REF
Description
Lubricant
A
Transmission
AKCELA Hy-Tran ULTRA
B
Final Drives
AKCELA 135 H EP 85W-140 Gear Lube
C
PTO Housing
AKCELA Hy-Tran ULTRA
D
Feeder & Cleaning Fan Gear Case
AKCELA Gear Lubricant SSL SAE 75W-90
Rotor Gear Case
AKCELA 135 H EP 85W-140 Gear Lube
100
100
600
600
100
600
100
600
100
600
G
100
600
H
Straw Chopper Gear Case (if equipped)
AKCELA Hy-Tran ULTRA
300
600
I
2-Speed Feeder Gear Case (if equipped)
AKCELA Hy-Tran ULTRA
300
600
J
Inclined Auger Gear Case
AKCELA 135 H EP 85W-140 Gear Lube
300
600
E
Lower Unloader Gear Case
AKCELA 135 H EP 85W-140 Gear Lube
F
Upper Unloader Gear Case
AKCELA 135 H EP 85W-140 Gear Lube
600
Figure 21.1 Engine Compartment
Figure 21.2 Rotor Drive
Figure 22.1
Figure 22.2
Table 23.1
23
Maintenance
Rock Trap
The mechanical rock trap on current 88 Series and prior
model Axial-Flow combines is mounted at the top of the feeder
housing, directly in front of the rotor. The rock trap uses a
3-blade beater to direct stones from the crop flow from the
feeder to the rotor downward into the rock trap (see figure
24.1). The rock trap will fill with grain and crop material
during normal use, however the force of rocks expelled from
the beater will push rocks into the trap.
The rock trap must be emptied daily, more often if harvesting
in rocky conditions (see figure 24.2).
The balance between optimum rock protection performance
and feeder capacity is determined by the beater speed and
beater blade extension adjustments.
• Rock trap performance is greatest with faster beater speed,
and beater extensions adjusted to the fully extended
position (see figure 24.3)
Excessive beater speed and blade extension may restrict crop
flow. The beater blades passing rapidly past the feeder form a
“wall” that inhibits the flow of material past the beater, and
on to the rotor.
24
• Beater blade extensions are mounted with slotted holes.
Retracting extensions will allow the greatest material flow,
however rock protection will be reduced.
• Sprockets on the left side of the feeder are used to adjust
beater speed (see figure 24.4). A 23-tooth driven sprocket
is standard equipment on 88 Series combines, and drives
the beater at 612 rpm at full throttle. This speed provides
a good balance of rock protection while preventing
wrapping of green, weedy crop material.
• A 35/18 tooth set is available from your Case IH dealer
for a beater speed of 913 rpm. The higher speed provides
enhanced rock protection and feeding.
Depending on feeding conditions and the number of rocks that
could potentially be picked up while harvesting, operators need
to make adjustments to speed and blade extension to protect
the combine with minimal impact on feeding performance.
• In tough feeding conditions or material wrapping, such as
a high degree of green stems, serrated blade extensions
can be ordered from your Case IH dealer and installed on
the beater to improve feeding aggressiveness
• Lower beater speeds will also reduce the incidence of wrapping
Figure 24.1
Figure 24.3
Figure 24.2
Figure 24.4
Maintenance
AFX Rotor Impeller Blade Wear
The AFX rotor impeller can wear significantly before adverse
feeding performance is observed. As the impeller wears, the
distance between the impeller and transition cone does not
vary greatly, and has little effect on crop flow.
• Wear may be somewhat uneven, especially in small grains. This is normal, and should not be cause for replacement
(see figure 25.1).
• Wear that develops a noticeable “hook” ➀ may lead to hair pinning of material, and impaired flow. Impeller replacement is necessary in this case (see figure 25.2).
• Replacement is indicated when wear progresses into
mounting bolt holes, or feeding is noticeably affected.
Your Case IH dealer can refer to Service Bulletin
NHE SB 029 05 for the correct method to measure impeller wear to determine if replacement is suggested
(see figure 25.3).
Figure 25.1
➀
Figure 25.2
Figure 25.3
25
Maintenance
Biodiesel Fuel
Wheel Bolt Torque
The use of biodiesel fuel is on the rise. A biofuel blend, up to
a maximum of 5% (B5) has been approved for use in Case IH
diesel engines. While biodiesel has distinct advantages such
as its clean burning characteristics, users of biodiesel should
be aware of some specific conditions.
Wheel bolt torque must be checked when new and periodically
thereafter. Refer to the Operator’s Manual for correct torque
for your combine. An accurate torque wrench is necessary to
confirm correct tightening values.
• Biodiesel blends attract more moisture, and may require
more frequent water separator draining
• Biodiesel should not be left in engines that are stored
more than four months
• A lower cloud point may contribute to harder cold weather
starting, making biodiesel less attractive than conventional
diesel fuel for winter use
• Depending on fuel quality, more frequent filter changes
may be required
In addition to low-emissions, other biodiesel advantages include:
• Biodiesel mixes well with conventional diesel fuel
• Oil change intervals are not affected with biodiesel use
As with all other fuels, purchase high quality biodiesel
fuel from known reputable suppliers to assure trouble-free
combine operation.
26
Welding on Combines
Microcomputers and solid-state electrical components have
become a way of life, and today’s combines are no exception.
This makes it essential that special precautions be taken
prior to welding ANYWHERE on the combine. Solid-state
components have little tolerance for errant voltage. The high
current flow during the welding process can damage sensitive
controllers and components on the combine, with disastrous
consequences.
• Disconnect ALL battery cables prior to welding. This
includes positive AND negative cables. (The electrical
system uses two 12-volt batteries connected in parallel.
This means that both positive cables connect to the electrical system, and both negative cables connect to
ground.)
• Follow Operator’s Manual safety instructions for cable
removal, disconnecting negative cables first, and re connecting negative cables last.
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Initial Settings For Rotors
Every experienced operator knows crop and harvesting conditions vary from season to season, and field to field. Taking advantage
of years of experience, the following tables have been assembled as recommendations for initial settings as harvest begins (for
average harvesting conditions). Fine-tuning as harvest progresses will allow you and your combine to maximize performance.
Combine Separator Adjustment Slide Rule
The settings in the table are incorporated into a handy slide rule for quick access to setting information for your particular crop
and conditions (see figure 27.1).
See your Case IH dealer for the slide rule for your combine model.
PM-12749
Front
PM-12749
Back
Figure 27.1
27
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
AFX Rotor—Initial Crop Settings
The threshing, separating and cleaning settings in the table below (table 28.1) are furnished only as a guide, and all settings
shown are for average crop conditions. Different crop and field conditions may require deviations from shown settings. Use good
threshing procedure and past experience to produce desired separation and cleaning results.
Crop
Alfalfa
Rotor
Concave
Type
Gear
Indicator
Speed ➈
➃
Range
650
Second
5
Chaffer Setting (Inch) ➆
Shoe Setting
Setting Fan Speed Grate Type
(Inch)
Type
(Inch)
Front
Middle
Rear
Type
SW
1 1/8
1/4
3 /8
3 /8
1 1/8
Round Hole
500
Slot
1/8
1/2
1 /2
5 /8
1
1/8
3 /8
Barley
700
Third
10
SW
1
1000
Slot
Lentil Beans
300
First
10
LW
1 1/8
1/2
1 /2
5 /8
1 1/8
1/8
550
Slot
LW
1
1/8
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1
1/8
3 /8
850
Slot
1/8
3/8
1 /2
5 /8
1
1/8
5/16
Pinto Beans
300
First
15
Sunflower
300
First
25
LW
1
770
Bar
Grass ➄
550
Second
10-20
SW
1 1/8
1/4
3 /8
3 /8
1 1/8
1 /4
450
Slot/Solid
Bentgrass ➄
900
Third
0
SW
1 1/8
1/4
3 /8
3 /8
1 1/8
1/16
450
Slot
Bluegrass ➄
400
First
7-8
SW
1 1/8
3/8
1 /2
1 /2
1 1/8
1/16
500
Slot
Brome ➄ ➇
500
Second
15
SW
1 1/8
5/8
3 /4
3 /4
1 1/8
5/16
650
Slot
1/8
3/8
1 /2
1 /2
1
1/8
1 /4
450
Slot
3/8
1 /2
1 /2
1 1/8
1/16
500
Slot
1/2
1 /2
5 /8
3/8
1100
1 /4
1 /2
1 /2
1 5/8
CLOSZ
5/16
1200
1/2
1 /2
5 /8
9/16
1000
1 /4
1 /2
1 /2
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1/2
1200
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
3/8
900
1 /8
3 /8
3 /8
1 1/8
1 5/8
CLOSZ
5/16
1100
Rye ➄
650
Second
20-25
SW
White Clover ➄
900
Third
0
SW
Second
15-25
LW
First or
Second
15-25
LW
First
15-25
LW/SL
Corn
400
500
Corn (w/straight
separator bars)
➀➁
300
Edible Beans
300
450
(Navy, Pinto)
400
Flax
850
Third
5
SW
Maize/Milo
450
Second
15
LW
Mustard
300
First
20
Oats
600
Second
15
Popcorn
400
First
5-15
1
1 1/8
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1 5/8
CORN
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1 5/8
CORN
1 1/8
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1/4
1 /4
1 /2
3/8
1 /2
1 /2
SW
1 1/8
1 1/8
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1 1/8
1/2
1 /2
LW
1 1/8
1/2
LW
3/8
Bar
Bar
Bar
1 /8
500
Slot
5/16
1100
Bar
1 /2
1 1/8
1 1/8
1 5/8
CLOSZ
1 1/8
1/16
800
Slot
1 /2
5 /8
1 1/8
3 /8
780
Slot
3 /8
1 /2
1 /4
1
1/8
3 /8
700
Bar
1/8
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1
1/8
3 /8
Peas - Black Eye
300
First
10
LW
1
700
Bar
Rape
400
First
20
SW
1 1/8
1/4
3 /8
1 /2
1 1/8
1/16
600
Slot
Rice ➂ ➁
850
Third
10
LW
1 1/8
3/8
3 /8
1 /2
1 1/8
5/16
880
Bar
Wild Rice
600
Second
5
LW
1 1/8
1/2
1 /2
1 /2
1 1/8
9/16
850
Bar
LW
1
1/8
3/8
1 /2
5 /8
1
1/8
5/16
800
Bar
1
1/8
1/2
5 /8
5 /8
1
1/8
3 /8
1050
Bar
1
1/8
1/4
1 /2
1 /2
1
1/8
1 /4
1050
Slot
Safflower
Soybeans ➅
Wheat ➀
300
350
650
1050
First
First or
Second
Third
20
15-20
10
LW
SW
➀ Straight separator bars may be needed for harvesting corn yielding more than 150 bushels per acre (9 400 kg/ha) and in other crops during dry conditions. Increase fan
speed to 1250 rpm in wet corn.
➁ Once installed, straight separator bars need to be removed only for harvesting rice and harvesting rice and edible beans and similar viney crops.
➂ Tough rice requires the use of spiked rasp bars over the concave area and the grate area. Set concave indicators at Number 20 when spiked rasp bars are used in the
concave area.
IMPORTANT: Concave zero must be re-calibrated after installation of the spiked rasp bars or the rasp bars could make contact with the concave.
➃ LW - Large Wire (1/4 Inch Diameter); SW - Small Wire (3/16 Inch Diameter); SL - Smooth Slotted.
➄ Use of non-spiked rasp bars in all positions is recommended for most grass seed harvest conditions. Spiked bars may be helpful in extremely damp crops. Rotate fan
cutoff rearward to the vertical position to reduce air volume.
➅ Some soybeans may require rotor speeds up to 700 rpm or more.
➆ The front portion of the chaffer sieve is, by design, to be set slightly more closed than the rest of the sieve
28
Table 28.1
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Evaluating Grain Loss and Combine Performance
It’s harvest-time, and the return on a season’s investment in labor, land, fertilizer, herbicide and pesticides all lies with the
combine’s ability to put every kernel in the grain tank. A tall order, and in reality impossible. But the Axial-Flow combines from
Case IH will get you closer to perfection than any other combine.
Some simple steps should be taken as the combine is adjusted to match each crop and season, to check the cutting, threshing
and separating performance of the combine, and isolate where adjustment may be necessary to get the best possible sample in
the tank, with minimal loss.
A structured method of determining the source of loss is essential prior to making any adjustment to reduce loss. The illustration
demonstrates how to make an accurate assessment of the source of harvest loss (see figure 29.1).
Remove straw spreaders. Enter an average area of the field, away from edges. Harvest a full swath, at normal
operating speed. Travel a minimum of approximately two combine lengths into the field after the machine is full
and delivering grain to the grain tank. Stop ground travel and the separator.
Back up approximately one combine
length. Safely stop the combine, and
perform seed loss evaluation.
Figure 29.1
The number of seeds counted in each area indicated represents
loss in various stages of harvest:
Area A: Pre-harvest loss in standing crop, prior to contact with
the reel.
Area B: Pre-harvest + Header loss. (Header loss = B – A) Loss
occurring at the header due to shatter, dropped heads.
Area C: Pre-harvest + Header + Separator Loss. (Separator
loss = C – B – A) Combine loss will not be isolated to the
rotor or cleaning system.
1. Note the current upper and lower sieve settings. Open upper
and lower sieves fully, and repeat the test as illustrated. If
observed separator loss is unchanged, loss is coming from
the rotor. If loss decreases, observed loss from first test was
from the cleaning system.
2. Perform the initial test with straw spreaders installed.
Make sure the separator has stopped before backing away
from cut crop. Observed loss in Area “C” is from the sieves
(cleaning system). Observed loss in Area “D” is rotor loss
that was spread across the width of the machine by the
straw spreaders.
Isolating Separator Loss
Combine loss can be isolated to rotor or cleaning system loss
in either of two ways.
29
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Determine the amount of loss at each source.
The next step is to count the grains lost on the ground in each
“counting area.” Each “counting area” should be equal to about
10 square feet. The amount of grain lost depends on whether
the collection is from windrowing or spreading. If collection is
taken when windrowing the entire width of the cleaning system
needs to be collected. If collection is taken when spreading,
assuming even distribution, count the seeds within the area.
To convert the amount of loss you find at any point to bushels,
refer to the seed loss tables in your Operator’s Manual. Losses
should be checked in several areas and averaged to eliminate
the effects of any uneven feeding.
Make the proper adjustments.
Once the loss counts have been performed as described,
required areas of attention will be identified.
• To reduce header losses, make sure header is adjusted
properly as explained in the Operator’s Manual
• Before making adjustments for separator losses, be sure
there are no grain leaks due to missing bolts, open clean
out doors, or other obvious causes
• For adjustments to the rotor and cleaning system, see your
Operator’s Manual. For additional separator adjustments
and recommendations, see pages 28.
“Power-Stall” Problem Diagnosis (Quick Stop)
Problems with internal components are difficult to analyze.
If you’re losing grain at the separator, you may want to use the
“power-stall” diagnostic method.
Increase Productivity With The Case IH
AFX Rotor
With over 30 years of experience in rotary technology, Case IH
stands tall with the most advanced design in rotary technology
on the market today. Benefits of the AFX rotor include:
• Increases throughput by as much as 25% in tough crops or
harvesting conditions
• Allows harvesting earlier in the day, and later at night
• Smoother, uninterrupted crop flow means more consistent
delivery to the cleaning system
• Reduces peak horsepower demands in tough conditions,
reducing load on the rotor drive belt
• Creates a powerful vacuum to move dust away from the
feeder house and cab for better visibility
• Quieter operation
• Improved fuel efficiency
Straight separator bars (A) do not need to be removed to harvest
other crops. These separation bars control material flow for
effective separation. However, they are not recommended for
rice.
• The position of the standard eight straight separator bars
are for a corn combine equipped with the AFX rotor (see
figure 30.2)
• The position of the four straight separator bars in a
combine equipped for use in small grains with the AFX
rotor (see figure 30.3)
• The “power-stall” uses an approved method of stopping the
separator quickly while harvesting
• By preventing the separator from emptying, as would
be the case in a normal shutdown, the procedure allows
inspection of the inside of the combine as if it were in
operation (see figure 30.1)
A
Straight Separator Bar
• There will be some major differences between the
conditions observed and those that exist during operation.
Even with these obvious limitations, the procedure can be
an extremely useful diagnostic “tool.”
• See the Operator’s Manual under the heading “Quick Stop”
Problem Diagnosis for a description of the procedure
Figure 30.2
B
Helical Rotor Kicker
Figure 30.1
30
Figure 30.3
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Increase Productivity With the Case IH
AFX Rotor (cont.)
Helical kickers (B) are used to move material from the rotor
cage into the discharge beater or chopper.
Some additional optional threshing and separating components
are available to address specific crop conditions.
• Interrupter bars are used to increase threshing
aggressiveness in hard-threshing small grains. The effect of
Interrupter bars is to increase threshing area with
additional concave bars (see figure 31.1).
• Spiked rasp bars increase agitation of the crop mat as it
moves through the rotor cage (see figure 31.2). Spiked
rasp bars will provide additional separation in heavy straw
and crop residue conditions.
• Smooth rasp bars can be installed on AFX rotors (see figure
31.3). Smooth rasp bars are recommended for use in food
grade crops such as food corn where minimal crop damage
is a requirement. Dealers can find more information in
Service Bulletin NHE SB 001 92.
Straw Spreader Distribution Pattern
Distribution of residue from the straw spreaders can be
adjusted by changing spreader speed and bat configuration.
Uneven right/left distribution may be due to the flow of material
to the spreaders from the discharge beater or chopper. Often,
residue flow is greater from the right side of the combine due
to the normal flow of material in the rotor cage.
• Baffle inside the rear of the machine above the sieves is
adjustable to four different positions (see figure 31.4)
Figure 31.4
• Adjustment evens flow to spreaders for more uniform
distribution.
Figure 31.1
Figure 31.2
Figure 31.3
31
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Combine Performance Troubleshooting Tables
The following separator adjustment tables are developed for specific crops. Identify the performance issue requiring attention
in the left column. The numbers indicate the suggested sequence in which adjustment should be performed. Adjustments are
described at the top of the corresponding column. Complete only those adjustments with corresponding numbers. A symbol or
letter appearing below a number indicates the type of adjustment action to be performed, as described in the key with each table.
32
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
33
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
34
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
35
COMBINE ADJUSTMENTS
Increasing the Efficiency of Axial-Flow Combines in Tough Harvest Conditions
These suggestions have helped many combine operators increase their efficiency in challenging conditions:
• If congestion becomes a problem in green, weedy crop conditions, reduce the rotor-to-concave clearance and/or increase the
rotor rpm to help the green material move through the rotor cage
• When harvesting hard-to-thresh grains, help the combine complete the threshing operation by retarding two or more of
the transport vanes to the slow position over the concaves, beginning with the first two vanes. For very severe hard-to-thresh
conditions, such as a heat-stressed crop, interrupter bars can be installed in the concaves. In most cases, however, once
the desired concave clearance is set, the best way to achieve ideal operation is to vary rotor speeds. Another plus for the
Axial-Flow concept.
Optimizing Straw Quality
The grain-on-grain and rubbing nature of the Axial-Flow
combine threshing and separating system can inherently
reduce straw length, making baling straw challenging in some
conditions. Some specific settings, and harvesting conditions
can be implemented to help produce longer length and quality
straw. Special settings will tend to reduce threshing and
separating performance, so a balance of straw value and grain
loss must be determined when making adjustments.
Reduce Aggressiveness of Rotor, and move material through
the Rotor cage quickly:
• Rotor—remove the straight separator bars and replace
them with rasp bars. Do not use spiked rasp bars unless
necessary due to trashy conditions.
• Increase rotor speed and reduce concave clearance to
move straw out of the rotor more quickly with less repeat
contact with the rotor
• Adjust transport vanes over separator grates to the fast position
• Adjust transport vanes over the concave to the mid or fast position
Configure Rotor cage for smoother material flow:
• Use small wire concaves, or at a minimum, in the first
concave position
• Use slotted grates with bars on the outside in the ½ hole
position
• If grain loss is not an issue, use solid separator grates in
the second and third positions
Other machine settings:
• Use a combine with discharge beater instead of straw chopper
• Retract the straw chopper concave and/or reduce chopper/
beater speed
• Reduce rock trap beater
• Remove straw spreaders
• If straw is being driven into the stubble, leave spreader
discs in place, but remove spreader bats or angles
Harvesting conditions:
• Harvest when straw is tough during damp, tough conditions
such as early morning or late evening
• Cut stubble lower for more stem than normal
36
advanced farming systems (AFS)
AFS
The power of information that you gather with the Pro 600
Display operating Case IH AFS Precision Farming systems can
have a greater impact on your operation’s profitability than
many other factors that often get far greater attention. If not
used correctly, a tool’s full potential is seldom realized. With
that thought in mind, some simple guidelines may help you
make AFS operation simple and second nature, and ready to
work for you (see figure 37.1).
Five basic components work together to capture harvest
information as the combine moves through the field.
• The flow sensor measures grain volume
• The moisture sensor measures the grain moisture
• A ground speed sensor and programmed header width
determine coverage area
Figure 37.1
• The yield monitor combines all crop and area data to
populate the touch screen display
• Information is stored on a memory card that transfers data
to desktop software
Add a DGPS receiver and record a data point every 1, 2, or
3 seconds as you travel through the field, to fully realize the
power of information.
To record harvest data, four criteria must be met. Refer to the
appropriate Operator’s Manual for the software version running
in your AFS system.
• A memory card must be inserted in the top slot of the
display before turning the power ON
• The clean grain elevator must be running between 250 and
599 rpm
• Ground speed must be registered
• The header must be lowered below the header cut “stop
height” position
Figure 37.2
When data is being recorded, the “Recording to Data Card”
icon will be displayed in the Status/Warning area.
Grain Moisture and Weight Sensors
The grain moisture sensor operates on the principle of an
electrical current flowing from the sensor fin, through the
grain, and to ground (see figure 37.2).
• The grain moisture sensor fin must be clean for proper
function. A buildup of crop sap can reduce sensor accuracy.
• Remove any crop residue by scraping or using soap and
water or solvent to clean the moisture fin and temperature
sensors
The bypass auger is controlled by a proximity switch that
cycles the auger as required, to assure the sensor fin is
always in contact with grain.
Figure 37.3
37
advanced farming systems (AFS)
Grain Moisture and Weight Sensors (cont.)
Component Calibration
• The bypass auger should be removed and cleaned. Ensure
that the auger has not seized to the plastic block that
supports the non-drive end (see figure 37.3).
To understand the need for system calibration, consider that
AFS operates using electronic components that translate
ground speed, header position, grain moisture and grain
volume data into electrical signals.
NOTE: Operators should monitor Instantaneous Moisture
values while harvesting to confirm the sensor is functioning. If
moisture values do not show some fluctuation, a problem may
exist with the moisture sensor that requires attention to assure
accurate harvest data.
• Many variables make “set-at-the-factory” accuracy
impossible
• The operator manually enters the actual moisture values
and weight from calibration samples
• If moisture readings are consistently very low, the auger
may be operating constantly, preventing grain contact with
the fin. (Likely to occur only in lower yield crop where the
bypass auger removes grain from the bypass as quickly as
it enters.)
• Calibration values can be selectively applied to past or
future harvest data, allowing the system to accurately
reflect the moisture and weight of the grain being harvested
• If moisture readings never change, and remain at a value
likely to be representative of actual grain moisture, the
auger may not be operating. (The sensor is merely
providing a moisture reading of a static sample that is in
the bypass housing.)
• Header stop height (turns counting on and off)
• The auger should operate for 30 seconds after the
separator is disengaged, to clean grain from the bypass.
Check by watching the end of the auger shaft during this
30-second period, to see if the shaft is turning.
• If not, check to assure the moisture sensor bypass auger
fuse is not blown. If problems persist, contact your Case IH
dealer for assistance.
Prior to harvesting, inspect the flow sensor impact plate (see
figure 38.1). Clean the plate if necessary to assure crop flows
smoothly across the surface. If any holes are worn through the
plate it should be replaced.
System inputs that require calibration:
• Distance (used to calculate ground speed)
• Grain Moisture
• Grain Weight
Operators must also remember that adjustment or replacement
of any component that affects calibration requires re-calibration.
• Refer to the Operator’s Manual after re-calibration to use
the correct Utility menu to apply calibration to harvest data
collected after the component is replaced
In understanding the calibration process, the operator will
realize the importance of maintaining an accurate record of load
identification, calibration load weights and moisture test results.
• Make sure scale tickets are identified with the AFS farm,
field, crop and task names to assure correct “actual”
values are entered. See the calibration record table
included in the AFS Operator’s Manual (see table 38.1).
Crop Type:
Date:
Combine:
Operator
Field Load
1
Cal
1 Hi
2
Cal
2 Hi
3
Cal
1 Med
4
Cal
2 Med
5
Cal
1 Lo
6
Cal
2 Lo
Flow Estimated Actual
%
Bu./Hr. Weight
Weight Error
Include?
(Y/N)
7
Figure 38.1
38
Table 38.1
advanced farming systems (AFS)
Important steps to assure accurate calibration.
• Do not attempt to make the first load harvested a calibration
load. Frequent stops and starts as harvest begins and the
machine is adjusted will result in inaccurate calibration.
• Do not harvest calibration loads until headlands are harvested
• Prior to harvesting the calibration load, make sure the grain
tank and truck, cart or trailer used to transport the
calibration load is completely empty.
• Attempt to harvest calibration loads of nearly the same size
for best accuracy. Loads of 3,000-10,000 lbs. are suggested
Figure 39.1
• Empty the load into the truck or trailer
• Do not unload-on-the-go when harvesting calibration loads
• Use a range of speeds and throughputs that are expected
in normal operation. The objective is to “teach” the flow
sensor how different flow rates “feel” to the sensor.
• The highest output flow rate should be near that which the
operator would prefer to operate the machine
• Medium and low flow rates are also suggested since
variations in yield throughout the field, or conditions
that result in reduced ground speed, can periodically lower
throughput during normal harvest. A medium flow rate is
30% less than the high flow rate. A low flow rate is 30%
less than the medium flow rate. Reduced flow rates are
achieved by driving slower or taking a reduced swath.
• The operator should attempt to maintain a consistent
flow rate when harvesting each of the loads. Use the
“Instantaneous Flow-Dry” display to monitor throughput.
Figure 39.2
Moisture Wizard
Select the Farm Name for the calibration Task.
Farm
Plank Road
• Use at least one load from each flow rate
• Take 4-5 moisture tests in each load, from different areas
of the grain tank. Average readings for actual values.
• Apply calibration values according to procedures for the
calibration method being used
Cancel
Back
Proceed
Figure 39.3
Figure 39.4
Calibration Wizards
New Case IH 88 Series Combines can be equipped with the
AFS Pro 600 display with software version 21 (see figure
39.1).
• Calibration Wizards greatly aid operators in performing
successful calibrations with ease
• Once the operator is familiar with the basic navigation,
the Wizards provide the necessary instructions to complete
calibration
Figure 39.5
• Operator’s Manual used to acquaint users with basic
Wizard navigation
Three different crop calibration methods can be selected (see
figure 39.2).
• Fast Calibration
• Moisture and Weight Calibration Using the Wizard
• Advanced Calibration
Figure 39.6
39
advanced farming systems (AFS)
Important steps to assure accurate calibration (cont.)
weight calculated for each load (see figure 40.1*)
Wizards automatically progress step-to-step through the process.
• Operator can choose to apply Actual values immediately, or
at a later time (see figure 40.5)
• First display calibration load identification input screens in
order (see figure 39.3) (Grower, Farm, Field, Crop, Task)
• Task is equivalent to “Load” in prior systems. New task is
assigned by system when “Stop” is pressed after harvesting
previous load.
• On-screen instructions for harvesting, handling and
measuring the necessary calibration loads (see figure 39.4)
• Intuitive screens allow operators to input actual crop
moisture and weight values (see figure 39.5)
• Operator can select up to 10 tasks (loads) to apply to
calibration (see figure 40.2*)
An understanding of these basics is essential in achieving
accurate AFS data records. The AFS Pro 600 Yield Monitor
Operator’s Manual provides detailed step-by-step instructions
for performing AFS operations, calibrations and managing the
display information and harvest data.
*Yield Wizard screens closely resemble Moisture Wizard
screen is figures 40.1 & 40.2
• Clearly displays options for saving and applying new
calibration data
Three separate factors critical to Yield Monitor accuracy
are the Distance, Crop Moisture and Crop Weight values.
Calibration of these factors must be performed in this order
to assure correct monitor software function. Distance calibration is critical for speed and area calculations
• Synchronizes the Yield Monitor with the actual distance the
machine travels over a set course
• Wizard explains how to set up and drive the course,
including Stop/Start commands
Figure 40.1
Figure 40.2
• Displays screens for the actual distance value input and
updating the calibration (see figure 39.6)
Moisture and Weight Calibration
• Fast Calibration uses averaged moisture value and scale
weight (yield) for one load
• Wizard and Advanced Calibration use multiple loads to
update moisture and weight (yield) values
Moisture Calibration fine-tunes the accuracy of the AFS
moisture sensor by updating sensed values with moisture
values of the same grain, measured in a known accurate
moisture tester.
• Actual moisture values entered, percent error relative to
sensed moisture calculated for each load (see figure 40.1)
Figure 40.3
Figure 40.4
• Operator can select up to 10 tasks (loads) to apply to
calibration (see figure 40.2)
• Moisture calibration must be performed before Weight
calibration Weight Calibration fine-tunes the accuracy of the AFS flow
sensor by updating sensed values with weight values of the
same grain, measured in a known accurate scale.
• Harvest separate loads at high, medium and low target
throughput flow rates (see figure 40.3)
• Press “Start” and follow on-screen instructions (see figure
40.4)
• Actual weight entered, percent error relative to sensed
40
Figure 40.5
Storage
Combine Storage
When harvest is done, and you’ve worked long hours for weeks to bring in the harvest, it is real easy to want to kick back; or if the
conditions are right, get out and do some fall tillage before the snow flies. You deserve some time off, or a chance to get a jump
on next year. But, just make sure to give your combine some end-of-season and pre-storage attention before the shed doors close,
and it’s forgotten until next harvest season. Off-season neglect can cost big in terms of corrosive damage, rust and deterioration,
all avoidable with a little thought to prevention and maintenance.
The combine should be stored in a dry, protected location. Outside storage, subject to weather and elements will shorten the life
of the machine.
The following procedure should be used to prepare the combine for storage periods of up to 6 months.
1. The combine should be thoroughly cleaned before storage to remove chaff and debris that can collect moisture or attract rodents during storage.
• A high volume and velocity air blower like a leaf blower or industrial compressor works best when debris is dry
• Washing the unit will provide the most complete cleaning, removing debris that may be stuck to grease or oily accumulations that cannot be removed with just compressed air or mechanical cleaning; as well as removing the grease
and oil as well
• If the unit is washed, care must be exercised to assure COMPLETE removal of chaff and debris, especially from
inconspicuous areas where it will result in accelerated rust and corrosion over an extended period of time
• Tightly cover the engine starter and alternator with plastic, before washing the combine
• Avoid directing the blast from a high-pressure washer or steam cleaner against non-greaseable sealed bearings, where
moisture that infiltrates the seals will remain and lead to corrosive damage
• In areas that freeze make sure to remove any water that may be trapped in the transition cone, auger bed or grain tank. All of these areas have removable covers, doors or plugs that allow water to drain.
2. After thoroughly cleaning the combine and allowing it to dry, lubricate the machine as specified in the “Lubrication/Filters/
Fluids section of the Operator’s Manual.
• Remove the coverings from the starter and alternator
3. Clean the inside of the machine including the concave and separator grate, upper and lower sieves, cleaning fan, clean grain and tailings auger troughs.
• Open the clean grain and tailings elevator doors
• Open the auger bed front door and clean the auger bed
4. Clean the inside of the cab and instrument panel. Clean the cab air and recirculation filters.
5. Rodents can damage a combine while in storage. Rodents will eat plastic, insulation or rubber materials, especially when coated with grain dust.
• Clean the areas where rodents may nest
• Leave access panels and doors open to remove convenient nesting pockets. In some conditions, leaving mothballs will help discourage rats and mice.
6. Check coolant anti-freeze protection. Use only low silicate, heavy-duty coolant in the cooling system.
• Add cooling system conditioner and change the coolant filter conditioner
7. Run the engine long enough to completely warm the oil in the crankcase before draining the oil.
• Remove and replace the oil filter as instructed
• Fill the crankcase with fresh oil and run the engine for two to five minutes
8. Open the drain on the water separator fuel filter and drain water and sediment.
• Fill the fuel tank with a premium grade diesel fuel. If this fuel grade has not been used regularly, drain the fuel tank and fill with premium diesel fuel. Do not store the combine with biodiesel fuel in the tank or fuel system.
• Run the engine for five minutes to circulate the fuel through the fuel injection system
• Close the fuel shutoff valve between the water separator filter and fuel tank to prevent fuel draining from fuel injection
system into the fuel tank
41
storage
Combine Storage (cont.)
9. Clean the air cleaner filter and body.
10. Cover the engine breather pipe and exhaust pipe.
11.Batteries can remain in the combine, but must be fully charged to prevent freezing in cold temperatures.
• Remove the battery ground cables to prevent slow discharge
12. Store the combine out of direct sunlight. Clean tires before storage, and support the combine on blocking if possible to
remove load from the tires.
• If the combine is not blocked, check tires frequently and maintain inflation during storage
• Lower the head to remove weight from tires
14. Lubricate chains with light oil or chain lubricant.
15. Lower the head to remove load from the hydraulic system.
• Retract all hydraulic cylinders if possible. Coat exposed cylinder rods with grease to prevent rust and corrosion. (Clean grease from rods when removing the combine from storage.)
16. Remove tension from belts.
17. On combines equipped with Moisture Sensor, remove the bypass auger and remove grain from the housing. Make sure the
auger turns freely in the plastic bearing block. Use the retaining pins to reach through the bearing block to align and hold
the auger in place while re-installing the block.
Removing the Combine from Storage
Consult the Operator’s Manual. In addition to confirming fluid levels and closing cleanout doors, several other inspections are
suggested when preparing the combine for use.
42
Notes
43
Now you can identify the Case IH parts you need online
• Visit www.caseih.com
•C
lick on Search for Parts under Parts & Service
•E
nter your model number or product name
• View a parts list and diagram
• Build a list of the parts you need
• Contact your Case IH dealer to order parts
SAFETY Always read the Operator’s Manual before
SAFETY
Safety Never Hurts!™
NEVER
NEVER
HURTS Inspect equipment before using it, and
HURTS
operating any equipment.
be sure it is operating properly. Follow the product safety signs, and use
any safety features provided.
Case IH, CNH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC.
Any trademarks referred to herein, in association with goods and/or services
of companies other than CNH America LLC, are the property of those
respective companies.
PM-14743 Replaces: None Issued 5/09
© 2009 CNH America LLC.
CNH America LLC reserves the right to make improvements in design and
changes in specifications at any time without notice and without incurring
any obligation to install them on units previously sold. Specifications,
descriptions and illustrative material herein are as accurate as known at
time of publication, but are subject to change without notice.
This literature has been published for worldwide circulation. Availability
of some models and equipment builds varies according to the country in
which the equipment is used.
All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.
www.caseih.com
7120/8120/9120 SERIES CombINE pRodUCTIvITy GUIdE
FEATURING
• Safety
• Controls and Operations
• Service Inspections
• Maintenance
• Combine Adjustments
• Adavanced Farming Systems (AFS)
• Storage
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