CONTENTS - Back Creek I Homeowners Association

CONTENTS - Back Creek I Homeowners Association
RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
iii
SERVICE POLICY
v
SERVICE DIRECTORY
HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
vii
ix
SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE GUIDE
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
1
APPLIANCES
11
ATTIC
14
BATHROOMS
15
CABINETS
18
CONCRETE
21
COUNTERTOPS AND VANITY TOPS
28
DECK
32
DOORS
34
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
40
EXTERIOR FINISHES
46
FIREPLACE
54
FLOORING AND FINISHES
58
FRAMING AND CARPENTRY
67
INTERIOR WALLS AND CEILINGS
69
LANDSCAPING AND GRADING
73
PAINTING
78
PLUMBING SYSTEM
81
PLUMBING FIXTURES
86
ROOFING, GUTTERS, AND DOWNSPOUTS
95
WATER INFILTRATION AND CONDENSATION
99
WINDOWS
104
GLOSSARY
109
INDEX
117
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CONTENTS
RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
INTRODUCTION
THE EXCITEMENT Is BUILDING!
Your brand new Ryland home is, or will soon be, under construction.
And as a future Ryland homeowner, you will soon want to know how to
properly maintain and care for your home.
Our feeling is that the more you know about your home, the better you will be able
to take care of it, and that means you'll enjoy it more.
To acquaint you with the variety of maintenance aspects common to
homeownership, Ryland is providing you with this Homeowner's Manual. Here,
you'll discover a tremendous variety of useful information that will guide and help
you to effectively handle most maintenance and service requirements.
THE HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS:
Ryland 's Service Policy: Provides instructions to request service, the appropriate
forms, and explains what to do in case of electrical, plumbing, or heating
emergencies.
Service Directory: Provides a convenient list of all major Contractor firms
involved with the construction of your home. Includes the address and telephone
number of your local Ryland Division Office and the name of your Sales
Representative and Service Supervisor.
Homeowner's Maintenance Check List: Provides a condensed listing of important
preventative maintenance procedures and establishes a time schedule for when
specific maintenance items should be performed.
Service and Maintenance Guide: During the first year, keeping your home in tiptop condition is a shared responsibility between Ryland Homes and you, the new
homeowner. This section will acquaint you with the major mechanical systems and
components of your home: from the air
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INTRODUCTION
iii
RYLAND HOMES
conditioning and heating to the plumbing and electrical systems; from the
exterior construction of roof, attics, and finishes to the interior construction of
kitchens and bathrooms. The Service and Maintenance Guide presents a range
of subjects, all listed alphabetically for quick reference.
Further, the Guide defines Ryland's responsibilities to you, and explains your
maintenance responsibilities as the homeowner.
Each section is then broken down into four main parts:
1. The Introduction to each section provides general information
specific to each topic.
2. The Typical Repair Guidelines spell Out Ryland's coverage and
responsibilities, defining covered items, the length of coverage provided,
and often outlines the Specific repairs we will make should corrections be
necessary.
3. The Homeowner's Maintenance Guidelines provide you with
maintenance and operating procedures, tips, and ideas to keep your home
and its components operating properly.
4. Solutions to Common Problems is a handy reference chart in each
section that can save you time, money, and many unnecessary service
calls.
A Glossary that defines building industry terms used throughout the Service
Guide and an Index are located at the end of this document.
We urge you to review this material thoroughly and to keep it readily
available for future use.
Again, we want to thank you for choosing Ryland Homes to build your new
home. We are proud of our homes and dedication to customer service. And
we are hopeful that you will tell your friends about us.
We wish you happiness in your new Ryland home.
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INTRODUCTION
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RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
SERVICE POLICY
Ryland's Service Policy is driven by our total company commitment to deliver
outstanding customer service and to satisfy your homebuying expectations.
Your Service Representative will be yo ur primary contact for service once
Settlement occurs and after you've moved into the home. Most questions and repairs
will normally be resolved through the Customer Service Conferences discussed in
your Homebuyer's Guide. Routine maintenance questions are also addressed in the
following pages of this Manual, in both the individual subject sections and in the
Solutions to Common Problem sections.
TO REQUEST ADDITIONAL SERVICE
Should you require additional service beyond the Customer Service Conferences,
please fill out the "Service Request Form" found in this section, and return it to your
local Division Office. Ryland will acknowledge your request and set up an
appointment time for the repairs covered by Ryland's Typical Repair Guidelines,
plus applicable HOW and Manufacturers' Warranties.
Should a problem occur that requires immediate but not emergency service, call us
during regular business hours and your Service Representative will contact you
within 24 hours. Please provide the Ryland Service Administrator with your name,
address and subdivision, date of closing, home and work telephone numbers, and
describe the nature of the problem.
In some instances, you will need to contact our Contractors directly, and their
numbers are included in the Ryland Service Directory. Many appliances and other
products are also protected with Manufacturer's Warranties, and their toll-free 800Hotline numbers, if available, are in the Manufacturer's Warranty material you
received at the Pre-Settlement Orientation.
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SERVICE POLICY AND PROCEDURES
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RYLAND HOMES
EMERGENCIES
Most emergencies are either electrical, plumbing, or heating related, and
are normally handled by the appropriate Contractor or Utility Company.
The names and service telephone numbers of both are listed in Ryland's
Service Directory.
Before calling for help with an emergency, please review the appropriate electrical,
heating, or plumbing section in this Manual to determine if something very simple
can resolve the problem. Unnecessary use of our emergency service may delay a
necessary response to a genuinely critical situation.
VALID EMERGENCIES INCLUDE:
Electrical Emergencies: An emergency exists when there is no electrical
power anywhere in your home. Please do not call unless you have checked to
ensure that all circuit breakers in the main electrical panel are in the "ON"
position.
Plumbing Emergencies: An emergency exists if your home is completely
without water or if all toilets are stopped up. If there is some water, and at least
one working toilet, your service call will be handled during regular business
hours.
Heating Emergencies: An emergency exists if there is no heat anywhere in the
home. Please note that air conditioning failure is not considered an emergency
unless there is a health threat to someone in the home. Otherwise, such problems
will be handled during regular business hours.
SERVICE ACCESS TO YOUR HOME
When routine repairs are necessary, Ryland Service personnel and our
Contractors will need access to your home during normal working hours.
If you or an adult family member cannot be available, we ask that you
authorize, in writing, a neighbor or friend to provide the necessary access.
As an alternative, please fill out the "Permission to Enter and Key
Receipt," provided by your Ryland Service Representative.
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SERVICE POLICY AND PROCEDURES
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RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
SERVICE DIRECTORY
RYLAND HOMES DIVISION OFFICE
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE
YOUR RYLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE:
YOUR RYLAND SERVI CE REPRESENTATIVE:
MAJOR RYLAND CONTRACTORS
NAME
TELEPHONE
Heating &
Air Conditioning
Electrical
Plumbing
List the names and telephone numbers of product manufacturers and appropriate
contractors for parts and service.
CONTRACTOR / TELEPHON E
MANUFACTURER / TELEPHONE
Appliances
Brick
Cabinets
Carpeting
Ceramic Tile
Fireplace
Garage Door
Landscaping
Paint
Resilient Floors
Roofing
Security System
Siding
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SERVICE DIRECTORY
vii
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CONTRACTOR / TELEPHONE
MANUFACTURER / TELEPHONE
Windows & Doors
Wood Floors
Other Contractors
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Police Department
Hospital
Fire and Rescue
Telephone Company
Gas & Electric Co.
Sewer and Water
Schools
Elementary
Middle School
High School
U.S. Post Office
Others
viii SERVICE DIRECTORY
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RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
INTRODUCTION
The importance of maintaining your new home on a regular basis is directly comparable
to maintaining a brand new car. If you never change the oil or get the car tuned up, little
problems will eventually become big problems.
Similarly your new Ryland home is designed and built to last for many years, and yet it
has numerous components and equipment that require periodic maintenance by the
homeowner. By implementing the following preventative maintenance guidelines, you
can help keep the components of your home functioning properly with as few problems as
possible.
To help you pinpoint when specific homeowner maintenance items should be
performed, this check list is divided into distinct time periods: After Move -In, Every
Month, Every Six Months, Annual, plus Spring and Fall. For additional information
regarding the subjects presented here, please refer to the appropriate Manufacturer's
Operating Instructions and/or the specific subject discussions contained in this Manual.
Please note that this Section is intended to provide you, the homeowner, with
maintenance guidelines that you can perform, and does not indicate the services that
Ryland will perform. Also be aware that you will be charged directly by the contractor
who provides any of these services.
AFTER MOVE-IN CHECK LIST
BATHROOMS
v Apply silicone based grout sealer to ceramic tile grout.
DECK
v Apply preservative sealer to wood surfaces following manufacturer's instructions.
ELECTRIC
v Locate and label the main circuit breaker in the electric panel box and show family members how to
turn it off in case of eme rgency.
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HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
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RYLAND HOMES
FIRE EXTINGUISHER
v Purchase a general purpose fire extinguisher for each floor of the home plus one small
kitchen extinguisher for grease fires. Demonstrate proper usage to family members in
case of an emergency.
FIREPLACE
v Purchase fireplace screen, wood grate or andirons, and tools as necessary.
FIRST AID KIT
v Keep first aid materials and a book on first aid procedures in an accessible
location.
FLOORING
v Attach furniture protectors underneath furniture legs to protect hardwood,
resilient, and ceramic tile floors.
HOUSEHOLD TOOLS
v Acquire basic tools to help you with normal home maintenance chores, to
include: pliers, adjustable wrench, flat-blade and Phillips head screwdrivers, claw
hammer, hand saw, tape measure, caulk and caulking gun, putty knife, paint roller and
brush, power drill and drill bits, assorted nails, brads, screws, nuts, bolts, sandpaper,
utility knife, toilet plunger, and flashlight.
LANDSCAPING
v
Follow your Landscaping Contractor's instructions for year-round
landscaping care. Review and implement recommendations in the Landscaping and
Grading Section of this Manual.
PLUMBING
v Locate and label the main water line shut-off valve and show all family members
how to close it in case of a plumbing emergency.
WATER EROSION
v After first heavy rain, check foundation for erosion and fill eroded areas.
Ensure that splashblocks are correctly positioned to divert rain water away from
the home. Thereafter, always be on the alert for erosion and take immediate action to
fill eroded areas.
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HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
EVERY MONTH CHECK LIST
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
v Check air filters and clean or replace as necessary.
v Vacuum air supply and air return registers to remove dust and lint.
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
v
Check fire extinguishers to ensure that they are fully charge
GARBAGE DISPOSAL
v
Clean disposal blades by grinding up ice cubes. Freshen it with baking soda and by
grinding up citrus fruit rinds.
INTERIOR CAULKING
v
Check for cracks or separations in caulking around sinks, bathtubs, toilets, faucets,
countertops and backsplashes, ceramic walls, resilient and ceramic floors, window
sills, and any other areas originally caulked by Ryland To repair these areas, use an
appropriate caulking compound and follow the caulking instructions in the Plumbing
Fixtures Section of this Manual.
RANGE HOOD FAN
v Clean or replace dirty filter.
SMOKE DETECTOR
v Test smoke detectors.
v Clean and/or vacuum detector openings as necessary.
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HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
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RYLAND HOMES
EVERY SIX MONTHS CHECK LIST
CABINETS
v Clean and apply a light coat of wax.
DOORS
v Check screws on door lockset and hardware and tighten as necessary.
v Lubricate bifold and by-pass doors as necessary.
v Clean sliding door track and apply silicone spray to tracks as necessary.
ELECTRIC
v Test and reset all GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) receptacles.
v Check electrical extension and appliance cords. Replace frayed or split cords.
EXTERIOR FINISHES
v Check for cracks and voids in exterior caulking and re-caulk as necessary.
v Inspect vinyl siding and clean as necessary per manufacturer's instructions.
v Check exterior painted. surfaces for damage and weathering. To repair, follow the
maintenance instructions contained in the Painting Section of this Manual.
PLUMBING
v
Check water supply lines and valves to sinks and toilets. Tighten if loose or
leaking.
v Clean out faucet aerators, spray nozzles, and drains.
v Check pipes and drains for water leakage.
v
Remove water heater residue following instructions in the Plumbing Fixtures
Section of this Manual.
WATER INFILTRATION AND CONDENSATION
v Check basement and foundation for moisture. Review Water Infiltration and
Condensation Section of this Manual.
WINDOWS
v Check sills for caulking cracks or separations and re-caulk as necessary.
v Check weatherstripping around windows and repair or replace as necessary.
v Check windows for smooth opening and closing Operation. Clean tracks and
lubricate as necessary.
v Inspect window screens and repair or replace as necessary.
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HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
ANNUAL CHECK LIST
ATTIC
v Check attic to ensure that soffit vents are not blocked with insulation and move
insulation back to its original location if there are voids on the attic floor.
CABINETS
v Check drawers and hinges for proper alignment. Tighten and adjust as
necessary.
DECK
v Check and tighten all deck bolts.
v Replace damaged pickets, rails, and boards. Replace warped boards that create a
trip hazard.
v Re-seal wood surfaces with a preservative as necessary following
manufacturer's instructions.
DOORS
v
v
v
v
Check and repair or replace weatherstripping on exterior doors as necessary.
Check and tighten door hardware and lubricate as necessary.
Tighten all bolts on garage door.
Oil moving parts of garage door.
SUMP PUMP
v
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Clean sump pump following manufacturer's instructions and the directions in the
Plumbing Fixtures Section of this Manual .
HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST xiii
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SPRING CHECK LIST
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
v Hire an HVAC Contractor to perform seasonal maintenance check-up for summer.
v Ensure that rugs, draperies, and furniture do not block air supply registers.
EXTERIOR HOSEBIBS
v Turn exterior faucets on by reversing the winterizing process described in the
Plumbing Fixtures Section of this Manual.
ROOFING
v
Visually inspect roof from the ground for loose, warped, torn, or missing
shingles. Hire a Roofing Contractor should repairs be required.
v Hire a Contractor to check and clean gutters and down spouts, inspect for ice or
winter damage, and repair gaps in flashing and soffits.
v Hire a Contractor to check skylights for loose flashing and gaps in caulking.
FALL CHECK LIST
EXTERIOR HOSEBIBS
v
To prevent exterior pipe freezing, review and implement the winterizing
instructions in the Plumbing Fixtures Section of this Manual.
FIREPLACE
v
v
Have chimney professionally cleaned as necessary.
Check firebox for loose fire brick or mortar.
HEATING SYSTEM
v
Hire an HVAC Contractor to perform seasonal maintenance check-up for
winter.
ROOFING
v
v
Xiv
Hire a Contractor to clean and check gutters for leakage.
Check alignment of gutters, downspouts, and splashblocks to ensure that
water is properly diverted away from the home.
HOMEOWNER MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
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HOMEOWNER'S S MANUAL
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING
A.
INTRODUCTION
The air conditioning and heating equipment was installed by the HVAC
(Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) Contractor listed in Ryland's
Homeowner Service Directory.
All Systems provide year-round climate control and consist of a thermostat to
control temperature, a basic furnace unit to heat the air, a filter to cleanse the air,
plus a fan unit to distribute and circulate air throughout the home via ducts and
registers. Heat pumps and air conditioners have an outdoor unit that transfers heat
into and/or away from the home.
It is important to read the Manufacturers' Service Manuals, operating instructions,
maintenance guidelines, warranties, and energy-saving recommendations provided
to you at the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Where appropriate, fill out and return the
Warranty Registration Cards to the manufacturer. Failure to do so may void the
manufacturer's warranty.
Note: As equipment technology frequently changes, the Manufacturers' Service
Manuals will supercede all recommendations and procedures contained in this
guide.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
The following guidelines apply to the heating and air conditioning system.
Guidelines specific to air filters, thermostats, and the air distribution
system are contained in their respective descriptions.
1. A heating or air conditioning problem caused by defective workmanship or
equipment will be inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's
installation and product specifications.
2. The heating system shall be capable of producing an inside temperature of 70°
F as measured in the center of each room at a height of 5.0 feet above the floor,
under local outdoor winter design
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AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
1
RYLAND HOMES
conditions as specified in the ASHRAE Handbook. Deficiencies within the
system will be inspected and corrected to meet the 70° F specification.
3. The air conditioning system shall be capable of maintaining a temperature of
78° F as measured in the center of each room at a height of 5.0 feet. Should
outside temperatures exceed 95°F a differential of 15°F from the exterior
temperature will be maintained. Deficiencies will be inspected and corrected to
meet the 78°F specification. Rooms on second floors or on finished lower
levels will vary in temperature from rooms on the floor where the thermostat is
located.
4. A clogged condensation line caused by defective workmanship will be
corrected by removing the clog.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: Two Year Coverage
1. A refrigerant line that leaks will be inspected to determine the source of the
leak, and will be repaired by sealing the leak, recharging the unit, and restoring
the system to proper working order.
Warranty Caution: Any addition, alteration, or modification to the original
heating, venting, or air conditioning system installation may void all applicable
warranties.
Manufacturer Warranties: The air conditioning, gas heating, and heat pump
equipment installed in your home is protected by Manufacturer Warranties that
may extend beyond Ryland's First Year Coverage. Should you experience warranty
protected problems beyond the first year of occupancy, please contact the HVAC
Contractor listed in Ryland's Homeowner Service Directory.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Service Contract: An extended annual service contract may be available from an
HVAC Contractor that provides seasonal check-ups of the heating and cooling
components, plus periodic cleaning. The advantage is that
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AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
scheduled service may reduce system failure by preventing problems before they
occur.
BEFORE CALLING FOR SERVICE:
1. Insure that the thermostat is properly set.
2. For an electric furnace or heat pump:
A. Check the circuit breaker in the panel box. If tripped, reset
by switching the breaker to full OFF, then fully back to the
ON position. If the circuit breaker will not reset, contact the
IWAC Contractor. See Circuit Breakers in the Electrical
System Section.
B. Check the electrical disconnect switch, located on or near the furnace, and
reset
C. Check the exterior disconnect switch located outside the home, near the
heat pump, and reset.
3. For a gas furnace:
A. Check the circuit breaker and switch at the furnace to be certain they are
set to the On position.
B. Check the pilot light, then re-light in accordance with the manufacturer's
instructions, or contact the Gas Company for assistance.
C. If the gas furnace is equipped with an automatic pilotless ignition, please
call for service and do not attempt self-repair.
D. Check to ensure that the door on the front of the gas furnace, which has a
safety switch, is securely closed.
CALLING FOR SERVICE:
For prompt service, contact the HVAC Contractor listed in your Ryland
Homeowner's Service Directory directly. Ryland cannot assume
responsibility for service performed by anyone other than the authorized
Contractor.
B.
AIR FILTER
The air filter, located adjacent to the furnace fan unit, helps reduce the flow of dust
into the air. In some installations, the air filters may be
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AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
3
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HOMES
located at the return air grilles. As the filter collects dust, it reduces the
system's efficiency and must be either cleaned or replaced.
Ryland has installed one air filter in each filter location and will, at the PreSettlement Orientation, demonstrate proper filter installation, cleaning, and
replacement procedures. After that, the cleaning, replacement, and
maintenance of air filters is the homeowner's responsibility.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Monthly filter cleaning or replacement will provide cleaner air, improve air
flow, and help reduce utility costs. To remove and clean or replace filters,
turn the furnace and fan off using the thermostat control, then pull out the old
filter and clean, or insert a new one. Replacement filters are available through
hardware stores.
C.
THERMOSTAT
The thermostat controls the entire heating and cooling system and is
physically located to maximize the efficiency of the HVAC system. Air
conditioner and heat pump thermostats provide a selectable fan switch to
circulate the air when neither heating or cooling is required. A heat pump
thermostat has a blue/green light that indicates when the supplemental heating
element is on. See Supplemental Heat, under Heat Pumps, in the Air
Conditioning and Heating Section.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: First Year Coverage
1. A thermostat that malfunctions will be inspected and then repaired or
replaced as follows:
A. A thermostat problem caused by defective workmanship will be
corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications.
B. A thermostat that is improperly calibrated will be repaired by recalibrating.
C. A thermostat that cannot be repaired will be replaced.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
Manufacturer Warranty: The thermostat installed in your home is protected by a
Manufacturer Warranty that may extend beyond Ryland's First Year Coverage.
Should you experience warranty protected problems beyond the first year of
occupancy, please contact the FIVAC Contractor listed in Ryland's Homeowner
Service Directory.
D.
AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
The heating and cooling system can be adjusted and balanced to meet individual
temperature preferences. When the right balance is achieved, utility bills and wear
and tear on the heating system are reduced.
Duct Work and Dampers: Ducts carry and distribute heated or air conditioned air to
each room. Some air ducts are fitted with adjustable dampers that open to increase
or close to restrain air flow to major parts of the home. Please consult the HVAC
Contractor for correct positioning or adjustment of dampers.
Registers: Two kinds of registers are used: air supply registers, located on the floor,
ceiling, or walls, that deliver warm or cooled air into the room; and air return registers,
located on walls, that return air from the room back into the air handler fan to be re-heated
or re-cooled.
To regulate temperatures on different floors or rooms during different seasons,
adjust the air supply registers by partially openi ng or closing them, thus restricting or
moving additional air into each room.
Interior doors in each room are undercut to allow return air to circulate throughout
each room when the doors are closed.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Season to season balancing is the responsibility of the homeowner. If the
homeowner cannot achieve the desired results, the HVAC Contractor that
2.
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installed the heating and air conditioning system will, at the homeowner's request,
balance the system in the home one time.
A ticking or crackling noise coming from the duct work is normal.
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
5
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HOMES
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: Two Year Coverage
1. Duct work that separates or becomes unattached will be re-secured.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Vacuum Supply and return registers to ensure they remain dust-free. Check
that registers are not blocked by draperies, furniture, or other obstructions that
restrict normal air flow.
E.
GAS HEATING EQUIPMENT
In communities where natural gas is available, the home may be equipped
with a gas-fired, forced-air heating system. Operation and maintenance
instructions are provided by the manufacturer and should be carefully
reviewed. The local utility company is a good resource for additional gas
energy information and energy-saving tips.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Pilot Light: The gas furnace may feature a pilot light that stays lit all the
time, or a pilotless ignition. If the unit has a pilot light, keep it on during the
summer. The minimal amount of heat it generates will keep the furnace dry
and prevent corrosion.
Do not store combustible items such as clothing, brooms, dust mops, or oily
rags near a gas furnace, as this presents a fire hazard.
Flue: A gas furnace has a flue that vents exhaust fumes to the outside of the
home. A ticking sound resulting from flue expansion and contraction is
normal.
F.
AIR CONDITIONER
Gas heated homes are equipped with an air conditioning compressor located
outside the home. The system provides cool air by removing heat and
humidity.
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AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Keep the air conditioning compressor level and keep the area surrounding the unit
clear to allow unimpaired air flow. Do not plant bushes near the unit and be careful that
dirt, leaves, and grass clippings are cleared away.
Do not build a deck around or over the air conditioner unless there is an 18.0 inch
clearance on the sides and a 6.0 foot minimum clearance on top.
G.
HEATPUMP
Your home may be equipped with an electric forced-air heating system that
includes a heat pump. The heat pump is an electrically powered, single refrigeration
unit located outside the home that provides both heating and cooling functions. It
operates on the principle that outdoor air, even in wintertime, contains heat or
thermal energy. During wintertime, the heat pump extracts heat from the outside air
and then transfers it to the indoor air. In the summer, the process is reversed,
whereby the heat pump removes heat from indoor air, discharges it outdoors, and
then circulates cooled air throughout the home.
A heat pump can be expected to operate continuously if outside temperatures fall below
40°F the resulting increased air circulation provides a more consistent inside temperature.
Heated air coming from the registers feels cool to the touch. This is normal since the
heat pump generates a low level of heat, sometimes below 90°F, while normal body
temperature is 98.6°F
Supplemental Heat: when outdoor temperatures fall below 25° to 30° F, the heat
pump is unable to draw sufficient heat from the outside air, and a supplemental
heating unit automatically turns on. You will know it is operating when the
indicator light on the thermostat lights. The heating elements, located in the furnace
unit's air handler, will turn on for a short time. The supplemental heat will also turn
on if the thermostat is adjusted more than two degrees above room temperature.
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AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
7
RYLAND HOMES
Emergency Heating: Should the heat pump fail, activate the Emergency Heat
switch on the thermostat. The red light indicates that it is on. This will stop
the heat pump from operating and will provide supplemental heat until the
HVAC Contractor arrives.
Defrosting: During winter, ice can accumulate on the sides of the heat pump's
exterior coil. When ice covers 80% of the surface, the system automatically
activates a defrost cycle that lasts about five minutes, heating the coil to melt
the ice. It will also activate t he supplemental heat to prevent ducts from
blowing cold air into the home during the defrost cycle. This process may
occur several times each day, and you will notice that steam rises from the
unit when it occurs. This is completely normal and is not cause for concern.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Keep the heat pump unit level and keep the area surrounding the unit clear to
allow unimpaired airflow. Do not plant bushes near the unit and be careful that
dirt, leaves, and grass clippings are cleared away.
Do not build a deck around or over the heat pump unless there is an 18.0- inch
clearance on the sides and a 6.0- foot minimum clearance on top.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING PROBLEMS
Problem
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Likely Cause
Solution
Reduced airflow or
excessive dust on vents
and registers
Dirty air filter.
Clean or replace air filter
as necessary.
Indicator light on
Thermostat stays on
continuously.
Disconnect breaker
at heat pump or
panel box tripped.
Check disconnect
breaker. Reset or
replace as necessary.
Gas furnace does not
operate.
Furnace cover not
closed tightly.
Close and latch
cover securely.
Heat pump, fan, or
air conditioner not
operating.
Circuit breaker
tripped.
Reset circuit breaker
at panel box or unit.
Air conditioner or
heat pump not
operating properly.
Outside unit
obstructed by snow,
bushes, leaves, etc.
Clear obstructions
from top and sides of
unit.
Inside air handler is
leaking water.
Condensate pump, if
applicable, not
working.
Check circuit
breaker. Insure that
pump is plugged in.
Inside air handler is
leaking water.
Inside coil is frozen.
Call HVAC
Contractor.
Inside air handler is
leaking water.
Condensate drain
clogged.
Gendy tap condensate
line or pour a cup of
50/50 bleach/water
solution through
condensate line.
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
9
RYLAND HOMES
-
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
Inside or outside coil
Low refrigerant in
Call 'IVAC
is frozen.
heat pump or dirty
Contractor. Clean or
air filter.
replace filter.
Excess water on
Excess humidity in
Lower huinidifier
window panes.
home.
setting. Use exhaust
fans.
10
Burning smell when winter of
Accumulated dust on electrical
Normal. Happens once each
auxiliary heat first turned on.
coils.
year.
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
APPLIANCES
A.
INTRODUCTION
Your Ryland home comes equipped with a variety of appliances, and may include
an electric oven and cooktop or a gas o ven and cooktop, a microwave oven,
countertop broiler, convection oven, range hood, dishwasher, refrigerator, garbage
disposal, washing machine, or electric dryer.
At move -in time, test ail appliances for proper operation. Review the
Manufacturers' Service Manuals for operafion and maintenance instructions. Then
file the manuals in a convenient locafion for future reference. Where appropriate,
fill out and return the Warranty Registration Cards to the manufacturer. Failure to
do so may void the manufacturer's warranty.
Many manufacturers offer a toll-free 800-Rotline service to answer questions about
appliance problems and operation. For future reference, record these nurnbers in
Ryland's Homeowner Service Directory.
For appliance repair protecfion that extends beyond the manufacturer's warranty
period, you may want to consider a service contract available through an
appropriate Contractor.
If you purchase your own appliances, carefully measure existing appliance
openings to ensure proper fit. Check that doorway widths leading to the fmal
appliance location are wide enough to move the appliance through.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An appliance problem caused by defective workmanship or equipment will be
inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation and product
specifications.
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APPLIANCES
11
RYLAND HOMES
Warranty Caution: Any electrical, HVAC, or plumbing addition, alteration, or
modification to the original appliance installations may void all applicable
warranties.
Manufacturer Warranties: The appliances installed in your home are
protected by Manufacturer Warranties that may extend beyond Ryland's First
Year Coverage. Should you experience warranty protected problems beyond the
first year of occupancy, please contact the appropriate appliance manufacturer.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Before Calling for Service: If an electrical appliance fails to work, implement
the following checklist before Calling the appropriate Electrical, HVAC, or
Plumbing Contractor. Otherwise, you may be charged for a service call.
1.
2.
3.
4.
12
APPLIANCES
Check that the appliance is plugged in.
If the appliance is plugged into a wall-switched electrical outlet, make
sure the switch is On.
The circuit breaker in the panel box controlling the appliance should be in
the On position. See Circuit Breakers in the Electrical Systems Section.
Some appliances come with their own separate fuses or circuit breakers.
Review the Manufacturer's Service Manual for exact location, then check
for proper setting.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON APPLIANCE PROBLEMS
Problem
Clothes do not dry.
SE - 1
Likely Cause
Clogged dryer vent due
to kinked line, lint buildup, or other obstruction.
Solution
Remove kink or line
obstruction.
APPLIANCES
13
RYLAND HOMES
ATTIC
INTRODUCTION
The attic space is constructed with either a truss system or rafters.
Warranty Ca ution: Roof trusses should not be cut to install attic stairs. This
can structurally damage the integrity of the roof and will void HOW's major
structural defect warranty.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
The attic truss system is not engineered to support additional weight and
should not be used for any storage purpose.
Ryland installs a variety of attic vents to remove excessive heat and moisture
from the attic space. These include ridge vents, gable louvers, roof louvers,
soffit vents, and baffles where the roof meets the wall. Do not cover these
vents with insulation or any other material.
Insulation in the attic protects the rooms below it. If the insulation is moved, it
will leave gaps between the insulation panels and may obstruct the attic vents.
Always replace moved insulation back to its original position.
14
ATTIC
SE - 2
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
BATHROOMS
A. CERAMIC TILE WALLS
The ceramic tile in your bathroom is easy to maintain. The grout joints between the
tiles are not waterproof and require proper maintenance to prevent water seepage
and damage of materials adjacent to and undemeath the tile.
Cracks in the caulking joints between tile and tub, in the shower stall comers, and
at the floor, are caused by the high degree of moisture present in every bathroom,
as well as from the normal shrinkage of caulking material. Separation between the
tub and wail tile is caused by home settlement and by the weight of the tub when
filled with water.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES First Year Coverage
1. A cracked ceramic wall tile will be replaced if caused by structural movement
and will not be replaced if caused by homeowner abuse or negligence.
2. A loose ceramic wail tile will be re-secured by removing and replacing the tile
mastic, re-positioning the tile, and then re-grouting.
3. A crack in caulking where the ceramic tile meets tub/shower, comer seams, or
base of tub, will be re-caulked one time.
4. A crack or void in the grouting of ceramic tile will be re-grouted one time.
Note: Drywall, flooring materials, insulation, paint, and woodwork can suffer
severe damage due to unattended grouting and caulking problems. Inadequate
homeowner care or failure to immediately report grout and caulking problems
can result in extensive damage and this damage will not be repaired by
Ryland.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all ceramic wall tile
during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, chips, and cracks will not be
repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the Pre-Settlement Check
List.
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BATIIROOMS
15
RYLAND HOMES
Ceramic Tile Wall Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that ceramic tile
wall repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing tile
material or colored grouting. Slight color variations are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Clean wail tiles with a damp cloth, and remove accumulated film with a soapless,
non-abrasive detergent or tile cleaner. Keep white tile seams clean by brushing with
diluted bleach in a well-ventilated room.
Caulk minor cracks in grout joints and separations between tub or shower stall and
wail surfaces with a silicone caulk, taking care to wipe the tile clean once caulking
is complete. Do not use clear silicone caulk since it yellows with age and stains
easily. See Re-Caulking of Tubs and Showers in the Plumbing Fixtures Section.
B.
MIRRORS AND MEDICINE CABINETS
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Clean bathroom mirrors with a spray glass cleaner and a soft cloth, wiping several
times to remove all glass cleaner residue. Do not use abrasive
cleansers which will permanently scratch and mar mirror surfaces.
C.
BATHROOM MAINTENANCE
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Mildew: Moisture and mildew problems can occur in any room where water vapor
is present. To reduce mildew, turn on the exhaust fan or slightly open a window
when bathing. Wipe off wet tiles when done, then hang up towels and washcloths
to dry. To clean mildewed surfaces and reduce mildew odors, apply a liquid
mildew agent in a well-ventilated room, followed by a disinfectant and thorough
rinsing with clear water.
Soap Scum: In some geographic areas, "hard water" or water that is high in
mineral content, can contribute to soap scum buildup. To clean and remove this
residue, wash the affected surfaces with a mild vinegar and water solution.
16
BATHROOM
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HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON BATHROOM PROBLEMS
Problem
Grout cracks
between tiles.
SE- 1
Likely Cause
Settlement.
Solution
Re-caulk cracks with
silicone-based caulk.
BATHROOMS
17
RYLAND HOMES
CABINETS
INTRODUCTION
Kitchen and laundry room cabinets, bathroom vanity bases, and medicine cabinets
are selected for their attractive appearance, durability, and ease of care. With
proper maintenance, the cabinets will remain serviceable and attractive.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Cabinet door warpage that exceeds 1/4 inch, as measured from the face frame
to the point of furthermost warpage when the door is closed, will be repaired
by adjusting the hinges.
2. A cabinet drawer that does not fit flush against the face frame when closed,
will be repaired by adjusting the drawer guides.
3. A gap between the cabinet and ceiling or wall that exceeds 1/4 inch in width,
will be repaired by installing a filler board or trim of similar color.
4. A cabinet that becomes loose from the wall or bulkhead will be resecured,
unless it is determined that the weight limitation of 20 pounds per square foot
has been exceeded.
5. A cabinet handle, drawer handle, hinge, or drawer guide that fails to operate as
designed, will be replaced.
6. A lazy susan that fails to operate as designed will be adjusted unless it is
determined that the weight limitation of 20 pounds per square foot has been
exceeded.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all cabinets during
the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, chips, and cracks will not be repaired
after occupancy unless specifically noted on the Pre-Settlement Check List.
18
CABINETS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Wood Cabinets: Wood cabinet tone, grain, and color variations are normal, and
reflect the natural characteristics of real wood.
Clean wood cabinets with the same gentle care you would give any fine wood
furniture. Lemon oil applied once or twice a year will protect the finish and
appearance.
Cabinet mounted coffee makers are not recommended since the rising steam will
damage solid wood and wood veneer, causing fading or delamination. For the same
reason, position regular coffee makers out from underneath the upper cabinets and
near the front of the counter.
Laminate Cabinets: Clean laminate cabinets with a soapy cloth or sponge, or use
a non-abrasive liquid household cleanser for more stubborn stains. There are onestep cleaning products available for laminates that clean, reduce streaking, and
leave surfaces polished. As with all cleaning products, carefully follow the
manufacturer's instructions.
Shelves and Lazy Susan Cabinets: Flat and carrousel shelves are not designed to
hold weight that exceed 20 pounds per square foot. Keep canned goods, flour,
sugar, and heavier products on the bottom shelf of the base cabinets. If desired,
apply contact paper to shelves to protect against scratches and water stains.
Drawer and Hinge Care: Check the hinges at least once a year for proper
alignment and tightness, using a screwdriver to make necessary adjustrnents. Check
drawers for easy movement and apply a silicone spray to the drawer guides should
sticking occur. Close the drawers to protect the drawer guides and to keep the
contents clean.
Repairing Nicks and Scratches: Hardware stores offer color matching putty,
stains, and polymer fillers to cover and repair cabinet nicks and scratches.
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CABINETS
19
RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON CABINET PROBLEMS
Problem
Cabinet drawer
sticks.
20
CABINETS
Likely Cause
Drawer glides out of
alignment or debris
in track.
Solution
Realign track.
Check for debris.
Spray with silicone.
SE - 1
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
CONCRETE
A.
FOUNDATION
Two types of foundations, concrete block or poured-in-place concrete, are used to
build the foundation and basement of Ryland homes.
It is important to understand that concrete is a porous, brittle material that will
expand, contract, and crack as the result of temperature changes, shrinkage, and
stress. Hairline cracks that may appear on foundation walls are usually cosmetic, as
opposed to structural. Foundation cracks are common and are caused by shrinkage
or stress.
Shrinking results from the normal curing process of concrete that varies with the
time of year and the moisture conditions that exist when the concrete is poured.
Stress is caused by soil placed up against the wall, plus the full weight of the home
that rests upon the walls. The weight from these forces can create a variety of
stresses which, in combination with seasonal temperature variations, can cause
concrete and masonry foundations to expand and contract.
If your home has a basement, the block foundation may be covered on the outside
with a cement parging, while the poured-in-place concrete foundation walls do not
require parging. Both have an application of a material that is water resistant but
not totally waterproof. Crawl space foundations do not require the application of
water resistant materials.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A vertical crack in the foundation that exceeds 1,8 inch in width will typically
be repaired as follows:
A. A slight contraction and expansion crack may be filled with a
flexible silicone concrete caulking.
B. In the case of water penetration or structural repair of a poured wall
foundation, a crack can be repaired from the interior by
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CONCRETE
21
RYLAND HOMES
injecting an epoxy resin material into the crack to bond the concrete
together.
C. A crack in a poured wall or block foundation may be repaired by
excavating the exterior wall, chiseling an inverted V shaped channel,
filling the exposed crack with a hydraulic cement, and then re-damp
proofing the wall.
2. A horizontal crack in the foundation occurs infrequently. Horizontal cracking
will be inspected by a Ryland representative to determine the cause and to
monitor future movement.
3. A wall tie or honeycomb on poured-wall foundations that leaks water will be
repaired by applying an epoxy or hydraulic cement to the affected area from
either side.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Drainage: Proper water drainage around the foundation will keep the basement
dry, and eliminate unnecessary stress on the foundation wall. In many locations,
drain tile and sometimes a sump pump, are used to drain water away from the
foundation. Familiarize yourself with the system installed in your home and locate
where the drain tile discharges. Check periodically to insure that all drains are
clear of debris, that pumps are operating, window wells are clean, and that the soil
around the foundation properly slopes away from the home. See Controlling
Foundation Water Penetration in the Water Infiltration & Condensation Section.
Moisture Control: Slight moisture condensation on basement walls and floor is
normal during the first year, since hundreds of gallons of water are used to make
the concrete, mortar, drywall mud, and paint. As this water evaporates, it naturally
raises the moisture content. Proper ventilation will reduce this condensation. Open
basement wi ndows during clear, dry weather and then close them during damp,
humid weather. if excessive humidity develops, consider using a dehumidifier to
remove unwanted moisture from the air. See Water Infiltration and Condensation
Section.
Efflorescence: A white powdery substance that may appear on block walls or
stucco is called efflorescence It is composed of water soluble
22
CONCRETE
SE 1
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
salts, originally present in masonry materials, that are brought to and deposited on
the surface when water evaporates. Most efflorescence can be removed with a stiff
scrub brush and water.
B. BASEMENT, GARAGE SLABS AND SLABS ON GRADE
Hairline cracks less than 1/8 inch in width are common to large concrete basement
slabs, garage slabs, and slabs on grade, and are caused by slight home settlement, or
expansion and contraction. These cracks are normal and it is best to leave them
alone, since attempts to fill the cracks will not stop the expansion and contraction.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A slight expansion and contraction crack in the basement or garage slab, that
exceeds 1/8 inch in width, will be repaired by filling the crack with a flexible
silicone concrete caulking.
2. A crack in the basement floor or garage slab, that exceeds 1/8 inch in vertical
displacement, will be repaired by grinding, surface patching, or other methods
as required.
3. A basement or garage slab that settles, heaves, or separates in excess of
1/4 inch from the house structure, will be inspected by a Ryland
representative to determine the cause and to monitor future movement.
4. A crack in concrete slab-on-grade that ruptures the surface of resilient flooring
will be repaired by removing the flooring material, and then grinding, chiseling,
or surface-patching the concrete.
5. Concrete floors in habitable moms shall not have pits, depressions, or areas of
unevenness that exceed 1/4 inch in 32 inches measured horizontally. This does
not apply to basement floors or where a floor or portion of a floor has been
designed for drainage purposes.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Due to certain soil types, some staining of concrete is normal. Clean concrete floors
with a solution of five tablespoons of baking soda to a gallon of water. Before using
the cleaning solution, wet the floor with clear water and loosen dirt with a steel
brush or scraping blade.
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CONCRETE
23
RYLAND HOMES
A concrete sealer may be applied to the floor, following the manufacturer's
directions, approximately six months after you move in. This will make it easier
to clean and will reduce concrete dusting.
C.
PORCHES, STEPS, STOOPS, AND SIDEWALKS
In most cases, exterior concrete cracks are due to the freeze and thaw cycle,
slight home settlement, or shrinkage that occurs during the concrete curing
process.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An expansion and contraction crack on porches, steps, stoops, and
sidewalks that exceeds 1/8 inch in width, will be repaired by filling the
crack with a flexible silicone concrete caulking.
2. A crack on porches, steps, stoops, and sidewalks that exceeds 1/4 inch in
vertical displacement, will be repaired by removal and replacement of the
affected area.
3. A porch, step, stoop, or sidewalk that settles, heaves, or separates in excess
of 1/2 inch from the house structure, will be repaired by surface capping.
4. Water should drain from outdoor stoops and steps. The possibility of small
amounts of water standing on covered porches for a short period after a rain
can be anticipated. If water remains on concrete stoops or steps, a repair
will be made by removing and replacing the affected areas. For standing
water on brick steps, the affected step will be replaced.
5. A concrete surface that disintegrates by means other than chemicals or
abuse will be repaired by removing and replacing the affected area.
6. Minor chips will be repaired by surface patching if noted on the PreSettlement Check List
Caution: Concrete surfaces, under normal usage and weather conditions,
should not disintegrate to the extent that the aggregate is exposed and loosened.
Even during the First Year Coverage, Ryland is not responsible
24
CONCRETE
SE-1
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
for concrete deterioration caused by homeowner abuse or negligence, salt,
chemicals, heavy vehicles, or other factors beyond our control.
Concrete Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that concrete or masonry repairs
requiring new material will match the color of the existing material. Color
variations are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Remove snow and ice promptly from porches, steps, and stoops. If a thin layer of
ice cannot be removed, cat litter or clean sand offer safe traction.
Do not apply de-icing salts or chemicals to any concrete surface. Repeated thawing
and freezing with salt and chemicals can damage brick, concrete, and mortar, as
well as kill grass, shrubs and trees.
D. DRIVEWAYS AND PATIOS
Driveways are subjected to heavy use and severe weather conditions. You may
experience slight cracking and movement in the driveway slab due to the freezethaw cycle, vehicular traffic, and soil settlement. It is not uncommon for exterior
poured concrete to rise and fall due to the freezing and thawing of the soil on which
they are poured.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1 . An expansion and contraction crack in the driveway slab or patio that exceeds
1,8 inch in width will be repaired by filling the crack with a flexible silicone
concrete caulking.
2. A crack in the driveway slab or patio that e xceeds 1/4 inch in vertical
displacement will be repaired by removal and replacement of the affected area.
3. A driveway or patio that permanently settles, heaves, or separates in excess of
1/2 inch from any adjoinlng slab or apron, will be repaired by surface capping
of the affected area.
4. A concrete surface that disintegrates by means other than chemicals or abuse,
will be repaired by removing and replacing the affected area.
5. Minor low spots that hold water are normal and should be anticipated.
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CONCRETE
25
RYLAND HOMES
Caution: Concrete surfaces, under normal usage and weather conditions, should
not disintegrate to the extent that the aggregate is exposed and loosened. Even
during the First Year Coverage, Ryland is not responsible for concrete
deterioration caused by homeowner abuse or negligence, salt, chemicals, heavy
vehicles, and/or other factors beyond our control.
Concrete Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that concrete repairs requiring new
material will match the color of the existing material. Color variations are normal
and will become less noticeable over time.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Salt Damage: Salt and other de-icing chemicals will cause severe damage to
exterior concrete surfaces. Even when salt is not used, it can be tracked in from the
street on feet, tires, or accumulated under the fenders of your vehicle. When left to
melt, this highly concentrated salt causes pitting, spalling, and possibly the
exposure of aggregate. Although unsightly, this surface deterioration eventually
stops and does not continue past the contaminated areas.
Salt Precautions: Apply a concrete sealant to protect the concrete from water
penetration.
Weight Precautions: Keep excessive weight, such as moving vans, large
construction ve hicles, firewood, sand, and lumber off the driveway to prevent
cracking.
26
CONCRETE
SE-1
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON CONCRETE PROBLEMS
Problem
SE- 1
Likely Cause
Solution
Minor cracking.
Normal settlement,
shrinkage, expansion
and contraction.
Fill with flexible
silicone concrete
caulking.
Minor dusting.
Heavy traffic.
Apply concrete
sealer (after 6
months in home).
CONCRETE
27
RYLAND HOMES
COUNTERTOPS & VANITY TOPS
A.
COUNTERTOPS & VANITY TOPS
Kitchen countertops are covered with laminate material or ceramic tile, while
cultured marble is used on bathroom vanity tops.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A laminate countertop that delaminates will be repaired by re-gluing.
2. Loose or missing filler material in the miter joints of laminate tops will be
re-applied one time.
3. A cracked ceramic countertop ifie will be replaced if caused by structural
movement and will not be replaced if caused by homeowner abuse or
negligence.
4. A loose ceramic countertop tile will be re-secured by removing and
replacing the tile mastic, re-positioning the tile, and then re-grouting.
5. A crack or void in the grouting of ceramic countertop tile will be regrouted one time.
6. A crack in caulking, where the laminate or ceramic tile counter meets the
wall, will be re-caulked one time.
Caution: Service requests regarding the Typical Repair Guidelines presented
above must be immediately reported to Ryland by the homeowner. Failure to
do so is considered negligence and can result in significant water damage
which will not be repaired by Ryland.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all countertops
and vanity tops during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, chips, and
stains will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the
Pre-Settlement Check List.
Ceramic Countertop Tile Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that ceramic
countertop tile repairs requiring new material will match the color of the
existing tile material or colored grouting. Slight color
28
COUNTERTOPS AND VANITY TOPS
SE - 1
¼
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
variations are normal. Also be aware that the grout used on ceramic tile counter
tops will stain and that such stains will not be repaired by Ryland.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Laminate Countertops: Clean laminate countertops with a soapy cloth or sponge,
or use a non-abrasive liquid household cleanser for more stubborn stains. There are
one-step cleaning products available for laminates that clean, reduce streaking, and
leave surfaces polished. As with all cleaning products, carefully follow the
manufacturer's instructions. Always clean across the joints in laminate countertops.
Rust Stains: The contact of wet metal on sink surfaces, for example, the bottom of
a shaving can, may produce rust stains. To remove them, apply a powdered rust
remover following the manufacturer's instructions.
Keep standing water away from the back splash, seams, and the seal around the
sink. These areas are prone to water damage, since excessive moisture will
eventually break down the seal and cause swelling or delamination. Check seams
periodically and re-caulk as necessary. See Re-Caulking of Tubs and Showers in the
Plumbing Fixtures Section.
Ceramic Tile Countertops: Clean countertop tiles with a damp cloth, and remove
accumulated film with a soapless non-abrasive detergent or tile cleanser. Use a mild
vinegar and water solution to remove grease and soap scum. Keep white tile seams
clean by brushing with diluted bleach in a well-ventilated room.
Apply a grout sealant with a small brush to reduce grout staming, taking care to
keep the sealant off the tile surface.
Caulk cracks and separations of seams adjacent to tile with a silicone caulk, taking
care to wipe the tile clean once caulking is complete. Do not use clear silicone caulk
as it yellows with age and stains easily. See Re-Caulking of Tubs and Showers in
the Plumbing Fixtures Section.
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COUNTERTOPS AND VANITY TOPS
29
RYLAND HOMES
Tile can be damaged by dropped objects or by forcefully hitting the counter
edges.
Cultured Marble Vanity Tops: Clean cultured marble with a damp cloth and a
non-abrasive detergent. Caulk cracks and separations of seams adjacent to walls
with a silicone caulk, taking care to wipe the cultured marble clean once
caulking is complete. Do not use clear silicone caulk as it yellows with age and
stains easily. See Re-Caulking of Tubs and Showers in the Plumbing Fixtures
Section.
COUNTERTOP PRECAUTIONS:
1. Keep countertop dry at all times.
2. Excessive heat can cause charring, burning, lifting, or blistering. Do not place
hot pans, coffee pot, baking dishes, hot iron, or burning cigarettes directly on
laminate countertop surfaces. Use protective hot pads or trivets under
countertop electrical appliances.
3. Always use a cutting board since knives will gouge and mar the surface.
4. Steam from an open dishwasher may cause swelling and delamination. Allow
time for the dishwasher to cool before opening the door. To further reduce
moisture damage, apply a silicone spray to the underside of countertops,
directly over the dishwasher, and two feet left and right of the dishwasher.
30
COUNTERTOPS AND VANITY TOPS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
COUNTERTOP PROBLEMS
Problem
SE - 1
Likely Cause
Solution
Countertop
separating from
wall.
Settlement.
Re-caulk gap
between countertop
and wall.
Countertop chipped
or damaged.
Accidents.
Contact porcelain or
countertop repair
company.
Dull finish on cultured
marble surfaces.
Daily use.
Apply automotive
wax and buff to restore
finish
COUNTERTOPS AND VANITY TOPS
31
RYLAND HOMES
DECK
INTRODUCTION
A deck is constructed with pressure-treated wood which resists rot, decay, and
termites.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
A deck support post that warps or twists in excess of 1 inch over an8 foot
length will be replaced A rail post that warps or twists in excess of 1/2
inch will be replaced.
2.
A deck board that develops cracks at knots that are across the grain will be
replaced.
3.
A deck component that becomes loose or cracked and impairs deck safety
will be repaired by re-attachment, or it will be replaced.
4.
Cupped decking or rails that exceed 3/16 inch across the face of the board
will be replaced if the board cannot be re-nailed.
Deck Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that deck repairs requiring new
material will match the color of the existing material. Color variations between
new wood and existing wood are normal. If the deck has not been stained or
sealed, the new wood will naturally weather to a uniform color. If the deck has
been stained, it is the homeowner's responsibility to apply stain or other finishes
to the new boards.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
To prolong the life and beauty of the deck, treat it periodically with a water
repellent or wood preservative. Painting pressure-treated deck lumber is not
recommended. A local hardware store can help you select the right product.
Check nuts and bolts of deck and deck supports annually to ensure tightness.
Excessive weight may cause structural damage to decks. Do not put children's
swi mming pools or hot tubs on decks.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO DECK PROBLEMS
Problem
Loose boards.
Likely Cause
Wood shrinkage.
Solution
Re-nail using galvanized
nails.
SE-1
Raised nail heads on
floor decking.
Wood shrinkage.
Re-set nails.
Cracking, drying, or
Change of wood color.
Low moisture or
excessive sunlight.
Apply penetrating
oil finish.
Dark discoloration
of wood.
Mildew.
Periodically use deck
cleaner or bleach
solution.
DECK
33
RYLAND HOMES
DOORS
A.
INTRODUCTION
Your Ryland home comes with a variety of doors, including interior passage
doors, french doors, louver doors, bifold doors, sliding glass doors, exterior
doors, and garage doors.
B.
INTERIOR DOORS
Interior doors expand and contract in reaction to temperature and moisture
changes, and will be wider in humid summer periods and narrower during
dryer winter months.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An interior passage, closet, or bifold door that warps in excess of 1/4 inch, as
measured diagonally from corner to comer, will be repaired by adjusting the
2.
3.
4.
5.
door back to normal operation.
An interior door that sticks will be repaired by adjusting the door, hinges,
and jambs, or by planning the edges of the door back to normal operation.
An interior door with detached veneers will be repaired by gluing and
clamping.
An interior door with a gap that exceeds 1 1/4 inches, as measured from
the bottom of the door to the finished floor surface, will be re-hung.
An interior door lock that does not operate properly will be repaired by
adjusting the latch/keeper or door lock mechanism.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Sticking Doors: Home settlement or swelling caused by humidity may cause the
door to be out of alignment. In some cases, this may only be temporary due to
seasonal variations, and the sticking will tend to correct itself without any
adjustment.
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If adjustment is required:
1. Check hinge screws for tightness.
2. Fold sandpaper around a wooden block and sand the edge that sticks, but be
careful to not remove too much wood
3. Always paint or varnish sanded or planed areas to protect the wood from future
moisture penetration and sticking.
Bifold Doors: Keep the door tracks free of paint and dirt, and apply a small amount
of wax or silicone spray to the guide edges of the tracks.
Door Precautions: Interior doors are hollow core and are not designed to support
attachments and hanging accessories. Hanging heavy items on door knobs, or at the
top of a door, can damage hardware and hinges.
C. SLIDING GLASS DOORS
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A sliding glass door that binds will be inspected and corrected by adjusting
it to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications.
2. A sliding glass door lock that does not lock properly will be repaired by
adjusting the latch/keeper or door lock mechanism.
3. Double-pane glass doors that lose their seal and become fogged between
the panes will be replaced in accordance with the manufacturer's product
warranty.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all window and sliding
door glass during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Glass that is broken or scratched
will not be repaired or replaced after occupancy unless specifically noted on the
Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Clean glass with a spray glass cleanser and wipe frames with sudsy water and a soft
cloth. Periodically clean the bottom of the door track, and check to ensure that drain
holes are clear of obstructions. To keep the doors moving freely, apply a silicone
spray to the tracks.
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35
RYLAND HOMES
Keep sprinklers away from sliding glass doors and windows when watering
the lawn.
D.
EXTERIOR DOORS
An exterior door that is properly aligned, fitted, weatherstripped, and maintained
will help control energy costs. Exterior doors are steel-clad to prevent warpage
and to maximize insulation.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
An exterior door will warp to some degree, due to temperature differences
between the inside and outside surfaces.
A. An exterior door that warps in excess of 1/4 inch, as measured diagonally
from corner to comer, will be repaired by adjusting the door back to
normal operation.
B. M exterior door that warps to the extent that it becomes inoperable will
be replaced.
C. An exterior door that allows air infiltration will be repaired by adjusting
the weatherstripping or threshold.
2.
An exterior door that sticks will be repaired by adjusting the door, hinges, or
jamb.
3.
An exterior door lock that does not lock properly will be repaired by adjusting
the latch/keeper or door lock mechanism.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all doors during the
Pre-Settlement Orientation. Dents will not be repaired after occupancy unless
specifically noted on the Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Painting: Steel-clad doors are maintenance-free and require little attention
except for painting and upkeep from dents and scratches.
Weatherstripping: Weatherstripping on exterior doors helps maintain the
home's energy efficiency, preventing the loss of conditioned air, and reducing
the infiltration of outside air. Weatherstripping must remain in place to operate
effectively.
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1. Replace weatherstripping that becomes loose or damaged.
2. Prolong the life of vinyl and rubber weatherstripping by applying a silicone
spray.
3. The sweep weatherstripping at the bottom of the door may require replacement.
To replace, remove the sweep and match with a replacement available at
hardware stores.
4. To raise the threshold, adjust the screws on the wood portion of the threshold.
E. GARAGE DOORS
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. The exterior of a garage door, because of its exposure to weather changes, will
shrink, expand, and flex, and this may expose unpainted surfaces. Should this
occur, the garage door will be repainted one time.
2. A misaligned garage door with a gap that exceeds 3/8 inch, from the edge of the
door to the surrounding trim or slab, will be repaired by adjusting it back to the
3/8 inch specification or less.
3. A garage door that is difficult to open, or that will not stay open, will be
repaired by adjusting the door tension.
Caution: The installation of a garage door opener unless installed as an available
Ryland option, may void any applicable Garage Door Warranty. Garage doors are
warranted for proper mechanical operation as installed. The installation of a
garage door opener alters the operation of the door and Ryland cannot be
responsible for altered mechanical operation.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Do not leave garage doors open for long periods of time as this can cause inward
warping.
Wood shrinks as it ages, which loosens the screws that fasten the hardware to the
garage door. Check and tighten these once a year, and oil the moving parts of
garage doors every six months.
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37
RYLAND HOMES
Garage doors use high tension springs that make homeowner repair
dangerous. Please contact a garage door company for spring repairs.
F. DOOR HARDWARE
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
Brass-plated door hardware with finish deterioration will be repaired by
replacing the fixture. This does not cover brass tarnishing or damage caused by
improper cleaning.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
The brass-plated door knockers, door locks, door handles, kick plates, and
hinges used throughout the home are exposed to both outside elements and
common everyday use, and this may cause them to discolor. Clean these with
a damp cloth and do not use abrasive cleansers or solvents. Periodic polishing,
following manufacturer's recommendations, will help maintain their original
luster and appearance. Do not use brass polish on lacquered brass parts or
fixtures.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO DOOR PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
Door will not stay
open.
Settlement.
Bend hinge pin.
Door will not latch
Settlement.
Adjust keeper.
Hinges on door
squeak.
Friction on hinge pin.
Apply wax to hinge
pin.
Door key does not
Normal usage.
Spray white graphite
properly.
operate smoothly.
Door knob loose or
rattles.
SE - 1
into key hole.
Normal usage.
Tighten screws.
DOORS
39
RYLAND HOMES
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
A. INTRODUCTION
The electrical system in your Ryland home is designed for safe, trouble-free
service and meets both local and national electric code requirements.
Electrical wiring, switches, outlets, and circuit breakers were installed by the
licensed Electrical Contractor listed in Ryland's Homeowner Service
Directory.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An electrical outlet, wall switch, or light fixture problem caused by
defective workmanship or equipment, will be inspected and corrected to
meet the manufacturer's installation and product specifications.
2. A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) is installed to prevent electric
shock. The units are sensitive to power surges and some tripping is
normal. A GFCI that trips frequently will be inspected and corrected to
meet the manufacturer's installation and product specifications.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: Two Year Coverage
1. A circuit breaker problem caused by defective workmanship or equipment
will be inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation and
product specifications.
2. Electrical wiring that falls to carry its designated load as a result of
defective workmanship or equipment, will be inspected and corrected to
meet the manufacturer's installation and product specifications, and to
meet national electrical code specifications.
CALLING FOR SERVICE:
For prompt service, contact the Electrical Contractor listed in your Ryland
Homeowner 's Service Directory directly. Ryland assumes no
responsibility for service performed by anyone other than the authorized
Contractor.
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Warranty Caution: Any addition, alteration, or modification to the original
electrical system installation may void all applicable warranties.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Electrical Safety Cautions: Do-it-yourself electrical wiring is dangerous. Improper
electrical repairs can endanger the lives of your family and jeopardize your
homeowner's insurance in the event of fire or electrical injury. Always use a
licensed Electrician to make electrical repairs, adjustments, and additions.
Power Failure: If the electric power goes out, check first to deterrnine if neighbors
are also without power, and if so, contact the utility company. Before attempting to
reset circuit breakers, check that power has been restored to the area. If neighbors
have power, check the main circuit breaker in the panel box. See Homeowner's
Maintenance Guidelines under Circuit Breakers, this Section.
Be aware that not every electrical power problem is due to problems within the
home's electrical system. Utility companies experience a variety of situations that
affect power supplies, including power surges and interruptions, peak overload
periods, and even total shutdowns.
B. ELECTRIC METER BOX
The utility company installed an electric meter box to measure your electric usage
for billing purposes. Their invoice is based on kilowatt-hours used over a given
time period, with a kilowatt-hour being the energy expended by 1000 watts for one
hour. Should you have questions about meter box functions, please contact the
Customer Service Department at the utility company.
C. CIRCUIT BREAKERS
Electrical wiring and appliances are protected by circuit breakers to stop circuit
overloading. The main circuit breaker is located in the electrical panel box, and if
tripped for any reason, entirely cuts off all electricity.
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41
RYLAND HOMES
The smaller circuit breakers within the same panel box control appliances,
wall switches, lighting, and the heating system, and each switch is clearly
marked as to what it controls.
Do not tamper with the electrical service entrance cable that provides power
to the service panel.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Circuit Tripping Causes and Remedies: Thunderstorms, lightning, and power
failures can cause circuit breakers to trip. If only your home is affected, try to
reset by switching the breaker to full OFF, then fully back to the ON position.
If this does not reset the breaker, or if the breaker continues to trip, do not
continue resetting the breaker as this can damage the panel box, wiring, or
appliance that it controls. Call the Electrical Contractor for service inspection.
Overloaded circuits can also cause tripping. This occurs when too many small
or large appliances are used on one circuit. To reduce the load, remove plugs
of appliances that may cause the overloading, then reset the breaker as
described above.
If you install a microwave or other appliances that require large electrical
loads, you may need a licensed Electrical Contractor to add additional wiring
to accommodate the load.
D.
OUTLETS AND WALL SWITCHES
If an electrical outlet does not work, check first to make sure the outlet is not
controlled by a wall switch. If the outlet still does not operate, contact the
Electrical Contractor.
An electrical outlet or light switch on an exterior wall may produce a
slight dralt, allowing cold ail to be drawn into the room. Ryland makes a
special effort to reduce these drafts; however, some cold air is normal.
Draft protection pads that help reduce cool air drats can be installed by a
qualified electrician or are available at hardware stores.
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E. GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS (GFCI)
GFCI electric outlets prevent electrical shock, and are installed in kitchens,
bathrooms, garages, basements, and exterior areas where water may be present.
GFCI receptacles are sensitive to power surges and interrupt power under certain
conditions to prevent injury.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
GFCI outlets are often wired in a series. For example, the bathroom GFCI outlet
controls the bathroom, and may possibly control other outlets throughout the home.
Taking this example further, if the electrical outlet in the garage is not functioning,
check the GFCI in the bathroom. Also be aware that some Ryland homes have
multiple GFCI 's, so be certain to inspect and reset the affected outlet.
When a GFCI controls more than one outlet, an overloaded bathroom outlet will
also shut down all connected outlets. For this reason, do not plug refrigerators,
freezers, or electric garage door power cords into GFCI outlets.
If a GFCI receptacle is not functioning, press the Reset button on the wall plate to
restore proper operation. If that does not work, check and reset the circuit breaker in
the panel box first, then press the GFCI Reset button. If the outlet still fails, it may
indicate a short in the appliance. If other appliances will not operate, an electrician
should be contacted and the GFCI replaced.
To test GFCI 's, press the Test button on the receptacle. The outlet should not
perform. To reset, press the Reset button.
F. PRE-WIRED TELEPHONES, TV ANTENNA & CABLE TV
Ryland homes are pre-wired for telephone, and in some communities are pre-wired
for TV antenna or Cable TV If you experience problems with phone connections or
cable TV reception, contact the phone company or local cable company.
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43
RYLAND HOMES
If the telephone or cable TV company state that there is trouble in the house
wiring, please call the Electrical Contractor who installed the wiring as listed
in Ryland's Homeowner Service Directory. Neither Ryland nor the Electrical
Contractor will pay for wiring repairs done by the telephone or cable TV
company.
G. LIGHT FIXTURES AND POST LAMP
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Interior and exterior lighting fixtures require periodic homeowner
maintenance to preserve the finish Carefully review and follow the
instructions provided for these fixtures.
Do not use indoor bulbs in exterior lighting fixtures. Do not use light bulbs
with a higher wattage than the maximum wattage stated on the light fixture.
H. SMOKE DETECTORS
The smoke detectors in your home are pre-wired, per electrical code
requirements, into the main electrical system.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Test the detectors weekly, and clean and vacuum the openings of the smoke
detector once a month. Visually inspect the clear button of the test switch to
see that the indicator light is glowing. To test the alarm, press the Test button
for about ten seconds, or until the horn sounds loudly. Never use an open
flame to test the detector. The built-in test switch accurately tests all detector
functions as required by Underwriter's Laboratories. This is the only way to
test the detector.
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ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
SE-1
Complete power
failure.
Main breaker
tripped. Electrical
outage.
Reset main breaker.
Call power company
if power is still out.
Electrical outlets
not working.
Outlet switch is off
or circuit breaker is
tripped.
Turn on switch.
Check and reset
breaker.
GFCI switches not
operating.
GFCI receptacle or
circuit breaker is
tripped.
Reset GFCI Check
and reset circuit
breaker.
Light fixture not
working.
Switch is off or bulb
is burned out.
Turn on switch. Turn
off power to replace
bulbs.
Appliance does not
work.
Circuit breaker
tripped or appliance
broken.
Reset circuit breaker.
If problem persists,
see appliance manual.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
45
RYLAND HOMES
EXTERIOR FINISHES
A. INTRODUCTION
Exterior finishes are applied once the exterior framing is complete and the
drywall is placed within the home. The exterior is finished with wood, vinyl
or aluminum siding, a brick or stone veneer, or a combination of these
materials.
B. VINYL SIDING
Vinyl siding reduces the need for future painting. You should be aware that
vinyl siding is installed loosely to allow for expansion and contraction that
occurs with changing temperatures. A small amount of deflection should be
anticipated.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A vinyl siding problem caused by defective workmanship will be
inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation
specifications.
2. A vinyl siding problem caused by defective material, including panels
with inconsistent fadi ng or finishes that discolor, crack, or peel, will be
inspected and corrected by replacing the material in accordance with the
manufacturer's product warranty and specifications.
3. Interior water leakage, caused by defective workmanship or defective
vinyl siding material, will be corrected by repaliing the affected panels,
and by repairing the interior areas damaged by water.
4. A vinyl panel that comes loose or unattached will be re-secured. The vinyl
siding manufacturer does not provide warranty coverage should the panels
come loose or detached by winds in excess of 54 miles per hour. Wind
gusts in excess of 54 miles per hour are considered as "Acts of God" and
repairs may be covered by homeowner's insurance.
5. "Oil-canning" or excessive buckling of the siding will be repaired.
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Warranty Note: The length of warranties for vinyl siding is different for different
manufacturers. For specifics, please review the product literature appropriate to
your siding installation.
Vinyl Siding Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that siding repairs requiring new
material will match the color of the existing material. Color variations caused by
weathering effects are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Cleaning: For specific cleaning instructions, please refer to the appropriate
Manufacturer's Service Manual.
C. SOFFIT AND FASCIA
The vinyl soffit and aluminum fascia do not require painting. The soffit vents are
located under the roof overhang and on porch ceilings. The fascia is used behind
gutters and to cover gable trim boards. In some areas, wood is used for the soffit
and fascia.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A soffit or fascia problem caused by defective workmanship will be i nspected
and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications.
2. A soffit or fascia problem caused by defective material, including
inconsistent fading or finishes that discolor, crack, or peel, will be corrected by
replacing the affected material in accordance with the manufacturer's product
warranties and specifications.
3. Interior water leakage caused by defective workmanship or defective soffit and
fascia material, will be corrected by repairing the affected materials, and by
repairing the interior areas damaged by water.
4. A soffit or fascia that comes loose or unattached will be re-secured by face
nailing. The soffit and fascia manufacturer does not provide warranty coverage
should the panels come loose or detached by winds in excess of 54 miles per
hour. Wind gusts in excess of 54 miles per hour are considered as "Acts of
God" and repairs may be covered by homeowner's insurance.
5. A fascia that bows out past the shingle drip line will be repaired.
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47
RYLAND HOMES
Warranty Note: The length of warranties for vinyl soffits and aluminum
fascia is different for different manufacturers. For specifics, please review the
product literature appropriate to your installation.
Soffit and Fascia Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that soffit and fascia
repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing material.
Color variations caused by weathering effects are normal.
D.
EXTERIOR WOOD TRIM AND WOOD SIDING
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Ye ar Coverage
1. An exterior wood trim or siding problem caused by defective
workmanship will be inspected and corrected to meet installation
specifications.
2. An exterior wood trim or siding problem caused by defective materials
will be inspected and corrected.
A. A split board will be repaired by filling the crack, sanding, and
painting, or it will be replaced if the split exceeds 118 inch in
width.
B. A board that warps or bows in excess of 1/4 inch for any 32-inch
measurement will be replaced.
C. A board with excessive sap leakage will be cleaned, sealed, and
repainted.
3. A veneer trim board that delaminates will be replaced.
4. Joints between exterior trim elements, including siding and masonry, shall
not result in open joints in excess of 3/8 inch. In all cases the exterior trim,
masonry, and siding shall be capable of performing its function to exclude
the elements. A butt or miter joint between exterior trim boards that
exceeds 1/4 inch in width will be repaired by caulking one time.
5. Caulk or filler that shrinks will be repaired by re-caulking or by filling the
affected area one time.
6. Wood trim with loose or missing knots will be filled, sanded, and
repainted.
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Exterior Wood Trim and Wood Siding Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that
wood trim and siding repairs requiring new material will match the color of the
existing material. Color variations caused by weathering effects are normal. Where
surfaces are repaired that require staining or painting, Ryland will paint or stain
the new material only.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Keep garden sprinklers away from the house and do not plant shrubbery too close
to the walls.
Periodically inspect the exterior to be sure that wood siding and trim joints and
seams are tightly caulked. Loss of seal can result in water damage.
For mildew problems, see Painting Section.
E. BRICK VENEER
Upon completion of construction, the brick was cleaned with a diluted acid solution
or a non-acidic solution, per the manufacturer's recommendation.
Slight variations in size, color, and placement create the textural interest that
contributes to the look of a brick exterior. Surface chips and cracks add a weathered
appeal, while small hairline cracks in the mortar are caused by shrinkage. Minor
brick chipping, cracking, and mortar shrinkage are normal.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Brick veneer problems caused by defective workmanship will be inspected
and corrected.
A. A crack in the mortar joint of the masonry veneer that exceeds 1/8
inch in width will be repaired by pointing or patching.
B.
A mortar joint that varies more than 3/8 inch in width will be
corrected by removing and replacing the affected brick.
C. A horizontal mortar joint should run in a straight line. Any variation
that exceeds 1/4 inch over a 32 inch measurement, will be corrected
by removing and replacing the affected brick.
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49
RYLAND HOMES
D.
A brick with dips or bulges that exceed 112 inch, as measured
vertically or horizontally, will be repaired by removing and
replacing the affected brick.
E. A window sill that is level or that tilts toward the window will be
removed and replaced, so that it tilts away from the window and
allows water to drain away from the home.
2. A brick veneer problem caused by defective material will be inspected to
determine if the brick meets specific dimensional tolerances. if these
tolerances are not met, the affected brick will be removed and replaced.
A. Brick Size: Bricks may vary m size because of variations in the raw
material and manufacturing processes. Size variations, however,
will not vary by more than 1/2 inch in length or width.
B. Brick Distortion: Bowed brick will not exceed 3,8 of an inch over
the brick's length.
C. Brick Chipping: Bricks may be chipped during packaging,
shipping, or on the job site. Chips are measured from an edge or a
comer, and the total length of these chips will not be greater than
10% of the perimeter of the face of the brick, nor greater than 5116
inch from the edge, nor greater than 1/2 inch on the corners.
Brick Veneer Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that brick or mortar
repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing material.
Color variations are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Bricks can be cleaned with a soap and water solution. Gentle scrubbing with
a non-abrasive household cleaner will remove most stubborn discolorations.
A white powdery substance that may appear on masonry walls is called
efflorescence. It is composed of water soluble salts, originally present in
masonry materials, that are brought to the surface when water evaporates.
Efflorescence can usually be removed with a stiff scrub brush and water.
50 EXTERIOR FINISHES
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F. STONEVENEER
Slight variations in size, color and placement create the textural interest that
contributes to the look of a stone exterior. Minor stone chipping, cracking, and
cement shrinkage are normal.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: First Year Coverage
1.
A crack in the cement joint of stone veneer that exceeds 1/8 inch in
width will be repaired by pointing or patching.
Stone Veneer Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that stone or cement repairs
requiring new material will match the color of the existing material. Color
variations are normal.
G. SYNTHETIC STUCCO VENEER
Synthetic stucco veneer combines gypsum board with expanded polystyrene
covered with fiberglass reinforced mesh and a copolymer acrylic. This is painted
with an exterior latex paint.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: First Year Coverage
1. A buckle that exceeds 1/2 inch, as measured horizontally from the flat veneer
surface, or a crack that exceeds 1/4 inch, will be repaired by refinishing and
repainting or by removing, replacing, and repainting the affected area.
Synthetic Stucco Veneer Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that repairs requiring
repainting will exactly match the existing paint. Due to weathering of the original
paint, color variations are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Do not subject synthetic stucco veneer to excessive impact from ladder placement,
weed trimmers, or lawn mowers, as the finish is susceptible to abusive treatment
and could dent or puncture.
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51
RYLAND HOMES
Problem
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
EXTERIOR FINISH PROBLEMS
Likely Cause
Solution
Dirty siding.
Adverse weather
conditions and
soiling
Periodic hosing. See
manufacturer's
recommendations.
Siding blows off.
Strong winds under
54 miles per hour.
Call Ryland for
inspection.
Siding blows off.
Strong winds.
Act of God. Review
Homeowner’s
insurance policy.
Cracking/peeling of
painted surfaces.
Normal aging and
weathering.
Clean and sand
surface, then prime
and repaint.
Gaps at joints in
wood trim.
Normal caulk and
filler shrinkage.
Re-caulk or fill.
Sap on exterior trim.
Wood drying out.
Sand, prime, and
paint.
Efflorescence on
masonry finishes.
Crystallized soluble
salts.
Scrub with water
and stiff brush.
Mildew on wood
siding.
Wet weather and
lack of sunlight at
affected area.
Pressure wash
affected area with
diluted bleach.
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SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
EXTERIOR FINISH PROBLEMS
Problem
Mildew on vinyl
siding.
SE-1
Likely Cause
Wet weather and lack of
sunlight at affected area.
Solution
Pressure wash with
water.
EXTERIOR FINISHES
53
RYLAND HOMES
FIREPLACE
A. INTRODUCTION
Ryland uses both masonry and pre-fabricated fireplaces. Masonry fireplaces are
constructed in the field with brick and mortar, while pre-fabricated fireplaces are
factory built of sheet metal and then delivered to the home site.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
2.
3.
4.
5
6.
7.
A pre-fabricated fireplace problem caused by defective workmanship or
equipment will be inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's
installation and product specifications.
Cracks in refractor panels of a pre-fabricated fireplace that are
1/64 inch or less are acceptable. Cracks in excess of 1/64 inch will be
repaired in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations.
A masonry fireplace that does not draw smoke up the chimney will be
inspected to determine the cause of the problem and corrected.
A brick crack in a masonry fireplace that exceeds 3/16 inch in width will be
removed and replaced.
A crack in the mortar of a masonry fireplace that exceeds 1/8 inch in width
will be filled.
A damper in a masonry or pre-fabricated fireplace that is defective will be
inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's product specifications.
Excess mortar in a masonry fireplace will be removed if it interferes
with the damper or fireplace operation.
Warranty Caution: Do not burn pressure treated wood, scrap lumber, Christmas
trees, trash, cardboard, plastic, or any flammable material such as gasoline.
Burning these may cause brick, flue liners, or glass doors to crack, and may void
your fireplace warranty.
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FIREPLACE
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Fireplace Equipment: A fireplace screen and andirons or grate are necessities. A
set of fireplace tools, available from a local fireplace equipment shop, will help you
handle logs, stoke the flames, and shovel out cold ashes.
Fireplace Inspections: A clean, unobstructed fireplace and chimney
are important for safe fireplace operation. Have a fireplace cleaning company
inspect the fireplace and chimney annually for soot build-up and appropriate
cleaning. Inspect the hearth and firebrick liner for loose or cracked firebrick and
loose mortar.
Starting a fire: Follow this checklist for safe fireplace use.
1. Open the flue damper fully and visually check that the flue is not obstructed.
2. Clear obstructions and ashes away from the air inlet channels and fireplace
screen.
3. Use a steel or cast iron grate to elevate the wood above the fireplace brick. Do
not build fires directly on the fireplace brick.
4. Place crumpled, non-colored newspaper under the grate.
5. Add kindling (small wood chips and twigs) on the gr'ate over the newspaper.
6. Place three logs in a pyramid arrangement at the back of the firebox, providing
air spaces between the logs.
7. Preheat flues by lighting a piece of newspaper on top of the logs, making sure
that the smoke is carried up the chimney
8. Ignite the newspaper under the kindling.
9. Use seasoned hardwood for a long burning, smoke-free fire. Store firewood
outside as it may harbor insects.
10. Do not build extremely large fires.
11. Keep damper open and screen closed throughout the life of the fire.
12. Close damper the following day when the fire is completely out. Periodically
remove ashes from previous fires and place them outdoors in a metal container.
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FIREPLACE
55
RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON FIREPLACE PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
Fire will not stay lit.
Wood is wet or
unseasoned.
56
Use dry, seasoned
wood.
Fire will not stay lit.
Starting fire with
firewood logs that
are too large.
Start fife with
newspaper, kindling,
and small logs.
Smoke backs up
into room.
Damper not open.
Obstructed chimney
flue.
Open damper.
Clean chimney
Smoke backs up
into room.
Chimney flue not
pre-heated.
Light newspaper
above wood and
grate to create draw.
Smoke smell in
home when the fire
is not burning
Dirty flue.
Left over ashes in
firebox. Wet flue.
Clean flue. Clean out
ashes. Install
chimney cap.
Smoke smell in
home when the fife
is not burning
Exhaust fan pulling
air down flue into
home.
Close damper.
Water inside
fireplace.
Rain coming down
chimney.
Install chimney cap.
Cracks in fire brick
and/or in mortar.
Burning fires that
are too large and too
hot.
Get brick and mortar
repaired. Do not
build large fires.
FIREPLACE
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON FIREPLACE PROBLEMS
SE-1
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
Down drafts pull
smoke into home.
Drafting problems.
Call Ryland for
inspection.
Excessive black soot on
inside of fireplace and
flue.
Burning poor quality
wood or items other
seasoned hardwoods.
than wood.
Burn only dry,
Get chimney cleaned.
FIREPLACE
57
RYLAND HOMES
FLOORING AND FINISHES
A.
INTRODUCTION
Your home is finished with a variety of flooring materials which may include a
combination of carpet, resilient vinyls, hardwood and parquet floors, and
manufactured tiles.
B.
CARPETING
The carpet is durable and requires minimal care. Color variations and shading may
be noticeable, and depend upon the surface texture and pile fiber of the carpet.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
A carpet problem caused by faulty workmanship, including gapping at seams,
carpet buckling, separation of carpet from tack strip, or mismatched dye-lots
will be inspected and repaired or replaced.
A. A carpet seam with visible gaps that exceed 1/8 inch at the seam
joint, will be repaired by re-seaming the carpet sections.
B. A carpet that buckles or stretches will be re-stretched and resecured.
C. A carpet that separates from the tack strip will be re-secured to the
tack strip.
2.
A carpet problem caused by defective material or unjustified (not caused by
homeowner negligence) staining, fading, or discoloration, will be repaired by
removing and replacing the affected area.
An independent carpet testing agency will inspect and test the carpet to verify
unjustified staining and discoloration. This process could take as long as two
months. Their decision and recommendations are considered binding.
Carpet Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that carpet repairs requiring new
material will match the color of the existing material. Ryland is not responsible for
man 14acturer dye-lot variations.
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FLOORING A ND FINISHES
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Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all carpeting during the
Pre-Settlement Orientation. Carpet damage or stains will not be repaired after
occupancy unless specifically noted on the Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Frequent vacuuming and immediate stain removal are primary carpet care steps.
For complete instructions, please refer to the manufacturer's cleaning
recommendations.
While normal vacuuming will only remove loose fibers from carpet yams, an
occasional tuft may be lifted above the surface. Do not pull out the tuft; just snip it
off to the length of the other tufts using scissors.
Color fading caused by sunlight can be minimized by closing the draperies during
the day, or by using shear draperies to reduce incoming sunlight.
C. RESILIENT FLOOR COVERINGS
Resilient floor coverings come in 6-foot or 12-foot wide rolls or individual tiles,
and are installed in foyers, kitchens, bathrooms, laundry areas, and finished
basements.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A resilient floor covering problem will be inspected.
A. A problem caused by defective workmanship will be corrected to meet the
manufacturer's installation specifications.
B. A problem caused by defective material will be repaired by removing and
replacing the affected area, in accordance with the manufacturer's product
warranties and specifications.
2. Resilient floor covering seam joints will be visible.
A. A seam that gaps will be repaired.
B. Individual tiles that pop up or come loose will be re-glued.
3. Resilient flooring that lifts, bubbles, or becomes unglued, will be repaired by regluing.
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59
RYLAND HOMES
4.
5.
A raised nail head or staple in the sub-flooring or underlayment that does not
break the surface of the resilient flooring, will be repaired by re-setting the
nail or staple.
A raised nail head or staple in the sub-flooring or underlayment that breaks
through the surface of the flooring, will be repaired by removing and
replacing the affected area
Warranty Caution: Review and follow the manufacturer's cleaning and care
recommendations. Using a cleaning solution other than that specifically
recommended by the manufacturer will void the man 14acturer's warranty. Do not
wax a no-wax floor.
Warranty Caution: Do not place foam, plastic, or rubber backed mats on resilient
floor coverings as they may cause discoloration.
Resilient Floor Covering Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that resilient floor
covering repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing
material. Ryland is not responsible for manufacturer dye-lot variations.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all resilient floor
coverings during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, gouges, dents, and
other damage will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the
Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
For resilient floor cleaning and maintenance guidelines, please refer to the
manufacturer's instructions.
Mop up bathroom water spills from showers and baths immediately. Water seeping
into the mastic through the seams and under the baseboard trim can cause seam
separation and lifting. A silicone caulk, available at hardware stores, is
recommended for use at tub and floor joints to minimize this problem.
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FLOORING AND FINISHES
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Attach furniture protectors to the bottom of furiture legs to protect the resilient
flooring from scuffing and surface damage. Be aware that high heeled shoes will
damage resilient floor coverings and that rubber-backed or latex-backed rugs or
carpet may cause permanent discoloration.
D. WOOD FLOORS
Pre-finished wood parquet and plank floors are pre-finished at the factory with a
baked-on wax coating or a urethane coating. On-site finished wood floors are also
protected with a urethane coating. Wood floor tone, grain, and color variations are
normal, and reflect the natural characteristics of real hardwood.
Some squeaking of hardwood floors is normal and is caused by seasonal weather
and humidity changes.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A hardwood flooring problem caused by defective workmanship will be
inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications.
2. A problem caused by defective material will be inspected and corrected.
A.
A floor board with a split or crack that exceeds 1/8 inch in width, or
a gap between floor boards that exceeds 1/8 inch in width, will be
replaced.
B. A floor board with a split or crack that is less than 1/8 inch in width
will be filled with a color coordinated wood filling compound.
3. A hardwood floor that squeaks will be inspected to determine the specific cause,
and will be corrected if caused by defective installation.
4. An uneven hardwood floor caused by boards that buckle, swell, or warp, and
that exceed a l/4 inch ridge or depression within any 32-inch measurement as
measured parallel to the joists, will be inspected to determine the cause.
A. If the problem is caused by defective workmanship, the affected area
will be repaired to meet the manufacturer's installation
specifications.
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FLOORING AND FINISHES
61
RYLAND HOMES
B.
If floor warpage, buckling, or swelling is caiised by excessive
humidity and moisture in the home, Ryland will provide the
homeowner with recommendations to reduce the moisture level.
See Homeowner's Maintenance Guidelines in the Water Infiltration
and Condensation Section.
5. A hardwood floor board with hollow knot holes or loose knots will be
removed and replaced.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all hardwood
floors during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, gouges, dents, and
other damage will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted
on the Pre-Settlement Check List.
Hardwood Flooring Repair Notes: Ryland cannot ensure that hardwood
flooring repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing
material. It is normal to expect surface nailing to occur around the perimeter
area of pre finished hardwood floors, and around ally repaired areas, as
well.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
For pre-finish hardwood floor cleaning and maintenance guidelines, please
refer to the manufacturer's instructions.
For site finished wood floor cleaning, use a dust mop that is lightly misted
with water.
Caution: The protective urethane coating on site fin ished wood floors can
react with certain commercial floor wax products. These products generally
have a warning label that use on a urethane floor will cause discoloration
and/or clouding of the floor surface Problems caused by these products will
not be repaired by Ryland
Use entrance rugs or mats to protect wood flooring from dirt and water spots.
Do not use foam, plastic or rubber-backed mats as they may cause
discoloration. Mop up water spills immediately. Do not set potted plants
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FLOORING AND FINISHES
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
directly on a hardwood floor as moisture can leak through and cause permanent
staiing and warpage.
Attach fumiture pmtectors to the bottom of furniture legs to protect the hardwood
flooring from scuffing and surface damage. Be aware that high heel shoes will
damage hardwood floors.
E. CERAMIC TILE FLOORS
Ceramic tile is easy to maintain and impervious to water. The seams and joints are
not waterproof and require special attention to prevent water seepage.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. A cracked floor tile will be replaced.
2. A loose floor tile will be re-secured by removing and replacing the tile mastic,
re-positioning the tile, and then re-grouting.
3. A crack in caulking will be re-caulked one time.
4. A crack or void in the grouting of ceramic tile will be re-grouted one time.
5 Loose underlayment will be repaired by removing the affected tile, resecuring
the underlayment, and then re-installing the tile and grouting.
Ceramic Tile Floor Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that ceramic tile floor
repairs requiring new material will match the color of the existing tile material or
colored grouting. Color variations are normal.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all tile floors during the
Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches and chips will not be repaired after
occupancy unless specifically noted on the Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Grout Sealing: Water can penetrate grout seams and joints, and will
damage materials adjacent to and underneath the tile. This occurs when
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FLOORING AND FINISHES
63
RYLAND HOMES
excessive amounts of water are used during floor washing, or in the bathroom
from splashes and spills from showers, tubs and sinks. The homeowner can
apply a silicone based grout sealer at move in time to reduce staining, mildew,
and water penetration. Grout sealers are available at hardware stores and should
be used following manufacturer's guidelines.
Seam Caulking: The seam joints, where baseboard and tile meet, will crack
and erode from normal settlement of the home. Inspect these areas frequently
and apply a silicone caulk to the joints as needed.
Floor Protection: Chipping, scratching, and cracking of floor tiles can be
caused by putting heavy furniture directly onto the surface. Minimize this
damage and reduce skidding by placing flat furniture protectors underneath
furniture wheels and legs.
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FLOORING AND FINISHES
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
FLOORING AND FINISH PROBLEMS
Problem
SE-1
Likely Cause
Solution
Carpet seams
noticeable.
Fibers separate from
vacuuming and
normal traffic.
Vacuum carpet m
same direction as
seams.
Carpet fades near
windows and doors.
Excessive sunlight.
Close window
coverings to reduce
excessive sun.
Carpet stains.
Spills, pets.
Follow
manufacturer's
guidelines.
Carpet looks matted
on stairs and high
traffic areas.
Dirty carpet or
insufficient
vacuuming.
Have carpet
professionally cleaned.
Vacuum more often.
Resilient or vinyl
floor finish looks
dull.
High traffic areas or
furniture rubbing
against floor.
Follow
manufacturer's
guidelines.
Resilient or vinyl
floor seams are
apparent.
Normal.
No repair.
Nail or staple pops
up under vinyl or
resilient floor.
Settlement.
Gently re-set nail or
staple.
Caulk around vinyl
floors cracks.
Caulk shrinkage and
settlement.
Re-caulk gaps with
silicone caulking.
FLOORING AND FINISHES
65
RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
FLOORING AND FINISH PROBLEMS
66
Problem
Dents in vinyl or
resilient floors.
Likely Cause
Objects dropped,
heavy furniture, or
high heeled shoes.
Follow
manufacturer's
guidelines.
Fine scratches, white
splotches, stains on
pre-finished floors.
Normal wear,
furniture scratches,
and spills.
Follow
manufacturer's
guidelines.
Grout cracks along
baseboards.
Normal expansion
and contraction.
Re-grout cracks.
Grout staining.
Liquid spills and
grease from food.
Follow
manufacturer's
guidelines.
FLOORING AND FINISHES
Solution
SE- 1
HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
FRAMING AND CARPENTRY
A. INTRODUCTION
Framing and carpentry with wood studs, beams, and joists creates the skeletal
structure of the home.
Ryland uses a pre-engineered truss system that supports the weight of the roof and
can be used in combination with conventional ceiling and roof framing.
Warranty Caution: Attic access must be installed parallel to and in between the trusses.
Roof trusses should not be cut to install attic stairs. This can structurally damage the
integrity of the roof and will void HOW's and any other structural defect warranty.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
As the wood in your home dries, normal shrinkage will occur that causes
settlement. While every home has certain degrees of settlement, not all settlement is
severe enough to require repair. All wood framing and carpentry settlement will be
inspected and repaired to meet state and local building specifications, as follows:
1. Floor decking with a ridge or depression that exceeds 1/4 inch within a
32-inch horizontal or vertical measurement, will be corrected to meet
specifications.
2. The surface of an interior or exterior wall will have slight variances. However,
a wall that bows more than 1/4 inch within a 32-inch horizontal or vertical
measurement, will be corrected by cutting and repairing the affected stud.
3. A wall that is out of plumb by more than 1/4 inch within a 32-inch vertical
measurement, will be repaired by moving the base or top plates into a plumb
position.
4. A wall that is out of square by more than 1/4 inch within a 32 inch horizontal
measurement will be corrected to meet specifications.
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67
RYLAND HOMES
5.
6.
7.
8.
68
A hole in exterior sheathing will be repaired by taping.
A cracked or broken truss will be inspected for structural integrity and
repaired to meet engineering specifications.
Roof sheathing with uneven areas that exceed 1/2 inch over a 2-foot span
as measured horizontally across the trusses, will be repaired by reinforcing
the affected area.
Floor squeaks resulting from improper installation will be inspected and
repaired.
FRAMING AND CARPENTRY
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
INTERIOR WALLS AND CEILINGS
A.
INTRODUCTION
Your Ryland home features two types of walls: load bearing and non- load bearing.
Warranty Caution: Any alteration of bearing walls may undermine the structure by
reducing its load bearing or support capacity, and may void HOW's major
structural defect warranty.
B. INSULATION
Flexible insulation, in the form of fiberglass blankets, is commonly used in walls,
floors, ceilings, and around ducts. Blown insulation of loose fiberglass can be used
in flat ceiling areas. Plastic foam may be used for spot insulation around windows
and doors, pipe openings and other air leakage points.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An insulation problem caused by defective workmanship will be inspected and
corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications plus local
building code requirements.
C. DRYWALL
Drywall is installed according to the manufacturer's specifications. The seams
where sheets of drywall come together are taped, spackled with a joint compound,
allowed to dry, and then sanded to prepare them for painting.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Drywall materials, including corner bead and seams, that exceed
1/4 inch out of plumb for any 32 inch vertical measurement, will be corrected
by feathering the wall with joint compound to meet installation specifications.
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69
RYLAND H0MES
2.
3.
4.
5.
A nail pop will be repaired by resetting or replacing the existing protruding
nail, covering the area with spackling compound, and sanding the area to a
smooth finish
A crack that exceeds 1/16 inch in width, will be repaired by spackling and
sanding the repaired area.
Corner bead that becomes detached will be re-attached by re-nailing.
Corner bead that is twisted will be replaced.
Ryland will repair and touch up nail pops and settlement cracks one time.
Drywall Repair Notes: Please do not write on walls or make other marks where
dry wall is to be repaired. Drywall repairs will be made in areas painted or
wallpapered by the homeowner however re-painting or rewallpapering of the
repaired areas is the homeowner's responsibility. Visible, minor drywall
imperfections are normal. Any repairs to textured ceilings will have slight color
and texture variations, which are normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Nail Pops and Drywall Repairs: Minor drywall cracks and nail pops on the
interior wall and ceiling surfaces are caused by home settlement and the normal
drying of stud framing and drywall materials. Nail pops are nails that come loose
from the studs, pushing the drywall joint compound up to produce a bump on the
drywall surface. Both nail pops and small drywall cracks are simple to repair:
Drywall Nail Pop and Crack Repair Instructions:
1.
Reset the protruding nail slightly into the gypsum board surface or remove
it entirely. Place another drywall nail two inches above or below the
popped nail, and gently hammer it slightly below the paper surface. Then
cover the area with spackling compound, allow to dry, sand smooth, and
then re-paint the surface.
2.
For drywall joint cracks, press a small "V" shaped indentation using the
back of a putty knife along the length of the crack, about 1/8 inch deep
and 1/8 inch wide. Spackle, sand, and repaint as with nail pops.
3.
To prevent cracks wider than 1/4 inch from reopening, first apply the
spackling compound, cover the crack with a strip of drywall tape, add
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INTERIOR WALLS AND CEILINGS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
another top layer of spackle feathering the edges well, sand to a smooth finish,
then re-paint
4. Deep scrapes and indentations on drywall surfaces can be filled with two or
three applications of spackling compound. Allow it to dry thoroughly, and sand
between each application.
Wall Fasteners and Anchors: There are a variety of specially designed wall
fasteners for drywall available from a hardware store. They offer strength in
supporting an object, like a large framed picture, and yet create little damage
should you mo ve the picture later.
D. PLANT LEDGES
Plant ledges are architectural design features and should be used strictly to hold
plants and other decorative objects. They are not constructed to support the weight
of an adult or child.
E. INTERIOR TRIMS AND MOLDINGS
Ryland homes are built with kiln-dried ceiling moldings, floor moldings, door
casings, and other wood trims. Some separation of wood trims and moldings is
normal, and is caused by home settlement, plus shrinkage or expansion due to
extremes of dryness or humidity.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. An interior wood trim or molding problem caused by defective
workmanship or materials will be inspected and corrected to meet
installation specifications.
2. Gaps between molding joints or between adjacent surfaces and molding
that exceed 1/16 inch in width will be repaired by caulking or by filling the
gap with a color-coordinated wood filler. This will be done on a one-time
basis.
3. A veneer trim board that delaminates will be replaced.
4. A crack or split in the wood trim will be filled, sanded, and painted.
5. Wood molding that becomes loose will be re-nailed, the nail holes filled,
and then re-painted.
6. Wood trim with grain surfaces that raise 1/16 inch or more will be replaced.
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71
RYLAND HOMES
Interior Trim and Molding Repair Note: Ryland will only paint or stain the new
material when repairing interior wood trim and molding. It is normal that the new
material may not exactly match the color of existing material.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Should the baseboard trim come loose, simply re-nail the baseboard quarter-round
back into proper position. For moldings, it is better to wait for several months to
see if settlement will bring the pieces back together naturally. If not, a separation at
comers or seams can be patched with a wood fillier and then stained or painted to
match the existing molding.
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LANDSCAPING AND GRADING
A. GRADING
The soil around each homesite is graded to channel water away from the home.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Ground settlement around foundation walls, utility trenches, or other filled areas
shall not interfere with water drainage away from the home. Settling of ground
around these areas shall not interfere with drainage away from the home.
Ryland will fill affected areas to restore proper drainage one time, and the
repaired area will be reseeded or resodded to the original specifications. The
homeowner is responsible for removing planted landscaping that they have
installed and that is affected by the placement of the filler material.
2. Areas that washout or erode at downspouts or drainage swales will be repaired,
one time, at the homeowner's request. The repair includes filling the eroded
areas, reseeding, and then stabilizing the area. The stabilization method will be
determined by Ryland.
3. Standing or ponding water that remains for more than 24 hours on the lawn, or
for more than 48 hours in a swale, will be inspected and corrected to meet
specifications. No grading determination will be made when there is frost on
the ground, or if the ground is saturated with water.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
The best way to keep the basement dry is to maintain the original grading around
the home. Proper grading ensures that surface water will flow away from the home,
rather than accumulating and soaking into the ground immediately around
foundation walls.
Over time, the grade around the house can settle. If this occurs, spread additional
soil in the depressions to raise and re-establish the grade.
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73
RYLAND HOMES
To prevent erosion and ponding of water:
1. Do not alter the soil grade.
2. Keep water ditches or swales open and free of leaves and debris. Do not
install sheds, hot tubs, decks, fences, pools, trees, shrubs, or gardens in the
swales. Otherwise, water may not flow properly through the swale.
3. Direct water run-off away from the home to prevent washouts. Reposition
splash blocks if they are moved. Do not allow sprinklers to wet the house
or form puddles near or against the foundation.
4. Correct any areas in need of seed by loosening the dirt, seeding, and
watering until mature.
B. LAWN
Yards will be graded, seeded, fertilized and strawed or, if applicable, sodded
before closing (weather permitting). Mter closing, lawn maintenance is the
homeowner's responsibility.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: FIRST YEAR COVERAGE
1.
Sod will be alive at Settlement.
A. Sod that is not alive at Settlement will be replaced.
B.
Gaps between sections of sod that exceed 1 inch in width will be
repaired by filling the gaps with cut sod or by filling the gap
with soil.
2. Your home will be enrolled with a professional lawn care company for a 1
year program. They will contact you within the first 30 days after closing.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
The future beauty of your yard depends on the care and attention you provide.
Ryland cannot be responsible for improper landscape care and maintenance. We
offer the following suggestions to make the job easier.
Seeding: Proper watering, cutting, reseeding, and fertilizing is the homeowner's
responsibility after the original seed application.
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
Where grass seed is used, a layer of straw is placed on top of the seed. Do not rake
the straw away as this will disturb the germination of underlying grasses. Gently
redistribute the straw if it is heavily matted. The straw will eventually decompose
and provide the soil with additional nutrient.
Watering: Both sod and grass seed require constant moisture for the fiirst full
growing season. If allowed to dry out, the grass seed will not germinate, and the sod
will shrink and gaps will appear between the sections. If this occurs, the homeowner
will need to repair these areas.
Water each section of the lawn for 30 minutes twice each day, once in the morning
and once in the late afternoon. When moving the sprinkler, check to see if you are
leaving foot prints. If so, the area has been over watered.
Be aware that sod, when initially installed, will occasionally go into
"shock" and turn brown. The sod is not dead and you should continue to water it.
Extremely hot weather or above average rainfall will affect these instructions.
Mowing: Mow the new grass when it attains several inches of new growth. Do not
rake the newly seeded areas, as the grass is still young and fragile. Do not mow if
the ground is soggy or if the grass is wet. Set the mower at the highest height setting
and be sure the mower blades are sharp.
Fertilizing, Weeding and Liming: For proper fertilizer, weeding, and liming
guidelines, please contact a lawn care specialist.
Fertilizer is applied to the initial seeding to help the lawn through its early growth
period.
Do not spray immature grass with chemicals to kill weeds. The best approach is to
use pre-emergent weed control beginning the following spring, when grass is
stronger and more mature.
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75
RYLAND HOMES
Certain communities have highly acidic soil and lime should be applied as
necessary following manufacturer's directions.
C. NEW SHRUB AND TREE CARE
All trees and shrubs are nursery grown, and a Landscape Contractor
handled the initial planting. The homeowner is responsible for maintaining the
new plantings with proper maintenance care and water. The first six to nine
months are the most crucial for new plantings. The type of tree or shrub will
dictate the specific care needed.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Any new tree, shrub, or ground cover that dies will be replaced one time
within 30 days of Settlement unless damage is caused by homeowner
transplanting, under or over watering, or by insects.
2. If a tree, shrub, or ground cover is dormant when installed and foliage
does not appear the following spring, it is the homeowner's responsibility
to notify Ryland of the potentially dead planting.
Caution: Do not remove or transplant trees and shrubs from their original
location as this will void the Landscape Contractor's warranty. Should a tree
or shrub die, leave it in the ground and let the Landscape Contractor remove
it.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Watering: It is extremely important that new plants and trees be watered
twice a week for the first month and once a week for the next three months.
Weather conditions may affect watering frequency. This should be done with
an open end garden hose, one minute on shrubs, and three to four minutes on
trees. For best results, contact a lawn care specialist for proper maintenance
guidelines.
Fertilizing: Plants should be fertilized on a regular basis. Contact a lawn care
specialist for proper maintenance guidelines.
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SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
LANDSCAPING AND GRADING PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
Tips of grass blades Dull mower blades.
frayed or turning tan.
Sharpen blades
Weeds growing in
lawn.
Improper weed
control.
Use pre-emergent
weed control in the
spring
Lawn thinning out
after several
Thatch build-up.
Lawn needs aeration
or dethatching.
Slow growth or pale
sod.
Lack of lawn
fertilizer.
Fertilize following
manufacturer's
directions.
Trees and shrubs
turning yellow.
Lack of tree and
shrub fertilizer.
Fertilize following
manufacturer's
directions.
Trees and shrubs
wilting.
Too much or too
little water.
Check soil around
base of plant and
water accordingly.
Wetness around
foundation.
Settlement of soil
around home.
Fill settled areas and
re-mulch or re-seed
as necessary.
mowings.
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PAINTING
A.
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINT
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Interior and exterior paints that do not adhere to or cover up the surface to
which it is applied, will be refinished.
2. Interior and exterior paints that run, wrinkle, peel, or crack will be scraped
and sanded, the resulting depressions filled, and the surface primed and
repainted.
3. Water stains will be sealed with a primer sealer before repainting so the
mark will not bleed back through.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all painted
surfaces during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Paint with scuffs and dirt
marks will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the
Pre-Settlement Check List.
Painting Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that painting repairs requiring
new material will match the color of the existing material. Paint repairs may'
show slight variations in color as a result of weathering, aging, or pigment
variations in different pa int manufacturing runs. Color variations are
normal.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Cleaning Flat Latex Painted Surfaces: A lead-free latex paint is
applied to the interior walls of the home. This is not a scrubbable paint and
will smudge if cleaned. Ryland does not recommend washing these surfaces,
but instead suggests using the supplied touch-up paint to cover paint scuffs
and marks.
Cleaning Semi-Gloss Latex Painted Surfaces: A lead-free semi gloss latex
paint is applied to interior wood trim and doors. These surfaces may be
cleaned with a sponge and lukewarm water. The less moisture on the sponge,
the better. Wipe quickly with a gentle
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washing pressure from top to bottom without allowing the solution to
run down the door or trim. if the water does not work, try the same procedure using
a small amount of mild detergent mixed with water. Once complete, lightly rinse
the washed area with plain water and allow to dry.
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RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PAINTING PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
80
Exterior paint
peeling.
Surface not cleaned.
Moisture/solvents
under paint surface.
Scrape, sand, prime,
and repaint.
Blisters in paint.
Poor adhesion caused
by water or solvent
trapped under paint.
Scrape, fill resulting
depression, sand,
prime, and repaint.
Wrinkling, runs,
and/or drips.
Paint applied too
thick.
Sand smooth and
repaint.
Interior and/or
exterior caulking
cracks or shrinks.
Normal drying,
settlement, expansion
& contraction.
Remove old caulking
only if unsightly.
Caulk open gaps.
Paint peeling off
masonry.
Surface not cleaned.
Moisture/solvents
under paint surface.
Scrape peeling paint.
Repaint with latex
paint.
Efflorescence
peeling on
foundation.
Alkali compounds
on foundation.
Scrape, apply alkali
neutralizer, repaint.
Bleeding wood
knots.
Wood resin seeping
out.
Sand, apply stain
killer, repaint.
Mildew on painted
surfaces.
Fungus from
moisture and little
sunlight.
Carefully wash with
water-diluted
chlorine bleach.
PAINTING
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
PLUMBING SYSTEM
A. INTRODUCTION
A Plumbing Contractor installed all plumbing lines and Systems in your Ryland
home, and these have been tested and inspected.
In most cases, minimum homeowner maintenance is all that the plumbing system
requires. Attending to small problems as they occur keeps them from becoming
larger, more costly ones. Ryland assumes no responsibility for consequential
damages to personal property.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINE: 30-Day Coverage
1. A clogged sewer or drain problem caused by defective five workmanship or
material will be repaired by removing the clog, and then corrected to meet the
manufacturer's installation and product specifications. The homeowner is
responsible for all repair costs should homeowner action or negligence produce
the clog.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
The following guidelines apply to water lines, the main shut-off valve, intake
valves, and drain traps.
1. A defective plumbing valve or fitting will be inspected and repaired by
replacing the defective parts.
2. Some noise coming from the water pipe system is normal, and is caused by
water flow and pipe expansion and contraction. Noisy plumbing caused by
loose pipes or air hammer will be inspected to determine the cause and
corrected to reduce or eliminate the noise.
3. Freezing of drain, waste, vent, and water supply lines will be inspected and
corrected by either further insulating the area and pipe, or by moving the pipe to
a more protected location. This does not apply to any exterior faucet that must
be winterized by the homeowner. See Winterizing Instructions under Exterior
Hosebibs in the Plumbing Fixtures Section.
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RYLAND HOMES
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: TWO Year Coverage
The following guidelines apply to water lines, the main shut-off valve, intake
valves, drain traps, and sanitary sewer lines.
1. A water supply problem caused by defective workmanship or equipment
will be inspected and corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation and
product specifications.
A. A water supply problem caused by the municipal water main or
other conditions beyond our control is not Ryland's responsibility.
2. A soil, waste, vent, or water supply line that leaks will be inspected and
repaired by cementing the affected area. Condensation on piping does not
constitute leakage, and is not covered.
Caution: It is important to immediately notify Ryland should a leak occur,
since leak damage resulting from homeowner delay is considered negligence
and may void any warranty protection.
Warranty Caution: Any addition, alteration, or modification to the original
plumbing system installation may void all applicable warranties.
Repair Notes: Ryland will repair and repaint any drywall or siding damage
that occurs due to water leakage resulting from defective materials and/or
workmanship. Consequential damages to personal property or homeowner
supplied wall finishes (wallpaper or paint) are not covered by' Ryland.
B.
WATER LINES
The pipes that carry water into the home are designed to resist rust and
corrosion. Water pressure may be unusually high in your locality. In such a
case, a water pressure regulator is installed at the main shut-off valve. Do not
attempt to adjust the water pressure regulator yourself. lt is designed to keep
water line pressure surges from entering the home, and improper adjustment
can burst the water lines and create severe water damage. If you feel the water
pressure needs adjustment, please contact the water utility company or the
Plumbing Contractor listed in the Homeowner's Service Directory.
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HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Noisy Pipes: Pounding or knocking sounds in the water system should be corrected
immediately since the resulting vibrations can damage plumbing line fittings and
cause them to leak. There is one exception: Exterior hose faucets often produce a
high pitched noise caused by an attached vacuum breaker or back-flow preventer.
This noise is normal and is not cause for concern.
Noisy pipe problems can be identified and corrected as follows:
1. The water heater temperature may be set too high, producing steam in the pipes.
To resolve, gradually reduce the water heater temperature setting until the steam
is reduced.
2. Abruptly turning off a faucet in areas with high water pressure can produce a
pounding or knocking sound. To resolve, slightly close the main shut-off valve.
3. Air can get into the pipes. To resolve, open all interior and exterior faucets and
run for a few minutes, allowing all air to pass through the system. It is not
necessary to open exterior faucets if they have been winterized.
Frozen Pipes: Prevention is the best cure.
1. Winterizing Pipes: At the beg inilng of each winter, turn off the outside faucets
and then bleed out excess water from the lines. See Winterizing Instructions
under Exterior Hosebibs in the Plumbing Fixture Section.
2. During extreme cold weather conditions, keep pipes from freezing by allowing
the faucets to drip slightly. Also, leave the sink cabinet doors open to allow heat
inside to the pipes.
3. Do not leave the home or any room without heat during cold weather.
Safe Defrosting of Pipes: Freezing is most likely to occur near an outer
wall that is exposed to winter winds.
1. Begin by restoring heat to the affected area.
2. Open all faucets connected to the pipe line so steam can escape during
thawing.
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RYLAND HOMES
3. Begin thawing slowly at the frozen point nearest the faucet. Thaw slowly
to prevent formation of steam which can cause pipes to rupture or burst. A
heat lamp set at least six inches from a plasterboard or wall panel will
thaw the pipes behind it, For exposed pipes, use a hair dryer or rent a heat
cable to wrap around the pipe.
4. As the pipe thaws, move the source of the heat to the next frozen area
until all piping has been defrosted.
5. If drain traps have been affected, pour hot water into the drain until
thawed. Do not use boiling water since pipes can crack from such a drastic
temperature change.
Caution: Do not use open flame torches to thaw frozen pipes.
C. MAIN SHUT-OFF VALVE
This is the center of the plumbing system, the point at which the main water
line comes into the home. If a major plumbing problem occurs, turn off the
main shut-off valve to prevent flooding. It is a good idea to show every
family member where the shut-off valve is, explain how to close it in case of
an emergency, and to mark it with an easy-to-locate name tag.
D. WATER INTAKE VALVES
Every plumbing fixture in the home has a water intake valve to individually
shut off the water supply to that fixture for minor repairs and emergencies.
Show family members how to operate them and where they are located on
sinks, bathtubs, showers, toilets, water heater, washing machine, and laundry
tub. Toilet valves are behind the toilet, and sink valves are under the sink.
E. DRAIN TRAPS
Every plumbing fixture in the home is equipped with a drain trap, an Sshaped pipe that holds water and acts as a barrier to keep airborne bacteria
and sewer gas fumes from coming back into the home. If a sink or bathtub
fixture is not used frequently, turn it on periodically to replace evaporating
water and to keep the water trap barrier intact.
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HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Drain traps can be cleaned by putting 3 tablespoons of ordinary washing soda (not
baking soda) into the drain. Add a little hot water, let stand for 15 minutes, then
flush with hot water. Use a rubber plunger to unclog a blocked toilet.
Cautions: Do not pour grease into drains or toilets, or use caustic sodas to open
plugged drains. Do not use a plunger when using any drain cleaning chemicals.
When using a chemical drain cleaner, carefully follow the manufacturer's safety
precautions and product directions.
F. SANITARY SEWER LINES
In the final stages of preparing your home for move -in, Ryland tested and flushed
the sewer lines to ensure they were clear and working properly.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Do not put hair, grease, lint, garbage, heavy tissue, disposable diapers, or sanitary
materials into the sewer system.
When operating the garbage disposal, always use a generous amount of cold water
to keep the sink drain clear and the disposal motor cool.
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RYLAND HOMES
PLUMBING FIXTURES
A. INTRODUCTION
The plumbing fixtures in your Ryland home include the water heater, bathtubs,
showers, toilets, and sinks, and may include a sump pump where required.
Note: As equipment technology changes frequently, the Manufacturer's Service
Manuals will supercede all recommendations and procedures contained in this
manual.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
The following guidelines apply to water heaters, sump pumps, porcelain
fixtures, bathtubs and tub-shower combinations, kitchen and bathroom sinks,
and interior and exterior faucets.
1.
A defective plumbing fixture, valve, fitting, or faucet will be inspected
and repaired by replacing the defective parts.
2.
Plumbing fixture components, including drain stoppers, sink stoppers, and
floats that do not operate as designed, will be inspected and repaired by
replacing the defective parts.
3.
A clogged fixture problem caused by defective workmanship or materials
will be repaired by removing the clog, and corrected to meet installation
specifications. The homeowner is responsible for all repair costs should
homeowner action or negligence produce the clog.
4.
A defective sump pump will be inspected and corrected by repairing or
replacing the sump pump.
5.
A defective water heater will be inspected and repaired by replacing the
defective parts.
Warranty Caution: Any addition, alteration, or modification to the water
heater, sump pump, or plumbing fixture installation may void all applicable
warranties.
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Manufacturer Warranties: The water heater (and sump pump if applicable)
installed in your home are protected by Manufacturer Warranties that may extend
beyond Ryland's First Year Coverage. Should you experience warranty protected
problems beyond the first year of occupancy, please contact the Plumbing
Contractor listed in Ryland's Homeowner Service Directory.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all bathtubs, showers,
toilets, and sinks during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Scratches, chips, and
cracks will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the PreSettlement Check List.
B. WATER HEATER
The electric or gas water heater is equipped with an automatic temperature and
pressure relief valve, a safety feature that opens and releases excessive pressure or
heat build-up. Should this occur, water will flow from the tank until both
temperature and pressure are reduced to safe levels.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Hot Water Temperature: Water temperatures ranging from 125°F to l45°F are
pre-set at the factory, as specified in the Manufacturer's Service Manual. While
lower settings reduce utility operating costs, bear in mind that dishwashers do not
operate properly with settings below 125°F Most gas water heaters feature a
"vacation setting" switch to reduce costs while you are away, without completely
shutting the water heater off.
Do not store combustible items, oily rags, clothing, brooms, or dust mops near the
water heater, since this obstructs air flow and presents a potential fife hazard.
Scale: Small amounts of scale deposits will collect and settle to the bottom of the
water tank. Remove this residue by periodically draining the tank. For electric
water heaters, shut off the power first, using the appropriate circuit breaker in the
electrical panel box. Then open the valve at the bottom of the water heater,
allowing a quart or two of residue to drain out
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RYLAND HOMES
until the water runs cleat For gas water heaters, drain out one gallon. If
you live in a hard water region, a water softener will reduce the need for more
frequent draining.
Do not completely drain an electric water tank without first shutting off the
water heater circuit breaker. Otherwise, the heating element will quickly bum
out.
Ryland does not recommend the installation of an insulating jacket on a gas
water heater. If you choose to install an insulation jacket, follow the jacket
manufacturer's instructions carefully. The draft diverter and combustion air
openings must never be blocked.
C. SUMP PUMP
The sump pump, if your Ryland home has one, is part of a drainage system
designed to carry moisture away from the underside of the home. The sump
pit is located in a trench area just beneath the foundation. As water
accumulates in the pit, the pump automatically turns on and pumps the water
out and away from the house. To test the pump for proper operation, simply
pour water into the pit. Always disconnect the sump pump electrical
connection before doing any work or repairs.
D.
PORCELAIN FIXTURES
Kitchen and bathroom sinks, toilets, and porcelain-on-steel bathtubs are made
with vitreous china or finished with porcelain.
MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
To clean, use a non-abrasive spray cleanser and sponge. Dropping heavy
objects onto porcelain can chip or crack the surface, and may produce
permanent staining. Do not leave steel wool pads on sink surfaces, as they
will rust and stain the finish
Be aware that continuous action toilet bowl cleansers, placed in the toilet
water tank, can prematurely wear out the rubber tank flapper and discolor the
bowl.
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E. KITCHEN SINK
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
For routine cleaning, use a non-abrasive household cleanser with warrn water
and a sponge. Do not scrape the surface with utensils, pots or pans. Do not
leave leftovers in sink or drainer, particularly tea bags, which
contain harmful acids. Washing soda, not baking soda, should be added to the
drain to keep it grease and soap free.
Do not clean stainless steel sinks with steel wool or metal brushes, and do not
leave rubber mats in the sink since they trap water and produce surface
discoloration. To restore luster to stainless steel, apply a small amount of
mineral oil with a soft cloth, then wipe dry.
F. BATHROOM SINKS
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Sink surfaces can be easily chipped and stained, so treat accordingly.
Prevent hair accumulation clogs by periodically removing the stopper for
cleaning. Avoid setting lit cigarettes on the edge of the sink, as they will burn
and permanently damage the surface.
G. BATHTUBS AND TUB-SHOWER COMBINATIONS
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Cleaning: Clean porcelain-on-steel bathtubs, fiberglass tub-shower
combinations, and shower stall floors with warm water and a non-abrasive
cleanser. Clean glass shower doors with a commercial glass cleaner.
Check bathtub stoppers and shower floor drain grates for hair accumulation.
Do not step into a bathtub or tub-shower wi th shoes on. Gritty particles adhere
to shoe soles that will scratch the enamel.
Re-Caulking of Tubs and Showers: Over time, cracks and separations between
tub or shower stall and wall surfaces or bathroom floors will
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89
RYLAND HOMES
appear. Maintaining these areas is critical since excessive moisture can
severely damage underlying materials.
It will be necessary to re-apply a tub and tile caulk when the previous
caulking has dried out or eroded. To re-caulk the area, use a tub and tile caulk
available in local hardware stores. Do not use a clear silicone caulk. Begin by
removing the old sealer and cleaning the area. Once the area is dry, apply
fresh caulking to fill the vacant space, then smooth out the fmish with a wet
finger.
H. INTERIOR FAUCETS
Interior faucets are either single-lever faucets or washer faucets.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Single-Lever Faucets: The single-lever kitchen and bath faucet are low
maintenance, washer-less faucets. Should the cartridge ever need to be
replaced, turn off the water supply under the sink, remove the handle
assembly, and unscrew the cartridge. Take the cartridge to a local plumbing
supplier and match accordingly, being sure to follow installation instructions.
Washer Faucets: A washer faucet has a shut-off feature that requires light
closing pressure to stop the flow of water. Do not apply too much pressure
since washers can be damaged.
Faucet Aerators: Screened aerators screw into the spout of a faucet to add
air to the flowing water and to reduce splashing and water consumption.
Aerators are easy to remove for periodic cleaning, and this should be done
every three to four months.
Washer Replacement: Dripping faucets can drumatically increase water
bills and represent the loss of a valuable natural resource. Over time, all
washers will wear out and must be replaced. Neglecting to change washers
may cause damage to the valve seat or to the entire faucet. Many homeowners
prefer to do this simple replacement procedure themselves.
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1. Turn off the water supply intake valve located under the sink.
2. Using a wide-jaw wrench, remove the hexagonal cap from the top of the faucet
assembly. This may take a turn or two .
3. Remove the inside part, turn it upside down, and you'll see a fiber washer held
by a screw through its center. This is the source of the leak. The screw will
remove easily, but the washer itself may take a little prying to remove.
4. Match the new was her to the worn-out washer and replace it. Reuse the same
screw if it is in good condition. Then re-assemble the faucet.
I. EXTERIOR HOSEBIBS
Exterior faucets, called hosebibs, are either standard or frost-free faucets.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Standard Hosebibs: Conventional exterior hosebibs require winterizing. This
procedure must be performed prior to the first frost to avoid rupture or bursting of
the water pipes. Failure to winterize exterior hosebibs will void your warranty.
Winterizing Instructions: To prevent exterior pipe freezing:
1. Turn off the interior water pipe valve, then open the exterior faucet.
2. Loosen the bleeder nut located on the underside of the interior water valve,
allowing air into the line.
3. Leave the interior valve turned off and the exterior faucet open throughout the
winter season, then reverse this process in the springtime to start water flowing.
To replace washers on standard exterior faucets, follow the same procedure for
washer replacement. See Washer Replacement under Interior Faucets, this Section.
Disconnect hoses to drain all exterior water prior to the first winter frost.
Check for leaks and replace washers as required since a leaking exterior
faucet can cause a damp basement. See Washer Replacement under
Interior Faucets, this Section.
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RYLAND HOMES
Water Back-Flow Prevention: Some Ryland homes have a vacuum breaker
installed on the exterior hose faucet. This device prevents back-flow, and
stops contaminated water from flowing back into the home water supply
system via the garden hose. Where installed, these devices are a plumbing
code requirement and may not be removed.
With a vacuum breaker installed, it is normal to hear a humming or vibrating
noise throughout the home when the exterior faucet is in use. This is caused
by the array of washers built into the back-flow preventer, and is not cause for
concern.
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Problem
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SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
PLUMBING FIXTURES PROBLEMS
Likely Cause
Solution
No hot water from
electric water heater.
Tripped circuit
breaker.
Check and reset circuit
breaker.
No hot water from
gas water heater.
Temperature setting
too low. Pilot light is
out.
Adjust temperature
setting. Re-light
pilot light.
Hot water runs out
quickly.
Temperature adjustment
on water heater
set too low.
Call Plumbing
Contractor for
adjustment.
Hot water recovery
is slow.
Burnt out heating
element.
Call Plumbing
Contractor.
Toilet rims
constantly.
Water level in tank is
too high.
Adjust float arm
stem in toilet water
tank downward.
Toilet makes loud
noise when flushed.
Ball cock in water
tank is not working
properly.
Replace ball cock in
toilet water tank.
Toilet backing up
and/or overflowing.
Obstruction in line.
Turn toilet intake
valve off and plunge
toilet.
Water flow from
faucet is reduced.
Aerator at tip of
faucet is clogged.
Unscrew aerator
screen and rinse
thoroughly.
PLUMBING FIXTURES
93
RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
PLUMBING FIXTURES PROBLEMS
Problem
94
Likely Cause
Solution
Water splatters out
of faucet.
Air in water supply
line.
Open all faucets in
home for five
minutes.
Water leaking from
under sink.
Loose plumbing
fitting(s).
Hand tighten
coupling(s) on drain
pipes.
Water dripping from
shut-off valves.
Loose packing nut.
Open valve all the
way, then gently
tighten nut.
Garbage disposal
clogged.
Obstruction in
disposal.
Use disposal wrench
in bottom of
disposal.
Garbage disposal
will not operate.
Tripped circuit
breaker.
Check reset button
on bottom of
disposal unit.
PLUMBING FIXTURES
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ROOFING, GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS
A. INTRODUCTION
The roof of your Ryland home is constructed with roofing felt, shingles, flashing,
ridge vents, gutters and downspouts. These materials are installed following
manufacturer's guidelines and product specifications. .
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
The following guidelines apply to roofing felt, shingles, flashing, ridge
vents, gutters, and downspouts.
1. Any defect in roof workmanship or material that causes water leakage will be
inspected and corrected to eliminate roof leaks. Any interior damage caused by
roof leakage will be repaired.
2. Fiberglass shingles that come loose or unattached will be re-secured. Neither
the shingle manufacturer nor the Roofing Contractor provide warranty coverage
should the shingles come loose or detached by winds in excess of 54 miles per
hour. Winds this powerful are considered as "Acts of God" and repairs may be
covered by homeowner's insurance.
3. Standing water in the gutter that exceeds 1/2 inch in depth will be repaired by
adjusting the pitch of the gutter.
4. Gutters that come loose or unattached will be re-secured with gutter spikes
every 2 feet, placed into the tails of the trusses.
Shingle Repair Note: Ryland cannot ensure that shingle repairs requiring new
material will match the color of the existing material. Color variations caused by
weathering effects are normal.
Manufacturer Warranties: Fiberglass shingles are protected by
Manufacturer Warranties that may extend beyond Ryland's First Year
Coverage. Should you experience warranty protected problems beyond the
first year of occupancy, please contact the Manufacturer directly.
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95
RYLAND HOMES
B.
SHINGLES
Roofing felt is attached to the roof sheathing and fiberglass shingles are laid over the
felt. The underside of fiberglass shingles has a mastic or glue applied to it that, when
warmed by the sun, automatically seals the upper shingle to the one beneath it.
HOMEOWNER' S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Shingle Inspections: Severe winds may cause some fibergl ass shingles to lift
slightly, however they will settle back into position during warmer weather.
Visually check the roof (from the ground) after severe storms to determine if
shingles are torn, broken, or missing, and have a Roofing Contractor
immediately replace them to prevent water penetration and damage.
C.
FLASHING
Roof flashings are sheet metal trims used around roof openings on chimneys,
vents, valleys, and skylights. Their purpose is to channel water onto the
shingles.
D.
RIDGE VENTS
The ridge vent is located at the peak or top ridge of the roof, and serves to
reduce the heat that builds up in the attic. As the hot air rises out of the ridge vent,
cooler air is drawn into the attic through the soffit vents. Keep obstructions
away from the vent openings.
E.
SKYLIGHTS
See Skylights in Window Section.
G.
GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS
Gutters channel rain water run-off from the roof to downspouts that guide the
water to ground level drainage areas. Splash blocks located at the base of the
downspouts divert water away from the foundation. See Water Infiltration and
Condensation Section.
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ROOFING, GUTTERS, AND DOWNSPOUTS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Gutters and downspouts should be inspected and cleaned regularly. Check for holes
and leakage, make necessary repairs, and clear the gutters of accumulated debris
such as leaves, twigs, branches, balls, and other objects.
Gutters need to slope slightly downward to channel water to the downspout. Splash
blocks should be properly positioned at the bottom of the downspout to direct water
away from the foundation. Finally, the soil grade must slope away from the home.
See Grading in the Landscaping and Grading Section.
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97
RYLAND HOMES
SOLUTIONS T0 COMMON
ROOF, GUTTER AND DOWNSPOUT PROBLEMS
Problem
Roof leakage.
Likely Cause
Solution
Gutters plugged up.
Clean gutters and
downspouts.
98
Roof leakage.
Loose flashing.
Loose pipe collars.
Secure and re-seal
flashing and pipe
collars.
Roof leakage.
Loose or missing
shingles and/or ridge
vents.
Secure and/or replace
loose or missing
shingles/ridge vents.
Roof leakage.
Hole in gutter or
downspout.
Inspect, locate, and
repair.
Skylight leakage.
Loose flashing.
Caulking
deteriorated.
Secure flashing.
Inspect and re-caulk.
ROOFING. GUTTERS. AND DOWNSPOUTS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
WATER INFILTRATION & CONDENSATION
A. BASEMENT WATER INFILTRATION
To reduce water infiltration at basement walls, Ryland implemented several
important precautions during the construction and grading process of your home.
The block foundation may be covered on the outside with a cement parging, while
poured-in-place concrete foundation walls do not require parging. Both are sprayed
with a material that is water-resistant but not waterproof. A drain around the
exterior perimeter of the basement is installed to carry off any water that might
penetrate the structure. In some instances, an interior perimeter drain is also
installed. Gutters and downspouts are used to control and direct roof water off and
away from the home. And finally, the grade around the home's exterior was
carefully graded to divert water away from the foundation. See Foundations in the
Concrete Section, and Grading in the Landscaping and Grading Section.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDEELINES: First Year Coverage
1. Water leakage through the basement foundation will be repaired per the Repair
Guidelines outlined in the Concrete Foundation Section. Leaks resulting in
actual trickling of water shall be repaired. Wall or floor dampness may occur
but is not considered a deficiency.
2. Water that enters the home from the top of the foundation and r uns down the
inside wall, will be repaired by re-caulking the exterior seals and by insuring
that the siding and flashing is properly installed and functioning.
3. Downspouts, splash blocks, and sump pump discharges that recirculate through
the soil will be repaired by diverting or relocating the discharge area.
4. Areas around the foundation that settle will be raised with additional soil to
establish proper flow of water away from the foundation. See Grading in the
Landscaping and Grading Section.
5. Water that enters through sewer lines, water lines, or electrical
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RYLAND HOMES
connections and penetrates through foundation walls, will be repaired by
applying a hydraulic cement or comparable material to the inside of the
affected area. If water penetration persists, the exterior foundation wall will
then be excavated to determine appropriate corrective measures.
Caution: Water leakage caused by homeowner neglect or a homeowner
change in the exterior soil grade that causes the infiltration will not be
repaired. Ryland will inspect the situation and explain a proper course of
action that the homeowner can implement to correct the problem.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Controlling Foundation Water Infiltration: The following guidelines, when
implemented, will help control and prevent water infiltration problems.
1. Keep gutters and downspouts free of blockage from leaves or other debris.
If gutter seams leak, apply a gutter sealant available at hardware stores.
2. Keep splash blocks directly beneath downspout openings and position
them so that runoff water is channeled away from the foundation.
3. Water infiltration problems caused by improper grade should be
immediately corrected by the homeowner. Immediately fill soil
depressions that form close to the foundation with dry dirt. Do not change
the established drainage pattern when landscaping. Ensure that drainage
away from the foundation is definite, yet gradual.
4. Do not spray the foundation directly with lawn sprinklers. Make certain
that hose fittings are firmly secured and not leaking at the hosebib
connection.
5. Do not plant trees and shrubs too close to the foundation. Check with a
Landscape Contractor or nursery to determine the root characteristics of
plantings so that root growth will not undermine the foundation or
driveway surfaces. Be aware that new plantings require substantial
amounts of water and that plants too close to the foundation will place
additional moisture against the walls.
100 WATER INFILTRATIONS AND CONDENSATION
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
B. CONDENSATION
Condensation, or the appearance of moisture that occurs when warm moist air
comes into contact with a colder surface, is most prevalent in new ho mes,
especially during the first year. This is caused by the large quantities of water used
to build the home, from the concrete foundations to the paint on the walls. As this
water evaporates, and the drying-out process occurs, the moisture takes the form of
condensation on interior windows, basement walls, and plumbing pipes.
Another source of indoor humidity is everyday water usage. For example, a family
of four doing the laundry, bathing, cooking, watering plants, and running the
dishwasher puts approximately 2 to 5 gallons of moisture into the air everyday.
Window condensation is produced by conditions beyond Ryland's control and is
not covered. Ryland will inspect doors and windows to ensure proper fit and
function, and will repair defective weatherstripping.
See Bathroom Maintenance in the Bathroom Section, and Moisture Control in the
Concrete Section.
HOMEOWNER'S MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES
Ventilation: Proper ventilation is the safe and steady way to reduce indoor
humidity and condensation.
1. During warm dry weather, open basement windows, and close them when
outside humidity is high.
2. Ensure that the clothes dryer is properly vented to the outside and that the vent
is clear of obstructions and lint.
3. Use bath exhaust fans to carry moist air outside. Use the fans for short time
periods since they exhaust conditioned air out of the home.
4. If condensation persists, the use of a dehumidifier may be required.
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RYLAND HOMES
Crawl Space Areas: Proper ventilation in crawl space areas prevents high
humidity levels, condensation, and resulting mildew. Do not enclose crawl
space areas that open to an existing basement unless you provide exterior
venting. Do not block or close existing vents. Do not use crawl space areas
for storage of items that may be damaged by high humidity and mildew.
102 WATER INFILTRATIONS AND CONDENSATION
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON
WATER INFILTRATION & CONDENSATION PROBLEMS
Problem
SE-1
Likely Cause
Solution
Wet basement floor
or walls.
Altered grade.
Clogged areaway
drain or gutters.
Correct grade. Clear
debris from drains
and gutters.
Damp basement floor
or walls. Excessive
moisture inside the
house.
Condensation.
Use a dehumidifier.
Water is present
around furnace unit.
Condensation line is
clogged or
misaligned to drain.
Snake out and clear
line. Realign pipe to
floor dram.
WATER INFILTRATION AND CONDEN SATION
103
RYLAND HOMES
WINDOWS
A. INTRODUCTION
The windows in your Ryland home may be single or double-pane glass with wood
or aluminum frames.
TYPICAL REPAIR GUIDELINES: First Year Coverage
1.
An insulated double-pane window with condensation forming between the
panes has a broken seal, and will be replaced in accordance with the
manufacturer's product warranty.
2.
Condensation that forms on the inside of a window is caused by interior
humidity, and Ryland will instruct the homeowner about meas ures to reduce
indoor humidity.
3.
A window problem caused by defective workmanship will be inspected and
corrected to meet the manufacturer's installation specifications.
4.
A window problem caused by defective material will be inspected and
repaired or replaced.
5.
A skylight leak caused by defective workmanship or material will be
inspected and corrected to eliminate roof leaks. Any interior damage to the
home caused by water leakage will be repaired. Consequential damage to
personal property is not cove red by Ryland.
Pre-Settlement Orientation Check List: Carefully examine all windows, screens,
and glass during the Pre-Settlement Orientation. Glass that is broken, scratched,
or chipped will not be repaired after occupancy unless specifically noted on the
Pre-Settlement Check List.
HOMEOWNER'S 's M MN"I'ENANCE GUIDELINES
Wood Windows: For easy operation, keep the sill and side tracks clean. if the
window does not slide easily, spray the channel with silicone or rub the channel
with a piece of paraffin. Do not paint
104
WINDOWS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
vinyl liners or jambs. Abrupt changes in weather rnay cause wood widows to
bind or stick. Should this occur, apply silicone spray to the window sash
tracks.
Aluminum Windows: Abrupt changes in weather rnay cause alurninurn
windows to bind or stick. Should this occur, apply silicone spray to the
window sash tracks.
Skylights: Periodic inspection by a roofmg contractor to repair caulking and
check flashings will ensure that the skylight remains weather tight.
Window Condensation: The appearance of moisture that occurs when warm
moist air comes in contact with a colder surface is called condensation. While
moisture may appear on windows, this does not indicate a window problem.
The most common cause is humid air inside the home hitting the cold surface
of the window glass.
To reduce indoor humidity and condensation, review the Water
Infiltration and Condensation Section, and implement the Ventilation
Maintenance Guidelines.
Be aware that high indoor humidity, in combination with extremely cold
weather, can turn window condensation into ice. Do not forcefully open
windows that are frozen shut as this will bend the frames and tracks.
Window Screens: Window screens are provided with every Ryland home,
and their sole purpose is to help prevent insects from coming inside when the
windows are open. Window screens may be washed and rinsed using a mild
household detergent.
SAFETY CAUTION
Window screens will not prevent children from falling through open widows
to the ground below. The screen is not a barrier, and the
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105
RYLAND HOMES
fastening system for the screen will not support any weight beyond the screen
itself. Ryland strongly advises that homeowners never allow children near an
open screened window, or place any weight on, or push against a window
screen. Similarly, do not place furniture near windows so that children have
easy access to the window.
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WINDOWS
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
SOLUTIONS TO COMMON WINDOW PROBLEMS
Problem
Likely Cause
Solution
SE-1
Aluminum window
sash comes out
when fully opened.
Tension rod clips on
side jambs left in
open position.
Position clips in
closed position
before opening.
Window binds or is
difficult to open.
Paint or dirt on
jambs.
Clean jamb and
spray with silicone.
Condensation on inside
surface of
window.
High humidity inside
home. Moisture trapped
between window and
blinds or curtains.
Use exhaust fans and
a dehumidifier. Open
blinds or curtains.
WINDOWS
107
RYLAND HOMEOWNER' S MANUAL
GLOSSARY
A
Aerator: A small, removable extension at the tip of a sink faucet, with air ports
and screen, that mix streaming water with air to reduce splashing and
conserve water.
Aggregate: The gravel or stone that constitutes the bulk of mixed concrete,
normally covered by a smooth fin ish.
Air Gap: A safety device on kitchen sinks that prevents contaminated sink water
from being drained back into the dishwasher
Air Hammer: A banging noise in plumbing pipes caused by air infiltration.
Alkali: A soluble mineral salt or mixture of salts capable of neutralizing acids.
Areaway Drain: A drain system for the basement door that is below grade.
B
Ball Cock: A device in flush toilets consisting of a valve connected by a lever with
a floating ball. The valve shuts when the ball is raised, and opens when the
ball is lowered.
Baseboard: A decorative and protective wood molding positioned where the wall
meets the floor.
Bleeder Nut: A nut located on the underside of the in terior shut-off valve that
unscrews to drain water from exterior faucets for winterizing.
Bulkhead: In the kitchen, a section of the ceiling that is lowered to meet and
support the cabinets.
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RYLAND HOMES
C
Circuit Breaker: A switching device, located in the main electrical panel, that opens and
closes electrical circuits and that automatically shuts off electricity to the circuit
should it become overloaded. Once the electrical load is reduced, the breaker
switch can be turned back on to resume normal service.
Collar Beams: A horizontal brace in the roof system that braces opposing rafters.
Concrete Dusting: A fine dust that accumulates on finished concrete surfaces.
Condenser: An exterior unit that is part of the air conditioning system which expels heat
into the outside air.
Corner Bead: An angled metal edging used to protect and form an edge where drywall
panels meet at outside edges.
Consequential Damages: Unavoidable damage to homeowner's personal property
caused by covered Ryland repairs.
D
Damper: An adjustable valve in the duct work of the heating system that can be opened
or closed to control the flow of air conditioned or heated air throughout the
home. Also, a device in a fireplace or gas heater that controls the air draft up the
chimney.
Dehumidifier: An electrical appliance that removes humidity from the air. Particularly
useful in basement areas during summer.
Delamination: The separation of the top plies or laminate from the base to which they
are attached. In vanity and kitchen countertops, the warping or detachment of
laminate material from the wood substrate.
Dethatching: The loosening and/or removal of matted grass and leaves from existing
lawns, which allows the grass to breathe and therefore promotes healthy growth.
Drywall: Also known as gypsum board or sheetrock, these large sheets are attached to
the wall studs and ceiling framing to construct the walls and ceilings of the home.
110 GLOSSARY
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
E
Efflorescence: A white powdery substance that can form on new block, brick, or
stucco finishes. It is composed of water soluble salts that are present in mason
my materials and that rise to the surface via water evaporation.
F
Face Frame: The front of kitchen and bathroom cabinets, to which the hinged
doors attach.
Face Nailing: Nailing through a finished, exposed surface so that the flat top of
the nail head is still visible after nailing.
Fascia: The exterior horizontal trim around rafters. Also positioned directly
behind gutters and over gable trim boards. Can be either aluminum or wood
covered.
Fillers: A wood putty used in preparation for rpainting to fill holes or cracks in
wood.
Filler Board: Cabinet grade wood used to fill gaps that occur between cabinets
and wall openings.
Flashing: Flat sheet metal inserted under roof shin gles at overhangs and vent
pipes, and above windows and doors frames to keep rain water from
penetrating the house structure.
Flue: A vertical duct, constructed of sheet metal or clay, that channels smoke or
gas fumes from a fireplace or gas furnace out of the home.
G
Gabled Louvers: A vent with louvers located at the peak of gable ends.
Graphite Lubricant: A finely powdered graphite used as a lubricant.
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RYLAND HOMES
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI): A specialized electrical device
that will interrupt electrical power where a weak electrical loss of
ground occurs. Normally installed in areas where water may be
present.
Grout: A white or colored plaster-like mortar compound used to fill spaces
between ceramic tiles.
H, J, K
Header: A heavy timber that spans open spaces in walls, over doors and
windows, and provides support to structural members above
it.
Honeycomb: In concrete, an open cell like surface texture that occurs while
pouring the concrete.
Hose bib: The exterior faucet connection for lawn and garden hoses.
Joint Compound: A plaster-like compound, used with drywall tape, to join
sheets of drywall into a smooth, continuous panel.
Joists: The horizontal support members used to construct the floor.
Keeper Plate: The metal plate that keeps a door lock latch firmly in place.
L, M, N
Lockset: A door lock.
Mastic: A construction adhesive that is thick and waterproof
Moldings: Shaped strips of ornamental wood used around doors, and
windows. Also used for base molding, tile molding, as chair rails, and
for exterior area molding. Moldings finish the junction of different
materials or shapes.
Nail Pops: A nail that comes loose from a stud and pushes joint compound
up. Caused by normal wood shrinkage and home settlement.
112 GLOSSARY
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
0, P
Oil-Canning: A loud, booming noise that occurs in sheet metal duct work
that buckles. Can also occur with vinyl siding as a result of
temperature changes.
Parging: A water-resisting, exterior coating used to protect concrete
foundations from water penetration.
Pointing: The filling and finishing of brick mortar and stone cement masonry
joints.
Ponding: The collection of water on driveways, walkways, or lawns. Ponding
for excessive periods of time are indicative of grading problems.
R
Resilient: Vinyl flooring used in areas such as kitchens, halls, bathrooms,
and playrooms.
Retaining Wall Tie: Large timbers usually assembled into a wall, often
backfilled with soil.
Ridge Vent: A open vent system located along roof peaks, which, in
conjunction with soffit vents, creates a natural-air ventilation.
S
Scaling: In concrete, the breaking away of the top surface of the concrete,
caused by a freeze/thaw cycle. in painting, the flaking or peeling away
of paint.
Silicone: A synthetic lubricating compound with high resistance to
temperature change and water. When added to caulking, it extends
elasticity properties and increases the life of the caulking.
Sill Plates: A support member laid on the top of the foundation wall that
serves as a base for the wall framing.
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GLOSSARY
113
RYLAND HOMES
Soffit: A vent located under the ceiling of a roof overhang.
Spackle: See joint compound.
Spalling: Flaking or chipping of stone or other masonry material. Similar to
scaling, but the chips and flakes are larger.
Sparker Unit: Eliminates pilot light in gas stoves and furnaces.
Subflooring: A wood sheet flooring directly over the joists that supports the
underlayment or floorcovering.
Sump Pump: A motorized pump that expels excessive water accumulation
that gathers under the home foundation.
Surface Capping: The addition of another layer of similar material over the
top of the existing material. Usually 1/4 inch in depth or thicker.
Swale: The soil contour on a building lot deliberately shaped to channel rain
water away from the home.
T
Tack Strips: A wood strip with exposed tack points that is attached to
subflooring and holds stretched wall-to-wall carpet in position.
Thermocouple: A safety device for gas powered equipment that will not
allow the unit to be turned on unless the pilot light is burning.
Turnaround: An additional section of driveway where cars can be turned
around.
U, V
Underlayment: A flooring layer over the base subflooring, over which tile or
resilient floorcovering is laid.
Vacuum Breaker: Also called a back flow preventer, this device is placed on
exterior faucets to allow water to only flow out of the home.
114 GLOSSARY
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
Valve Seat: An interior part of the faucet valve assembly where the valve
rests.
Vitreous China: Highly impervious, glass-like china often used to finish sinks,
showers and tubs.
W
Wall Ties: The metal pieces that tie masonry veneer to the frame of the home,
or; when pouring concrete, the metal pieces that the hold concrete
foundation wall forms in place until the concrete cures.
Washers: A round, rigid rubber or plastic disc used as a sealing device in
water faucet valves.
Washing Soda: Used for heavy cleaning of surfaces and to help prevent
accumulation of materials in drain traps.
Washouts: An area where water has produced soil erosion.
Weatherstripping: A weather insulating strip of material placed around doors
and windows to reduce water entry into the home. Also reduces air
infiltration in to the home or escape of conditioned air out of the
home.
Window Balance: A counter balance device in window housings that assists
with the opening and closing of a window, and then keeps the window
in position.
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RYLAND HOMEOWNER'S MANUAL
INDEX
Aerators, 90
Air Conditioning, 1-10
Air Distribution System, 1, 5
Air Drafts, 42
Air Filters, 1,34
Aluminum Siding, 46
Aluminum Windows, 105
Appliances, 11-13,4143
Attic, 14, 67, 96
Bathroom Maintenance, 16, 101
Bathroom Sinks, 86, 88-89
Bathrooms, 15, 17,43, 59
Bathtubs and Tub-Shower Combinations,
86, 89
Before Calling for Service, 3, 12
Bifold Door, 34
Brick, 24-25, 46,49-50, 54-56
Brick Veneer, 49-50
Cabinets, 16, 18-20
Cable TV, 4344
Carpeting, 58-59
Caulking, 15-16, 21, 23-25, 27-30, 48,
63-65,71, 80,90,98, 105
Ceiling and Roof Framing, 67
Ceramic Tile Countertops, 28-29
Ceramic Tile Floors, 63
Ceramic Tile Walls, 15
Circuit Breakers, 3, 12, 4042
Circuit Trippi ng, 42
Concrete Block, 21
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Concrete, 21-27, 99, 101
Concrete Foundation, 21, 99
Condensation, 22, 82, 96, 99-105, 107
Countertop Precautions, 30
Countertops and Vanity Tops, 28-31
Crawl Space Areas, 102
Dampers, 5
Deck, 7-8, 32-33
Dishwasher, 11, 30
Door Hardware, 38
Door Locks, 38
Door Precautions, 35
Doors, 5, 34-39, 78, 101
Downspouts, 73, 95-100
Drain Traps, 81-82, 84-85
Drainage, 22-23, 73, 96, 100
Drawer and Hinge Care, 19
Driveways, 25
Duct Work, 5-6
Efflorescence, 22-23, 50, 52, 80
Electric Dryer, ll
Electric Meter, 41
Electric Oven and Cooktop, 11
Electrical System, 3, 4041,44
Emergency Heating, 8
Exhaust Fans, 10,101,107
Exterior Doors, 34, 36
Exterior Finishes, 46-53
Exterior Hosebibs, 81, 83,91
INDEX
117
RYLAND HOMES
Fascia, 4748
Faucet Aerators, 90
Faucets, 83, 86, 90-91, 94
Fertilizing, 74-76
Fiberglass Shingles, 95-96
Fireplace Equipment, 55
Fireplace, 54-57
Fireplace Inspections, 55
Flashing, 95-96, 98-99
Flooring and Finishes, 58-66
Foundations, 21-22, 99, 101
Framing and Carpentry, 67-68
Frozen Pipes, 83-84
Garage Door, 37-38, 43
Garbage Disposal, 11, 85, 94
Gas Heating Equipment, 6
Gas Oven and Cooktop, 1 1
Grading, 73-77, 97, 99
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters, 43
Gutters, 47, 95-100, 103
Hardwood Floors, 61-63
Heat Pump, 24,7-10
Heating, 1-10,42, 88, 93
Hosebibs, 81, 83, 91
Humidifier, 10
Insulation, 14-15, 36, 69, 88
Intake Valves, 81-82, 84
Interior Doors, 5, 34-35
Interior Faucets, 90-91
Interior Trims and Moldings, 71
Interior Walls and Ceilings, 69-72
Kitchen Sink, 89
Laminate Cabinets, 19
118 INDEX
Laminate Countertops, 29
Landscaping and Grading, 73-77, 97, 99
Lawn, 73-77
Light Fixtures, 44
Locks, 38
Main Shut-Off Valve, 81-84
Masonry, 21, 23, 25,48-50, 52, 54, 80
Microwave Oven, 1 1
Mildew, 16, 33, 49, 52-53, 64, 80, 102
Mirrors, 16
Moisture Control, 22, 101
Mowing, 75
Nail Pops, 70
New Shrub and Tree Care, 76
Noisy Pipes, 83
Outlets and Wall Switches, 42
Painting, 32, 36,4649, 69, 78-80
Patios, 25
Pilot Light, 3, 6,93
Plant Ledges, 71
Plumbing Fixtures, 16, 29-30, 81, 86-94
Plumbing System, 81-82, 84
Porcelain Fixtures, 86, 88
Porches, 24-25
Post Lamp, 44
Range Hood, 11 :
Refrigerator, 1 1
Registers, 1, 5-7, 9
Resilient Floors, 66
Ridge Vents, 14, 95-96, 98
Roof Sheathing, 68, 96
Roofing, 9 5-98, 105
Rust Stains, 29
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HOMEOWNER’S MANUAL
Salt Damage, 26
Sanitary Sewer Lines, 82, 85
Seeding, 74-75
Semi-Gloss Latex Paint, 78
Shelves and Lazy Susan Cabinets, 19
Shingles, 95-96, 98
Shower Doors, 89
Shrubs and Trees, 25
Sidewalks, 24
Siding, 4649, 52-53, 82, 99
Single-Lever Faucets, 90
Skylights, 96, 105
Sliding Glass Doors, 34-36
Smoke Detectors, 44
Soap Scum, 16, 29
Sod, 74-75, 77
Soffit, 14, 4748, 96
Standard Hosebibs, 91
Starting a Fire, 55
Steps, 24-25, 59
Sticking Doors, 34
Stone Veneer, 46, 51
Stoops, 24-25
Stucco, 22, 5 1
Sump Pump, 22, 86-88, 99
Supplemental Heat, 4,7-8
Telephones, 43
Termites, 32
Thermostat, 1-5, 7-9
Trusses, 14, 67-68, 95
TV Antenna, 43
Vacuum Breaker, 83, 92
Vanity Tops, 28-31
SE-1
Ventilation, 22, 101-102, 105
Vitreous China, 88
Wall Fasteners and Anchors, 71
Washer Replacement, 90-91
Water Back-Flow Prevention, 92
Water Heater, 83-84, 86-88, 93
Water Infiltration, 22, 99-103, 105
Water Intake Valves, 84
Water Lines, 81-82, 99
Water Pipes, 91
Watering, 36, 74-76, 101
Weatherstripping, 36-37, 101
Window Condensation, 101,105
Window Screens, 105
W'mdow Wells, 22
Windows, 22, 101, 104-107
Winterizing Instructions, 81, 83, 91
Wood Cabinets, 19
INDEX
119
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