Cannondale ON, Slice User manual

Cannondale ON, Slice User manual
READ THIS MANUAL CAREFULLY!
It contains important safety information.
Keep it for future reference.
slice carbon
Owner’s Manual Supplement
120849.PDF
CONTENTS
SAFETY INFORMATION ............................... 1
About This Supplement .......................... 2
Important Composites Message .......... 3
Intended Use ............................................... 3
Building Up A Frameset........................... 4
Extreme Temperatures............................. 4
Bike Stands................................................... 4
Inspection and Crash Damage ............. 5
Repainting and Refinishing ................... 5
SERIAL NUMBER ............................................. 6
SI BOTTOM BRACKET SHELL ...................12
Compatibility ............................................12
Bearings ........................................................ 9
SI Tools .........................................................11
68mm Standard Adapter ......................12
SI COMPRESSION ASSEMBLY ..................14
CABLE ROUTING ............................................. 6
GEOMETRY/SPECIFICATION ....................18
SEAT POST ......................................................... 8
Saddle Position/Angle ............................. 8
80mm MINIMUM INSERT ........................ 9
Cutting the Seat Post................................ 9
Seat Post Parts ..........................................10
Changing Saddle Position ....................11
REPLACEMENT PARTS .................................19
CHAINSTAY PROTECTION ..........................16
REAR DERAILLEUR HANGER ....................16
REAR BRAKE MOUNT ADAPTER ..............17
Please note that the specifications and information in this manual are subject to change for
product improvement. For the latest product information, go to http://www.cannondale.
com/tech/.
SAFETY
INFORMATION
WARNING
About This Supplement
Cannondale Owner’s Manual Supplements
provide important model specific safety,
maintenance, and technical information. They
are not replacements for your Cannondale
Bicycle Owner’s Manual.
This supplement may be one of several for
your bike. Be sure to obtain and read all of
them.
If you need a manual or supplement, or have a
question about your bike, please contact your
Cannondale Dealer immediately, or call us at
one of the telephone numbers listed on the
back cover of this manual.
You can download Adobe Acrobat PDF
versions of any Cannondale Owner’s Manuals
or Supplements from our website: http://www.
cannondale.com/bikes/tech.
•
This manual is not a comprehensive
safety or service manual for your bike.
•
This manual does not include assembly
instructions for your bike.
•
All Cannondale bikes must be completely
assembled and inspected for proper
operation by a Cannondale Dealer before
delivery to the owner.
This supplement may include procedures
beyond the scope of general mechanical
aptitude.
Special tools, skills, and knowledge may
be required. Improper mechanical work
increases the risk of an accident. Any
bicycle accident has risk of serious injury,
paralysis or death. To minimize risk
we strongly recommend that owners
always have mechanical work done by an
authorized Cannondale retailer.
WARNING
IMPORTANT COMPOSITES MESSAGE
Your bike is made from composite materials
also known as “carbon fiber.”.
All riders must understand a fundamental
reality of composites. Composite materials
constructed of carbon fibers are strong
and light, but when crashed or overloaded,
carbon fibers do not bend, they break.
For your safety, as you own and use the
bike, you must follow proper service,
maintenance, and inspection of all the
composites (frame, stem, fork, handlebar,
seat post, etc.) Ask your Cannondale Dealer
for help.
We urge you to read PART II, Section D.
“Inspect For Safety” in your Cannondale
Bicycle Owner’s Manual BEFORE you ride.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED,
PARALYZED OR KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT
IF YOU IGNORE THIS MESSAGE.
2
120849.PDF
Intended Use
WARNING
The intended use of your bike or frameset is
CONDITION 1 / HIGH PERFORMANCE ROAD.
UNDERSTAND YOUR BIKE AND ITS
INTENDED USE. CHOOSING THE WRONG
BICYCLE FOR YOUR PURPOSE CAN BE
HAZARDOUS. USING YOUR BIKE THE
WRONG WAY IS DANGEROUS.
Industry usage Conditions 1 - 5 are
generalized and evolving. Consult your
Cannondale Dealer about how you intend
to use your bike.
Please read your Cannondale Bicycle
Owner’s Manual for more information
about Intended Use and Conditions 1-5.
For riding on
pavement
only
Maximum Weight Limit
CONDITION 1 / HIGH-PERFORMANCE ROAD
bikes and framesets are designed for riding
on a paved surface where the tires do not lose
ground contact. They are not intended to be
ridden off-road, cyclocross, or touring with
racks or panniers.
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE *
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
275 / 125
10 / 4.5
285 / 129
* Seat Bag /Handlebar Bag Only
Material use is optimized to deliver both
light weight and specific performance. You
must understand that (1) these types of bikes
are intended to give an aggressive racer or
competitive cyclist a performance advantage
over a relatively short product life, (2) a less
aggressive rider will enjoy longer frame life, (3)
you are choosing light weight (shorter frame
life) over more frame weight and a longer
frame life, (4) you are choosing light weight
over more dent resistant or rugged frames
that weigh more. All frames that are very
light need frequent inspection for cracks that
would indicate that the frame is worn out from
fatigue. These frames are likely to be damaged
or broken in a crash. They are not designed to
take abuse or be a rugged workhorse.
3
Building Up A Frameset
Bike Stands
The clamping jaws of ordinary bike stand can
generate a crushing force strong enough to
seriously damage and ruin your bike frame.
Before building up a frameset, consult with
your Cannondale Dealer and the component
manufacturers, and discuss your riding style,
ability, weight, and interest in and patience for
maintenance.
CAUTION
SERIOUS FRAME DAMAGE:
Make sure the components chosen are
compatible with your bike and intended for
your weight and riding style.
DO NOT USE STANDS THAT CLAMP TO THE
FRAME OR SEAT POST.
USE A STAND THAT RELIES ON SUPPORTING
THE BOTTOM BRACKET AND DROPOUTS.
(Park Tool, PRS-20 shown)
Generally speaking, lighter weight components
have shorter lives. In selecting lightweight
components, you are making a trade-off,
favoring the higher performance that comes
with less weight over longevity. If you choose
more lightweight components, you must
inspect them more frequently. If you are a
heavier rider or have a rough, abusive or “go for
it” riding style, buy heavy duty components.
Read and follow the component manufacturers
warnings and instructions.
Protect From
Extreme Temperatures
• Protect your carbon bike from extreme
temperatures when storing or transporting it.
• Allow your bike to cool off or warm up before
you ride
• Do not store your bike in places where the
temperature will exceed 66.5C° (150°F). For
example, do not leave your bike lying flat in
a black pickup truck bed in the desert sun or
under the glass of a hatchback auto.
4
120849.PDF
Inspection & Crash
Damage of Carbon Frames
WARNING
AFTER A CRASH OR IMPACT:
Inspect frame carefully for damage (See
PART II, Section D. Inspect For Safety in your
Cannondale Bicycle Owner’s Manual.)
Repainting Or Refinishing
You should not paint over the existing finish,
refinish or repaint your bike. The carbon fiber
composites making up the frame are held
together by some extremely strong bonding
chemicals. However, these bonds can be
attacked or weakened by paint stripping or
refinishing chemicals.
WARNING
Do not ride your bike if you see any sign
of damage, such as broken, splintered, or
delaminated carbon fiber.
Repainting, painting over, retouching, or
refinishing your frame or fork can result in
severe damage leading to an accident. You
can be severely injured, paralyzed or killed.
ANY OF THE FOLLOWING MAY INDICATE
A DELAMINATION OR DAMAGE:
Refinishing chemicals : Solvents, and
strippers can attack, weaken, or destroy
the important composite chemical bonds
holding your frame together.
An unusual or strange feel to the frame
Carbon which has a soft feel or altered
shape
Creaking or other unexplained noises,
Using abrasives or sanding the frame/fork
structure, original paint, decals, or coatings
through the use of mechanical actions
such as plastic or glass bead blasting or
other abrasive methods such as sanding
or scraping can remove frame material or
weaken it.
Visible cracks, a white or milky color present
in carbon fiber section
Continuing to ride a damaged frame
increases the chances of frame failure,
with the possibility of injury or death of
the rider.
5
1
3
2
serial number
The serial number (1) printed and permanently affixed barcode label. Use this serial number for
warranty registration and theft recovery. See your Cannondale Bicycle Owner’s Manual for more
information on warranty registration.
cable routing
The rear and front derailleur cables exiting the
down tube (2) are routed through the bottom
bracket cable guide (3).
Extension
The top tube guide is removable so that brake
cable may be routed inside the tube. The guide
is secured in the tube opening by the installed
brake cable tension. Make sure the guide is
seated properly in the top tube opening when
installing and connecting the rear brake.
BB Guide
Be sure to use a ferrules on housing ends.
When installing cables, make sure ferrule is seated
inside frame opening correctly.
KF363/
6
Screw
120849.PDF
Rear Brake Housing
Rear Brake Frame Opening
Cable
Ferrule
Front Derailluer Frame Opening
Cable
Ferrule
Top Tube Opening
Brake Housing
Rear
Brake
Cable
KP063/
Guide
Ferrule
7
seat post
6 Nm
Tighten both
clamp bolts evenly
MINIMUM INSERT
80mm
6 Nm
Clean and apply
Carbon seat post gel (kf115/)
to the post before
inserting into frame
Saddle Position and Angle
The seat post can be configured to place the saddle in a TRIATHLON or TIME TRIAL position.
Please see “Changing Saddle Position” on pages 9 and 10. The water bottle cage bracket parts
can only be used with saddle in the TRIATHLON position (shown above). Two water bottle cages
may be mounted on the sides of the seat post, or a single cage can be mounted on the back.
Saddle angle can be adjusted by rotating the upper saddle clamp 180°. The change is 3° per
groove. If the upper saddle clamp orientation is reversed 180°, saddle adjustment range will
change ±1.5° in relation to 0° , again with 3° of change per groove. Ask a professional bike
mechanic to show you how this works.
8
120849.PDF
80mm Minimum Insert
The minimum insert depth that the seat post must be inserted into the frame is 80mm. Seat
posts are permanently marked with ‘MINIMUM INSERT” line 80mm up from the bottom of an
un-cut seat post.
Cutting the Seat Post
In some frames (especially smaller sizes), a seat post will only be able to be inserted into a seat tube
to a maximum depth of 100 mm. Below a depth of 100mm carbon material can interfere with the
seat post. The material can not be removed.
The full length of the seat post can be cut down to have sufficient adjustment range. The minimum
insertion depth requirement of 80mm does not change. 80mm should be marked from the bottom
of a cut seat post. The seat post may be cut (shortened). A new “MINIMUM INSERT” line 80mm
from the bottom of the post must be marked or indicated without scoring, scratching or
otherwise damaging the surface of the seat post. Use a thin decal (automotive pin striping) or
permanent marker.
WARNINGS
TO AVOID SERIOUS SEAT POST OR FRAME DAMAGE:
1. After any crash, fall, or impact, remove and inspect the seat post for damage (e.g., cracks,
scratches, scrapes, gouges, splintering). If damage is found, do not ride it; discard it.
Replace the seat post with a new one.
2. Do not use solvents, or chemical spray cleaners to clean.
3. Never force a seat post into the seat tube.
4. Use a good torque wrench to tighten fasteners to the specified torque. Correct tightening
torque of the seat post clamp and the bolts that hold the saddle to the seat post is also
very important to your safety. Always tighten seat post to saddle clamp bolts to the correct
torque. Bolts that are too tight can stretch and deform. Bolts that are too loose can move,
fatigue and fracture. Either mistake can lead to a sudden failure of these bolts. Such a
failure may lead to an accident, with risk of serious injury, paralysis or death.
5. If the seat post requires cutting, have it done by a professional bike mechanic with
experience cutting high-performance carbon components.
YOU CAN BE
WARNINGS.
SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED OR KILLED IF YOUR IGNORE THESE
9
6.
7.
5.
4.
8.
9.
3.
6 Nm
2.
6 Nm
1.
REFLECTOR
6 Nm
FORW
ARD
KP062/
10
2008 SLICE MULTISPORT SEATPOST
Water Bottle Bracket Assembly Update Parts
To obtain the update parts,
please contact a Cannondale Dealer.
6Nm
SMALL FOAM WASHER
Affix the washer to arm at contact with post.
6Nm
LARGE FOAM WASHERS
Position between seat post and brackets.
Please consult the Cannondale SLICE CARBON Owner’s Manual Supplement 120849.PDF
for seat post installation and service information. See www.cannondale.com/tech.
120849.PDF
TIME TRIAL
TRIATHALON
Changing Saddle Position
1. Remove the saddle clamp bolts (2) and
remove clamp barrel (3), upper clamp
(9), lower clamp (8), and barrel (4).
3. Remove the circlips (6).
Single
rear facing
cage
4. Reposition clamp over (5) and use
other pin (7) and reinstall pin and
all four circlips (6). Make sure all four
circlip are seated in the pin grooves.
5. Reinstall the saddle, clamp bolts, and
tighten the clamp bolts evenly to the
specified torque.
Twin side facing cages (shown).
FORW
ARD
11
si bottom bracket
Compatibility
The BB shell is compatible with the BB30 Standard. See http://www.bb30standard.com/ For
information see SI Cranksets Owner’s Manual Supplement. See http://www.cannondale.com/
tech/.
Bearings
Shell bearings are sealed cartridge type and do not require lubrication. Inspect bearing
condition annually (at a minimum) and anytime the crankset assembly is disassembled or
serviced. The bearings are a press fit within the shell. Old bearings should not be reinstalled if
removed. Replace both bearings at the same time.
Replacements circlips (QC616/) are available if the circlips become damaged. The circlips can be
lifted from the BB groove (inset) by lifting the hooked end with a thin blade screwdriver.
CAUTION
DO NOT FACE, MILL OR MACHINE THE BOTTOM BRACKET SHELL FOR ANY REASON.
Doing so can result in serious damage and possibly a ruined bike frame.
SI Tools
KT011/ is a bearing removal tool.
KT010/ is a set of bearing installation tools to be used with a standard headset press.
KT013/ a two piece tool set required for removing the crankarms SI Hollowgram alloy cranksets.
For information see SI Cranksets Owner’s Manual Supplement.
com/tech/.
See http://www.cannondale.
SI BB30-to-68mm Standard Adapter
The adapter (Cannondale kit KF365/) converts the BB30 bottom bracket cranksets for use with
68mm bottom brackets. The adapter IS NOT a repair part and will only work in undamaged
frames in good condition. Improper installation or removal can result in damage and void
applicable frame warranty.
CAUTION
SERIOUS FRAME DAMAGE : Once installed, the SI-to-Standard adapter is a non-removable/
permanent frame part. Do not remove it. Adapters must be installed by a professional bike
mechanic.
12
120849.PDF
QC616/
KB6180/
KP018/ (ceramic)
KT011/
KT010/
KT013/
TOOL
Loctite 609
(green)
groove
TOOL
BB SHELL
8mm
ADAPTER
KF365/
DRIVE SIDE
13
si compression assembly
The cylindrical shape of the TOP CAP fits snugly within the carbon steering tube inside diameter
(I.D.), supporting the steerer from the clamping force of the stem. It must fit snugly inside the
I.D. of the steerer.
How to install the assembly
1. Assemble the fork, headset, spacers, and stem. Make sure that the stem bolts are loose.
2. Set up the compression assembly. “READY TO INSERT” above. The length should be about
48mm as shown above. You can do this by unthreading the top cap from the expander and
then threading it back on about 6-7 turns. The expanding parts should not be expanded.
3. Insert the SI compression assembly into the fork steerer. It should slide in snugly; the TOP
CAP closely fitting the steerer inside diameter.
4. Insert a 5mm Allen key through the access hole in the TOP CAP and into the EXPANDER BOLT.
Tighten the expander by turning clockwise to 6.8Nm, 5 ftLbs.
5. To set bearing preload, insert a 6mm allen key into the hex shape in the TOP CAP iteself.
Turn the entire TOP CAP clockwise to increase preload. Turn counter-clockwise to decrease
preload.
6. When the headset preload is correct, align handlebar and tighten the stem fork clamp bolts
to the torque specified for the stem. Consult the stem since torque values are often marked
on the stem, or consult the manufacturer’s instructions.
WARNINGS
USE ONLY ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT CANNONDALE SI COMPRESSION ASSEMBLY. Do not
replace it with a star nut or use any other compression or expanding wedge assembly.
DO NOT INSTALL HEADSET SPACERS ON TOP OF THE STEM. Installing spacers above the
stem will raise the TOP CAP inside the steerer removing necessary support for the steerer
tube wall. When stem bolts are tightened. the steerer tube can be damaged.
PLACE HEADSET SPACERS ONLY BETWEEN THE HEADTUBE AND THE BOTTOM OF THE
STEM.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED OR KILLED IF YOUR IGNORE THESE
WARNINGS.
14
120849.PDF
6mm
EXPLODED VIEW
TOP CAP
“READY TO INSERT”
5mm
EXPANDER BOLT
6.8N•m, 5 Ft•Lbs
KP017/
48mm
EXPANDER
Do not grease.
Cut the steerer tube
2 - 3mm below the top
of the installed stem.
CARBON
STEERER
TUBE
HEADSET SPACERS
Thread on TOP CAP.
Set EXPANDER BOLT
so that the the expanding parts are not
expanded and not loose.
STEM
55mm
HEADSET TOP CAP
MAXIMUM STACK HEIGHT
Measure from the top edge of the headtube
to the bottom edge of the stem.
HEADTUBE
For more information on Cannondale Carbon Road Forks, please see your Carbon
Road Fork Owner’s Manual Supplement 120860.pdf included with your bike or
download it from our website http://www.cannondale.com/tech_center/
15
KP065/
chainstay protection
The chainstay plate (KP065/) located on the right chainstay just behind the chain rings, protects
the chainstay from damage in the event the chain is dropped from the chain ring. Contact your
Cannondale Dealer for a replacement if it is becomes missing or damaged. The clear chainstay
protector (above right) provides limited protection against frame or finish damage caused by
the chain. Replacement protectors are available through a Cannondale Dealer.
rear derailleur
hanger
1.1 Nm, 10 InLbs
Loctite 242 (blue)
Before re- installing (same or new): Clean
dropout and inspect carefully for any cracks or
damage. Clean surfaces and apply a light film
of bike grease to the dropout to minimize any
noise or “creaking” that might result from very
slight movement between the dropout and
hanger during movement of the derailleur.
Apply grease and Loctite carefully. Do not
contaminate the male or female bolt threads
with grease which would cause the Loctite to
be ineffective.
Check derailleur adjustment after
replacement. Readjust wheel quick release
so it is very tight. See PART I Section 4. A in
your Cannondale Bicycle Owner’s Manual.
LIGHT
GREASE
2.5 mm
KF096/
CAUTION
DO NOT USE A DERAILLEUR HANGER
ALIGNMENT TOOL TO STRAIGHTEN.
16
120849.PDF
rear brake
mount adapter
To install a rear brake:
1. Remove the adapter bolt (1) with a 4mm
Allen wrench.
2. Lift the brake mount adapter (2) from the
frame.
2
3. Install a serrated washer (3) onto the
brake bolt and mount the brake onto the
adapter.
Tighten the brake recessed nut (4) to
the brake manufacturer’s recommended
torque.
4
4. Apply grease to adapter bolt threads and
install adapter and brake into frame.
Tighten adapter bolt to 7 Nm.
2
3
Replacement brake mount kit - KP064/
1
4mm
17
geometry/specification
A
REACH
B
STACK
M
J
K
F
L
E
D
G
C
H
ITEM
Wheel Size
Horizontal Top Tube Length (cm)**
Measured Size (cm)
Seat Tube Angle*
Head Tube Angle
Chainstay Length
Fork Rake
Bottom Bracket Height (cm)
Wheelbase (cm)
Trail (cm)
Standover @ Top Tube Midpoint
Bottom Bracket Drop (cm)
Front Center Distance (cm)
Head Tube Length (cm)
STACK (cm)***
REACH (cm)***
Headset Compression
Seatpost Minimum Insert Depth.
Seat Binder
Rear Brake Mount Adapter Bolt
Dropout Spacing
51
54
56
56
700c
700c
700c
700c
A
50.5
53.5
55.0
56.5
B
50
51.5
53.5
55.5
C
75°
75°
75°
75°
D
71.5°
71.5°
72°
72°
E
40
40
40
40
F
4.5
4.5
4.5
4.5
G
26.5
26.5
26.5
26.5
H
95.4
98.5
99.7
101.3
I
6.5
6.5
6.2
6.2
J
74.9
76.4
78.3
80.2
K
72
72
72
72
L
56.5
59.6
60.7
62.3
M
9.0
10.5
12.5
14.5
49.4
50.9
52.9
54.8
37.1
39.8
40.7
41.7
Cannondale SI Compression Assembly - KP017/
80mm
KP062/
MAXIMUM TORQUE
7Nm
Rear 130mm, Front 100mm
60
700c
58.0
57.5
75°
72°
40
4.5
26.5
102.6
6.2
82.2
72
63.9
17
57.2
42.5
6Nm
* The Slice seat post has two positions for mounting the saddle. A full range of angles from 73° to 78° is achievable depending on rider’s preference and/or the event.
** This is the actual measurement of the top tube. The distance from the saddle to the bars will vary based on the choice of seat post position.
*** STACK and REACH - STACK is measured vertically from the center of the BB to the top of the head tube; REACH is measured horizontally from the center of the
BB to the top of the head tube.
If you ride a 56 road frame, you should choose a size 56 Slice frame.
18
120849.PDF
replacement parts
ORDER
FRAME
KF363/
KF055/
KP061/
KP062/
KP060/
KF115/
KP065/
KF096/
KP064/
BB CABLE GUIDE w/fixing bolt
INLINE ADJUSTER (QTY 2)
SEAT POST SLICE AERO
SEAT BINDER SLICE AERO
SEAT POST HARDWARE SLICE AERO
SEAT POST GEL
CHAINSTAY PROTECT-AERO SLICE
REAR DERAILLUER HANGER
BRAKE GUIDE SLICE AERO
ORDER
KB002/
QC778/
KP017
HEADSET & FORK PARTS
KIT,HEADSET,SI CRB W/15 TC
BRAKE BOLT(35mm)
SI COMPRESSION ASSY
ORDER
SI BB30
BOTTOM BRACKET
SI CIRCLIPS (QTY 2)
SI BEARINGS (QTY 2)
SI CERAMIC BEARINGS (QTY 2)
SI BEARING SHIELD (QTY 2)
SI BEARING SHIELD SL (QTY 2)
SPINDLE-SI ROAD
SI SHIMS (QTY 5)
SI WAVE WASHER
TOOLS
SI BEARING PRESS TOOL(USED WITH HEADSET PRESS)
SI BEARING REMOVAL TOOL
SI LOCKRING TOOL
SI HOLLOWGRAM CRANKARM EXTRACTION TOOL
SIBB/68 ADP.INSTALL
EXTRACT CAP TOOL FOR SI CARBON CRANKSETS
ADAPTER,SIBB TO 68MM TAP
QC616/
KB6810/
KP018/
QC615/
KP023/
QC612/
QC617/
QC618/
KT010/
KT011/
KT012/
KT013/
KF365/
QC787/
KP009/
For an up to date list of kits available for your bike, please visit our Tech Center at : http://www.cannondale.
com/bikes/tech/
19
ORDER
SI HOLLOWGRAM
KA014/170SLV
KA014/172SLV
KA014/175SLV
KA015/170SLV
KA015/172SLV
KA015/175SLV
KP019/170L
KP019/172L
KP019/175L
KP019/170R
KP019/172R
KP019/175R
QC690/
QC850/
KA019/
ORDER
QC781/
QC782/
QC783/
QC784/
QC785/
QC786/
KF361/
QC787/
ORDER
QC694/
QC693/
QC603/
KP024/
KP025/
KP026/
KP027/
KP021/
QC789/
QC790/
QC791/
QC792/
QC788/
SI HOLLOWGRAM CRANKSETS
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 39/53,170
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 39/53,172
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 39/53,175
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 34/50,170
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 34/50,172
CRANKSET,SL,ROAD 34/50,175
CRANKARM-SL SLV,170 LFT
CRANKARM-SL SLV,172 LFT
CRANKARM-SL SLV,175 LFT
CRANKARM-SL SLV,170 RHT
CRANKARM-SL SLV,172 RHT
CRANKARM-SL SLV,175 RHT
BB,CDALE Si,68X104mm Rd
B,CDALE Si,68X104mm Rd-SRM
BB,CDALE Si,68X104 CERAMIC
SI CARBON
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,39/53,170
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,39/53,172
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,39/53,175
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,34/50,170
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,34/50,172
CRANKSET,CRB 2PC,34/50,175
BOLTS, SI CARBON CRANK (QTY 2)
TOOL-EXTRACT. CAP.SI CRB
SI CHAINRINGS/SPIDER
Spider,H-GRAM SI,130MM BCD
Spider,H-GRAM SI,110mm BCD
Pin,Chain Catch-SI
CHAINRING,MK5-53T/130BCD
CHAINRING,MK5-39T/130BCD
CHAINRING,MK5-50T/110BCD
CHAINRING,MK5-34T/110BCD
LOCKRING-SL --REQUIRES KT012/
CHAINRING,SI,39T/130BCD
CHAINRING,SI,53T/130BCD
CHAINRING,SI,34T/110BCD
CHAINRING,SI,50T/110BCD-34Tspecific
BB,CDALE SI,2PC
20
USE OF THIS MANUAL
Other Manuals & Instructions
Many of the components on your bike were not
made by Cannondale. When available from the
manufacturer, Cannondale packages these manuals
and/or instructions with our bikes for delivery to you.
We strongly recommend that you read and follow
all the manufacturer’s specific instructions included
with your bike.
Cannondale Bicycle Owner’s Manual
This manual contains important information affecting
your safety and the proper use of bicycles. It is a
very important manual for every bike we make. It is
organized into two parts:
Authorized Cannondale Retailers
Your local Authorized Cannondale Retailer is your
primary contact for service and adjustment of your
bicycle, instruction in its use, and any warranty
questions.
PART I
Is a generic guide to the proper function and use
of bicycles. This generic information is used by
many bike companies. Most aspects of bicycles are
common or “generic.” PART I of this manual is the 9th
edition of the generic manual.
Your new bike is to be delivered by a Authorized
Cannondale Retailer to you in a completely assembled
and properly adjusted condition, complete with all
required safety equipment, Owner’s Manuals, any
Cannondale Owner’s Manual Supplements, and the
available manufacturer’s instructions (shipped by
Cannondale) for parts and components for your
bike.
PART II
Contains Information specific to Cannondale bicycles
and topics we feel you need to know and understand
about our bikes.
A manual alone cannot teach you how to ride, and a
manual the size of an encyclopedia could not cover
every combination of bicycle, rider and conditions.
Thus, as a reasonable person would expect, the
Cannondale manuals and supplements focus on the
bicycle, not teaching you to ride.
To find the Cannondale retailer closest to you, call
1-800-BIKE-USA, or use our website dealer locator at
www.cannondale.com.
Use Only Genuine Replacement Parts
It is important to your safety and the performance
of your Cannondale bicycle that you use only
genuine Cannondale replacement parts in Headshok
and Lefty forks, Cannondale swingarms and rear
suspension assemblies, derailleur hangers and other
frame hardware. These parts are described in Owners
Manual Supplements. This note does not apply to
widely used generic bicycle components such as
derailleurs.
This manual is not intended as a comprehensive use,
service, repair or maintenance manual. It contains no
assembly instructions. This manual is not a service
manual for any parts of your bike. Please see your
dealer for all service, repairs or maintenance. Your
dealer may also be able to refer you to classes or
books on bicycle use, and maintenance.
Owner’s Manual Supplements
Cannondale Owner’s Manual Supplements are
“supplements” to this manual providing important
additional model specific safety, maintenance, and
technical information. Cannondale Owner’s Manual
Supplements are not replacements for this or any
other manual for your bike.
You can download Adobe Acrobat PDF versions of
any Cannondale Owner’s Manual or Owner’s Manual
Supplements or Tech Notes from our website. Go to:
http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/tech/.
This manual meets EN standards
14764, 14766, and 14781.
1
125289 CUSA EN
PART I
CONTENTS
SECTION 5. SERVICE ............................ 38-41
5.A Service Intervals ..........................................................39
5.B If Your Bicycle Sustains an Impact .........................41
USE OF THIS MANUAL .................................1
PART II
SECTION A.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFO .................. 42-50
PART I
A Wide Range of Injuries Are Possible .........................42
GENERAL WARNING.....................................4
Bicycles Cannot Protect You ............................................42
Bicycling Inherent Risk ......................................................42
Warning Label.......................................................................43
Riding in Traffic, Commuting...........................................43
Riding at Night, Dusk, Dawn ...........................................44
Refinishing .............................................................................45
Modifications ........................................................................45
Child Carriers .........................................................................46
Children and Stationary Bike Trainers ..........................45
Bicycles Have Sharp Surfaces ..........................................46
Bar Ends ..................................................................................46
Installing Accessories .........................................................46
Tire Size ...................................................................................47
Aerodynamic Handlebars.................................................47
About Shimmy .....................................................................48
Toe Clip Overlap...................................................................48
Brake Power Modulators...................................................49
Aftermarket Brake Systems..............................................49
Aftermarket Power Systems ............................................50
A SPECIAL NOTE FOR PARENTS ..................4
SECTION 1. FIRST .................................... 5-8
1.A Bike Fit............................................................................... 5
1.B Safety First........................................................................ 5
1.C Mechanical Safety Check ........................................... 6
1.D First Ride .......................................................................... 8
SECTION 2. SAFETY ............................... 8-14
2.A The Basics ......................................................................... 9
2.B Riding Safety .................................................................10
2.C Off-Road Safety ............................................................11
2.D Wet Weather Riding ...................................................11
2.E Night Riding .................................................................12
2.F Extreme, Stunt, or Competition Riding ..............13
2.G Changing Components
Adding Accessories ....................................................14
SECTION B. INTENDED USE ................. 51-59
SECTION 3. FIT .................................... 15-19
3.A Stand Over Height ......................................................15
3.B Saddle Position ............................................................16
3.C. Handlebar Height and Angle ..................................18
3.D Control Position Adjustments ................................19
3.E Brake Reach ...................................................................19
This section also includes weight limit
information.
High Performance Road....................................................52
General Purpose Riding ....................................................53
Cross-Country, Marathon, Hardtails .............................54
All Mountain..........................................................................55
Gravity, Freeride, Downhill ...............................................56
Dirt Jump................................................................................57
Cyclocross ..............................................................................58
Road Tandems ......................................................................58
Mountain Tandems .............................................................59
SECTION 4. TECH ............................... 20 - 37
4.A Wheels.............................................................................20
4.B Seat Post Cam Action Clamp...................................26
4.C Brakes ..............................................................................27
4.D Shifting Gears...............................................................30
4.E Pedals...............................................................................32
4.F Bicycle Suspension......................................................33
4.G Tires and Tubes ............................................................34
2
SECTION C.
MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDING ..................... 60-63
CANNONDALE
AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS ...................84
Off-Road Riding ...................................................................60
Bike Types ...............................................................................60
Inspection and Maintenance Routines........................60
Suspension ............................................................................61
Jumping ..................................................................................61
Stay In Control ......................................................................61
Downhill and Lift-Serviced Riding ................................61
Shifting Gears While Pedaling ........................................61
Freeride and Downhill Riding .........................................64
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A.
Cannondale BB30 Bicycle Frames .................................86
APPENDIX B.
Maximum Fork Length ......................................................87
APPENDIX C.
Carbon Fiber Seat Posts ....................................................88
SECTION D.
INSPECT FOR SAFETY .......................... 66-76
1. Understanding Metals ..................................................67
APPENDIX D.
Carbon Fiber Forks and Stems ........................................90
2. Understanding Composites (Carbon Fiber) ........72
3. Understanding Components .......................... 74
Bicycle Lifespan ....................................................................76
Useful Life of Lightweight Frames.................................76
APPENDIX E.
Bicycle Racks .........................................................................92
APPENDIX F.
Bicycle Trainers .....................................................................94
SECTION E.
MAINTENANCE ..................................... 77-81
30 Day Service ......................................................................77
Cleaning..................................................................................77
Preventing Corrosion .........................................................77
Lubrication.............................................................................78
Tightening Torques .............................................................78
Repair/Work Stands ............................................................79
Protect From Extreme Temperatures ...........................79
RIding Through Water ........................................................79
Applying Frame Protection..............................................80
SECTION F.
CANNONDALE LIMITED WARRANTY .......82
Warranty Registration ........................................................83
Serial Number .......................................................................83
SECTION G.
PRE-RIDE CHECKLIST ............................. 95-96
3
PART I
GENERAL WARNING
A SPECIAL NOTE FOR PARENTS
Like any sport, bicycling involves risk of injury and
damage. By choosing to ride a bicycle, you assume
the responsibility for that risk, so you need to know
— and to practice — the rules of safe and responsible
riding and of proper use and maintenance. Proper
use and maintenance of your bicycle reduces risk of
injury.
As a parent or guardian, you are responsible for the
activities and safety of your minor child, and that
includes making sure that the bicycle is properly fitted
to the child; that it is in good repair and safe operating
condition; that you and your child have learned and
understand the safe operation of the bicycle; and
that you and your child have learned, understand
and obey not only the applicable local motor vehicle,
bicycle and traffic laws, but also the common sense
rules of safe and responsible bicycling. As a parent,
you should read this manual, as well as review its
warnings and the bicycle’s functions and operating
procedures with your child, before letting your child
ride the bicycle.
This Manual contains many “Warnings” and “Cautions”
concerning the consequences of failure to maintain
or inspect your bicycle and of failure to follow safe
cycling practices.
and
The combination of the safety alert symbol
the word WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, could result in serious
injury or death.
WARNING
MAKE SURE THAT YOUR CHILD ALWAYS
WEARS AN APPROVED BICYCLE HELMET
WHEN RIDING; BUT ALSO MAKE SURE THAT
YOUR CHILD UNDERSTANDS THAT A BICYCLE
HELMET IS FOR BICYCLING ONLY, AND MUST
BE REMOVED WHEN NOT RIDING.
The combination of the safety alert symbol
and
the word CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous
situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor
or moderate injury, or is an alert against unsafe
practices.
The word CAUTION used without the safety alert
symbol indicates a situation which, if not avoided,
could result in serious damage to the bicycle or the
voiding of your warranty.
A helmet must not be worn while playing, in play
areas, on playground equipment, while climbing
trees, or at any time while not riding a bicycle.
Failure to follow this warning could result in
serious injury or death.
Many of the Warnings and Cautions say “you may lose
control and fall”. Because any fall can result in serious
injury or even death, we do not always repeat the
warning of possible injury or death.
Because it is impossible to anticipate every situation
or condition which can occur while riding, this
Manual makes no representation about the safe use
of the bicycle under all conditions. There are risks
associated with the use of any bicycle which cannot
be predicted or avoided, and which are the sole
responsibility of the rider.
4
SECTION 1. FIRST
1.B - SAFETY FIRST
1. Always
wear
an
approved
helmet
when riding your bike, and follow the
helmet
manufacturer’s
instructions
for fit, use and care.
NOTE: We strongly urge you to read this Manual in its
entirety before your first ride. At the very least, read
and make sure that you understand each point in this
section, and refer to the cited sections on any issue
which you don’t completely understand. Please note
that not all bicycles have all of the features described
in this manual. Ask your dealer to point out the
features of your bicycle.
2. Do you have all the other required and
recommended safety equipment? See SECTION 2.
It’s your responsibility to familiarize yourself
with the laws of the areas where you ride, and to
comply with all applicable laws.
3. Do you know how to correctly operate your
wheel quick releases? Check SECTION 4.A.1 to
make sure. Riding with an improperly adjusted
wheel quick release can cause the wheel to
wobble or disengage from the bicycle, and cause
serious injury or death.
1.A - BIKE FIT
1. Is your bike the right size? To check, see SECTION
3.A. If your bicycle is too large or too small for you,
You may lose control and fall. If your new bike is
not the right size, ask your dealer to exchange it
before you ride it.
4. If your bike has toeclips and straps or clipless
(“step-in”) pedals, make sure you know how they
work (see SECTION 4.E). These pedals require
special techniques and skills. Follow the pedal
manufacturer’s instructions for use, adjustment
and care.
2. Is the saddle at the right height? To check, see
SECTION 3.B. If you adjust your saddle height,
follow the Minimum Insertion instructions in
SECTION 3.B.
5. Do you have “toe overlap”? On smaller framed
bicycles your toe or toeclip may be able to
contact the front wheel when a pedal is all
the way forward and the wheel is turned. Read
SECTION 4.E. If you have toeclip overlap.
3. Are saddle and seat post securely clamped? A
correctly tightened saddle will allow no saddle
movement in any direction. See SECTION 3.B.
4. Are the stem and handlebars at the right height
for you? If not, see SECTION 3.C.
6. Does your bike have suspension? If so, check
SECTION 4.F. Suspension can change the way
a bicycle performs. Follow the suspension
manufacturer’s instructions for use, adjustment
and care.
5. Can you comfortably operate the brakes? If not,
you may be able to adjust their angle and reach.
See SECTION 3.D and 3.E.
6. Do you fully understand how to operate your
new bicycle? If not, before your first ride, have
your dealer explain any functions or features
which you do not understand.
5
PART I
1.C - MECHANICAL SAFETY CHECK
Make sure nothing is loose. Lift the front wheel off the
ground by two or three inches, then let it bounce on
the ground. Anything sound, feel or look loose? Do a
visual and tactile inspection of the whole bike. Any
loose parts or accessories? If so, secure them. If you’re
not sure, ask someone with experience to check.
Routinely check the condition of your bicycle before
every ride.
Nuts, Bolts Screws & Other Fasteners
Because manufacturers use a wide variety of fastener
sizes and shapes made in a variety of materials, often
differing by model and component, the correct
tightening force or torque cannot be generalized.
Tires & Wheels
Make sure tires are correctly inflated (see SECTION
4.G.1). Check by putting one hand on the saddle, one
on the intersection of the handlebars and stem, then
bouncing your weight on the bike while looking at
tire deflection. Compare what you see with how it
looks when you know the tires are correctly inflated;
and adjust if necessary.
To make sure that the many fasteners on your bicycle
are correctly tightened. See page 78.
Always refer to the torque specifications in the
instructions provided by the manufacturer of a
component in question.
Tires in good shape? Spin each wheel slowly and look for
cuts in the tread and sidewall. Replace damaged tires
before riding the bike.
Correctly tightening a fastener requires a calibrated
torque wrench. A professional bicycle mechanic with
a torque wrench should torque the fasteners on you
bicycle. If you choose to work on your own bicycle,
you must use a torque wrench and the correct
tightening torque specifications from the bicycle
or component manufacturer or from your dealer. If
you need to make an adjustment at home or in the
field, we urge you to exercise care, and to have the
fasteners you worked on checked by your dealer as
soon as possible.
Wheels true? Spin each wheel and check for brake
clearance and side-to-side wobble. If a wheel wobbles
side-to-side even slightly, or rubs against or hits the
brake pads, take the bike to a qualified bike shop to
have the wheel trued.
CAUTION
Wheels must be true for the brakes to work
effectively. Wheel trueing is a skill which requires
special tools and experience. Do not attempt to
true a wheel unless you have the knowledge,
experience and tools needed to do the job
correctly.
WARNING
CORRECT TIGHTENING FORCE ON FASTENERS
–NUTS, BOLTS, SCREWS– ON YOUR BICYCLE IS
IMPORTANT.
Too little force, and the fastener may not hold
securely. Too much force, and the fastener can
strip threads, stretch, deform or break. Either
way, incorrect tightening force can result in
component failure, which can cause you to loose
control and fall.
6
Seat post
Wheel rims clean and undamaged? Make sure the
rims are clean and undamaged at the tire bead and,
if you have rim brakes, along the braking surface.
Check to make sure that any rim wear indicator
marking is not visible at any point on the wheel rim.
If your seat post has an over-center cam action
fastener for easy height adjustment, check that it is
properly adjusted and in the locked position. See
Section 4.B.
Handlebar and Saddle Alignment
WARNING
Make sure the saddle and handlebar stem are parallel
to the bike’s center line and clamped tight enough
so that you can’t twist them out of alignment. See
SECTION 3.B and 3.C.
BICYCLE WHEEL RIMS ARE SUBJECT TO WEAR.
Ask your dealer about wheel rim wear. Some
wheel rims have a rim wear indicator which
becomes visible as the rim’s braking surface
wears. A visible rim wear indicator on the side
of the wheel rim is an indication that the wheel
rim has reached its maximum usable life. Riding
a wheel that is at the end of its usable life can
result in wheel failure, which can cause you to
loose control and fall.
Handlebar Ends
Make sure the handlebar grips are secure and in good
condition. If not, have your dealer replace them. Make
sure the handlebar ends and extensions are plugged.
If not, plug them before you ride. If the handlebars
have bar end extensions, make sure they are clamped
tight enough so you can’t twist them.
Brakes
WARNING
Check the brakes for proper operation (see SECTION
4.C). Squeeze the brake levers. Are the brake quickreleases closed? All control cables seated and securely
engaged? Do the brake pads contact the wheel rim
squarely and make full contact with the rim? Do the
brake pads touch the wheel rim within an inch of
brake lever movement? Can you apply full braking
force at the levers without having them touch the
handlebar? If not, your brakes need adjustment.
Do not ride the bike until the brakes are properly
adjusted by a professional bicycle mechanic.
LOOSE OR DAMAGED HANDLEBAR GRIPS
OR EXTENSIONS CAN CAUSE YOU TO
LOSE CONTROL AND FALL. UNPLUGGED
HANDLEBARS OR EXTENSIONS CAN CUT
YOU AND CAUSE SERIOUS INJURY IN AN
OTHERWISE MINOR ACCIDENT.
VERY IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTE:
Wheel Retention System
Please also read and become thoroughly familiar
with the important information on the lifespan
of your bicycle and its components in PART II,
SECTION D. INSPECT FOR SAFETY.
Make sure the front and rear wheels are correctly
secured. See SECTION 4.A
7
PART I
SECTION 2. SAFETY
1.D - FIRST RIDE
When you buckle on your helmet and go for your first
familiarization ride on your new bicycle, be sure to
pick a controlled environment, away from cars, other
cyclists, obstacles or other hazards. Ride to become
familiar with the controls, features and performance
of your new bike.
WARNING
MANY STATES REQUIRE SPECIFIC SAFETY
DEVICES. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO
FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH THE LAWS OF
THE STATE WHERE YOU RIDE AND TO COMPLY
WITH ALL APPLICABLE LAWS, INCLUDING
PROPERLY EQUIPPING YOURSELF AND YOUR
BIKE AS THE LAW REQUIRES.
Familiarize yourself with the braking action of the
bike (see SECTION 4.C). Test the brakes at slow speed,
putting your weight toward the rear and gently
applying the brakes, rear brake first. Sudden or
excessive application of the front brake could pitch
you over the handlebars. Applying brakes too hard
can lock up a wheel, which could cause you to lose
control and fall. Skidding is an example of what can
happen when a wheel locks up.
Observe all local bicycle laws and regulations.
Observe regulations about bicycle lighting,
licensing of bicycles, riding on sidewalks, laws
regulating bike path and trail use, helmet laws,
child carrier laws, special bicycle traffic laws.
If your bicycle has toeclips or clipless pedals,
practice getting in and out of the pedals.
See paragraph B.4 above and SECTION 4.E.4.
It’s your responsibility to know and obey the
laws.
If your bike has suspension, familiarize yourself with
how the suspension responds to brake application
and rider weight shifts. See paragraph B.6 above and
SECTION 4.F.
Practice shifting the gears (see SECTION 4.D).
Remember to never move the shifter while pedaling
backward, nor pedal backwards immediately after
having moved the shifter. This could jam the chain
and cause serious damage to the bicycle.
Check out the handling and response of the bike; and
check the comfort.
If you have any questions, or if you feel anything
about the bike is not as it should be, consult your
dealer before you ride.
8
2.A - THE BASICS
2. Always do the Mechanical Safety Check (SECTION
1.C) before you get on a bike.
1. Always wear a cycling helmet which meets the
latest certification standards and is appropriate
for the type of riding you do. Always follow the
helmet manufacturer’s instructions for fit, use and
care of your helmet. Most serious bicycle injuries
involve head injuries which might have been
avoided if the rider had worn an appropriate
helmet.
3. Be thoroughly familiar with the controls of your
bicycle: brakes (SECTION 4.C.); pedals (SECTION
4.E.); shifting (SECTION 4.D.)
4. Be careful to keep body parts and other objects
away from the sharp teeth of chainrings, the
moving chain, the turning pedals and cranks,
and the spinning wheels of your bicycle.
5. Always wear:
t 4IPFTUIBUXJMMTUBZPOZPVSGFFUBOEXJMMHSJQUIF
pedals. Never ride barefoot or in sandals.
t #SJHIU WJTJCMF DMPUIJOH UIBU JT OPU TP MPPTF UIBU
it can be tangled in the bicycle or snagged by
objects at the side of the road or trail.
t 1SPUFDUJWFFZFXFBSUPQSPUFDUBHBJOTUBJSCPSOF
dirt, dust and bugs —tinted when the sun is
bright, clear when it’s not.
Your helmet should be:
6. Don’t jump with your bike. Jumping a bike,
particularly a BMX or mountain bike, can be fun;
but it can put huge and unpredictable stress
on the bicycle and its components. Riders who
insist on jumping their bikes risk serious damage,
to their bicycles as well as to themselves. Before
you attempt to jump, do stunt riding or race with
your bike, read and understand SECTION 2.F.
t 64$POTVNFS1SPEVDU4BGFUZ$PNNJTTJPO$14$
certified (look for the label on the helmet)
7. Ride at a speed appropriate for conditions.
Increased speed means higher risk.
Figure 1. Bicycle Helmet
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ASK YOUR RETAILER FOR HELP
WARNING
FAILURE TO WEAR A HELMET WHEN RIDING
MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
9
PART I
2.B - RIDING SAFETY
10. Never hitch a ride by holding on to another
vehicle.
Obey all rules of the road and all local traffic laws.
11. Don’t do stunts, wheelies or jumps. If you intend
to do stunts, wheelies, jumps or go racing with
your bike despite our advice not to, read SECTION
2.F, Downhill, Stunt or Competition Biking, now.
Think carefully about your skills before deciding
to take the large risks that go with this kind of
riding.
1. You are sharing the road or the path with others
— motorists, pedestrians and other cyclists.
Respect their rights.
2. Ride defensively. Always assume that others do
not see you.
3. Look ahead, and be ready to avoid:
t 7FIJDMFTTMPXJOHPSUVSOJOHFOUFSJOHUIFSPBEPS
your lane ahead of you, or coming up behind
you.
t 1BSLFEDBSEPPSTPQFOJOH
12. Don’t weave through traffic or make any moves
that may surprise people with whom you are
sharing the road.
13. Observe and yield the right of way.
14. Never ride your bicycle while under the influence
of alcohol or drugs.
t 1FEFTUSJBOTTUFQQJOHPVU
t $IJMESFOPSQFUTQMBZJOHOFBSUIFSPBE
t 1PU IPMFT TFXFS HSBUJOH SBJMSPBE USBDLT
expansion joints, road or sidewalk construction,
debris and other obstructions that could cause
you to swerve into traffic, catch your wheel or
otherwise cause you to lose control and have an
accident.
t 5IF NBOZ PUIFS IB[BSET BOE EJTUSBDUJPOT XIJDI
can occur on a bicycle ride.
4. Ride in designated bike lanes, on designated
bike paths or as close to the edge of the road
as possible, in the direction of traffic flow or as
directed by local governing laws.
5. Stop at stop signs and traffic lights; slow down
and look both ways at street intersections.
Remember that a bicycle always loses in a
collision with a motor vehicle, so be prepared to
yield even if you have the right of way.
6. Use approved hand signals for turning and
stopping.
7. Never ride with headphones. They mask traffic
sounds and emergency vehicle sirens, distract
you from concentrating on what’s going on
around you, and their wires can tangle in the
moving parts of the bicycle, causing you to lose
control.
8. Never carry a passenger, unless it is a small child
wearing an approved helmet and secured in a
correctly mounted child carrier or a child-carrying
trailer.
9. Never carry anything which obstructs your vision
or your complete control of the bicycle, or which
could become entangled in the moving parts of
the bicycle.
10
15. If possible, avoid riding in bad weather, when
visibility is obscured, at dawn, dusk or in the dark,
or when extremely tired. Each of these conditions
increases the risk of accident.
2.C - OFF-ROAD SAFETY
2.D - WET WEATHER RIDING
We recommend that children not ride on rough
terrain unless they are accompanied by an adult.
Under wet conditions, the stopping power of your
brakes (as well as the brakes of other vehicles sharing
the road) is dramatically reduced and your tires don’t
grip nearly as well. This makes it harder to control
speed and easier to lose control.
1. The variable conditions and hazards of off-road
riding require close attention and specific skills.
Start slowly on easier terrain and build up your
skills. If your bike has suspension, the increased
speed you may develop also increases your risk
of losing control and falling. Get to know how
to handle your bike safely before trying increased
speed or more difficult terrain.
WARNING
WET WEATHER IMPAIRS TRACTION, BRAKING
AND VISIBILITY, BOTH FOR THE BICYCLIST
AND FOR OTHER VEHICLES SHARING THE
ROAD.
2. Wear safety gear appropriate to the kind of riding
you plan to do.
3. Don’t ride alone in remote areas. Even when
riding with others, make sure that someone
knows where you’re going and when you expect
to be back.
The risk of an accident is dramatically
increased in wet conditions.
To make sure that you can slow down and stop safely
in wet conditions, ride more slowly and apply your
brakes earlier and more gradually than you would
under normal, dry conditions. See also SECTION 4.C.
4. Always take along some kind of identification,
so that people know who you are in case of an
accident; and take along a couple of dollars in
cash for a candy bar, a cool drink or an emergency
phone call.
5. Yield right of way to pedestrians and animals.
Ride in a way that does not frighten or endanger
them, and give them enough room so that their
unexpected moves don’t endanger you.
6. Be prepared. If something goes wrong while
you’re riding off-road, help may not be close.
7. Before you attempt to jump, do stunt riding
or race with your bike, read and understand
SECTION 2.F.
Off-Road Respect
Obey the local laws regulating where and how you
can ride off-road, and respect private property.
You may be sharing the trail with others — hikers,
equestrians, other cyclists. Respect their rights. Stay
on the designated trail. Don’t contribute to erosion
by riding in mud or with unnecessary sliding. Don’t
disturb the ecosystem by cutting your own trail
or shortcut through vegetation or streams. It is
your responsibility to minimize your impact on the
environment. Leave things as you found them; and
always take out everything you brought in.
11
PART I
2.E - NIGHT RIDING
WARNING
Riding a bicycle at night is many times more
dangerous than riding during the day. A bicyclist
is very difficult for motorists and pedestrians to
see. Therefore, children should never ride at dawn,
at dusk or at night. Adults who chose to accept
the greatly increased risk of riding at dawn, at dusk
or at night need to take extra care both riding and
choosing specialized equipment which helps reduce
that risk. Consult your dealer about night riding
safety equipment.
DO NOT REMOVE THE FRONT OR REAR
REFLECTORS OR REFLECTOR BRACKETS FROM
YOUR BICYCLE. They are an integral part of the
bicycle’s safety system.
REMOVING
THE
REFLECTORS
MAY
REDUCE YOUR
VISIBILITY
TO
OTHERS
USING
THE
ROADWAY.
BEING STRUCK BY OTHER VEHICLES MAY
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
WARNING
The reflector brackets may protect you from the
brake straddle cable catching on the tire in the
event of brake cable failure. If a brake straddle
cable catches on the tire, it can cause the wheel
to stop suddenly, causing you to loose control
and fall.
REFLECTORS ARE NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR
REQUIRED LIGHTS. RIDING AT DAWN, AT
DUSK, AT NIGHT OR AT OTHER TIMES OF
POOR VISIBILITY WITHOUT AN ADEQUATE
BICYCLE LIGHTING SYSTEM AND WITHOUT
REFLECTORS IS DANGEROUS AND MAY
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
If you choose to ride under conditions of poor
visibility, check and be sure you comply with
all local laws about night riding, and take the
following strongly recommended additional
precautions:
Bicycle reflectors are designed to pick up and reflect
street lights and car lights in a way that may help you
to be seen and recognized as a moving bicyclist.
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powered head and tail lights which meet all
regulatory requirements and provide adequate
visibility.
CAUTION
Check reflectors and their mounting brackets
regularly to make sure that they are clean,
straight, unbroken and securely mounted. Have
your dealer replace damaged reflectors and
straighten or tighten any that are bent or loose.
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accessories, such as a reflective vest, reflective
arm and leg bands, reflective stripes on your
helmet, flashing lights attached to your body
and/or your bicycle ... any reflective device or
light source that moves will help you get the
attention of approaching motorists, pedestrians
and other traffic.
The mounting brackets of front and rear reflectors are
often designed as brake straddle cable safety catches
which prevent the straddle cable from catching on
the tire tread if the cable jumps out of its yoke or
breaks.
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may be carrying on the bicycle does not
obstruct a reflector or light.
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correctly positioned and securely mounted
reflectors.
12
WHILE RIDING AT DAWN, AT DUSK OR AT
NIGHT:
WARNING
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ALTHOUGH
MANY
CATALOGS,
ADVERTISEMENTS AND ARTICLES ABOUT
BICYCLING DEPICT RIDERS ENGAGED
IN EXTREME RIDING, THIS ACTIVITY IS
EXTREMELY DANGEROUS, INCREASES YOUR
RISK OF INJURY OR DEATH, AND INCREASES
THE SEVERITY OF ANY INJURY.
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moving traffic.
t
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IF RIDING IN TRAFFIC :
Remember that the action depicted is being
performed by professionals with many years of
training and experience. Know your limits and
always wear a helmet and other appropriate
safety gear. Even with state-of-the-art protective
safety gear, you could be seriously injured
or killed when jumping, stunt riding, riding
downhill at speed or in competition.
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you and predict your movements.
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unexpected.
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dealer about traffic safety classes or a good
book on bicycle traffic safety.
2.F - EXTREME, STUNT OR
COMPETITION RIDING
WARNING
Bicycles and bicycle parts have limitations with
regard to strength and integrity, and this type of
riding can exceed those limitations.
Whether you call it Aggro, Hucking, Freeride, North
Shore, Downhill, Jumping, Stunt Riding, Racing or
something else: if you engage in this sort of extreme,
aggressive riding you will get hurt, and you voluntarily
assume a greatly increased risk of injury or death.
Not all bicycles are designed for these types of riding,
and those that are may not be suitable for all types
of aggressive riding. Check with your dealer or the
bicycle’s manufacturer about the suitability of your
bicycle before engaging in extreme riding.
When riding fast down hill, you can reach speeds
achieved by motorcycles, and therefore face similar
hazards and risks. Have your bicycle and equipment
carefully inspected by a qualified mechanic and be
sure it is in perfect condition. Consult with expert
riders and race officials on conditions and equipment
advisable at the site where you plan to ride. Wear
appropriate safety gear, including an approved
full face helmet, full finger gloves, and body
armor. Ultimately, it is your responsibility to have
proper equipment and to be familiar with course
conditions.
13
PART I
We recommend against this type of riding because
of the increased risks; but if you choose to take the
risk, at least:
2.G - CHANGING COMPONENTS
OR ADDING ACCESSORIES
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There are many components and accessories
available to enhance the comfort, performance and
appearance of your bicycle. However, if you change
components or add accessories, you do so at your
own risk. The bicycle’s manufacturer may not have
tested that component or accessory for compatibility,
reliability or safety on your bicycle.
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develop your skills before trying more difficult or
dangerous riding
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racing or fast downhill riding
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safety gear
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imposed on your bike by this kind of activity may
break or damage parts of the bicycle and void the
warranty
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or bends. Do not ride your bicycle when any part
is damaged.
If you ride downhill at speed, do stunt riding or
ride in competition, know the limits of your skill
and experience. Ultimately, avoiding injury is your
responsibility.
Before installing any component or accessory,
including a different size tire, make sure that it is
compatible with your bicycle by checking with
your dealer. Be sure to read, understand and follow
the instructions that accompany the products you
purchase for your bicycle. See also PART II, SECTION
D. INSPECT FOR SAFETY.
WARNING
FAILURE TO CONFIRM COMPATIBILITY,
PROPERLY INSTALL, OPERATE AND MAINTAIN
ANY COMPONENT OR ACCESSORY CAN
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
WARNING
Changing the components on your bike may
void the warranty. Refer to your warranty, and
check with your dealer before changing the
components on your bike.
14
SECTION 3. FIT
NOTE: Correct fit is an essential element of bicycling
safety, performance and comfort. Making the
adjustments to your bicycle which result in correct
fit for your body and riding conditions requires
experience, skill and special tools. Always have your
dealer make the adjustments on your bicycle; or, if
you have the experience, skill and tools, have your
dealer check your work before riding.
WARNING
IF YOUR BICYCLE DOES NOT FIT PROPERLY,
YOU MAY LOSE CONTROL AND FALL.
Figure 2. Stand Over Height
If your new bike doesn’t fit, ask your dealer to
exchange it before you ride it.
WARNING
IF YOU PLAN TO USE YOUR BIKE FOR
JUMPING OR STUNT RIDING, READ
SECTION 2.F AGAIN.
3.A - STAND OVER HEIGHT
Stand over height is the basic element of bike fit (see
fig. 2). It is the distance from the ground to the top of
the bicycle’s frame at that point where your crotch is
when straddling the bike. To check for correct stand
over height, straddle the bike while wearing the
kind of shoes in which you’ll be riding, and bounce
vigorously on your heels. If your crotch touches the
frame, the bike is too big for you. Don’t even ride the
bike around the block. A bike which you ride only
on paved surfaces and never take off-road should
give you a minimum stand over height clearance of
two inches (5 cm). A bike that you’ll ride on unpaved
surfaces should give you a minimum of three inches
(7.5 cm) of stand over height clearance. And a bike
that you’ll use off road should give you four inches
(10 cm) or more of clearance.
2. Step-through frame bicycles
Standover height does not apply to bicycles with
step-through frames. Instead, the limiting dimension
is determined by saddle height range. You must be
able to adjust your saddle position as described in
3.B. SADDLE POSITION without exceeding the limits
set by the height of the top of the seat tube and the
”Minimum Insertion” or “Maximum Extension” mark
on the seat post.
15
PART I
3.B - SADDLE POSITION
Once the saddle is at the correct height, make sure
that the seat post does not project from the frame
beyond its “Minimum Insertion” or “Maximum
Extension” mark (fig. 4).
Correct saddle adjustment is an important factor
in getting the most performance and comfort from
your bicycle. If the saddle position is not comfortable
for you, see your dealer.
NOTE: Some bicycles have a sight hole in the seat
tube, the purpose of which is to make it easy to see
whether the seat post is inserted in the seat tube far
enough to be safe. If your bicycle has such a sight
hole, use it instead of the “Minimum Insertion” or
“Maximum Extension” mark to make sure the seat
post is inserted in the seat tube far enough to be
visible through the sight hole.
The saddle can be adjusted in three directions:
1. Up and Down Adjustment
To check for correct saddle height (fig. 3):
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is in the down position and the crank arm is parallel
to the seat tube.
If your leg is not completely straight, your saddle
height needs to be adjusted. If your hips must rock
for the heel to reach the pedal, the saddle is too high.
If your leg is bent at the knee with your heel on the
pedal, the saddle is too low.
If your bike has an interrupted seat tube, as is the
case on some suspension bikes, you must also make
sure that the seat post is far enough into the frame
so that you can touch it through the bottom of the
interrupted seat tube with the tip of your finger
without inserting your finger beyond its first knuckle.
Also see NOTE above and fig. 5).
WARNING
If your seat post is not inserted in the seat tube as
described in B.1 above, the seat post may break,
which could cause you to lose control and fall.
Figure 3. Saddle Position
Figure 4. Minimum Insertion Mark
Ask your dealer to set the saddle for your optimal
riding position and to show you how to make this
adjustment. If you choose to make your own saddle
height adjustment:
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recommended torque (See manufacturer’s
instructions).
16
NOTE: If your bicycle is equipped with a suspension seat
post, periodically ask your dealer to check it.
Small changes in saddle position can have a
substantial effect on performance and comfort.
To find your best saddle position, make only one
adjustment at a time.
WARNING
When making saddle angle adjustments with a
single bolt saddle clamp, always check to make
sure that the serrations on the mating surfaces of
the clamp are not worn. Worn serrations on the
clamp can allow the saddle to move, causing you
to lose control and fall.
Figure 5. Interrupted Seat Tube
2. Front and Back Adjustment
The saddle can be adjusted forward or back to help you
get the optimal position on the bike. Ask your dealer
to set the saddle for your optimal riding position and
to show you how to make this adjustment.
Always tighten fasteners to the correct torque.
Bolts that are too tight can stretch and deform.
Bolts that are too loose can move and fatigue.
Either mistake can lead to a sudden failure of the
bolt, causing you to lose control and fall.
If you choose to make your own front and back
adjustment, make sure that the clamp mechanism is
clamping on the straight part of the saddle rails and is
not touching the curved part of the rails, and that you
are using the recommended torque on the clamping
fastener(s) (See manufacturer’s instructions).
WARNING
After any saddle adjustment, be sure that
the saddle adjusting mechanism is properly
tightened before riding. A loose saddle clamp
or seat post binder can cause damage to the
seat post, or can cause you to lose control and
fall.
3. Saddle Angle Adjustment
Most people prefer a horizontal saddle; but some
riders like the saddle nose angled up or down just
a little. Your dealer can adjust saddle angle or teach
you how to do it.
A correctly tightened saddle adjusting
mechanism will allow no saddle movement in
any direction. Periodically check to make sure
that the saddle adjusting mechanism is properly
tightened.
If you choose to make your own saddle angle
adjustment and you have a single bolt saddle clamp
on your seat post, it is critical that you loosen the
clamp bolt sufficiently to allow any serrations on
the mechanism to disengage before changing the
saddle’s angle, and then that the serrations fully
re-engage before you tighten the clamp bolt to
the recommended torque (See manufacturer’s
instructions).
17
PART I
If, in spite of carefully adjusting the saddle height,
tilt and fore-and-aft position, your saddle is still
uncomfortable, you may need a different saddle
design. Saddles, like people, come in many different
shapes, sizes and resilience. Your dealer can help you
select a saddle which, when correctly adjusted for
your body and riding style, will be comfortable.
WARNING
Some people have claimed that extended
riding with a saddle which is incorrectly
adjusted or which does not support your
pelvic area correctly can cause short-term or
long-term injury to nerves and blood vessels,
or even impotence.
If your saddle causes you pain, numbness or
other discomfort, listen to your body and stop
riding until you see your dealer about saddle
adjustment or a different saddle.
3.C - HANDLEBAR
HEIGHT AND ANGLE
Your bike is equipped either with a “threadless” stem,
which clamps on to the outside of the steerer tube,
or with a “quill” stem, which clamps inside the steerer
tube by way of an expanding binder bolt. If you aren’t
absolutely sure which type of stem your bike has, ask
your dealer.
WARNING
If your bike has a “threadless” stem, your dealer may
be able to change handlebar height by moving
height adjustment spacers from below the stem
to above the stem, or vice versa. Otherwise, you’ll
have to get a stem of different length or rise. Consult
your dealer. Do not attempt to do this yourself, as it
requires special knowledge.
QUILL STEMS:
THE STEM’S MINIMUM
INSERTION MARK MUST NOT BE VISIBLE
ABOVE THE TOP OF THE HEADSET.
If the stem is extended beyond the minimum
insertion mark the stem may break or damage
the fork’s steerer tube, which could cause you to
lose control and fall.
If your bike has a “quill” stem, you can ask your dealer
to adjust the handlebar height a bit by adjusting
stem height.
A quill stem has an etched or stamped mark on
its shaft which designates the stem’s “Minimum
Insertion” or “Maximum Extension”. This mark
must not be visible above the headset.
18
3.D - CONTROL POSITION
ADJUSTMENTS
WARNING
On some bicycles, changing the stem or
stem height can affect the tension of the front
brake cable, locking the front brake or creating
excess cable slack which can make the front
brake inoperable. If the front brake pads move
in towards the wheel rim or out away from the
wheel rim when the stem or stem height is
changed, the brakes must be correctly adjusted
before you ride the bicycle.
The angle of the brake and shift control levers and
their position on the handlebars can be changed.
Ask your dealer to make the adjustments for you.
If you choose to make your own control lever angle
adjustment, be sure to re-tighten the clamp fasteners
to the recommended torque (See manufacturer’s
instructions).
3.E - BRAKE REACH
Some bicycles are equipped with an adjustable
angle stem. If your bicycle has an adjustable angle
stem, ask your dealer to show you how to adjust if.
Do not attempt to make the adjustment yourself, as
changing stem angle may also require adjustments
to the bicycle’s controls.
Many bikes have brake levers which can be adjusted
for reach. If you have small hands or find it difficult
to squeeze the brake levers, your dealer can either
adjust the reach or fit shorter reach brake levers.
WARNING
WARNING
THE SHORTER THE BRAKE LEVER REACH, THE
MORE CRITICAL IT IS TO HAVE CORRECTLY
ADJUSTED BRAKES, SO THAT FULL BRAKING
POWER CAN BE APPLIED WITHIN AVAILABLE
BRAKE LEVER TRAVEL.
Always tighten fasteners to the correct torque.
Bolts that are too tight can stretch and deform.
Bolts that are too loose can move and fatigue.
Either mistake can lead to a sudden failure of the
bolt, causing you to lose control and fall.
Brake lever travel insufficient to apply full braking
power can result in loss of control, which may
result in serious injury or death.
WARNING
AN INSUFFICIENTLY TIGHTENED STEM
BINDER BOLT, HANDLEBAR BINDER BOLT OR
BAR END EXTENSION CLAMPING BOLT MAY
COMPROMISE STEERING ACTION, WHICH
COULD CAUSE YOU TO LOSE CONTROL AND
FALL.
Place the front wheel of the bicycle between
your legs and attempt to twist the handlebar/
stem assembly. If you can twist the stem in
relation to the front wheel, turn the handlebars
in relation to the stem, or turn the bar end
extensions in relation to the handlebar, the bolts
are insufficiently tightened.
Your dealer can also change the angle of the
handlebar or bar end extensions.
19
PART I
SECTION 4. TECH
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through it which has a nut on one end and a fitting
for a hex key, lock lever or other tightening device on
the other (through bolt, fig. 9)
It’s important to your safety, performance and
enjoyment to understand how things work on your
bicycle.
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or into the hub axle (bolt-on wheel, fig. 10)
WARNING
We urge you to ask your dealer how to do the things
described in this section before you attempt them
yourself, and that you have your dealer check your
work before you ride the bike.
RIDING WITH AN IMPROPERLY SECURED
WHEEL CAN ALLOW THE WHEEL TO WOBBLE
OR FALL OFF THE BICYCLE, WHICH CAN CAUSE
SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. THEREFORE, IT IS
ESSENTIAL THAT YOU:
If you have even the slightest doubt as to whether
you understand something in this section of the
Manual, talk to your dealer.
1. Ask your dealer to help you make sure you
know how to install and remove your wheels
safely.
4.A - WHEELS
Bicycle wheels are designed to be removable for
easier transportation and for repair of a tire puncture.
In most cases, the wheel axles are inserted into slots,
called “dropouts” in the fork and frame, but some
suspension mountain bikes use what is called a
“through axle” wheel mounting system.
2. Understand and apply the correct technique
for clamping your wheel in place.
3. Each time, before you ride the bike, check that
the wheel is securely clamped.
The clamping action of a correctly secured wheel
must emboss the surfaces of the dropouts.
If you have a mountain bike equipped with through
axle front or rear wheels, make sure that your dealer
has given you the manufacturer’s instructions, and
follow those when installing or removing a through
axle wheel. If you don’t know what a through axle is,
ask your dealer.
Wheels are secured in one of three ways:
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through it which has an adjustable tension nut on
one end and an over-center cam on the other (cam
action system, fig.8a & 8b).
20
Your bicycle may be equipped with a different securing method for the front wheel than for the rear wheel.
Discuss the wheel securing method for your bicycle with your dealer.
It is very important that you understand the type of wheel securing method on your bicycle, that you know
how to secure the wheels correctly, and that you know how to apply the correct clamping force that safely
secures the wheel.
Ask your dealer to instruct you in correct wheel removal and installation, and ask for the manufacturer’s
instructions.
21
PART I
1. Front Wheel Secondary Retention Devices
2. Wheels With Cam Action Systems
Most bicycles have front forks which utilize a
secondary wheel retention device to reduce the risk
of the wheel disengaging from the fork if the wheel
is incorrectly secured. Secondary retention devices
are not a substitute for correctly securing your front
wheel.
There are currently two types of over-center cam
wheel retention mechanisms: the traditional overcenter cam (fig. 8a) and the cam-and-cup system (fig.
8b). Both use an over-center cam action to clamp
the bike’s wheel in place. Your bicycle may have a
cam-and-cup front wheel retention system and a
traditional rear wheel cam action system.
Secondary retention devices fall into two basic
categories:
A. Adjusting The Traditional
Mechanism (Fig. 8a)
a. The clip-on type is a part which the manufacturer
adds to the front wheel hub or front fork.
Cam
Action
The wheel hub is clamped in place by the force
of the over-center cam pushing against one
dropout and pulling the tension adjusting nut,
by way of the skewer, against the other dropout.
The amount of clamping force is controlled by
the tension adjusting nut. Turning the tension
adjusting nut clockwise while keeping the cam
lever from rotating increases clamping force;
turning it counterclockwise while keeping the
cam lever from rotating reduces clamping force.
Less than half a turn of the tension adjusting nut
can make the difference between safe clamping
force and unsafe clamping force.
b. The integral type is molded, cast or machined
into the outer faces of the front fork dropouts.
Ask your dealer to explain the particular secondary
retention device on your bike.
WARNING
DO NOT REMOVE OR DISABLE THE SECONDARY
RETENTION DEVICE.
As its name implies, it serves as a back-up for a
critical adjustment. If the wheel is not secured
correctly, the secondary retention device can
reduce the risk of the wheel disengaging from
the fork. Removing or disabling the secondary
retention device may also void the warranty.
WARNING
THE FULL FORCE OF THE CAM ACTION IS
NEEDED TO CLAMP THE WHEEL SECURELY.
Holding the nut with one hand and turning
the lever like a wing nut with the other hand
until everything is as tight as you can get it
will not clamp a cam action wheel safely in the
dropouts.
Secondary retention devices are not a substitute
for correctly securing your wheel. Failure to
properly secure the wheel can cause the wheel
to wobble or disengage, which could cause you
to loose control and fall, resulting in serious
injury or death.
See also WARNING on page 20.
22
B. Adjusting The Cam-and-cup Mechanism (Fig.
8b)
(2) If your bike has cam action front wheel retention,
move the cam lever from the locked or CLOSED
position to the OPEN position (figs. 8a & b). If
your bike has through bolt or bolt-on front wheel
retention, loosen the fastener(s) a few turns
counter-clockwise using an appropriate wrench,
lock key or the integral lever.
The cam-and-cup system on your front wheel
will have been correctly adjusted for your bicycle
by your dealer. Ask your dealer to check the
adjustment every six months. Do not use a camand-cup front wheel on any bicycle other than
the one for which your dealer adjusted it.
3. Removing And Installing Wheels
(3) If your front fork has a clip-on type secondary
retention device, disengage it and go to step
(4). If your front fork has an integral secondary
retention device, and a traditional cam action
system (fig. 8a) loosen the tension adjusting nut
enough to allow removing the wheel from the
dropouts. If your front wheel uses a cam-and-cup
system, (fig. 8b) squeeze the cup and cam lever
together while removing the wheel. No rotation
of any part is necessary with the cam-and-cup
system.
WARNING
IF YOUR BIKE IS EQUIPPED WITH A HUB BRAKE
SUCH AS A REAR COASTER BRAKE, FRONT OR
REAR DRUM, BAND OR ROLLER BRAKE; OR
IF IT HAS AN INTERNAL GEAR REAR HUB, DO
NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE THE WHEEL.
The removal and re-installation of most hub
brakes and internal gear hubs requires special
knowledge. Incorrect removal or assembly can
result in brake or gear failure, which can cause
you to lose control and fall.
You may need to tap the top of the wheel with
the palm of your hand to release the wheel from
the front fork.
B. Installing A Disk Brake Or Rim Brake Front
Wheel
CAUTION
CAUTION
If your bike has a disc brake, exercise care in
touching the rotor or caliper. Disc rotors have
sharp edges, and both rotor and caliper can get
very hot during use.
If your bike is equipped with a front disk brake,
be careful not to damage the disk, caliper or
brake pads when re-inserting the disk into the
caliper. Never activate a disk brake’s control lever
unless the disk is correctly inserted in the caliper.
See also Section 4.C.
A. Removing A Disk Brake Or Rim Brake Front
Wheel
(1) If your bike has rim brakes, disengage the
brake’s quick-release mechanism to increase the
clearance between the tire and the brake pads
(See Section 4.C fig. 11 through 15).
(1) If your bike has cam action front wheel retention,
move the cam lever so that it curves away from
the wheel (fig. 8b). This is the OPEN position. If
your bike has through bolt or bolt-on front wheel
retention, go to the next step.
23
PART I
(2) With the steering fork facing forward, insert the
wheel between the fork blades so that the axle
seats firmly at the top of the fork dropouts. The
cam lever, if there is one, should be on rider’s left
side of the bicycle (fig. 8a & b). If your bike has a
clip-on type secondary retention device, engage
it.
WARNING
SECURELY CLAMPING THE WHEEL WITH A
CAM ACTION RETENTION DEVICE TAKES
CONSIDERABLE FORCE.
If you can fully close the cam lever without
wrapping your fingers around the fork blade for
leverage, the lever does not leave a clear imprint
in the palm of your hand, and the serrations on
the wheel fastener do not emboss the surfaces
of the dropouts, the tension is insufficient.
Open the lever; turn the tension adjusting nut
clockwise a quarter turn; then try again.
(3) If you have a traditional cam action mechanism:
holding the cam lever in the ADJUST position
with your right hand, tighten the tension
adjusting nut with your left hand until it is finger
tight against the fork dropout (fig. 8a). If you
have a cam-and-cup system: the nut and cup (fig.
8b) will have snapped into the recessed area of
the fork dropouts and no adjustment should be
required.
See also WARNING on page 20.
(4) While pushing the wheel firmly to the top of the
slots in the fork dropouts, and at the same time
centering the wheel rim in the fork:
(6) If you disengaged the brake quick-release
mechanism in 3. a. (1) above, re-engage it to
restore correct brake pad-to-rim clearance.
(a) With a cam action system, move the cam lever
upwards and swing it into the CLOSED position
(fig. 8a & b). The lever should now be parallel
to the fork blade and curved toward the wheel.
To apply enough clamping force, you should
have to wrap your fingers around the fork blade
for leverage, and the lever should leave a clear
imprint in the palm of your hand.
(7) Spin the wheel to make sure that it is centered
in the frame and clears the brake pads; then
squeeze the brake lever and make sure that the
brakes are operating correctly.
C. Removing A Disk Brake Or Rim Brake Rear
Wheel
(b) With a through-bolt or bolt-on system, tighten the
fasteners to the torque specifications in Appendix
D or the hub manufacturer’s instructions.
(1) If you have a multi-speed bike with a derailleur
gear system: shift the rear derailleur to high gear
(the smallest, outermost rear sprocket).
NOTE: If, on a traditional cam action system, the lever
cannot be pushed all the way to a position parallel to
the fork blade, return the lever to the OPEN position.
Then turn the tension adjusting nut counterclockwise
one-quarter turn and try tightening the lever again.
If you have an internal gear rear hub, consult your
dealer or the hub manufacturer’s instructions
before attempting to remove the rear wheel.
If you have a single-speed bike with rim or disk
brake, go to step (4) below.
(6) With a through-bolt or bolt-on system, tighten the
fasteners to the torque specifications in Appendix
D or the hub manufacturer’s instructions.
(2) If your bike has rim brakes, disengage the
brake’s quick-release mechanism to increase the
clearance between the wheel rim and the brake
pads (see Section 4.C, figs. 11 through 15).
24
(3) On a derailleur gear system, pull the derailleur
body back with your right hand.
(5) On a single speed or an internal gear hub, replace
the chain on the chainring; pull the wheel back in
the dropouts so that it is straight in the frame and
the chain has about 1/4 inches of up-and-down
play.
(4) With a cam action mechanism, move the quickrelease lever to the OPEN position (fig. 8b). With
a through bolt or bolt on mechanism, loosen the
fastener(s) with an appropriate wrench, lock lever
or integral lever; then push the wheel forward far
enough to be able to remove the chain from the
rear sprocket.
(6) With a cam action system, move the cam lever
upwards and swing it into the CLOSED position
(fig. 8 a & b). The lever should now be parallel
to the seat stay or chain stay and curved toward
the wheel. To apply enough clamping force, you
should have to wrap your fingers around the
seat stay or chainstay for leverage, and the lever
should leave a clear imprint in the palm of your
hand.
(5) Lift the rear wheel off the ground a few inches and
remove it from the rear dropouts.
D. Installing A Disk Brake Or Rim Brake Rear
Wheel
(7) With a through-bolt or bolt-on system, tighten the
fasteners to the torque specifications in Appendix
D or the hub manufacturer’s instructions.
CAUTION
If your bike is equipped with a rear disk brake, be
careful not to damage the disk, caliper or brake
pads when re-inserting the disk into the caliper.
Never activate a disk brake’s control lever unless
the disk is correctly inserted in the caliper.
NOTE: If, on a traditional cam action system, the lever
cannot be pushed all the way to a position parallel
to the seat stay or chain stay, return the lever to the
OPEN position. Then turn the tension adjusting nut
counterclockwise one-quarter turn and try tightening
the lever again.
(1) With a cam action system, move the cam lever
to the OPEN position (see fig. 8 a & b). The lever
should be on the side of the wheel opposite the
derailleur and freewheel sprockets.
WARNING
SECURELY CLAMPING THE WHEEL WITH A
CAM ACTION RETENTION DEVICE TAKES
CONSIDERABLE FORCE.
(2) On a derailleur bike, make sure that the rear
derailleur is still in its outermost, high gear,
position; then pull the derailleur body back with
your right hand. Put the chain on top of the
smallest freewheel sprocket.
If you can fully close the cam lever without
wrapping your fingers around the seat stay or
chain stay for leverage, the lever does not leave
a clear imprint in the palm of your hand, and the
serrations on the wheel fastener do not emboss
the surfaces of the dropouts, the tension is
insufficient. Open the lever; turn the tension
adjusting nut clockwise a quarter turn; then try
again.
(3) On single-speed, remove the chain from the front
sprocket, so that you have plenty of slack in the
chain. Put the chain on the rear wheel sprocket.
(4) Then, insert the wheel into the frame dropouts
and pull it all the way in to the dropouts.
See also WARNING on page 20.
25
PART I
Adjusting The Seat Post Cam Action
Mechanism
(8) If you disengaged the brake quick-release
mechanism in 3. c. (2) above, re-engage it to
restore correct brake pad-to-rim clearance.
The action of the cam squeezes the seat collar
around the seat post to hold the seat post securely
in place. The amount of clamping force is controlled
by the tension adjusting nut. Turning the tension
adjusting nut clockwise while keeping the cam lever
from rotating increases clamping force; turning it
counterclockwise while keeping the cam lever from
rotating reduces clamping force. Less than half a turn
of the tension adjusting nut can make the difference
between safe and unsafe clamping force.
(9) Spin the wheel to make sure that it is centered
in the frame and clears the brake pads; then
squeeze the brake lever and make sure that the
brakes are operating correctly.
4.B. SEAT POST CAM
ACTION CLAMP
Some bikes are equipped with a cam action seat
post binder. The seat post cam action binder works
exactly like the traditional wheel cam action fastener
(Section 4.A.2) While a cam action binder looks like
a long bolt with a lever on one end and a nut on the
other, the binder uses an over-center cam action to
firmly clamp the seat post (see fig. 8a).
WARNING
THE FULL FORCE OF THE CAM ACTION
IS NEEDED TO CLAMP THE SEAT POST
SECURELY.
Holding the nut with one hand and turning the
lever like a wing nut with the other hand until
everything is as tight as you can get it will not
clamp the seat post safely.
WARNING
Riding with an improperly tightened seat post
can allow the saddle to turn or move and cause
you to lose control and fall. Therefore:
WARNING
1. Ask your dealer to help you make sure you
know how to correctly clamp your seat post.
If you can fully close the cam lever without
wrapping your fingers around the seat post or a
frame tube for leverage, and the lever does not
leave a clear imprint in the palm of your hand,
the tension is insufficient. Open the lever; turn
the tension adjusting nut clockwise a quarter
turn; then try again.
2. Understand and apply the correct technique
for clamping your seat post.
3. Before you ride the bike, first check that the
seat post is securely clamped.
26
4.C - BRAKES
1. Brake Controls And Features
It’s very important to your safety that you learn and
remember which brake lever controls which brake on
your bike.
There are three general types of bicycle brakes: rim
brakes, which operate by squeezing the wheel rim
between two brake pads; disc brakes, which operate
by squeezing a hub-mounted disc between two
brake pads; and internal hub brakes. All three can
be operated by way of a handlebar mounted lever.
On some models of bicycle, the internal hub brake
is operated by pedaling backwards. This is called a
Coaster Brake and is described on page 30.
For example:
In the US and Europe, The rear brake is controlled
by the right-hand brake lever; the front brake is
controlled by the left-hand lever.
In the United Kingdom and Japan, the rear brake
is controlled by the left lever; the front brake is
controlled by the right lever.
WARNING
Confirm with your dealer how your bike is set up.
1. Riding with improperly adjusted brakes or worn
brake pads is dangerous and can result in serious
injury or death.
Make sure that your hands can reach and squeeze
the brake levers comfortably. If your hands are too
small to operate the levers comfortably, consult your
dealer before riding the bike. The lever reach may be
adjustable; or you may need a different brake lever
design.
2. Applying brakes too hard or too suddenly can lock
up a wheel, which could cause you to lose control
and fall. Sudden or excessive application of the front
brake may pitch the rider over the handlebars, which
may result in serious injury or death.
Most brakes have some form of quick-release
mechanism to allow the brake pads to clear the tire
when a wheel is removed or reinstalled. When the
brake quick release is in the open position, the brakes
are inoperative. Ask your dealer to make sure that you
understand the way the brake quick release works on
your bike (see figs. 11, 12, 13, 14 & 15) and check each
time to make sure both brakes work correctly before
you get on the bike.
3. Some bicycle brakes, such as disc brakes (fig.
11) And linear-pull brakes (fig.12), Are extremely
powerful. Take extra care in becoming familiar with
these brakes and exercise particular care when using
them.
4. Some bicycle brakes are equipped with a brake
force modulator, a small, cylindrical device through
which the brake control cable runs and which is
designed to provide a more progressive application
of braking force. A modulator makes the initial brake
lever force more gentle, progressively increasing force
until full force is achieved. If your bike is equipped with
a brake force modulator, take extra care in becoming
familiar with its performance characteristics.
2. How Brakes Work
The braking action of a bicycle is a function of the
friction between the brake surfaces — usually the
brake pads and the wheel rim. To make sure that you
have maximum friction available, keep your wheel
rims and brake pads clean and free of dirt, lubricants,
waxes or polishes.
5. Disc brakes can get extremely hot with extended
use. Be careful not to touch a disc brake until it has
had plenty of time to cool.
6. See the brake manufacturer’s instructions for
installation, operation and care of your brakes. If
you do not have the manufacturer’s instructions, see
your dealer or contact the brake manufacturer.
27
PART I
Brakes are designed to control your speed, not just to
stop the bike. Maximum braking force for each wheel
occurs at the point just before the wheel “locks up”
(stops rotating) and starts to skid. Once the tire skids,
you actually lose most of your stopping force and all
directional control. You need to practice slowing and
stopping smoothly without locking up a wheel. The
technique is called progressive brake modulation.
Instead of jerking the brake lever to the position
where you think you’ll generate appropriate braking
force, squeeze the lever, progressively increasing the
braking force. If you feel the wheel begin to lock up,
release pressure just a little to keep the wheel rotating
just short of lockup.
Two keys to effective speed control and safe stopping
are controlling wheel lockup and weight transfer.
This weight transfer is even more pronounced if your
bike has a front suspension fork. Front suspension
“dips” under braking, increasing the weight transfer
(see also SECTION 4.F). Practice braking and weight
transfer techniques where there is no traffic or other
hazards and distractions.
Everything changes when you ride on loose surfaces
or in wet weather. Tire adhesion is reduced, so the
wheels have less cornering and braking traction and
can lock up with less brake force. Moisture or dirt on
the brake pads reduces their ability to grip. The way
to maintain control on loose or wet surfaces is to go
more slowly.
It’s important to develop a feel for the amount of
brake lever pressure required for each wheel at
different speeds and on different surfaces. To better
understand this, experiment a little by walking your
bike and applying different amounts of pressure to
each brake lever, until the wheel locks.
When you apply one or both brakes, the bike begins
to slow, but your body wants to continue at the
speed at which it was going. This causes a transfer of
weight to the front wheel (or, under heavy braking,
around the front wheel hub, which could send you
flying over the handlebars).
A wheel with more weight on it will accept greater
brake pressure before lockup; a wheel with less
weight will lock up with less brake pressure. So, as you
apply brakes and your weight is transferred forward,
you need to shift your body toward the rear of the
bike, to transfer weight back on to the rear wheel;
and at the same time, you need to both decrease rear
braking and increase front braking force. This is even
more important on descents, because descents shift
weight forward.
28
OPEN
Figure 11.
Figure 14.
OPEN
PUSH
Figure 12.
Figure 15.
OPEN
Figure 13.
29
PART I
COASTER BRAKES
1. How the coaster brake works
The coaster brake is a sealed mechanism which is a part of the bicycle’s rear wheel hub. The brake is activated
by reversing the rotation of the pedal cranks (indicated by arrow above). Start with the pedal cranks in a nearly
horizontal position, with the front pedal in about the 4 o’clock position, and apply downward foot pressure on
the pedal that is to the rear. About 1/8 turn rotation will activate the brake. The more downward pressure you
apply, the more braking force, up to the point where the rear wheel stops rotating and begins to skid.
WARNING
Before riding, make sure that the brake is working properly. If it is not working properly, have the bicycle
checked by your dealer before you ride it.
WARNING
If your bike has only a coaster brake, ride conservatively. A single rear brake does not have the stopping
power of front-and-rear brake systems.
2. Adjusting your coaster brake
Coaster brake service and adjustment requires special tools and special knowledge. Do not attempt to
disassemble or service your coaster brake. Take the bicycle to your dealer for coaster brake service.
30
4.D - SHIFTING GEARS
Whether upshifting or downshifting, the bicycle
derailleur system design requires that the drive
chain be moving forward and be under at least some
tension. A derailleur will shift only if you are pedaling
forward.
Your multi-speed bicycle will have a derailleur
drivetrain (see 1. below), an internal gear hub
drivetrain (see 2. below) or, in some special cases, a
combination of the two.
CAUTION
1. How a derailleur drivetrain works If your bicycle
has a derailleur drivetrain, the gear-changing
mechanism will have:
Never move the shifter while pedaling backward,
nor pedal backwards immediately after having
moved the shifter. This could jam the chain and
cause serious damage to the bicycle.
t BSFBSDBTTFUUFPSGSFFXIFFMTQSPDLFUDMVTUFS
t BSFBSEFSBJMMFVS
t VTVBMMZBGSPOUEFSBJMMFVS
t POFPSUXPTIJGUFST
b. Shifting the Rear Derailleur
t POF UXP PS UISFF GSPOU TQSPDLFUT DBMMFE
chainrings
The rear derailleur is controlled by the right shifter.
The function of the rear derailleur is to move the drive
chain from one gear sprocket to another. The smaller
sprockets on the gear cluster produce higher gear
ratios. Pedaling in the higher gears requires greater
pedaling effort, but takes you a greater distance
with each revolution of the pedal cranks. The larger
sprockets produce lower gear ratios. Using them
requires less pedaling effort, but takes you a shorter
distance with each pedal crank revolution. Moving
the chain from a smaller sprocket of the gear cluster
to a larger sprocket results in a downshift. Moving
the chain from a larger sprocket to a smaller sprocket
results in an upshift. In order for the derailleur to
move the chain from one sprocket to another, the
rider must be pedaling forward.
t BESJWFDIBJO
a. Shifting Gears
There are several different types and styles of shifting
controls: levers, twist grips, triggers, combination
shift/brake controls, push-buttons, and so on. Ask
your dealer to explain the type of shifting controls
that are on your bike, and to show you how they
work.
The vocabulary of shifting can be pretty confusing.
A downshift is a shift to a “lower” or “slower” gear,
one which is easier to pedal. An upshift is a shift to
a “higher” or “faster”, harder to pedal gear. What’s
confusing is that what’s happening at the front
derailleur is the opposite of what’s happening at the
rear derailleur (for details, read the instructions on
Shifting the Rear Derailleur and Shifting the Front
Derailleur below).
c. Shifting the Front Derailleur:
The front derailleur, which is controlled by the left
shifter, shifts the chain between the larger and
smaller chainrings. Shifting the chain onto a smaller
chainring makes pedaling easier (a downshift).
Shifting to a larger chainring makes pedaling harder
(an upshift).
For example, you can select a gear which will make
pedaling easier on a hill (make a downshift) in one
of two ways: shift the chain down the gear “steps” to
a smaller gear at the front, or up the gear “steps” to a
larger gear at the rear. So, at the rear gear cluster, what
is called a downshift looks like an upshift. The way
to keep things straight is to remember that shifting
the chain in towards the centerline of the bike is for
accelerating and climbing and is called a downshift.
Moving the chain out or away from the centerline of
the bike is for speed and is called an upshift.
31
PART I
d. Which gear should I be in?
WARNING
The combination of largest rear and smallest front
gears (fig. 16) is for the steepest hills. The smallest
rear and largest front combination is for the greatest
speed. It is not necessary to shift gears in sequence.
Instead, find the “starting gear” which is right for your
level of ability — a gear which is hard enough for
quick acceleration but easy enough to let you start
from a stop without wobbling — and experiment
with upshifting and downshifting to get a feel for the
different gear combinations. At first, practice shifting
where there are no obstacles, hazards or other
traffic, until you’ve built up your confidence. Learn to
anticipate the need to shift, and shift to a lower gear
before the hill gets too steep. If you have difficulties
with shifting, the problem could be mechanical
adjustment. See your dealer for help.
NEVER SHIFT A DERAILLEUR ONTO THE
LARGEST OR THE SMALLEST SPROCKET IF THE
DERAILLEUR IS NOT SHIFTING SMOOTHLY.
The derailleur may be out of adjustment and the
chain could jam, causing you to lose control and
fall.
e. What if it won’t shift gears?
If moving the shift control one click repeatedly fails
to result in a smooth shift to the next gear chances
are that the mechanism is out of adjustment. Take the
bike to your dealer to have it adjusted.
2. How an internal gear hub drivetrain works
If your bicycle has an internal gear hub drivetrain, the
gear changing mechanism will consist of:
t B TQFFE PS QPTTJCMZ BO JOöOJUFMZ
variable internal gear hub
t POFPSTPNFUJNFTUXPTIJGUFST
t POFPSUXPDPOUSPMDBCMFT
t POFGSPOUTQSPDLFUDBMMFEBDIBJOSJOH
t BESJWFDIBJO
a. Shifting internal gear hub gears
Shifting with an internal gear hub drivetrain is simply
a matter of moving the shifter to the indicated
position for the desired gear. After you have moved
the shifter to the gear position of your choice, ease
the pressure on the pedals for an instant to allow the
hub to complete the shift.
b. Which gear should I be in?
The numerically lowest gear (1) is for the steepest
hills. The numerically largest gear is for the greatest
speed.
Figure 16.
A. Hills
B. Greatest Speed
1. Smallest front
4. Largest front
2. Chain
5. Smallest rear
3. Largest rear
32
Shifting from an easier, “slower” gear (like 1) to a harder,
“faster” gear (like 2 or 3) is called an upshift. Shifting
from a harder, “faster” gear to an easier, “slower” gear
is called a downshift. It is not necessary to shift gears
in sequence. Instead, find the “starting gear” for the
conditions — a gear which is hard enough for quick
acceleration but easy enough to let you start from
a stop without wobbling — and experiment with
upshifting and downshifting to get a feel for the
different gears. At first, practice shifting where there
are no obstacles, hazards or other traffic, until you’ve
built up your confidence. Learn to anticipate the need
to shift, and shift to a lower gear before the hill gets
too steep. If you have difficulties with shifting, the
problem could be mechanical adjustment. See your
dealer for help.
c. What if it won’t shift gears?
If moving the shift control one click repeatedly fails
to result in a smooth shift to the next gear chances
are that the mechanism is out of adjustment. Take the
bike to your dealer to have it adjusted.
4.E - PEDALS
1. Toe Overlap is when your toe can touch the front
wheel when you turn the handlebars to steer
while a pedal is in the forwardmost position.
This is common on small-framed bicycles, and is
avoided by keeping the inside pedal up and the
outside pedal down when making sharp turns.
This technique will also prevent the inside pedal
from striking the ground in a turn.
WARNING
TOE OVERLAP COULD CAUSE YOU TO LOSE
CONTROL AND FALL. ASK YOUR DEALER TO
HELP YOU DETERMINE IF THE COMBINATION
OF FRAME SIZE, CRANK ARM LENGTH, PEDAL
DESIGN AND SHOES YOU WILL USE RESULTS
IN PEDAL OVERLAP.
to avoid serious injury from the pedals’ sharp
surfaces. Based on your riding style or skill level,
you may prefer a less aggressive pedal design,
or chose to ride with shin pads. Your dealer can
show you a number of options and make suitable
recommendations.
3. Toeclips and straps are a means to keep feet
correctly positioned and engaged with the
pedals. The toeclip positions the ball of the foot
over the pedal spindle, which gives maximum
pedaling power. The toe strap, when tightened,
keeps the foot engaged throughout the rotation
cycle of the pedal. While toeclips and straps give
some benefit with any kind of shoe, they work
most effectively with cycling shoes designed
for use with toeclips. Your dealer can explain
how toeclips and straps work. Shoes with deep
treaded soles or welts which might allow the foot
to be trapped should not be used with toeclips
and straps.
WARNING
GETTING INTO AND OUT OF PEDALS WITH
TOECLIPS AND STRAPS REQUIRES SKILL
WHICH CAN ONLY BE ACQUIRED WITH
PRACTICE.
Until it becomes a reflex action, the technique
requires concentration which can distract your
attention and cause you to lose control and fall.
Practice the use of toeclips and straps where
there are no obstacles, hazards or traffic. Keep
the straps loose, and don’t tighten them until
your technique and confidence in getting in and
out of the pedals warrants it. Never ride in traffic
with your toe straps tight.
4. Clipless pedals (sometimes called “stepin pedals”)
are another means to keep feet
securely in the correct position for maximum
pedaling efficiency. They have a plate, called a
“cleat,” on the sole of the shoe, which clicks into a
mating spring-loaded fixture on the pedal.
Whether you have overlap or not, you must keep
the inside pedal up and the outside pedal down
when making sharp turns.
2. Some bicycles come equipped with pedals that
have sharp and potentially dangerous surfaces.
These surfaces are designed to add safety by
increasing grip between the rider’s shoe and
the pedal. If your bicycle has this type of highperformance pedal, you must take extra care
33
PART I
4.F - BICYCLE SUSPENSION
They only engage or disengage with a very specific
motion which must be practiced until it becomes
instinctive. Clipless pedals require shoes and cleats
which are compatible with the make and model
pedal being used.
Many bicycles are equipped with suspension systems.
There are many different types of suspension systems
— too many to deal with individually in this Manual. If
your bicycle has a suspension system of any kind, be
sure to read and follow the suspension manufacturer’s
setup and service instructions. If you do not have
the manufacturer’s instructions, see your dealer or
contact the manufacturer.
Many clipless pedals are designed to allow the rider
to adjust the amount of force needed to engage or
disengage the foot. Follow the pedal manufacturer’s
instructions, or ask your dealer to show you how to
make this adjustment. Use the easiest setting until
engaging and disengaging becomes a reflex action,
but always make sure that there is sufficient tension
to prevent unintended release of your foot from the
pedal.
WARNING
FAILURE TO MAINTAIN, CHECK AND
PROPERLY ADJUST THE SUSPENSION SYSTEM
MAY RESULT IN SUSPENSION MALFUNCTION,
WHICH MAY CAUSE YOU TO LOSE CONTROL
AND FALL.
WARNING
CLIPLESS PEDALS ARE INTENDED FOR USE
WITH SHOES SPECIFICALLY MADE TO FIT
THEM AND ARE DESIGNED TO FIRMLY KEEP
THE FOOT ENGAGED WITH THE PEDAL.
If your bike has suspension, the increased speed you
may develop also increases your risk of injury. For
example, when braking, the front of a suspended bike
dips. You could lose control and fall if you do not have
experience with this system. Learn to handle your
suspension system safely. See also SECTION 4.C.
DO NOT USE SHOES WHICH DO NOT ENGAGE
THE PEDALS CORRECTLY.
Practice is required to learn to engage and disengage
the foot safely. Until engaging and disengaging the
foot becomes a reflex action, the technique requires
concentration which can distract your attention and
cause you to lose control and fall. Practice engaging
and disengaging clipless pedals in a place where
there are no obstacles, hazards or traffic; and be sure
to follow the pedal manufacturer’s setup and service
instructions. If you do not have the manufacturer’s
instructions, see your dealer or contact the
manufacturer.
WARNING
CHANGING SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENT CAN
CHANGE THE HANDLING AND BRAKING
CHARACTERISTICS OF YOUR BICYCLE.
Never change suspension adjustment unless
you are thoroughly familiar with the suspension
system manufacturer’s instructions and
recommendations, and always check for changes
in the handling and braking characteristics of the
bicycle after a suspension adjustment by taking
a careful test ride in a hazard-free area.
34
Suspension can increase control and comfort by
allowing the wheels to better follow the terrain. This
enhanced capability may allow you to ride faster;
but you must not confuse the enhanced capabilities
of the bicycle with your own capabilities as a rider.
Increasing your skill will take time and practice.
Proceed carefully until you have learned to handle
the full capabilities of your bike.
CAUTION
Not all bicycles can be safely retrofitted with
some types of suspension systems. Before
retrofitting a bicycle with any suspension, check
with the bicycle’s manufacturer to make sure
that what you want to do is compatible with the
bicycle’s design. Failing to do so can result in
catastrophic frame failure.
4.G TIRES AND TUBES
Figure 17.
1. Tires
Bicycle tires are available in many designs and
specifications, ranging from general-purpose designs
to tires designed to perform best under very specific
weather or terrain conditions. If, once you’ve gained
experience with your new bike, you feel that a
different tire might better suit your riding needs,
your dealer can help you select the most appropriate
design.
The size, pressure rating, and on some highperformance tires the specific recommended use, are
marked on the sidewall of the tire (see fig. 17). The
part of this information which is most important to
you is Tire Pressure.
The best and safest way to inflate a bicycle tire to the
correct pressure is with a bicycle pump which has a
built-in pressure gauge.
WARNING
THERE IS A SAFETY RISK IN USING GAS STATION
AIR HOSES OR OTHER AIR COMPRESSORS.
They are not made for bicycle tires. They move a
large volume of air very rapidly, and will raise the
pressure in your tire very rapidly, which could
cause the tube to explode.
Tire pressure is given either as maximum pressure
or as a pressure range. How a tire performs under
different terrain or weather conditions depends
largely on tire pressure. Inflating the tire to near its
maximum recommended pressure gives the lowest
rolling resistance; but also produces the harshest ride.
High pressures work best on smooth, dry pavement.
WARNING
NEVER INFLATE A TIRE BEYOND THE
MAXIMUM PRESSURE MARKED ON THE TIRE’S
SIDEWALL.
Exceeding the recommended maximum pressure
may blow the tire off the rim, which could cause
damage to the bike and injury to the rider and
bystanders.
35
PART I
7FSZMPXQSFTTVSFTBUUIFCPUUPNPGUIFSFDPNNFOEFE
pressure range, give the best performance on smooth,
slick terrain such as hard-packed clay, and on deep,
loose surfaces such as deep, dry sand.
Tire pressure that is too low for your weight and the
riding conditions can cause a puncture of the tube by
allowing the tire to deform sufficiently to pinch the
inner tube between the rim and the riding surface.
CAUTION
Pencil type automotive tire gauges can be
inaccurate and should not be relied upon for
consistent, accurate pressure readings. Instead,
use a high quality dial gauge.
Ask your dealer to recommend the best tire pressure
for the kind of riding you will most often do, and have
the dealer inflate your tires to that pressure. Then,
check inflation as described in SECTION 1.C so you’ll
know how correctly inflated tires should look and feel
when you don’t have access to a gauge. Some tires
may need to be brought up to pressure every week
or two. So, it is important to check your tire pressures
before every ride.
Some special high-performance tires have
unidirectional treads: their tread pattern is designed
to work better in one direction than in the other. The
sidewall marking of a unidirectional tire will have an
arrow showing the correct rotation direction. If your
bike has unidirectional tires, be sure that they are
mounted to rotate in the correct direction.
36
2. Tire Valves
There are primarily two kinds of bicycle tube valves:
5IF4DISBEFS7BMWFBOEUIF1SFTUB7BMWF5IFCJDZDMF
pump you use must have the fitting appropriate to
the valve stems on your bicycle.
We highly recommend that you carry a spare
inner tube when you ride your bike.
PATCHING A TUBE IS AN EMERGENCY REPAIR.
The Schrader valve (fig. 18) is like the valve on a car
tire. To inflate a Schrader valve tube, remove the
valve cap and clamp the pump fitting onto the end
of the valve stem. To let air out of a Schrader valve,
depress the pin in the end of the valve stem with the
end of a key or other appropriate object.
If you do not apply the patch correctly or apply
several patches, the tube can fail, resulting in
possible tube failure, which could cause you to
loose control and fall. Replace a patched tube as
soon as possible.
The Presta valve (fig. 18) has a narrower diameter and
is only found on bicycle tires. To inflate a Presta valve
tube using a Presta headed bicycle pump, remove the
valve cap; unscrew (counterclockwise) the valve stem
lock nut; and push down on the valve stem to free it
up. Then push the pump head on to the valve head,
and inflate. To inflate a Presta valve with a Schrader
pump fitting, you’ll need a Presta adapter (available
at your bike shop) which screws on to the valve stem
once you’ve freed up the valve. The adapter fits into
the Schrader pump fitting. Close the valve after
inflation. To let air out of a Presta valve, open up the
valve stem lock nut and depress the valve stem.
Schrader valve
Presta valve
WARNING
Valve Stem
Locknut
Figure 18.
37
PART I
SECTION 5. SERVICE
If you want to learn to do major service and repair
work on your bike, you have three options:
1. Ask your dealer for copies of the manufacturer’s
installation and service instructions for the
components on your bike, or contact the
component manufacturer.
WARNING
2. Ask your dealer to recommend a book on bicycle
repair.
TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES HAVE MADE
BICYCLES AND BICYCLE COMPONENTS MORE
COMPLEX, AND THE PACE OF INNOVATION IS
INCREASING.
3. Ask your dealer about the availability of bicycle
repair courses in your area.
We recommend that you ask your dealer to check
the quality of your work the first time you work on
something and before you ride the bike, just to make
sure that you did everything correctly. Since that
will require the time of a mechanic, there may be a
modest charge for this service.
IT IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR THIS MANUAL TO
PROVIDE ALL THE INFORMATION REQUIRED
TO PROPERLY REPAIR AND/OR MAINTAIN
YOUR BICYCLE.
In order to help minimize the chances of an
accident and possible injury, it is critical that
you have any repair or maintenance which is not
specifically described in this manual performed
by your dealer. Equally important is that your
individual maintenance requirements will be
determined by everything from your riding style
to geographic location.
We also recommend that you ask your dealer for
guidance on what spare parts, such as inner tubes,
light bulbs, etc. it would be appropriate for you to
have once you have learned how to replace such
parts when they require replacement.
Consult your dealer for help in determining
your maintenance requirements.
WARNING
MANY BICYCLE SERVICE AND REPAIR TASKS
REQUIRE SPECIAL KNOWLEDGE AND TOOLS.
Do not begin any adjustments or service on your
bicycle until you have learned from your dealer
how to properly complete them. Improper
adjustment or service may result in damage to
the bicycle or in an accident which can cause
serious injury or death.
38
5.A - SERVICE INTERVALS
4. AFTER EVERY LONG OR HARD RIDE OR AFTER
EVERY 10 TO 20 HOURS OF RIDING:
Some service and maintenance can and should be
performed by the owner, and require no special
tools or knowledge beyond what is presented in this
manual.
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and back. Everything feel solid? If you feel a clunk
with each forward or backward movement of the
bike, you probably have a loose headset. Have
your dealer check it.
The following are examples of the type of service
you should perform yourself. All other service,
maintenance and repair should be performed in
a properly equipped facility by a qualified bicycle
mechanic using the correct tools and procedures
specified by the manufacturer.
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from side to side. Feel smooth? If you feel any
binding or roughness in the steering, you may
have a tight headset. Have your dealer check it.
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the center line of the bike; then do the same with
the other pedal. Anything feel loose? If so, have
your dealer check it.
1. BREAK-IN PERIOD: Your bike will last longer
and work better if you break it in before riding
it hard. Control cables and wheel spokes may
stretch or “seat” when a new bike is first used and
may require readjustment by your dealer. Your
Mechanical Safety Check (SECTION 1.C) will help
you identify some things that need readjustment.
But even if everything seems fine to you, it’s best
to take your bike back to the dealer for a checkup.
Dealers typically suggest you bring the bike in for
a 30 day checkup. Another way to judge when it’s
time for the first checkup is to bring the bike in
after three to five hours of hard off-road use, or
about
10 to 15 hours of on-road or more
casual off-road use. But if you think something is
wrong with the bike, take it to your dealer before
riding it again.
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worn or not hitting the wheel rim squarely? Time
to have the dealer adjust or replace them.
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housings. Any rust? Kinks? Fraying? If so, have
your dealer replace them.
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side of each wheel between your thumb and
index finger. Do they all feel about the same? If
any feel loose, have your dealer check the wheel
for tension and trueness.
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are still secure, and tighten any which are not.
2. BEFORE EVERY RIDE: Mechanical Safety Check
(SECTION 1.C)
3. AFTER EVERY LONG OR HARD RIDE: If the
bike has been exposed to water or grit; or at
least every 100 miles: Clean the bike and lightly
oil the chain. Wipe off excess oil. Lubrication is a
function of climate. Talk to your dealer about the
best lubricants and the recommended lubrication
frequency for your area.
39
PART I
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all tube joints; the handlebars; the stem; and
the seatpost for any deep scratches, cracks or
discoloration. These are signs of stress-caused
fatigue and indicate that a part is at the end of
its useful life and needs to be replaced. See also
PART II, SECTION D. INSPECT FOR SAFETY.
5.
AS REQUIRED: If either brake lever
fails
the
Mechanical
Safety
Check
(SECTION 1.C), don’t ride the bike. Have your
dealer check the brakes. If the chain won’t shift
smoothly and quietly from gear to gear, the
derailleur is out of adjustment. See your dealer.
WARNING
LIKE ANY MECHANICAL DEVICE, A BICYCLE
AND ITS COMPONENTS ARE SUBJECT TO
WEAR AND STRESS. DIFFERENT MATERIALS
AND MECHANISMS WEAR OR FATIGUE FROM
STRESS AT DIFFERENT RATES AND HAVE
DIFFERENT LIFE CYCLES.
IF A COMPONENT’S LIFE CYCLE IS EXCEEDED,
THE COMPONENT CAN SUDDENLY AND
CATASTROPHICALLY FAIL, CAUSING SERIOUS
INJURY OR DEATH TO THE RIDER.
6. EVERY 25 (HARD OFF-ROAD) TO 50 (ON-ROAD)
HOURS OF RIDING: Take your bike to your dealer
for a complete checkup.
Scratches, cracks, fraying and discoloration are
signs of stress-caused fatigue and indicate that a
part is at the end of its useful life and needs to be
replaced. While the materials and workmanship
of your bicycle or of individual components
may be covered by a warranty for a specified
period of time by the manufacturer, this is no
guarantee that the product will last the term of
the warranty.
Product life is often related to the kind of riding
you do and to the treatment to which you submit
the bicycle. The bicycle’s warranty is not meant
to suggest that the bicycle cannot be broken or
will last forever. It only means that the bicycle is
covered subject to the terms of the warranty.
Please be sure to read PART II, SECTION D.
INSPECT FOR SAFETY, “The Lifespan of Your
Bicycle and Its Components.”
40
5.B - If Your Bicycle Sustains An Impact:
First, check yourself for injuries, and take care of them
as best you can. Seek medical help if necessary.
Next, check your bike for damage, and fix what you
can so you can get home. Then, take your bicycle to
your dealer for a thorough check.
Carbon composite components, including fames,
wheels, handlebars, stems, cranksets, brakes, etc.
which have sustained an impact must not be ridden
until they have been disassembled and thoroughly
inspected by a qualified mechanic.
See also Bicycle Lifespan on page 76.
WARNING
A CRASH OR OTHER IMPACT CAN PUT
EXTRAORDINARY STRESS ON BICYCLE
COMPONENTS, CAUSING THEM TO FATIGUE
PREMATURELY. COMPONENTS SUFFERING
FROM STRESS FATIGUE CAN FAIL SUDDENLY
AND CATASTROPHICALLY, CAUSING LOSS OF
CONTROL, SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.
41
PART II
SECTION A. IMPORTANT
SAFETY INFORMATION
BICYCLING INHERENT RISK
WARNING
BICYCLING IS AN ACTIVE SPORT WITH
INHERENT RISK.
A Wide Range Of Bicycling Injuries Are
Possible
“Inherent risk,“ means that due to the nature
of bicycle riding, the situations you encounter
while riding expose you to the risk of serious
injury, paralysis, or death in an accident.
Many hazards are described, and we have attempted
to explain how to avoid or minimize the dangers.
Because any fall can result in serious injury, paralysis
or death we do not repeat the warning of these
potential consequences every time we call attention
to a hazard. Some low speed falls may result in serious
injuries, and some wild high speed falls may result
in none. The reality is that the exact nature of the
consequences of a fall or accident is not predictable.
The risk can not be taken away or eliminated.
You can minimize risk by doing the following:
Ŷ
Bicycle training & practice
Ŷ
Bicycles Cannot Protect You
Progressive step-by-step learning of new
cycling skills
Ŷ
The good judgement to ride in control
Bicycles are lightweight, human-powered vehicles.
Unlike a car, much like a motorcycle, there is no
restraint system for your body, no protective structure
around your body. Crash worthiness cannot be a
design criterion. A rider sits on a bicycle and can be
easily thrown off for many reasons including overly
hard use of the front brakes (See PART I, SECTION 4.C
Brakes) or striking an obstacle.
Ŷ
Bicycle experience, riding with experienced
riders
Ŷ
Use of a proper bicycle helmet and
appropriate protective gear
Ŷ
Reading and thinking about this entire
owner’s manual, all owner’s manual
supplements and instructions that came
with your bicycle are essential to your safety
BOEQBSUPGUIFMFBSOJOHQSPDFTT7JTJUXXX
cannondale.com/bikes/tech/manuals.
Ŷ
Riding within your own unique capabilities
and considering the conditions where you
are riding.
42
WARNING LABEL
RIDING IN TRAFFIC, COMMUTING
We urge you to locate the warning label on your
bike. It contains important information that you and
anyone else who rides your bike should read and
follow.
WARNING
RIDING IN TRAFFIC (AND COMMUTING) IS
HAZARDOUS AND YOU CAN BE SEVERELY
INJURED OR KILLED DOING IT.
Do not remove it. If you bought an older Cannondale
or are refinishing any Cannondale, contact us for a no
charge replacement.
As noted in PART I of this manual, you must
learn and obey local traffic laws. Riding in traffic
is hazardous. We cannot teach you about all of
these hazards. We suggest:
Effective Cycling (ISBN 0-262-06159-7) by John
Forester.
And, www.bicyclesafe.com by Michael Bluejay
“How to Not Get Hit by Cars: Important lessons
on Bicycle Safety”
Here are just some important topics you must
consider:
Traffic Law, Accidents,Intersections,
Commuting And Utility Cycling Where To Ride,
On Roadway,Changing Lanes In Traffic,Riding
At Night, Improving Your Odds With Safety,
Lighting , And Weather Equipment
Many bike clubs conduct training programs and
workshops that focus on these and other safe
cycling topics. Ask at your local bike shop. Seek
the advice of an experienced bicycle commuter
at your retailer.
Figure 19.
43
PART II
RIDING AT NIGHT, DUSK, DAWN
Mountain Biking At Night
Mountain biking at night is risky. Take the
challenges outlined in SECTION C. and add
another level of difficulty and risk. Seeing
the terrain is much more difficult at night.
Mountain biking at night is only for skilled
mountain bikers, on familiar terrain, with
excellent light systems, riding with other skilled
mountain bikers, and riding cautiously.
WARNING
RIDING AT NIGHT/DUSK OR AT DAWN IS VERY
HAZARDOUS.
Avoid riding at night. If you
choose to ride at night:
Ŷ
Install front and rear lights.
Ŷ
Install a blinker or strobe light.
Ŷ
Check your state or national laws. Lights
are required for riding at dusk, night, or
dawn.
Ŷ
Wear reflective clothing.
Ŷ
Stay alert, others may not see you.
Ŷ
Make sure your bicycle is equipped with
all required reflectors, lights, strobes, or
blinkers.
Adding Lighting
REFLECTORS ARE NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR
PROPER LIGHTS. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY
TO EQUIP YOUR BICYCLE WITH ALL NATIONAL,
STATE AND LOCALLY MANDATED LIGHTS.
Riding at dawn, at dusk, at night or at other
times of poor visibility without a bicycle
lighting system which meets local and state
laws and without reflectors is dangerous
and may result in serious injury or death.
If you ride your bike before dawn or after
dusk, your bicycle must be equipped with
lights so that you can see the road and avoid
road hazards, and so that others can see
you. Traffic laws treat bicycles like any other
vehicle. That means you must have a white
front and a red rear light operating if you
are riding after dusk. Your bike dealer can
recommend a battery or generator powered
lighting system appropriate to your needs.
Required Reflectors
The location and type of each reflector on your
bike is required by a national authority, in the US,
the US Consumer Product Safety Commission
(CPSC). Your Cannondale bike must be delivered
with: 1. A front mounted forward facing reflector
2. A rear mounted, rear facing reflector, 3. A
spoke mounted reflector on each wheel, 4. Front
and rear facing reflectors on the left and right
pedal. DO NOT REMOVE, BLOCK, OR COVER
REFLECTORS.
Flashing (blinker) and Strobe Lighting
Cannondale also strongly urges you to
use a flashing light or strobe. All of us at
Cannondale who ride at night or in conditions
of lower visibility use flashers. They can
save your life. (Yeah, we know there may
be legal issues with flashers in some areas.
They can save your life. Enough said.)
Much Higher Risks At Night
The risk of an accident, particularly being struck
by a motor vehicle, is much higher at night. If
you choose to accept this higher risk, improve
your odds with a proper lighting system,
strobe light, light colored reflective clothing
and careful riding. Seek the advice of an
experienced bicycle commuter at your retailer.
44
REFINISHING
MODIFICATIONS
WARNING
WARNING
WE KNOW THAT BIKE OWNER’S REFINISH AND
REPAINT BIKES. NO OWNER’S MANUAL OR
VOIDED WARRANTY WILL PREVENT THIS. WE
CAN’T PREDICT ALL THE THINGS THAT COULD
GO WRONG IN THE REFINISHING PROCESS.
WHAT WE HOPE TO COMMUNICATE TO YOU IN
THE FORM OF THIS WARNING IS THAT:
DO NOT MODIFY YOUR BIKE FRAME OR
COMPONENTS IN ANY WAY. MODIFICATIONS
CAN CAUSE DAMAGE LEADING TO FAILURE
AND ACCIDENT. YOU CAN BE SEVERELY
INJURED OR KILLED.
1. Incorrectly refinishing or repainting your
bike can lead to a serious accident.
2. Refinishing could hide structural damage
(fatigue cracks, dented or bent tubes, or
other structural problems) also leading to
an accident. You can be injured or killed.
PRECAUTIONS:
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might attack your frame and/or fork (carbon
fiber) and weaken them.
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scouring, scratching, or blasting) can actually
remove frame material possibly weakening
them.
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refinishing might conceal serious damage.
IF YOU DECIDE TO REFINISH: (suggestions)
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be voided
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frame builder).
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aluminum and/or carbon frames.
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coarser than 150 grit.
45
Do not physically alter your frame in any way.
Don’t sandblast, shot blast or glass bead your
frame. Don’t use any coarse sandpaper on your
bike. Don’t grind, wire brush, file, scrape or
machine buff your frame. Don’t weld, braze or let
anyone touch your frame with a torch. Don’t drill
any holes in your frame. Don’t acid dip or etch
your frame. Don’t anodize or chrome plate your
frame. Any of these procedures will seriously
harm the structural integrity and/or longevity of
your frame, which could lead to serious accident
and injury.
Modifications
warranty.
will
void
any
applicable
PART II
CHILD CARRIERS
BICYCLES HAVE SHARP SURFACES
WARNING
WARNING
CHILD CARRIERS ADD WEIGHT AND RAISE THE
CENTER OF GRAVITY, MAKING BALANCE AND
CORNERING MORE DIFFICULT. IF YOU LOOSE
CONTROL, YOU AND YOUR CHILD PASSENGER
CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED OR KILLED.
BICYCLES HAVE EXPOSED SHARP SURFACES.
Exercise caution with chainrings and pointed,
aggressive platform pedals, as they have sharp
and potentially dangerous surfaces. Use caution
when working on your bike. If you slip or fall you
could be injured.
Cannondale urges you NOT to install child carriers
on bicycles. If you choose to install a child carrier,
have an experienced bicycle mechanic install it.
Install only on a compatible bicycle. If you insist
on using a child carrier we urge that you confirm
with both the carrier rack manufacturer and the
child carrier manufacturer that the two products
are safely compatible. Always use caution when
riding with a child carrier.
BAR ENDS
Cannondale urges consumers not to install “Bar Ends”
on bicycles. Some handlebars are designed to take
UIF BEEFE TUSFTT PG CBS FOET PUIFST BSF OPU 7FSZ
lightweight handlebars may be particularly poorly
suited for bar ends. If you want bar ends, consult
your Authorized Cannondale Retailer about suitable
choices, read and follow instructions and warnings
that accompany the handlebars and bar ends, and
inspect the handlebars and bar ends regularly.
Some saddles are equipped with coil springs. If
you use a rear rack mounted child carrier there
is a risk that a child’s fingers could be injured if
trapped in the coil springs when the rider hits a
bump and the springs compress. Be sure that the
child cannot reach the springs when properly
strapped in the carrier.
INSTALLING ACCESSORIES
Cannondale encourages use of trailers for
children. Be very careful when towing a trailer.
Remember that braking distances increase, and
the trailer will track inside the line of the bicycle
when making turns. Children should always wear
helmets when riding in a child carrier or trailer.
Use of bicycle helmets on children is required by
law in many areas.
Have all accessories mounted by your Authorized
Cannondale Retailer. Be sure that any accessory you
or your authorized retailer fits to your bike does not
block or interfere with nationally required reflectors
or lights.
WARNING
INCOMPATIBLE ACCESSORIES OR POORLY OR
IMPROPERLY MOUNTED ACCESSORIES CAN
ADVERSELY AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE OF
YOUR BICYCLE AND MAY BE UNSAFE.
46
TIRE SIZE
AERODYNAMIC HANDLEBARS
Aerodynamic or “Triathlon” handlebar extensions are
fitted to some triathlon or racing bikes. They are also
added by customers. Understand that when riding
on these extensions your steering and braking are
adversely affected. Some riders find it harder to bend
their neck to see forward. Be sure to practice riding
with aero handlebar extensions on hazard and traffic
free roads. Practice the transition from having your
hands on the extensions to having your hands on the
regular handlebars and brake levers.
WARNING
Mounting the wrong size tires can result in the
tires hitting the fork or frame when riding. If
this happens, you can lose control of your bike
and you can be thrown off, a moving tire can be
stopped because it touches the fork or frame.
Do not mount oversized tires, ones that rub or
hit the fork or frame, ones that result in too little
clearance, or ones that can hit the fork or frame
when the suspension is fully compressed or
when riding.
WARNING
DO NOT RIDE ON THE AERO HANDLEBAR
EXTENSIONS IN TRAFFIC OR ON DIFFICULT
ROADS.
Take care that the tires you select are compatible
with your bike’s fork or frame design. Also, be sure
to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations
of your front fork and rear shocks.
Ride on the aero handlebar extensions only
when the road is clear of traffic and hazards and
you have a long line of sight.
When you are considering tires for your bike
consider...
When using the extensions understand that you
are compromising steering and braking in favor
of speed. If you need to take evasive steering
or braking action while on the extensions you
could have an accident, with risk of serious
injury, paralysis or death.
The actual measured size of a tire may be different
than its sidewall marking. Each time you mount
a new tire, take the time to inspect the actual
clearance between the rotating tire and all parts
of the frame. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) requires at least 1/16” (1.6
mm) tire clearance from any part of the bike.
Allowing for lateral rim flex and a wheel or rim
that is out-of-true will likely mean choosing a
rear tire that provides even more clearance than
the CPSC recommends.
ASK YOUR CANNONDALE DEALER FOR
THE RIGHT TIRES FOR YOUR BIKE AND ITS
PARTICULAR COMPONENTS!
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED
OR KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT IF YOU IGNORE
THIS WARNING.
47
PART II
ABOUT SHIMMY
Some cyclists have experienced disturbing “shimmy”
or “vibration” at certain speeds. This symptom is
rarely reported and there is no agreement among
experts as to the cause. Among the proposed causes
of shimmy are: a loose headset, frame alignment
problems, weight of front wheel magnets for cycle
computers, and spoke tension.
FRONT
TIRE
TURNED
Larger riders on larger frames are thought by some to
be more likely to experience such vibration.
TOE CLIP
07&3-"1
LEFT OR
RIGHT
PEDAL
If you experience such a vibration, gently apply the
brakes and slow down. Another suggestion is to press
your leg against the top tube as you slow down.
Figure 20.
WARNING
“Toe clip overlap” is common on small frame size
bicycles. It is simple to avoid any contact with the
front tire: have the inside pedal up before beginning
a turn. As you turn to the left, the inside (left) pedal
should be positioned at twelve o’clock. As you turn to
the right, the inside (right) pedal should be positioned
at twelve o’clock. Having the inside pedal up will
prevent any toe clip-to-tire contact and maximize
cornering ground clearance. Learn to make it your
habit on any sized bike.
IF YOU EXPERIENCE “SHIMMY,” DO NOT RIDE
CONTINUE TO RIDE YOUR BIKE. TAKE THE
BICYCLE TO YOUR RETAILER FOR INSPECTION,
SERVICE, OR CHANGES.
TOE CLIP OVERLAP
What is It?
“Toe clip overlap” or “toe overlap” describes the toe
of your shoe or toe clip contacting the front tire (or
front fender). This may occur when the pedal with
your shoe (with or without a toe clip) is all the way
forward and the front wheel is turned sharply to a
position where the toe or toe clip can contact the
tire (or fender). If you ride with clipless pedals, attach
your riding shoes to the pedals and check for front
tire clearance.
Whether or not you have overlap, or how much
overlap you have can be changed. Be aware that toe
clearance can be increased or decreased by changes
in crank arm length, size of pedals or toe clips used,
size of tires used, addition of fenders, size/design of
shoes worn.
WARNING
TOE CLIP OVERLAP COULD CAUSE YOU TO
LOSE CONTROL OF YOUR BIKE, FALL AND BE
SERIOUSLY INJURED, PARALYZED OR KILLED.
Please consult with your retailer on the simple
steps you must follow to avoid an accident. Insist
that your retailer work with you to determine if
your own combination of bicycle, shoe(s) and
components have this common design feature.
48
BRAKE POWER MODULATORS
AFTERMARKET BRAKE SYSTEMS
Your bike may be equipped with a brake modulator,
a device installed between the front brake lever and
the front brake to reduce initial front braking force.
(Brake power modulators are also used on the rear
brake of some bicycles.)
WARNING
DO NOT MODIFY YOUR BIKE IN ANY WAY TO
MOUNT BRAKES SYSTEMS. MODIFCATIONS
CAN DAMAGE YOUR BIKE LEADING TO AN
ACCIDENT. YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED
OR KILLED.
If a rider applies the front brake too strongly or too
suddenly, these devices can help reduce the risk of
locking the front wheel or throwing the rider. Once
the modulator device is bottomed out, the front
brakes have the same power, and the same risks
of overly hard use, as brakes without a modulator.
Modulators are a small help in giving a rider more of
a chance to react correctly.
Choose only brakes that mount to the frame,
swingarm, or fork using only the existing disc
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modify the existing mounts or clamp, weld, or
in any other way add new or different mounts.
Any modification will void the warranty and may
weaken or damage the frame. For installation
instructions and other warnings, read the
literature provided by the brake manufacturer.
Modulators are not a substitute for practicing and
learning to brake correctly. See PART I, SECTION 4.C.
WARNING
When choosing replacements, please ask your
Cannondale Dealer. Have your bike’s brakes
installed and adjusted by a professional bike
mechanic.
A BRAKE MODULATOR WILL NOT PREVENT
WHEEL LOCK UP OR BEING THROWN OFF
THE BIKE DUE TO OVERLY HARD OR FAST OR
ABRUPT APPLICATION OF THE BRAKES.
It is important that you understand modulators are
not an intelligent, sophisticated system. Modulators
ARE NOT anti-lock braking systems (ABS). Bicycle
brake modulators are not like ABS in a car. Unlike
automotive ABS there is not an intelligent system of
sensors and computer control. Unlike an ABS system
in a car you cannot just jam on the brakes and let the
system take over. There is no system to think or act
for you.
Some people, including sales people, may try to
explain brake modulators on bicycles by saying that
they are “like ABS”. This is misleading and inaccurate.
We urge you to ask your retailer to confirm if you have
a brake modulator on your bike. We urge you to ask
your retailer to demonstrate how it works. We urge
you to work with the front brake lever while standing
still to understand how it works. We urge you to read
any brake and brake modulator instructions that
came with your bike.
49
PART II
AFTERMARKET POWER SYSTEMS
WARNING
DO NOT INSTALL A POWER SYSTEM (GAS OR
ELECTRIC TYPE) ONTO YOUR BIKE.
Your Cannondale bike was not designed or
intended for use with any type of aftermarket
power system.
There are many types of power systems from
many different manufacturers. We simply can’t
predict what all can go wrong by installing one.
We can say that installing an aftermarket power
system represents a MAJOR modification of your
bike. It will change the way your bike handles
and fundamentally alter its operation.
When combined with your bike, the power
system can be become dangerous to operate..
For example, the brakes may not be adequate
for higher speeds.
50
SECTION B.
INTENDED USE
WARNING
UNDERSTAND YOUR BIKE AND ITS INTENDED USE. CHOOSING THE WRONG BICYCLE FOR YOUR
PURPOSE CAN BE HAZARDOUS. USING YOUR BIKE THE WRONG WAY IS DANGEROUS.
No one type of bicycle is suited for all purposes. Your retailer can help you pick the “right tool for the job”
and help you understand its limitations. There are many types of bicycles and many variations within each
type. Cannondale makes many types of mountain, road, racing, hybrid, touring, cyclocross and tandem
bicycles.
There are also bicycles that mix features. For example we have road/racing bikes with triple cranks. These
bikes have the low gearing of a touring bike, the quick handling of a racing bike, but are not well suited for
carrying heavy loads on a tour. For that purpose you want a touring bike.
8JUIJO FBDI PG UZQF PG CJDZDMF POF DBO PQUJNJ[F GPS DFSUBJO QVSQPTFT7JTJU ZPVS CJDZDMF TIPQ BOE öOE
someone with expertise in the area that interests you. Do your own homework. Seemingly small changes
such as the choice of tires can improve or diminish the performance of a bicycle for a certain purpose.
On the following pages, we generally outline the intended uses of various types of bikes.
Industry usage Conditions are generalized and evolving. Consult your Cannondale Dealer about how you
intend to use your bike.
In addition to this section, please consult any Cannondale Owner’s Manual Supplements or components
manufactuer’s instructions for information on intended use.
51
PART II
HIGH-PERFORMANCE ROAD
broken in a crash. They are not designed to take
abuse or be a rugged workhorse.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE *
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
275 / 125
10 / 4.5
285 / 129
* Seat Bag /Handlebar Bag Only
CONDITION 1
Bikes designed for riding on a paved surface where
the tires do not lose ground contact.
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
Super Six, Slice Carbon, Six Carbon, Six, Slice, Synapse,
CAAD7, CAAD8, CAAD9, Ironman, SystemSix, CAPO,
All Road Tandems
INTENDED
To be ridden on paved roads only.
NOT INTENDED
For off-road, cyclocross, or touring with racks or
panniers.
TRADE OFF
Material use is optimized to deliver both light weight
and specific performance. You must understand
that (1) these types of bikes are intended to give an
aggressive racer or competitive cyclist a performance
advantage over a relatively short product life, (2) a
less aggressive rider will enjoy longer frame life, (3)
you are choosing light weight (shorter frame life) over
more frame weight and a longer frame life, (4) you
are choosing light weight over more dent resistant
or rugged frames that weigh more. All frames that
are very light need frequent inspection for cracks
that would indicate that the frame is worn out from
fatigue. These frames are likely to be damaged or
52
GENERAL PURPOSE RIDING
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
30 / 14
330 / 150
55 / 25
355 / 161
Touring/Trekking
300 / 136
CONDITION 2
Bikes designed for riding Condition 1, plus smooth
gravel roads and improved trails with moderate
grades where the tires do not lose ground contact.
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS:
Hooligan, Street, Touring, Trekking, Adventure,
Comfort, Quick, Bad Boy, All Cyclocross, Street
Tandem,
INTENDED
For paved roads, gravel or dirt roads that are in good
condition, and bike paths.
NOT INTENDED
For off-road or mountain bike use, or for any kind
of jumping. Some of these bikes have suspension
features, but these features are designed to add
comfort, not off-road capability. Some come with
relatively wide tires that are well suited to gravel or
dirt paths. Some come with relatively narrow tires
that are best suited to faster riding on pavement. If
you ride on gravel or dirt paths, carry heavier loads
or want more tire durability talk to your dealer about
wider tires.
53
PART II
CROSS-COUNTRY,
MARATHON, HARDTAILS
NOT INTENDED
For use in extreme forms of jumping/riding such
as hardcore mountain, Freeriding, Downhill, North
Shore, Dirt Jumping, Hucking etc.
TRADE OFF
Cross-Country bikes are lighter, faster to ride
uphill, and more nimble than All-Mountain bikes.
Cross-Country and Marathon bikes trade off some
ruggedness for pedaling efficiency and uphill speed.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE *
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
5 / 2.3
305 / 138
* Seat Bag Only
Front suspension frames manufactured w/ original
equipment seatstay and dropout rack mounts
only.
CONDITION 3
Bikes designed for riding Conditions 1 and 2, plus
rough trails, small obstacles, and smooth technical
areas, including areas where momentary loss of tire
contact with the ground may occur. NOT jumping.
All mountain bikes without rear suspension are
Condition 3, and so are some lightweight rear
suspension models.
300 / 136
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
Rush, Rush Carbon, Taurine, Caffeine, Scalpel,
F-Series, Law Enforcement
INTENDED
For cross-country riding and racing which ranges
from mild to agressive over intermediate terrain
(e.g., hilly with small obstacles like roots, rocks, loose
surfaces and hard pack and depressions). There are
no large “sick drop” or drop offs, jumps or launches
(wooden structures, dirt embankments) requiring
long suspension travel or heavy duty components.
Cross-country and marathon equipment (tires,
shocks, frames, drive trains) are light-weight, favoring
nimble speed over brute force. Suspension travel is
relatively short since the bike is intended to move
quickly on the ground and not spend time in the air
landing hard and hammering through things.
54
55 / 25
355 / 161
ALL MOUNTAIN
NOT INTENDED
For Hardcore Freeriding, Extreme Downhill, Dirt
Jumping, Slopestyle, or very aggressive or extreme
riding .
TRADE OFF
All-Mountain bikes are more rugged than cross
country bikes, for riding more difficult terrain. AllMountain bikes are heavier and harder to ride uphill
than cross country bikes. All-Mountain bikes are
lighter, more nimble and easier to ride uphill than
Freeride bikes. All-Mountain bikes are not as rugged
as Freeride bikes and must not be used for more
extreme riding and terrain.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
CONDITION 4
Bikes designed for riding Conditions 1, 2, and 3, plus
rough technical areas, moderately sized obstacles,
and small jumps.
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE *
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
5 / 2.3
305 / 138
* Seat Bag Only
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
Prophet, Jekyll, Rize, Moto
INTENDED
For trail and uphill riding. All-Mountain bicycles
are: (1) more heavy duty than cross country
bikes, but less heavy duty than Freeride bikes,
(2) lighter and more nimble than Freeride bikes,
(3) heavier and have more suspension travel than
a cross country bike, allowing them to be ridden
in more difficult terrain, over larger obstacles and
moderate jumps, (4) intermediate in suspension
travel and use components that fit the intermediate
intended use, (5) cover a fairly wide range of intended
use, and within this range are models that are more
or less heavy duty. Talk to your retailer about your
needs and these models.
55
PART II
GRAVITY, FREERIDE,
AND DOWNHILL
Gravity,Freeride, and Downhill bikes are: (1) heavier
and have more suspension travel than All-Mountain
bikes, allowing them to be ridden in more difficult
terrain, over larger obstacles and larger jumps, (2) the
longest in suspension travel and use components
that fit heavy duty intended use. While all that is true,
there is no guarantee that extreme riding will not
break a Freeride bike.
The terrain and type of riding that Freeride bikes are
designed for is inherently dangerous. Appropriate
equipment, such as a Freeride bike, does not change
this reality. In this kind of riding, bad judgment, bad
luck, or riding beyond your capabilities can easily
result in an accident, where you could be seriously
injured, paralyzed or killed.
NOT INTENDED
5PCFBOFYDVTFUPUSZBOZUIJOH3FBEPVSi'SFFSJEF
Downhill” warning. See page 64.
CONDITION 5
TRADE OFF
Bikes designed for jumping, hucking, high speeds, or
aggressive riding on rougher surfaces, or landing on
flat surfaces. However, this type of riding is extremely
hazardous and puts unpredictable forces on a bicycle
which may overload the frame, fork, or parts. If you
choose to ride in Condition 5 terrain, you should take
appropriate safety precautions such as more frequent
bike inspections and replacement of equipment. You
should also wear comprehensive safety equipment
such as a full-face helmet, pads, and body armor.
Freeride bikes are more rugged than All-Mountain
bikes, for riding more difficult terrain. Freeride
bikes are heavier and harder to ride uphill than AllMountain bikes.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
Gemini, Perp, Judge,
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE *
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
5 / 2.3
305 / 138
* Seat Bag Only
INTENDED
For riding that includes the most difficult terrain that
only very skilled riders should attempt.
Gravity, Freeride, and Downhill are terms which
describe hardcore mountain, north shore, slopestyle.
This is “extreme” riding and the terms describing it
are constantly evolving.
56
DIRT JUMP
NOT INTENDED
For terrain, drop offs or landings where large amounts
of suspension travel are needed to help absorb the
shock of landing and help maintain control.
TRADE OFF
Dirt Jumping bikes are lighter and more nimble than
Freeride bikes, but they have no rear suspension and
the suspension travel in the front is much shorter.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
CONDITION 5
Bikes designed for jumping, hucking, high speeds, or
aggressive riding on rougher surfaces, or landing on
flat surfaces. However, this type of riding is extremely
hazardous and puts unpredictable forces on a bicycle
which may overload the frame, fork, or parts. If you
choose to ride in Condition 5 terrain, you should take
appropriate safety precautions such as more frequent
bike inspections and replacement of equipment. You
should also wear comprehensive safety equipment
such as a full-face helmet, pads, and body armor.
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
Chase
INTENDED
For man-made dirt jumps, ramps, skate parks other
predictable obstacles and terrain where riders need
and use skill and bike control, rather than suspension.
Dirt Jumping bikes are used much like heavy duty
BMX bikes.
"%JSU+VNQJOHCJLFEPFTOPUHJWFZPVTLJMMTUPKVNQ
Read our “Freeride & Downhill” warning. See page 64.
The same message is true.
57
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
0
300 / 136
PART II
CYCLOCROSS
ROAD TANDEMS
CONDITION 2
CONDITION 1
Bikes designed for riding Condition 1, plus smooth
gravel roads and improved trails with moderate
grades where the tires do not lose ground contact.
Bikes designed for riding on a paved surface where
the tires do not lose ground contact.
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
All Road Tandems
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
All Cyclocross
INTENDED
INTENDED
Are designed to be ridden on paved roads only. They
are not designed for mountain biking or off-road use.
Cannondale road tandems are designed for touring
with racks and panniers.
For cyclocross riding, training and racing. Cyclocross
involves riding on a variety of terrain and surfaces
including dirt or mud surfaces. Cyclocross bikes
also work well for all weather rough road riding and
commuting.
NOT INTENDED
Road tandem should not be taken offroad or used as a mountain tandem.
NOT INTENDED
For off road or mountain bike use, or jumping.
Cyclocross riders and racers dismount before reaching
an obstacle, carry their bike over the obstacle and
then remount. Cyclocross bikes are not intended for
mountain bike use. The relatively large road bike size
wheels are faster than the smaller mountain bike
wheels, but not as strong.
Please read your Cannondale Tandems Owner’s
Manual Supplement. It contains important safety
JOGPSNBUJPOTQFDJöDUPUBOEFNSJEJOH
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
RIDER
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
300 / 136
30 / 13.6
330 / 150
58
RIDER(s)
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
500 / 227
75 / 34
575 / 261
MOUNTAIN TANDEMS
NOT INTENDED
For very agressive mountain bike riding. Mountain
tandems are most definitely NOT for Downhill,
Freeriding, North Shore. Choose terrain with the
abilities of both the Tandem’s captain and stoker in
mind.
MAXIMUM WEIGHT LIMIT
CONDITION 2
Bikes designed for riding Condition 1, plus smooth
gravel roads and improved trails with moderate
grades where the tires do not lose ground contact.
CANNONDALE BIKE MODELS
All Mountain Tandems
INTENDED
The challenges of mountain biking are obvious, but
are outlined in PART II, SECTION C. MOUNTAIN BIKE
RIDING of this manual . The added challenges of
tandem riding, mean that you should limit off-road
tandem riding to easy-moderate terrain.
Please read your Cannondale Tandems Owner’s
Manual Supplement. It contains important safety
JOGPSNBUJPOTQFDJöDUPUBOEFNSJEJOH
59
RIDER(s)
lbs / kg
LUGGAGE
lbs / kg
TOTAL
lbs / kg
500 / 227
75 / 34
575 / 261
PART II
SECTION C. MOUNTAIN
BIKE RIDING
BIKE TYPES
WARNING
PICK A MOUNTAIN BIKE FOR HOW YOU WILL
RIDE.
See also APPENDIX B. Maximum Fork Length.
See also SECTION B. Intended Use.
There are now many different kinds of “mountain
bikes.”
Cannondale makes mountain bikes
ranging from the light, nimble Rush and Scalpels,
designed for cross country (XC) racing, to our
rugged, long-travel freeride bikes. A Scalpel is
OPUEFTJHOFEGPSGSFFSJEF*GZPVUSZVTJOHZPVS
bike for something it was not intended, you may
break it with risk of serious injury, paralysis or
death.
OFF-ROAD RIDING
Off road riding usually involves many, many
variables such as constantly changing traction,
obstacles, changes in line of sight, up hill, down hill,
soft surfaces, dry surfaces, wet surfaces. Off road
riding requires managing a complex and constantly
changing rider–to-bicycle feedback loop of traction,
weight distribution, application of power, application
of brakes and steering driven by the conditions one
encounters. The complexity and ever-changing
nature of off road riding requires focus, concentration,
strength, fitness and learning to read the trail. The
art of managing all this while surrounded by nature
makes this a challenging and wonderful sport.
Matching the intended use of any kind of
mountain bike to your expected riding is
import.
Read SECTION B. INTENDED USE starting on
page 51 .
If you have ridden your mountain bike on a paved
road, or on a gravel or dirt road, you have done very
little in the way of learning to mountain bike. Learning
to ride off road is a process. It does not automatically
occur because you have a mountain bike. Learning to
ride off road does not come from watching “extreme”
NPVOUBJOCJLFWJEFPTPS57*OGBDUUIFSJEFSTJOUIPTF
films are professional entertainers and/or daredevils,
not teachers.
WARNING
INSPECTION AND
MAINTENANCE ROUTINES
WARNING
MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDING IS VERY HARD ON
BIKES. MOUNTAIN BIKES NEED FREQUENT
CLEANING, MAINTENANCE AND INSPECTION.
Clean your bike after every ride and
conduct a pre-ride inspection before every
ride.
Detailed inspection as outlined in
SECTION D. in this manual is needed more often
than for road bikes. Failure to keep up with
maintenance and inspection increases the risk of
an accident, with risk of serious injury, paralysis
or death.
MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDING IS VERY DIFFERENT
FROM RIDING A BIKE ON THE ROAD. For
starters, it is almost certain you will fall off.
(FU USBJOJOH +PJO B DMVC BOE öOE FYQFSJFODFE
people to teach you. It is likely that your retailer
can hook you up with local rides. Practice and
learn to stay in control. Carefully, progressively,
learn to expand your limits, but always ride
within them.
60
SUSPENSION
STAY IN CONTROL
Suspension will increase the handling capabilities
and comfort of your bicycle. This enhanced capability
may allow you to ride faster, particularly on rough
or bumpy surfaces. As common sense tells you,
increased speed brings increased risk.
WARNING
FAILURE TO RIDE IN CONTROL COULD RESULT
IN A FALL LEADING TO SERIOUS INJURY,
PARALYSIS, OR DEATH.
WARNING
While the risks inherent to this sport cannot be
eliminated, you can minimize the risks by riding
in control and wearing a helmet. The reality is
that simple, and that challenging.
DO NOT CONFUSE THE BUILT-IN CAPABILITIES
OF A SUSPENSION BIKE WITH YOUR OWN
CAPABILITIES, WHICH MUST BE LEARNED.
Increasing your skill will take time and practice.
Stay in control, and carefully, gradually learn the
feel and handling of your suspension bike.
DOWNHILL AND LIFTSERVICED RIDING
When you apply the front brakes on a suspension
bike, the front of the bike will fall or dip as
weight shifts forward. This is normal. (The front
of your car dips when you apply the brakes.) You
must learn to anticipate this weight shift and
compensate by shifting your body weight back.
WARNING
TO RIDE DOWNHILL AT SPEED OR IN
COMPETITION IS TO VOLUNTARILY ASSUME A
VERY LARGE RISK. YOU COULD BE SERIOUSLY
INJURED, PARALYZED, OR KILLED.
JUMPING
When riding downhill such as at a ski area, on
trails or access roads, or on dirt roads such as fire
roads, you can reach speeds seen on motorcycles,
with similar hazards and risks.
WARNING
JUMPING IS VERY RISKY. YOU COULD HAVE A
FALL LEADING TO SERIOUS INJURY, PARALYSIS
OR DEATH.
Wear appropriate safety gear, including a
full face helmet, full finger gloves, protective
clothing, and body armor. Have your bicycle and
equipment carefully inspected by a qualified
mechanic and be sure it is in excellent condition.
Consult with expert riders and/or race officials on
conditions and equipment advisable at any site
where you plan to ride downhill. Experienced
riders often pre-walk or carefully and slowly preride a downhill course before attempting it at
any speed.
Jumping a mountain bike is fun, but it puts
extreme stress on your bike. Perhaps most
vulnerable to jumping-related damage is your
fork. Riders who insist on jumping their bikes
risk serious damage, to their bicycles as well as
themselves.
61
PART II
SHIFTING GEARS WHILE PEDALING
CAUTION
Shifting under extreme pedaling pressure puts
a great amount of stress on components. While
most components can withstand an occasional
“power shift,” continual power shifting will most
assuredly damage some part of your drivetrain.
Whenever possible, ease up on your pedals
when shifting.
62
This page has been left blank intentionally.
63
PART II
FREERIDING & DOWNHILL
WARNING
FREERIDING AND OTHER FORMS OF “EXTREME RIDING” RE EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED OR KILLED IN A SERIOUS ACCIDENT.
Freeriding, jumping, hucking, dirt jumping, mountaincross, downhill, slalom, slopestyle, urban
or street riding or other evolving forms of extreme or hard core mountain biking are inherently
dangerous and can lead to serious accidents. Wear all safety gear and be sure your bike is in excellent
condition. Follow all the instructions and warnings below. These steps will reduce, but not eliminate,
the inherent risks. Even with state of the art protective safety gear you could be seriously injured,
paralyzed or killed. If you do not want to take these risks, do not engage in this type of riding.
Fundamental Risk
Freeriding, jumping, hucking, dirt jumping, mountaincross, downhill, slalom, slopestyle, urban or
street riding. It seems that everywhere you look, from Mountain Dew® commercials to the X-Games®
to the Red Bull®Rampage, riders are grabbing big air and sticking sick drops. And it sure looks fun.
But what the videos and bike magazines and ads don’t always tell you is that extreme riding takes
an amazing amount of skill. Some of the riders you see are well-paid pros who have gradually built
up their skills through endless hours of practice, and who have also had their share of stitches,
concussions and busted bones (and bikes). Others are daredevils who have chosen to accept or
ignore the risks. Would you allow anyone to say that you are so weak in the head, and have such poor
judgment that you copy those you see in the media without thought of the serious risks?
The stakes are high if you screw up. Realize too late that you aren’t up to the challenge, and you run
the risk of major injury or even – say it aloud – death, paralysis. In short, extreme riding carries a high
degree of fundamental risk, and you bear the ultimate responsibility for how you ride and what you
attempt to pull off. Do you want to avoid these significant risks? Then do not ride this way.
continued on next page........
64
Product Limitations
Problems of pilot error aside, hard-core riding also beats the heck out of your equipment. Although
we build and test our bikes to make them tough, there’s no way that we can guarantee they’ll
survive your umpteenth six-foot drop. For starters, there is no industry “jumping” standard. The many
circumstances of takeoff, landing, speed, rider technique, etc. are unique. The judgment, lack of
judgment or insanity of a rider who may ride a Cannondale bicycle cannot be completely predicted,
so it’s flat-out impossible to predict how anyone’s equipment is going to hold up.
Let’s get another thing straight. Buying a Freeride bike does not make you any better. Do not confuse
the built-in capabilities of equipment with your own capabilities, which must be learned.
Keeping your bike and all its components in good working order is critical, and it’s up to you to
maintain and inspect it. Even so, your sweet rig isn’t going to last forever. Nothing does, particularly
bikes and parts that are built to minimize weight and then are subjected to abuse. Cannondale frames
carry a warranty, but that’s to cover issues with workmanship and/or materials. (See the Cannondale
Limited Warranty in this manual). The warranty doesn’t mean that they’re going to last forever. They’re
not. The warranty certainly doesn’t mean that the bicycle can in any way protect you from injury.
Use of Specialized Protective Gear
Cannondale has long urged the use of helmets. As riskier, extreme downhill and freeriding became
part of the sport we communicated frankly about the risks in this freeride warning. We have recently
become aware of neck braces, designed for mountain biking and motocross riding, fitted between
the rider and helmet, that can decrease the risk of paralysis, spinal cord and neck injuries. As the
manufacturer clearly states, these braces cannot prevent all injuries. We urge riders, particularly riders
into challenging and risky riding, to investigate and consider prophylactic neck braces (For example,
see http://www.leatt-brace.com/). A prophylactic neck brace might save your life or keep you out of
a wheelchair.
In Conclusion
If you’re going hard-core, be smart about it. Always wear a full face helmet, state-of-the-art neck
brace, body armor, full-finger gloves, and protective clothing. Choose a bike that’s right for you, your
riding and terrain, and check it often for signs of fatigue or other trouble. (Your dealer can help you
on both fronts.) Read PART II, SECTION B. MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDING. And most importantly, know your
limitations. Practice. Stay in control, and carefully, gradually expand your limits – but ride within
them.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED, OR KILLED IF YOU IGNORE THIS WARNING.
65
PART II
SECTION D. INSPECT
FOR SAFETY
WARNING
FREQUENT INSPECTION OF YOUR BIKE IS
IMPORTANT TO YOUR SAFETY. FOLLOW THE
PRE-RIDE CHECKLIST BEFORE EVERY RIDE.
See the back cover of this manual.
In this section, we will do our best to outline some
material science basics and explain how they relate
to your bicycle, some of the trade offs made in
designing your bicycle, what you can expect from
your bicycle and provide important, basic guidelines
on how you maintain and inspect it.
Periodic, more detailed inspection of
your bicycle is important. How often
this more detailed inspection is needed
depends upon you.
You, the rider/owner, have control and knowledge
of how often you use your bike, how hard you
use it and where you use it. Cannondale does
not. We design rugged and light bicycles and test
them extensively. But, because we cannot track
your use, you must be responsible for inspection
and maintenance. Most customers will have a
retailer do all inspection and maintenance.
Carbon fiber bikes and components are becoming
more common. In addition to 2. Understanding
Composites (Carbon Fiber) in this section, see also:
APPENDIX A, page 86
APPENDIX C, page 88.
APPENDIX D, page 90.
If you are not interested in the “hands on” aspects
of your bicycle, and do not wish to perform
inspection or maintenance on your own bike,
then you must make your retailer a partner in
maintaining and inspecting your bicycle. Work
with your retailer to determine a maintenance
and inspection schedule appropriate for your
riding. PART I, SECTION 5. A provides some
general guidelines on service intervals.
APPENDIX E, page 92
APPENDIX F, page 94
For
your
safety,
understanding
and
communication with your retailer, we urge you
to read this section. The materials used to make
your bike determine how to inspect it properly.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED,
OR KILLED IF YOU IGNORE THIS WARNING.
66
1. UNDERSTANDING METALS
Metals are subject to fatigue. With enough cycles
of use, at high enough loads, metals will eventually
develop cracks that lead to breakage. It is very
important that you read Metal Fatigue 101 next.
Steel is the traditional material for building bicycle
frames. It has good characteristics, but in high
performance bicycles, steel has been largely
replaced by aluminum and some titanium. The main
factor driving this change is interest by enthusiast
customers in lighter bicycles.
Let’s say you hit a curb, ditch, rock, car, fallen cyclist
or other object. First, read the Important warnings at
the beginning of SECTION A: Bicycles Cannot Protect
You. At any speed above a fast walk your body will
continue to move forward, momentum carrying you
over the front of the bike. You cannot and will not
stay on the bike and what happens to the frame and
fork is irrelevant to what happens to your body.
Properties of Metals
Please understand that there is no simple statement
that can be made that characterizes the use of
different metals for bicycles. What is true is how the
metal chosen is applied is much more important than
the material alone. One must look at the way the bike
is designed, tested, manufactured, supported along
with the characteristics of the metal rather than
seeking a simplistic answer.
What should you expect from your metal frame?
It depends on many complex factors, which is
why we tell you that crash worthiness cannot
be a design criteria. With that important note,
we can tell you that if the impact is hard enough
the fork or frame may be bent or buckled.
See Figure A on page 68. On a most all steel bikes,
the steel fork may be severely bent and the frame
undamaged. Aluminum is less ductile than steel,
but you can expect the fork and frame to be bent or
buckled. Hit harder and the top tube may be broken
in tension and the down tube buckled. Hit harder
and the top tube may be broken, the down tube
buckled and broken, leaving the head tube and fork
separated from the main triangle.
Metals vary widely in their resistance to corrosion.
Steel must be protected or rust will attack it.
Aluminum and Titanium quickly develop an oxide
film that protects the metal from further corrosion.
Both are therefore quite resistant to corrosion. The
6000 series aluminum alloys Cannondale has used
for years are commonly used in marine applications.
Aluminum is not perfectly corrosion resistant and
particular care must be used where it contacts other
metals and galvanic corrosion can occur.
Metals are comparatively ductile. Ductile means
bending, buckling and stretching before breaking.
Generally speaking, of the common bicycle frame
building materials steel is the most ductile, titanium
less ductile, followed by aluminum.
Metals vary in density. Density is weight per unit
of material. Steel weighs 7.8 grams/cm3 (grams
per cubic centimeter), titanium 4.5 grams/cm3,
aluminum 2.75 grams/cm3. Contrast these numbers
with carbon fiber composite at 1.45 grams/cm3.
67
PART II
When all metal bikes are crashed you will usually see
some evidence of this ductility in bent, buckled or
folded metal.
One can design a part that is so strong that fatigue
life is nearly infinite. This requires a lot of material and
a lot of weight. Any structure that must be light and
strong will have a finite fatigue life. Aircraft, race cars,
motorcycles: all have parts with finite fatigue lives. If
you wanted a bicycle with an infinite fatigue life, it
would weigh far more than any bicycle sold today. So
we all make a trade-off: the wonderful, lightweight
performance we want requires that we inspect the
structure.
It is now common for the main frame to be made of
metal and the fork of carbon fiber. See the composites
101 section below. The relative ductility of metals
and the lack of ductility of carbon fiber means that
in a crash scenario you can expect some bending
or bucking in the metal but none in the carbon.
Below some load the carbon fork may be intact even
though the frame is damaged. Above some load the
carbon fork will be completely broken.
In most cases a fatigue crack is not a defect. It is a
sign that the part has been worn out, a sign the part
has reached the end of its useful life. When your car
tires wear down to the point that the tread bars are
contacting the road, those tires are not defective.
Those tires are worn out and the tread bar says
“time for replacement.” When a metal part shows a
fatigue crack, it is worn out. The crack says “time for
replacement.”
Metal Fatigue 101
Common sense tells us that nothing that is used
lasts forever. The more you use something, and the
harder you use it, and the worse the conditions you
use it in, the shorter its life.
Fatigue is the term used to describe accumulated
damage to a part caused by repeated loading. To
cause fatigue damage, the load the part receives
must be great enough. A crude, often-used example
is bending a paper clip back and forth (repeated
loading) until it breaks. This simple definition will
help you understand that fatigue has nothing to
do with time or age. A bicycle in a garage does not
fatigue. Fatigue happens only through use.
FIGURE A
So what kind of “damage” are we talking about? On
a microscopic level, a crack forms in a highly stressed
area. As the load is repeatedly applied, the crack
grows. At some point the crack becomes visible to
the naked eye. Eventually it becomes so large that the
part is too weak to carry the same load that, without
the crack, it could carry. At that point there can be a
complete and immediate failure of the part.
68
THIS IS A
THIS IS A
BENT
COMPLETELY BROKEN
METAL FORK.
CARBON FORK.
A few things to think about:
t40.&$3"$,4QBSUJDVMBSMZMBSHFSPOFT
MAY MAKE CREAKING NOISE AS YOU RIDE.
Think about such a noise as a serious warning
signal. Note that a well-maintained bicycle will
be very quiet and free of creaks and squeaks.
t0/$&"$3"$,445"354*5$"/(308"/%
GROW FAST. Think about the crack as forming
a pathway to failure. This means that any crack
is potentially dangerous and will only become
more dangerous.
SIMPLE RULE 5: Investigate and find the
source of any noise. It may not a be a crack, but
whatever is causing the noise should be fixed
before riding.
SIMPLE RULE 1: If you find crack, replace the
part.
t$03304*0/41&&%4%"."(& Cracks grow
more quickly when they are in a corrosive
environment. Think about the corrosive solution
as further weakening and extending the crack.
SIMPLE RULE 2: Clean your bike, lubricate your
bike, protect your bike from salt, remove any salt
as soon as you can.
t45"*/4"/%%*4$0-03"5*0/$"/0$$63
NEAR A CRACK. Such staining may be a warning
sign that a crack exists.
SIMPLE RULE 3: Inspect and investigate any
staining to see if it is associated with a crack.
t4*(/*'*$"/54$3"5$)&4(06(&4%&/54
OR SCORING CREATE STARTING POINTS
FOR CRACKS. Think about the cut surface as
a focal point for stress (in fact engineers call
such areas "stress risers," areas where the stress
is increased). Perhaps you have seen glass cut?
Recall how the glass was scored and then broke
on the scored line.
SIMPLE RULE 4: Do not scratch, gouge or score
any surface. If you do, pay frequent attention to
this area or replace the part.
69
PART II
Fatigue Is Not A Perfectly Predictable
Science
Aluminum Frame Inspection
Fatigue is not a perfectly predictable science, but
we can give you some general factors to help you
determine how often you need to inspect (or have
your retailer inspect) your bicycle. The more you fit
the “shorten product life” profile, the more frequent
your need to inspect. The more you fit the “lengthen
product life” profile, the less frequent your need to
inspect.
2. Inspect the whole frame carefully for cracks.
Pay particular attention to the underside of the
downtube where it intersects the headtube
1. Clean the bike and remove the wheels.
3. Next carefully inspect the area where the
crankset and rear wheel come closest to the
right chainstay, particularly on the innermost
part of the chainstay and the outermost part of
the chainstay. Next look at the welds that join all
of the tubes. Be sure to look at the inside of the
rear triangle or swingarm while the wheel is out,
including the dropouts.
Factors that shorten product life:
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bike
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t
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rider
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winter road salt, accumulated sweat)
t
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soil in riding environment
4. Finally check all mounting points such as disc
brake caliper brackets and water bottle and rack
mounts.
BE
DTU
DO
W
Factors that lengthen product life:
t
4NPPUIøVJESJEJOHTUZMF
t
/P IJUT DSBTIFT KVNQT PUIFS TIPUT
to bike
t
-PXNJMFBHF
t
-PXFSCPEZXFJHIU
t
-FTTBHHSFTTJWFSJEFS
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/PODPSSPTJWF FOWJSPONFOU ESZ TBMU
free air)
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TOPTUBE
HEA
NT
UB
E
Inspect this area for cracking
Figure 21.
70
Other Suspension Forks
WARNING
If you have a fork made by a third party, please read
and follow the inspection instructions contained in
the manual that covers that fork. If you do not have
the third party’s manual, get one now.
DO NOT RIDE A FRAME OR FORK WITH ANY
CRACK, EVEN A SMALL ONE. RIDING A
CRACKED FRAME OR FORK COULD LEAD TO
YOUR FRAME/FORK BREAKING, WITH RISK OF
ACCIDENT, SERIOUS INJURY, PARALYSIS OR
DEATH.
WARNING
RIDING WITH AN IMPROPERLY SECURED
WHEEL CAN ALLOW THE WHEEL TO WOBBLE
OR FALL OFF THE BICYCLE, WHICH CAN CAUSE
SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. THEREFORE, IT IS
ESSENTIAL THAT YOU:
Fork Inspection
1. Remove the front wheel.
2. Clean the fork.
3. Carefully inspect the whole fork for cracks. Pay
particular attention to the fork crown area and
the area where the dropouts meet the fork
blades. Look on the inside of the fork while the
wheel is out. Check the area around the brake
pivot bosses or caliper mount.
1. Ask your dealer to help you make sure you
know how to install and remove your wheels
safely.
2. Understand and apply the correct technique
for clamping your wheel in place.
3. Each time, before you ride the bike, check
that the wheel is securely clamped.
Cannondale Headshok or Lefty Forks
If you have a Cannondale fork you must follow the
special inspection instructions in the Owner’s Manual
Supplement that came with your bike. If you do not
have this owner’s manual supplement, get one now.
The clamping action of a correctly secured wheel
must emboss the surfaces of the dropouts.
See SECTION 4. A Wheels on page 20.
For important inspection and safety information
see your owner’s manual supplement or visit http://
www.cannondale.com/bikes/tech/index.html.
71
PART II
2. UNDERSTANDING
COMPOSITES (CARBON FIBER)
What Are The Limits Of Composites?
Well designed “composite” or carbon fiber bicycles
and components have long fatigue lives, usually
better than their metal equivalents.
All riders must understand a fundamental reality of
composites. Composite materials constructed of
carbon fibers are strong and light, but when crashed
or overloaded, carbon fibers do not bend, they
break.
While fatigue life is an advantage of carbon fiber,
Cannondale still urges you to regularly inspect your
carbon fiber frame, fork, or components.
What Are Composites?
The term “composites” refers to the fact that a part
or parts are made up of different components or
materials. You’ve heard the term “carbon fiber bike.”
This really means “composite bike.”
Carbon fiber composites are typically a strong, light
fiber in a matrix of plastic, molded to form a shape.
Carbon composites are light relative to metals. Steel
weighs 7.8 grams/cm3 (grams per cubic centimeter),
titanium 4.5 grams/cm3, aluminum 2.75 grams/cm3.
Contrast these numbers with carbon fiber composite
at 1.45 grams/cm3.
Carbon fiber composites are not ductile. Once a
carbon structure is overloaded, it will not bend; it will
break. At and near the break, there will be rough,
sharp edges and may be delamination of carbon fiber
or carbon fiber fabric layers. There will be no bending,
buckling, or stretching.
If You Hit Something Or Have A Crash, What
Can You Expect From Your Carbon Fiber
Bike?
Let’s say you hit a curb, ditch, rock, car, fallen cyclist
or other object. First, read the Important warnings at
the beginning of PART II Section A. Bicycles Cannot
Protect You in this manual.
The composites with the best strength-to-weight
ratios are made of carbon fiber in a matrix of epoxy
plastic. The epoxy matrix bonds the carbon fibers
together, transfers load to other fibers, and provides
a smooth outer surface. The carbon fibers are the
“skeleton” that carries the load.
At any speed above a fast walk, your body will
continue to move forward, the momentum carrying
you over the front of the bike. You cannot and will not
stay on the bike and what happens to the frame and
fork is irrelevant to what happens to your body.
What should you expect from your carbon frame? It
depends on many complex factors, which is why we
tell you that crash worthiness cannot be a design
criteria. With that important note, we can tell you that
if the impact is hard enough, the fork or frame may be
completely broken. See Figure A on page 68. Note
the significant difference in behavior between carbon
and metal. 1. Understanding Metals in this section.
Even if the carbon frame was twice as strong as a
metal frame, once the carbon frame is overloaded it
will not bend, it will break completely.
Why Are Composites Used?
Unlike metals, which have uniform properties in all
directions (engineers call this isotropic), carbon fibers
can be placed in specific orientations to optimize the
structure for particular loads. The choice of where to
place the carbon fibers gives engineers a powerful
tool to create strong, light bicycles. Engineers may
also orient fibers to suit other goals such as comfort
and vibration damping.
Carbon fiber composites are very corrosion resistant,
much more so than most metals. Think about carbon
fiber or fiberglass boats.
Cannondale carbon frames/fork/components are
designed for normal riding loads with a factor of
safety. These frames/fork/components will be broken
by some crash or impact loads.
Carbon fiber materials have a very high strength-towieght ratio.
See “Composite Frame, Fork, And Component
Inspection” on next page.
72
Composite Frame, Fork, and
Component Inspection
composite you will hear a consistent sound, usually
a hard, sharp sound. If you then tap a delaminated
area, you will hear a different sound, usually duller,
less sharp.
Cracks:
Inspect for cracks, broken, or splintered areas. Any
crack is serious. Do not ride any bicycle or component
that has a crack of any size.
Unusual Noises:
Either a crack or delamination can cause creaking
noises while riding. Think about such a noise as a
serious warning signal. A well maintained bicycle
will be very quiet and free of creaks and squeaks.
Investigate and find the source of any noise. It may
not be a crack or delamination, but whatever is
causing the noise must be fixed before riding.
Delamination:
Delamination is serious damage. Composites are
made from layers of fabric. Delamination means that
the layers of fabric are no longer bonded together.
Do not ride any bicycle or component that has any
delamination. These are some delamination clues:
t " DMPVEZ PS XIJUF BSFB 5IJT LJOE PG BSFB MPPLT
different from the ordinary undamaged areas.
Undamaged areas will look glassy, shiny, or “deep,”
as if one was looking into a clear liquid. Delaminated
areas will look opaque and cloudy.
t#VMHJOHPSEFGPSNFETIBQF*GEFMBNJOBUJPOPDDVST
the surface shape may change. The surface may have
a bump, a bulge, soft spot, or not be smooth and fair.
t" EJòFSFODF JO TPVOE XIFO UBQQJOH UIF TVSGBDF
If you gently tap the surface of an undamaged
Damage caused by a handlebar
rotating and striking the top tube is
common. The resulting impact cracks
and breaks the top tube.
This is not a warranty.
The frame is not safe to ride.
Any impact or crash damage can
produce serious damage to the frame.
This chainstay was cracked in a crash.
This is not a warranty.
The frame is not safe to ride.
73
WARNING
DO NOT RIDE A FRAME OR FORK WITH ANY
DELAMINATION OR CRACK. IF YOU RIDE A
DELAMINATED OR CRACKED FRAME/FORK/
COMPONENT IT MAY COMPLETELY BREAK
APART WITH RISK OF ACCIDENT, SERIOUS
INJURY, PARALYSIS OR DEATH.
PART II
3. UNDERSTANDING COMPONENTS
Ŷ Aftermarket “Super Light” Components
It is often necessary to remove and disassemble
components in order to properly and carefully
inspect them.
Most customers will use this
component list as a checklist. The intention here is to
tell you what parts, and what area of each part, most
need inspection. Insist that your mechanic do such
inspections. Our intention is definitely not to teach
bicycle mechanics.
Think carefully about your rider profile as outlined
above. The more you fit the “shorten product life”
profile, the more you must question the use of super
light components. The more you fit the “lengthen
product life” profile, the more likely it is that lighter
components may be suitable for you. Discuss your
needs and your profile very honestly with your
retailer. Take these choices seriously and understand
that you are responsible for the changes.
A great slogan to discuss with your retailer as you
consider changing components: “Strong, Light,
Cheap – Pick two.”
WARNING
FAILURE TO DISASSEMBLE OR REASSEMBLE
BICYCLE COMPONENTS PROPERLY COULD
RESULT IN AN ACCIDENT, WITH RISK OF
SERIOUS INJURY, PARALYSIS OR DEATH.
Ŷ Original Equipment Components
Cannondale tests the fatigue life of many of the
components that are original equipment on your
bike. This means that the designs many original
equipment components have met our test criteria
and have reasonable fatigue life. It does not mean
that the original equipment components will last
forever. They will not.
There are many special tools and techniques
required. Unless you are a very experienced and
skilled bicycle mechanic, we urge you to have
this work done by a professional bicycle retailer.
IF YOU SEE ANY CRACK, OR ANYTHING YOU
ARE UNSURE OF, PLEASE TAKE YOUR BICYCLE
TO A RETAILER. IF YOU RIDE A DELAMINATED
OR CRACKED FRAME/FORK/COMPONENT IT
MAY COMPLETELY BREAK APART WITH RISK
OF ACCIDENT, SERIOUS INJURY, PARALYSIS
OR DEATH.
ŶStem
IF YOU HAVE CARBON FIBER COMPONENTS,
YOU MUST READ PART II, SECTION D. 2.
UNDERSTANDING COMPOSITES.
Ŷ Handlebars
Clean and inspect carefully for cracks. Pay particular
attention to the underside of the stem. If the stem is
of welded construction, examine the edges of each
weld. See also the closely related handlebar section
below.
Remove from stem. With road bars, you will need to
remove the handlebar tape. Remove any handlebar
mounted components. Clean and inspect carefully
for cracks. Pay particular attention to the area where
the handlebar emerges from the stem. This is the area
where virtually all handlebars will eventually break.
Periodic replacement of all handlebars is strongly
recommended. How often they need to be replaced
depends upon the many factors outlined above.
DO NOT ride any component with a crack, even a
small one. Replace the component before riding.
Break or saw in half any component you replace
so that no one uses it again.
Be sure that you do not scratch or score the surface
of the handlebars with either the stem or the brake
or shifter levers. As noted above, any such damage
will reduce the life of the handlebar and could lead
to breakage.
If you find that there is a sharp edge or burr on the
inside of the stem, right where the handlebars emerge,
it must be smoothed out with fine sandpaper (220
grit or finer) before the new handlebars are installed.
Such a sharp edge or burr could cause a scratching or
scoring of the handlebar. As noted above, any such
74
Ŷ Crankset
damage will reduce the life of the handlebar and
could lead to breakage.
Remove both sides from the bottom bracket. Clean
and inspect all parts carefully for cracks. Examine
both inside and outside surfaces. Pay particular
attention to edges, shapes and changes of shape
that are a part of your particular crankset design. Also
check the area around the pedal mounting holes.
Ŷ Seat Post
Remove from seat tube and remove from saddle.
Disassemble the head/saddle clamp assembly. Clean
and inspect all parts carefully for cracks.
Pay particular attention to the bolt (or bolts) that
clamp the saddle in place. If the bolt looks stretched,
bent or in any way damaged, replace it. Note that
these bolts have been known to be broken due to
fatigue when not properly tightened. They must be
tightened with a torque wrench.
Ŷ Wheels
Clean the wheels. Inspect the hub flange, where
the heads of the spokes are hooked (or otherwise
attached) to the hub flange, for cracks. Inspect the rim
where the spokes meet the rim. It is not uncommon
to see cracks form where the spokes meet the rim.
The threads of the seat post bolts be greased before
reassembly.
Ŷ Brake Track of Wheel Rim
The brake track is the surface of the rim where the
brake pads make contact. While not related to
fatigue, this surface can be worn out. We urge you
to inspect the brake tracks on your rims. They can
wear out quite quickly on a mountain bike used in
abrasive conditions. Many rims have brake track
wear indicators; please ask your retailer to show you
this feature.
Be sure the clamp assembly is clamped only to the
straight parallel part of the saddle rails.
Ŷ Seat Post Lubrication
Clean and apply the following to a seat post before
inserting into the frame.
FRAME MATERIAL
SEAT POST
LUBRICATION
SEAT TUBE
SEAT POST
ALLOY
ALLOY
ALLOY
CARBON
CARBON GEL
CARBON
ALLOY
CARBON GEL
CARBON
CARBON
CARBON GEL
Some brake pads are very aggressive and speed up
wear. If you see a noticeable amount of wear relative
to the nearby surface untouched by the brake pads,
speak to your retailer about possible replacement.
Severely worn brake tracks can lead to a broken
wheel.
GREASE
WARNING
GREASE - A high-quality bicycle bearing grease
CARBON GEL - Is a gel like lubricant formulated for use
with carbon fiber components (Cannondale p/n KF115/).
DO NOT RIDE ON A RIM THAT HAS BEEN WORN
OUT!
Ŷ Saddle
If the wear indicator shows that the rim is worn
out, there is a danger that the rim could be
broken due to tire pressure and/or riding loads.
While the saddle is off the seat post, clean and inspect
the rails carefully for cracks. Check the saddle rails to
the saddle body; make sure that the rails are firmly
attached.
IF THE RIM BREAKS WHILE YOU ARE RIDING
YOU COULD HAVE AN ACCIDENT, WITH RISK
OF SERIOUS INJURY, PARALYSIS OR DEATH.
Ŷ Pedals
Remove both from the crankset. Clean and inspect
carefully for cracks. Pay particular attention to
the pedal axle. See clipless pedal manufacturer’s
instructions for information on cleat wear and
replacement.
75
PART II
BICYCLE LIFESPAN
USEFUL LIFE OF
LIGHTWEIGHT FRAMES
NOTHING LASTS FOREVER,
INCLUDING YOUR BIKE
Lightweight frames and components usually have
shorter lives. For example, all aspects of use being
identical, a lightweight Super Six, System Six, CAAD7
or CAAD8 frame will have a shorter life than a heavier
CAAD3 frame.
When the useful life of your bike or its components is
over, continued use is hazardous.
Every Cannondale bicycle frame and the components
attached to the frame have a finite, limited useful life.
The length of that life will vary with the construction
and materials used in the frame and components, the
maintenance and care the frame and components
receive over their life and the type and amount of
use the frame and components are subjected. Use in
competitive events, trick riding, ramp riding, jumping,
aggressive riding, riding on severe terrain, riding in
severe climates, riding with heavy loads, commercial
activities and other types of non-standard use
can dramatically shorten the life of the frame and
components. Any one or a combination of these
conditions may result in an unpredictable breakage.
In selecting lightweight frames and components
you are making a trade-off, favoring the higher
performance that comes with light weight over
longevity. So, If you choose lightweight, high
performance equipment, be sure to inspect it
frequently.
ALL FRAMES AND COMPONENTS SHOULD BE
PERIODICALLY CHECKED BY AN AUTHORIZED
CANNONDALE RETAILER for indicators of stress and/
or potential breakage , including cracks, deformation,
delamination, creaking sounds, corrosion, paint
peeling, dents, and any other indicators of potential
problems, inappropriate use or abuse. These are
important safety checks and very important to help
prevent accidents, bodily injury to the rider and
shortened product life. (See PART I, Section 5 Service
and PART II, Section D. Inspect For Safety)
76
SECTION E. MAINTENANCE
CLEANING
Use only water and dishwashing liquid.
On suspension forks and shocks, cover adjustment
knobs and air filter (if equipped) with a clean plastic
bag secured temporarily with a rubber band or
masking tape.
WARNING
INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE ARE
IMPORTANT TO YOUR SAFETY AND THE
LONGEVITY OF YOUR BICYCLE.
Before wiping away dirt, use an ordinary water hose
to gently spray off heavy soils and dirt.
ANY PART OF A POORLY MAINTAINED BIKE
CAN BREAK OR MALFUNCTION LEADING TO
AN ACCIDENT WHERE YOU CAN BE KILLED,
SEVERELY INJURED OR PARALYZED.
CAUTION
DO NOT power wash or spray water under high
pressure to clean. Power washing will force
contaminants into parts where they will promote
corrosion, immediately damage, or result in
accelerated wear.
Please ask your Cannondale Dealer to help you
develop a complete maintenance program, a
program which includes a list of the parts on your
bike for YOU to check regularly. Frequent checks
are necessary to identify the problems that can lead
to an accident.
DO NOT use compressed air to dry.
DO NOT use abrasive or harsh chemical cleaner/
solvents which can damage the finish or attack
and destroy both the outside and internal parts.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED
OR KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT IF YOU IGNORE
THIS WARNING.
When rinsing, avoid directing the spray directly
at shock/fork adjusters or bearings.
30 DAY SERVICE
PREVENTING CORROSION
Many retailers offer a special on the first service of
your new bike. Whether it is free or not, please be
sure to have this first service done. The first service
is very important. Many parts of the bike will break
in, bed in, stretch or seat themselves through use.
This is true even with a perfectly assembled new
bike. The first service is the chance to make all the
small adjustments that will enhance the safety,
performance and durability of your new bike.
After cleaning and drying it is a good idea to lightly
coat the water bottle bosses with a water displacing
lubricant such as Tri-Flow or WD40 to minimize
corrosion from sweat and salt. This is particularly
important on bicycles used in coastal salt air
environments and those drenched in sweat on an
indoor trainer.
This is as important as the first oil change on a
new car. This first service also gives you the perfect
opportunity to ask questions arising from reading
the manuals and actually riding your new bike, take
steps to fine tune your fit and comfort on the bike,
and add accessories to suit your needs.
To thoroughly clean the frame it is desirable to remove
components. This is best done in conjunction with
a periodic overhaul by an authorized Cannondale
retailer.
77
PART II
LUBRICATION
TIGHTENING TORQUES
After cleaning your bike you should lubricate it. The
chain should be lubricated. Consult with your retailer
to choose among the many types of chain lubes best
suited to your climate and riding conditions. The
pivot points on your derailluers should be lubricated.
Apply a small drop of oil to each pivot point and wipe
off the excess.
Correct tightening torque for the fasteners (bolts,
screws, nuts) on your bicycle is very important to your
safety. Correct tightening torque for the fasteners is
also important for the durability and performance
of your bicycle. We urge you to have your Dealer
correctly torque all fasteners using a torque wrench.
If you decide to torque fasteners yourself always use
a torque wrench.
Periodically, depending upon how, how often, and
where you ride and the design of the components
on your bike, other lubrication must be part of your
maintenance. Some of you will know how to perform
the procedures on this check list, while others will
need to take the bike to a dealer. If you are not an
experienced and skilled bicycle mechanic, take your
bike to a retailer.
Find Tightening Torque Information
The wide range of bicycle models and
components used means that a listing of
tightening torque would be out of date by the
time it was published. Many fasteners should be
installed with a thread locking adhesive such as
Loctite ®.
Other Lubrication Checklist
t%FSBJMMFVS$BCMFT
To determine correct tightening torque and
any adhesive application for a fastener we
ask you to check:
t#SBLF$BCMFT
t#SBLF1JWPUT
t)FBETFU#FBSJOHT
Ŷ
Markings on the component. Many
components are marked. On-product
marking is becoming common.
Ŷ
Torque specs in the component
manufacturers instructions shipped with
your bicycle.
Ŷ
Torque specs listed on the websites of
component manufacturers.
Ŷ
With your Dealer. Dealers have access to
current data and have experience with
correct torque for most fasteners.
t#PUUPN#SBDLFU#FBSJOHT
t)VC#FBSJOHT
t'SFFIVC
t4FBU1PTU5P4FBU5VCF
See page 74.
t4UFN5P4UFFSJOH5VCF
t )FBETIPL PS -FGUZ 4VTQFOTJPO 'PSLT
(See owner’s manual supplement)
78
BICYCLE REPAIR / WORK STANDS
The clamping jaws of a bike stand can generate a
crushing force strong enough to seriously damage
your frame. See next figure.
CAUTION
Never place your bike in a bike stand by clamping
the frame.
Incorrect
Place your bike in a stand by extending the seat
post and positioning the stand clamp on the
extended seat post. Don’t extend beyond the
MINIMUM INSERT line marked on the seat post.
Since your carbon seat post can also be damaged
by clamping force, adjust the stand clamp for the
minimum clamping force needed to secure the
bike.
Correct
Also, before clamping, clean the post and protect
the seat post finish with a rag.
RIDING THROUGH WATER
Figure 22.
CAUTION
“Sealed” components (such as HeadShok and
Lefty forks, headsets, bottom brackets and hubs)
are effective at keeping mud and grit out of your
bearings.
PROTECT CARBON BIKES FROM
EXTREME TEMPERATURES
t 1SPUFDU ZPVS DBSCPO CJLF GSPN FYUSFNF
temperatures when storing or transporting it.
However, any bike that is submerged or exposed
to large amounts of water will require a complete
bearing overhaul to prevent extensive—and
expensive—damage.
t "MMPXZPVSCJLFUPDPPMPòPSXBSNVQCFGPSFZPV
ride
t %P OPU TUPSF ZPVS CJLF JO QMBDFT XIFSF UIF
temperature will exceed 66.5C° (150°F).
For example, do not leave your bike lying flat in
a black pickup truck bed in the desert sun, or,
under the glass of a hatchback auto.
79
PART II
APPLYING FRAME PROTECTION
Also, adhesive frame guards are not a fix for
incorrectly installed or routed cables or lines. If you
find that applied guards are wearing out very quickly,
consult with your Cannondale Dealer about the
routing on your bike.
Some areas of your bicycle require protection from
abrasion. If protection is not in place, damage can
result. Please consult with your Cannondale Dealer
about the replacement location and position of these
various frame protections.
NOTE: Damage to your bike resulting cable rub is not
covered under your warranty. Make sure the protections
indicated below are in place whenever you ride your
bike. Ask your Cannondale Dealer for help.
Housing and Cable Guides
Normal line and cable movement against the frame
can wear away painted finishes and decals.
Figure 24.
THIS PHOTO SHOWS A TYPICAL USE OF GUARD
MATERIAL AT A CONTACT POINT.
Headtube area
Seattube
Pivots areas
Anywhere a control cable or housing
may contact the frame.
Figure 23.
To apply the guard material :
1. Clean the frame with a mild detergent and wipe
dry with a clean towel. Do not use solvents or
harsh chemicals to clean the frame. OPTIONAL:
Trim the adhesive guard material to the shape
required.
CAUTION
Over time, cable rubbing can wear into the frame
itself causing very serious frame damage.
2. Remove the backing and position the guard
under the cable/ line.
Check over your bike after your first few rides.
Apply the guard material where rubbing is found.
When applied correctly and renewed when
worn, the guard material is good protection for
your bike.
3. Rub the guard firmly against the frame with your
fingers to fix it in place.
4. Periodically, recheck the guards and other areas
of the frame as you continue to ride. Replace the
guards if they wear out.
80
Right Chainstay Plate
Chainstay Protector
On mountain or road bikes, the chainstay plate (1)
is located on the right chainstay (2) just behind
the chainrings (3). This plate protects the carbon
(composite) chainstay from damage in the event the
chain is dropped from the chainring.
On mountain or road bikes, the chainstay protector
is a clear, adhesive film applied to the upper surface
of the right chainstay. This protector can prevent
damage to the chainstay caused by the chain.
Figure 27.
Figure 25.
On mountain bikes, a wrap-around fabric type
protector (1)
can be installed as additional
protection.
Downtube Protector
On mountain bikes, placement on the down tube
protector (1) on the downtube (2) reduces the
potential for damage caused by debris thrown by the
wheel.
Figure 28.
Figure 26.
81
PART II
SECTION F. CANNONDALE
LIMITED WARRANTY
Cannondale Retailers or other outlets specifically authorized
by Cannondale to distribute Cannondale bicycles.
Damage resulting from normal wear and tear, including
the results of fatigue, is not covered. Fatigue damage is a
symptom of the frame being worn out through normal use.
It is one kind of normal wear and tear, and it is the owner’s
responsibility to inspect his/her bicycle. See Section 5. and
D.
The specific warranty covering your Cannondale bicycle is
governed by the law of the state or country in which it was
purchased, and applies only to bicycles purchased from
Authorized Cannondale Retailers.
Damage resulting from corrosion is not covered.
Damage resulting from improper assembly or maintenance,
or from installation of parts and accessories not compatible
with the Cannondale bicycle, is not covered.
FRAMES: (frame, fork structure, swing arm): Cannondale
frames (except frames for Freeride, and Dirt Jumping bikes,
see below) are warranted by Cycling Sports Group, Inc., 16
Trowbridge Drive, Bethel, CT 06801 against manufacturing
defects in materials and/or workmanship for the lifetime of
the original owner.
All labor charges for warranty service are the responsibility of
the bicycle’s owner.
During the duration of this limited warranty, CYCLING
SPORTS GROUP, INC., will either repair any defective frame or
component, or, at our option, replace any defective frame or
component with the same or most nearly comparable model
PSDPNQPOFOUUIFOBWBJMBCMF5)*4*45)&&9$-64*7&3&.&%:
UNDER THIS WARRANTY. ANY AND ALL OTHER REMEDIES
AND DAMAGES THAT MAY OTHERWISE BE APPLICABLE ARE
EXCLUDED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, INCIDENTAL
03$0/4&26&/5*"-%"."(&40316/*5*7&%"."(&4
Cannondale frames for Freeride & Dirt Jumping bikes
(such as Gemini, Gemini DH, Judge, Perp and Chase) are
warranted against manufacturing defects in materials and/or
workmanship for a period of three (3) years from the date of
original retail purchase. The Freeride / Dirt Jumping warranty
does not cover any bike purchased and used for rental
purchase. The Freeride / Dirt Jumping warranty differs from
the warranty as stated in the Cannondale Owner’s Manual
only in its term. All other conditions apply.
THIS IS THE ONLY WARRANTY MADE BY CYCLING SPORTS
GROUP, INC., ON ITS FRAMES AND COMPONENTS, AND
THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES WHICH EXTEND BEYOND
THE DESCRIPTION HEREIN. ANY WARRANTIES THAT MAY
OTHERWISE BE IMPLIED BY LAW INCLUDING, BUT NOT
LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY
OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE EXCLUDED.
COMPONENTS: All other components, including HeadShok
and Lefty internal parts, suspension parts, frame fixtures
and finishes (paint and decals) are warranted against
manufacturing defects in materials and/or workmanship for a
period of one year from the date of original retail purchase.
Suspension forks (other than those made by Cannondale)
are not covered by this limited warranty, but are separately
covered by the stated warranty of their manufacturer.
Please refer to the documents included with your bicycle for
possible further restrictions.
This Limited Warranty gives the consumer specific legal
rights. The consumer may also have other legal rights which
vary from state to state or country to country. Some states
and countries do not allow the exclusion or limitation of
incidental or consequential damages or warranties, so the
above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. If it
is determined by a court of competent jurisdiction that a
certain provision of this limited warranty does not apply,
such determination shall not affect any other provision of
this limited warranty and all other provisions shall remain in
effect.
TERMS OF LIMITED WARRANTY:
This limited warranty is not meant to suggest or imply that
the bicycle cannot be broken or will last forever. It does mean
that the bicycle is covered subject to the terms of the limited
warranty.
This limited warranty applies only to the original owner of
a Cannondale bicycle and is not transferable to subsequent
owners.
For any warranty claim to be considered, the bicycle must be
brought in to an Authorized Cannondale Bicycle Retailer on
the same continent on which the bicycle was purchased. The
bicycle must be in assembled condition and accompanied by
the original, dated sales receipt for the bicycle. (Be sure to
keep your receipt in a safe place.)
This limited warranty is void if the bicycle is subjected to
abuse, neglect, improper repair, improper maintenance,
alteration, modification, an accident or other abnormal,
excessive, or improper use.
This limited warranty applies only to bicycles purchased in
fully assembled and adjusted condition from Authorized
82
WARRANTY REGISTRATION
Where Else Can I Find The Serial Number?
1. The serial number should also appear on your
original sales receipt.
We encourage you to register your bike with us
through one of the options below. Registration
helps us ensure your continued satisfaction as well as
enabling us to contact you with important product
recall safety information at a later time. You have the
following options:
2. The serial number is printed on a “Warranty Card”
applied to the inside back cover of this manual.
Your Cannondale Dealer should have placed
the label there. Other numbers important in
the manufacture of your bike are printed on this
card.
1. MAIL-IN: (USA Only) You can complete the tearout cannondale warranty registration postcard
in this manual, place a postage stamp on it and
drop it in a mailbox.
2. OUR WESBITE: You can go to our website and
complete the registration information online.
Go to http://www.cannondale.com/
1-&"4&/05&5)"5:06.645)"7&:06303*(*/"-
PROOF OF PURCHASE (SALES RECEIPT) WHEN
PRESENTING A WARRANTY CLAIM. BE SURE TO KEEP IT
*/"4"'&1-"$&5)&41&$*'*$8"33"/5:$07&3*/(
:063 $"//0/%"-& #*$:$-& *4 (07&3/&% #:5)&
COUNTRY IN WHICH IT WAS PURCHASED.
We respect your privacy, see http://www.cannondale.
com/privacy for details.
Other Numbers On The Bottom Bracket
The other number stamped into the bottom bracket
in the same area are NOT unique to your bicycle
although, they could be helpful to authorities in theft
recovery. These numbers are used in our factory.
SERIAL NUMBER
The serial number for your bike is located on a
barcoded label which is attached permanently to the
underside of the bottom bracket.
WARNING
Please register your bike with us. If you don’t,
we may not be able to contact you directly
with important safety recall information.
OTHER
NUMBERS
SIZE
Figure 30. Underside of Bottom Bracket
SERIAL NUMBER
(7- characters)
Figure 29. Underside of Bottom Bracket
83
PART II
CANNONDALE AUTHORIZED
DISTRIBUTORS
BELARUS:
DiscoverySport, 220030 Minsk Kirova
St. 23-7, Rep. of Belarus, tel/fax: +375 17 220 23 50,
website: www.velo.by email: [email protected]
EUROPEAN DISTRIBUTORS: [email protected],
tel: 0041 61 4879387, fax: 0041 61 4879385 0031-541-573587,
fax: 0031-541-514240
The following lists are subject to change without notice.
* Denotes Apparel and Accessory Distributor only.
EUROPE
(GLOBAL):
$BOOPOEBMF
#7
1PTUCVT
5100, Hanzepoort 27, 7570 GC,Oldenzaal, NL,
tel:
0031-541-573580,
fax:
0031-541-514240,
email: [email protected]
CROATIA: Keindl Sport, Reljkoviceva 2, 10000 Zagreb,
Croatia, tel: 00385-13708323, fax: 00385-13708324,
email: [email protected]
CZECH REPUBLIC: 7PLPMFL 3F[MFSPWB 1SBIB
10, CSK, tel: 00420 241740712, fax: 00420 241740712,
email: [email protected]
ESTONIA: Rattapood OU CCC, Rummu tee 3, Tallin 11911, tel:
+3726238776, fax +3726237132 email: [email protected]
GREECE: Gatsoulis Imports, 8 Thessalonikis street, T.T14342,
New Filadelfia Athens, GRD, tel: 0030-2102512779, fax: 00302102533960, email: [email protected]
EUROPEAN TOURISM AND RESORTS: [email protected]
cannondale.com, tel: 0041 61 4879387, fax: 0041 61 4879385
0031-541-573587, fax: 0031-541-514240
EUROPEAN APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES DEALERS:
[email protected], tel: 0041 61 4879387, fax:
0041 61 4879385
INTERNATIONAL SALES: 'SJFOETIJQ 7JMMBHF 3%
Bedford, PA 15522 USA tel: 814-623-4391, fax: 814-623-2107,
[email protected]
ARGENTINA: Lauro Competicion, Avda. San Pedrito 577,
Buenos Aires Argentina 01406, tel: 4613-8859, fax: 54-114612-8805 Email: [email protected] website:
www.cannondaleargentina.com
AUSTRALIA: Cannondale Australia, Unit 6, 4 Prosperity
Parade, N.S.W. 2103, Australia, tel: 61-2-9979-5851,
[email protected]
HUNGARY: Mali Bicycle Technology, Gyepsor Szinesfem
u. 22-24., H-1211 Budapest, Hungary, tel: 0036-1420-5032,
fax: 0036-142-0532
BERMUDA: The New Winners Edge, 34 Church
Street, Hamilton HM11, Bermuda, tel: 441-295-6012,
fax: 411-292-1904
ICELAND: GA Petursson Ltd., Faxefen 14, 128 Reykjavik, Box
8176, Iceland, IS-108, tel: 354-520-0200, email: [email protected]
is
BOLIVIA: 7JTBM*NQPSU&YQPSU"WFOJEB#BO[FS4BOUB
Cruz, Bolivia, tel: (591-3) 341 4141, fax: (591-3) 341 4600
LATVIA:'"/44JBiBRVBQSPw&MJKBT3JHB-7UFM
00371-7626025, fax 00371-7892053, email:[email protected]
BORNEO: Cannaisa, 101 Frankel Ave.,
tel/fax: 65-6441-4772, www.cannasia.com
MALTA: Pedal Power, 56 Triq Is-Stazzjon, B’Kara, BKR 12,
Malta, tel: 00356-21227265, fax: 00356 227265
BRAZIL: Cannondale Brasil, Av. Prof. Sylia Matos, 370, CEP
04182-010 Sao Paulo Brazil Tel:2264-2167/2264-2143 www.
cannondale.com.br
POLAND: PGR Sp. Z.O.O., 15A/39
Warszawa 01-864 tel: +48713431539,
Literacka
St.,
RUSSIA: Sportclub Triatlon, Lusinovskaya Ul 53/12,
7&-0.*3 .PTDPX 364 UFM GBY
007952378463, email: [email protected]
SLOVAKIA: Eximo s.r.o., Trencianska 764/409, 01851
Nova
Dubnica,
Slovakia,
tel:
00421-424430034,
fax: 00421424430034, email: [email protected]
Singapore
BRUNEI: Cannasia, 101 Frankel Ave., Singapore, 458224,
tel:65-6441-4772, email: [email protected]
www.cannasia.com
CHILE: Inversiones Intercycles Ltda., Av. Neuva Las Condes,
4BOUJBHP $IJMF 4PVUI "NFSJDB UFM 3470, fax: 562-217-3167, email: [email protected]
CHINA: Kele ShanGu Trading Co. LTD (Shenzhen) F2-28 Arc
%F5SJPNQIF4US$JUZ7BMMF4IBIF8FTU3PBE/BOTIBO
Shenzhen PR China tel: 755-267-54695
SLOVENIA: Sporttrade 2000, Celovska 280, Ljubljana,
1000, tel: 00386-15104945, fax: 00386-15199580,
email: [email protected]
COLOMBIA: 64" #JLFT &6 $3" " .FEFMMJO
Colombia, tel: 574 262 2820, fax: 574 262 2880 [email protected]
epm.net.co
TURKEY: Delta Bisiklet, 19 Sk. 4a Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490,
email: [email protected], www.deltabisiklet.com
,IBSLPW
COSTA RICA: Xcesso S.A., San José, Costa Rica,
tel: 506-2290-5696, fax: 506-2290-3412, [email protected]
MOLDAVIA: 7FMPTFSWJDF1BSBMBY TUS 5JHIJOB Kishinev, email: [email protected]
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: "SP 1FEBM EF 'FCSFSP Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, tel: (809) 686-5861, fax:
(809) 687-6548, email: [email protected]
UKRAINE: 7FMPUSBEF &OBLJFWTLBZB &
email: [email protected]otrade.kharkov.com
KAZAKSTAN: Limpopo, 534 Seifallin str, 050022 Almaty
email: [email protected]
ECUADOR: X-Bikes, Shirys N41-206 e Isla Floreana, Quito
Ecuador tel: 593-99-217050 fax: 593+22-440312
LITHUANIA: Umarai, Ukmerges g 283A, 06313 Wilnius
email: [email protected]
84
EL SALVADOR: Grupo Extremo, Blvd Santa Elena Atrium
Plata 5y6 Antiquo Cuscattan San Salvador, El Salvador tel:
502-228-99636
PANAMA: %JTUSVCVJEPSB 3BMJ 7JB 5PDVNFO "QBSUBEP 052, Zona 7, Panama, tel: 507-220-3844, fax: 507-220-5303,
[email protected]
GUAM: Hornet Bicycles, PO Box 8294, Tamuning,
Guam 96931, tel: 671-646-9191, fax: 671-646-1900,
email: [email protected]
PERU: Cycling S.R.L.,
Higuereta-Surco, Lima,
[email protected]
GUATEMALA: Bike Center, S. A., 20 Calle 24-67 Zona 10, Paris
Plaza, Local 2-3, Guatemala City Guatemala, tel: 502-3334388, fax:502-333-7394, email:[email protected]
PHILIPPINES: Newton Multi-Sales, 71 Kundiman, Cor. llagan
St., SFDM, Quezon City, Philippines, 1105, tel: (0632)372512728 & 3717231, fax: (0632) 3735439, [email protected]
HONDURAS:
Hondubikes,
Col.Humuya
Av.Sabana
Tegucigalpa, Honduras , tel: & fax: 504-239-2192
PUERTO RICO: Seamount Corporation, Marginal Borie,
&EJöDJP -PDBM 4BO +VBO 1VFSUP 3JDP UFM
1-787-763-4369, fax: 1-787-765-6520, [email protected]
HONG KONG: Flying Ball Bicycle, 478 Castle Peak Road,
Cheung Sha Wan, Hong Kong, tel: 852-238-13661, fax: 852239-74406, www.flyingball.com
Av. Tomas Marsano 2851,
Peru, tel/fax: 511-271-0247,
PUERTO RICO: TL Bicycle Distributor Inc, Jose A. Lugo, Edif.
.BS EF *TMB 7FSEF "QU 2 4BO +VBO 1VFSUP 3JDP tel: 787 613 1040,
INDIA: Tube Investments of India, PO Box 5, MTH Rd
Ambattur, Chennai 60053, India, tel: 914 428 553492, fax:
914 428 553757
SINGAPORE: Cannasia Pte. Ltd., 101 Frankel Avenue,
Singapore 458224, tel: 65-6441-4772, [email protected]
com.sg, www.cannasia.com
INDONESIA: Cannasia Pte. Ltd., 101 Frankel Ave., Singapore,
458224, tel: 65-6441-4772, email: [email protected]
com.sg, www.cannasia.com
SOUTH AFRICA: Cape Cycle Systems (PTY) Ltd., 10 Argo
Road, Wetton, South Africa, 7808, tel: 27-21-761 3528, fax: 2721-761 5914, [email protected]
ISRAEL: DAA Sport Marketing LP, PO Box 6035, Netanya,
Israel, 42160, tel: 972-(0)9-865-6960, fax: 972-(0)9-885-0144,
[email protected]
TAIWAN: Three Peaks Bicycle Company, No. 222 Jin9JBO UI 3E 5BJDIVOH 5BJXBO 1IPOF www.threepeaks.com.tw
JAMAICA: Hi Tech Industries LTD., 8 Dumfries Road Kingston
10 Jamaica W. Indies, tel: 876 855 8888 , fax: 876 978 7414
THAILAND: Cycoholic 45/39 Soi Atthakrawee 1, Sukhumvit 26
Road (Soi Aree) Bangkok, Thailand 10110 tel:+66815678886
[email protected] www.thaicannasia.com
JAPAN: Cannondale Japan, 5-12-5, Harayamadai, Sakai
City, Osaka, Japan, 590-0132, tel: 072-299-9399, [email protected]
cannondale.com
TRINIDAD: Motorcycles Etc., 89 Eastern Main Road, Barataria,
Trinidad and Tobago, tel: 868-675-2453, fax: 868-675-3816,
[email protected]
KAZAKASTAN: Doctor Can, 158 Makataeva Street, 61 app,
Rep. Of Kazakhstan, 480090, tel: 7 3272 338943
TRINIDAD: Sports & Games 47 Tissue Drive Trincity, Trinidad
Tel: 868-640-2507 Fax: 868-640-0505
KOREA:4BOCBEB4QPSUT%PPIZVO#MEH/POIZVO
dong, Kangnam-Gu, Seoul, Korea, tel: 822-543-6390, fax: 8223442-6391, email: [email protected]
KUWAIT:4JMJDPO7BMMFZ(SPVQ$BOOPOEBMF4UPSF4IVXBJLI
Industrial Area, Kuwait City, Kuwait Tel: 965-482-6723 Email:
[email protected]
LEBANON:70."9"TDP$FOUFS4BTTJOF#FJSVU-FCBOPO
tel: 961-132-6111, fax: 961-132-8666, www.vo2maxlb.com
MALAYSIA: Cannasia Pte. Ltd., 101 Frankel Avenue,
Singapore, 458224, tel: 65-6441-4772, [email protected]
com.sg & www.cannasia.com
MAURITIUS:&NDBS-UE0ME.PLB3PBE#FMM7JMMBHF3FQVCMJD
of Mauritius, tel: 230-208-6335, fax: (230) 212-5952
MEXICO: 7JBOTJ 5SJBUIMPO #PVUJRVF "W %JWJTJPO %FM /PSUF
$PM3PTFEBM$PZPBDBO.FYJDP%'UFM
5549-5291, fax: 525-549-5291, [email protected]
NETHERLAND ANTILLIES:5SJ4QPSU /7 # "JSQPSU #MWE
Simpsonbay, St. Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, tel: (599)5454385, fax: (599)545-4384, [email protected]
NEW CALEDONIA: Royal Motors SA., 9, route de la Baie des
Dames B.P. 2548, Nouméa, New-Caledonia, 98846, tel: 687
285 912, fax: 687 286 320, [email protected]
UNITED ARAB EMRIATES:1SP[POF10#PY%VCBJ
(United Arab Emirates) Phone: +9714 33-88644 Fax: +009714
3385552 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.
dubaicycles.com
URUGUAY: .PUPDJDMP 4" "7 4BZBHP $1 Montevideo, Uruguay, phone: 5982 354 20 80
VENEZUELA: #JDJ#JLFT""7&E"SUFMJUPMPDBM8*/%$53
-PT1BMPT(SBOEFT$BSBDBT7FOF[VFMBUFM
0285; fax: 58-212-283-7466
VENEZUELA: Bicimania C.A., C.C., M Ave. Bolivar, Porlamar,
.BSHBSJUJB *TMBOE 7FOF[VFMB UFM GBY 295-262-9116, [email protected]
VENEZUELA:#JLF4QPSUT7FOF[VFMB$FOUSP$PNFSDJBM*CBSSB
Local 3A, Calle Garcilazo, Colinas de Bello Monte, Caracas,
7FOF[VFMBUFMGBY
WORLD WIDE MILITARY SALES: tel: 814 623 4391; fax: 814
623 2107, [email protected]
WORLD WIDE TOURISM & RESORTS: tel: 814 623 4391; fax:
814 623 2107, [email protected]
(10/09)
85
PART II
APPENDIX A
Cannondale BB30 Standard Bicycle Frames
Certain Cannondale bicycle frames are manufactured using the BB30 standard. See http://www.BB30standard.
com/. It may be possible to convert a BB30 frame for use with standard English/68mm or 73mm bottom
bracket cranksets using the appropriate Cannondale frame adapter. Other adapters, ones not specifically
approved for use by Cannondale may void your warranty.
Figure 31. BB30 Bottom Bracket Shell
CAUTION
All Adapters must be installed by a professional bike mechanic. No adapter should be used as a frame
repair part. Adapters should only be used in undamaged frames in good condition. Improper installation
or removal can result in damage and void applicable frame warranty.
The adapter is removable, however, repeated removal and reinstallation could result in damage to the
SI BB shell and is not recommended. Damage caused by improper removal is not covered under your
warranty.
86
APPENDIX B
Maximum Fork Length (Mountain Bikes)
Maximum Fork Length is an important frame safety testing specification for front suspension mountain bikes.
You must observe the measurement when installing headset parts, headset adapters, installing and adjusting
a fork, and selecting replacement forks.
WARNING
YOU MUST SELECT A REPLACEMENT FORK NOT ONLY BASED ON HEAD TUBE DIAMETER BUT THE
CRITICAL FACTOR OF FRAME MAXIMUM FORK LENGTH
DO NOT EXCEED MAXIMUM FORK LENGTH Exceeding the MAXIMUM FORK LENGTH limit can overload
the frame causing it to break)while riding.
Your retailer MUST follow observe this specification for your bike. For Maximum Fork Length specifications
for Cannondale bicycles, see http://www.cannondale.com/tech_center/
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY
IF YOU IGNORE THIS WARNING.
INJURED,
PARALYZED
OR
FROM
BOTTOM OF FRAME
HEAD TUBE
Headset
MAXIMUM
FORK
LENGTH
TO CENTER OF
THE FORK AXLE
87
KILLED
IN
AN
ACCIDENT
PART II
APPENDIX C
4. Insert the seat post and tighten the seat binder
to the specified torque with an accurate torque
wrench. Consult the seat post manufacturer’s
instructions for torque information.
Care And Maintenance Of
Carbon Fiber Seat Posts
5. Check tightening torques of the saddle to seat
post clamp bolts. Too much torque may break the
bolts. Too little torque will result in movement
which leads to fatigue and bolt breakage.
Inserting the Seat Post
Check the seat tube (1) opening , and slot (2) carefully
for sharp edges or burrs. Anything that can scratch,
score, gouge, or cut the seat post can cause serious
damage leading to breakage of the seat post.
Sharp edges or burrs can be removed by hand by
lightly sanding with a very fine sandpaper (400 grit).
The should feel very smooth without jagged edges
or nicks.
Figure 33.
Periodic Seat Post Inspection
Frequent seat post checks are necessary to identify
the problems that can lead to an accident. Regularly
or in conjunction with your regular bike maintenance
routine, do the following:
1. Remove the seat binder from the frame seat
post. Clean the binder, the seat post, and inside
the seat tube. Use a clean dry towel. Do not use
solvents.
Figure 32.
2
1. Make sure the seat post, seat binder, and seat
tube are clean.
2. Apply small amount of a carbon seat post
gel (Cannondale part number KF115/ to
seat post surface. The gel adds desirable
friction and minimizes corossion. It will
help keep your seat post in place.
3
Carefully inspect the seat post for damage (e.g.,
cracks, scratches, scrapes, gouges, splintering).
If the seat post is damaged in any way, (cracks,
scratches, scrapes, gouges, splintering), do not
ride it; discard it. Replace it with a new one.
3. Always properly torque saddle to seat post clamp
bolts. Too much torque may break the bolts.
Too little torque will result in movement which
leads to fatigue and bolt breakage.
Position the seat binder on the seat tube with
the binder slot (A) opposite the seat tube slot
(b). Locating the binder slot opposite the seat
tube slot reduces the chances of cracking from
deformation or accidental overtightening.
88
WARNINGS
TO AVOID SEAT POST OR FRAME DAMAGE:
1. FOLLOW THE SEAT POST MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS If you do not have the manufacturer’s
instructions for your seat post, obtain and read them before using the seat post.
2. INSPECT AFTER ANY CRASH, FALL, OR IMPACT - Remove and inspect the seat post for damage (eg.,
cracks, scratches, scrapes, gouges, splintering). If you find damage, replace it with a new one. STOP
RIDING A DAMAGED SEAT POST IMMEDIATELY GO TO PART II, Section D. Inspect For Safety. Read
“Understanding Composites” for information on carbon fiber
3. NEVER FORCE A SEAT POST INTO THE SEAT TUBE. The seat post should always be a slide fit. If the
seat post is difficult to install, there is a serious problem. Do not shorten or cut a seat post. Ask your
Cannondale dealer for help in properly fitting and adjusting your seat post.
4. KEEP THE SEAT POST’S “MINIMUM INSERT” BELOW THE TOP OF THE SEAT TUBE.
5. USE A TORQUE WRENCH TO TIGHTEN SEAT POST BINDER AND ALL SADDLE MOUNTING
FASTENERS.
6. NEVER USE LIGHT OR SPRAY OILS TO LUBRICATE A SEAT POST OR INSIDE THE SEAT TUBE. Never
use solvents, or chemical spray cleaners to clean the inside of the seat tube. Wipe out the seat tube with
a clean dry towel only. Light oils (WD40 and oils typically used in honing) and solvents, and including
chemical cleaners can attack and weaken composite bonds holding the frame together leading to
breakage. Follow the seat post and frame manufacturer instructions. See also page 74.
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED OR KILLED IF YOUR IGNORE THESE WARNINGS.
89
PART II
APPENDIX D
Care And Maintenance Of Carbon Fiber Forks & Stem
WARNINGS
ALWAYS SEEK PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
Incorrectly installing, adjusting, servicing, or assembling the wrong parts (handlebar stem, compression
assembly, brake bolt, spacers and spacer positions) on your bicycle fork can cause serious damage to
it. Any failure in the fork, headset, handlebar stem, or compression assembly while riding can cause
you to have a serious accident. All adjustments, maintenance, and any changes must be made by your
Cannondale Dealer.
STOP RIDING A DAMAGED FORK & STEM IMMEDIATELY Your fork can be seriously damaged in any
crash or impact. Damage can be concealed and requires very carefully inspection by a professional bike
mechanic.
A damaged fork and/or handlebar stem can fail without warning. Go to PART II, Section D. Inspect For
Safety. Read “Understanding Composites” for information on carbon fiber
REPLACE THE FORK WITH A NEW ONE IF THE DROPOUT TABS ARE MISSING OR DAMAGED. The dropout
tabs located at the bottom of the fork dropout act as a secondary wheel retention device and can reduce
the risk of the wheel disengaging from the fork if the quick release is not correctly adjusted and closed. It
is possible for the tabs to become worn out or damaged through repeated wheel installation and removal,
car rack use, etc.
DO NOT MODIFY THE FORK IN ANY WAY. Do not drill holes or install mechanical clamps.
DO NOT EXCEED THE MAXIMUM STACK HEIGHT OR LOCATE SPACERS ON TOP OF THE STEM. MAXIMUM
STACK HEIGHT is a distance spacers may be stacked between the top of the head tube and the bottom of
the stem. Exceeding this distance with spacers or locating spacers on top of the handlebar stem can place
significant stress on the steerer tube. It could break.
For technical information and specifications, see http://www.cannondale.com/tech_center/
YOU CAN BE SEVERELY INJURED, PARALYZED OR KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT IF YOU IGNORE THESE
WARNINGS.
90
NOTE: Carbon fiber bicycle forks and
stems come in many different shapes.
The basic parts common to most carbon
forks and handlebar stem systems are
shown here.
Your fork appearance and shape may vary
from what is shown.
If you have any questions about your fork,
ask your Cannondale Dealer.
NOTE:
DROPOUTS, STEERER, and
HANDLEBAR STEM can be made from
carbon fiber, metals or both in a “carbon
fiber” fork.
91
PART II
APPENDIX E
BICYCLE RACKS
Bicycle automobile racks are available from many different manufacturers and many different rack designs
exist. They are convenient devices to transport your bike. However, any bicycle rack has the potential to
seriously damage your bicycle. Damage can occur immediately due to some aspect of an incompatible or poor
rack design. Damage can occur after repeated mounting, and dis-mounting. Damage can also happen while
the the bike is being transported in the rack. We can’t cover all the possible ways in which a rack can cause
damage to your bike.
WARNING
READ AND FOLLOW THE RACK MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE MOUNTING YOUR BIKE.
Both carbon and aluminum frames and forks can be damaged (crushed, cracked, or dented) by the clamps
and support systems of a bike rack. Both carbon and aluminum can suffer serious abrasion damage by the
movement of the bike in the rack during transport. All damage to your bike is very serious, that is why you
must take extra care when choosing a bike rack and when actually mounting your bike in the rack.
WHEN MOUNTING YOUR BIKE ON A RACK
Remove all bags, panniers, water bottles etc. To minimize wind resistance, loading, and avoid chafing
damage.
ASK YOUR CANNONDALE DEALER FOR HELP CHOOSING AND USING A BIKE RACK.
See the table on the following page for more rack information.
CAUTION
WHEN USING A RACK WITH FORK DROPOUT CLAMPS
Make sure that both fork dropouts are engaged in the rack before clamping. Make sure both dropouts are
clamped with equal force. If only one dropout is engaged and the bike tips over, the leverage can exert
great force that may damage the dropout. If your bike tips over, have the dropouts examined by a retailer.
92
TYPE OF RACK DESIGN
RECOMMENDATION & CAUTIONS
CLAMPS ON TIRES / WHEELS ONLY
Suitable for both carbon and aluminum frames
This type does not use clamps on
any other part of the frame or fork.
This is the best system design because there is no potential
cracking or crushing damage to the frame or fork. Chafing
wear is avoided.
FLOATING FORK MOUNT & REAR
WHEEL TRAY
Suitable for both carbon and aluminum frames
This design functions exactly as a
quick release on your bike. The rear
wheel is clamped in a tray. No other
clamps are used on any other part of
the frame.
WHEEL CLAMPS & UPRIGHT ARM
CLAMP
In this design, wheels are clamped in
a wheel tray and the bicycle is held
upright by and arm clamping the
downtube.
NON-FLOATING FORK
& REAR WHEEL TRAY
MOUNT
Be sure quick release on rack is properly adjusted and tightly
closed.
The Thule Echelon with ETC Equalized Twin Cam is suitable as it
has an axle floating mechanism, like a standard quick release.
Do not use on bikes with carbon fiber downtubes.
When clamp is tightened the carbon downtube can be broken.
When clamp is looser, chafing can cause structural wear.
A loose clamp can allow movement and possible chafing
damage. Clean the clamping area to eliminate abrasive particles,
pad the clamping area and properly tighten the clamp.
Not recommended for either carbon or aluminum bikes.
example: Thule Peloton.
If one dropout is slightly thicker than the other dropout, all
the clamping force is applied to the thicker dropout. The high
force on the one thicker dropout may crack a carbon dropout.
The thinner dropout may move in the rack causing wear and
abrasion, The fork blade attached to the thicker dropout takes
most of the loads caused by 70 mile per hour wind and bumps.
The result may be damage to your fork.
HANGER RACK
Not recommended for either carbon or aluminum bikes.
On this type the bicycle hangs on
two arms projecting aft from a trunk
mounted rack
Do not use on bikes with carbon fiber tubes.
With this type, a mechanism pulls the
two sides of the fork in at the same
time, and pulls both sides in the
same distance.
The point loading where the arms contact the underside of
the tubes may crack the tubes. Additionally the lower part of
the bike is difficult to secure, and it may move, causing chafing
and structural wear. Additionally when two bikes are mounted
on these racks the contact points between the bikes may be
cracked or chafed, causing structural damage.
93
PART II
APPENDIX F
Risk To Children
BICYCLE TRAINERS
WARNING
Potential Damage
KEEP CHILDREN AWAY FROM BICYCLES
MOUNTED ON STATIONARY TRAINERS, EVEN
WHEN THE BICYCLE IS NOT IN USE.
CAUTION
Spinning wheels attract children’s attention and
present a serious risk to young fingers.
Improperly mounting a bike in a trainer, or
using one that is not compatible with your
particular bike frame can cause serious
damage.
Children have also been known to rotate cranks
by hand on bicycles left unattended on stationary
trainers, putting themselves at risk of serious
injury.
This kind of damage is not covered by the
Cannondale Limited Warranty.
Ask you dealer for help with trainers, the right one
and the correct way to use it.
If you ride a trainer that requires removal of the front
wheel and clamps the fork dropouts: Be sure your
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wear parts, weaken and damage your bike.
If you ride a trainer that holds the bike up by clamping
the rear quick release between two cones: Take off
the nice, lightweight quick release that came with
your bike. Substitute a heavy, classic all steel quick
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wear parts, weaken and damage your bike. Note that
many modern quick releases will not fit the clamping
cones in this kind of trainer because their shapes are
incompatible.
Be particularly cautious with a carbon frame or fork.
Carbon is relatively soft, not abrasion resistant. If there
is any relative movement, carbon will wear quickly.
If you ride a trainer a lot, consider using an old
bike: Corrosion from sweat will take it’s toll.
Weight is irrelevant. Save wear on your expensive
components.
94
SECTION G.
PRE-RIDE CHECKLIST
Are you visible to motorists? If you are riding at
dusk, dawn or at night, you must make yourself
visible to motorists. Use front and rear lights and
a strobe or blinker. Reflectors alone do not provide
adequate visibility. Wear reflective clothing (See PART
I, Section 2.E Night Riding and PART II, A. Important
Safety Information).
WARNING
Is it raining or wet? If so, be more cautious. Your
braking distances will increase, and your tires’ grip
on the road will decrease. Remember that motorists’
visibility decreases with bad weather (See PART
I, Section 2.D Wet Weather Riding and PART II, A.
Important Safety Information)
FOLLOW THIS CHECKLIST BEFORE EVERY
RIDE. IF YOU HAVE ANY REASON TO SUSPECT
THAT YOUR BICYCLE IS NOT FUNCTIONING
PROPERLY, DO NOT RIDE IT.
Have it inspected by an Authorized Cannondale
Retailer. To locate your nearest Authorized
Cannondale Retailer call 1-800-BIKE-USA. Failure
to follow this checklist and to have any potential
problem inspected could lead to an accident, with
risk of serious injury, paralysis or death.
Are your tires properly inflated? Tires
must inflated to the recommended pressure.
(See PART I, Section 4.G Tires and Tubes).
Are your wheels true? Lift each end of the bike and
spin each wheel. Does the space between the rim
and the brake pads, or the tire and the frame, remain
nearly the same size as the wheel turns? Are your
spokes tight? (See PART I, Section 1.C Mechanical
Safety Check).
Are you wearing a helmet and other appropriate
equipment and clothing, such as protective
glasses and gloves? Do not wear loose clothing that
could become entangled in the bicycle (See PART I,
Section 2.A The Basics).
Are your wheels’ quick-releases properly
fastened? Be sure to read the section on proper
operation of quick-release skewers (See PART I,
Section 4.A Wheels).
Are your seatpost and stem securely fastened?
Twist the handlebars firmly from side to side while
holding the front wheel between your knees. The
stem must not move in the steering tube. Similarly,
the seatpost must be secure in the seat tube (See
PART I, Section 3. Fit).
95
PART II
Are your front and rear brakes functioning
properly? 8JUI7CSBLFT UIF RVJDL SFMFBTFiOPPEMFw
must be properly installed. With cantilever brakes,
the quick release straddle cable must be properly
attached. With caliper brakes the quick release lever
must be closed. With any rim brake, the brake pads
must make firm contact with the rim without the
brake levers hitting the handlebar grip (See PART I,
Section 4.C Brakes).
With hydraulic disc brakes, check that the lever feels
firm, does not move too close to the handlebar grip,
and there is no evidence of leaking brake fluid. With
cable actuated disc brakes, check that the lever feels
firm and does not move too close to the handlebar
grip. With any disc brakes, the brake pads must make
firm contact with the rotor without the brake levers
hitting the handlebar grip (See PART I, Section 4.C
Brakes).
How do your clipless pedals work today? Clip in
and out of your pedals before you begin. Experienced
cyclists do. The connection between cleat and pedal
is affected by dozens of factors including dirt, mud,
lubrication, spring tension and wear. By clipping in
and out you will check the function and have a fresh
memory of how they feel (See PART I, Section 4.E
Pedals).
How recently were your frame, fork and
components inspected? Never ride a frame, fork or
components with any crack or damage. (See PART II,
- Section D. Inspect For Safety)
96
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