System for recording identical electronic and photographic images

System for recording identical electronic and photographic images
US005389984A
United States Patent [191
[11]
[45]
Lovenheim
Patent Number:
Date of Patent:
5,389,984
Feb. 14, 1995
[54] SYSTEM FOR RECORDING IDENTICAL
ELECTRONIC AND PHOTOGRAPHIC
IMAGES
the Professional Photographer”, brochure.
[76] Inventor:
Instant Proo?ng Systems, Dr. Harry J. Oles.
John E. Lovenheim, 190 Council
Rock Ave., Rochester, NY. 14610
[21] Appl. No.: 983,955
[22] Filed:
[51]
Int. Cl.6 .................... .. G03B 29/00; G03B 17/38;
[52]
US. Cl. ................................. .. 354/76; 354/267.1;
G03B 15/06
354/290; 358/909.1
[58]
Field of Search .................... .. 354/76, 267.1, 290,
[56]
354/430; 358/9091, 906
References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,027,315
4,285,587
5/1977
3/1981
Babney ................................ .. 354/76
..
4,566,767 1/ 1986
4,603,966 8/ 1986
4,615,596
4,616,926
4,618,239
4,738,526
10/1986
10/1986
10/1986
4/1988
4,799,072
1/ 1989
4,805,037
4,835,563
4,864,410
4,903,057
4,959,670
4,972,221
5,006,871
5,008,697
5,053,879
5,072,246
2/1989
5/1989
9/ 1989
2/1990
9/1990
11/ 1990
4/1991
4/1991
10/1991
12/1991
5,138,460
5,140,360
Studio Pro TM Instant Preview Systems, brochure.
“You’re a VIP with Cokesbury and Olan Mills”, Olan
Mills, p. 135.
“A Whole Family of Instant Proo?ng Systems”.
“Proo?ess Operation Saves Time, Boosts Sales”, Mike
Dec. 1, 1992
.
Electra Vision, “A New Generation of Equipment For
8/1992 Tsukamoto et a1. .............. .. 354/430
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
0233736 2/1987 European Pat. Off. .
3018722 11/1981 Germany .
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Electra Vision EVZOOO, “The Power to be Your Best”
brochure.
Daniel, p. 8.
Highlights, “EPS Introduces the New Studio Pro In
stant Preview System”, vol. 1, No. 11, Spring 1991.
Highlights, “EPS Enters Electronic Imaging”, vol. VI.
“A Whole Family of Instant Preveiw Systems”, Studio
Pro, pp. 78-85.
“Danny Mfg. Co., Inc. Enters Market With New Elec
tronic Preview System”, Background Times.
“Electronic Proo?ng Has Landed”, Denny Variali,
Chairman of Denny Electravsion Co., Inc.
“$7,595 Plus Tax and Shipping”, Video Proofs.
“Beattie LRX”, Video Proofs.
Sony Service Manual, XC-7l1/711P.
Primary Examiner-Michael L. Gellner
Assistant Examiner-Jae N. Noh
Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Sh1esinger Arkwright &
Garvey
[57]
ABSTRACT
Apparatus for recording a video image which is identi
cal to a photograph of a person includes a video camera
for making a video image and a photographic camera
having an openable shutter for exposing a piece of ?lm
for taking a photograph. A computer is operatively
connected to the photographic camera and to the video
camera for sending a take signal to the photographic
camera at a predetermined time before sending a take
signal to the video camera, the predetermined time
being equal to the length of time required to open the
shutter. Thus the photographic camera takes a photo
graph which is identical to the video image recorded by
the video camera, because the photographic camera and
the video camera respond to their respective take sig
nals at the same time.
19 Claims, 3 Drawing Sheets
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FIG. 3
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5,389,984
SYSTEM FOR RECORDING IDENTICAL
ELECTRONIC AND PHOTOGRAPHIC IIVIAGES
2
video capture that the studio photography system be set
to capture the video image just before the high intensity
strobes go off by using the modeling light. This scheme
results in a video image which is captured earlier in time
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The invention relates to a system for recording an
than the photographic image; hence, necessarily, the
video image and the photographic image, although
image of an object on an electronic medium and for
recording an identical image of the object on a photo
similar, are not identical.
U.S.'Pat. No. 4,835,563 to Larish discloses a portrait
graphic medium.
studio system for simultaneously recording a color
video image of the portrait subject as seen by a photo
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
graphic camera. That system includes a lens for direct
Despite the availability of inexpensive photographic
ing image-forming light from a portrait subject to both
cameras which allow amateur photographers to take
a photographic camera and a video camera. A beam
photographs, there remains a demand for studio portrait
photography. Studio portrait photography is still popu
splitter directs part of the image-forming light to the
video camera while allowing part of the image-forming
lar because beautiful, accurate portraits of individuals
light to expose a piece of photographic ?lm. When a
are best made under controlled lighting conditions with
high quality, professional photographic equipment.
Traditionally, a portrait photographer took various
poses of a subject, developed the photographs at a later
time, and had the subject return for approval of
“proofs.” The proofs selected by the subject would then
be reproduced in greater quantity and in different sizes
portrait photograph is to be taken, the operator de
presses a push-button on the camera whereby the cam
era circuitry (in cooperation with a microprocessor)
actuates ?ashlighting of the portrait subject, opens the
shutter of the camera, and simultaneously records a
video image of the portrait subject. That system works
well yet does not take into account timing differences of
as desired by the subject/customer. Needless to say, this
the video and photographic cameras. There is a need for
was a very time-consuming process that required lots of 25 an even more accurate system for consistently record
effort. Furthermore, occasionally no proofs would be
satisfactory to the customer, or through some mishap
no photographs would be suitable, and another photo
graphic posing session would have to be scheduled.
“One-hour” development of photographic ?lm is
now commonplace thanks to automation. It is possible,
therefore, to provide a customer with proofs relatively
quickly. However, the problem remains that there may
be problems with the actual images of the customer on
ing identical electronic images of a subject correspond
ing to the photographic images captured on a photosen
sitive medium.
Conventional video cameras have a continuous scan
ning cycle in which images are constantly being tempo
rarily stored by a charge coupled device (CCD) which
then downloads the image for storage on video ?lm or
into the memory of a computer. When the CCD is being
the photographic proofs. Accordingly, prior studio 35 discharged into the vertical register memory, the CCD
is unable to record any new video images; i.e., the video
photography systems have been developed that allow a
photography subject to view, such as on a television or
video monitor, a likeness similar to the photographic
image captured on a film negative, whereby a decision
can be made whether or not to develop a particular
negative.
To facilitate posing, photographers currently use
various reference marks scribed or written directly on a
ground glass view?nder or on an acetate overlay placed
device is in a black, download register state, or vertical
blanking state, and is incapable of accepting new image
data.
Accordingly, problems arise in conventional still
photography when a photographic camera is used in
conjunction with a video camera for recording video
images of a portrait subject so that the subject can view
images of what is supposed to be on the photographic
on the ground glass. Furthermore, in conventional pho 45 film negative. It is desirable to have the portrait subject
view these video images so that the subject can decide
tography a photographer must manually or through
on which ones of the photographic negatives to develop
servomotors move and adjust both the camera and the
lens settings.
or print.
In conventional studio photography, when a take
occurs there is an intense strobe ?ash light for providing
the best image of the subject to be photographed and
If the video image and the photographic image are
not identical, the video image corresponding to the
photographic negative cannot be selected with cer
videoed. conventionally, the photographer or a camera
tainty. For example, if those two images do not corre
mechanism physically adjusts the f-stop of the video
spond exactly, the video image may look ?ne with the
camera lens to compensate for the increased amount of
portrait subject wide-eyed and smiling, while the photo
light which will result from the strobe ?ash, and then 55 graphic image recorded at a slightly different time per
physically adjust the f-stop after the take back to the
iod may show the portrait subject’s eyes closed.
appropriate setting for the less intense ambient studio
In addition, it is desirable to use photographic ?ash or
modeling lights. If the settings on the video camera
strobe illumination of a portrait studio subject to
were always set for the high intensity strobe ?ash, the
achieve high quality video and photographic images.
video images would be severely underexposed for the 60 High intensity lighting is desired, as there is a substantial
modeling light live image. Conversely, if the video
loss of light re?ected from the portrait subject into the
camera gain were set for the ambient modeling lights,
photographic camera and video camera respectively,
the ?ash strobe lights would overexpose the captured
owing to the multiple lenses commonly found in such
image. Consequently, many video cameras have auto
equipment.
matic gain controls built into the circuitry, but none 65
Further, high intensity light is desirable owing to the
responds quickly enough to the changing lighting con
fact that the electric charge on a CCD dissipates (leaks)
ditions of a strobe ?ash to be of any practical use. Ac
over time and results in lower voltage and intensity;
cordingly, it has been suggested by those practicing
consequently, the greater the initial illumination and,
3
5,389,984
4
hence, electric charge on a CCD, the greater the re
facilitates the process of posing the subject to be photo
maining electrical charge will be when the CCD is
downloaded into electronic storage.
Accordingly, earlier efforts have been directed at
graphed.
It is another object of the invention to provide a
system for recording identical images of an object that
automatically provides a repeatable sequence of images
of the subject.
controlling different aspects of recording video images,
capturing photographic images, and subject illumina
tion, especially when high intensity ?ash or strobe light
It is a still further object of the invention to provide a
ing is used.
system for recording images of an object that eliminates
U.S. Pat. No. 4,805,037 to Noble et al. discloses con
the need for a photographic view?nder.
In summary, therefore, a system for recording an
trolling the timing of a video camera and preventing
transfer of a charge from a CCD to the vertical registers
when an image take signal is received in order to pre
vent an illuminating ?ash from occurring during the
object on an electronic medium and on a photographic
medium is provided which includes means for record
ing an image of an object on an electronic medium,
means for capturing an image of the object on a photo
video blanking period or to prevent the ?ash from being
split between the ?rst and second scanning (video) 15 sensitive medium, and means for controlling the record
?elds.
ing means and the capturing means for causing a sub
U.S. Pat. No. 5,006,871 to Noble discloses a system in
stantially identical image to be recorded and captured.
which a ?ash strobe is delayed during and prior to the
In summary, therefore, a system for recording an
video blanking period so that the ?ash occurs entirely
object on an electronic medium and on a photographic
20
during ?eld one or ?eld two.
medium is provided which includes means for record
U.S. Pat. No. 5,008,697 to Noble includes a video
ing an image of an object on an electronic medium,
timing generator (clock) for a video camera, and during
the ?ash the system interrupts the clock generator so
image transfer does not take place from a CCD to the
vertical registers.
25
The known prior efforts have been directed at delay
ing the operation of different parts of the systems within
means for capturing an image of the object on a photo
sensitive medium, and means for controlling the record
ing means and the capturing means for causing a sub
stantially identical image to be recorded and captured,
the controlling means including means for sending a
take request signal when an image of an object is to be
the normal take sequence; none of the conventional
devices has coordinated the various elements in order to
recorded and captured, means for determining the lag
have the video image and photographic image captured 30 time required for the take request signal to cause the
capturing means to capture an image, and means opera
at the identical and optimal point in time.
tively connected to the take request signal means for
OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE
causing the take request signal means to send the take
INVENTION
request signal to the capturing means at a predeter
Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to pro 35 mined time prior to sending the take request signal to
the recording means, the predetermined time being
vide a system for recording identical images of an ob
equal to the length of lag time determined by the deter
ject on an electronic medium and on a photographic
mining means.
medium that overcomes the drawbacks of conventional
devices.
It is a further object of the invention to provide a 40
system for recording identical images of an object that
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a system for
is easy and accurate to use.
recording identical electronic and photographic images
It is a still further object of the invention to provide a
system for recording identical images of an object at an
of an object;
FIG. 2 shows the video image of a photographic
optimal point in time.
It is another object of the invention to provide a
system for recording identical images of an object that
is self-calibrating for ensuring that the system operates
correctly over time.
45
subject aligned with a computer-generated reference
?gure according to the invention;
FIG. 3 illustrates the video image of a photographic
subject aligned with a computer-generated reference
pro?le according to the invention;
It is yet another object of the invention to provide a 50 FIG. 4 shows a computer-generated picture frame
surrounding a video image of a photographic subject
system for recording identical images of an object on an
according to the invention; and,
electronic medium and on a photographic medium, and
FIG. 5 illustrates schematically a series of successive
that accurately records images regardless of lighting
video image scanning ?elds and the relative times of
conditions.
It is a further object of the invention to provide a 55 occurrence of different functions of the system accord
ing to the invention.
system that records identical images of an object while‘
using a high intensity strobe light.
It is another object of the invention to provide a
system for recording identical images of an object that
reduces the cumulative errors present in conventional
systems arising from induced delays of operative com
ponents.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
FIG. 1 illustrates a preferred embodiment of the sys
tem for recording identical electronic and photographic
images of an object.
The system includes a photographic/video pickup 10
It is yet another object of the invention to provide a
and a computer 20 electrically connected to operative
system for recording identical images of an object that
is useful for law enforcement, animal photography, and 65 components of photographic/video pickup 10. The
commercial photography.
It is a further object of the invention to provide a
term “computer” as used throughout is to be under
stood in its broadest sense to include all forms of control
system for recording identical images of an object that
apparatuses, data processing equipment, microproces~
5
5,389,984
sors, memory chips, microprocessors, hard-wired elec
trical and electronic con?gurations, and the like.
6
phic/video pickup 10 is moved from its standard posi
tion for taking a portrait photograph at a predetermined
location, the photographic/video pickup 10 can be re
turned automatically under the direction of computer
20 to its standard position.
Likewise, omnitilt mechanism 120 can be used for
making photographs based on a national standard, such
as standards promulgated by the Federal Bureau of
A photographic ?lm 30 is held between a ?lm deliv
ery cartridge 32 and a ?lm take-up cartridge 34, photo
graphic ?lm 30 being the medium on which photo
graphic images of a subject S are captured. Photo
graphic ?lm 30 is advanced in the direction of arrow 36,
and an image I (i.e., image-forming light) re?ected from
subject S is recorded on photographic ?lm 30 when a
shutter 40 is in an open position. A shutter open sensor
44 determines when shutter 40 is in its closed or opened
Investigation (FBI) for taking a series of three standard,
successive views of a criminal suspect. Such so-called
“mug shots” generally consist of a left-side close view,
positions, respectively. This “photography” portion of
a front close view, and a front % view of a criminal
the photo graphic/video camera combination 10 records
suspect. The omnitilt mechanism 120, in conjunction
image I after image I passes through a ?rst optical lens
L1 and then through a ?rst beam splitter B1.
15 with programming of computer 20 to control all move
ments of photographic/video camera combination 10,
A video portion of the photographic/video pickup 10
such movements including height, tilt, all zoom lens
includes a charge coupled device (CCD) 60 electrically
movements such as focal length, f-stop, focusing, and
connected to a video display 62 having controls 64, all
like adjustments, allows consistent mug shot photos to
of which are electrically connected to computer 20.
Computer 20 is likewise operatively connected to a
be taken across the country all at consistent focal
display monitor 70. A keypad or other input device 72
lengths and heights, for example. A series of prepro
is operatively connected to display monitor 70, com~
grammed movements of photographic/video camera
puter 20, and, hence, photographic/video camera com
combination 10 can be executed by appropriate pro
bination 10 and video monitor 62.
gramming of computer 20 and by electromechanical
Image I reaches charge coupled device 60 by way of
?rst passing through ?rst lens L1, being re?ected off a
beam splitter B1, passing through a second optical lens
L2, being re?ected off an optional mirror or second
beam splitter B2, and ?nally passing through a third
25 control devices available to a person having ordinary
skill in the art. Appropriate f-stop settings correspond
ing to a preprogrammed movement can be likewise
concurrently carried out.
Turning to FIG. 2, a schematic video screen 130 on
optical lens L3. The path of image forming light being
which a computer-generated outline FIG. 132 functions
as a guideline for positioning an image 134 of a subject
S to be photographed. Such a computer-generated
re?ected by subject S travels along paths in a manner
similar to the paths disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,835,563,
which is incorporated herein by reference.
image is useful in assisting a relatively unskilled portrait
Additional illumination of subject S is provided by a
?rst ?ash strobe 82 which is operatively connected by a 35 photographer to take high quality photographs of sub
ject S.
transmission wire 84 (or by an unillustrated wireless
FIG. 3 shows an image 140 of the right-side of the
transmitter) to a second ?ash strobe 86. Computer 20
head of a subject S. A computer-generated outline 142
controls the ?ring of ?ash strobes 82 and 86, or inter
of a standardized head of a subject to be photographed
cepts and processes the ?ash request signal, unlike con
ventional systems in which a signal from a photo 40 serves as a guide by which the user/photographer
graphic camera directly controls the ?ash.
knows that the head of subject S is in a proper position
An optional high re?ection backdrop screen 90 is
for a right-side pro?le view, such as is commonly re
especially suited for use with background scenery or
quired for state driver’s licenses and other of?cial uses.
images, such as a local ?re engine for use when taking
The extent of outline ?gure guide 142 also provides the
photographs of children, or a background of shelves full 45 user with a visual “chec ” on the positioning and size of
of law books when photographing a lawyer or politi
the image of subject S that will be captured by photo
cian. The background scenery can be projected from
graphic/video pickup 10.
conventional photographic slides of the images onto
A single image 150 of a subject S can be displayed on
highly re?ective screen 90 by the use of a front projec
display monitor 70, as illustrated in FIG. 4. A comput
tor disclosed in US. Pat. No. 4,835,563, described 50 er-generated mat board or frame 152 surrounds image
above.
150 so as to provide the user with visual information as
Display monitor 70 displays a plurality of successive
video images 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, and 106. Display
to how image 150 will appearwhen its photographic
counterpart is placed in a picture frame and surrounded
monitor 70 allows the user to view one or more of
images 101-106 in a side-by-side fashion so that the user 55
(or the customer buying portrait photographs, for ex
ample) can determine which of the images correspond
ing to the successive images captured on photographic
flm 30 should be developed and processed as photo
graphs.
An omnitilt device 120 may be connected to photo
graphic/video pickup 10 and operatively associated
with computer 20 so that all up and down and side-to
side movements of photographic/video pickup 10 rela
tive to subject S can be governed by and/or remem
bered by the software of computer 20.
Omnitilt mechanism 120 is useful for remembering a
standard position, for example, so that if photogra~
by a mat.
FIG. 5 schematically illustrates a series of pairs of
successive video image scanning ?elds (i.e. alternating
?eld one (1) and ?eld two (2)) of the standard 525-1ine
scanning pattern used in the United States (and also the
remainder of North America, South America, and Ja
pan). The system according to the invention is equally
suited for the television/video standards found else
where in the world, yet will be explained with respect
to this 525-line scanning pattern for simplicity.
The operation of the system according to the inven
65
tion, as well as additional details thereof, will become
more apparent from the description of the operation
below.
7
5,389,984
OPERATION
When subject S is to be photographed, the operator
positions subject S in front of photographic/video
pickup 10. Ambient studio light illuminates subject S.
Conveniently, the operator captures the subject’s
name, address, and other appropriate database informa
tion by keypunching the data into computer 20 via
keypad 72. A sitting reference number is assigned to the
customer, and the customer name and other informa
tion, such as the date, is transmitted to computer 20.
8
quired from the time the take signal was sent from con
trol 64 to shutter 40 to the time at which shutter 40 was
actually, physically in its shutter full open position.
Computer 20 determines when shutter 40 is in its full
open position by receiving a signal from shutter open
sensor 44. Alternatively, a ?rst, sample take is made for
calculating the shutter lag time. This can simply be done
as the ?rst one of a series of photographs, as multiple
photographs will generally be made.
Thus, for example, if the previous take signal required
a period of time equivalent to 650 lines, (i.e., a lag time
Preferably, the date, the sitting number, and an assigned
650 lines long) then the shutter open signal will be sent
from computer 20 to shutter 40 by that amount of lag
identifying each individual segment of photographic
time before sending an actuation/take signal to the ?ash
?lm.
15 strobes.
If desired, one of computer-generated stick ?gures
Given the television/video standards present in
132 and 142 are displayed on video monitor 62, which is
North America, each scan line (“line”) described above
a hand-held device under control of the operator.
as a reference time period is equivalent to about 0.064
The operator begins the camera shooting sequence by
seconds.
activating controls 64. Computer 20 sets the pose num 20
It is preferred that shutter 40 opens and ?ash strobes
ber to 1, and photographic/video camera combination
82 and 86 discharge near to, but not during vertical
10 is moved automatically to the ?rst desired position
blanking period B, and preferably, within ?eld 1. The
by omnitilt mechanism 120 or by direct control of the
?ash is commanded to go off at this time, not only be
operator. Likewise, main focusing lens L1 is automati
cause computer 20 has instructed the electronic gain of
cally or manually positioned.
25 the capture boards to be adjusted according to the ex
The operator initiates the “take” (i.e., tells the camera
pected light intensity from the ?ash of strobes 82 and
to take a photograph) by pressing an appropriate one of
86, but also because the electric charge on a conven
customer identi?cation (ID) number is stored for use in
controls 64. Computer 20 conducts a routine camera
tional charge coupled device dissipates (leaks) over time
status check including determining whether a piece of
resulting in lower voltage/intensity for image informa
photographic ?lm 30 is present in photographic/video 30 tion to be downloaded and hence, stored, and displayed
pickup 10, whether ?lm 30 is properly loaded, whether
on video monitor 62.
the pose number is within acceptable limits, whether the
Computer 20 uses the lag time measured in the previ
ID information has been accessed, whether strobes 82
ous take for determining how much earlier to send the
and 86 have been adequately charged, and like status
shutter open signal, in this example sending the shutter
checks. The take automatically continues, or the de 35 open signal 650 lines prior to sending the ?ash request
tected problem is communicated to the operator such as
by displaying a problem code or a written synopsis of
the problem on the screen of video monitor 62.
(i.e., the time period corresponding to 650 lines).
portions thereof, the timing sequence being schemati
stantly being updated.
Computer 20 likewise measures thev actual time re
quired in the present take, so that a most recently deter
Computer 20 automatically adjusts the electronic
mined camera shutter delay/lag time is always being
gain in the conventional unillustrated video capture 40 used. In this manner, variations in the length of time
boards associated with the charge coupled device 60
required for the shutter 40 to actually open, owing to
and video monitor 62 in order that strobes 82 and 86 do
mechanical changes in shutter 40, such as wear of shut
not overexpose captured image 106 when strobes 82 and
ter 40 and wear on moving parts thereof, as well as
86 ?re.
dynamic changes such as changes in temperature and
Concurrently, computer 20 is generating the external 45 humidity which also affect the operation of shutter 40,
synchronization of the scanning ?elds of the photogra
are continuously accounted for. Consequently, an opti
phic/video pickup l0; namely, of the video camera
mum time for sending the shutter open signal is con
cally illustrated in FIG. 5.
The strobe ?ring signal is sent by computer 20 to
After computer 20 has determined where in the tim 50 strobes 82 and 86 when shutter 40 is in its full open
ing sequence the video portion of photographic/video
position. Photographic/video pickup 10 works well
pickup 10 the capture boards are, a camera take signal is
sent to the camera portion, speci?cally, to shutter 40 of
because from the perspective of computer 20, the time
required for shutter 40 to open fully after the shutter
photographic/video pickup 10.
open signal has been sent is relatively long, yet the
The optimal time for sending the camera take signal is 55 period of time is relatively fast for shutter 40 which is
calculated by computer 20 determining at what point in
essentially a mechanical device.
the timing sequence the present time period is, deter
The customer ID information is exposed on a portion
mining the point at which ?eld 1 will download to the
of the photographic film at the same time.
registers (i.e., during a vertical blanking period B,
Computer 20 then saves these next two video ?elds in
which is generally during lines 2425-2625 of respec 60 memory, as these particular paired ?elds serve as the
tive ?elds 1 and 2 of the two scanning ?elds comprising
interlaced video ?elds which will make up the complete
the whole scanning pattern, that is the video scanning
video image to provide the desired identical electronic
frame. (Alternatively, computer 20 can read where in
image corresponding to the photographic image.
the timing sequence of the scanning ?elds the video
Computer 20 then digitizes the image, and analyzes
portion of the system is by receiving data from the 65 the luminance in each of the two ?elds.
internal synchronization signals generated by conven
tional video equipment.) Computer 20 will have previ
The luminance is balanced in each ?eld, so as to fur
ther reduce the ?icker inherent in a standard video
ously measured and stored the amount of lag time re
image comprised of two interlaced pictures (i.e., inter
9
5,389,984
laced ?elds). Each ?eld is scanned in about 1/60 of a
second, the two interlaced ?elds forming a standard
video image taken in l/3O of a second. The strobe ?ash
generated by strobes 82 and 86 generally occurs in one
or two microseconds (1/ 1000-2/ 1000 seconds).
As ?eld 1 is read in 1/60th of a second, each adjacent
interlaced line in ?eld 2 inherently will be read l/60th
of a second later than its neighboring line in ?eld 1.
In ordinary moving video of dynamic scenes this
poses no problem because the charge coupled device is
10
shortly before the vertical blanking period in ?eld 1,
accordingly, an optimal time for discharging the strobes
and for having shutter 40 of the photographic camera
portion fully open is shortly before that vertical blank
ing period; computer 20 has determined the length of
lag time required for shutter 40 to actually open after a
take signal is sent from computer 20 to shutter 40, and,
hence, computer 20 sends a take signal to shutter 40 by
a period of time equal to the lag time previously deter
mined; computer 20 sends a ?ash request signal to
being constantly refreshed by normal, ambient lighting.
strobes 82 and 86 at about the same time a take request
In conventional video/photography of static scenes
this l/60th of a second has presented a problem, as the
two ?elds will have even greater differences in lumi
nance owing to the leaking of the electric charge on the
signal is sent to the video camera portion of the system;
consequently, the shutter is fully open at the same time
both the ?ash is discharging and the video camera por
tion is able to receive images, whereby a photograph
identical to a recorded video image is captured.
It is further contemplated that the length of time
required for the shutter to open be determined under
CCD. Each adjacent interlaced line from the second
?eld will be inherently “darker” as it has been dissipat
ing its electrical charge l/60th of a second longer than
the immediately preceding line from the ?rst ?eld.
control laboratory settings and preprogrammed into the
When the video image is displayed on video monitor 20 system. Alternatively, when the shutter lag time is de
62, or on display monitor 70, the more the two ?elds
differ in luminance intensity, the more there will be an
optical appearance of ?icker or movement on the video
termined by a practice take, the film advance can be
decoupled so that no ?lm is wasted.
Furthermore, temperature monitors can be provided
for measuring the temperature of the shutter, for exam
reading the overall luminance of the two ?elds and 25 ple, so that additional temperature compensation can be
electronically balancing them in memory to eliminate
made, especially if the temperature of the shutter com
the ?icker appearance.
ponents differs from the temperature measured the pre
Computer 20 then enhances the digital image, and
vious time the shutter was operated. When photographs
monitor. Accordingly, computer 20 compensates by
displays the captured image on display monitor 70,
are taken relatively closely spaced together, tempera
display monitor 70 being located in a separate, viewing
ture compensation will usually be unnecessary, as the
room, if desired.
length of shutter lag time remembered by the computer
Computer 20 now adjusts the electronic gain for
standard, ambient modeling light exposure; i.e., com
will be an accurate estimate of the length of shutter lag
time likely to occur in the present take. When a photo
graph taken is the ?rst one of the day, for example,
puter 20 resets the gain after the two captured video
?elds have been downloaded.
35 temperature compensation would have greater impor
Finally, the pose number is increased by one, the ?lm
tance.
usage of photograph ?lm 30 is increased by one, and
Additional monitors can be provided for monitoring
photographic/video pickup 10 is moved automatically
bearing wear, relative humidity, and wear of other parts
by computer 20 to the next pose position of subject S, if
of the electromechanical shutter.
necessary or desired.
40
Still further, it is contemplated that the video came
After the posing session is complete, a customer will
ra/photography system may include software for gov
view the poses, i.e. images 101-106, on display monitor
erning the optimal time for taking a photograph
70.
/recording a video image based on the “speed” of the
To show the customer how the captured image 150
photographic film, the temperature of the photographic
will look when surrounded by a frame 152, computer 20 45 ?lm, and other physical factors. Likewise, nine or more
generates various frames as selected by commands en
“proofs” may be displayed on a video monitor at one
tered into keypad 72. Thus, the customer is not only
time.
shown a video image 150 which is identical to the pho
It is anticipated that no photosensitive elements are
tographic image captured on photographic ?lm 30, so
required, as the system synchronizes the timing of the
that only the desired images are developed as ?nished
photographic and video elements so that these elements
photographs, and so that the customer immediately sees
operate to capture identical images, independent of the
video equivalents of images captured in the studio, but
the customer can see the complete package of captured
timing of the ?ash.
While this invention has been described as having a
subject S when a photographic image is eventually
preferred design, it is understood that it is capable of
framed.
55 further modi?cations, and uses and/or adaptations of
Once the customer has chosen the desired images of
the invention and following in general the principle of
subject S, the operator can enter the information into
the invention and including such departures from the
computer 20, whereby the method of payment, the
present disclosure as come within the known or custom
setting information, the inventory of photographic ?lm,
and the like are instantly updated.
A non-limiting, exemplary summary of the operation
of a basic form of the system according to the invention
is as follows: the operator presses control 64 in order to
ary practice in the art to which the invention pertains,
and as may be applied to the central features hereinbe
fore set forth, and fall within the scope of the invention
or limits of the claims appended hereto.
We claim:
take a desired picture of subject S; control 64 signals
1. A system for recording an image of an object on an
computer 20 that a photograph is to be taken; computer 65 electronic medium and on a photographic medium,
20 determines at what point in the video scanning se
comprising:
quence the video components are; computer 20 has
a) means provided for recording an image of the
been programmed to discharge the strobes 82 and 86
object on an electronic medium;
11
5,389,984
b) means provided for capturing an image of the
object on a photosensitive medium;
c) means provided for controlling said recording
means and said capturing means for causing a sub
stantially identical image of an object to be re
corded and captured, said controlling means in
cluding:
i) means for sending a take request signal to said
recording means and to said capturing means
when an image of an object is to be recorded and
captured;
ii) means for determining a length of lag time re
quired for the take request signal sent by said
take request signal means to cause said capturing
means to capture an image of an object; and
15
iii) means operatively connected to said take re
quest signal means for causing said take request
signal means to send a take request signal to said
capturing means at a predetermined time prior to
12
i) means for sending a take request signal to said
recording means and to said governing means
when an image of an object is to be recorded and
captured;
ii) means for determining a length of governing lag
time required for the take request signal sent by
said take request signal means to cause said gov
erning means to go from said ?rst state to said
second state in which a photosensitive medium is
able to be exposed; and
iii) means operatively connected to said take re
quest signal means for causing said take request
signal means to send a take request signal to said
governing means at a predetermined time prior
to sending a take request signal to said recording
means, the predetermined time being substan
tially equal to the length of governing lag time
determined by said determining means; and,
f) whereby, said recording means records an image of
the object that is identical to the image of the ob
sending a take request signal to said recording 20
means, the predetermined time being substan
ject captured by said capturing means.
tially equal to the length of lag time determined
8. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
by said determining means; and,
claim 7, wherein:
d) whereby, said recording means records an image
of the object that is identical to the image of the 25 a) said recording means includes a photosensitive
electronic image recording means for electroni
object captured by said capturing means.
cally capturing an image of an object.
2. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
9.
A system for recording an image as de?ned in
claim 1, wherein:
claim 7, further comprising:
a) said recording means includes a photosensitive
electronic image recording means for electroni 30 a) a video display operatively connected to said re
cording means for displaying an image of an object
cally capturing an image of an object.
to be recorded by said recording means.
3. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
10. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
claim 1, wherein:
claim 7, wherein:
a) said capturing means includes a means for govern
a) said governing means comprises a shutter.
ing the exposure of a photosensitive medium.
35
11. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
4. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
claim 10, wherein:
claim 3, wherein:
a) means is provided for moving said shutter from a
a) said governing means comprises a shutter.
closed position to an open position, said closed
5. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
position corresponds to said ?rst state and said
claim 1, wherein:
40
open position corresponds to said second state;
a) means is provided for splitting an image of an ob
b) means is provided for sensing when said shutter is
ject for directing substantially identical views of
in said open state; and,
the object to said recording means and to said cap
c) said determining means includes means for timing
turing means.
a length of shutter lag time required for said shutter
6. A system for recording an image as de?ned in 45
claim 1, further comprising:
a) a viewing monitor operatively connected to said
recording means for displaying at least one image
of an object recorded by said recording means.
to go from said closed state to said open state after
a take request signal has been sent from said take
request signal means to said governing means.
12. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
7. A system for recording an image of an object on an 50 claim 7, wherein:
a) means is operatively associated with said control
electronic medium and on a photographic medium,
ling ‘means for illuminating an object to be re
comprising:
a) means provided for recording an image of the
corded; and,
b) said controlling means includes means for instruct
ing said illuminating means to illuminate when said
b) means provided for capturing an image of the 55
governing means is in said second state.
object on a photosensitive medium;
13. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
0) means operatively associated with said capturing
claim 12, wherein:
means for governing the exposure of a photosensi
a) means is provided for adjusting the gain of an
tive medium;
image recorded on an electronic medium by said
d) said governing means having a ?rst state in which
object on an electronic medium;
a photosensitive medium is prevented from being
exposed and a second state in which a photosensi
tive medium is able to be exposed;
e) means provided for controlling said recording
means and said capturing means for causing a sub 65
stantially identical image of an object to be re
corded and captured, said controlling means in
cluding:
recording means; and,
b) said controlling means includes means for telling
said gain adjusting means to adjust the gain by an
amount required to compensate for illumination of
an object illuminated by said illuminating means
from ambient light to illuminating light when said
instructing means instructs said illuminating means
to illuminate.
13
5,389,984
14. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
14
b) said computer causes the take signal to be sent to
the photographic camera at a predetermined time
claim 7, wherein:
a) means is provided for remembering the length of
equal to the length of time required to open the
governing lag time determined by said determining
shutter when an earlier photograph was taken.
means and for providing a remembered length of 5
governing lag time to said causing means for use as
the predetermined time.
15. An apparatus for recording a video image which
is identical to a photograph of a person, comprising:
10
a) a video camera for making a video image;
b) a photographic camera having an openable shutter
for exposing a piece of ?lm for taking a photo
graph;
0) a computer operatively connected to said photo
graphic camera and to said video camera for send
ing a take signal to said photographic camera at a
predetermined time before sending a take signal to
said video camera, the predetermined time being
equal to the length of time required to open the 20
shutter; and
17. An apparatus as de?ned in claim 15, wherein:
a) a ?ash is operatively connected to said computer;
and
b) said computer causes the ?ash to operate at the
same time as the video camera makes a video im~
age.
18. A system for recording an image of an object on
an electronic medium, comprising:
a) means provided for recording an image of the
object on an electronic medium;
b) a video display operatively connected to said re
cording means for displaying an image of an object
to be recorded by said recording means in a display
area of said video display;
c) means provided for displaying a computer
generated outline ?gure substantially within said
display area of said video display; and,
d) said computer-generated outline ?gure being su
d) whereby, the photographic camera takes a photo
graph which is identical to the video image re
corded by the video camera, because the photo
graph camera opens its shutter and exposes a piece 25
of ?lm at the same time as the video camera makes
perimposed on said image of an object to be re
corded so that the object to be recorded can be
aligned relative to said computer-generated outline
?gure on said video display area.
19. A system for recording an image as de?ned in
a video image as instructed by their respective take
signals from said computer.
claim 18, wherein:
a) a viewing monitor is operatively connected to said
a) said computer includes means for storing the 30
recording means for displaying at least one image
length of time required for opening the shutter;
of an object recorded by said recording means.
16. An apparatus as de?ned in claim 15, wherein:
and,
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