OTIS S-71 ELECTRICS

OTIS S-71 ELECTRICS
OTIS S-71 GOLF CART
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Jim Kaness
Revised November 2015
OTIS GOLF CART S-71
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
This manual was written without the knowledge, consent, or participation of the Otis
Elevator Company, and it does NOT have their endorsement. This manual is my own
work on my own initiative and the responsibility for its content is mine alone.
Except for the sales brochure excerpt on page 5, the text, drawings, and photographs in
this document are my own work from my own reverse engineering done on my own S71, and comparison with other S-71’s available for inspection. Despite 40-odd years of
electronics engineering and construction, technical writing, and “jack of all trades” it is
still possible for me to err. I reserve the right to update and correct this document as new
information becomes available. Comments, suggestions, and corrections are welcomed.
Jim Kaness
4267 Varsity Street
Ventura, CA 93003-3803
805.644.3237
www.jimkaness.com
For a free PDF download copy of this manual, click on
http://www.jimkaness.com/engineering/s71.pdf
This document was created using LibreOffice Writer with Linux Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.
© 2015 by Jim Kaness
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS.....................................................................................................3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.................................................................................................4
OTIS S-71 HISTORY..........................................................................................................5
OTIS S-71 GENERAL INFORMATION............................................................................6
INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................................6
SERIAL NUMBER..........................................................................................................6
OTIS S-71 ELECTRICAL...................................................................................................6
MOTOR...........................................................................................................................6
MOTOR REMOVAL.......................................................................................................7
MOTOR BRUSHES........................................................................................................8
DIRECTION CONTROL AND INTERLOCK...............................................................8
SPEED CONTROL.........................................................................................................9
HIGH CURRENT SCHEMATIC..................................................................................10
REVERSING SWITCH CONNECTIONS....................................................................11
LOW CURRENT SCHEMATIC...................................................................................12
OTIS S-71 BATTERIES....................................................................................................13
BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS......................................................................................13
TROJAN BATTERY DATE CODES............................................................................13
BATTERY MAINTENANCE........................................................................................13
BATTERY LAYOUT AND WIRING............................................................................14
BUILT-IN CHARGER...................................................................................................15
ADDED ACCESSORIES.................................................................................................16
EXTERNAL CHARGER INPUT..................................................................................16
LIGHTS.........................................................................................................................16
BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE METER...................................................................16
OTIS S-71 MECHANICAL..............................................................................................17
WHEELS AND TIRES..................................................................................................17
BRAKING.....................................................................................................................17
REAR SUSPENSION....................................................................................................18
FRONT SUSPENSION.................................................................................................18
STEERING....................................................................................................................18
REAR AXLE AND DIFFERENTIAL...........................................................................19
REAR WHEEL BEARINGS.........................................................................................19
FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS.......................................................................................19
SEATS AND BATTERY ACCESS................................................................................20
OPERATOR CONTROL PANEL..................................................................................20
REFERENCES..................................................................................................................21
INTERESTING WEBSITES.............................................................................................21
3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The following people have generously provided information to me:
Stephen Showers
Corporate Archivist
Otis Elevator Company
Five Farm Springs Road
Farmington, CT 06032
860-676-5577
historica[email protected]
NOTE: Steven Showers arranged for Otis Elevator Company to grant me formal written
permission to use their copyright photo and text. A signed contract to that effect is in my
files.
Mark Eyestone
Westcoaster Info Center
2306 Crystal Way
Crystal Lake, IL 60012-2221
815-455-2179
[email protected]
NOTE: Mark Eyestone is the moderator of a Yahoo forum on all Otis and Westcoaster
vehicles.
John Triolo
Mountain Golf Cars, Inc.
9547 Highway 105
Banner Elk, NC 28604
800-328-1953
[email protected]
http://www.golfcartcatalog.com/
NOTE: John Triolo of Mountain Golf Cars, Inc. generously provided me with a copy of
the original Otis Model S-71 Parts and Service Manual and Operators Manual after my
own manual was written. It shows exploded drawings, original part numbers, and wiring
diagrams. I have scanned the manual and it is available from me as a PDF file on CD-R
at no cost to you. The file is too large to email.
4
OTIS S-71 HISTORY
The Otis S-71 golf cart was produced between 1970 and 1976 by Westcoaster, a
subsidiary of Otis Elevator Company, and may be branded either “Otis” or
“Westcoaster”. In 1970 Otis Elevator Company acquired West Coast Machinery
Company of Stockton, CA who manufactured a full line of electric and gasoline powered
vehicles under the brand name ‘Westcoaster’ for use off the public roads- on airports,
factories, farms, ranches and golf courses. In 1976 Otis sold the Westcoaster / Otis
product line to EVA-Chloride, who was then engaged in development of electric vehicles
for highway use. In 2015 many of these S-71 golf carts are still in use.
EXCERPT FROM WESTCOASTER SALES BROCHURE [1]
The photo and text below are Copyright © 1971
by Otis Elevator Company and are used by permission.
5
OTIS S-71 GENERAL INFORMATION
INTRODUCTION
The Otis S-71 Golf Cart has a fiberglass body on a tubular steel frame, and uses six 6-volt
batteries to power a GE 36-volt series (the field and armature are connected in series) DC
motor. Speed is controlled by adding or removing resistance in series with the motor
voltage. The S-71 provides four speeds forward and reverse. The S-71 weighs 740
pounds without batteries [1] and about 1100 pounds with batteries. Top speed is 12 miles
per hour [1].
SERIAL NUMBER
One Westcoaster S-71 reported to me has an adhesive serial number label on the lower
dash between the steering wheel and the glove box.
OTIS S-71 ELECTRICAL
MOTOR
The motor is a General Electric DC Motor, Model 5BC48JB517B rated on the nameplate
for 55-amperes at 36-volts DC. The nominal shaft horsepower rating is 2.0. The field and
armature are connected in series. The motor terminals may not be labeled- I have
arbitrarily labeled them 1 through 4 for correspondence with the diagrams on the
following pages. Terminals 1 and 2 go to the field winding. Terminals 3 and 4 go through
brushes to the armature. Brushes are accessible by removing the rubber covers next to
terminals 3 and 4.
Shaft from
Differential
DC MOTOR
(Top View)
1
2
3
Brake
Assembly
4
NOTE: Most electric motors have the field and armature connected in parallel. When
motors are used for propulsion, as this one is, the field and armature are usually
connected in series as this provides maximum torque at low speed. However a seriesconnected motor MUST always have a load on it or its speed may rise to an unsafe value
[2]. This will not be a problem unless the motor is removed from the S-71 for bench
testing.
6
MOTOR REMOVAL
The motor mounts to the differential with two bolts and a splined shaft. Remove all
electric cables from the motor making sure that the terminal bolt does not rotate. Use
a thin 9/16” end wrench on the rear nut while removing the front nut and the cable. Then
remove the brake cable assembly from the brake. Remove the two bolts at the outer
perimeter of the rear motor housing from the differential end of the motor. The motor
armature has a splined socket that fits over a splined shaft coming out of the differential
housing. It is a tight squeeze, but the motor may be pulled away from the differential and
removed from the S71.
In this condition the motor has no rear
bearing so while the armature may rotate, it
will rub on the stators. The motor rear
housing with a rubber shaft seal is bolted to
the differential with four bolts. Remove the
four bolts and tap gently on the differential
side of the motor rear housing. The housing
will separate from the differential and come
loose. A paper gasket appears to be used
between the differential and the motor rear
housing.
The photo upper-right shows the motor rear
housing still attached to the differential, just
after the motor is pulled off. The splined
shaft from the differential is visible in the
center of the housing. The motor is keyed to
this housing with a single small finger key
which should point toward the top of the
cart .
The photo to the right shows the rear of the
motor with its rear housing missing, just
after the motor is pulled off the differential.
The splined socket is visible in the center of the armature. The finger key may be seen as
a dark spot on the outer case of the motor, near the top of the photo.
7
MOTOR BRUSHES
The motor has two replaceable carbon brushes. Each brush is held in its holder by a
spring that may be pulled back by the fingers for brush removal. Each brush has a heavy
stranded wire and lug that bolts (brush terminal) to a piece of flat steel which is spot
welded to the motor armature terminal as shown in the photo below.
Brush Holder
Brush Spring
Brush
Brush terminal
Armature
terminal
The armature terminal bolt is insulated from the motor housing by an inner round washer,
an outer square washer, and a center bushing with a square inner hole (to fit the square
shank on the bolt) and a square outer shape to fit the square hole in the motor housing.
One nut holds all this together and a second nut is used to attach the electrical motor
cable. I have found two of these that were over-torqued such that the center insulation
(between the washers) was destroyed and the bolt could rotate in its hole, bending the
metal tab attached to it. This could eventually lead to a short circuit. Both the brush and
the brush terminal screw should be readily accessible through the inspection hole as
shown in the photo above. If the brush terminal is not fully visible, look for bent (out of
proper shape) metal between the armature terminal and the brush terminal caused by
rotation of the armature terminal bolt.
DIRECTION CONTROL AND INTERLOCK
The Forward - Reverse lever on the control panel directly operates the high-current DC
polarity reversing switch. To prevent arcing, a normally-open microswitch closes when
the lever is in the full “Forward” or full “Reverse” position, allowing the solenoids to
apply power to the motor.
8
SPEED CONTROL
The accelerator pedal operates a pushrod connected to a series of switches inside the
enclosed box (under the seat) on which the solenoids are mounted. As the accelerator is
pressed down, power is applied to the motor through two solenoids, and through resistors
(they look like coils of heavy wire) mounted under the motor. As the accelerator pedal is
pressed further other solenoids reduce the amount of resistance in the circuit. Five
solenoids and two resistors (one with a tap) offer four speeds. This approach has been
used in electric street railways for over a century [3].
Solenoids LT and LB are both used to apply or remove power from the motor. The S-71
uses these two solenoids with their contacts in series, apparently to guarantee that power
can be removed from the motor in the event the contacts on one of these solenoids should
weld closed. The other three solenoids (RT, RM, and RB) are used to short out various
parts of the resistance for speed control.
Solenoid ON
LT, Left Top
LB, Left Bottom
RT, Right Top
RM, Right Middle
RB, Right Bottom
Accelerator Position
A, B ,C ,D
A, B, C ,D
B, C, D
C, D
D
The accelerator, as it is pressed, offers OFF and positions sequentially labeled (by me) A
(slowest), B, C, and D (fastest). With any one of the motor wires disconnected, and key
ON, you can hear the solenoids turn ON as the accelerator is depressed through its range.
The pushrod between the accelerator pedal and the switches can be adjusted in length so
that, at rest, NO switches are engaged, and so just before the accelerator bottoms on the
floorboard ALL switches are engaged.
The five solenoids are basically automotive starter solenoids with all four terminals
isolated from the metal case and from each other. The solenoid coils are rated at 12 VDC
and show a measured DC resistance of 12 to 14 ohms. In my S-71 they are each operated
on 18 VDC. The solenoids are bolted to the metal box holding the accelerator switches
but the nuts inside the box are not captive and will fall down inside the box if the bolts
are removed. Sheet metal screws may be used to re-mount a solenoid.
NOTE: THE S-71 MOTOR USES UP TO 55 AMPERES. FOR
SATISFACTORY OPERATION IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT ALL
CONNECTIONS TO THE MOTOR, BATTERIES, RESISTORS, AND
REVERSING SWITCH BE CLEAN AND TIGHT.
9
HIGH CURRENT SCHEMATIC
This schematic shows the high-current connections between the batteries and the motor.
MOTOR 1 and MOTOR 2 are the field winding. MOTOR 3 and MOTOR 4 are the
armature winding. Except as noted, all wiring in this diagram is heavy-gauge stranded
copper wire (AWG-6 or larger) or copper strap rated for not less than 55 amperes.
The Forward – Reverse switch swaps connections to the armature winding.
NOTE: The resistors shown are a fraction of an Ohm each and will measure zero Ohms
with the usual bench multimeter.
Small Red Wire, From Internal
Charger Positive Output
LT
MOTOR 2
LB
36V BATTERY
POSITIVE
RB
RM
RT
SOLENOID HIGH
CURRENT
CONTACTS ARE
SHOWN AS
FWD-REV
SWITCH
ASSEMBLY
36V BATTERY
NEGATIVE
MOTOR 3
MOTOR 4
FORWARD
MOTOR 1 TO MOTOR 3,
AND MOTOR 4 TO BATTERY NEGATIVE
MOTOR 1
REVERSE
MOTOR 1 TO MOTOR 4,
AND MOTOR 3 TO BATTERY NEGATIVE
10
REVERSING SWITCH CONNECTIONS
Viewed from passenger side with control panel pulled forward. The MOTOR 4
connection is at the top. The dashed rectangles are the shorting bars on the reverse side of
the switch assembly. The four unused bolt connections are only there to help the shorting
bars slide smoothly over them to the intended connections. The two copper shorting
bars MUST be insulated from the metal spring-loaded carrier that moves them
around.
COPPER SHORTING BARS SHOWN BELOW IN ‘FORWARD’ POSITION.
MOTOR 4
BATTERY NEGATIVE TO
SOLENOID CONTROL
CIRCUIT (low current schematic)
BATTERY
NEGATIVE
36 VOLTS
MOTOR 1
MOTOR 3
COPPER SHORTING BARS SHOWN BELOW IN ‘REVERSE’ POSITION.
MOTOR 4
BATTERY NEGATIVE TO
SOLENOID CONTROL
CIRCUIT (low current schematic)
BATTERY
NEGATIVE
36 VOLTS
MOTOR 1
MOTOR 3
11
LOW CURRENT SCHEMATIC
This schematic is for the low-current wiring, showing the solenoid coils, switches, and
fuses. The accelerator switch progressively connects more solenoids as the pedal is
pressed down. With the accelerator resting, none of the solenoids is energized. The
drawing shows the switch having energized LB and LT, for the slowest of the four speeds.
The colored lines below indicate the wire color code in my S-71.
PLUS 18 VOLTS
From center of
36V battery bank
RB
RM
(faster speed)
RT
LB
LT
ACCELERATOR
SWITCH
20A Inline
Fuse
MINUS 18 VOLTS
AND
MINUS 36 VOLTS
From Fwd-Rev
Switch
Key
Switch
20A
Meter
Brown, From Internal
Charger Rectifier
Negative Output
20A Fuse on
Fwd-Rev Switch
Assembly
12
Two Micro Switches
on Fwd-Rev
Switch Assembly
OTIS S-71 BATTERIES
BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS
My S-71 uses six 6-volt Trojan batteries, model T-105, rated at 185 ampere-hours for 5
hours. Each measures 7 1/8” wide by 10 3/8” long by 10 7/8” high. The two 5/16 -18
threaded post connections are at diagonal corners. Other high-quality deep-cycle Golf
Cart batteries may be used. Each T-105 weighs 62 pounds. Use a battery-lifting strap
rated for this weight when removing or installing batteries.
TROJAN BATTERY DATE CODES
The Trojan date code is a letter-number combination stamped on the negative post. The
code is MY, with the Month being A = January, B = February, etc. The Year is a single
digit such that 3 = 2003, 4 = 2004, etc. Thus A3 indicates January 2003.
WARNING:
WHILE 6 OR 36 VOLTS WILL NOT PRESENT A
SHOCK HAZARD, THE HIGH AMPERAGE AVAILABLE FROM
THESE BATTERIES CAN MELT OR WELD JEWELRY AND TOOLS
THAT MAY ACCIDENTALLY SHORT ONE OR MORE OF THESE
BATTERIES. TO ENSURE YOUR SAFETY WHEN WORKING ON OR
NEAR THE BATTERIES, REMOVE RINGS, WATCHES, AND OTHER
METAL OBJECTS FROM YOUR HANDS AND ARMS, AND WRAP
ALL TOOL HANDLES WITH TAPE.
WARNING: THESE BATTERIES CONTAIN SULFURIC ACID. IF
THIS ACID CONTACTS SKIN, EYES, OR OTHER BODY PARTS
IMMEDIATELY FLUSH WITH LOTS OF WATER.
BATTERY MAINTENANCE
Periodically check the fluid level in the batteries- in all 18 cells. Hot weather and the
battery charging process will normally cause the batteries to lose water. Remove the caps
and verify that the fluid level is above the lead plates. If it is not, slowly add DISTILLED
WATER until it is over the plates. DO NOT USE TAP WATER, as the dissolved minerals
in it will shorten the life of the batteries.
Periodically check the battery terminals and, if any corrosion is observed, clean the
battery terminals. Corrosion may be removed by using a solution of baking soda mixed
with just enough tap water to make a wet paste. Using an old toothbrush, brush this paste
over the corrosion, let it stand a few minutes while the paste bubbles, and then rinse the
terminals with tap water. Repeat as needed until the terminals are clean.
Once the terminals are clean and the connections are tight, smear automotive grease over
them to inhibit future corrosion.
13
BATTERY LAYOUT AND WIRING
Driver’s side view looking down on the batteries with the seat raised. Top of the page is
the passenger side of the S-71. Left side of the page is toward the front of the S-71.
12V to Lights
+36V to LB
-36V to FwdRev Switch
GE 36-VOLT
SERIES MOTOR
+18V to All Solenoids
EXTERNAL CHARGER INPUT
Viewed From Front
14
BUILT-IN CHARGER
The Otis S-71 originally came with a built-in battery charger. Many of these are no longer
functioning and an external charger must be used. The transformer and rectifiers are
under the front “hood” behind the dash. The 20-ampere ammeter, timer, and AC power
cord connector are on the operator control panel between the seats. Behind this panel,
located on the Fwd-Rev Switch Assembly, is a 20-ampere fuse between the charger
output and the batteries.
The built-in charger uses a transformer and two silicon diodes in a standard full-wave
rectifier circuit. The transformer has a tapped primary to accommodate varying AC line
voltages. The timer operates off the AC input and allows charging for the desired number
of hours to prevent overcharging. The ammeter confirms that charging is taking place.
The transformer and diodes may be accessed by removing the glove box in the dash. The
glove box mounts with two bolts and tapped L-brackets that grip behind the dash. To
remove, unscrew the two bolts about 8-turns each. It should then be possible to wiggle
the glove box free of the dash. The transformer and diodes are just inside and to the left.
Mounted Behind Dash
Mounted on Control Panel
Transformer
Brown, Negative, to 20A Fuse and Ammeter
120
115
110
Red, Positive, to LB
Timer
Black
Red
White
Red
Ground to Chassis
The recessed male AC power connector on the S-71 is a type no longer made. I made a
mating female connector from an L5-15R female connector by sawing the plastic
connector body to lengthen the arc of the opening for the ground terminal.
15
ADDED ACCESSORIES
The Otis S-71 did not originally come with the following accessories. Various owners
have added them to my S-71.
EXTERNAL CHARGER INPUT
The external-charger input is wired directly to the 36-volt connections of the battery
bank. The charger connector is a standard 30-ampere female connector used for 240VAC
electric clothes dryers. The ground terminal is not used. Any commercial 36-volt, 20
ampere charger may be used for charging the batteries. NOTE: Modern automatic
chargers may require at least 30-volts in the 6-battery-string or they may not turn
on and charge!
LIGHTS
The front headlights and rear red taillights are all wired in parallel and use 12-volts from
two of the 6-volt batteries as shown on the battery-wiring diagram. This wiring has a 5ampere fuse for safety. An SPST toggle switch on the dash controls the lights.
BATTERY STATE OF CHARGE METER
This expanded voltmeter is widely available at golf cart shops for about $30. This “fuel
gauge” is connected to the positive 36-volt battery post. The negative lead goes to the key
switch so the meter only works when the key is ON. A 5-ampere fuse in the negative lead
protects the wiring.
16
OTIS S-71 MECHANICAL
WHEELS AND TIRES
The S-71 has four wheels, which use 18 x 8.50 – 8 standard golf cart tires widely
available in many tread designs. Normal tire pressure is 20 PSI. I am using 10-PSI tire
pressure for a smoother ride on gravel roads. The S-71 is unique in using a five-lug rim.
The current standard golf cart rim mounts with only four lugs.
BRAKING
The brake pedal operates a single brake shoe that is pulled against a drum attached (using
a key and an Allen screw) to the forward-end of the motor shaft. The brake pedal is
attached to a flexible cable, the other end of which pulls on the shoe through a spring.
Pushing the brake pedal further engages a pawl that holds the brake ON as a parking
brake. The brake pedal is also interlocked with the accelerator pedal. Simply pushing on
the accelerator pedal will release the parking brake. An adjusting nut and locking nut are
provided where the brake cable attaches to the shoe. The shoe should be adjusted so that
the parking brake functions reliably. The photo below is taken from the driver’s side with
the seats raised, looking down on the motor.
MOTOR BRUSH
ACCESS COVERS
BRAKE
ADJUSTMENT
17
REAR SUSPENSION
Rear suspension on each side consists of a coil spring, with a shock absorber inside each
spring (like a two-piece strut), and a swing-arm that bolts to the rear axle and pivots at the
frame attachment.
The two rear swing-arms are of different construction. The right (passenger) side is made
of hollow steel pipe. The left arm is of flat steel. The reason for this is unknown to me at
this writing.
The rear shock absorbers are stamped “Monro-Matic” with the part number “1034”. The
date code is “C10C71”. The rear coil springs are pre-loaded. The spring must be
compressed about an inch in order to safely bolt or unbolt the shock. We jacked up the
frame and set it on blocks located at the rear of the battery framework, just at the forward
edge of the rear trailing arms, and then used a floor-jack under the rear axle to raise the
axle until the shocks could be fastened without tension. The rubber bushings for the
shocks may be replaced with HELP! part number 31018 or Napa part number 650-1113.
FRONT SUSPENSION
Front suspension on each side consists of a flat single-leaf spring and a flat half-leaf, and
shock absorber. The rear end of the leaf spring and half leaf are solidly bolted (no pivot)
to the frame. The forward end of the whole leaf spring is solidly bolted to the front axle.
The shock absorbers are located between the front axle and the frame.
The front shock absorbers are stamped “MAECO” with the part number “A40099”. The
date code is “C2D73”.
STEERING
Steering is a conventional automotive type, according to Otis. I strongly suspect the S-71
uses the same components as were used for Otis gasoline-powered products of higher
power and speed.
The steering assembly has a total of six grease fittings, three on each side as indicated by
the arrows on the photos below.
18
REAR AXLE AND DIFFERENTIAL
The rear axle and differential are of the
automotive type, according to Otis.
The differential can provide power to
either rear wheel. I strongly suspect
the S-71 uses the same components as
were used for Otis gasoline-powered
products of higher power and speed.
The differential cover, facing rear has
an oil plug with a square hole for a
3/8” ratchet drive and used for
inspecting and adding gear oil (see
photo). Standard 90-weight gear oil is
suggested.
REAR WHEEL BEARINGS
Each rear wheel uses a ball-bearing wheel bearing located in the end of the axle housing.
For access, jack up the rear axle and remove the rear wheel. Remove the cotter pin and
castle nut holding the hub and pull the hub straight off- it is splined to the axle shaft. The
bearing will be visible at the end of the axle. This bearing should be flooded with clean
grease. I have not removed one of these so cannot say further the exact procedure for
bearing removal. The bearing appears to be retained by a plate that bolts to the end of the
axle housing (with a large opening for the axle and through which the bearing may be
viewed). To replace the hub align the splines of the hub and rear axle and push on.
Replace the castle nut and tighten until it is tight, then back off the nut until the cotter pin
can be inserted through the castle nut and axle and locked in place. Then replace the
wheel. The recommended wheel lug nut torque is unknown to me but I use a 3/8 handratchet and ¾-inch deep well socket for this with good results.
FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS
Each front wheel has an inner and an outer roller bearing that should be well greased. For
access, jack up the front axle and remove the front wheel. Remove the grease cover from
the hub by prying it straight out. Remove the cotter pin and castle nut holding the hub and
pull the hub straight off. The roller bearings will lift out of the hub- they are only secured
by grease. To replace the hub align the roller bearings with the axle and push the hub onto
the axle. Replace the castle nut and tighten until it is tight, then back off the nut until the
cotter pin can be inserted through the castle nut and axle and locked in place. The hub
should rotate freely and have no side or end play. Then replace the wheel. The
recommended wheel lug nut torque is unknown to me but I use a 3/8 hand-ratchet and ¾inch deep well socket for this with good results.
19
SEATS AND BATTERY ACCESS
The two individual seats are bolted to a piece of ½-inch plywood (covered with indooroutdoor carpet) that is hinged at the front edge for access to the batteries. A rod and rodholder (for propping up this cover during battery maintenance) are located on the battery
side behind the driver’s seat. The passenger seat mounts with four bolts from the rear of
this cover into tapped nuts in the seat. The driver’s seat mounts to adjustable tracks so it
can be moved fore and aft to accommodate the driver. The tracks have threaded studs that
extend through the cover and are attached with washers and nuts. The left-rear nut also
secures the rod and the right-rear nut also secures the rod holder.
OPERATOR CONTROL PANEL
The operator control panel mounts to the fiberglass body using a bolt, nut, and washer at
the top end (between the seats) and using either a bolt or sheet metal screw at the bottom
edge near the floor. Remove the upper bolt first. Then remove the bottom fastener- it
screws into a captive Tinnerman U-type self-retaining speed nut on the inside lip behind
the fiberglass. When the bolts are removed, lift up on the panel about ½-inch so the
bottom lip clears the fiberglass. The panel may then be pulled forward a few inches for
access to the components mounted on it. The heavy battery cables and the studs on the
reversing switch may hang up on the fiberglass but with a little patience and care the
panel will come free for inspection and maintenance.
Bottom end of
control panel
Lip part of control panel
Fastener
Tinnerman speed nut
Fiberglass body (partial)
20
REFERENCES
[1] Westcoaster sales brochure entitled “full line”. Otis Collection Item #2599. © 1971 by
Otis Elevator Company. Used by permission.
[2] Circuits and Machines in Electrical Engineering, Volume II Machines
By John O. Kraehenbuehl and Max A. Fawcett
Second Edition, ©1947, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York
Page 251.
[3] I.C.S. Reference Library (4 volumes)
Volume: Electric Railways, Interior Wiring
©1904, International Textbook Company, Scranton
Section 24, Page 16.
INTERESTING WEBSITES
SUBJECT
Electric Vehicle History
EVA-Chloride
Otis Elevator Company
Otis Elevator Company
Trojan Batteries
Westcoaster
Golf Cart Parts
Golf Cart Parts
WEBSITE LINK
www.econogics.com/ev/evhista.htm
See listing at www.econogics.com/ev/evhiste.htm
www.otis.com
See listing at www.econogics.com/ev/evhisto.htm
www.trojanbattery.com
No listing found
http://www.golfcarcatalog.com/
http://www.teetimegolfcars.com/
21
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