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SECTION 4
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OPERATING THE COACH
4-L. IDENTIFICATION
PLATES
There are a number of identification plates and
decals (fig. 4-1) designed to assist you in licensing
and registering, as well as certain caution and
warning plates (do's and don'ts) for your comfort
and safety. Listed below are the plates we feel
will
you
need
to license
and register your coach.
f . Tire and Rim Plate. Contains important
tire sizes, pressures and loadings, and is located
on panel behond drivers seat.
g. Recreationd Vehicle Emb1em. Contains the
recreational vehicle institute emblem and rrånufacturer's registration number. It is located above
the state identif ic ation plate near the passenger
door.
"
NOTE
When reference is made throughout the
manual to left and right sides, they will
always be in relation to you as you face
the front of the coach while inside of it.
a. Coach Serial Number Plate. Contains the
coach serial number and is located on the left
hand side of the windshield, mounted to the dashboard and facing outward. View the plate by looking
through the windshield into the driver's compartment.
h. Other Plates. There are additional plates,
decalsrmused
throughout the coach that
are described within each pertinent section.
4-2.
BREAK-IN RECOMMENDATIONS
For the first 500 miles, the
coach road speed
should not exceed 50 miles per hour in "D'' range,
or an engine speed of 3000 RPM in the lower ranges.
Work up to this speed gradually during the first
200 miles and vary the speed periodically instead
of driving at a steady pace for longperiods.
b. Engine Identification Plate. Contains engine
model and serial number information and is located
on the engine oil pump. To read, remove the engine
service aecess panel (fig . 4^2) at the right rear
exterior of the coach.
Monitor engine temperature gage fre-
c. Engine Emission Certification Decal. Contains the engine exhaust emission data and timing
data necessary to comply with the Federal Clean
Air Act. For the 2900R use data indicated for the
Chrysler 440-I engine. The decal is located on the
left (inboard) valve cover and is accessible through
the engine f trans,rnission service door. On early
During the succeeding 2000 miles of operation, the
road speed may be gradually increased to complete
models, decal was on kitchen window.
d.
National Highway Traffic Safety Administra-
tion
distribution in conformance with Federal standards.
located on the coach exterior to the rear of
the passenger door.
It is
€. State Identification Plate. Contains coach
o date of manu-
sefiåt
facture and is located on the coach exterior to the
rear of the passenger door. This plate isfurnished
by the state in which your coach is registered and
may not be required in all states.
quently to prevent engine overheating.
Temperature should not exceed 250oF.
the t'break-int' process.
Your motor coach should not be loaded in excess
of the recommended gross vehicle weight (GVW)
as shown in Section 6. It is important that the load
be distributed in a proper proportion between the
front and rear tires at the ground. Refer to tire
and rim plate (fig. 4-I) for load capacity at
recommendeci inflation pressures. Weigh the front
and rear of a fully loaded coach, separately, on a
standard scale. Your coach has been designed
f rom the ground up to provide proper balance
and weight distribution between the front and rear
tires so you can enjoy a smooth nonpitching ride.
A littie care on your part when';qfowing gear on
board will maintain this balance aihd make your
trip more enjoyable.
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Figure 4-1. ldentification Plates
4-2
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Good driving practices, supplemented by regular
lubrication and maintenance, will do mucb to keep
your motor coach running at its top efficiency.
Establish a regular service schedule for your coach
and become acquainted with the maintenance s€rvices contained in this manual. We urge you to
read the maintenance instructions thoroughly for
details on servicing procedures. If you are operating under severe conditions not fully covered in
this manual, consult your FMC Recreational Vehicle Dealer or the Factory Service Department
to determine the best maintenance intervals for
such conditions.
4-
3.
KEYS
There are three keys to your motor coach: an
ignition key, a passenger door key, and an access
door key. Record the numbers stamped on each
key in the event of loss.
4-4. LOCK YOUR
inlet and exhaust vents.
*
cated on the
Lo-
left side of coaeh, this drain is used
for sewage discharge. The sewage hose is stored
in a container under the coach just aft of the front
wheels on the same side as the sewage drain
valves. Waste water and sewage tank drain valves
are accessible from ahead of the left rear wheels.
No key is required for access.
e' FueI Tank Fill. Located on the left side of
coach behind the left rear wheel, this single-lock
compartment contains the fuel filler and cap.
COACH
Always remove ignition key and lock all doors,
windows, and access panels when leaving the coach
unattended, even in your own driveway. Try to
park in a well lighted area and never invite theft
by leaving articles of value exposed to outside
view,
4-5.
A Plumbing and Heating Service. Located on
the left side of coach, this single-lockcompartment
contains the hot water heater controls andfurnace.
Accessible are: water heater air and intake vents,
pilot reset button, gås control valve, temperature
relief valve, water tank drain, and the furnace air
EXTERIOR COMPARTMENTS (FIG. 4-2)
We suggest that you become acquainted with each
of the exterior storage and service access colilpartments. With your compartment key, walk around
the coach beginning at the right front and examine
the compartments as follows:
4. T'resh Water FiIl. Located forward of the
driver's seat, this double-lock compartment provides aecess to the filler for the fresh water tanks,
the windshield washer reservoir, and the hydraulic
brake master cylinder. Early models .had the fresh
water fill on the right side along with the windshield
washer reservoir. Check your coach for configura-
tion. To filt water tanks, remove plastic cap and
fill with a hose or water container. Keep plastic
cap on filler tube when not in use. Remove cap
L 1 lO-VoIt Seryis_e_Ir:ine glrd Agxiliarv_Pp\,'er
Unit (APUL Located on the left side of the coach
behind the left rear wheel, this single-lock compartment contains the 1lO-volt service line andthe
auxiliary power unit (APU). PulI out linetohook up
to campground electrical power. The APU is for
use in areas where campground power is not
available.
& Engine, Transmissi-on- and_ APU Service.
Located at rear clf coach, this single-Iock compart-
ment provides access to engine oil fill, transmission oil fill cåpr the ,transrnission oil dipstick,
and the auxiliary power unit (APU).
b
Located at the center
rear of coach, ttris compartment provides access to
the radiator filler cap. Coolant level should be
within approximately 3-1/ 2 inches of' top of filler
neck; keep filled for safe operation. No key is
required.
City Water Pressure Connection. Located. to
i Engine- Se:'vice. Located on the right side of
eoach at the rear, this single-lock compartment
provides aeeess to the engine oil dipstiek, power
steering reservoir, and automotive batteries. Engine dipstick should read at the 'TFULL'' mark,
power steering reservoir f luid should be close
to the top, and battery should be filled with
distilled water to split ring level.
garden hose swivel type equipped with a removable
plastic cap and a "press-to-operate" drain button,
No key is required for aeeess.
compartment is accessible from either side of the
coach. Each compartment door is secured by the
compartment key,
from brake master cylinder to check fluid level;
fluid should be near the top. Keep master cylinder
filled for safe operation.
L
the rear of left f ront wheel, this connection is
simply "hooked in" to a city pressure syste'm for
fresh water supply. The connection is a 3/A-inch
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j: Shi Storage Compartment. A ski storage
4-3
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SKI
STORAGE
APU
AND IIO
VO
PLUMBING
AND HEATING
SERVICE
..
fBFSH WATER Ff LL
BRAKE UNSTTN
CY LINDER
TANK FILL
LIN
WASTE
LT
SERVICE
E
WATER
w/wasHER nEsrnrTårn
AND
FUEL
ctTy wnrFn
pREssuRE
SEWAGE
SEWAGE
HOSE
STORAGE
DRAIN
CONNECTION
RADIATOR
FI LL
CENTRAL
AIR CONDITIONING
ENGINE
TRANSMTSSION
APU SERVICE
AND
LPG
ENGINE
RIGHT
SIDE
STORAGE
SERVICE
SERVICE
SERVICE
sD-372
Figure
4-2. Exterior Compartments
4-4
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k. Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)Service. Located
on the right side just behind the right rear wheel.
It contains the LPG tank complete with fill valve,
main shut-off and pressure relief valve, regulator,
and gas level meter. The outage valve contains a
vent hose to discharge any excess gas to the
atmosphere. No key is required; lift latch.
4-7. TRAILER ELECTRICAL
The trailer conneetor at rear of coach connects
trailer lights into the coachautomotive electrical system. when connected, the coach light switch
and brake switch controls the trailer lights. To
Lift connector cover and insert trailer
use:
plug. Lock plug in place by hooking end of cover
over the plug.
To remove, lift cover and pull
trailer plug from connector.
the
Make certain LPG valve is closedbefore
refueling. See Section 5.
1. Central Air
Locate
compartment provides
mounting space for a front and rear air conditioning system operating from 110-volt power. All
controls for the central air conditioning system
are located above the clothes closet (see Section 5).
m. Right Side Storage Compartment. Located
forward of the passenger door, this double-Iock
compartment is used for storage and is also ac;
cessible from inside.
4-6.
BUMPERS (fig. 4-3)
Plated steel front and rear bumpers, fitted with
compression- leaf springs (brackets) protect the
coach from damage while parking or from a minor
collision when moving. Earlier models were equipped with "energy absorbers"; four single energy
absorbers on the front and two tandem-mounted
energy absorbers on the rear.
L--,,----'
Figure 4-3. Trailer Connector and Bumper
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NOTE
This completes the exterior walk around;
Conditioner (1lO-volt) Serviee.
door, this double-leck
CONNECTOR (fig.
4-3)
the following paragraphs deal with the
,
4-8.
aoach from the inside.
DRIVER'S AND PASSENGER SEATS
a., Driver's Seat (fig. 4-4). The driver's seat
positions for your
adjGts tore
leg and arm comfort. This seat also pivots to the
right, which makes getting in or out of it very
easy. Place yourself in the seat and adjust the
forward position to your comfort by moving the
fore and aft slide latch (under the seat) to the left.
Move seat forward or backward until you feel comfortable with your right foot on the accelerator
pedal. Release slide latch. Latch will "click" when
seat is secure in track. Raise arm rests; adjust
and fasten seat.belt or shoulder belt. To swing out
of the seat, simply lower arm rest, release seat or
shoulder belt, and push down on seat pivot lever
Iocated beneath seat frame on driver's seat pedestal. If the seat is in the full rearward position, you
witl have to move it forward (about 2-I/2 inches)
to allow space for the seatback to clear the galley
partition.
Figure
4-4. Driver's
Seat-Adj
4-5
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b.
Passenger Seat
(fig.4-5), The passenger
seat on floor plan r?Ail only adjusts fore and aft
(four positions) in same manner as the driver's
seat. To move fore and aft slide latch to your left
(with left hand) to move seat forward or backward.
Release slide latch and seat will click into position.
On coaches equipped with a dinette (floor plan tt4tt)
the passenger seat arm rests can be folded down if
desired. When dinette area (floor plan ttAtt) is used
for sleepirig, passenger seat must be moved to its
full forward position. Passenger
seat is equipped
with two seat belts and headrests.
On coaches equipped with a sofa-seat arrangement
(floor plan tt;tt) passenger seat backrest moves forward against dash to become a bed headrest. This
sqat, is equipped with two seat belts and is a high
back design to provide headrest when in the passenger position.
Figure
4-6. Passenger Door
Step
a, Starting-Ignition
stailin
Switch. The key-operated
four positions:
ttACCYril r?OFFrtt ftIGNrtt and ttSTART.tt When the
key is turned to the I'ACCY" position, the following
items are activated: windshield wlpers and washers,
heater and defroster, and automotive air conditioning system. Turning to the ??IGN" position, activates
the engine ignition systeffi, instrument panel lights,
lorake lights, ffid turn signal lights. To start engine,
turn key to extreme right; when engine starts,
release pressure on key and it will return to the
f'IGN?' position. To remove key, turn to center
f
'OFF" position.
b. Speedometgr. Located directly in front of
driver, the speedometer is graduated in increments
from 0 to 100 mph. It is equipped with a mileage
odometer to record total miles traveled.
Figure 4-5. Passenger Seat-Adj Lever
c.
dodi
Passenger Door Step (fig. 4-6). T'he passenger
i
"pull-outstep
for ease of entry and exit. Pull out step from under
door sill and push on step to lock in extended
position. Lift step to unlock and slide under door sill
before moving eoach.
4-9. DRIVER'S INSTRUMENTS AND
CONTROLS
(fig. 4-7)
Familiarize yourseU with the driver's instruments and controls BEFORE YOU OPERATE your
motor coaeh. The instruments provide useful informationl eheck them frequently as you drive.
4-6
c. Tac&tqeler.
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Located directly in front of the
records engine revolutions
per minute. Tachometer is graduated in increments
reading from 0 to 5000 rpm.
d. Engine Oil P,ressure Gauge. Located above
andTo
e is graduated
in increments reading from 0 to 150 pounds per
square ineh. Gauge indicates engine oil pressure
but not oil level. Pointer should indicate 65 pounds
minimum when engine is operating at cruising speed
and normal temperature.
a Fuel Gauge. Located below engine oil pressure gauge. With the ignition switch in IGN position,
the pointer wil indicate amount of fuel in tank.
.
Water Temperature Gauge. Located above
this gauge indieates engine eoolant
temperature. Pointer will normally stay near c€nf
tach6-meter ',
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ter, but may rise slightty in traffic or under neavy
tight)
load.
High Beam Indicator. Beam indicator (blue
tt3111ttt comes on when the headlights are on
high beam. It is readily visible at night.
Monitor temperature gauge frequently to prevent
engine overheating. Temperature should not exceed 250oF.
g. Alternator Indicator (Voltage Gauge). Locat6o
r indicates whether battery is being charged or
discharged. It is graduated in increments reading
from 0 to 16. Pointer will normally stay centered
while driving.
h. Turn Signal Indicators. The turn indicators
(green
th the outside lights
when the turn signal
is operated.
i. Brake Indicator. Brake indicator (red light)
"BRK" comes on if coach parking brake is in the
I'IJP'? (on) position, or if the dual booster brake
system should fail.
E.
Erlgine Stopped Indica.tor. Indicator (red light)
ENG" comes on
otr, restart engine.
'f
if
engine stops.
If light comes
Wiper/Washer Control $witches. Located on
to left of driver, these two switches control
the left and right windshield wipers. All wipers
have two speeds for clarity and safety. Rotate switch
!
panel
iji:iill
,,.!.;i
'-*"-' -"t
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
B.
LIG HT SWITC H
LEFT WI PER
HAZARD SWITCH
RIGHT WIPER
OIL
BRAK
PRESSURE
E
HIGH
9.
I
O.
II
.
EN
GIN
o=-ru'"*,,,,,.,,i.
14.
E
HEATER
17.
BLOWER
TRANSMISSION RANGE SELECTOR
I
A/C-HEAT
SELECT
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IB.
SPEEDOMETER
FUEL
t9
A/C
.
20,
BEAM
Figu re 4-7
&\-*-/'
I5
12.
3.
.
CIGAR LIGHTER
. ALTERNATOR
I6. TAC HOMETER
WATER TEMPERATURE
VE NT
STARTING
-
IN
D
ICATOR
IGNITICN
SWITCH
Instrument Panel
4-7
fu æslooFl
to left for "OFFr" one position to rightfor I'HALF"
speed, and two positions to right for "FULL" speed.
Push knob into activate washers as desired; release
knob to stop washers. Rrshing knob activates an
electric pump to spray fluid (water, windshield
solvent) from washer reservoir as desired. Wet
glass with washers before operating wipers. If
interior of coach is cold, operate the defroster fo.r
a few minutes, after the engine has \ilarmed up, to
reduee possibility of smearing or f reezing the fluid
on the windshield. During eold weather make sure
washer solution contains antif re eze specifieally
made for this use.
rn. Hazard Switch. Located on panel to left of
driver, this switch aetivates the emergeney warning system and is not intended for use when
coach is in motion. PuIl out to plac e hazard switch
ln I'ON' r position. The f ront turn signal lights
(park) and rear brake lights will flash. If it is
necessary to leave the coach to go for serviee,
the flasher -system will continue to operate even
with the ignition key removed.
L Lights Switch. Located on the left panel is
the main light switeh for your motor coach. The
switeh controls all the exterior lights and the
instrument panel lights. Pdlling knob to first stop
activates all the exterior lights, except the headlights; pulling knob all the way out turns on headlights. Brightness of instrument panelis controlled
by rotating knob to left for bright, to right for dim.
The hi-beam foot switeh is on the left side of the
floor board.
o. Air
cat6o
Conditioning and Heater Controls. Lo-
are
-\-_-,'
Never use r?P' while the coach is in
motion. Always set parking brake while
in this range. When parking on an incline
put range selector in '?Ntt, apply parking
brake, then move selector to trP" positfon.
The ffRrr (reverse) position is used to back your
coach and only after the coach has been stopped
completely. An audible warning buzz,er is activated
when selector is placed in !'R" position to warn
pedestrians that coaeh is going to back up. The
rfN'r (neutral) is used for standing for prolonged
periods with the engine running. Engine can be
started in this range. The 'D" (drive gear) is used
for most city and highway driving. The tt ztt (seeond
gear) is used for driving slowly in traffic or on
mountain roads where more precise speed control
is desirable. It is used also when climbing long
grades, and for "engine braking" when descending
moderately steep grades.
f
Do not exceed 25 miles per hour in ?'1"
ranger or 55 miles per hour in "2 " range.
q. Parking Brake (fig. 4-8). The parking brake
lever
the driver's seat.
Pull up to vertical position to set brakes; push
down to release. Parking brake lever cabletension
is adjustable by turning knob on lever. Turn knob
countercloclcrvise (Ieft) to relieve tension; clockrpise
(right) to inerease tension.
the controls for the automotive air conditioning
and automotive blower. The blower knob controls
the speed of the blower, the "HEATER' ' lever
eontrols the heat output ducts between full open
?
'HIGH' or fully closed "OFFr" the "SE LECT"
lever controls the air output for either "AC" air
conditioning, "HEAT" for warm air heating and
f
the defroster.
p.
Transmission Range Selector. Located to the
positions; r'P'?
rignt o
or park, ftR, or reverse, rfNrt or neutral, trDtt or
drive gear, ttItt or seeond gear, ttlrr or low gear.
The rrP, parking position supplements the parking
brake by locking the transmission. Engine can be
started in this range. The "1, (low gear) is used
for climbing very steep hills and for "engine
braking" at low speeds when going down hill.
4-8
Figure 4-8, Parking Brake Lever
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Flat Wheel-Full Up
Full Tilt- Full Rearward
Figure 4-9.
&ndc:oø
Warn children to stay away from operator' s controls, especially parking
brake and transmission range selector.
Steering Wheel
u. Mirrors. Left and right side view mirrors
interior rear view mirror are installed to
afford the driver all possible vision to the rear.
Mirrors should be adjusted to give driver a clear
view of left and right sides of coach. Mirrors swivel
in and out and can be tilted up or down to suit
and an
drivert s needs.
r. Steering Wheel. The steeriqg column and the
adjuståble to afford you
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maximum comfort and position selection (fig.4-9).
To adjust column, hold steering wheel with right
hand and loosen column clamp with left hand. Select
the column position most comfortable for you f rom
full up to full down, then tighten column clamp. Adjust wheel by pulling tilt lever up and pulling on
upper rim of wheel to set wheel at an angle most
comfortable for you. Wheel will lock in place when
v. Map Lights (fig. 4-10). Overhead map lights,
one above driver's seat on left ceiling and one
above passenger seat on right ceiling, illuminate
area for reading. Each light has its own switch to
suit individual requirements.
tilt lever is released. The horn button is at
center of steering wheel and activates a dual
set of horns located under front cowling.
s. Turn Signal Lever. The turn signal control
lever
of the steering column
below steering wheel. PuIl lever to signal for a left
turn; push lever to signal for a right turn. Use
turn signals for left and right turns, when changing
lanes, or when pulling away from a curb. Signal
your intention as far ahead of the actual maneuver
as possible. The signal will remain on until the
normal turn [s completed or until the lever is
returned to neutral by hand.
Figu
Visors. Your coach is equipped with teft
and right visors for sun control in conjunction with
the tinted windshield. Visors swing down for use;
swing up against roof when not in use. Visors are
t.
I
V"*"r.v/
Sun
safety padded.
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re 4-10. Map Light
'w. Driver's and P
Shaing
ation and sig"ating
are contained in the driver's door and passenger
window. Pull or push window handle to open or close
4-9
hs æstoon
windows. If coach air conditioning is operating,
keep these windows, and others throughout the
eoaeh, closed for efficient cooling.
Driver should insist that all passengers
fasten seat belts before moving coach.
Take no chances; buckle up.
y. Brake Pedal. The hydraulic brakes on your
coach are activated by the brake pedal. Dual våcuum booster cylinders assist you in applying the
brakes. Should the booster action fail, the hydrau:
Iic brake system will function without it to apply
the brakes. Any diffieulty with the brake vacuum
boosters should be checked by a qualified service
technician.
Figure 4-11. Driver's Sliding Window
x. Seat Belt3. Seat belts are provided on the
driver's and passenger seats up front and on the
rearmost seat in the dinette on floor plan rrAf'
eoaches. The driver's seat also has a shoulder
belt that can be used in lieu of the seat belt, if
desired. All belts are fastened to the eoach hull
and keep driver and passengers moving with the
coach. When the coach is in motion, it is ESSENTIAL that all occupants have their seat belts
fastened even a short but hard brake application
can cause injury to an unbuckled occupant.
Table
4-L. Before
From outs ,a"/that:
Fresh water fill cap is in place and windshield
washer reservoir is filled.
Brake master cylinder
is filted.
Hot water tank drain is closed and furnace air
exhaust and intake vents are clear and free of
z. Accelerator Pedal. The aecelerator pedal
opens and closes the engine carburetor throttle
valve and thereby controls the coach speed. This
pedal also controls the transmission low-gear
kickdown mechanism to obtain rapid aceeleration
of coach at slow speeds.
4-10. BEFORE STARTING CHECKLIST
(table 4-1)
Before ^starting on a trip, it is wise to make a
(flot the coach
gear and its interior
"rttnirrg
equipment. Sueh a check
can prevent unnecessary
delays and thereby make your trip more enjoyable.
Replace any worn or damaged parts; bring oil,
water, and coolant up to proper level.
eheek
Starting Checklist
By che
ing through:
Left front fresh water fill access. (Early models
fill was on right side.)
I,eft front brake cylinder and windshield
washer aCcess.
Plumbing and heating service access on left side.
dust.
Fuetr tank
4-r0
filler
cap
is in place and tight.
Fuel tank access on left side.
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Table
4-L. Before Starting Checklist
(Continued)
\--.
Fronr outs iae/tfiat:
110-volt service line
is stowed.
Auxiliary power unit (APU) and transmission oil
Ievels are at or near "FULL" mark.
\/
By checking through:
APU service access at rear.
Engine-transmission service access at rear.
Engine oil leve1 is at or near "FULL" mark,
power steering reservoir fluid is near top, and
automotive battery is filled with distilled water
to split ring level.
Engine service access at right
Radiator coolant level is no lower than
3 -L /2 inches below top of filler neck.
Radiator
rear side.
fill service access at center rear.
fitl cap is in place and secure, and shut-off
valve is closed.
LPG service access on right side.
is in container, drain covers and
straps are in place, and waste water and sewage valves are closed.
Waste water and sewage tank access on left side.
LPG
Sewage hose
Domestic batteries are filled with water
Access cover under driver's toe board
City water pressure connection cap is in place
City water pressure connection access on left
(distitled water recommended)
and secure.
Tires are free of foreign objects and are rnflated to correct pressure.
,/
side
.
Inflate to 75 psi.
I
ltrratL
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4-tI
hc eleoon
Table 4-L. Before Starting Checklist
From outside
Passenger door step is up and under door
From inside
By checking through:
that:
sill.
See
figure 4-6.
Action (See fig. 4-7):
/rn^r,
There is an adequate amount of fuel in tank.
Turn ignition key to "IGN" position and read fuel
Brake red indicator tight (BRK) is on.
Turn ignition switch to "IGN" position and set
parking brake; red light should be on.
Red engine stopped indicator light (ENG) is
gauge.
or1.
Turn ignition switch to "IGN" position; red light
should be
or1.
\-/
I
Reverse warning buzzer is working.
Turn ighition switch to "IGN" position; place
transmission selector lever in t?Rtr1, buzzet
should be on.
Front windshield wipers and washer operate.
Turn on each windshield wiper and activate
washer; check wipers throtrgh both speeds,
Brake pedal operates freely, and feels solid when
Depress brake pedal. It should feel solid and begin to grip af ter about 3 / 8 inch of movement.
Rear brake lights should go or1.
depressed.
NOTE
Ask your passenger or co-pilot for an assist when checking
exterior lights.
All exterior lights are working.
4-12
Pull light switch to first position. All lights
should go on, except headlights; pull switch all
the way and headlights should go on. Depress
foot switch and check for high-Iow beam operation. In high beam position, blue light (BRT)
of high beam indicator should be on. Low
beam, outboard lights; high beam, inboard
Iights.
c4, ro/73
\--rt'
{ms
æEtmspa
Table 4-L. Before Starting Checklist (Continued)
From inside
/tnut,
Action (See fig. 4-7):
Turn signal lights flash when turn indicator is set
in left or right turn position.
Hazard warning lights flash in unison when switch
is
on.
4-IL.
Set indicator in lef t position, lef t front turn signal (park) and left rear brake lights should
flash; set indicator in right position, right
front turn signal (park) and right rear brake
lights should flash. Turn indicators on panel
should flash for left or right turn.
Turn on hazard switch, front turn signal (park)
Iights and rear brake lights should flash in
unison.
STARTING THE ENGINE
@tøeæc
The starter should not be operated for
Ionger than 1 MINUTE intervals. Awaiting period of at least 2 minutes between
sueh intervals should be observed to
protect starter from overheating.
Exhaust gases contain carbon monoxide;
gas that by itself is
colorless and odorless. To avoid inhaling
these gases, the following precautions
should be observed:
a potentially toxic
,,
Do not run the engine (including the
APU) in r closed garage or in confined
areas any longer than needed to move the
coach in or out of the area. The best
protection against carbon monoxide entry
is a properly maintained engine exhaust
system. Whenever a change is noticed
in the sound of the exhaust system, when
exhaust fumes can be detected inside the
motor coach, or when the underside of
the motor coach is damaged have a
competent mechanic, preferably an FMC
authorized service eenter mechanic, inspect the complete exhaust system and
adjaeent body areas for broken, damaged,
or mispositioned parts, deteridxation,
open seams or loose connections which
could permit exhaust fumes to seep into
the coach. In addition, inspect the exhaust
system during lubrication or oil change
periods. Replace or adjust as required.
\u--'
b. Normal Starting-Engine Warm. Same as
lpartway
e
above
down while starting.
c. Extremely Cold Weather Starting (Below
ZeroT. S
place transmission range selector in I'N'r (neutral)
or ?Pfr (park). Depress accelerator pedal to floor
and release. Then hold pedal part way down while
f
starting.
d.
Depi"ess the åccelerator pedal fully and hold to the floor until
engine starts. This will clear exeess fuel from
carburetor.
e. Assist
accom
Starting. Assist starting CANNOT be
ing or towing. Use a booster
battery or jumper cables from another vehicle in
conjunction with coach automotive battery.
Make certain negative cable from booster
battery is connected to negative terminal
on motor eoach battdry. Each post is
stamped on top (-) negative; (+)positive.
4-T2. SHIFTING THE
a.
Set parking
brake in 'tUP" (on) position, place transmission
range selector in rrN?' (neutrat) or " Pr' (park).
Depress accelerator pedal to the floor and r€lease. Turn ignition key to the ''START" position
and release when engine starts. Allow engine to
idle for a short period (approximately 2 minutes)
to allow engine to come up to normal operating
temperature ( 185"F).
c4, L0/73
TRANSMISSION
The transmission range selector is mounted onthe
right side of the instrument panel. When ready to
roll, release parking brake and move selector
from I'P* or rrNfr to the desired drive position.
Selector can be moved from I'P* to 'rR'r only by
moving lever past gate to the left. Use rfR" range
only when vehicle is stopped; "Nf' when motor
coaeh is standing for long periods with engine
running.
4-13
{ms æsDeI$Ft
Most driving will be in the 'rD" range when in
cities and on relatively level highways. If it's slow
going in traffic, shift to the ttztt range for more
preci,se speed control.
When driving in the mountains the ttztt or f'1r?
range position should be seleeted on upgrades which
require a heavy throttle for I/2mi1e or more. This
will reduce the possibility of overheating the transmission. Also use t'ztt range for "engine brakingt'
when descending moderately steep grades.
white in gear, can cause overheating of engine.
4-
16. REFUELING
The fuel tank filler tube is positioned on the lef'
side of the coach behind a key-locked aecess door
the- engine is Aesigned to run on low-lead gasoline.
Most low-lead gasolines can be used under normal
operating conditions. The use of eompletely lead
free gasolines is not recommended (See par . 4-2V),
Do not exceed 55 miles per hour in
ttztt range
-
transmission may overheat.
Make certain LPG valve is closedbefore
refueling. See Section 5.
If you're
going up a very steep hill or going down
,1'r range, also for ttengine
braking" at low speeds (25 mph or less).
a steep hill, shift to
Do not exceed 25 miles per hour in
r
ltr range - transmission may overheat.
f
4.T7.
Tow hooks at the front of the coach are provided
to tow the coaeh should a breakdown occur. These
hooks are located under the frame in line with
the driver's door and are the ONLY points from
which the coach can be towed.
4-13. ROCKING THE COACH
If the motor coach becomes stuck in snow, sand,
or mud, it can often be moved by a rocking motion.
To accomplish this, move the range selector
rhythmieally between
t?Dt?
TOIVING
--\
DO NOT allow any tow facility to wrap
chains or ropes around front or rear
and rrR."
\--.1'"
bumpers as energy absorbers might be
damaged. DO NOT
Avoid racing the engine or spinning the
wheels. Prolonged efforts to free a stuck
motor coach may result in overheating
and transmission failure.
4-L4. PASSING ACCE LERATION
To obtain rapid aeeeleration at speeds below 30
mph, depress the accelerator briskly to the floor.
This shifts the transmission to a lower gear. It will
shift up again when foot pressure is released. Any
time an engine lugging condition is encountered,
manually downs,hift the transmissionto obtain rapid
acceleration. After ther;'. esired speed has been
reached, manually shift the transmission into f'D"
range.
4-t5. HOLDING
a. Towing With Transmission
transmi
Inoperative. If
er
disconnecting the propeller shaft at the differential.
Tie disconnected end of propeller shaft securely
to frame.
b. Towing With Transmission
coaEh
Operative. The
at a
speed less than 30 mphfor distances upto 15 miles.
Because the transmission reeeives lubrication only
when the engine is running, diseonneet propeller
shaft (par. a above) if coach is to be towed more
than 15 miles.
4-
ON
AN UPGRADE
r,,,
)
lift coach to tow.
18. ELECTRICAL
SYSTEM
There are three electrical systems in your motor
The coach should be held on an upgrade only by
using the foot brake or parking brake and the 'rP'r
(park) position of the range seleetor lever. Using
a drive gear to hold on an upgrade ean eause the
coach: a 12-volt automotive engine-ignition and €X-
engine and transmission to become overheated. Do
only with the 12-volt automotive system (fig. A-LZ).
See Section 5 for interior 12-volt and 1 lO-volt
lighting systems .
not idle the engine for more than 1 minute with
transmission in gear, Longer periods of idling,
terior light system with driver's instruments and
eontrol lights; a 12-volt interior lighting system;
and a 1l0-volt lighting system. This section deals
a'
4-14
c4, Lo/73
./V
\_-/\
{me
æsrgclpt
Engine Ignition. The engine in your coach is
a lz-volt electronic ignition syst€ffir
which consists of two separate circuits - a low
voltage (primary) circuit and a high voltage (seeon-
4-19.
of the automotive battery (in engine compartment);
L. Headlights. Your coach is equipped with dual
sealed beam headlights; low beam and high beam.
The outboard headlights contain low and high beam
elements and the inboard lights contain a single
high beam element. Keep headlights clean and free
of dirt for complete effectiveness. It is r€cofilmended that when driving during daylight hours on
two-way two-lane highways you turn on the head-
?.
LIGHTS (fig. 4-I4)
equipped with
dary) circuit. The low voltage circuit is made up
dual ballast resistor and ignition coil, toothed
reluctor, and magnetic pickup (part of engine distributor); starting-ignition switch and alternator
indicator (on driver's instrument panel) the electronic control unit and the potor coach frame and
wiring. The high voltage circuit includes the ignition
coil secondary; the distributor cap and rotor (part
of engine distributor); the spark plug cables; spark
plugs; and the motor frame.
b. Automotive Battery.
battery
The Lz-volt automotive
e
compartment suPPlies
current to the low voltage primary circuit for engine
ignition and also powers the exterior lights and
driver's instruments through the starting-ignition
switch. Powered directly from the battery are the
horn, hazard lights, cigar lighter, and air conditioner condenser circuits. The automotive electrical system charges both the automotive and domestic batteries.
't
Do not quick charge battery. Charge rate
should not exceed B amp f hour.
c. tgritiq" S*itctt, The ignition switch mounted
on tfre driver's instrument panel (fig. 4-'l) is a
four-position switch: ttACCYrtt ttOFFrtt ttlcNrtt and
"START." Powered from the "ACCY" positionare:
the front-heater cooler and rear air conditioning
blowers, and instrument lights. Powered from the
"IGN" position are: the headlights, park-turn
signal lights, and stop tail lights. Powered from
the "STAItTrr position is the engine starting circuit. All circuits are protected by fuses as indicated in paragraph d below. See Section 6 for
Automotive Light Bulb Listing'
d. Fuses (fig. 4-13). The automotive electrical
from overloads by fuses
circuit
which form an integral part of each circuit. All
fuses, except the backup light circuit fuse, are
mounted on a panel under the driver's instrument
panel. The backup light fuse is mounted on the
starter relay panel in the engine compartment.
Figure 4-13 indicates fuse capacity and identification. This information is also contained on the
inside of the fuse panel cover.
.d,"
The automotive electrical system powers all the
exterior lights and instrurnent panel lights.
lights for your safety,
L High Beam Foot Switeh. This switch is located
to the left of the steering column. Aetivate switch
with your foot to turn high beams
on
or
off
.
c. Park-Turn
coa&,
Signal Light. Located on front of
contain a dual element bulb and an amber lens. When parked, pull
light switch to first position and normal intensity
element will go ON. The high intensity element
operates when making a turn or whenhazard switch
is in "ON" position.
d. Rear Lights. The rear lights - stop, turn,
tail, [email protected]
are horizontally mounted and
recessed in the coach body. With light switch in
first or second position, taillights will go ON. The
back-up lights operate when transmission range
selector -lever is placed in "R'? (reverse). Stop
lights go ON when brake pedal is depressed and
the turn signal lights go ON when indicator lever
on steering wheel is activated.
o. License Plate Light-Rear. Licenseplate light
isas
rtherearlicense
plate and is lit when main light switch is in first
or second position.
f. Running Lights-Front and Rear. Located on
the low
go ON when
light switch is pulled to first or seeond position.
Each running light is equipped with a reflex lens
which reflects light to identify the coach. Front
light has an amber lens; rear has a red lens.
g
Clearance-Identification Lights - Front and
b.
Rear Roof. Clearance lights are mounted at each
roof corner and the identification lights are in the
middle (set of three) at front and rear of coach.
All the front lights are equipped with an amber
Iens and the rear lights have a red lens. All
clearance and identification lights go ON when
light switch is pulled to first or second position.
f
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t
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4-L5
{ms æsBffiFcFFB
RI
GHI RUNN
I NG
CONTINUED TO SHETI'3
LIGHT
12BL
_J
RIGHT
CLEARANCI
LIGHT
co
16R
t6R
14BR
T4 BR
æ.
Ho-RN
18 BK
<<r
14 BL
-J
co
S
sl
18BK
I8W/R
RANGE
18W
ALTERNATOR
ELECTOR
I
LI GHT
18 W/BR
ND I CATOR
R IGHT PARKTURN SIGNAL
FUEL
LIGHI
GAGE
DIAL LIGHT
I8W/R
SI
IGN
SW
I8W/GN
GNAL
DIAL LIGHT
S
IGH BEAM
H
I ND I
CATOR
T8B
R
18W/BL
ENG INE
RIGHT
HIA DL IGHT
14 GN
PEEDOMETER
STOP PED
I ND I
I8BL/W
CATOR
18W/BL
BRAKE
D
IAL LIGHT
-cJ'
:
D
IAL LIGHT
0rL
IGN
WARNING
LI GHT
I-ACHOMETER
l8w
LEFT
TU RN
I ND I
:
CATOR
l8R
I2GY
I8W/BL
PRISS
DENTIFICATION
LI
(_) D I STR.
GAGE
DIAL LIGHT
WATER
I8W/BL
GHIS
TTMP
GAGI
I8W/R
14GY
(W)
RIGHT
WA SHER
14GN
F (3)
FRONT
A (4)
W/WIPTR
. r4BK
,>_>
=
MOTOR
co
.if,
LEFT
HEADLIGHT
æ
V)
=
=
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L!
Ll-
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=
z.
l'l
LrJ
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(J
LI GHT
S
BK
MOTOR
I4BK
\Z
æ
c<j-
s
W/WIPER
=
oo
P(2)(PA RK
SWIICH
LEFI-FRONT
W/BREAKER
6 AMP
i
I
I
w/w tPER,
WA SHER
WA SHER
SW ITCH
14R
IGN
REMA
I
<F=
-c)co
(9-=
168
6 AMP
l4c,Y
I
NG
GNAL
LEFT
..
I
VEH
SI
B
A (4)
SEAT BELT
I
(W)
FRONT
W/WIPER
I'
WARN
(2)PA RK
WA SHER
J
LEFI' PA RKTURN SIGNAL
W/B REAKER
P
F (3)
F
v,
=
:. t8\ru/G
MOTOR
LEFT
I
SW I TCH
RIGHT FRONT
oo
rnorur
oo
B
WiW I PER
IN
SEATED WH ILE
ICLE I 5 IN MOTION
DR lVE SAFELY
-.t
HEADLIGHT
-=oo
Lr'r'
R
}4BK
SWITCH
CLEA RANCE
LIGHT
I8W/BL
18
I8WIR
W/BL
18 W/R
16 BR
16 BL
16W
}8GN
18 GN
18 GN
10 BR
LEFT RUNN ING
SD. I5
LI GHT
Figu re
4-L6
4-12. Automotive Wiring Diagram (Sheet
1
of 4l
c4, rc/73
CONTINUED TO SHEil
12 GN
B
-l
(CRUISE SPEED)
HEATER,
AI R CONDITIONING
CONTROL TURN
HEATTR-COOLER
BLOWIR &
CLUTCH SW ITCH
SIGNAL SWITCH
m
3
BLOWER MOTOR
t6R
14 BP
-l
m
C\J
i* L+åfii'-a=
Y Y Y-Yl=ld lX
EI
I
14BL
åELj
14W/BK
18 W/BR
TO DOMTST IC
HARNESS FOR
18 (0)
18 (0)
REAR A
D
IO
STA RT
lGNlTlONl \' I
IR CON-
IT ION ING UN IT
2A
TO lOB
tGNtTtg
SWIICH
18W
t8Y
ISWi BL
18 W/BL
ACcESSoRY
BUSS
&
FU SES
12GN
+
Y
18 W/BL
f-r
=l
16Y
I
116
18 BL
=
]O
æ
-J
z"
SPEED
=
oo
E
A/C BLOW
m
-t
\*
BR
10 GY
lJ.l
æ
=o
o
I8W/R
_J
U,J
E
I8 W/R
z.
(,
ISWi BL
æ.
6
.<f
T SIGN
BATTERY BUSS
l0BK
)E)
FU SES
& r-u
+
STOP L
B
H EA DL
IGNITION BUSS
& FUSE BLOCK
IGHT
IMMTR
SWITCH
D
(BUSS WIRE)
\Z
æ
s
A/C CON
CIGAR LIGHTER
V
co
O
m
rffiJrtx{Ft
I
l
ryi'Fi,^T.;.
18W/BL
I8W/R
16 BR
.rf,
| ,',i,i[[
TURN FLASHTR
16BL
I6W
|
t 6GN
16 BR
16 BL
RF SIGNAL
)
BK/BL
BK/Y
i 6Y
I 8(0)
BK
STOP LITE
LF SIGNAL
LR SIGNAL
RR SIGNAL
DIRECTIONAL
s
rclvnl
CONTROL HORN
BUTTON
HORN
18 GN
8GN
IO
'1
f
BR
\="*'
Figure 4-12. Automotive Wiring Diagram (Sheet 2 of 4l
c4,
h;1+
to
/73
sD-402
4-L7
he elslooFr
CONTINUED FROM SHETI- 2
18 BR
18 BR
'\--l'
IO BR
NoTE:
U=
r-t
18 BK
8BKI
I
18 W/BR
I
tl
18GYl
I
18P
|
18
|
W/GN
t4GNt
t4R I
14BKI
|
14BL
18
W/BK
18Y
16 BR
18rl
|
I
16Y |
16GNr
l8BL
12BK
t
t
Ao*
soME coACHES THts (RED)
LEAD IS DISCONNECTED AND
TIED BACK; IATER COACHES
DO NOT HAVE TH I S LTA
A
CON DEN SER
H
D
IR COND lTION ING
S
IGH PRESS SWITCH
I8 BK
I8
GY
I
I
r
I
|
I
18Y
|
18Y
16 BR
I
4BK
|
r
t
12 BK
r
14 BR
I88K
I4W/R
14 W/R
4BK
\Z
æ
TO DOMESTIC
BATTER
I
ES
oo
J
6l
sl
-l
A
STRVO
SPEEDOMETER
CRU I SE
(SPEED}
SINDER
CONTROL
I8R
æ.
æ
SENDER
START &
BACK UP
s=
J
TEMPERATURE
NEUTRAL
æ.
FUEL
SENDER
\Z
co
CLUTCH
IGN IT ION
co
oo
\Z
PANEL
r<r
]
BACK UP
BACK UP
IGNITION COIL
-l
A/C COMPRESSOR
SW ITCH
BUZZER
WA RN ING
ALTERNATOR
(85-AM P)
FLA SHER
BK/Y
I8BR
RIGHT SI DE OF COACH
BR/GY
IGN ITION
e
z.
CONTROL
a
UN
(9
GY/BR
FLD
IGN
IT
REGULATOR
(OPEN}
(9
æ.
co
LEFT s I DE
oF coAcH
æ
æ
(J
BALLA ST RES I STOR
\
DISTRIBUTOR
sD-403
4-18
Figure 4-12. Automotive Wiring Diagram (Sheet 3 of 4)
\".#"
{\
\-
R
RIGHT
,
LIGHT
18 BR
PRIMARY COLOR
IGHT
CLEARANCE
MA RKER
LIGHT
CODES:
- BL
Blue
Blue - LB
BIue - DB
Purple - P
Gray - GY
White - W
Pink
- PK
Maroon - M
Black - BK
Brown - BR
_R
Red
Orange - 0
Yellow - Y
Green - GN
Dk. Green - DG
Lt.
FL =
D =
(l) =
DK.
FRONT LIGHTING HARNTSS
DASHHARNESS
WIRE P0S|I|ON lN C0NNECT0R
E
TAILTURN
æ
STOP LIGHTS
EI
18 W/BR
18 GY
REAR WINDOW
=
W I PER MOTOR
BACK UP
LI GHT
GND
16 BR
TA IL
18Y
R.
TU RI\
16 BR
L.
TURN
18 W/BL
AUX
4BK
TRA I LER
CONNECTOR
16 GN
12 BK
IDENTIFICATION
]LIGHTS
18 BK
18 BR
\
14 W/R
4BK
V
æ.
6
-J
6
C9
oo
=
æ
oo
V.
æ.
o
æ
s=
OIL PRESS
SENDER &
\Z
æ
SWITCH
LI CENSE
sr
PLATE
LI GHT
BATTERY
CHARGE
o
-J
i2GY
oo
=
EQUAL IZER
START
ER
RELAY
REAR IGNITION
BUSS
\-\-START _l
RELAY PANEL
GNGINE COMPARTMENT}
APU START
æ.
oo
æ
.-l
t
-rl
=++
LEFT-iT[iT
u.',F'
*'-U.i
sD-404
c4,
Lo/73
Figure 4-12. Automotive Wifing Diagram (Sheet 4 of 4l
TAIL TURN
= STOP
LlGHT
tEj
LEFI'
CLEARANCE
LIGHT
T|NE
?=TcIclFT
'*"-'*
\
\-l
5tsauPA/C
.\E)
SPEED
REAR
5 AMP
rE15 AtP T
CONTNOI
CIGAR LIGHTEB
a
"\=
30 AUP
\-/
A/c coilD
IURN SIGNAT
REAR DEFROST
@@m
STOP LIGHT
///
\-///
\TI/
s\ff >-\\ \il ll
\\\-
-
I
I
\.Jt
t
lltt
l
I
I
,r
|I
----
I
U
.
Å\
t--'--1
tCt
|
-/
)
.\
ii
Figure 4-13. Electrical Fuses
4-20
5D-370
\#,
he pls|ooFl
C LEARANCE
C LEARANC
LIGHT-AMBER
IDE NT IF ICAT
E
LIG HT-RED
ION
LIGHTS-AMBER
\
ffi
a\\\
IDENTIFICATION
\LIGHTS-REDx
STO P-TAI
@l
-lI-
E
L-TURN
LIGFIT JL-:I
4
I
I
e !--)
-;:
ll
lL^
II
ffi
g
LICENSE
P
LATE
LIGHT
HEAD LIG HT
LOW BEAM
K-U
LIGHT
BAC
RUNN ING
LIG HTS
PAR
SI
K-TUR N
P
RUNN ING
AMBER
LIGHT-RED
GNAL
SD-20
Figure 4-14. Exterior Lights Locator Diagram
-'r\-.t
4.20. AUTOMOTIVE HEATING-AIR
CONDITION-
ING SYSTEM (fig. 4-L5)
The air in your coach is comfort-conditioned by a
combination heating-cooling system with some
common components and controls.
a.. Heating System. A hot water system pumps
engl-ne
heater-cooler unit at the
front of the coach. Warm air is then blown into
of the rear bedroom panel or in the center of the
right bedroom panel, has its own integral controls
(fig. 4-L7). When operating the heatihg-air conditioning system, make sure windows, doors, and
roof vents are closed. The heating-air conditioning
system will automatically adjust the coach interior
temperature. A heating-air conditioning flow diagram, is provided in figure 4-15,
,:
the coach interior through duets and openings in
the heater-cooler unit. controls for the heaterdefroster system are on the driver's instrument
panel.
L Air Conditi.gn:Ln_åFyste$. The air conditioning system for driver and passenger comfort consists of a front and rear mounted unit with separate
controls. Controls for the front air conditioner
unit are on the driver's instrument panel. The rear
air conditioning unit, mounted either in the center
The entire automotive air conditioning
system, including the compressor, is
under constant pressure. NEVER attempt
to disconnect a hose, remove an oil plug
or internally service the system. REFER ALL SERVICING TO AN FMC OR
THERMO KTNG DEALER.
..\
1
^\\..+z'
c4, lo/73
4-2r
he eleooFl
-F".*\.
FRE
\\-/
ON
C OMPRE SS OR
ENGINE
WATER
PU MP
R
EAR
R
AIR CONDITIONING
UN IT
(EVAPORATOR COO LER)
(coAc H 00001 ro 00350)
EC E IVER
TAN K
HEATER-
C
OO
LER
\'
V
(
DRAIN TUBES
ROOF
tå3 NDENSER
\
I
TO FREON
HOT
WATER
AIR CONDITION
->
PUMP
I
AIN
REAR
AIR CONDITIONING
uNrT (coAcH 00351 AND
ING --r"f>
TU BE
UP)
sD-373
Figu
re 4-15. Automotive Heating-Air Conditioning
\
\-.*1
4- 22
c4, Lo/73
{ms æffinæclm
4-2I.
HEATER DEFROSTER OPERATION
L-.,
To operate heater: bring engine up to operating
temperature (about 180'F), set SELECT lever to
"HEAT," JIEATER lever to "HIGH," and turn
BLOWER knob to "LOWr" "MEDr" or rrHIGH''
as desired. Blower will force heated air into
driver's and passenger compartments to heat coaeh
interior. To defrost windshield, move SE LECT
lever to frDEF't and blower will force heated air
across windshield.
4-22. FRONT AUTOMOTIVE AIR
CONDITIONING
Controls for the front AC are the same as the
heater/d,ef.roster system. To operate: move select
Iever to "ACr" heater lever to "OFF," then turn
blower knob to t'LOWrtt t'MEDrt' or t'HfGHrr as
desired. Unit will automatically supply cool air
when blower is turned on.
Have the air conditioning checked by a qualified
refrigerant technician prior to the summer season
or expected heavy usage.
MOUNTED EITHER
Figure
IN
REAR
OR SIDE BEDROOM PANEL
4-17. Rear Automotive Air Conditioning Outlets
4-24. TIRES AND WHEELS
a, Tilgs and Wheels. Coach wheels are trucksize tires, which are heavy and require special
tools for proper tightening of studs, we recommend
that owners change tires only when no other service facilities are available. It is possible to remove one of the dual rear wheels for use on the
front should one of those fail. Remove the rear
wheel from the same side of the eoach as the
'\-""
failed wheel by following the jacking instructions
(par, b below) for replacing a rear wheel. The
wheel removed from the rear may be mounted on
the front in the same manner as if it were a spare.
It is possible to drive the coach at low speed in
this condition until you are able to reach a service
station to have the flat tire repaired.
Figure 4-16. Front Air Conditioning Outlets
Do not exceed 25 mph, since driving
in
4-23. REAR AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING
(fig
. 4-L7)
To operate: turn air control knob to "HIGH," set
temp control knob to "COLDER." Direct the air
flow 'rUPt' or 'tDOWNtf and "LEFTtt or trRIGHTrt
for your individual comfort by turning vent cofrtro1s.
excess of 25 mph may overheat the
single rear tire and cause a blow-out.
Keep wheels tight on
torque (300-350
their hubs by applying proper
ft-lb,
lubed) to allwheel nuts.
\r,*--"
c4, to/73
4-23
he æElooFt
Proper balance of the wheels and tires and alignment of the front wheels are essential to long tire
life
.
Turn off the
and set the parking brake.
back of the wheel diagonally
opposite the wheel to be removed.
engine
Block both front
and
Pay particulai attention to the condition of the
tires. If given reasonable care, the tires should
give you many thousands of miles of trouble-free
serviee. But if abusedr or overloaded, the tires
may fail prematurely.
The jack
for
check the tire pressures regularly with a trucktype air pressure gauge once a week is not too
often. Keep tires inflated to pressure reeommended
in seetion 6. Always make sure the valve caps are
tight.
Inspect
tires at least once a month and remove
any foreign objects caught in the treads.
is
changirrg
designed
for use as a tool
tires only.
rvVe
recommend
that you do not use the tire jack to lift
the coach for service purposes. Jack
coach only at designated points as shown
in figure 4-18.
Gl Front wheel. place jack on a firm base
[email protected]
until it just eontacts jacking
point on underside of coach near wheel to be
and
removed. Raise jack just enough to take some of
the weight off the wheel, Do NoT raise the tire
off the ground at this time. with a wheel-nut
Do not attempt to dismount a tire from a
rim or remount it, This service should be
performed by a tire service station. A
safety hazard exists for an inexperienced
person who dismounts or remounts atire.
b. Jacking. To ehange a flat tire, place jack
squailelyGF frame ia-tcing points as indicated
in figure 4- 18 and lift coach. Remove wheel cover
by prying with a wide blade screwdriver or similar
tool. Loosen all wheel nuts and then raise.coach
until tire is clear of ground.
NOTE
If you plan to go off the main tourist
routes, take along a short board for
supporting the base of the jack should
you have to change a tire in soft or
sandy soil.
g
Changing
a Wheel. Each coach is supplied
with a heavy-duty jack stowed in forward compartment on right side. we recommend that only an
approved jack be used to raise the motor coach.
(Fig.4-18.)
wrench loosen, but do not remove the wheel nuts.
Resume jacking coach until jack stand fits under
th.e jacking point (fig. 4-18). Lower coach onto jack
stand. Remove jack and unscrew mechanical extension from jack, then reinsert jack under coach.
Raise coach until tire is about 1 inch above grotrnd.
Then raise jack stand to contact jacking point and
lower jack so coach is supported by both jack and
stand. Remove the nuts and the wheel. place wheel
on the coach and torque wheel nuts with wheet off
the ground. Remove jack and stand and lower wheel
to ground. Tighten the wheel nuts. stop at a service
station as soon as possible and have attendant check
wheel nuts for proper torque (900-8b0ft. lb).
J1
,,
\-r
(Q
Failure of one of the
tires ooes-nol necessitate removing the
wheel on the road. However, the coach should not
be driven in excess of 2b mph until it is repaired.
Driving in exeess of z5 mph may destroy the flat
tire, overheat the remaining tire and cause a
dual- wheel
blow-out.
(g) Rear Wheel Dual. When installing dual
wheels, make sure they are mounted properly to
prevent shearing of the wheel studs. Both wheels
on same side must be off the ground (not resting
on inner dual) to minimize the possibitity of loose
wheels after correct mounting torque is applied.
.:
.1
\-4t
4-24
c4, L0/73
.\,
{ms
æEIoclFt
t\
JACKING
TOW HOOKS
PO INTS
/,'
tr
WHEEL
WRENC H
t\
JACK
STAN D
,}d*,,
sD-374
't
Y --..2*
Figure 4- 18. Jacking Points
d. Tire Rotation (figure 4- 18 ). Periodic rotation of the tires on your coach should be done only
if tires are wearing unevenly. It is recomrnended
that you rotate your tires in a manner that will
even out the wear. It is not necessary to remove
the tire from the wheel, just shift the complete
wheel and tire. The rear dual tires should be
matched for wear to prevent overloading one tire
in a set. Under-inflation wear can be prevented
by maintaining recommended tire pressure. It is
-
We recommend you obtain road service
whenever possible and only attempt tire
changing under emergency conditions
with close adherenee to the instructions.
(4) W
To eliminate the possibility
of the wheel studs being sheared or the bolt holes
in the wheels becoming elongated, all wheel nuts
should be tightened at frequent intervals. This is
especially important during the first few hundred
miles of operation to allow the wheel nuts to
become properly set. On the rear dual wheels, the
nuts should be checked at intervals of 100,500,
and 11000 miles on a new coach and thereafter
every 21000 miles. After reinstalling dual wheels,
be sure the nuts are checked at 100 and 500 mile
.74
-\
intervals and thereafter every 21000 miles. All nuts
should first be seated firmly against the wheel.
Then the nuts should be serviced by tightening the
nut opposite to the previously tightened nut.
recommended that you check with a Michelin Dealer
when rotating tires to correct uneven wear.
Becaus e of the
e.
possible high operating speeds proper tire and
wheel balance is an important factor in correct
and safe performance of your coach, Consult your
nearest authorized FMC Service Center atthe
first
sign of erratic wheel action or abnormal vibration
so the wheel and tire balance may be inspected
and corrected, if necessary withproper equipment.
!"
\-,-c4, ro/73
4-25
{me
æslncrn
f. Wheel Alignment. To provide the desired
tire lif e, the f ront wheels
steerTn
must be properly aligned with the road. Wheel
toe-in adjustments are provided, but should only
be made with the proper aligning gauges and adjustment know-how. It is recommended that this
work be done only by your authorized FMC Service
C
enter.
.
4-25. LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE (fig.
4-19)
Lubrication and maintenance services for your
FMC motor coach detailed in the following paragraphs are recommended to insure you of maximum protection under all types of driving conditions. trt is very important that these services be
performed at the intervals indicated to extend
maximum ilife of eaeh component and for a pleasant
and trouble-free motor trip. To accommodate
owners who accumulate limited mileage, maintenance intervals are specified in both mileage and
time intervals where appropriate. A Periodic
Maintenance Services Chart (fig. 4-19) is provided
to cover all lubrication and services that must be
performed at specified intervals. This chartcanbe
removed from this manual for use by a service
station attendant. Make sure attendant checks all
points and uses only recommended lubricants and
fluids.
a.
Lubrication. The Periodic Maintenance Services Chart will guide service personnel in select'
ing the proper lubricants and using them correctly.
Please note that the information on the chart applies
to NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS ONLY. If
you operate your motor coach under conditions of
extreme heat or over dusty unimproved roads,
increase the frequency of the basic recommendation. Get into the habit of performing a periodic
and comprehensive lubrication and maintenance
schedule based on recommendations contained
herein. Capacities for various components will
also be found in the Periodic Maintenance Services
Chart, figure 4-19.
(1) Engine Oil (EO). The SAE grade number
indicates engine oil viscosity or consistency; for
example, SAE30 is a single viscosity oil. Some engine oils are multiple viscosity, such as SAEl0W30, with a low viscosity when cold and increasing
viscosity as the engine approaches operating temperature. References to API engine oil classification designating engine oil quality levels, ås defined by both the old and new API engine oil classification system will be common during conversion
4-26
to the new designations for some time to come.
For example, referenee to 'MS'' (o1d designation)
and "S8", or ftccf' (new designations), may both
appear on many engine oil containers. Only oils of
"SEr" or f?CC" quality levels in the new system
(with or without additional reference to designaf
.A
tions in the old system) or oils with the old classification "For Service MSr" should be used in the
eoach engine. Use only oils bearing the aforementioned API classification designations with a viscosity rating suitable to temperature conditions
as follows:
(2) Lubrieant-Multi-Purpose (MG). A semisolid lubricant usually specified for universal joints
and wheel bearings bears the NLG1 designation.
These are further classified by Grade, such as 1,
2, 3, etc. Use this lubricant for the coach propeller
shafts and wheel bearings in the Grade 2 classifieation.
(3) Gear Lubricant (GL). A multipurpose
lubricant fo
ifferential gears.
Classified by SAE number which indicates the
viscosity or consistency of the lubricant. Use this
lubricant in the coaeh differential: SAE 140, GL-4
or GL-5, for all temperatures.
(4) Automatic Transmission Fluid (AT).
speciil
A
tic
transmissions. Use only fluids labeled "DEXRON|'
Automatic Transmission Fluid" for all temperåture ranges. This fluid is used in the coach transmission and also in the power steering unit.,,
(5) Brake Fluid (BF). A heavy-duty hydraulic
brake fluid conforming to SAE J1703 specifications. Hydraulic brake fluid not clearly identified
as meeting these specifications should not be used.
Approved brake fluid is a chemically balanced
high-quatity substance having a wide temperature
range so that it flows at low temperatures and
does not vaporize at high temperatures. Accept no
substitutes.
b. Bqttery Care. Check battery water level
everv effie
often in hot weather or on
long trips. DO NOT OVERFILL. Proper level is
up to the split-ring. Use distilled water whenever
possible. If water is added duringfreezingweather,
drive eoach several miles to mix electrolyte and
prevent battery damage due to free zing,Automotive
battery should be elamped securely in engine
eompartment, domestic batteries seeure in mount
under driver's floorboard, and eable clamps tight
on their terminal posts. Neutralize any eorrosion
by washing with a solutionof bakingsodaand water.
c4, to/73
\-1./
\
hc Eteoon
PERIODIC MAINTENANCE SERVICES CHART
( FOR OUALT Ft ED SERVTCE TECHNTCTANS)
t\
L
\r6j.
FREOUENCY LUBRICANT
LUBR I CANT
FR EOU ENCY
SYMBOL
SYMBOL
BF
BRAKE
MASTER CYLINDER
(NOTE 1)
WINDSHIELD
WASHER
RESERVOI
S
R
(NOTE 2)
DOMESTIC
BATTER I ES
(NOTE 7)
BRAKE BOOSTE
R
AIR CLEANER
(F
RONT)
(NOTE 3)
FRONT
SPR ING
(NOTE 20)
12
MG
PROP SHAFT
(BOTH SIDES}
(NOTE 15)
20
AT
WHEEL BEARINGS MG
BOTH SIDES
(NOTE 4)
TRANSM ISSION
DRAIN AND FILL
DIFFERENTIAL
DRAIN AND FILL
(NOTE 18)
12
GL
(NOTE 1e)
AT
TRANSMISSION
OIL DIPSTICK
(NOTE 17)
PROP SHAFT
(BOTH SIDES}
(NOTE 15)
MG
ENG IN E
OI L DRAIN
EO
CRANKCASE
CLEAN AIR
SYSTEM
#!
(NOTE 14)
\\./
EO
ENGINE OIL FILL
(NOTE 13)
(NOTE
APU FUEL PUMP
(NOTE 25)
LEMENT AND
CARBURETOR
AUTO CHOKE
(NOTE 16)
AIR CLEANER
*s
*s
APU DIPSTICK
*s
*s
*s
12
APU OIL DRAIN
(NOTE 24)
ENGINE OIL
DIPSTICK
(NOTE 6)
APU AIR
CLEANER
(NOTE 23)
APU OIL FILTER
c4, to/zg
r*-
.''- ' ;:
EO
(NOTE 8)
APU SPARK PLUG
(NOTE 26)
AUTOMOTIVE
BATTERY
(NOTE 7}
ENGTNE FUEL
ENGINE OIL FILTER
(NOTE 9}
ENGINE
RADIATOR COOLANT LEVEL
(NOTE 11)
*APU turned 1800 in later models
12
POWER STEERING AT
RESERVOIR
FI LTER
(NOTE 12)
12
DAILY
BRAKE BOOSTER
AIR CLEANCN (REAR)
(NOTE 3}
(NOTE 24)
*s
IN DUSTY AREAS
CLEAN ELEMENT
WHEEL BEARINGS MG
BOTH SIDES
(NOTE 4)
APU GOVERNOR
LINKAGE
(NOTE 22)
EO
4
E
(NOTE 21)
*s
S)
Figu
re 4-19. Periodic Maintenance Chart
WATER
MG
4
PUMP
(NOTE 10)
sD-400
4-27
hc aleooFl
PERIODIC MAINTENANCE SERVICES CHART
FREOUENCY
2-every 2,000 m iles or
o
|
Con tro
|
tem
MAXIMUM
SERVICE
CAPACITY
Inspect qnd c leon
See tobl e 4-2
Engine em ission
3 months
4-every 4,000 miles
LUBRICANT OR
APPTICATION
SYMBOLS
_ KEY
s
Broke Moste r Cy I i nde
BF- High Temperoture broke
r
fluid
months
Differentiol
G L- Mu I ti pu rpose Lub ric on t
'( Engine Air Cleoner Element
Cleon or Reploce
In dusfy oreos
c leon e lement doi ly.
Tronsmission
Oil
2.U. S. Gollons
1-3/4 IMP Go I lons
lB U.S. Pints
AT- Dexron Au tomotic
Tronsmission Fluid
Check
I U.S. Pints
3/4 IMP Pinrs
l5
IMP Pints
Check PCV volve, cleoner
hoses, ond corb choke for
Cronkcose Ventilotion
System
proper operotion
*
12-
12 ,000 m i les
or onnuol ly
Engine Oi
I Droin &
Fi
|
|
Eng ine Oi I designoted
ttMS", t'CCt', or !rSErt
EO-
AT- Dexron Au tomotic
tronsmission f lu id
Inspec t ond Add
Engine Woter Pump (2)
MG-Mu I tipurpose greose
N LG I , grode 2EP
* Eng
Chonge
Prope
Fue
ller
I Fi lter
filter
S. Ouorts (l )
(l
)
/
element
MG-Mu ltipurpose N LG
shofts
U.
4 U. S. Quorts
3 IMP Quorts
Power Steering Reservoir
ine
6
5 IMP Quorts
I
grode 2EP
20-eve ry 20,000 miles or
2
Tronsmission
yeors
S-os spec ified
Fi
il
Oil Droin
&
(3)
Automotive ond Domestic
botteries
Broke Booste
Cleoner
*
Engine
Oil Filter
Front Spring
U Bolt Nuts
I
(l)
(2)
4-28
3/4
Check coolont level.
Use mixture of 50%
ethylene glycol ond woter
27 IMP Quorts
",
IMP Quort
33-1/2 U. S. Quorts
MG- Mu I tipu rpose g reose ,
NLGI, grode 2EP
Windsh ie ld
so
lvent
(APU)
EO-Engine
Oil
I
U. S. Quort
IMP Quort
3/4
Inspect ond odd
Reservoirs
These ore emission-relofed; see toble
I U. S. Quort
EO- Engine Oil designoted
or t'SEtt
" MS
"CC
Inspect ond chonge
to 171 lB9 foot pounds
Windshield Wosher
*
I
Check tightness. Torque
Beorings
Auxiliory Power Unit
15 IMP Pints
Check leve
Add distilled woter
",
Rodiotor Coolont
Whee
lB U.S. Pints
Chonge oir c leoner filter
on Fronf ond Reor Boosters
r
Air
*
AT- Dexron Au tomotic
tronsmission fluid
Designoted
t'MS", CCtt, of
rrsErl
4 U. S. Quorts
3 IMP Quorts
(4)
(4)
4-2 for furlher informotion.
when fi lter is reploced, odd I U.
Use low pressure greose gun'
s. (3/4 lMp)quorr. (3) Initiol chonge ot 32,000 miles under normol operoting
condifions; 20,000 mile intervols thereofier.
(4) when filter is reploced,
r^ p) quorr.
"ta'l))u.s.-iå7g
c4,
L0/13
he ereooFt
PERIOD]C MAINTENANCE SERVICES NOTES
\-'
l.
2.
eoch 4,000 miles or 6 months of operotion, Replenish with Heovy Duty Hydroulic Broke
current SAE JI703 specificotion. Broke fluids not cleorly identified wiih these,specificotions shouid not be used.
Normol broke fluid level is l/4 inch below filler cop. Check systems for leoks if fluid is frequently low.
Broke Moster
Cylinder. Fluid should be checked
FfufifBil;"fo-mlnr-to
Wlf'ar!fg]!]&tgf fgAlygll. Fluid should
,o,oA-rr.d--TffilE-bl:il;Trent
be checked before storting on o trip ond oi eoch lubricotion ond
ond in cold weother use on ontifreeze spec.ificolly mode for wosher use.
oil chonge period. Fill with
Air Cleoner. Reploce cortridge every second oil chonge or if operoiing in dusty oreos every 4,000 miles or 6 months.
3.
Broke Booster
4.
Wheel Beorings Frgnt ond Reor. Once every 12,000 miles or onnuolly, remove hub ond inspect beorings. lf greose is in poor condition, insufficient quontity, or if vehicle hos been operoted under severe conditions, cleon the beorings, roces, ond hub covity thoroughly. Repock
the beorings with multi-purpose Greose NLGI Grode 2. NEVER ADD GREASE - RELUBRICATE COMPLETELy.
5.
Engine Oil Droin. Chonge every 4,000 miles or 6 months under normol driving conditions. For obnormol service - such os shori trips, proImæ?GA-Irequent idling, ond dusty conditions - chonge oil every 2,000 miles or 3 months. Droin while engine is ot normol operoting
temperoture (185'F). Oil droins more completely when hof, ond ony foreign motter ond contominonts will be removed with the oil.
6.
Engine
quort when
7,
oil level should be checked eoch time you stop for fuel. The "FULL" mork indicotes correct level of oil ofter
for some time. When engine is running, oil level drops slightly os it fills up the oil possoges ond chonnels. Add o
folls below "ADD OlL" mork on dipstick. Never ollow oil level to remoin below the "ADD OlL" mork,
Oil Dipstick.
Engine
;rffi-fi;$--.." tr*ding
oil
Automotive ond Domestic Botteries. Check woter level ond bring up to split ring.level eoch
Use distilled woter whenever ovoiloble.
oil chonge, Check
more frequently
if operofing
@
8.
9.
Power Steering Reservoir. Check fluid level every 4,000 miles or 6 months or with eoch oil chonge. Sfori engine, turn steering wheel from
stop-to-stop severol times to expell oir from system, then shut off engine. Wipe reservoir filler cop free of dirt, remove cop, check oil level.
Add fluid if necessory. Use only opproved DEXRON Automoiic Tronsmission Fluid.
Engine
oil chonge, Alwoys reploce with o Chrysler filter. lf operoting in dusfy oreos, reploce oil
ot eoch oil chonge, After replocement, operote engine for 5 minutes ond check for oil leoks. Add
to compensote for oil obsorbed by o new filter.
Oil Filter.
Reploce
filter every
TilTEicorfia-ge,rcre frequently, such
enough
f
\-,.
oil
second
os
lO.
Engine Woter Pump. Every 4,000 miles or six months lubricofe sporingly fitting locoied on woter pump housing behind comshoft pulley with
Mulii-purposeGreoseNLGl,Grode2EP. DONOTUSEAHIGHPRESSUREGREASEGUNONTHISFITTING.
ll.
RodioforFillondLevel. Cælontstuldbecheckedbeforestortingonotripondoteochlubricotionondoilchongeperiod. Coolonfshould
''""h., of top of filler neck. Use o mixture of [email protected]/o ethelyene glycol ond woter, Droin ond flush system every 12,000 miles
or onnuolly. Discord old coolont.
12.
Engine Fuel
13.
fi''ifi;3-lZ
Engine
Filter.
Oil Fill.
Reploce every
Add
oil if
l2,000miles oronnuolly.
Run engine ond test
for leoks.
dipstick (Noie 6) is ot or below "ADD OlL" mork. Use only oils meeiing API clossificotion with o viscosity
,.TfillilTå.bG-to temperoture conditions.
Above +32 degrees F the prefened viscosity for your cooch is SAE
40, then
SAE
30, sAElOil-30, SAE l0w-40, SAE lOn-50,
SAE
20w-40, or
)AE I(,il-JU.
As low os +10 degrees F the preferred viscosiiy for your cooch is SAE
As low os -10 degreBs F use SAE
l5w-40,
SAE
l0il-3O,
SAE
l0w-40, then
l0w-50, SAE lO{,
SAE
SAE
lOr-50,
5w-20, or
SAE
SAE
20tr-20.
5w-30.
Below -10 degrees F use SAE 5w-30 or 5w-40.
14' CronkcoseCleonAirfql3gl:y:e..Checkevery4,000milesor6months,ormorefrequenilyifcoochisusedforshorttripdriving,ond
@oleengineotid|eondremoveventi|otorvo|vefrom,o.keicoue,.|fvo|veisNoTp|ug9ed,o[ioing
noise will be heord ond o strong vocuum should be felt when you ploce your finger over volve inlet. Reinstoll volve, ihen remove cronkcose
inletoircleoner. Looselyholdopieceofstiffpoper(porhtog)
overopeninginrockercover. Afieroboutlminute,popershouldbepulled
ogoinst opening in rocker cover,
Stop engine qnd remove ventilotor volve from rocker covs. lf volve is free, o clicking noise will be heord. lf system meets fhe obove tests,
no further service is required. lf nof, reploce ventilotor volve with o new volve ond recheck system. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN THE
OLD VALVE.
Disconnect hose between corburetor oir cleoner ond cronkcose inlet oir cleoner (on volve cover). Inspect hose får blockoge ond cleon if
Remove cronkcose inlet oir cleoner ond wosh in kerosene or similor solvent. Wet the inlet oir cleoner filter by inverting cleoner
ond'filling with SAE 30 Engine Oil. Allow excess oil to dioin through vent nipple ot top of cleoner. Reinstoll cleoner ond connect hose.
necessory.
\.-,
Upon recheck, if poper is not pulled ogoinsi the opening in volve cover with noticeoble force, cleon ventilolor hoses ond possoges in lower
port of corburetor. Cleon in o good grode of solvent ond dry with compressed oir.
*
*
ri,r,'
c4, Lo/73
4-29
he Ereoon
15.
a-4
Propeller Shofts. Lubricote every 12,000 miles or onnuolly with Multipurpose Greose, NLGI Grode 2 EP. Apply greoæ to fitting ot eoch
universol ioint locoied on both sides of cooch ond on the tronsmission to differentiol shoft. Lubricote slip yokes with Molybendum Disulfide
Greose. DO NOT
16.
USE
A HIGH
PRESSURE GREASE
GUN.
\--l
Air Cleoner Elemenl ond Corbureior Automotic Choke. Every 4,000 miles or 6 months, remove element ond blow out dir\gently with on oir
2inchesowoyfrome|ementtoovoiddomoge.|feldmentissoturofed.withoi|formore
thon one-holf its circumference, reploce element qnd check Crqnkcose Cleon Air Emission System. Cleon metol conioiner. Every 20,000
miles or 2 yeors, instoll o new element. Service oir cleoner element more frequently (doily) if driving in severe conditions, such os dusiy
oreos.
To prevent the choke from sticking, opply o combustionchomber conditioner iochoke shoftwhereit roiotes in the oir horn. Ålove choke shoft
bock ond forth to distribute solvent. This will preveni formotion of gum deposits on shoft which moy restrict its movement. Apply some solvent to fost idle com ond pivot pin to remove dirt, oil, ond other deposits which could couse sticking or errotic motion. Apply conditibner
ot leost every 4,000 miles or 6 months,
17.
t_g115191.aj]__Agtil.!. Check fluid level every 4,000 miles, 6 months, or every engine oil chonge.
To check, stort engine ond bring
up to normol operoting temperoiure. With porking broke ON ond engine idling, -move selecior lever into eoch position ending
in the "N" position. Remove dipstick: fluid level should be between "FULL" ond "ADD ONE PINT" morks, but never obove the "FULL"
mork when engine is wormed up. Add or droin fluid to bring to proper level. Moke certoin cop is reseoted properly on filler tube.
tronsmission
lB.
Fill, Under normol operotion droin fluid ot 32,000 miles. At some time, cleon filter. When operoting under severe
-i6EAsJroiler towing, or off highwoy, especiolly in hot weother, increose frequency of service to 20,000-mile intervols,
To droin, ploce o contoiner with o lorge opening under tronsmission oil pon. Loosen pon bolis ond iop pon bolts ot one corner to breok pon
loose ond ollow fluid to droin. Remove occess plote from front of converter, remove droin plug ond droin fluid. Instoll droin plug (torque
to 100 inch-pounds) ond insloll occess plote. Remove ond cleon oil pon. Use o new gosket ond insioll oil pon. Tighten pon screws to 150
inch-pounds. Add DEXRON Type Automotic Tronsmission Fluid through filler tube ond check level os in Note 17.
Tronsmission Droin ond
C-iæ- wittrE
19.
Differentiol Droinond Fill. Every engineoilchonge, remove differentiol filler plugond check lubricont level. Add Multipurpose Geor
fimontCÅET4O;]GI"[orGL-5) tobringlevel uptobottomoffillerholeplus. DONOTOVERFILL. Droindifferentiol ondrefill prior
ioonyonticipotedtemperoturechongeorofterevery32,000milesofoperotion.whicheveroccursfirsi.
ditions, chonge lubiicont every 20,000 miles.
20.
21
.
.Fronf
Spring. Check tightness of froni spring Ll bolt ottoching nuis within the first 500 miles
eoch time cooch is lubricoied. Recommended forque is I7l to I89 foot-oounds.
Insevereorobnormoloperotingcon-
of operotion.
Thereofter, check U
Auxiliory Power Unit Dipstick. Every 8 operotionol hours, remove oil filler cop ond check level on dipsiick.
W|eve|be|ow''LoW',mork.Rep|ocecoptight|ytopreventoi||eokoge.When
olwoys use some brond thot is in cronkcose. Never remove
qil filler
bolt nuh
Keep oil ot " FU LL " mqrk.
odding oil between chonges,
cop when APU is running.
22.
Auxiliory Power Unii Governor Linkoge, Every 50 operoiionol hours, check governor linkoge for free movement through its entire trovel.
@oll
ioinh.
23.
Auxiliory Power Unit Air Cleoner. Every 100 operotionol hours, remove poper element ond cleon by removing foom wropper,ond tqpping
element ogoinst o flof surfoce to loosen dust ond dirt. Blow out dirt from the cleon to the dirty side, using LESS thon 100 psi oir pressure.
lf necessory, wosh elemenl ond
foom wropper in o solution of worm woter ond mild detergent.
Every 500 operotionol hours, chonge the
24. Auxiliory
Power
coriridge.
Remove
wing screw ond cover; insfoll new cortrifoe ond secure with wing screw ond
Unii Cronkcose Oil ond Filter. Every^100 operotionol hours, droin cronkcose oil ond refill with good quolify heovy duty
res(ld0oFondobove),chongeoi|every50operotiono|hours.Useontyoi|i'..iin9Ai|d",1
ignotion MS, MS/DG, 5E, or SE/CC, Use proper grode
Above 90'F use SAE 50;
30'io
gOoF use SAE
oil for the expected
30;
d to 3dF
conditions.
use SAE
l0w-40, 5w-30; below fF
use
5w-30.
Every 200 operotionol hours, chonge the cronkcose oil filter. Remove filter by iurning counterclockwise using o filter wrench. Cleon ond
wipe dry the drip pon below the filter. Instoll new filter ond goskei ond iighten finger tight l/4 to l/2 turn.
25.
Auxi lio
26.
Auxiliory Power Unit Spork Plugs, Check spork plug gop ond set io 0,025 inch on both plugs.
PowerUniiFuelPump, Removelowercoveronfuelpumpondcleqnscreeningoodgrodeofsolvent.
v
4-30
c4,
Lo/73
fne æ$$clFt
\-..
Do not quick charge battery, Charge rate
should not exceed B amp f hour.
! Power Steering Pump (fig. 4 -?01, Check
power steering pump belt frequently for proper
tension. Belt should not be worn or frayed. Proper
belt tension is 60,- B0 pounds measured on a belt
tension gage. Tighten bett using a lf 2" socket in
square hole top of bracket.
or sparks away from battery
explosive hydrogen gas may be present.
Keep flame
'
Make sure vent caps are on securely
before washing. Rinse with clear water.
c. Severe Operating Conditions. Severe operating-Zo
short distances
t
\ \-;'-
of only a few miles at a time and at low speeds,
pulling heavy load, off-highway operation and winter
driving - require special maintenance attention. At
low speeds for short miles, moisture will condense
in the erankcase and form a sludge. Under these
conditions, the engine does not become warm
enough to expel the condensation through the
crankcase ventilation system. Consequently, the
engine oil should be changed about every 11000
miles. PrJlling a heavy load or off-highway oper&tion places additional work on the transmission.
Consequently, the tranmission fluid should be
drained and changed every 201000 miles.
d.air greatly
Driving through dust-laden
inereases the problems of keeping
abrasive materials out of the engine. Under these
conditions, speeial attention should be given to the
carburetor air cleaner and the crankcase ventilation system. Make sure these units are clean at
all times. This will tend to reduce to a minimum
the amount of abrasive material that may enter the
engine. Consequently, the crankcase oil and oil
filter cartridge should be changed more frequently.
The frequency will depend upon the severity of dust
conditions; therefore, no definite recommendations
can be made.
e. Alternator (fig. 4 -20). Alternator on coach
does not require lubrication. It is recommended that
the alternator-comlressor drive belts be checked
frequently for proper tension. Belts should not be
,{
\,_.
worn or frayed. Proper alternator-compressor belt
tension is 50 - 60 pounds measured on a belt tension
gage. Tighten belt by inserting a pry bar between
engine block and alternator, loosen alternator bolts,
and move ,alternator until belts are tight. Tighten
bolts securely against bracket.
c4,
Lo
/73
Figure 4-20. Belt Adjustment
4-26. FUEL SYSTEM (fig. 4-2L)
The fuel system consists of a 60-ga11on fuel tank
(left rear of coach), fuel pumpr fuel filter, cårburetor, and fuel and vacuum lines. The tank is
equipped with a filler neck cåpr air vent, and a
fuel gage sending unit. The sending unit measures
amount of fuel in tank and relays this information
to the fuel gage on the driver? s instrument panel.
The fuel tank supplies both the engine and auxiliary
power unit (APU).
Make certain LPG valve is closedbefore
refueling. See Section 5.
a. carburetor
desl-gn
Adjustments. The carburetor is
roper mixture for
most eeonomical and efficient performance at all
speeds while keeping air pollution to a minimum. If
adjustments become necessary, they shouldbe made
only by a Dodge Recreational Vehicle Serviee
Center or Chrysler Dealer with proper equipment.
See Periodic Maintenanee Services Chart, figure
for clean air servicing.
b. Fuel Filter. The fuel filter mounted on the
engine removes any sediment or water that may
enter the fuel tank. Filter is a replaceable element
type and the element should be replaced every
121000 miles, or 1 year, whichever occurs first.
See Periodic Maintenance Services Chart, figure
4- 19,
4- 19.
4
-31
fm æsDcIgFl
--,+-\..
'\-/
G
C HRYS LER
ENG INE
APU
CARBURETOR
FUE L
F ILTER
\-,/
sD-27
AUXILIARY
POWER
MAKE CERTAIN LPG VALVE IS CLOSED
BEFO RE REF UE LIN G
.
SEE SECT IO
N
5
U
N IT
lneu)
NOTE: APU TURNED
IN LATER
.
180"
COAC HES.
Figure 4-21. Fuel System Flow Diagram
4-27.
C
LEAN AIR EMISSION SYSTEM (fig . 4-22
and 4-23)
A Federal Clean Air Act, The Federal Clean
Air Act requires the vehicle manufacturer to fur-
nish, with eaeh new vehicle, sueh written instruc'
tions for the maintenance and use of the vehicle
by the ultimate purchaser as are reasonable to
assure the proper functioning of emission control
devices and systems installed in the vehicle. The
information appearing below is provided in compliance with the law.
b. Normal Coach Use. The emission control
maintenanee instructions contained herein are
based on the assumption that your coach will be
used as designed:
. . . To earry passengers
and camping equip-
ment within the limitations indicated on the
tire and rim plate on panel behind drivers
seat.
. . . To operate on reasonable
.
road surfaces
within legal operating limits.
. . To operate on a daily basis, as a general
\*t
4-32
c4, to/73
&# æffiffiffinm
CRANKCASE INLET
tl;
tll
/, \
A IR C LEANER
CRAN KCASE
CRAN KCASE
VENT VALVE
CRAN KCASE
AIR C LEAN ER
VENT VALVE
ll
C ARB URETO R
SD-28
Crankcase
Crankcase Inlet
Air
Air Cleaner
D-375
4-22. Glean Air System
rule, for at least several miles.
. . , To operate onlow-lead gasoline (see par, f).
. . . And to increase the frequency of maintenance if operating under unusual conditions.
Maintenance Source and Evidence. The r€quired owner maintenance presented herein should
be performed by a Dodge Recreational Vehicle
c4, Lo/73
s
Ventilator Valve
Cleaner and Hoses
Figu re
c.
and Vent Valve
Service Center or any other qualifiedservice outlet
which regularly performs such services on gasoline internal combustion engines. You should retain
receipts covering the performance of regular
maintenance in the plastic case provided in each
eoach should questions arise concerning maintBnance. These receipts and records should be
transf erred to each subsequent owner of this
coach,
4
-33
{ffis æs$æctpt
t.rr----/
Carburetor Choke Shaft
Ventilation Air Cleaner Hose Hook-Up
ffi
\-./
Air
Cleaner Element
Figu re 4-23. Clean
t Replacement Parts. The clean air emission
control system was designed, built, and tested
using geniune Chrysler Marine and Industrial Engine Dvision parts and the system is certified by
the Chrysler Corporation as being in eonformity
with federal regulations implementing the Federal
Clean Air Aet. Accordingly, it is recommended
that any replacement parts used for maintenance
services or repair of emission control system be
new, geniune, Chrysler engine parts. Use of
replacement parts whieh are not of equivalent
quality may impair the effectiveness of the system. Geniune parts are available from Chrysler
and Dodge Recreational Vehicle Service Centers.If
4-34
Air
System
other than geniune chrysler parts are used for
required maintenance of the emission control sys-
tem, the owner should satisfy himself that such
parts are warranted by their mantrfacturer to be
equivalent to the Chrysler part in performanee
and durability
.
NOTE
Geniune Chrysler part, when used in
with FMC Reereational Vehiele
Model 2900R, means parts manufactured
by or for the Chrysler Marine and Industrial
Engine Division for use on Chrysler marine
and industrial engines and distributed by
eonneetion
c4, Lo/73
he,æEIooFl
Table 4-2. Owner's Emission Control Maintenance Services ( 1)
MAINTENANCE
MAINTENANCE
INTE RVATS
SERVICE
Air Cleaner
Air Cleaner
Element (3)
Carburetor Choke
and Fast Idle Cam
Carburetor Passages
Crankcase Inlet
Air Cleaner
Crankcase Ventilator
Valve
Drive Belts
Engine Fuel Filter
Engine Oil Drain
Engine Oil Filter (2)
Ignition Cables
Ignition Timing and
IdIe Mi.xture
Radiator FilI &
Level
.\
I2
20
I
I
C
C
R
R
2
4
C
Hoses
I
SERVICE RECORD
C
I
C
C
C.
C
c
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
2=2, 000 miles
DATE
or 3 months
MILEAGE
4=4, 000 miles
or 6 months
MILEAGE
C
C
R
Record date & mileage of emission control
maintenance service and retain invoices.
t2=12 ,000 miles
or annually
I
I
I
or 2 years
3
or 3 years
I
(2)
DATE
MILEAGE
miles
0=3 0 , 000
DATE
MILEAGE
20=20,000 miles
I
DATE
DATE
MILEAGE
Change engine
oil filter
every second oil change.
I
(3)
'Change
eLement daily
in dusty areas.
{
\-,
'.(,
KEY
C_ CIean
I= Inspect,
R- Replace
corre ctf replace
(1) To be performed by a qualified service technician.
figure 4-19.
C.hrysler, Dodge Recreational Vehicle Division, or FMC Recreational Vehicle Division
Dealers and Service Centers.
See
if
necessary
Periodic Maintenance Services Chart,.
f. Gasoline Improvements. An important advan6m
been the reduction
in lead leve1 or elimination of lead from some
grades of gasoline. Your motor coach is designed
gasoline. However, any
gasoline with a minimum of 0.5 grams per gallon
and having a minimum 91 research octane number
or higher will satis,fy the engine's octane requirements. You can also use a "certified octane number" of 89, or better, which is equal to the published 91 octane rating.
to operate on low-lead
?
'\---,,'
e. Source of Emissions. Dring the combustion
proeess that takes place in an internal combustion
engine, some of the fuel fails to burn completely.
The unburned fuel in the form of hydrocarbons is
discharged into the engine crankcase or extraust
system. In addition to hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen are also formed during
the combustion process. These arealso discharged
into the exhaust system.
c4,
L0/'13
is
g. Positive Crankcase
Gq
Ventilation. Your engine
e ventilation
4-35
{sns æsac}ffiFt
sysfem designed and carefully calibrated for proper
carburetor mixture, and economical and efficient
performance at all speeds while keeping air poLlution to a minimum. If adjustment becomes nec€ssary it should be done by an authorized Dodge
Recreational vehiele Service Center or Chrysler
Dealer with proper equipment. A check of items
affecting emission control (table 4-2) at the first
oil change is important to provide for low emissions
of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Subsequent
checks should be made every 121000 miles or åonually. These checks involve adjustment of engine
idld speed, ignition timing, idle fuel mixture, and
operational checks of c rankease ventilation valve
and hoseg. Climatic conditions, type of operation,
wear, and contamination can affect these engine
adjustments and proper functioning of the system.
A frequent check for proper operation will not
only contribute to the eontrol of exhaust and engine
emissions, but
will improve
performance and
economy,
h.
Positive Crankcase Ventilation Operation. The
fully closed crankcase ventilation system operates
by air drawn into the crankcase from the air cleaner
and through the crankcase inlet air cleaner by
means of a hose (fig , 4-22). Air circulates through
the engine and is drawn out of the cylinder head
cover by manifold vacuum into the combustion
chambers and dispelled with the exhaust gases. The
system consists of a ventilator valve installed in
the outlet vent of the valve eover (fig , 4-22), and a
hose. The hose is connected between the ventila-
tor valve and the lower part of the carburetor
body. The valve regulates the flow of crankcase
ventilation at various throttle positions and will
operate effectively as long as hormal maintenance
is done. The valve and hose are subject to fouling
with sludge and carbon formation because of the
nature of the material carried by the ventilation
system. A plugged vent system may in turn cause
excessive engine crankcase sludge formation and
may also cause rough or erratic engine idle or excessive oil leakage. The ventilation system should
be cleaned every 6 months and the valve replaced
every year in average service - more frequently
if the coach is used extensively for short trips
(driving less than 10 miles) with frequent idling,
such as in city traffic.
4-28, ENGINE TUNE-UP
Test speeific gravity of coach battery (see Section
6). Add distilled water if necess zty t clean and
tighten battery connections. Tighten intake manifold
bolts tp 40 foot-pounds, Perform cylinder compression test. Compression should be in the 120 - 150
pounds range and not vary more than 40 pounds,
Use compression pressure only as a guide in diag-
4-3 6
nosing engine trouble. An engine in good condition
may exhibit hi.gher pressures. Clean or replace
spark plugs as necessary and adjust gap to 0.035
inch. Tighten to 10 foot-pounds. Inspect distributor
primary wire and vacuum advance operation.
Ignition timing and carburetor adjustments should
not be attempted by the coach owner because of
emission control requirements which require sophisticated test equipment and certification. See
paragraph 4-27 for clean air emission control servicing.
4-29. COOLING SYSTEM (fig. 4-24)
Cooling system consists of a large capaeity radi-
ator with an integral transmission oil cooler to
maintain the power plant temperature within an
efficient range. The system has a water pump,
thermostat, fan, and hoses and lines to circulate
the coolant under all operating conditions. Check
coolant level frequently. Always use a premixed
coolant of 50Vo ethylene glycol and water to provide
protection against freezing (to -34') and corrosion.
Never add coolant to the radiator when
the engine is overheated. Do not loosen
or remove cap to eool an overheated
g.
use caution in removing the pressurized (13 psi)
radiator cap when the ternperature is high. place
a cloth over the cap and loosen by turning counterclockwise to the first stop until all pressure is
released. Then push eap down and turn it further in
the same direction for removal. Maintain coolant
at a level approximately 3-l/2 inches below top of
filler
neck.
Monitor engine temperature -gauge frequently. Temperature should NOT exceed 250oF.
L Fan Belt Tension (fig. 4-25). Fan belt tension should be checked frequently and, if necessary, adjusted. Adjust belt to proper tension by
loosening idler pu1ley pivot screw and slotted hole
screw. Place a L/2 inch socket drive wrench in
square slot and adjust betts to 80 100 pounds on
a new belt, 60 - 75 pounds on a broken-in belt.
Torque pivot screw and slotted-hole screw to 100
foot-pounds.
U Lloses and Connections. Check all hoses and
coolant connections for leaks and corrosion due to
blockage. Replace any doubtful hoses and tighten
eonneetions.
c4, Lo/zs
\--rl
{ffie æsBmcIFn
..;
\\\\
TRANSMISSION
HOT OIL-OUT
Y/..t-=-)--a
//
TRANSMISS ION
o rL- rN
cool
N\N
TRANSMISSION
O IL COO LER
0
N
RAD IATOR)
ENGINE DRAIN
(EACH SIDE OF BLOCK)
DRAIN
\-------_,
FLow [-]
cooLANT FLow
ArR
I
\_:,,
NCTE: ON
LATER COACHES RADIATOR
OUTLET AND WATER PUMP ARE
+
INBOARD. ALL COACHES HAVE
TRANSMISSION O IL FLOW
A I3 PSI RADIATOR CAP, AND A
I
B5"F
T HERMO
STAT.
SD-35
Figu re
4-24. Cooling System Flow
g, Thermostat. If necessary to replaee thermostat, make certain heat range is correct for your
coach. Factory-installed thermostat begins to open
at I77
184"F. The use of a lower range thermo-
stat is not recommended.
d. Fill gn4 Drain. In the spring and fa1l, the
cooling system should be completely drained,
flushed, and refitled with a premixed coolant of 50
percent ethylene glyco1 and water. Discard old solution. To drain system, open drain cock at the bottom of radiator and at each side of engine block.
Close all drain cocks and refill system, Check
frequently during cold weather to avoid a freezeup. Oecasionally check the radiator for any foreign
matter that would impair air circulation.
Figu
re 4-25. Fan Belt Adjustment
ki-'
c4, rc/73
4-37
he EleooFl
.f:-!":\
REAR
HYDROVAC
MASTER
AIR C LEAN
ER
CY LIN DER
FR.NIT /
HYDR
ov^c
\
/
STOP LIG HT
I:}
SWITC H
BRAKE
PEDAL
WHEE L
CY LIN
FRONT
HYDROVAC
AIR
C LEAN
D ERS
WHEEL CYLINDERS
WHEEL
CY LIN DERS
SD- 37
ER
Figure 4-26. Brake System - Service
4-30. BRAKE SYSTEM-SERVICE AND PARKING
d. Service. When you depress" the brake pedal
on your coaeh, two assist units, technieally dubbed
ttHydrovacr" operate to power the applicationof the
brakes (fig. 4-26). A slight movement of the brake
pedal opens an engine vacuum line which activates
both the front and rear hydrovac units to increase
the brake fluid pressure and apply the brakes. The
front hydrovac boosts the pressure to the front
wheel brakes, and the rear hydrovac boosts pr€ssure to the rear brakes. Construetion is such that,
in ease of an engine failure and loss of vaeuum
power, th€ brakes
will funetion as in a conventional
nonpowered hydraulic brake system. More physical
effort is required, however, than when the hydrovac
is operating.
b. Parking. The parking brake lever located
nextlo tne Oriver's seat is linked by cable with
an internal expanding brake at the rear of the
transmission. The parking brake shoes clamp the
drum on the transmission to lock up the power
train.
g Bleeding Service Brake Svstern. grake bleeding should be performed only by a qualified service
technician. However, detailed brake bleeding pro-
cedures are provided in the 2900R sERvrcE MANUAL which is available, at a nominal cost, to the
\-rl"
coach owner.
d. Brake Shoe Adjustment. The fluid disptac€ment requirements of a hydraulie brake system
depend on how well the brakes are adjusted. When
properly adjusted, there is a minimum of brake
shoe movement necessary to bring linings into
contact with the drums. Each wheel brake is equipped with an upper and a lower wheel cylinder and
each shoe floats at its midpoint. Therefore, the
shoes move outward evenly against the drum for
total and immediate effectiveness. There is but
one point of adjustment at eaeh shoe, namely
the adjusting screw. Each adjusting screw is
threaded into or out of its anehor support. It is
sometimes called "star wheel" and used to €stablish desired lining to drum clearance. To
increase or decrease brake clearance rotate star
wheel.
For maximum safety adjust brakes when pedal
drops to within 2 to 3 inehes of floor board on a
hard application.
-_,",;
t\.-o'-
4-39
c4, Lo/ls
he æsooFl
Brake shoe adjustments should be performed only
by a qualified service technician. However, detailed
brake adjustment procedures are provided in the
2900R SERVICE MANUAL which is available, at a
nominal cost, to the coach owner.
After continued operation, the parking brake cable
may stretch or the drum lining will wear until the
adjusting knob
will
no longer establish the proper
brake drum pressure. At this point, the parking
brake system will require a brake system service
adjustment. This adjustment should only be per-
4-31.
EXTERIOR BODY MAINTENANCE
The exterior of your motor coach is a potyester
gelcoat reinforced with chopped fiberglass moulded
,- into a tough-wearing impervious material. Glass
fibers, imbedded into a polyester resin base, are
intr.icatety laced into a hard, durable, and brilliant
finish that resists weather, road salts, and the
ultra-violet rays of the sun. The finish is capable
of sustaining damage, but if damage should occur
it is usually limited to the area of impact and would
be economical to repair .
formed by a qualified service technician. However,
a step-by-step procedure is provided in the 2900R
SERVICE MANUAL which is available, at a nominal cost, to the coaeh owner.
a
a. Care and Cleaning. To wash your coach, use
milO
ent. Apply liberally from
the top down and rinse with clear water. stubborn
'stains can be removed by using paint
thinner or
acetone. Use a 220 grit wet-dry type sandpaper and
wet with water to provide a mild abrasive action
for removal of heavy road dirt and grime. Do not
use scrapers, wire brushes, or other metal tools.
Dulled areas may be restored by rubbing with an
automotive-type body cleaning compound followed
by a light application of liquid wæ<.
e. Parking Brake Adjustment (fig. 4-27). The
parking brake lever cable tension may be adjusted
for proper brake function by turning adjusting knob
on brake lever I clockruise to tighten; counterc loclnuise to relieve tension.
FORWAR D CONTRO
BELL CRANK
L
LEVER
CABLE TENS IO N
KNO
B
R
EAR
CONTRO
FORWARD
CO NTRO L CABLE
CABLE LENGTH
ADJUSTING
CA
I
L
BLE
NUTT-
\
\
C LEVIS
PROPELLER'\
LEVER
S
HAFT
LIN KAGE
OPERAT IN G
LEVER
S
Figu re
c4, Lo/73
D-378
4-27. Parking Brake and Cable
4-3I
he æslctoFl
@
Do not wipe with solvent.
Abrasive scouring-type cleaners will
scratch surface.
b. Maintenance. A scratch or gouge that penetrates only slightly into the laminate is considered
minor and repair can be aecomplished by using
hand tools with a power drill and sander. We
recommend that repair be done by a qualified
fiberglass repair center; however, if you do it yourself, you will need the following items:
Sandpaper and sanding discs (24
(6) Mark off the undamaged surface, leaving
approximately 5 inches sur-
a working area of
rounding the repair area
(7) Mix enough polyester body filler, per instructions on container, to reestablish the surface.
&z,rhoo
Mix filler on formica, teflon, or other
hard surfaee, Do not work on a pourous
to 80 grit
and 360 to 600 grit)
Electrie drill with sanding attachment andburr
bit
Files
Sanding block
filler
(9) Let filler set up until it is firm to the
touch. Then r€-establish original contour by filing
off exeess, still leaving the filler level slightly
higher than original surface.
and squeegee
Glazing putty
Goggles
A suggested method for repairing minor fiberglass
damage is listed below:
(1) Check temperature and humidity and compare with recommendations on filler can label.
Generally ?0"F and 10 humidity are considered
ideal; however, never work with the surface in
direct sunlight.
(2) Clean the damaged area with
equivalent; then inspect area elosely.
(8) Apply and spread filler with a plastic
squeegee, making sure to remove large air bubbles.
Allow filler to extend above original surface to
allow for shrinkage.
Orbital or flat spnder
Xylol or equiv,alent solvent
Heat gun or heat lamp
Body
surface sueh as cardboard.
(10) Use
a heat lamp to preshrink filler. A
of 120"F is required for
minimum . temperature
shrinkage.
Keep heat source at least
from repair area.
12 inches away
xylot or
(3) Push on the area immediately surrounding
and underneath the damaged area to determine the
extent of damage,
(4) Use a power drill and form a V-groove
the length of the scratch or gouge.
(11) Power sand the filler with 360 grit sandpaper until it is smooth and even with original
surface.
(12) If filler is slightly porous (has fine pinholes), apply a thin coat of glazing putty.
600
(13) Finish by sanding with a sanding blockand
grit wet sandpaper.
NOTE
Always wear goggles when cutting, drilling, or sanding.
If filler is pockmarked, do not use glazing
putty. Instead, apply another layer of body
filler.
(14) Complete the repair by cleaning the area
with air. Remask, if necessary; then spot prime
(5 ) Remove flaky edges and feather the pain.
surfaee baek about L/2 inch beyond the damage
area by hand-sanding or power sanding with 360
grit sandpaper; then elean area with dry eloth.
4-40
t*
I
and paint.
(15) Rub area with a fine rubbing eompound
and apply a coat of wax.
c4, Lo/73
t\--|
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