Navico MX420/2 GPS/DGPS Operator's Manual

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Navico MX420/2 GPS/DGPS Operator's Manual | Manualzz

MX420 Operator’s Manual

MX420/2 GPS/DGPS

MX420/8 GPS/DGPS

MX420/BR

MX420/BRIM

MX420/MKD

MX420/AIS DGPS

IMPORTANT NOTICE!!

THE MX420 IS AN AID TO NAVIGATION ONLY. UNDER NO CIRCUM-

STANCES SHOULD IT BE USED IN LIEU OF AUTHORIZED GOVERNMENT

CHARTS. ITS ACCURACY CAN BE AFFECTED BY MANY FACTORS SUCH

AS EQUIPMENT DEFECTS, ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS, OR IM-

PROPER OPERATION. THE USER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SAFE NAVIGA-

TION OF THE VESSEL. THIS INCLUDES CONSULTING AUTHORIZED GOV-

ERNMENT CHARTS AND EXERCISING COMMON PRUDENCE AND NAVI-

GATIONAL JUDGEMENT AT ALL TIMES.

Product Information

The model and serial number of your instrument are given on the instrument. Enter the model and serial number in the spaces provided below. Always refer to this information when you contact your dealer.

MX420 CDU Serial No.:_________________

MX421/MX521 GPS Antenna S/N: _______________

MX525 GPS Sensor S/N _________________

Copyright May, 2007

Doc. P/N 3508 102 70040

By: G.Dorotheo

Symbols Used In This Manual

Danger

Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.

Warning

Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

Caution

Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury and/or appreciable material, financial and environmental damage. This symbol is also used to alert against unsafe practices.

Important paragraphs which must be adhered to in practice, as they enable the product to be used in a technically correct and efficient manner.

This manual contains important safety directions as well as instructions for setting up the instrument and operating it. Read carefully through the Operator’s Manual, Options Manual, and Installation

& Service Manual before you switch on the instrument.

Scope Of This Manual

This manual reflects the software capabilities in version 2.0 software.

We have attempted to take care and develop manuals which provide in-depth information. Where possible, we have attempted not only to describe what you see on the screen, but how to understand and use it as well. Obviously, we can’t teach you how to navigate, but we can help make your work more thorough and enjoyable. Throughout the manual, you will find helpful hints about the interaction of various functions. In a piece of equipment that has the many capabilities of this receiver, important details can sometimes become obscured in one or two lines of text. In our effort to ensure you get the most out of this documentation, and to protect against important details becoming lost, don’t be surprised if you see the same or similar information more than once.

This manual is organized by describing first the various MX420 models covered in this book. Then the special front panel features including the traffic light indicator. The sections that follow detail each primary function as it is presented on the front panel (i.e. NAV, RTE, WPT,

PLOT, ...CFG). The appendixes describe important details about special functions.

Appendix-A is a special section describing the AIS displays and setups of the MX420/AIS model.

We hope you find the manual enjoyable and informative reading. As always, we welcome your comments on improving our products or manuals. We wouldn’t mind if you wrote to tell us that we did the job right the first time either. You can find a Reader Comment Card at the back of the manual.

Related Documents

MX 420 Installation Manual (P/N 3508 102 70060)

MX 420 Quick Reference Guide (P/N 3508 102 70050)

MX420/AIS Reference Card (P/N 725626) (for AIS models only)

How To Contact Us?

Contact your local MX Marine dealer for:

• Installation, Service, & Technical Support

• Sales of Accessories

• Hardware and Software Upgrades

Unlike many other consumer electronics industries which only sell consumer electronic devices, your marine dealer is often your best advisor for installation and service of your new GPS receiver.

MX Marine strongly encourages you to utilize the knowledge and experience of your sales and service dealer.

Should you need to contact us directly for new sales, upgrades, repair service, or technical support, we can be reached at the following:

International:

MX Marine (US)

A Division of NAVICO, Inc.

23868 Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 201

Torrance, California 90505

USA

+1-310-791-8213 Telephone (International)

+1-310-791-6108 Fax

Internet: www.mx-marine.com

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Operator’s Manual

About GPS Navigation ............................................................................... 1

Special Notes ..................................................................... 2

GPS .......................................................................... 2

DGPS ........................................................................ 2

Charts and Navigational Aids ................................... 2

Functional Description ................................................................................ 3

MX420 Configurations .................................................................... 3

MX420/2 GPS ...................................................................... 3

MX420/2 DGPS ................................................................... 3

MX420/8 GPS ...................................................................... 3

MX420/8 DGPS ................................................................... 3

MX420/BR ........................................................................... 4

MX420/BRIM (Dual Control Integrity Monitor) ........................ 4

MX420/MKD......................................................................... 5

MX420/AIS ........................................................................... 5

DGPS Beacon System ............................................................................... 7

Keypad & Display Description ................................................................... 8

Differential GPS Traffic Light Operation: .............................. 9

Red Flashing ............................................................ 9

Red/Yellow Solid ...................................................... 9

Red Solid .................................................................. 9

Yellow/Green Solid ................................................... 9

Yellow Solid ............................................................ 10

Green Solid ............................................................. 10

GPS Traffic Light Operation: .............................................. 10

Red Flashing .......................................................... 10

Red/Yellow Solid .................................................... 10

Red Solid ................................................................ 10

Yellow Solid ............................................................ 11

Green Solid ............................................................. 11

The Display: ...................................................................... 11

The Softkeys: ............................................................ 12

The Function Keys: ............................................................ 12

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Operator Manual Table of Contents

Mark Position ................................................. 12

GOTO ............................................................ 13

LIGHT ............................................................ 13

POWER ON/OFF ........................................... 13

MAN OVER BOARD (MOB) ............................ 14

E

E (EDIT) ......................................................... 15

C

C (CLEAR) ..................................................... 15

CURSOR ....................................................... 15

1

N AV

ABC

FUNCTION .................................................... 15

9

AIS

YZ

Automatic Identification System (AIS) ........... 17

Navigate .................................................................................................. 18

Dead Reckoning ......................................................................... 19

NAV1 - The Panorama Screen .................................................... 19

NAV2 - Basic Steering Information ............................................... 22

NAV 3 - Expanded Navigation Information .................................. 23

NAV4 - Sensor Input Navigation .................................................. 24

Route ....................................................................................................... 28

RTE1 - The Active Route ............................................................. 29

Creating a Route Using the GOTO Key: ............................ 30

Erasing an Existing Route ................................................. 33

Creating a Multi-Waypoint Active Route ............................ 34

Insert By Number ............................................................... 35

Choose in Bank ................................................................. 36

Insert New Waypoint ......................................................... 37

Insert Route ....................................................................... 38 ii

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Maneuvering Within the Route ........................................... 39

Scrolling ........................................................................... 39

Skipping and Unpassing Waypoints ................................ 39

Inserting Waypoints or Routes into an Existing Route....... 40

Reversing the Active Route .............................................. 42

ETA Setup ................................................................................... 43

SOG Based on Arrival Date & Time: ................................. 44

ETA Based on Speed: ...................................................... 44

RTE2 - The Route Bank .............................................................. 45

Waypoint .................................................................................................. 47

Creating and Editing Waypoints .................................................. 48

Waypoint Lock/Unlock ...................................................... 53

To Lock a Waypoint ................................................ 53

To Unlock a Waypoint ............................................ 54

To Lock all Waypoints ............................................ 54

To Unlock all Waypoints ......................................... 55

Removing Waypoints .................................................................. 55

Moving waypoints ........................................................................ 57

Downloading Waypoints & Routes to Other Devices .................. 58

Rnn - Routes: .......................................................... 59

RTE - Active Route: ................................................ 59

WPL - Waypoint Location - NMEA 0183 Standard: .. 60

WPL - Waypoint with Symbols & Description - NMEA

0183 Expanded: ....................................................................... 60

Downloading Waypoints to a Personal Computer ............. 61

Uploading Waypoints from Other Devices .................................. 63

Uploading Waypoints from a Personal Computer ............. 64

Mark or Event .................................................................................. 66

GOTO .............................................................................................. 67

Plot ........................................................................................................... 70

PLOT 1 - Relative to Boat ............................................................ 72

Modifying the Active Route Using the Plot Screen ............. 72

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Customizing the Display .................................................... 73

PLOT 2 - Relative to Marker ........................................................ 77

PLOT3 - AIS Plotter Display ......................................................... 77

Plot Screen Use Examples ......................................................... 78

Station Keeping ................................................................. 78

Grid Search ....................................................................... 79

Man Over Board .............................................................................. 79

Remote MOB ............................................................................... 81

Tide .......................................................................................................... 82

TIDE1 - Current Tide Display ....................................................... 82

TIDE2 - Tide Table Port List ........................................................ 83

Adding a Port ............................................................................... 85

Auxiliary .................................................................................................... 86

AUX1 - Alarm Log ..................................................................... 86

AUX2 - Speed Graph ................................................................. 87

AUX3 - Not Used ....................................................................... 87

AUX4 - Sun Almanac ................................................................. 87

AUX5 - Moon Phases ................................................................ 88

AUX6 - Batteries ........................................................................ 88

AUX7 -Unit Information ............................................................... 89

Position .................................................................................................... 90

POS1 - Position Display (Large) .................................................. 90

UTM .................................................................................. 91

User GRID ......................................................................... 91

POS2 - Position, Altitude, Magnetic Variation, & Time ................. 92

POS3 - Position & Log ................................................................. 92

GPS .......................................................................................................... 94

GPS1 - GPS Status Screen .......................................................... 94

GPS2 - GPS Health Screen ......................................................... 94

GPS5 - RAIM Status Screen (For RAIM enabled models) ........... 96 iv

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GPS6 - DGPS STATUS............................................................... 98

GPS7 - DGPS Messages .......................................................... 100

Configuration ............................................................................................ 99

AIS Config .................................................................................... 99

AIS Static ..................................................................................... 99

AIS Voyage ................................................................................. 99

Alarms ....................................................................................... 100

Anchor - Anchor Watch Alarm .................................................... 100

COG SOG - Course & Speed Filter Settings & Setup ................. 100

Compass - External Compass Input & Magnetic Variation Table101

Datum - Current Position Calculation .......................................... 102

Depth - NMEA Input Control ....................................................... 103

DGPS - DGPS Configuration...................................................... 104

DR - Dead Reckoning ............................................................... 106

Dual Control - Dual Station Control ............................................. 106

GPS - Elevation Mask Control ................................................... 107

Init Pos - Initial Position Entry...................................................... 108

Language - Language Configuration ......................................... 109

Lighting - Display/Keyboard Light & Contrast Control ................. 109

Log - Speed Log Input (Pulse or NMEA 0183) ............................ 109

Log Pulses - GPS SOG Log Pulse Output .................................. 111

MX480 - MX480 PC Chart Interface Control ................................. 111

Navigation ................................................................................. 112

NMEA Out 1 through n* - NMEA 0183 Output Data Control ......... 115

Other Special Cases Affecting NMEA 0183 Records: ..... 120

Operation - General Setup and Control Settings ........................ 121

Organizer - Automated Message Reminders ............................ 122

Position - Positioning Reference, Mode, & Alarm Control .......... 123

Printout 2 - Printer Output Control ................................................ 125

ROT (Rate of Turn) .................................................................... 128

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Operator Manual Table of Contents

Security ..................................................................................... 128

Serial I/O .................................................................................... 129

Time - Mode and Format Control ............................................... 129

Wind .......................................................................................... 130

Wpt & Rte Input - Uploading Waypoints into the Receiver ......... 131

Appendix A - Automatic Identification System (AIS) ................................ 133

Introduction................................................................................ 133

AIS System Setup ..................................................................... 142

AIS Config Setup ....................................................................... 142

Configuring the AIS Static Setup ................................................ 143

Configuring the AIS Voyage ....................................................... 148

AIS Function Key ...................................................................... 151

AIS 1 – OWN SHIP DATA .......................................................... 151

AIS 2 - Remote Ship List ........................................................... 153

AIS 3 - RECEIVED (RX) SAFETY MESSAGES ......................... 155

AIS 4 - TRANSMIT (TX) SAFETY MESSAGE ............................ 156

AIS 5 - TX Safety List ................................................................ 158

AIS 6 - REGIONAL AREAS ....................................................... 159

AIS 7- LONG RANGE (LR) DISPLAY ......................................... 161

AIS 8 – AIS DATA LINK STATUS ................................................ 163

AIS 9 – AIS STATUS .................................................................. 164

AIS 10 - AIS Password .............................................................. 165

PLOT 3 – AIS Plot Screen ......................................................... 167

Appendix B - Datum List ......................................................................... 168

Appendix C - Beacon List ....................................................................... 169

Appendix D- Engineering Mode ............................................................. 183

AUX7 - Unit Information & Self Test ............................................ 183

CDU Cold Start - Clearing Memory to Factory Default................ 185

GPS - GPS CDU Troubleshooting ............................................. 186

GPS3 - Visible Satellite Information ................................. 186

GPS4 - GPS Position Uncertainty .............................................. 187

GPS5 - GPS Debug Screen ....................................................... 187

MX421 Reset ............................................................................. 190

Appendix E - Dual Control Head Mode .................................................. 191 vi

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Table of Contents Operator’s Manual

Appendix F - Demonstration Mode ......................................................... 195

Glossary ................................................................................................. 197

PRODUCT WARRANTY AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY ........................... 221

ADDENDUMS

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About GPS Navigation Operator’s Manual

About GPS Navigation

This GPS receiver is a precision navigation instrument utilizing the latest technology available today to provide optimum performance from the GPS satellite and Beacon land signals received. As with all other forms of radio signals, the ultimate navigation result is dependent upon the quality of these signals. Radio signals may, on occasion, be distorted, jammed, or otherwise incorrect. As a result, your position accuracy may occasionally be less than that which can normally be expected.

!

The Navstar Global Positioning System, commonly referred to as GPS, is a satellite navigation system developed by the U.S. Department of

Defense to provide both military and civilian users with highly accurate, worldwide, three dimensional navigation and time. By receiving signals from orbiting GPS satellites, authorized users are able to continuously navigate with an accuracy on the order of 5 meters 2D RMS or better

A technique referred to as Differential GPS (DGPS), allows users to obtain maximum accuracy from the GPS system. DGPS requires the use of two GPS receivers. One receiver, known as the Reference Station, is placed at a surveyed location, the coordinates of which are precisely known. The purpose of the differential GPS system is to use the reference station to measure the errors in the GPS signals and to compute corrections to remove the errors. The corrections are then communicated in real-time to the navigators, where they are combined with the satellite signals received by the navigators, thereby improving their navigation or positioning. The geographic validity of these corrections decreases with distance from the reference station, but the corrections are valid for navigators hundreds of kilometers from the reference station.

Marine radio beacons operating in the 283.5 to 325.0 KHz frequency range are in widespread use for direction finding in coastal navigation.

Because the beacon system has been in place and widely used for many years, it provides an effective means for the transmission of

DGPS signals. Depending on their local environment and power output, their signals may be usable to several hundred miles. Marine beacons provide an economical means of obtaining DGPS accuracy for coastal navigators. GPS receivers with built-in beacon receivers are designed to provide low cost reception of DGPS corrections broadcast (normally free of charge) by coastal authorities.

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Special Notes

GPS

!

About GPS Navigation

Never rely solely on any single navigational aid. Always use whatever information is available, and cross-check information when possible.

GPS expected position accuracy is better than 30 meters (95% of the time) but may be up to 100 meters occasionally. The derived speed and course readings may be hampered accordingly. The GPS system was declared operational in 1994; however, the system’s availability and accuracy are subject to change at the discretion of the US Department of Defense.

DGPS

!

This GPS receiver’s position accuracy is improved to 2 meters or better for 95% of the time, subject to the availability, accuracy, and control of the DGPS correction transmission from the Beacon Station.

The beacon radio signal which carries the DGPS corrections may be hampered by weather conditions such as heavy rain, snow, and thunder storms. The beacon radio signal may also be interrupted by powerful radio transmitters operating in long wavelength bands.

Charts and Navigational Aids

Positions obtained from charts are not always as accurate as your navigator (due to environmental changes, the dates of charts, and datum offsets if the datum differs from the one in use by the navigator). The position of a floating aid can differ due to tide, set and drift.

!

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Functional Description

Functional Description

Operator’s Manual

MX420 Configurations

The MX420 Navigation System is available in several configurations.

Please refer to the Auxiliary Unit Information section of the manual to view sample screens to identify your particular model. Described below are the various MX420 configurations and their differences.

MX420/2 GPS

This is a basic MX420 Control and Display Unit (CDU) model with two

(2) bidirectional user NMEA ports. This model is supplied with a MX

Marine GPS only smart antenna. The smart antenna can achieve autonomous GPS accuracy better than 3 meters.

MX421-10 or MX521

Smart GPS Antenna

Mx420 CDU

Basic MX420/2 or MX420/8 GPS & DGPS Configuration

MX420/2 DGPS

This is a basic MX420/2 CDU supplied with a MX Marine combined

GPS and Beacon smart antenna (MX421B-10, MX521, MX525). The smart DGPS antenna unit can achieve 1-2 meter accuracy in areas with good beacon differential coverage.

MX420/8 GPS

This is an enhanced MX420 CDU equipped with eight (8) bidirectional user NMEA ports. It is supplied with a GPS only smart antenna unit.

MX420/8 DGPS

This is a basic MX420/8 CDU supplied with a smart DGPS antenna model.

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Operator’s Manual

MX420/BR

Functional Description

This is a dual-control CDU system where a MX420/8 (operating as a master) and a MX420/2 (operating as a slave) are supplied. Only one smart DGPS antenna is required. The antenna unit is connected only to the MX420/8 master unit.

MX421B

Smart GPS

Antenna

MX420 CDU

MX 422 Professional DGPS Navigator

MX420 CDU

MX 422 Professional DGPS Navigator

Slave Unit

Master Unit

MX420 BR Beacon and Remote Configuration

MX420/BRIM (Dual Control Integrity Monitor)

This is an enhanced Dual-Control configuration wherein two MX420/

8 CDUs and two smart DGPS antennas are supplied. These two MX420/

8 units are connected in dual-control configuration but they operate as independent navigator units with dedicated antennas. The Dual-

Control Integrity Monitoring (IM) feature is a software option that works only in the MX420/8 CDU hardware.

This configuration allows data to be shared between two remotely separated stations (i.e. navigator’s station and helmsman’s station), with independent access to various information fields. The purpose of this configuration is to enable each CDU to calculate its own position, then check the operational status of the other GPS receiver. The GPS receiver with the best overall operational status then provides the system position. This provides a fully redundant system, with selfrecovery capabilities. The D-C Integrity Monitor function can be set to Automatic switch over, forced to the Master unit, or forced to the

Slave unit for position and navigation functions.

MX421B

Smart DGPS

Antenna

MX421B

Smart DGPS

Antenna

MX420/8 CDU

MX 422 Professional DGPS Navigator

MX420/8 CDU

MX 422 Professional DGPS Navigat or

Unit 1

Unit 2

MX420/BRIM System Configuration

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DGPS Operator’s Manual

MX420/MKD (Minimum Keyboard and Display for AIS)

An entry level MX420/AIS CDU model supplied with an IMO-compliant AIS transponder unit. All the AIS transponder setups and controls are done through the MX420. It also gathers the ship’s sensor data and organizes the information for transmission via AIS. High-speed serial data ports are provided for output to the ECDIS chartplotter,

ARPA radar and other shipboard systems.

It also collects and decodes AIS reports from other stations and provides a readout from all AIS-equipped ships and shore stations. This model does not have any navigation functions.

X

AIS Transponder

GPS

Ant.

MX420/AIS

MX 422 Prof essi onal DGPS Na vigat or

MX420/AIS Basic Configuration

MX420/AIS (AIS & Navigation System)

An enhanced MX420/MKD unit supplied with the MX Marine smart

DGPS antenna. This model has full navigation and AIS features.

X

AIS Transponder

GPS

Ant.

MX421B

Smart DGPS

Antenna

MX420/AIS

MX 422 Professional DGPS Navigator

MX420/AIS Navigation System Configuration

The Installation & Service Manual has more details on the parts supplied with each configuration, and their associated part numbers.

Note:

1) In general, this manual will refer to all versions of this product line simply as the MX420 CDU, MX420/AIS, CDU or navigator. Where distinction between models is necessary, the particular model type will be indicated.

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Operator’s Manual Keypad & Display Description

2) Three smart GPS/DGPS antenna models are compatible with the MX420

CDU. They are the MX421-10 (GPS or DGPS), MX525 (DGPS only) and

MX521 (GPS or DGPS ).

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Keypad & Display Description Operator’s Manual

DGPS Beacon System

As Maritime Safety Administrations, Navy, and Coast Guard Organizations realize the limitations of standard GPS positioning, many have begun installing DGPS Beacon Stations. While an understanding of this system is not necessary for operating receivers with internal beacon receivers, you may want to read on to have a better understanding of how your receiver is capable of achieving the high levels of accuracy made possible by this network of transmitters.

The DGPS Beacon System is comprised of three segments: the reference station, Integrity Monitor (IM) equipment located at the beacon site, and the Navigator equipment located on board the user’s boat or vehicle. The DGPS beacon system design is illustrated below.

MX 9400N

D GPS Na vigat or

MX 51R

Integrity Monitor Site

Navigator Site

MX420 Navigation System

N AV

R TE

W P T

P L O T T I D E A U X

P O S

G P S

E

D G P S

C F G

C

Surveyors / Commercial

Users

Professional / Commercial /

Personal Craft Users

Reference Station Site

MX 9400R

D GPS Re fer e nce

5271-01C.500

Because of the limited range of the beacon transmitters, typically 150 to 400 km, the corrections generated by the reference station are always valid for users who can receive the correction signals and maintain a 5 meter or better accuracy figure.

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Operator’s Manual Keypad & Display Description

Keypad & Display Description

Traffic

Lights

Display Function Keys

N A V

R T E

W P T

P L O T

T I D E

A U X

P O S

G P S A I S

E

C F G

C

6289-01A.400

Softkeys Cursor Key

Refer to the illustration above. The Traffic Lights on the left side of the display will tell you how your navigator is operating.

Note: You need to take care in reading the traffic light indications, as there are overlapping possibilities between the

GPS and DGPS modes. If you are unsure of the current operating mode, select the CFG function key and scroll down to the DGPS selection. If the DGPS mode is selected to anything other than Off, then follow the Differential GPS Traffic Light Operation. If the DGPS mode is selected to Off, then follow the GPS Traffic Light Operation.

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Keypad & Display Description

Differential GPS Traffic Light Operation:

Operator’s Manual

Red Flashing

Not tracking satellites (no position update). This is normal for the first 2 minutes or so when turning the unit on. The very first time you turn the unit on, or if the memory is reset or lost, this condition is also normal. Allow the receiver to run for at least 30 minutes under these circumstances. If it still does not change to Red Solid, refer to the troubleshooting section of the Installation & Service Manual. An icon similar to the one at left will be displayed in the upper left corner of screen.

Red/Yellow Solid

Dead Reckoning . When normal GPS or DGPS operation is not available, this LED sequence is provided to quickly identify the DR navigation mode. A DR indicator is also displayed on all screens.

Red Solid

Tracking one or more satellites (no position update). This is also normal for the first 2 minutes or so when turning the unit on. The very first time you turn the unit on, allow the receiver to run for at least 20 minutes after changing to Red Solid to collect an almanac from the satellites, regardless of whether a position update has been calculated or not. This is also a normal indication if the HDOP is greater than 10, if the receiver is tracking too few satellites, or for other reasons as well.

Read the GPS and DGPS function screens for more information.

Yellow/Green Solid

!

GPS position update; DGPS corrections are not being received. You may see this from time to time during normal operation. It usually occurs when the beacon signal is not available (either it is being blocked by terrain or a local object or you are out of range of the transmitter) and/or you are tracking 3, 4, or 5 satellites, and the satellites have poor geometry relative to your position. The condition will normally go back to green solid, when it picks up another beacon station. The factory default level for dropping DGPS corrections is 60 seconds.

During this period, your positioning information is less than optimal, and position accuracy may be off by as much as 3 to 5 meters. Press the GPS function key and refer to the DGPS section in this manual for guidance if this light condition occurs.

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Operator’s Manual Keypad & Display Description

Yellow Solid

DGPS position update with poor HDOP value. You may see this from time to time during normal operation. It usually occurs when you are tracking 3, 4, or 5 satellites, and the satellites have poor geometry relative to your position. The condition will normally go back to Green

Solid when it picks up another satellite or the geometry of the existing satellites improves. The factory default level for this indication is with an HDOP of 4 to 10. During this period, your positioning information is less than optimal, and position accuracy may be off by as much as 5 to

10 meters. You can press the GPS function key and refer to the GPS section in this manual for guidance if this light condition occurs.

Green Solid

DGPS position update with HDOP value less than 4. This is the normal operating condition. Position accuracy is normally better than

3 meters. Keep in mind that position accuracy is always only as good as the corrections received, their age, your distance from the reference station, and the geometry of the satellites. This is the normal operating condition and no icon will be displayed.

GPS Traffic Light Operation:

Red Flashing

Not tracking satellites (no position update). This is normal for the first 2 minutes or so when turning the unit on. The very first time you turn the unit on, or if the memory is reset or lost, this condition is also normal. Allow the receiver to run for at least 30 minutes under these circumstances. If it still does not change to Red Solid, refer to the troubleshooting section of the Installation & Service Manual. An icon similar to the one at left will be displayed in the upper left corner of the screen.

Red/Yellow Solid

Dead Reckoning . When normal GPS or DGPS operation is not available, this LED sequence is provided to quickly identify the DR navigation mode. A DR indicator is also displayed on all screens in the upper left hand corner of the display.

Red Solid

Tracking one or more satellites (no position update). This is also normal for the first 2 minutes or so when turning the unit on. The very first time you turn the unit on, allow the receiver to run for at least 20

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Keypad & Display Description Operator’s Manual

minutes after changing to Red Solid to collect an almanac from the satellites, regardless of whether a position update has been calculated or not. This is also a normal indication if the HDOP is greater than 10.

The HDOP value can be read in the GPS function screens.

Yellow Solid

GPS position update has a poor HDOP value. You may see this from time to time during normal operation. It usually occurs when you are tracking 3, 4, or 5 satellites, and the satellites have poor geometry relative to your position. If you are patient, the condition will normally go back to Green Solid when you pick up another satellite or the geometry of the existing satellites improves. The factory default level for this indication is with an HDOP of 4 to 10. During this period, your positioning information is less than optimal, and position accuracy may be off by as much as 10 to 30 meters. You can press the GPS function key and refer to the GPS section in this manual for guidance if this light condition occurs.

Green Solid

GPS position update with HDOP value less than 4. This is the normal operating condition. Position accuracy is normally between 3 to 5 meters, but can be out as much as 30 meters. Keep in mind that position accuracy is always only as good as the geometry of the satellites and the navigation information provided by the satellites. This is the normal operating condition and no icon will be displayed.

The Display:

The CDU uses a Transflective LCD display screen. It provides optimum viewing in virtually all lighting conditions. To change the display contrast or backlight condition, select the CFG function key and scroll down to the Lighting menu choice. Refer to the CFG section of the manual for a complete description of menu options. The function key

( ) just above the Power On/Off key allows you to quickly change between daytime and night time screen settings.

Information displayed on the screen is normally divided into windows, similar to what you might see on a normal computer. Each screen has a page number in the upper left hand corner . These page numbers are there to help you quickly find the information you need, and to help us guide you on the rare occasion that you might request our assistance.

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Operator’s Manual Keypad & Display Description

With the exception of a portion of the PLOT and MOB screens which use two softkeys to change the view scale, all of the screens require that you press the E (Edit Mode) function key before you are allowed to change data on the screen. You can use the cursor key (the big key with the arrows pointing in four directions) to move between edit fields or menu choices on most screens when in the edit mode. When you are not in the edit mode, you can use the cursor to scroll between screens (i.e. NAV1, NAV2, NAV3, ...) or to move up and down on screens

(like the menu bar in the CFG screen).

The Softkeys:

The five softkeys under the display are so named because their purpose changes from one menu or screen to the next. With the exception of a portion of the PLOT screens and the MOB screens, all of the screens require that you press the E (Edit Mode) function key before the softkeys can be accessed. Don’t forget to press the E function key when you have finished editing a screen.

The Function Keys:

The Function Keys are the keys to the right of the display. There are 18 function keys in all. Eleven of the function keys access various screen and editing displays. Three of these keys are used for editing or moving within the screens. One key is used to mark your present position, another is used strictly for Man Over Board alarms. One switches between two display lighting options, and finally there is the power on/off key.

The ten function keys with alpha abbreviations on them are described in the ensuing chapters. The eight function keys with symbols are described below.

The function keys are also used in the edit mode to enter alphanumeric information into screen data fields.

Mark Position

This function key stores your present position, date and time at the next available waypoint location in the Waypoint Bank. A window pops up on the screen to confirm your key depression, and to tell you where the mark position is being stored. You can go into the WPT menu and edit the coordinates or description later. The CDU is also

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Keypad & Display Description Operator’s Manual

capable of performing this function from a remote contact closure input via Cable B (MOB/Event) wire. Refer to the Installation & Service

Manual for interface instructions.

GOTO

This function key allows you to quickly create a route from your present position to one other waypoint. This single waypoint route can use an existing waypoint from the Waypoint Bank, or you can quickly create one by either defining the appropriate coordinates or specifying a range and bearing.

Be careful when you use this selection, as it will erase your current active route when it creates the new one. Read through the ROUTE and PLOT sections of this manual to find other ways to use this key within an active route.

LIGHT

This function key allows you to quickly switch between two predetermined display lighting conditions. You can have two daytime settings, two night time settings, or a daytime/night time setting. Select the CFG function key and scroll down to the Lighting menu choice to make the desired adjustments. Refer to the Configuration section of the manual for a complete description of the Lighting menu options.

POWER ON/OFF

This function key turns the unit on and off. When depressed while the unit is on, you will be prompted to select a YES or NO softkey to confirm your action. This is known as a software power off.

If the operating program should hang up for any reason, you can also perform a hardware power off by continuing to depress the power on/ off function key for about 5 seconds. When the GPS is turned off using this technique, you can not reapply power for 10 seconds.

Note: An occasion may arise when you need to reset the memory back to the factory default values. Doing this will cause the CDU to lose all of your defined settings, as well as all 2,000 of your waypoints and routes. If you hold down the fifth (right most) softkey when power is applied for about two seconds, until you hear a

key

click, then the memory will be reset.

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Operator’s Manual Keypad & Display Description

MAN OVER BOARD (MOB)

This dedicated function key is located at the bottom right hand corner of the front panel. When depressed for a few seconds, it activates a number of automatic functions:

¾ Most obviously, it brings up an MOB1 (Plot) screen.This is an automatic scaling screen which selects the best zoom level to display your present position and the MOB position. In addition, the MOB position is displayed in the upper left corner, so that you can quickly read the coordinates to others who may be available to render assistance. This plot screen also provides the vital bearing and distance back to the MOB position, as well as your present course over ground.

¾ The MOB position, date and time are stored in the Waypoint Bank for future reference (e.g. log book entries).

¾ Navigation data output on the NMEA ports (i.e. BWC and BWR), are changed to reflect the current crisis situation. This way, other interfaced equipment can also help guide you back to the MOB position. When the MOB condition is canceled via a MOB screen softkey, the NMEA sentences will automatically revert to the active route information. Don’t forget to cancel the MOB so your

interfaced equipment will read the correct data!

¾ The MOB function key and remote MOB input are disabled from subsequent activation, until the MOB Cancel softkey is selected.

¾ Other functions such as Position and Navigate can still be accessed; however, the screen will revert to the MOB Plot screen after 30 seconds. Bearing and distance information in these other screens relate to the MOB position, not the next waypoint in the active route, until MOB is canceled.

To cancel a MOB condition, make sure you are in the MOB Plot screen.

Press the E function key, then select the Cancel MOB softkey.

This MX420 receiver is also capable of performing the MOB function from a remote contact closure. If the contact closure is made for less

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than 2 seconds, the input is registered as a Mark Position. If the contact closure is made for more than 2 seconds, the input is registered as a MOB Position. Refer to the Installation & Service Manual for interface instructions.

E

E (EDIT)

This function key activates or deactivates the softkeys and edit fields within any screen where editing is appropriate. You will quickly learn that this is an important operating feature in the unit. Press the E key when you want to start editing a screen and again when you have finished editing. If after editing you press a function key and nothing seems to happen, check to make sure you didn’t accidentally alter your information and press the E key to end editing. Most edit screens provides an Escape softkey. If you decide for some reason that you don’t want to use the changes you have made, pressing the Escape softkey will restore the original information. However, once you press the E key, all changes are accepted and the original data is lost.

C

C (CLEAR)

This function key is probably the least used of all the function keys; however, it can save you some otherwise frustrating editing time. This key allows you to erase or clear one character at a time. If you hold it down, it will erase the entire line that the cursor is currently on.

CURSOR

This function key is the most used of all the function keys. As its name suggests, this key is used to move between edit fields. It also allows you to move between function screen pages (by pressing left or right).

In addition, many of the edit fields allow you to use either the cursor key or the Change softkey to scroll through or select from predetermined choices.

1

NAV

ABC

FUNCTION

You might have noticed that above and below each primary function key there are numbers and letters. These numbers and letters are used

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when you are in the edit mode. You will find that they are most often used in the RTE, WPT, and CFG screens, but they are used in other screens as well. If you are trying to enter text, simply locate the desired letter and press the appropriate key repeatedly until the appropriate letter or number appears. If you accidentally go past the desired letter, repeat pressing the key and the letter will come up again. You can toggle between upper and lower case characters by pressing the key for a long period.

You will also find that some screens allow you to input symbols into the text fields. These symbols are selected through a softkey selection where symbols are allowed. Don’t forget to press the ‘E’ key to get out

of the edit mode!

Another helpful feature on this CDU is that successive depressions on the function key (when not in the edit mode) allow you to page through all of the screens available for that particular function. You can accomplish the same thing by selecting a function and using the left and right arrows on the cursor key (which is sometimes faster).

Whichever method you choose, it is impossible to get lost between function screens. In addition, the software remembers which screen you used last for each function. Each time you reenter a function (e.g.

you go from PLOT to NAV), you will enter the last screen you viewed for that function. You can change this setting in the CFG 1 Operation.

Use the associated function key to access the international character desired (i.e. A for Æ). The international characters supported are:

ABC = Ä, Å, Æ, À, Ç

DEF = É, È

GHI = Í

MNO = Ñ, Ó, Ö

STU = Ú, Ü

Use the CFG key when in the edit mode to cycle through these other optional characters.

‘ “ $ & ! ( ) ? / + - ° . , :

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9

AIS

YZ

Automatic Identification System (AIS)

This is a special function key used to display the various AIS related data. You can page through the various AIS screens by pressing the

AIS key repeatedly. More information about the AIS displays are available in ‘Appendix-A Automatic Identification System’ on pages 131 through 150 of this manual. The number and letters on the top and bottom of the AIS key can be used in the editing mode.

Note: The AIS display key is not functional in the MX420/2 and MX420/8 models. This is a special key that is active only in the MX420/AIS or MKD models. Non-AIS models will show the message “AIS Not Available on this Version” when the AIS key is pressed.

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Navigate

There are four basic NAV screens. NAV4 only provides data if appropriate sensors (e.g. wind speed/direction logs, NMEA compass, etc.) are interfaced and activated on the CDU. The NAV functions are highly interactive with the RTE1 screen, and a number of CFG menu selections.

The RTE1 screen provides the active route for the NAV screens. It also maintains a waypoint pass log for you. One other important feature in the RTE1 screen that you need to be aware of is that the up and

down arrow softkeys control which waypoints are skipped (down arrow) and which are restored (up arrow) for your current route. The ETA information is configured in the RTE 1 screen. Refer to the Route section of the manual for a full description.

The following CFG menus directly impact the NAV functions:

¾ COG SOG - sets the filtering time for the displayed values.

¾ Datum - sets the reference datum for your present position and waypoints in the active route.

¾ GPS Offset - sets an offset for calculating the GPS antenna position if you can’t physically locate the antenna exactly where you want it (e.g. over the centerline of the boat).

¾ Navigation - sets a variety of important functions and alarms

Ö Rhumb line or Great Circle navigation

Ö Range units: nautical miles, nautical miles and meters

(when under 1000 meters), nautical miles and feet (when under 1000 feet), statute miles, statute miles and meters

(when under 1000 meters), statute miles and feet (when under 1000 feet), kilometers, or kilometers and meters

(when under 1000 meters)

Ö Cross-track error limit and alarm control

Ö Waypoint pass criterion and distance: bisector line, perpendicular line, complex (combination of bisector line and perpendicular line), distance to waypoint, or manual

Ö Waypoint Approach distance

Ö Autopilot alarm control

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¾ Position - sets to either Lat/Lon or UTM, and some alarm limits.

There is an optional software package available to setup a user grid as well. The option is explained in the Position, and CFG

Position sections of this manual.

¾ Time - sets appropriate offsets, and 12 or 24 hour clock mode.

¾ Various NMEA input controls for sensors (i.e. speed log, wind instruments, etc).

You have probably already figured out that you will need to pay close attention to the configuration screens. The good news is that you should only have to setup one time. Keep in mind, though, that you may need to revisit these and other configuration screens from time to time to get the CDU to do exactly what you want it to.

Dead Reckoning

The MX420 CDU is capable of Dead Reckoning (DR) calculation when appropriate compass/heading and speed log sensors are connected and activated. Refer to the NAV4 and CFG sections of this document.

When the CDU is in the DR mode a DR icon is displayed in the upper right corner of the screen.

NAV1 - The Panorama Screen

This screen is designed to give you a unique 3 dimensional look at the active route you are to follow. It is typically referred to as a runway

view because you can see navigation markers, your course line, the cross-track error lines, and waypoint flags as you pass them. Take a look at the example below.

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If you don’t see the information described in this screen, you will need to create a route in RTE1 first.

The somewhat triangular shape at the bottom center of the screen

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Operator’s Manual Navigate

represents the bow of the boat. Icons on the screen are always related to this object. The two dash lines extending from the bottom of the screen towards the center of the screen represent your cross-track error limits. The dotted line extending from the bow of the boat icon represents your course line. The course line changes direction at the flags, which represent your waypoints, and continues through to the end of the active route you entered in RTE1. Notice that the crosstrack error lines end at the first flag. As you pass the flag and start the next leg of your course, these lines will be redrawn to reflect the course change. Icons that you see left and right of your course are navigation markers that you define in the Waypoint Bank (WPT1) where a symbol is used as the first character of the waypoint description. The

Panorama and Plot screens will automatically place these navigation markers on the screen as you approach them.

The degree values that you see are your Course Over Ground (COG), as calculated by the GPS receiver’s position fix to position fix, and

Bearing (BRG) from your present position to the waypoint. The speed value is your Speed Over Ground (SOG) as calculated by the GPS. The distance value displayed as the Range (RNG) is calculated from your present position to the waypoint. The Time-To-Go (TTG) is the calculated time it will take you to reach the waypoint, based on your Waypoint

Closure Velocity (see NAV4 description).

To keep the screen from jumping around when you are stopped, the screen freezes the graphic representation when your speed is under

0.5 Kn in DGPS mode or 2.0 Kn in GPS mode. Once you get underway, your course details will update appropriately.

You will see a RL or GC symbol in the upper right corner of the display indicating whether you are navigating under Rhumb Line or Great

Circle. This is set in the CFG Navigate menu.

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If you press the E key, the Panorama Display Option screen will allow

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you to customize the information presented.

¾ View - allows you to adjust the display for a Close (zoomed-in) or a Far (zoomed-out) representation of your route.

¾ Show Waypoints - allows you to turn waypoints which are not part of the active route on and off.

¾ Show Active Route - allows you to turn the course line on or off on the display (assuming a symbol is entered for the first character of the waypoint name).

¾ Show Off Track Limit - allows you to turn the cross-track error limit lines on or off on the display.

¾ Show Data Window - allows you to select between the two NAV 1 display types depicted at the beginning of this section, one in which the data is displayed in various parts of the graphic screen, the other in which the data is displayed in a separate window to the left of the graphic screen.

If you drift outside of your cross-track error limit and you decide not to return to your original course line, you can reset your course line from your present position to the waypoint by selecting Reset XTE from the display.

The Skip Waypoint softkey allows you to skip the waypoint you are presently going to, and advance to the next waypoint. For example, if you were under way and nearing waypoint 5 and you decide you want to go on to waypoint 6 now, press Skip Waypoint. If you make a mistake and you want to go back (unskip) to waypoint 5, you can do this by the following:

1. Go into the RTE1 screen.

2. Press E in the RTE1 screen.

3. Select the Route Control softkey.

4. Press the up arrow softkey (fourth from the left) once.

5. Press the E key again.

Refer to the Route section of this manual for more details about skipping and unskipping waypoints.

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NAV2 - Basic Steering Information

Navigate screen 2 provides the bearing (BRG) and range (RNG) to the waypoint you are approaching in large easily viewed characters. Below these, you will see your actual Course Over Ground (COG) and

Speed Over Ground (SOG). The bottom portion of the screen provides cross-track error information. Again, if you don’t see the information described here on your screen, you will need to create a route in RTE1 first (refer to the Route section of the manual).

In the bottom half of the window, the vertical line in the center represents your course line. The checkered area on the left and right side of this area represents the out of bounds or beyond the cross-track error limit area. Whenever the boat is left or right of the course line, the corresponding checkered area changes to solid black, indicating the side of the course line that you are on. The number next to the course line is your calculated cross-track error. The numbers in the lower left and right hand corners indicate the cross-track limit you set in the

CFG1 menu under Navigation. You will notice that the cross-track error limit lines are slanted, just as they were in the Panorama screen.

So if the boat is off to the right of the course, and the bow is pointing straight up, you are actually traveling away from the course line. Keep the bow pointed toward the top of the course line, and you should be able to maintain your course without a lot of drift. The BRG and COG values will confirm this for you, when executed properly.

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From time to time, you might drift off course and decide not to return to your original course line. If you drift outside of your cross-track error limit, you can reset your course line from your present position to the waypoint by pressing the E key and selecting Reset XTE from the display. This will save your autopilot from having to work hard to get you back on course. Press the E key again to get back into normal display mode.

In addition, if you decide you want to skip this waypoint, and go on to the next one, Press the E key, and the Skip Waypoint softkey one time.

Press the E key to end this procedure. If you skip one waypoint manually, and the CDU starts skipping more waypoints by itself, you probably need to change your Waypoint Pass Criteria in the CFG1 Navi-

gate menu. Refer to the Route section of this manual for more details about skipping waypoints.

Just as in NAV1, you will see an RL or GC symbol in the upper right corner of the display indicating whether you are navigating under

Rhumb Line or Great Circle. This is set in the CFG1 Navigate menu.

NAV 3 - Expanded Navigation Information

Navigate screen 3 has four windows. The upper left window is a smaller version of NAV2. Please read the previous section for a detailed description of this window. The two windows below this one indicate the current date, time and the ETA to the end of your route for the time zone currently entered. The date and time format is set in the

CFG1 Time menu. The ETA and TTG (in the right hand window) are filtered over time, so allow the filtering to settle when you first make a course or speed change. The filter time is controlled in the RTE1 ETA

Setup screen. The Time-To-Go (TTG) value on the bottom of the right hand window expands from HH:MM:SS to HHHH:MM:SS when the time to go is greater than 99:59:59. Also, these values are calculated by using your Waypoint Closure Velocity (WCV), not your SOG. WCV is described in short detail in the NAV4 section which follows.

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You will find the right hand window to be a helpful tool. In addition to identifying the waypoint you are currently approaching, it identifies the waypoint at the end of the next leg. The really unique feature of this screen is the graphical representation of your actual course line approach angle relative to the next leg of your course. This approach angle is continuously updated in real time and will help you setup for course changes.

Reset XTE and Skip Waypoint, described at the end of NAV2, is also available in NAV3.

NAV4 - Sensor Input Navigation

The NAV 4 screen applies the wind instruments, speed log, compass, and depth sounder inputs from external sensors to your active route, as appropriate. You can setup the sensors in the CFG1 screen. The

Installation & Service Manual will guide you through the interfacing capabilities of the CDU.

Use the following CFG1 menus to set this screen up:

Compass - Sets the input port number, compass type (gyro or magnetic), compass deviation table, and the input NMEA 0183 record from which to derive the compass information. The NMEA 0183 record should be specified by the user, because several NMEA

0183 records may contain compass information. This provides you the capability of knowing the compass source exactly. The CDU only accepts NMEA 0183 formatted data for the compass input.

Synchro or stepper gyro compasses are not compatible.

Depth - Sets the input port number, units of measure for depths and tide data, sensor offset, alarms, and the input NMEA 0183 record from which to derive the depth information. The NMEA 0183 record should be specified by the user, because several NMEA 0183

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records may contain depth information. This provides you the capability of knowing the depth source exactly.

Log - Sets the input port number, sensor type (pulse or NMEA 0183), alarms, and a correction factor (if needed).

Set & Drift - automatically calculated based on GPS derived values.

Wind - Sets the input port number, units of measure, sensor offset, alarms, and the input NMEA 0183 record from which to derive the wind information. The NMEA 0183 record should be specified by the user, because several NMEA 0183 records may contain wind information. This provides you the capability of knowing the wind source exactly.

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This screen is divided into four windows. The window on the top left provides details relating to the True Wind Angle (TWA), True Wind

Speed (TWS) and True Wind Direction (TWD), which are taken from the NMEA 0183 record of MWV or VWR. If the wind information is given in relative terms, the CDU calculates true values using available

GPS course and speed information to make the necessary adjustments.

Refer to the Glossary for definitions on Apparent/True Wind Angle/

Speed/Direction. To the right of the wind information is your Velocity

Made Good (VMG) towards the waypoint. The VMG data is filtered to show the average speed from the last waypoint to your present position towards the next waypoint. VMG is calculated from GPS data.

The CDU will also use the above data to calculate your speed parallel to wind and can output the VPW NMEA 0183 data sentence to other on-board instruments.

The window below the wind data provides information relating to your course and speed. You will find the Course Over Ground (COG calcu-

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lated by the MX421 smart GPS antenna), Heading (HDG, your NMEA

0183 compass input), and Heading To Steer (HTS) data on the left side of the window. HTS data is calculated by considering your Heading, minus COG and adding BRG to the waypoint. In doing so, the software considers any Set to be included in the HDG value. If there is no

Set, your HDG should be equal to COG. Set and Drift is calculated from

GPS and your Speed Log (NMEA 0183 VHW record or Pulse input) and Compass (NMEA 0183 HDM, HDT, or VHW) input or an operator manual input.

On the right side of the lower left window you will find the Speed Over

Ground (SOG, calculated by MX421 smart GPS antenna), Speed Log

(LOG, the NMEA 0183 or pulse speed input), and the Waypoint Clo-

sure Velocity (WCV). WCV reflects the real time velocity from your present position and course towards the next waypoint. The VMG and WCV are calculated from GPS data. Refer to the diagram below to see a graphical representation between VMG and WCV.

Velocity Made Good:

Beginning

Waypoint

Actual

VMG T

Course owards

10 Kn

Line

Waypoi nt

Present

Position

SOG 13 Kn

BRG

Next

Waypoint

Distance to

Waypoint Travelled

Effect of

Set & Drift

Original Course Line

Waypoint Closure Velocity:

Beginning

Waypoint

Effect of Set & Drift

Present

Position

SOG 13 Kn

Next

Waypoint

WCV 9 Kn

Extended

Course

Line

BRG & RNG

Original Course Line

6297_01B.100

WCV is based on

Extended Course

Line (COG), SOG,

BRG & RNG to WPT

HTS to counter

Set & Drift

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Below this information, you will find your Set and Drift data, which is calculated using GPS and your compass and speed sensor inputs.

Reset XTE and Skip Waypoint, described at the end of NAV2, is also available in NAV4.

The window on the right displays depth information coming from the depth sounder unit using the NMEA 0183 record of DPT, DBS, DBT, or

DBK. These are setup in the CFG1 Depth screen, refer to the Con-

figuration section of the manual and the Installation & Service Manual for full details on depth data.

Below the depth data you will find the next route leg vector, the Range to the waypoint and Time To Go data, explained in the NAV3 section.

Note: The NAV screens are not active until antenna is detected.

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Route

Route

There are two RTE screens. The NAV functions are highly interactive with the RTE1 screen. The RTE2 screen allows you to create a pool of predetermined routes that you might use often, so you need only create the route one time. Routes are created from waypoints. All waypoints are stored in the Waypoint Bank, regardless of which function is used to create them. Waypoints are either created in the

Waypoint Bank (WPT1), created by the GOTO function, selected from the PLOT screens in conjunction with the GOTO function, or from New Waypoints that can be defined in the Route Insert menu

(and simultaneously stored in the route and the Waypoint Bank).

We recognize the diverse needs of professional users. We have designed the route features to be very flexible to meet a wide range of users’ requirements by allowing up to 2000 waypoints to be stored between all of the routes. You can create up to 99 routes, with any number of waypoints, providing the maximum number of 2000 waypoints between all routes is not exceeded.

The Route (RTE) function serves two purposes:

1. The RTE1 screen provides all of the current, or active waypoint navigation data to the Navigate and Plot screens and is referred to as the Active Route. Therefore, whenever you begin a new trip or voyage, you should erase the previous voyage’s waypoints in this screen, then insert the new waypoints or routes (from RTE2) for the new voyage. If you want to store the waypoints from the previous active route for future use, you can copy these waypoints in the order in which they were entered to the Route Bank in the

RTE2 screen. This is described in the RTE2 - The Route Bank section of this manual. If you do not clear the RTE1 screen (refer to

Erasing an Existing Route section of this manual), the RTE1 screen will grow each time you add new waypoints to the route. The route function can hold a maximum of 2,000 waypoints between the routes stored in RTE1 and RTE2.

2. The RTE2 screen provides storage space for up to 100 user defined routes. You can pre-define routes, or copy new routes from the

RTE1 (active route) screen. Later you can choose individual routes or link two or more routes in the RTE1 screen (refer to Creating a

Multi-Waypoint Active Route section of this manual). When you are finished using the copied route in RTE1, you can erase the route from the RTE1 screen and the original stored route will re-

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main intact in the RTE2 screen.

The following CFG1 menus directly impact the RTE functions:

¾ Navigation - sets a variety of important functions and alarms.

Ö Rhumb line or Great Circle navigation

Ö Range units: nautical miles, nautical miles and meters (when under 1,000 meters), nautical miles and feet (when under 1,000 feet), statute miles, statute miles and meters (when under 1,000 meters), statute miles and feet (when under 1,000 feet), kilometers, or kilometers and meters (when under 1,000 meters)

Ö Waypoint pass criterion and distance: bisector line, perpendicular line, complex (combination of bisector line and perpendicular line), distance to waypoint, or manual.

Ö Waypoint Approach distance

Ö Autopilot alarm control

¾ Position - sets Lat/Lon or UTM and some alarm limits.

¾ Time - sets time offsets and 12 or 24 hour clock mode (for ETA calculation, and waypoint passed time stamp).

RTE1 - The Active Route

The RTE1 screen provides the active route data for the NAV and

PLOT screens. It also maintains a waypoint pass log for you. Another important feature in the RTE1 screen that you need to be aware of is that the up (Ï) and down (Ð) arrow softkeys, displayed when you are in the edit mode under the Route Control softkey, control which waypoints are skipped (down arrow - Ð) and which are restored (up arrow - Ï) for your current route.

Note: The CDU will recalculate the route when a navigation mode, either Rhumb Line or Great Circle is selected.

You can enter waypoints using different datums into the route

The RTE1 screen is where you are likely to do most of your trip preparation. There are several methods you can use to create routes. You are sure to find one or more methods which meet your needs in the following sections.

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Creating a Route Using the GOTO Key:

Using the GOTO function key is the fastest way to create a single leg route. Using this method will cause the existing active route to be erased and overwritten with the new position you define.

1. From any screen, press the GOTO key.

2. Press the E key.

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3. Select the waypoint determination method you want:

Waypoint Number - allows you to choose a waypoint stored in the

Waypoint Bank. This feature is nice to use if you already know the waypoint number that you want to go to and you don’t want to waste time scrolling through the available waypoints.

Enter the number of the waypoint, verify that the coordinates are correct, and press the E key to copy the waypoint to the active route.

Choose In Bank - allows you to scroll through the Waypoint Bank.

Align the cursor with the desired waypoint and press the E key. The waypoint is automatically inserted into the active route and the unit will revert to the NAV screens, displaying bearing and distance to this waypoint.

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Lat. Lon. - allows you to define a coordinate and description, which is also stored at the next available waypoint location in the

Waypoint Bank. Once the coordinates are defined, press the E key to copy the waypoint to the active route.

Bearing Range - allows you to define a coordinate by specifying the bearing and range from your present position, which is also stored at the next available waypoint location in the

Waypoint Bank. After entering the desired bearing and range, press the E key. The newly defined waypoint is copied to the active route automatically.

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If you make a mistake, you can use the cursor key to position the cursor over the mistake and overwrite the error.

Use the 9 key to insert a space in the description, if needed.

Use the 0 key to select a special character, if needed.

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International characters are available by selecting the associated function key. Refer to the Keypad & Display Description section at the front of the manual.

If you decide you don’t want to continue with this function, press the Escape softkey, then press the E key. Make another function key selection (e.g. NAV) and your original route will have been left intact.

3. Press the RTE function key. You will see two waypoints defined in the center of the screen.

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Waypoint 0, the first waypoint, is your Point of Departure, or the position you were at when you created the route. Waypoint 0 is a unique waypoint, in that the CDU internally constantly changes the position of Waypoint 0 to your present position. However, the CDU saves and displays the original coordinates entered when you created the route.

Waypoint 0 is displayed in Inverse Video, that is, white characters on a black background (when in the normal Daylight display mode; see

CFG1 Lighting). This indicates that you have already passed this coordinate. The time stamp at the lower portion of the description window indicates when the route was created. If you want to adjust your point of departure position, you can edit Waypoint 0 in the WPT function.

To the right of the coordinate window of Waypoint 0 is a bent arrow.

The bend in the arrow is adjacent to the range and bearing between the waypoint you just passed and the waypoint you are approaching.

Keep in mind that these are the fixed calculated values between these two coordinates and not the real time changing values that you will see in the navigation screens between your present position and your next waypoint during normal navigation.

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Below Waypoint 0 is the waypoint you defined in the GOTO function.

Notice that this information is in standard video, black characters on a white background, and that an ETA time is displayed in the same position as the waypoint passed time in Waypoint 0. This indicates that the waypoint has not yet been passed. Remember that the ETA time is filtered over time, so allow a few minutes for the filter to settle when you first get underway or make course and speed changes.

Erasing an Existing Route

To erase the active route:

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Press the Remove softkey.

4. Press the Erase Route softkey.

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5. Press the Yes softkey to confirm.

The active route is now erased and ready for new input. If you want to work in other areas of the CDU first, you will need to press the E key to exit the edit mode.

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Operator’s Manual Route

Creating a Multi-Waypoint Active Route

There are four methods to create a multi-waypoint route:

¾ Insert By Number - allows you to type in or scroll through in numerical order using the cursor key, waypoints that you previously stored in the Waypoint Bank (see WPT later in this manual).

¾ Choose In Bank - allows you to sort and scroll through the waypoints stored in the Waypoint Bank (WPT) by various techniques (symbol, date, distance from present position, numerical order, alphabetical order, or search by user defined string). This is a great tool if you can’t remember where you stored the waypoints you want to use.

¾ Insert New Waypoint - allows you to define new waypoint coordinates, define a waypoint by using Bearing and Distance from an existing waypoint, and enter them into the route and the Waypoint

Bank at the same time.

¾ Insert Route - allows you to copy a previously defined route in the RTE2 screen to the active route. This choice is only displayed when one or more routes are defined in the RTE2 screen.

Our experience has shown that you are likely to choose several of these methods at any given time to create a route. You can mix any of these routines to create routes, amend routes, or insert waypoints in the middle of existing routes. The software is designed to be as flexible as possible to meet your changing needs.

Be sure to take a few minutes to read through the Plotter section to find out how you can modify the active route using the Plotter and

GOTO functions.

The following four sections are examples of how to use each of the four basic functions outlined above. We encourage you to experiment using all of the methods available to find the one that best meets your needs. As long as you are working in the RTE1 screen and sitting at the dock, you are not going to do any damage (e.g. erase waypoints in the Waypoint Bank or routes in the Route Bank), so have some fun

and find out how helpful this GPS receiver really is.

If you are already comfortable with setting up a basic route, you might want to skip the examples which follow and jump ahead to the Maneu-

vering Within the Route section later in this section to understand some of the more advanced features of the software.

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Insert By Number

The following example assumes RTE1 is empty. Follow the directions in the Erasing an Existing Route section to start with an empty route if you have waypoints in the RTE1 screen.

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key to enter the edit mode.

3. Select Insert from the display. Skip to the next step if RTE1 is empty.

4. Select Insert by Number from the display.

5. Use the keypad to type in the number you want or the beginning number of a range you would like to select from, or use the cursor key to scroll through the previously stored waypoints in numerical order.

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6. When you have found the waypoint you want, press the Insert

this WPT softkey.

7. You can then choose to select another waypoint using the same method, select Escape to go back one level and use another method to enter waypoints, or select Done to go back to the main menu.

8. Don’t forget to press the E key to end your editing.

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Operator’s Manual Route

Choose in Bank

The following example assumes RTE1 is empty. Follow the directions in the Erasing an Existing Route section to start with an empty route if you have waypoints in the RTE1 screen.

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key to enter the edit mode.

3. Select Insert from the display. Skip to the next step if RTE1 is empty.

4. Select Choose in Bank from the display.

5. Select a waypoint by:

A. Pressing the Sort By softkey to arrange the waypoints by number, name, type, distance, or age (refer to the Waypoint section for a full description), then using the cursor key to scroll through the previously stored waypoints in the Waypoint Bank.

B. Pressing the Search for WPT softkey. When using this selection you actually spell out the name and or symbols of the waypoints you are looking for and the software will display any waypoint containing that combination of characters or symbols. Refer to the Waypoint section for a full description.

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6. When you have found the waypoint you want, press the Insert

this WPT softkey.

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7. When you are finished, press the Done softkey to get back to the main menu.

8. You can then choose to select another waypoint using the same method, select Escape to go back one level and use another method to enter waypoints, or select Done do go back to the main menu.

9. Don’t forget to press the E key to end your editing.

Insert New Waypoint

The following example assumes RTE1 is empty. Follow the directions in the Erasing an Existing Route section to start with an empty route if you have waypoints in the RTE1 screen.

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key to enter the edit mode.

3. Select Insert from the display. Skip to the next step if RTE1 is empty.

4. Select Insert new Waypoint from the display.

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5. Choose either Bearing, Distance or Lat/Lon (Grid Point, or TD if you are using other coordinate systems). Use the keypad to type in the range and bearing from the previous waypoint (or present position in the case of the first waypoint) or the coordinates you want and their appropriate description.

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6. When the information is correct, press the Done softkey.

Route

7. You can then choose to enter another waypoint using the same method, select Escape to go back one level and use another method to enter waypoints, or select Done to go back to the main menu.

8. Don’t forget to press the E key to end your editing.

Insert Route

The following example assumes RTE1 is empty. Follow the directions in the Erasing an Existing Route section to start with an empty route if you have waypoints in the RTE1 screen.

To perform this function, you must also have defined a route in the

RTE2 screen. The RTE2 description follows later in the Route section.

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key to enter the edit mode.

3. Select Insert from the display. Skip to the next step if RTE1 is empty.

4. Select Insert Route from the display.

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5. Use the cursor key to scroll through the available defined routes, which are created in the RTE 2 screen, in numerical order.

6. When you have found the route you want, press the Insert Fwd or the Insert Reverse softkey. Insert Fwd enters the route from the top of the defined list into the active route. Insert Reverse enters the route from the bottom of the defined list into the active route so that you can travel down the route in the reverse direction.

7. You can then choose to select another route using the same method or select another method to enter waypoints.

8. Don’t forget to press the E key to end your editing.

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Maneuvering Within the Route

Scrolling

You can use the cursor key to scroll up and down the active route. You will probably want to do this when you update your log book to indicate when you passed a given waypoint, or when you want to know the ETA to a waypoint other than the one you are currently traveling towards. It is also a good idea to set the cursor at the correct waypoint before entering the edit mode to insert and delete waypoints from the route.

Skipping and Unpassing Waypoints

You are likely to run into an occasional circumstance where you accidentally skipped a waypoint (due to your waypoint pass criteria selection in the CFG1 Navigation screen, or a manual skip in the NAV screens), and you want to switch back to a previous waypoint in the active route. You may also decide at some point that you want to skip the current or subsequent waypoints in the route. The software has a very simple design to accomplish both of these tasks.

The easiest way to accomplish either of these tasks is to scroll through the route with the cursor key until the cursor arrow is at the bottom of the last waypoint you want designated as passed (that is, white characters on a black background), whether this waypoint was passed several waypoints ago or is yet to be passed.

Then press the E key.

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Use the up (Ï) softkey to unpass or the down (Ð) softkey to pass waypoints in the route until the waypoint marked by the cursor is displayed with white characters on a black background (Daylight display, see CFG1 Lighting).

Press the E key to end editing.

If for some reason you can’t select the waypoint you want (the screen keeps passing waypoints you unpassed), you are probably too close to one of the waypoints. You will need to either change your Waypoint

Pass Criteria, change your Waypoint Pass Distance (see CFG1 Navi-

gation), or remove the waypoint from the route.

Inserting Waypoints or Routes into an Existing Route

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Scroll through the route with the cursor key until the cursor arrow is at the bottom of the waypoint you want to insert the new waypoint after.

40

3. Then press the E key.

4. Use one or more of the insert methods described in the Creating a

Multi-Waypoint Active Route section above.

This example shows Waypoint 7 inserted into the route using the

Insert by Number method:

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5. Press the E key to end editing.

There is one special way to add a waypoint to the active route using the Plotter display. This method adds the waypoint between your present position and the next waypoint in your active route.

1. Select either PLOT1 or PLOT2 display.

2. Use the zoom-in or zoom-out softkeys to display the waypoint you want to insert. Press the E key. All waypoints in the waypoint bank will be displayed if they are within the zoom level of the display.

Note that the waypoint must have a symbol as the first character of the waypoint name in order for it to be displayed on the PLOT screen when the edit mode is not active.

3. Use the cursor key to move the magnifying glass icon over the waypoint or marker that you want to go to.

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Verify that the waypoint number and coordinates are correct in the left hand window.

4. Press the GOTO function key.

5. Press the E key to exit the edit mode.

Note that RTE1 and PLOT1 are updated with your new waypoint.

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Reversing the Active Route

Once you get to your final destination, you might want to follow the same route home. To quickly accomplish this, simply use the Reverse

Direct softkey from the main RTE1 menu.

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Press the Route Control softkey.

4. Press the Reverse Direct softkey.

5. Press the E key. It’s that simple!

Notice that you still keep the same orientation on the screen, in other words, you always read from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen. The waypoints are rewritten in reverse order for you.

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ETA Setup

If you choose to use this function, it is probably better to operate the unit in UTC time mode if you are going to cross one or more time zones.

Note that the time entered uses the offset to UTC applied in the CFG1

Time display.

The software calculates Estimated Time of Arrival based on how you configure the unit. ETA settings are controlled from the RTE1 screen.

To change the ETA settings:

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Select the ETA/SOG Calc. softkey.

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4. Use the Change softkey to select which value you want the

CDU to calculate, either ETA based on speed, or speed (SOG) based on desired time and date of arrival.

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SOG Based on Arrival Date & Time:

Route

5. Enter the arrival time and date. Be sure to enter the date as day, month, year, as indicated on the screen.

6. Press the Done softkey.

In this mode, the actual SOG is compared to the required SOG to meet the specified arrival date and time. The result is given in a percentage

(%) value next to the displayed SOG in the NAV screens. If the percentage is below 100, you will arrive late. If the percentage is above 100, you will arrive early.

ETA Based on Speed:

5. Select a Speed Basis of either GPS SOG, which uses a long filter time (in seconds) that you define, or Constant, which uses a speed you intend to maintain (you define the speed).

6. Press the Done softkey.

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Route

RTE2 - The Route Bank

Operator’s Manual

The Route Bank is a convenient place for you to preprogram segments of a long voyage, or to program routes that you follow over and over again. Creating routes for the Route Bank uses the same methods as the Active Route with a few exceptions: you can’t use the GOTO key, and you can’t use the Plotter screen. You can use other routes as a subset to create a new route. Remember, you can always tie routes together in the Active Route by inserting one after another. You will find a Route Name softkey when you first enter the edit mode. The

Route Name selection allows you to identify each route by name, number and symbol when you are viewing the Route Bank from the main menu. To create a route:

1. Select the RTE key until the RTE2 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the route number you want to create or edit.

3. Press the E key.

4. Use the entry methods described in the Creating a Multi-Waypoint

Active Route section, following the exceptions noted above.

If you have a route in RTE1 that is not stored in RTE2, you can copy it into the Route Bank by selecting Insert then Insert Route, either in the forward or reverse direction.

5. When you are finished selecting waypoints, press the Route Name softkey.

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softkey.

Route

You can enter any name, number or symbol you want this route to be identified by.

6. Press the Done softkey when you are finished editing the name.

Note: It is a good idea at this point to select Lock Route so that way you won’t accidentally erase the route sometime in the future.

7. Finally press the E key to exit the edit mode.

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Waypoint

The Waypoint Bank (WPT) is a single list of up to 2,000 waypoints that you store for use in the routes you create. It also stores special coordinates and time, through the use of the Mark or Event function key or external input, or the MOB function key or external input. You can also enter waypoints from other NMEA 0183 devices (see CFG1

WPT & RTE In), such as plotters. You can also output waypoints and routes from the CDU to other NMEA 0183 devices (see CFG1 NMEA

Out Rnn, RTE, and WPL).

You can input very accurate coordinates, down to 18 cm in Lat/Lon, 0.1

m in UTM or 0.1 µs in TDs. You can select from more than 110 Datums to store your waypoints in. The CFG1 Position screen controls which coordinate reference system is used by the CDU.

While entering waypoints in the list is rather straight forward, the software does provide some helpful features that should be mentioned before giving any examples.

There are six methods to view or sort waypoints:

¾ Sort By Number - displays the waypoints in waypoint numerical order, starting with waypoint 0.

Note: You can manually alter Waypoint 0 to a different Point of Departure if you don’t want to start your route from your present position.

¾ Sort By Name - displays the waypoints by name in alphabetical order.

¾ Sort By Type - displays the waypoints by symbols, numbers, then names.

¾ Sort By Distance - displays the waypoints which are closest to your present location first.

¾ Sort By Age - displays the waypoints entered most recently, first.

¾ Search For WPT - allows you to type a symbol or name and the screen displays all waypoints having the exact match of the name you type. If you are unsure of the complete name, type a few of the characters you know are in the name, and the software will display all waypoints having the corresponding characters.

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For example, if you are looking for the LA HARBOR ENTRANCE and you enter HAR, the screen will display all waypoints with these three characters in this exact order.

Creating and Editing Waypoints

When editing a waypoint, you are always prompted to select the appropriate datum. You might occasionally see a prompt warning you that the waypoint is used either in a stored route or the active route.

You ultimately have the final decision whether to continue editing the waypoint, or exiting this waypoint by pressing the E key again to exit the edit mode.

Creating and editing waypoints is easy.

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Press the Make New WPT softkey or align the cursor with the waypoint you want to modify and press the Edit this WPT softkey.

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3. Make New WPT

4a. Use WGS-84 Datum

Select

Lat/Lon (W84)

4b. Use Datum Other

Than WGS-84

Select

Lat/Lon Datum

Select desired datum from displayed list.

Press

Select.

4c. Create a new WPT Based

on a Range & Bearing

from an existing WPT

Select

Range Bearing

Enter desired range and bearing.

Press the cursor down arrow

.

5. Enter Coordinates

Press the cursor

down arrow

.

6. Modify WPT Number

(Optional)

Press the cursor

down arrow

.

7. Modify WPT Text

& Symbol (Optional)

Press the

Done

softkey

.

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4a. Make New WPT - Select Lat/Lon (W84), Lat/Lon Datum, or Range

Bearing.

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Operator’s Manual Waypoint

Lat/Lon (W84) - allows you to enter coordinates in the WGS 84 datum. This choice takes you directly into the coordinate input screen. Go to step 5.

Lat/Lon Datum - allows you to choose a datum (see the list in the screen sample above) from the more than 110 available Datums.

Highlight the desired datum and press the Select softkey. Refer to Appendix A - Datum List for a complete list of datums and their WGS-84 offset. Go to step 5.

Range Bearing - allows you to define new waypoint coordinates from an existing waypoint in the Waypoint Bank. When you use this feature make sure you align the cursor next to the from waypoint number before you press the Make New WPT softkey.

Once you have entered the range and bearing, the CDU calculates the coordinates. You can then enter a text description or modify the waypoint number as described in step 6 below. Go to step 6.

4b. Edit This WPT - Select Accept to use the WGS 84 datum or press

Change to choose from the more than 110 available Datums. High-

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light the desired datum and press the Select softkey. Refer to Ap-

pendix A - Datum List for a complete list of datums and their WGS

84 offset.

5. Enter the appropriate coordinates using the cursor key and numeric keypad.

6. Move the cursor down and modify the waypoint number if you wish. Otherwise the CDU assigns the next available number, beginning at 1.

Range & Bearing Lat/Lon

This feature allows you to create a range of waypoints within a particular area. For example, you could put all of the waypoints for fishing spots near Catalina Island in the range of 500 to 530, all the waypoints for Cabo San Lucas in the range of 575 to 600, etc.

7. Move the cursor down, and enter the symbol and name information (optional). Use the techniques described in the Keypad &

Display Description section at the front of this manual.

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The following international characters are supported by cycling through the standard letter function key:

ABC = Ä, Å, Æ, À, Ç

DEF = É, È

GHI = Í

MNO = Ñ, Ó, Ö

STU = Ú, Ü

Press the CFG key when in the edit mode to cycle through these additional characters:

‘ “ $ & ! ( ) ? / + - ° . , :

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About one second after you stop scrolling through the alpha characters, the cursor will automatically advance to the next space.

7. Press the Done softkey.

8. When you are finished, press the Lock this WPT softkey to avoid accidentally erasing the waypoint in the future.

Note: Locked waypoints can not be overwritten by waypoints downloaded from the NMEA port or saved by the Mark or MOB functions.

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9. Then press the E function key to end editing.

You can press the E key when you finish editing a waypoint. This is treated the same as pressing the Done softkey. Pressing Done allows you to continue editing and entering other waypoints.

Waypoint Lock/Unlock

Locking a waypoint forces the user to consciously unlock the waypoint before it can be modified and prevents the waypoint from being overwritten when waypoints are being input over the data port. Note that when a waypoint received on the data port has the same waypoint number as a locked waypoint already stored in the CDU, the waypoint data received on the data port is disregarded and lost. Waypoints are locked by one of three methods: 1) selecting Lock this WPT when in the waypoint bank edit mode for a particular waypoint; 2) selecting

Lock this WPT when in the waypoint bank edit mode; or 3) incorporating a waypoint into a route stored in RTE2 and then locking the route.

Waypoints that are locked from the waypoint bank are indicated by a closed padlock in the display. Waypoints that are party to a locked route will display a message indicating that waypoint can not be modified.

To Lock a Waypoint

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the desired waypoint.

3. Press the E key.

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4. Press the Lock this WPT softkey.

5. Press the E key.

To Unlock a Waypoint

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the desired waypoint.

3. Press the E key.

4. Press the Unlock this WPT softkey.

5. Press the E key.

If you simply want to modify the waypoint, Edit this WPT will be displayed on the bottom left of the screen.

To Lock all Waypoints

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the desired waypoint.

3. Press the E key.

4. Press the More softkey.

5. Press the More softkey again.

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6. Press the Lock all WPT softkey.

7. Press the E key.

To Unlock all Waypoints

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the desired waypoint.

3. Press the E key.

4. Press the More softkey.

5. Press the More softkey again.

6. Press the Unlock all WPT softkey.

7. Press the E key.

Removing Waypoints

Unlocked waypoints can be overwritten by waypoints received on the

NMEA port. Waypoints that are contained within a stored route can not be removed until they are removed from the stored route in the

RTE2 screen. If you try to remove a waypoint stored in a route, a warning will be displayed indicating the first route a waypoint is stored in.

If the waypoint you want remove is locked, refer to the Waypoint

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Lock/Unlock section for a step by step procedure, and then return to this section.

To remove a waypoint:

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Move the cursor to the desired waypoint.

3. Press the E key.

4. Press the Remove softkey.

There are three methods to remove a waypoint: Remove this WPT,

Remove Unused, and Remove Range:

5a. If you select Remove this WPT, the waypoint will immediately be removed from the Waypoint bank.

5b. If you select Remove Unused, the CDU will delete all waypoints that are not locked or stored in a route. You will be prompted to confirm the deletion:

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5c If you select Remove Range, the CDU will delete all unlocked waypoints that are not stored in a route between a range of waypoint numbers that you enter. You will be prompted to confirm the deletion:

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6. Press the E key.

Moving waypoints

This feature allows you to create a range of waypoints within a particular area. For example, you could put all of the waypoints for fishing spots near Catalina Island in the range of 500 to 530, all the waypoints for Cabo San Lucas in the range of 575 to 600, etc.

To move a waypoint or range of waypoints:

1. Select the WPT key until the WPT1 screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Press the More softkey.

4. Press the Move softkey.

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5a. To move a single waypoint, enter the original waypoint number on the First WPT Number and Last WPT Number.

5b. To move a range of waypoints, enter the first and last waypoint numbers to move on the First WPT Number and Last WPT Number.

Keep in mind that the CDU will sort these waypoints numerically and all waypoints between the entered numbers will be moved to the new location.

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6. Enter the waypoint number where you want the first waypoint moved to in Destination WPT Number.

If the destination waypoint number is already being used, you will be prompted to either overwrite the first waypoint (Yes) and each subsequent waypoint that is to be overwritten, confirming each waypoint one at a time, overwrite all the waypoints (Yes To All), not overwrite any waypoints (No); or Escape back to base softkey menu.

Downloading Waypoints & Routes to Other Devices

Refer to the Installation & Service Manual for hardware interfacing guidelines.

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The CDU can download all of your stored waypoints and routes, and your active route to other NMEA 0183 devices which accept the RTE,

Rnn, and WPL data sentences. These sentences are controlled in the

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CFG1 NMEA Out screens for the identifier given below. The CDU outputs these sentences in the following format:

Rnn - Routes:

Waypoint identifiers, listed in order with starting waypoint first, for route number “nn”. The active route in the CDU is always route zero, but in the Rnn sentence the route number can be transmitted as either route 00 or 01.

Rnn is NMEA version 1.5. Use of GPRTE is recommended to comply with NMEA version 2.1.

field#: 1 2 3 4 1 1 1

4 5 6

$GPRnn,cccc,cccc,cccc,.....,cccc,cccc*hh<CR><LF> explanation / actual use:

1: nn = active route number, 00 or 01 can be set to 00 or 01 (default 00).

2 - 15: 14 field sequence of route waypoint IDs.

16:

RTE - Active Route:

Checksum can be set on or off (default on).

Waypoint identifiers, listed in order with starting waypoint first, for the identified route. Two modes of transmission are provided: “c” indicates that the complete list of waypoints in the route are being transmitted; “w” indicates a working route (active) where the first listed waypoint is always the last waypoint that has been reached (FROM), while the second listed waypoint is always the waypoint that you are currently heading toward (TO). The remaining list of waypoints represents the remainder of the route.

RTE can be sent as version 2.1 and 2.0.

field#: 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 1

5 6 7

$GPRTE,x,x,a,cccc,cccc,.....,cccc,cccc*hh<CR><LF> explanation / actual use:

2:

3:

Total number of messages being transmitted (a single route may require the transmission of multiple messages). A maximum of 11 waypoints are transmitted in each messages.

Message number.

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4:

Waypoint

Message mode: c = complete route, all waypoints, w = working , 1 st listed waypoint is ‘FROM’, 2 nd is ‘TO’ and remaining are the rest. c/w can be set to c or w (default w).

5: Route identifier, always 00 (Active Route only).

6 - 16: Waypoint identifiers, (less than 11 waypoints may be in the message).

The number of remaining waypoints can be set to 1, 2 or “all”

(default all) shortening the drawn track on the plotter.

17: Checksum can be set on or off (default on).

WPL - Waypoint Location - NMEA 0183 Standard:

Latitude and Longitude of specified waypoint. The content of this sentence will normally be the position of the next waypoint in the route.

The CFG1 NMEA out WPL has a special “Send All” option. Selecting this feature will send all the waypoints in the Waypoint Bank once, independent of the WPL sentence setup as ON or OFF. This format conforms to the NMEA 0183 standard.

WPL can be sent as version 1.5, 2.0 or 2.1.

field#: 2 3 4 5 6 7

$GPWPL,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,cccc*hh <CR><LF> explanation / actual use:

2 & 3: Waypoint Latitude, North or South, N/S number of decimals can be set to 2, 3, 4 or 5 (default 2).

4 & 5: Waypoint longitude, East or West, E/W number of decimals can be set to 2, 3, 4 or 5 (default 2).

6: Waypoint identifier.

7: Checksum can be set on or off (default on).

The WPL record can also contain the description information when

Include Waypoint Names in the CFG1 NMEA, Details is selected.

WPL - Waypoint with Symbols & Description - NMEA 0183 Expanded:

Latitude and Longitude of specified waypoint. The content of this sentence will normally be the position of the next waypoint in the

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route.

The CFG1 NMEA out WPL has a special “Send All” option. Selecting this feature will send all the waypoints in the Waypoint Bank once independent of the WPL sentence setup as ON or OFF. This format does not strictly conform to the NMEA 0183 standard, and may not work with all equipment. It is provided for your use to store data on a

PC using normal ASCII text editors.

WPL can be sent as version 1.5, 2.0 or 2.1.

field#: 2 3 4 5 6 7

$GPWPL,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,cccc xxxxxxxxxxzzzzzzzzzz*hh

<CR><LF> explanation / actual use:

2 & 3: Waypoint Latitude, North or South, N/S number of decimals can be set to 2, 3, 4 or 5 (default 2).

4 & 5: Waypoint longitude, East or West, E/W number of decimals can be set to 2, 3, 4 or 5 (default 2).

6.

Waypoint identifier; 4 place numeric waypoint number, followed by 1 space, followed by 10 characters for the top line of the description, followed by 10 characters for the bottom line of the description. When this field is output, you may see spaces between the xxx and zzz. These are “fill characters” and are necessary to fulfill the 10 character count to maintain character placement when read back into the CDU.

7: Checksum can be set on or off (default on).

Downloading Waypoints to a Personal Computer

You can use any terminal or communications program to download or upload waypoints and routes to or from the CDU and a PC.

Set the PC to:

4800 baud

1 stop bit no flow control

8 bits no parity

When sending data to the CDU, it must be sent in block form, followed by (with an appended) CR (carriage return) and LF (line feed). Normal communications programs, like Windows 3.1 or 3.11 Terminal are suf-

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ficient to get the job done. Unfortunately, Hyperterminal in Windows

95 doesn’t provide as simple a terminal emulation program as Win-

dows 3.11, and we have found it unreliable. We suggest that a third party terminal program be used with Windows 95.

Using Windows Terminal, do the following (from the Program Man-

ager):

1. Connect the CDU’s port 2 RS-232 port to the PC’s communications port (Refer to the Installation & Service Manual).

2. On the CDU press the CFG key until CFG1 screen is displayed.

3. Scroll down the menu to NMEA Out 2.

4. Press the E key.

5. If the port is already Active (Yes), write down which NMEA sentences are set to Yes, then set all of the NMEA sentences to No.

You need to do this to record just the waypoint data.

If the port is not Active (No), change it to Yes.

6. Scroll down to the WPL record and change it On.

7. Select the Details softkey.

8. Set Include Waypoint Names to either No or Yes. Refer to WPL -

Waypoint Location - NMEA Compliant and WPL - Waypoint With

Symbols & Description - NMEA 0183 Non-Compliant sections in this manual to determine the correct format for your purpose.

9. Set Decimals in Position to 4.

10. Press the Done softkey.

11. Set the WPL record to Off (you will need to turn the data off while setting up the computer).

12. On the computer, double click on the Accessories icon.

13. Double click on the Terminal icon.

14. Click on the Settings menu.

15. Double click on the Communications menu item and make the following settings:

4800 baud

8 data bits

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1 stop bit

Parity - none

Flow Control - none

Connector - Com1 (or Com2, depending where the external interface is)

Parity Check - blank

Carrier Detect - blank

OK

16. Click on the Transfers menu.

17. Double click on the CDU Text File menu item and make the following settings.

[give the file a name.txt]

[select a location (folder) to store the file]

OK

18. On the CDU, you should still be in edit mode on CFG1 NMEA Out

2 with the cursor flashing on Off at the WPL record. Press the Send

All softkey.

19. When all the waypoint sentences are sent, click on the Stop button on the PC.

20. Press the E key on the CDU to exit the edit mode.

Uploading Waypoints from Other Devices

The CDU will accept waypoints from any device which follows the

WPL formats identified earlier in the Waypoint section. The first two characters following the $ can be any NMEA defined talker ID. You do not have to calculate and include the checksum; however, you must end each data record with a carriage return and line feed. If you do include the checksum at the end of the data record, the CDU will verify the checksum. If the checksum is invalid, the waypoint will be rejected.

Waypoints received on the data port will be stored to the waypoint location specified in the WPL record. If the waypoint location specified in the WPL record is already occupied, the CDU will overwrite the existing waypoint (if it is unlocked). If the existing waypoint is locked, the WPL record received on the input port will be ignored and dropped.

The CDU will only recognize waypoints from one input port at any given time. This port is defined in CFG1 WPT & RTE In.

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Uploading Waypoints from a Personal Computer

You can use any terminal or communications program to download or upload waypoints and routes to or from the CDU and a PC.

Set the PC to:

4800 baud

8 bits

1 stop bit no parity no flow control

When sending data to the CDU, it must be sent in block form, followed by (with an appended) CR (carriage return) and LF (line feed). Normal communications programs, like Windows 3.1 or 3.11 Terminal are sufficient to get the job done. Unfortunately Windows 95 and new Win-

dows O/S doesn’t provide a basic terminal emulation program; therefore, a third party program is required with Windows 95 and abive.

Using Windows Terminal, do the following (from the Program Man-

ager):

1. Connect the CDU’s port 2 RS-232 port to the PC’s communications port (Refer to the Installation & Service Manual).

2. On the CDU press the CFG key until CFG1 screen is displayed.

3. Scroll down the menu to WPL Input.

4. Press the E key.

5. Set the Transducer Connected to Yes.

6. Set the Data Input Port No. to 2.

7. Press the E key.

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8. On the computer, double click on the Accessories icon.

9. Double click on the Terminal icon.

10. Click on the Settings menu.

11. Double click on the Communications menu item and make the following settings:

4800 baud

8 data bits

1 stop bit

Parity - none

Flow Control - none

Connector - Com1 (or Com2, depending where the external interface is)

Parity Check - blank

Carrier Detect - blank

OK

12. Click on the Transfers menu.

13. Double click on the Send Text File menu item and make the following settings:

[select the correct file name.txt]

[select the correct location (folder) for the file] check the Append LF box

OK

14. When all the waypoint sentences are sent, press the WPT key and scroll through the list to ensure all the waypoints transferred properly.

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Mark or Event

This function key stores your present position, date and time at the next available waypoint location in the Waypoint Bank. A window pops up on the screen to confirm your key depression, and to tell you where the Mark position is being stored. You can go into the WPT menu and edit the coordinates or description later. This key function is disabled for 2 seconds after each depression.

The cross-hair (

⊕) symbol to the left of the date in the Waypoint Bank indicates that the Mark or Event key created this waypoint. Note that you can also select the cross-hair (

⊕) symbol from the various symbols for other waypoints when editing waypoints.

The CDU is also capable of performing this function from a remote contact closure input via the Cable B “MOB/Event” wire. Refer to the

Installation &Service Manual for interface instructions. Contact closure on the two input pins for less than 2 seconds causes a Mark position to be generated. Contact closure on the two input pins for longer than 2 seconds causes a Man Over Board condition to be generated.

Note: The marker stores the position of the antenna location. Keep this in mind if you are trying to pinpoint items such as buoys, crab pots, etc. For some special applications such as these, you may need to locate the antenna at the point on the boat or ship where you need to make this exact measurement.

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GOTO

Using the GOTO function key is the fastest way to create a single leg route. This method will cause the existing active route to be erased and overwritten with the new position you define.

1. From any screen press the GOTO key.

2. Press the E key.

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3. Select the waypoint determination method you want:

Waypoint Number - allows you to choose a waypoint stored in the

Waypoint Bank, where you enter the waypoint number.

Choose in Bank - as used in the Route function (refer to Route -

Choose In Bank section of the manual), allows you to view waypoints in the Waypoint Bank as a list.

Lat. Lon., UTM- allows you to define a coordinate and description, which is also stored at the next available waypoint location in the Waypoint Bank.

Bearing Range - allows you to define a coordinate by specifying the bearing and range from your present position, which is also stored at the next available waypoint location in the Waypoint

Bank.

If you make a mistake, you can use the cursor key to position the cursor over the mistake and overwrite the error.

Use the DGPS key or cursor key to insert a space in the description, if needed.

Use the CFG key to select a special character, if needed.

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4. To activate the GOTO waypoint, press the E key. A warning is briefly displayed indicating that the active route will be replaced with the GOTO route.

If you decide you don’t want to continue with this function, press the Escape softkey, then select another function key (e.g.

NAV) and your original route will have been left intact.

Press the RTE function key. You will see two waypoints defined in the center of the screen.

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Waypoint 0, the first waypoint, is your Point of Departure, or the position you were at when you created the route. The CDU saves and displays the original coordinates, date and time when you created the route in Waypoint 0.

Waypoint 0 is displayed in Inverse Video, that is, white characters on a black background (when in the normal Daylight display mode; see

CFG Lighting). This indicates that you have already passed this coordinate. The time stamp at the lower portion of the description window, indicates when the route was created.

To the right of the coordinate window of Waypoint 0 is a bent arrow.

The bend in the arrow is adjacent to the range and bearing between the waypoint you just passed and the waypoint you are approaching.

Keep in mind that these are the fixed calculated values between these two coordinates and not the real time changing values that you will

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see in the navigate screens between your present position and your next waypoint during normal navigation.

Below Waypoint 0 is the waypoint you defined in the GOTO function.

Notice that this information is in standard video, black characters on a white background, and that an ETA time is displayed in the same position as the waypoint passed time in Waypoint 0. This indicates that the waypoint has not been passed yet. Remember that the ETA time is filtered over time, so allow a few minutes for the filter to settle when you first get underway or make course and speed changes.

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Plot

Plot

There are two PLOT screens available in the basic MX420 navigator models. The RTE1 and WPT functions are highly interactive with the

PLOT screens. The primary difference between the PLOT1 and PLOT2 screens is the point of reference. The PLOT1 screen displays graphic information around the boat at your present position. The boat always remains in the center of the screen. The PLOT2 screen displays graphic information around a marker. The marker always remains in the center of this screen. If you define some of your navigation markers in the

Waypoint Bank with a symbol in the first character position, the navigation symbol will show up in relation to your planned course on the plot screen, just as it does in the NAV1 Panorama screen. In addition to the graphic details provided by the CDU, the Plot screens provide basic navigation information, zoom-in/out capability and scaling factors for the display from around 10 to 20 meters, depending on your latitude, out to 128 nautical miles. You will find these screens very helpful in many ways, and we will provide you with a couple of ideas on how to make good use of the PLOT function after the screen description which follows.

For MX420/AIS models, a third plot screen PLOT3 is available which shows the locations of other AIS equipped vessels relative to your ships position. Additional softkeys can be brought up by pressing the E key. More detailed information about the PLOT3 screen is available in Appendix-A page 154 of this manual.

Note: The Plot screens do not show your route and cross-track error lines when in Great Circle Navigation mode.

The following CFG menus directly impact the PLOT functions:

¾ Navigation - sets a variety of important functions and alarms.

Ö Rhumb Line or Great Circle navigation

Ö Range units: nautical miles, nautical miles and meters (when under 1,000 meters), nautical miles and feet (when under 1,000 feet), statute miles, statute miles and meters (when under 1,000 meters), statute miles and feet (when under 1,000 feet), kilometers, or kilometers and meters (when under 1,000 meters)

Ö Waypoint Pass Criterion and distance

Ö Waypoint Approach distance

Ö Autopilot alarm control

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Ö Cross-track error limits

¾ COG / SOG Filter Settings.

Take a quick look at both screens. They both have a graphical area to the right, and a text data area to the left.

The bottom left softkey is the Zoom-In softkey; the second softkey from the left is the Zoom-Out softkey. These two softkeys are active

without pressing the E key. Each time you depress one of these softkeys, you scale by one-half or by double the graphical area. If you look to the top of the screen, just right of the page number (PLOT 1 or

PLOT 2), you will see a number in a white square. This is the scale of the graphic window based on the units selected in CFG1 Navigation.

Now look along the left and right edge of the graphic window, you will see some vertical black and white dash marks (these are harder to see at small scales like 1 and 2 or at large values such as 64 or 128). Each solid dash mark represents 1 nautical mile. A broken dash mark indicates 1/100th of a nautical mile when you are zoomed in at low scale.

You will find your bearing and range to the next waypoint (PLOT1) or marker position (PLOT2) just below the page number. The PLOT2 screen also provides the marker coordinates and the datum currently in use (set in CFG1 Datum).

The CFG1 Navigation menu allows you to display fractions of the major unit (nautical miles, statute miles, or kilometers) ranges less than

1000 in alternate units of feet or meters.

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PLOT 1 - Relative to Boat

The information in PLOT1 is always relative to your present position.

The boat always remains in the center of the screen and the bearing and range are always from your present position to the next waypoint identified in RTE1.

Modifying the Active Route Using the Plot Screen

Press the E key to modify the screen to your needs.

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You will notice that a magnifying glass icon appears in the middle of the screen. This icon is used to identify waypoints and symbols which appear on the plot screen. Use the cursor key to move the magnifying glass around. Zooming out allows you to move the magnifying glass over long distances at a faster rate. When the icon is on a symbol, it identifies the symbol in the text area under the description of Watch-

ing:. This information includes the Waypoint Bank storage location

(WPT 25), the waypoint description that you gave it, the waypoint

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coordinates and datum in which it is stored, and your present bearing and range to this location (as opposed to the waypoint you are traveling towards in your active route).

If you want to alter your present course, you can do it very quickly from here.

1. Move the magnifying glass to the new waypoint you want to go to.

2. Press the GOTO function key.

3. Press the E key. You are done!

What the above routine actually does is insert two new waypoints into your active route. Let’s say that you have an active route with 7 waypoints (21 through 27) in it. Some time after you pass the first 4 waypoints (WPT 24), you decide that you want to alter your course to a waypoint in the Waypoint Bank, but you can’t recall the waypoint number. So you go into the PLOT1 screen, locate WPT 35 with the magnifying glass and press the GOTO function key. At this point, the active route (RTE1) is modified by placing a new waypoint, your present position (i.e. WPT 1996), after WPT 24. This new waypoint is shown in inverse video, indicating that you have already passed the position.

This is good for you because you can indicate in your logs later on when and where you altered your course by the time stamp and coordinates in WPT 1996. Next, you will see WPT 35 in normal video, followed by waypoints 25, 26, and 27.

RTE1 Was:

WPT 21

WPT 22

WPT 23

WPT 24

WPT25

WPT 26

WPT 27

Waypoints Added

By GOTO Function:

WPT 1996

WPT 35

RTE1 Is

Changed To

WPT 21

WPT 22

WPT 23

WPT 24

WPT 1996

WPT 35

WPT 25

WPT 26

WPT 27

Customizing the Display

There are a number of display options available, press the E key to modify the screen to your needs.

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Press the Display Options softkey.

The following choices are available:

¾ Show Boat - Yes is the default condition, which places the boat icon in the middle of the screen. No places the boat in a Compass

Rose in the upper right corner of the screen (see the diagram below), where your direction is indicated by the boat in the Compass

Rose. The boat’s position is then indicated by an X in the center of the screen.

¾ Show All Waypoints - Yes is the default condition, which displays all waypoints, where the first character of the description is a symbol, in its proper location relative to the boat’s position. No causes none of the waypoints to be displayed.

¾ Show Active Route - Yes is the default condition, which causes the active route (course lines) and its waypoint symbols to be displayed. No causes the course lines not to be displayed. Note that these lines can only be displayed in Rhumb Line navigation mode

(see CFG1 Navigation).

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¾ Show Recorded Track - Yes is the default condition, which causes the course you have already traveled to be displayed. No causes the traveled course not to be displayed.

¾ Show Off Track Limit - Yes is the default condition, which causes the active route cross-track error lines to be displayed. These are

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only displayed for the leg of the course you are presently on. If you reset your cross-track error, these lines are redrawn to reflect the course change (see NAV2). No causes the cross-track error lines not to be displayed. Note that these lines can only be displayed in

Rhumb Line navigation mode (see CFG1 Navigation).

¾ Show Lat/Lon Grid - No is the default condition, which causes the coordinate grid not to be displayed. Yes causes the Lat/Lon grid to be displayed (regardless of positioning reference system selection in CFG1 Position). Note that the grid is only displayed at the 4 Nm scale or lower.

¾ Automatic Zoom - No is the default condition, which causes the displayed scale to be controlled by you. Yes causes the boat icon to be placed along one edge of the screen and the next waypoint flag to be placed along the opposite edge of the screen. As you approach your waypoint, the screen will automatically zoom in on your course, then expand back out after you pass the waypoint and start the next leg of your course.

If you press the Return softkey, then the Track Plotter softkey, you will access the recorded track options.

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Selecting Erase Track allows you to clear your recorded track. You can keep a portion, say the last mile or two, of your recorded track if you like, by specifying the range after you press the Erase Track softkey.

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Press Erase Now to confirm your action. Press Escape to return the previous screen without erasing or E to abort this process.

Selecting Record Track allows you to define how your course is saved.

Choosing not to save your track may free the processor up to run other functions a little bit faster; however, you are not likely to notice any difference in performance unless the four data ports are near their full throughput capacity. You also have three different levels of track saving capability: Normal, Fine, and Detailed. The software saves each calculated position coordinate to draw the lines for the plot screen.

There are a finite number of plot points which can saved in memory, before the CDU begins overwriting the first set of plot points. If you are traveling a long distance at a high rate of speed (say over 10 knots) you probably will want to use the Normal selection, which only stores a plot point when your direction changes. If you are doing some tight maneuvering or station keeping tasks, you will probably want to use the Detailed selection, which stores a position every 0.5 meters. The

Fine selection stores a plot point every 7 meters.

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Operator’s Manual

The PLOT2 functions are the same as the PLOT1. Refer to the previous section for customizing the display. One added feature to the

PLOT2 screen is the ability to place the marker at any coordinate that you want and have the CDU automatically calculate a bearing and distance to the marker.

If you want to relocate the marker, press E to enter the edit mode, then press the Move Marker softkey. You can move the marker by: defining a coordinate (see the flashing cursor over the coordinates in the upper left window), moving the magnifying glass using the cursor keys and pressing the To softkey, or by pressing the Too softkey, which moves the cursor to the boat’s present position. If you choose to use the magnifying glass method, make sure you move this icon before you select the Move Marker softkey. After you press the Move Marker softkey, pressing on the cursor keys only allows you to move within the coordinate fields.

PLOT3 - AIS Plotter Display

This plot screen is available only in MX420/AIS and MKD CDUs. It is accessed by pressing the PLOT key the third time. It displays a graphic picture of the area surrounding your vessel. In this display any AIS equipped vessel that is within the range will be shown. A maximum of

20 AIS targets will be displayed in the plot 3 screen.

More PLOT 3 screen details are available in Appendix A.

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Plot Screen Use Examples

Plot

Station Keeping

There may be a time when you want to maintain your position at a given location in open water. Some applications for this need may be:

¾ Staying over a dive wreck.

¾ Staying over a fishing hole.

¾ Recovering an oceanographic survey point.

You can easily accomplish this task by two methods: by placing the marker in PLOT2 on the location you want to maintain and by referring to the bearing and range in PLOT2 to maintain the position. If you are placing and recovering crab pots along a course line, you can enter your course in the RTE1 screen, then place the marker at each crab pot in turn.

You can also select WPT Pass Criterion: Distance to WPT in the CFG1

Navigation screen and set the WPT Pass Distance: 0.00; or set the

WPT Pass Criterion to Manual.

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By doing this and putting the coordinate you want to maintain in the

RTE1 screen, you will always get the bearing and distance to the waypoint in the PLOT1 and NAV screens, regardless of your angle of

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approach. Note for the plot example above, we turned off the crosstrack error lines, the active route, and track saving to keep the screen from getting cluttered while drifting.

Grid Search

If you are attempting to search a given area, you can use the PLOT2 screen to define a known coordinate in your search pattern, then use both the PLOT1 and PLOT2 screens to view your progress and help maintain your proper separation. You can also use the RTE1 screen’s

Insert New WPT feature in conjunction with the CFG1 Navigation,

WPT Pass Criterion: Distance to WPT (set the WPT Pass Distance: to the smallest acceptable value) to create the search pattern you want to follow. In the RTE1 screen, press Insert New WPT to define the coordinates of the first waypoint. Then use the Insert New WPT softkey to define subsequent range and bearing coordinates from your original position. This technique allows you to quickly define your search pattern, control the pattern separation, and view your progress along the way. The CDU will prompt you to turn at the predetermined waypoints you defined. This allows you to pay more attention to the task at hand, rather than having to keep a close eye on the GPS receiver.

Man Over Board

The Man Over Board function key is located at the bottom right hand corner of the CDU. When depressed for a few seconds, it activates a number of automatic functions described below. You can also active it by pressing E and selecting the Activate MOB softkey.

Most obviously, it brings up an MOB1 (Plot) screen. This is an automatic scaling screen. The screen centers on half the distance between your present position and the MOB position. In addition, the MOB position is displayed in the upper left corner, so that you can quickly read the coordinates to others who may be available to render assistance. This plot screen also provides the vital bearing and distance back to the MOB position, as well as your present course over ground.

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The MOB position, date and time are stored in the next vacant waypoint memory of the Waypoint Bank for future reference (e.g. log book entries). An MOB symbol is used to denote an MOB waypoint.

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Note: The range and bearing in the PLOT, NAV, and MOB screens all reflect your bearing and range back to the MOB position, not the active route, until the MOB is canceled.

NMEA 0183 sentences (i.e. BWC and BWR) and the printer output are changed to reflect the current crisis situation by also indicating the bearing and range back to the MOB position (until the MOB is canceled). This way, other interfaced equipment can also help guide you back to the MOB position. When the MOB condition is canceled, the

NMEA sentences will automatically revert to the active route information. Don’t forget to cancel the MOB so your interfaced equipment

will read the correct data!

The MOB function key and remote MOB input are disabled from subsequent activation until Cancel MOB is selected.

Other functions such as Position and Navigate can still be accessed; however, the screen will revert to the MOB Plot screen after 30 seconds.

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To cancel an MOB condition, make sure you are in the MOB Plot screen. Press the E key, then select the Cancel MOB softkey. Press E again to exit the edit mode.

Remote MOB

The MX420/8 is capable of performing the MOB function from a remote contact closure input via Cable B “MOB/Event” wire shared with the Mark input. If the contact closure is made for less than 2 seconds, the input is registered as a Mark Position. If the contact closure is made for more than 2 seconds, the input is registered as a MOB Position. Refer to the Installation & Service manual for wiring interface instructions.

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Tide

Tide

There are two TIDE screens. The TIDE1 screen displays graphic and digital information about the tide conditions at your present position.

This is based on tide table constants that you must enter in the TIDE2 screen, then access through the TIDE1 screen. You can store up to 100 tide tables in TIDE2.

The following CFG1 menus directly impact the TIDE functions:

¾ Depth - sets the measurement units in meters, feet, or fathoms.

Note: The Tide function is not active in the MX420/AIS Basic model without the MX421 antenna.

TIDE1 - Current Tide Display

This screen provides the current tide conditions for the tide constants indicated in the upper left hand corner. The number in the upper left corner of the window is the identification number of this table in the

British Admiralty Tide Table and in the TIDE2 screen. The name to the right of this number is the port name you entered in the TIDE2 screen.

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A graphical representation of the tide is given in the middle of the screen. The tide peak references are given to the right of the High/Low time on the right of the screen. High/Low tide times are given to the right of the graph. The marker time (indicated by the clock icon or + sign in the graphic area) and tide condition are given below the High/

Low tide information.

The tide marker automatically updates to the current time. When the tide marker is in the automatic mode, the cross-hair indicator is enclosed with a circle (like a clock). You can move the marker forward or backward in time using the softkeys at the bottom of the screen. Return the marker to the present time by simply pressing the Marker to

Now softkey. When you move the tide marker off of the present time,

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the marker changes to a + sign. The marker will remain at the manually positioned mark until you either press one of the manual marker control softkeys, or until you press the Marker to Now softkey - which returns the marker to automatic mode (indicated by the clock marker).

The tide measurement units can be displayed in meters, feet, or fathoms. Tide units are controlled along with depth units in the CFG1

Depth screen.

To select another port’s tide table, press the E function key, and use the Change softkey to scroll down the list or the Go Back softkey to scroll up the list. You can also use the left and right cursor keys to scroll through the tide tables available in TIDE2.

While in the edit mode, you can also move the cursor down to the date and manually change it to any date you are interested in.

Once you have found the table you need, press the E key again to load the table.

TIDE2 - Tide Table Port List

TIDE2 is where you store the constants for the port tide tables you are interested in. You can store up to 100 tide tables. The constants you need can be derived from Part III of:

Admiralty Tide Tables and Tidal Stream Tables

Published by the Hydrographer of the Navy,

United Kingdom

Hydrographic Office

Tauton, Somerset TA1 2DN

United Kingdom

+44-1823-337-900

+44-1823-323-753 Fax

46274 Telex

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This is a three volume set of tide tables, divided as follows:

Tide

84

Volume 1

Volume 2

Volume 3

Volume 3

6322-01A.600

The display provides the required tide table document name and section (Admiralty Tide Tables, Part III) under the Help softkey when in the edit mode as an added aid to help you identify the proper reference material.

The Admiralty Tide Tables port lists are also available, free of charge.

Contact your dealer or us at the address, fax, e-mail, or phone number provided at the back of this manual if you have not received a copy of these tide table lists.

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Adding a Port

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To add a port to the list, first locate it in Part III of the tide table book, then align the cursor with Add port to the Port List and press E. The

Zone in the upper left corner refers to the time zone offset to UTC. Use the name given in the tide table for the name given in the Place portion of the screen. To help you locate this port in the printed volume later, use the table number given in the first column of the manual as the tide number in the CDU.

Then simply follow along the table in the manual and enter the appropriate offsets. The software is setup just like the manual. You may encounter a table that requires seasonal offsets. Where these might apply, the CDU provides you the opportunity to input a Fixed value or the seasonal Table values. Select the first softkey to toggle between these two selections. Use the second softkey, Edit Table, to make the necessary corrections. Press the Done softkey when you finish the seasonal table, otherwise press the E key when the necessary data is entered.

You can scroll through the entered tables with the up and down cursor keys when you are not in the edit mode. You also have the option to modify or delete a port from the list.

Tide table information is mapped to an area of RAM which is saved during future software upgrades.

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Auxiliary

There are seven Auxiliary screens described in this section:

AUX1 - Alarm Log

AUX2 - Speed Graph

AUX3 - Not Used

AUX4 - Sun Almanac

AUX5 - Moon Phases

AUX6 - Batteries

AUX7 - Unit Information

AUX1 - Alarm Log

All alarms are registered in this screen, whether or not they have been corrected, until the log is erased or the log is full. When the log is full, the oldest alarms are overwritten. Alarms with an asterisk (*) next to the alarm number have not been corrected and can not be reset until they are corrected.

Reset Log clears the alarm log entries, except for any alarm conditions which have not been corrected and any alarms which have occurred since the uncorrected alarm.

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AUX2 - Speed Graph

The graph scales automatically to the speed you are at. You can zoom out to the last 56 minutes or in to the last 3.5 minutes. It is a handy tool if you are trying to maintain a certain speed.

AUX3 - Not Used

AUX4 - Sun Almanac

This almanac provides the sunrise and sunset times for a given day and location. You can enter another date or location of interest by pressing the E key, and editing the appropriate date and/or place.

Note: The AUX 4 function is not active in the MX420/AIS Basic model without the MX421 antenna.

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AUX5 - Moon Phases

Auxiliary

There are no edit functions available here. Moon phases are given in approximately one week increments and include all dates for new, half, and full moon. You change the year displayed by pressing the up or down cursor keys.

Note: The AUX 5 function is not active in the MX420/AIS Basic model without the MX421 antenna.

AUX6 - Batteries

The supply voltage indicates the approximate power being applied to the CDU. This screen is intended to give you a rough indication of the supply voltage. It is not a digital voltmeter and can be off by 0.5 VDC or more. Use it like you would a car battery indicator. The voltage should remain constant when the generators are on, and drop off slowly when running on the boat’s batteries. This is also where you reset the

Lithium battery age. Press the E key and select the Reset Age softkey after you replace the Lithium battery. Refer to the Installation & Ser-

vice Manual for instructions on replacing the memory backup battery.

This battery has a normal life of about 2 years.

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AUX7 -Unit Information

This screen indicates the specific CDU model, software version number, the hardware configuration, and the printed circuit board (PCB) serial number of your CDU. If you are having problems with your

CDU, refer to this screen for information to provide to customer service personnel.

A special softkey sequence displays sub version levels, the actual software build date and time, and allows access to a selftest sequence.

This information is useful to the technician and our Field Engineers during troubleshooting. To activate the screen, press the left most softkey three (3) times. Additional information in the Software window will be displayed.

MX420/2 AUX7 Screens

This also activates several engineering screens (the same as turning

Engineering Display to Yes in CFG1 Operation). Refer to Appendix C

- Engineering Mode for more details.

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Position

There are three POS screens in the CDU. The POS functions are highly interactive with a number of CFG1 menu selections.

The following CFG1 menus directly impact the POS functions:

¾ COG SOG - sets the filtering time for the displayed values.

¾ Datum - sets the reference datum for your present position.

¾ DGPS - sets the internal or external control for RTCM SC-104 corrections which affect your position accuracy.

¾ GPS - sets an offset for calculating the GPS antenna position if you can’t physically locate the antenna exactly where you want it (i.e.

over the centerline of the boat); sets the minimum elevation angle to look for satellites; and in 6 channel models, it also controls the satellite selection process.

¾ Navigation - sets a variety of important functions and alarms (used in other function screens), but only the Range units: nautical miles (Nm) nautical miles and meters (Nm/mtrs) nautical miles and feet (Nm/ft) statute miles (Sm) statute miles and meters (Sm/mtrs) statute miles and feet (Sm/ft) kilometers (Km), or kilometers and meters (Km/mtrs), affect the POS screens.

¾ Position - sets Lat/Lon or UTM, Grid (optional) and some alarm limits.

¾ Time - sets appropriate offsets, and 12 or 24 hour clock mode.

POS1 - Position Display (Large)

This single window display provides the largest presentation of the coordinate information from the CDU. In addition to the coordinates and datum in use, this screen displays the current course and speed

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over ground. There are no edit functions available in this screen unless it is in Demonstration mode. Refer to Appendix E - Demonstra-

tion Mode for a full description of this feature.

Latitude & Longitude

UTM

When using the UTM reference system in the polar regions of the

Earth, the CDU displays position using the UPS coordinate system instead of invalid UTM coordinates.

User GRID

User defined grids is an optional feature of the MX420. When enabled you can set the receiver to provide Easting and Northing position data based on a local grid. The grid function is set up in the CFG1 Position screen.

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POS2 - Position, Altitude, Magnetic Variation, & Time

This screen is divided into three windows. The upper left window provides your position coordinates, the antenna altitude (above Mean

Sea Level - MSL), altitude mode (2D or 3D), the magnetic variation

(Variation) for your present position, and the present datum in use for calculating your position.

The lower left window displays your course and speed over ground. If the degree symbol has a small ‘c’ under it, this indicates that the magnetic variation and compass deviation table are being calculated and displayed. Refer to the CFG1 Compass section for more details on how to set this up.

The right hand window indicates today’s date and time. This setup is in the CFG1 Time menu. It can be set for UTC time, local 12 hour time, or local 24 hour time. There is an added summer/winter feature to help you remember which direction to set the clock for day light savings in the summer.

There are no editing capabilities in this screen.

POS3 - Position & Log

This screen is divided into three windows. The upper left window is the same as POS2 and provides: your position coordinates, the antenna altitude (above Mean Sea Level - MSL), altitude mode (2D or

3D), the magnetic variation (Variation) for your present position, and the present datum in use for calculating your position.

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The lower left window is also the same as POS2 and displays your course and speed over ground. If the degree symbol has a small c under it, this indicates that the magnetic variation and compass deviation table are being calculated and displayed. Refer to the CFG Com-

pass section for more details on how to set this up.

The right hand window indicates your accumulated mileage since the

CDU was first turned on.

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You will also find two Trip Reset softkeys if you press the E key. Two trip logs are provided so that you can log the mileage for: a) the current leg or day of your trip; and b) the entire trip.

You will also find a flashing cursor on the second line in the Trip Log.

This is provided so that you can label what type of mileage you are logging. Edit this field the same way you would any of the description fields for the waypoints.

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GPS

Several GPS and DGPS screens are available under the GPS function key. The GPS/DGPS functions are highly interactive with these CFG1 menu selections:

¾ GPS - sets the lowest elevation at which a satellite will be tracked.

¾ DGPS - sets the internal beacon receiver to Auto, DGPS only, or

Off.

GPS1 - GPS Status Screen

There are two windows in this display. The left window has twelve graphic Power Bars representing the twelve GPS receiver channels of the MX421 antenna. The PRN (Pseudorandom Number) under each power bar represents the satellite ID number assigned or being tracked on that channel. The power bars indicate the valid receiver power range from 30 to 50. Any portion of the power bar which is filled in, indicates that a satellite is being tracked on that channel. If a power bar is empty, but a PRN number is labeled under the power bar, then the identified satellite is not currently being tracked.

The graphic on the right hand side of the screen indicates where the satellites are relative to your present position. The outer ring represents 0° elevation. The inner ring represents 45° elevation. The + sign represents 90° elevation and your present position. Under normal conditions, the best satellites to track are usually between 15 and 75 degrees in elevation.

GPS 2 through GPS 5 screens are skipped under normal operation.

GPS2 - GPS Health Screen

There are two windows in this display, the top window is a table indicating which satellites are reported Healthy or Unhealthy by the satellite almanac. The PRN (Pseudorandom Number) ID table is divided into columns and rows. The rows represent the 10’s digit of the ID

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number and the columns represent the 1’s digit of the ID number. The satellite system consists of up to 32 ID numbers. The ID numbers are called PseudoRandom Numbers.

To find a particular satellite ID, for example PRN 24, go down the left hand column and locate the 10’s digit (2- in this case). Then go across the row until you intersect with the appropriate 1’s digit (in this case 4).

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The bottom window provides some basic satellite tracking performance information. The HDOP and VDOP values indicate the current Horizontal or Vertical Dilution Of Precision.

The Used Sats value indicates the number of satellites used in the navigation filter to calculate your position

The Elevation Mask sets the lowest elevation at which a satellite will be tracked. Satellites with an elevation below this number will not be tracked, even if they are otherwise available to track.

Unhealthy Satellites

Satellites are expected to fail at some point in time and they may cause the position calculation to become erroneous. With RAIM enabled units, you will be able to determine which satellite PRN number is causing the position error. The operator can then decide to manually force the offending satellite to “unhealthy”. A satellite that is marked as unhealthy will not be used for position calculation.

To mark a satellite as unhealthy, do the following;

1. Press the E key.

2. Move the cursor to the PRN number using the cursor keys.

3. Press the “Force Unhealthy” softkey. The “H” mark for healthy will become “-” for unhealty.

4. Press the E key to exit.

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GPS5 - RAIM Status Screen (for RAIM Enabled Models Only)

RAIM (Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring) is an optional feature that can be enabled in the MX420 CDU. The RAIM feature is mandatory for IMO compliant vessels. It alerts the operator that a condition may exists in the GPS positioning solution that reduces the desired accuracy of the ship’s position. This feature requires at least five or more GPS satellites to operate properly, four satellites or less are considered to be a caution or unsafe RAIM condition. If the statistical

RAIM error exceeds a selected limit (100 meters default) a “RAIM

Unsafe” or “RAIM Caution” alarm will be indicated in the MX CDU.

This means that the RAIM estimated position error is equal or greater than the preset limit. The operator is advised to take extra precautionary measures when using the navigation solution until the RAIM indicator switches to “RAIM safe” condition. When less than 5 satellites are receivable a “RAIM Caution” will be indicated.

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The GPS5 screen shows the position Lat/Long, height of antenna,

HDOP, number of satellites used, the satellite ID number that may cause the statistical error and its bias value. It also shows a table containing the PRN numbers of satellites in use, their residual errors and elevations. Below it is the RAIM Status indicator and time. The

RAIM icon is shown on the top-right corner of the display.

Position errors may be caused by unhealthy satellites, incorrect pseudoranges, poor DGPS corrections and excessive atmospheric interference. When the RAIM caution or RAIM unsafe alarm is on, the

GPS/DGPS accuracy may be degraded but still usable when navigating in open waters.

When the RAIM option is enabled an icon is posted on the top right corner of all screens.

- means RAIM safe condition

- means RAIM Unsafe condition, position errors exceeded the range limit specified under the CFG/GPS/Accuracy Rng.

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- RAIM Caution. Not enough satellites are available for proper

RAIM calculation.

The GPS5 RAIM screen works interactively with the GPS/RAIM menu under the CFG key.

Use the procedure below to activate the RAIM feature;

1. Press the CFG key.

2. Scroll down to the GPS menu.

3. Press the E key to bring up the cursor.

4. Scroll down to “RAIM: .....No”

5. Press the Change softkey to switch it to “Yes”.

6. Scroll down to “Accuracy Rng 10-100m: 100” to change the range.

Otherwise you may skip this step. 100 meters is the default value.

Note: The GPS5 RAIM Status screen is available in MX420 models with program version 2.0 and using the MX521 or MX525 antenna sensors.

Warning:

THE MX420 AND RAIM FEATURE IS AN AID TO NAVIGATION ONLY. UN-

DER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD IT BE USED IN LIEU OF AUTHO-

RIZED GOVERNMENT CHARTS. ITS ACCURACY CAN BE AFFECTED BY

MANY FACTORS SUCH AS EQUIPMENT DEFECTS, ENVIRONMENTAL

CONDITIONS, OR IMPROPER OPERATION. THE USER IS RESPONSIBLE

FOR SAFE NAVIGATION OF THE VESSEL. THIS INCLUDES CONSULT-

ING AUTHORIZED GOVERNMENT CHARTS AND EXERCISING COMMON

PRUDENCE AND NAVIGATIONAL JUDGEMENT AT ALL TIMES.

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GPS6 - DGPS STATUS

There are several windows in this display, the left hand windows are divided into control and configuration windows. The right hand window displays all the corrections that are being received. Shown below are two GPS6 screens, the left showing the MX420/2 DGPS status screen while the right showing the MX420/8 screen. Note the slight difference in the amount of information available between the two models.

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MX420/2 GPS6 Screen MX420/8 GPS6 Screen

Status will tell you whether the correction data is being decoded is error free or not. Normally, Status will indicate either DGPS mode Off,

DGPS OK, Tracking or Searching (Automatic search mode) or No

Lock (Manual tuning mode). DGPS OK indicates that RTCM SC-104

DGPS corrections are being received without errors within the Age

Limit set in CFG1 DGPS. These information originates from the MX421B beacon receiver. Searching indicates that the beacon receiver is searching for the appropriate frequency and/or modulation of the beacon transmitter in automatic search mode. No lock indicates that the beacon receiver is not receiving DGPS corrections from the selected station in manual tuning mode. You might see the label Tracking, which indicates that a MSK beacon signal is present but DGPS corrections are not being received. This is usually caused by high noise on the beacon receiver or external device.

If you press the E key, you can select between Automatic beacon search mode, Manual beacon tuning mode, or Off. When the receiver is in the Manual tuning mode, you can use the cursor key to scroll down into the large window below Station Selection and edit the

Reference Station name. The name you enter will always be associated with the frequency to which you programmed the receiver. If you move to another region that uses a frequency and name you previously entered, the receiver will display the previously entered name.

You can enter a new name for any manually tuned frequency at any time.

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Use the cursor key to move down the screen again and program the frequency you desire. The receiver will automatically update the Sta-

tion ID. If the beacon station is transmitting its location, the receiver will calculate the distance between the reference station and the receiver, otherwise this will be blank. You can usually find current beacon status, location, and operating information from the governing country’s Coast Guard or Maritime Safety Administration. You will find a list of known beacon stations in Appendix C - Beacon List at the end of this manual. This list may be incomplete at your location, in which case we encourage you to contact the appropriate governing agency.

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When you are in manual tuning mode, pressing the E key will bring up the cursor on the Frequency. You can only complete the manual tuning operation by pressing the E key when the Frequency is highlighted.

Program the frequency you desire and press the E key. The CDU will automatically update the Station ID. If the beacon is transmitting its location, the CDU will calculate the distance between the reference station and the receiver.

You can usually find the current beacon status, location and operating information from the governing country’s Coast Guard or Maritime

Safety Administration. You will find a list of known beacon stations in

Appendix C - Beacon List at the end of this manual. This list may be incomplete, in which case we encourage you to contact the appropriate governing agency.

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Once you have entered the data for several beacon stations, you can cycle between these stations by pressing the Next Station or Previ-

ous Station softkeys. These softkeys are only displayed if you have entered a name for the reference station.

The window on the right side of the display indicates which satellite

ID’s are receiving corrections. When the PRN number is shown in inverse video, this indicates that the receiver is using the correction in the navigation solution. The Corr value is the actual satellite range measurement correction, given in meters. This value is typically between -20 and +20. The Age value indicates how long it has been since the satellite range correction was generated, given in seconds.

GPS7 - DGPS Messages

This screen will display the Type 16 messages received from the beacon station being used. These messages may contain information regarding operational problems and status or any scheduled equipment maintenance of beacon stations operating within the general area.

Note: The GPS screen is not active in the MX420/AIS model without the

MX421 antenna.

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Configuration

Operator’s Manual

The CFG screen includes setup and control of all of the receiver’s primary functions. There are more than 20 separate configuration items in this screen. The display is divided into two windows. The left hand window identifies the primary configuration items. The right hand window displays the current settings. Use the cursor key to select a configuration item of interest, then press the E key to edit the actual settings. There are some settings which can not be changed; however, these are displayed so that you have a better understanding of exactly how the receiver is configured. The Item list is arranged alphabetically based on the language chosen. This section of the manual is arranged alphabetically for English. You may choose to skip to only the items that interest you at first, then read this complete section at a later time.

No

te: The configuration list is too long to show in one page of the display. To view all of the configuration menu, scroll through to the bottom of each list with the cursor key.

AIS Config

This is an AIS setup menu used to select the type of AIS transponder.

See Appendix A for more details. Available selections are SAAB

(MX423), ATLAS (MX531) or Nauticast (MX535). This item is only available in MX420/8 models with the AIS feature option enabled.

AIS Static

This is an AIS setup menu used for configuring the vessel’s name,

MMSI #, IMO #, transponder radio settings, associated communication mode and data output selections. See Appendix A for more details.

This item is only available in MX420/8 models with the AIS feature option enabled.

AIS Voyage

This is an AIS setup menu used to setup the voyage related information such as navigational status, ship and cargo type, destination, ETA and number of passengers. See Appendix A for more details.

This item is only available in MX420/8 models with the AIS feature option enabled.

Alarms

This screen allows you to quickly see which alarms are active and inactive. The list of available alarms is interactive with the remaining screens described in this section. Therefore, changing the state of the alarm in a screen such as Anchor from Off to On will also cause the

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anchor alarm in this screen to go from Off to On. Likewise, if you turn the anchor alarm from On to Off in this screen the Anchor screen will also match this one.

Anchor - Anchor Watch Alarm

This screen allows you to setup an anchor watch alarm and maximum drift radius after you drop the anchor. The receiver will remember the drop coordinates and provide an alarm if the antenna drifts beyond the maximum distance you entered. If you are on a large commercial ship, don’t forget that the anchor may be several hundred feet from the receiver antenna. You will need to consider this when setting in the distance.

COG SOG - Course & Speed Filter Settings & Setup

This screen controls the Speed Over Ground (SOG) unit of measure

(meters per second, kilometers per hour, miles per hour, or knots). You can also set a filter time to average your speed and course over ground measurements. This helps to smooth these measurements on the display and NMEA output, a particularly useful tool for slow moving vessels. The default filter setting is 2.0 seconds.

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Compass - External Compass Input & Magnetic Variation

Table

The receiver will accept a magnetic compass input using the NMEA

0183 data record of xxHDT, xxHDG, xxHDM, xxHCC, xxHCD, xxVHW, or any of the above. “xx” refers to the Talker Identifier as specified in the

NMEA 0183 standard. The receiver will accept these data records from any talker ID, and from any version (1.5 or higher) of the NMEA 0183 standard.

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To implement this feature, change Compass Connected to Yes.

Identify the appropriate input port that the compass connects to the receiver by using the Change softkey.

Select whether or not the receiver should give an alarm if data is not received on the input port.

Select the compass type, either Magnetic or Gyro. Only the NMEA

0183 records identified above are accepted for the gyro input.

Magnetic:

Select the magnetic deviation method: either In Compass - the deviation is corrected before being sent to the receiver; or In Naviga-

tor - the deviation is corrected by editing a deviation table (Edit

Table softkey) in the receiver.

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Gyro:

Set the constant Gyro Heading Offset (or bias) if any.

Specify the input NMEA 0183 record for the Input Sentence.

HDT, HDG, HDM, HCC, HCD, VHW, or Any.

Datum - Current Position Calculation

This screen controls which datum the receiver uses to display any position. There are over 100 datums to choose from. Appendix B provides a complete list of available datums. You can enter an offset to

WGS-84 if your specific datum is not provided for in the receiver. Use the Previous or Next softkeys or the cursor key to scroll through the list until you find the datum you need. Press Escape to go back to the original datum displayed when you first pressed the E key.

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Depth - NMEA Input Control

This screen allows you to configure the depth unit (meters, feet, or fathoms) for the NAV 4 and TIDE 1 screens .

Depth information is accepted by the receiver from the NMEA 0183 data sentence DBK, DBS, DBT, or DPT on any input NMEA port. Refer to the Installation & Service Manual for hardware interface instructions.

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Press the E key and move the cursor to the Echo Sounder Connected line. Use the Change softkey to activate the input data options described below:

Depth Unit - select between meters, feet, or fathoms. This data field sets the depth unit displayed in NAV 4 and TIDE 1, regardless of whether a sensor is connected or not.

Echo Sounder Connected - causes the receiver to look for one of the appropriate NMEA 0183 data sentences when set to Yes.

Data Input Port No. - Select the appropriate NMEA 0183 port that the sensor is connected to (Ports 1& 2 for MX420/2 or Ports 1,2, 5 through 10 for MX420/8). Ports 3 and 4 are reserved for the MX421 antenna controls.

Offset - Input the appropriate offset for the sensor, based on the measurement you are most interested in. If your boat draws about the same amount of water each time you use it, you may want to put in the difference between the sensor and the waterline height. If your boat’s draught changes from one trip to another, as would be the case when the receiver is used on a freight ship, you may want to put in the difference between the sensor and the lowest point of the ship’s hull.

Shallow Alarm Active - allows you to receive an alarm if the sensor receives depth data lower than the limit you set in Alarm Limit

(below). The default setting is No.

Alarm Limit - allows you to specify at what depth you want an alarm to

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activate. This alarm limit is enabled by the Shallow Alarm Active selection of Yes.

Alarm If No Data - Allows you to receive an audible and visual alarm if

NMEA 0183 data is not being received on the data port at regular intervals (typically every few seconds). The available choices are

Yes (default) and No.

Input Sentence - Specifies the NMEA 0183 data sentence to read the depth data from. The available choices are Any (default), DPT,

DBS, DBT, or DBK sentence. It is better to specify the appropriate sentence because more than one method of reporting depth may be available on the port.

The window in the lower portion of the screen allows you to see the depth data that is received on the data port (Input:) and the data that is actually displayed in NAV 4 (Used Value:).

DGPS - DGPS Configuration

This screen controls the built in beacon receiver in the MX Marine smart antenna unit.

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DGPS Mode:

Auto - sets the receiver to automatic DGPS or GPS modes. This is the default setting. If DGPS corrections are being received and their age is less than the Max Age limit, the receiver will operate in DGPS mode (assuming you are receiving corrections for enough satellites to operate in DGPS mode). Otherwise, the receiver operates in GPS positioning mode.

The traffic light will be green when it is in DGPS mode.

When it drops to GPS mode, a DGPS symbol will be displayed

(indicating Non Differential GPS mode), and the yellow and green traffic light will be on.

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Use this mode when maximum navigation coverage is more important than accuracy. Reverting to GPS mode will degrade the overall navigation results, but it is better than no navigation results at all in most circumstances.

DGPS Only - sets the receiver to only provide DGPS position

fixes. If corrections are being received and their age is less than the Max Age limit, the receiver will operate in DGPS mode

(assuming there are enough corrections to operate in DGPS mode). Otherwise, the receiver will not provide any position fix at all.

Use this mode when accuracy is more important than maximum navigation coverage. When operating in this mode, you should also set the Max Age to 30 seconds.

Off - sets the receiver to operate in GPS mode only.

Max Age -sets the maximum time limit that the last received DGPS correction will be applied to the satellite range measure-

ment in the receiver. The default setting is 60 seconds. The receiver will accept values from 10 to 999 seconds. Due to the removal of the S/A dithering from the satellite signal, you may now use values of 300 seconds in the maximum age and still be very accurate.

Message 16 Alarm - sets the alarm to On or Off if a reference station

text message is received. The default setting is Yes. Received

Type 16 messages can be displayed on the GPS7 screen, regardless of the alarm setting.

Alarm For No Corrections - sets the alarm to on or off if DGPS correc-

tions are not received within the Max Age. The default setting is Yes. If the alarm is set to Yes, you should notice that the receiver drops out of DGPS mode and into the mode selected in

DGPS Mode described earlier in this section at the same time the alarm sounds.

Alarm on health change - Sets the alarm to On or Off if the satellite becomes unhealthy or unusable.

WAAS/EGNOS enabled - sets the source of differential correction to come from satellite based augmentation system such as US-WAAS or European-EGNOS system. Although this systems are available, they are still not considered as IMO compliant systems. Use of these differential correction sources should be done with great caution.

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DR - Dead Reckoning

DR, or Dead Reckoning, is an added navigation feature of the MX420.

When the DR setting is set to ‘Yes’ and appropriate compass/heading and speed log sensors are connected and activated, the MX420 will automatically switch to DR calculation when the GPS positioning becomes unavailable. A DR icon on the top right corner of the display indicates that the position displayed is derived from DR calculation.

To set the DR to ‘Yes’ press the E key then ‘Change’ softkey. Press the E key again to exit the edit mode.

Dual Control - Dual Station Control

This screen sets the functional control between two MX420 CDU’s interfaced together. The default setting is No. When this selection is changed to Yes, one receiver is set to Master, the other receiver is set to Slave. The master unit can be either an MX420/8 CDU or MX420/2.

These two units will share a common database and one antenna. Refer to Appendix E for more detailed information about the dual control setup and operation.

MX420 Dual Control Menu

GPS - Elevation Mask Control

This screen controls the elevation mask angle, or the angle above the

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horizon, at which the receiver will attempt to track a satellite. Satellites with an elevation below this angle will be tracked but will not be included in the position solution. You can set the elevation limit to any value up to 90°. For most marine applications, the default limit of 5° is appropriate.

The Antenna Offset allows you to virtually offset your antenna. That is, if you are forced to place the antenna in a location other than where you want your position fix calculated (due to superstructure or other high power antennas), you can place the antenna in a practical location. Then enter the appropriate Antenna Offset, and the receiver will calculate your position in the place where you would have preferred to place the antenna.

The RAIM menu is available only in MX420 models where the RAIM feature is enabled. For more detailed information about RAIM, please refer to page 96 of this manual. Standard MX420 CDU will only show the Elevation mask and Anttena offset menu items.

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Init Pos - Initial Position Entry

This screen is provided to help the GPS receiver in the MX Marine antenna to get a faster first position fix. While the smart antenna is capable of computing its position without any user input, this feature can cause a position fix to occur several minutes earlier. Another time this feature is useful is when the receiver has been moved over 300 miles from the last location it was used while in the off condition.

Again, the receiver will calculate a position fix without any user input in this circumstance. However, moving the receiver to a new location and not inputting a new initial position will cause the receiver to select a satellite constellation consistent with the last known receiver coordinates. In this event the receiver may “get lucky” and find common satellites between the old position and the new location, or it may take up to 20 minutes to go through all of the constellation possibilities.

Note that the receiver will stay on the original constellation for 15 minutes before attempting other constellation possibilities. We assume the receiver will be turned on and off in the same general area each time, and we provide the unit every opportunity to try and track satellites at the last known coordinates.

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Language - Language Configuration

The receiver supports 9 languages: English, Dutch, French, Finnish,

German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish and Danish

Press the E key. Use the cursor key to scroll down the list until you find the desired language. Press the E key again. The CFG menu list will sort the menu selections in alphabetical order based on the language selected.

Lighting - Display/Keyboard Light & Contrast Control

There are two basic display setups. The light function key allows you to instantly switch between two predefined screens (Daylight &

Nightlight).

Log - Speed Log Input (Pulse or NMEA 0183)

This screen controls the input port (NMEA-0183 or Pulse) and format of the speed log input to the receiver. In the default condition, the speed log is not connected. NMEA 0183 speed is accepted from the xxVHW data sentence originating in any of the version 1.5, 2.0 or 2.1

format where xx is a valid talker ID as specified in the NMEA 0183 standard. The receiver will also accept speed log pulse input, with pulses of up to 1.5 kHz. Refer to the Installation & Service Manual for the wiring interface instructions.

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NMEA 0183 (VHW) Input Screen

NMEA Input:

Pulse Input Screen

Data Input Port No. - Select the appropriate NMEA input port as determined by the hardware interface. Refer to the Installa-

tion & Service Manual for wiring connections.

Alarm If No Data - Causes an alarm to activate if data is not received on the port you defined within 10 seconds when Yes is selected (the default condition). To disable the alarm, select

No with the Change softkey.

Correction Factor - Allows you to make minor adjustments to observed or measured errors in your speed through water calculation. The input value will be multiplied by this value before it is used in the receiver. The default value is 1.00.

Digital Pulse Input:

Digital Pulse Input Port No. - Select between Digital Input Port 1, or Digital Input Port 2. A single pulse input which is calibrated for log pulse rate and the receiver will automatically make the necessary calculations.

Digital Input Port 1 is pin 3 (black/white) of Cable B connector and Pulse Input Port 2 in pin 2 (black) of Cable B. Both ports share pin 1 (shield-GND or power ground) as a common ground. These input ports are different from the NMEA-0183

Input Ports 1 and 2.

Pulses Pr. Nm - This is the calibrated pulses per speed unit value that you must get from the speed log manufacturer.

Alarm If No Data - Causes an alarm to activate if data is not received on the port you defined when Yes is selected (the default condition). To disable the alarm, select No with the Change softkey.

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Correction Factor - Allows you to make minor adjustments to observed or measured errors in your speed through water calculation. The input value will be multiplied by this value before it is used in the receiver. The default value is 1.00.

Both input types have a window in the lower portion of the display which indicates the input value in real time. If you input a calibrated pulse rate, you can check for the appropriate speed right here.

You will be able to view the speed log information in the NAV4 screen when it is implemented in future software.

Log Pulses - GPS SOG Log Pulse Output

This screen controls the output port (Pulse) of the speed over ground log output from the MX420 CDU at a user-defined pulse rate per nautical mile. This output is normally used to feed GPS SOG to an ARPA radar. The default state is that the speed log is not active, and set to

200 pulses per nautical mile. Refer to the MX 420 Installation & Ser-

vice Manual for the hardware interface from one of the NMEA output ports (NMEA 1 or 2 for the MX420/2 and NMEA 1, 2 or 5 through 10 for the MX420/8 models)

Activate the output by selecting Yes to Emulation Enable, select the appropriate hardware port, and set the pulse rate based on the device that you are connecting to.

MX480 - MX480 PC Chart Interface Control

The MX420 CDU can be interfaced with the MX Marine MX480 a PC based electronic charting software. When the MX480 mode is enabled, the charting program assumes the following functions of the receiver:

Active Route Creation

Waypoint Library

Tides

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The COM1 port of the PC must be connected to the RS-232 port of

NMEA 2 of the CDU (refer to the Installation & Service Manual).

Note: The message “Function is not active” will be shown when the WPT, RTE or TIDE keys are pressed when the MX480 chart mode is activated.

Navigation - Navigation Method & Waypoint Pass Criterion

Control

This screen sets the navigation mode to Rhumb Line or Great Circle,

Cross-track Error limits and alarms, Waypoint Pass Criterion, and

Waypoint Approach alarms. These settings have a direct effect on your route calculation and how data is displayed in the NAV and PLOT screens.

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Navigation:

Sets navigation to Rhumb Line (default) or Great Circle mode.

Note: When the navigation mode is set to Great Circle, the PLOT screens will not show your course or cross-track error lines.

Range Unit:

Sets the unit of measure for all range calculations. You can choose between Nautical Mile (default), Nautical Mile & Meters, Nauti-

cal Mile & Feet, Statute Mile, Statute Mile & Meters, Statute

Mile & Feet, Kilometers, and Kilometers & Meters.

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Direction:

Sets all displays which indicate direction to True or Compass. If you want the receiver to agree with your magnetic compass, select

Compass. The receiver will automatically add or subtract the appropriate magnetic variation and deviation. Enter the compass deviation table into the receiver in this screen. You can differentiate between True and Compass settings by observing the degree symbol on any bearing or heading display. True is indicated by a degree symbol (°), Compass is indicated by a degree symbol with a small c under the symbol ( c ).

XTE Limit:

Sets the distance left or right from the course line you consider to be the maximum allowable off-track error (known as cross-track error, “XTE”). The PLOT screens will display the scaled crosstrack error distance. The NAV screens will indicate the cross-track error in numerical format and present the cross-track error graphically scaled left or right of the course line.

XTE Alarm:

Causes an alarm to sound if your position exceeds the maximum

XTE Limit defined above when Yes is selected. To disable the alarm, select No (default) with the Change softkey.

WPT Pass Criterion:

Sets the waypoint passed determination method. There are five methods available:

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Complex:

This is the default setting. Passing the waypoint is determined by reaching an imaginary perpendicular line. Or you can pass the

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waypoint by crossing the bisector line of an acute angle (providing you are within 0.2 NM of the waypoint) or an obtuse angle between your present course line and the next leg of your route.

Manual:

Passing the waypoint can only be accomplished by manually skipping a waypoint. Refer to the Skipping and Unpassing Waypoints in the Route section of this manual.

This is a great way to perform station keeping maneuvering. Refer to the Plot Screen Use Examples in the Plot section for further details on this application.

Distance:

Passing the waypoint is determined by reaching an imaginary circle around the waypoint, the radius of which you can define in WPT

Pass Distance. The default value is 0.10 Nm.

If you set this distance to 0.00, you will never pass the waypoint.

This is a great way to perform station keeping maneuvering. Refer to the Plot Screen Use Examples in the Plot section for further details on this application.

Bisector Line:

Passing the waypoint is determined by reaching the bisector line of an acute or obtuse angle between your present course line and the next leg of your route.

Perpendicular Line:

Passing the waypoint is determined by reaching an imaginary perpendicular line from your present course line.

Approach Alarm:

Causes an alarm to sound if your position is within the radius defined in Approach Distance (below) when Yes is selected. To disable the alarm, select No (the default condition) with the Change softkey.

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Approach Distance:

Sets the waypoint approach alarm distance (above) to sound if your position is within the radius defined. The default setting is

0.30 Nm. This is a convenient tool for large boats and ships that need to perform Transfer and Advance maneuvers prior to reaching the waypoint.

Autopilot Alarm:

Causes an alarm when your position is outside the cross-track error limit defined in XTE Limit (above) or when you change course to a new leg in your route (manually or automatically passing a waypoint) when Yes is selected. It also causes the NMEA data records of APA, APB, and XTE to change their reported status of

Valid to Invalid when you reach the waypoint of the current leg.

This tells the autopilot not to use the data from the receiver. When the alarm is canceled, which requires your depression of the Can-

cel Alarm softkey (displayed during the alarm condition), these data fields will revert to valid data and the autopilot will accept the receiver data again. This is provided as a safety feature so that the

boat does not turn toward a new direction without your knowing

of the impending change. To disable the alarm, select No (the default condition) with the Change softkey.

NMEA Out 1 through n* - NMEA 0183 Output Data Control

These screens set the specific NMEA 0183 output record parameters as well as the port control. The default setting is No. When this selection is changed to Yes, you can turn on individual data records. Refer to the installation manual of the device you interfaced with the receiver to determine which output records are required. Refer to the

Installation & Service Manual for receiver hardware interface information.

* The number of user NMEA ports available depends on the model of the CDU unit:

MX420/2 Model - has two user NMEA ports available and one proprietary port (NMEA3) dedicated to the MX Marine smart antenna.

MX420/8/AIS Model - has eight user NMEA ports available and two antenna ports (NMEA3 & 4) dedicated to the MX421 or

MX421B smart antenna.

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Note: Pre plan your interface requirements to ensure all of your interfacing needs are met. When two receivers are interfaced in a dual-head configuration, Port 1 is reserved for this interface. All NMEA Ports are RS-422 electrically.

Only Port 2 can be configured as either RS-422 or RS-

232. We recommend using this port to interface to a computer or other “single ended” interface.

The default condition of each port is Off. When you want to output data on a NMEA port, scroll down the Item menu to the appropriate

NMEA Out port number and change Port Active to Yes. In doing so, the receiver will display all available NMEA 0183 output sentences.

MX 420/2 NMEA Out Menu MX420/8 & /AIS NMEA Out Menu

Scroll down the list using the cursor key to the desired NMEA 0183 sentence. Use the Change softkey or right arrow key on the cursor to select On.

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Press the Details softkey to view the characteristics for the NMEA record you select. If you notice that the top of some text is cut off by the Capacity Needed window, this indicates that there are more selections available than can fit in the window. Use the cursor key to scroll down the list. Each record is controlled separately. Generally speaking, the following controls are available to you for most or all of the records:

Checksum On or Off - NMEA 0183 version 2.1 and above requires that the checksum is present. Versions 1.5 and 2.0 do not re-

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quire the checksum. The receiver provides you the option of turning the checksum on or off to provide flexibility in interfacing.

Output Rate - maximum once per second, unless the Multi-Hertz option is installed. Refer to the Total Load Is section which follows.

Note: All position information contained in any data record is

output in the local datum selected in CFG/Position; ex-

cept GGA, which provides a selection in the Details screen

to output in either WGS-84 or the datum selected in CFG/

Position.

Most:

NMEA Version - Some of the NMEA 0183 records are no longer supported by version 2.3. However, you may have an autopilot, plotter, or other older model equipment that does not support the newer version of the NMEA 0183 standard. The receiver provides you the flexibility to interface using older versions of the NMEA standard to support these devices.

Decimals In Lat/Lon - The software allows you to select from 2 to

5 decimal places in records containing position or waypoint information.. The receiver provides you the flexibility to match the expected input on these devices.

Decimals In BRG or HDG - The receiver allows you to select from 0 to 1 decimal places in records containing bearing information.

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xxx loads the port by - The NMEA 0183 standard limits the port baud rate to 4800 bits per second. It is impossible to turn on every NMEA 0183 data record on one port in the receiver at a once per second output rate, due to the NMEA standard limitation. xxx loads the port by tells you how much throughput capacity is required to send the selected data record out the port (where xxx is the NMEA data sentence identifier). If you change the Output Rate, xxx loads the port by: value will adjust to reflect the change after you move the cursor to the next line. This is a very helpful tool to ensure that you don’t loose data due to lack of throughput on the data port.

Total load is - Due to the throughput limitation of the NMEA 0183 standard, you can not turn on all of the output records available from the receiver at a once per second output rate at one time. The Total load is counter will help you maximize the port usage on the receiver. It monitors the total throughput capability of all the output records that are currently turned on. If you go over 100% and you require all of the data records that are currently turned on, try reducing the Output Rate for one or more of the less critical data records. Continue this process until the Total load is 100.0% or less.

There are several special case screens which provide added support.

Rnn - Active Route Data Record:

The NMEA-0183 standard allows you to output the active route with an ID sentence that begins either as GPR00 or GPR01.

Some of the equipment you might interface may require this sentence to outputs R00 and other equipment may require this data record as R01. The receiver allows you to configure the

ID either way (R00 is the default).

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WPL - Waypoint Location Data Record:

The receiver outputs all of the waypoints in the active route. If you want to output the complete Waypoint Bank, simply press the Send All softkey from the NMEA WPL screen.

The WPL record, as defined by the NMEA 0183 standard, technically does not allow the output of waypoint descriptions when interfacing to other devices such as Chart Plotters.

However, MX Marine realizes that with 2000 waypoints, you have spent a lot of time preparing your library of waypoints with definitions and symbols. You probably will want to record these to a PC, just in case the memory in the receiver fails in the future. For this reason, we have provided you the option to

Include Waypoint Names in the WPL record to save your waypoints to a PC or to meet the NMEA 0183 standard for interfacing to other marine equipment. The definition of the differences between these two formats is given in the WPT section of this manual and in the NMEA 0183 format section of the Installation & Service Manual.

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Other Special Cases Affecting NMEA 0183 Records:

BWC, BWR, APA, APB, RMB, RMC, and Man Over Board (MOB):

During the period when the Man Over Board function is activated,

NMEA 0183 records which contain bearing and range data, such as those identified above (but not limited to these), will reflect the bearing and range back to the MOB position until the MOB function is canceled. Refer to the MOB section of this manual.

APA, APB, XTE, and the Navigation Autopilot Alarm:

Refer to the CFG Navigation section. When the Autopilot Alarm is set to No, the receiver always indicates a mode ‘A’, or valid data to the autopilot or other marine device which might be receiving this data. If the Autopilot Alarm is set to Yes, then the receiver changes the mode ‘A to ‘V’, indicating invalid data when you reach a waypoint or exceed your cross-track error limit set in the

CFG Navigation XTE Limit field. When the alarm is canceled, which requires your depression of the Cancel Alarm softkey (displayed during the alarm condition), these data fields will revert to Valid data and the autopilot will accept the receiver data again. This is

provided as a safety feature so that the boat does not turn toward a new direction without your knowing of the impending change.

Output Port Configuration Conflicts:

The NMEA output ports can only be assigned once. If you have already defined a given port for one format, and you attempt to define a different format for the same port, the receiver will warn you of the port conflict. The first format to be defined on a port maintains the port. The second format will be ignored.

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Operation - General Setup and Control Settings

This screen controls a few basic operating settings:

Remember Display: When set to Yes (default), the receiver remembers the Page Number or screen you viewed the last time you used a particular function. For example, if you normally monitor the NAV3 display and you decided to look at the PLOT1 screen, the next time you press the NAV function, the receiver will automatically revert to the NAV3 screen immediately.

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If you select No for Remember Display, the receiver will always display the first page of a function when you press the function key.

Edit Timeout: You can set the timeout limit between None (default), or 1 to 10 minutes. If you enter the edit mode on any screen and have a timeout period other than None, the receiver will automatically exit the edit mode if no keys are touched and the timeout period expires.

Preceding Zeroes: Places zeroes (0s) before directions less than

100° when Yes is selected. For example, 079°. Otherwise directions are shown without the leading zeros when No is selected

(default). For example, 79°.

Beeper: If you attempt to perform a key function that is not allowed, you normally hear an Error Tone. This is performed when the Beeper is set to On (default). If you don’t want to hear the error or any other keyboard beep, set the Beeper to

Off.

Retain External Alarm: Allows the CDU to hold the external alarm while the alarm condition still exist. When Retain external

alarm is set to On, the external alarm will normalize only when the cause of alarm is corrected.

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Engineering Display: This enables an expanded series of display screens in some of the functions. In general, these screens are used by the technician during troubleshooting or by MX

Marine engineers during development testing. Screens which are relevant for troubleshooting are described in Appendix D of this manual. The default setting is No. If you should enable these screens, the receiver will automatically turn them off the next time power is cycled on the unit.

Demonstration Mode: This enables the receiver to function as though you are under way, even though you are completely stationary. The default setting is No. When set to Yes, all three

Traffic Lights will be illuminated, and a D symbol is displayed in the upper right corner of every display. Generally speaking, this feature is used by MX Marine and your dealer for show room or trade show demonstrations. However, you can use it as a training tool until you become familiar with the receiver.

As a safety feature, you can not use it to output NMEA 0183 records on the data ports to test and demonstrate other devices such as autopilots, chart plotters, and radars. Refer to

Appendix F of this manual for a full description of the Demon-

stration Mode.

Organizer - Automated Message Reminders

This screen enables you to program the receiver with up to 25 different message reminders (up to 30 characters in length). You can program it to alarm for shift changes, log entry intervals, medication intervals, weather fax updates, etc.

Note: When the Organizer alarm is activated, the voltage on

the Alarm Output Port is also activated. If you have other

devices connected to this port, you might need to consider what other systems will be affected when the alarm sounds. MX Marine offers an External Alarm control software option. Check with your dealer or MX Marine, or refer to the Options Manual for details on this software package.

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The setup is straight forward. Use the Change softkey to increment forward through the available choices. Use the Go Back softkey to increment backward through the available choices. You can also use the left and right cursor keys to accomplish these same operations.

Enter text the same as you do for the waypoints and routes. Use the numeric key pad to enter the appropriate time. Don’t forget to set

Message Active to Yes when you are finished editing, to enable the alarm.

Position - Positioning Reference, Mode, & Alarm Control

This configuration screen controls several important parameters which determine your present position.

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Reference System:

This setting controls the coordinate system used to display your position. The available choices are Lat/Lon (default) or UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator). The receiver will automatically convert any waypoint in the Route Bank or Waypoint Bank when a different coordinate system is entered. Note that when you select a coordinate system other than Lat/Lon, data in the NMEA 0183 records will remain in the Lat/Lon format, as defined in the NMEA

0183 standard.

When you select UTM, you can set the Zone yourself (Man), or let the receiver calculate the zone for you (Auto, default).

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Likewise, when you select Loran C, you can set the Chain yourself

(Man), or let the receiver calculate the chain for you (Auto, default).

Alarm For High HDOP:

This allows the receiver to create an alarm for HDOP values which rise above a number that you determine. This indicates that position accuracy is becoming bad, due to poor satellite geometry relative to your position and/or the number of satellites currently under track. You may want to set the alarm to Yes if position accuracy is critical to you. Otherwise this alarm is normally set to No.

HDOP Alarm Limit:

Sets the HDOP value which will cause the alarm to sound. The default value is 4. The valid range is from 1.0 to 9.9. The higher your

HDOP value, the more error you will have in your position fix. Refer to the GPS1 Current Satellite Status section of this manual for more information about the HDOP value.

Alarm If No Update:

This setting causes an alarm when you stop calculating a position fix for a few seconds when set to Yes (default). A setting of No disables the alarm when position fix can not be obtained.

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Printout 2 - Printer Output Control

This menu item controls the printer output sometimes required for commercial shipping. The interface is accomplished on NMEA Out 2 port. The printer output is simple ASCII text designed to operate on any serial line printer, including narrow column printers.

The receiver has two print formats, namely: Full or Brief.

A sample of the Full printer output format is given below:

MX Marine MX420/8 Navigator

====================================

20:42:41 UTC 12 Apr 2002

POS Mode : DGPS 3D Datum:W84

Position : N 33 48.5056

W 118 21.0073

Altitude : 5.6 m

COG: 346 T SOG: 0.1 Kn

ROUTE: From WPT 0 To WPT 1

NAV Mode : RL XTE: .108L Nm

BRG: 345 T Dist: 2.51 Nm

SATS Used: 6 HDOP 1.4 VDOP 1.6

DGPS Age : 9s Station ID: 262

SW Vrs. 1.5 MX421 V4.84

------------------------------------

Route and DGPS information is printed if these functions are active.

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Here is a sample of the Brief format without an active route:

MX Marine MX420/8 Navigator

====================================

21:24:00 UTC 12 Apr 2002

POS Mode : DGPS 3D Datum:W84

POS: N 33 48.5124 W 118 21.0213

COG: 152T SOG: 0.1 Kn

------------------------------------

Here is a sample of the Brief format with an active route or MOB condition:

MX Marine MX420/8 Navigator

====================================

21:24:00 UTC 11 Aug 1997

POS Mode : DGPS 3D Datum:W84

POS: N 33 48.5124 W 118 21.0213

COG: 152T SOG: 0.1 Kn

BRG: 239T Dist: 27.4 Nm XTE:0.14L Nm

RTE: RL From WPT 1234 To WPT 1357

------------------------------------

Sending: Causes the printer output to be turned On or Off (default).

Print Interval (Sec): Allows you to control how often the print out will be sent to the printer port. The default value is 60 seconds, and the valid range is from 1 to 9999 seconds.

Format: Allows you to choose either the Full or Brief formats described above.

Bit Rate: This allows you to control the port interface baud rate to match the printer or computer you are interfacing with. The available baud rates are: 600, 1200, 2400, 4800 (default), 9600 or 19,200.

Data Bits: This allows you to match the printer’s requirement of 7 or 8

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(default) bit serial data.

Stop Bits: This allows you to match the printer’s requirement of 1

(default) or 2 stop bits.

Parity Check: This allows you to match the printer’s requirement of

None (default), Even or Odd parity.

Handshake: This allows you to match the printer’s requirement of No

(default), XON/XOFF or HW (Hardware; CTS, RTS ).

ROT (Rate of Turn)

The ROT configuration menu is only available in MX420 models with the AIS or MKD feature enabled. It is not available in standard MX420 models. The “ROT connected” mode can be toggled to YES or NO, by pressing the E key and then pressing the ‘Change’ softkey.

Data input port no: ...1 (valid port selections are 1,2,5 through 10)

Alarm if no data: ....No (‘Yes’ value sets the alarm to sound if no ROT input data is detected in 5 seconds)

Note: Only IEC type approved ROT information can be used by the AIS transponder. Rate-of-Turn messages designated by talker device ID “$TIROT” are required.

Security

The Security screen allows you to lock out the E key in order to keep crew members or visitors from changing settings that you have made.

Once this feature is enabled, a press of the E key will require the correct password to gain access. To disable the security functions, you will be prompted to enter a 5 digit password. You will then be prompted to reenter the password. The security function is then disabled until you enter a new password through the CFG1 Security screen again. Be sure to keep your password in a safe place. If you loose your password, you will need to call the factory to reset the security feature.

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Serial I/O

This menu provides a means to verify the status and baud rate settings of all the NMEA ports. Note that the NMEA port 3 (MX420/2) and

NMEA ports 3 & 4 (MX420/8) are reserved for the MX421 GPS and

Beacon receiver interface. You have no control in these two ports. You can not change the baud settings in its original values.

MX420/2 Serial I/O Menu MX420/8 Serial I/O Menu

Time - Mode and Format Control

This menu item sets the method in which time is displayed on the receiver.

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Time System: Sets the time to UTC (default) or Local. When Local is selected, several parameters associated with local time are displayed.

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Time Format: Sets the time to either a 24 Hour (default) or 12 Hour clock.

Wind

Time Offset: Sets the local offset to UTC time. 0:00 is the default.

Summer Time: Sets the local clock ahead one hour in the summer for daylight savings time when set to Yes, or to the Local Offset time when set to No.

The adjusted time value is displayed in the lower window so you can verify the current time without having to leave the screen.

The receiver will display wind information in the NAV4 screen when connected to a NMEA 0183 sensor which can provide the MWV or

VWR sentence.

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Data Input Port: 1 (default) or 2 for MX420/2

1 (default) or 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 for MX420/8

Note: Ports 3 & 4 are reserved for the MX421 GPS and Beacon controls and will not be selected.

Wind Speed Unit: miles per hour, meters per second, knots, kilometers per hour.

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Alarm If No Data: Allows you to receive an audible and visual alarm if

NMEA 0183 data is not being received on the data port at regular intervals (typically every few seconds). The available choices are

Yes (default) or No.

AWA Offset: Allows you to input a constant angle correction value.

AWS Correction Factor: Allows you to input a wind speed correction factor.

Input Sentence: Specifies the NMEA 0183 data sentence to read the depth data from. The available choices are Any (default), MWV, or

VWR sentence. It is better to specify the appropriate sentence, because more than one method of reporting wind may be available on the port.

Wpt & Rte Input - Uploading Waypoints into the Receiver

This screen enables the input data port to receive waypoints and routes from a chart plotter, PC (VMS), or other device to the receiver. You can receive this data through any of the user NMEA 0183 input data ports.

Load the WPL sentences first, then the RTE sentences. Change Trans-

ducer Connected from No (default) to Yes and select the appropriate port. Refer to the Waypoints - Uploading Waypoints from Other De-

vices section of this manual for more details on the software interface.

Refer to the Installation & Service Manual for hardware interface.

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Appendix A - Automatic Identification System

(AIS)

Introduction

AIS is a shipborne broadcast transponder system in which ships continually transmit their ID, position, course, speed and other data to all other nearby ships and shoreside authorities on a common VHF radio channel. The concept is derived from the pioneering work of a Swedish inventor named Håkan Lans, who developed in the mid 1980s an ingenious technique for spontaneous, masterless communication, which permits a large number of transmitters to send data bursts over a single narrowband radio channel by synchronizing their data transmissions to a very precise timing standard.

AIS is designed to operate in one of the following modes:

• In a ship-to-ship mode for collision avoidance

• In a ship-to-shore mode as a means for coastal states to monitor and obtain information about a ship and its cargo

• As a traffic management tool when integrated with a Vessel Traffic

System (VTS)

Ship-to-Ship Data Exchange

The primary operating mode for AIS will be autonomous ship-to-ship reporting. In this mode, each ship transmits its data to all other AIS-equipped ships within VHF range. The unique communications scheme permits these data transmissions to take place independently without the need for a master control station.

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Position and other data are fed automatically from the ship’s sensors into the AIS system, where the data is formatted and transmitted in a short data burst on a dedicated VHF channel. When received on the other ships, the data is decoded and displayed for the officer of the watch, who can view AIS reports from all other

AIS-equipped ships within range in graphic and text format. The AIS data may optionally be fed to the ship’s integrated navigation systems and radar plotting systems to provide AIS “tags” for radar targets. The AIS data can also be logged to the ship’s Voyage Data Recorder (VDR) for playback and future analysis.

Updated AIS messages are transmitted every few seconds, to keep the information up to date. Note that the ship-to-ship data exchange takes place automatically without any action required by the watch officer on either ship. In pilotage waters, a pilot can plug a laptop computer, loaded with his own navigation program, directly into the ship’s AIS system. In this way, the pilot can monitor the position and movement of all other vessels in the area independent of the ship’s installed navigation systems.

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Coastal Surveillance

In coastal waters, shoreside authorities may establish automated AIS stations to monitor the movement of vessels through the area. These stations may simply monitor AIS transmissions from passing ships, or may actively poll vessels via the

AIS channels, requesting data such as identification, destination, ETA, type of cargo and other information. Coast stations can also use the AIS channels for shore-to-ship transmissions, to send information on tides, notices to mariners and local weather forecasts. Multiple AIS coast stations and repeaters may be tied together into Wide Area Networks (WAN) for extended coverage.

Coastal nations may use AIS to monitor the movement of hazardous cargoes and control commercial fishing operations in their territorial waters. AIS data can be logged automatically for playback in investigating an accident, oil spill or other event. AIS is also a useful tool in search and rescue (SAR) operations, allowing

SAR coordinators to monitor the movements of all surface ships, aircraft and helicopters involved in the rescue effort.

Vessel Traffic Systems

When integrated with shore-based vessel traffic systems (VTS), AIS provides a powerful tool for monitoring and controlling the movement of vessels through restricted harbors and waterways. The AIS can augment traditional radar-based

VTS installations, providing an AIS “overlay” on the radar picture, or can provide a cost-effective alternative in areas where it is not feasible to establish radar-based systems. When integrated with radar, the AIS can ensure continuous coverage,

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even when the radar picture is degraded by heavy precipitation or other interference.

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The AIS channels can be used to transmit port data, pilotage, berth assignments, shipping agency information, tides and currents, notices to mariners and other information from shore to ship, as well as ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore AIS reports. It is also possible for the VTS to broadcast the complete harbor picture to all ships in the area, so the masters and pilots all share the same “big picture.”

The VTS center can assume control over the assignment of time slots for AIS messages to ensure optimum data exchange within the coverage area. Special dedicated channels may be designated for local-area AIS operations. The shipboard AIS equipment will have the ability to shift to different channels automatically when directed by the shoreside VTS controller.

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AIS Communications Scheme

Operator’s Manual

AIS

messages must be updated and retransmitted every few seconds at a minimum, since the usefulness of the data decays rapidly as a function of time. To accommodate this high update requirement, AIS utilizes a unique self-organizing time-division multiple access (SOTDMA) data communications scheme, which uses the precise timing data in the GPS signals to synchronize multiple data transmissions from many users on a single narrowband channel.

Each ship broadcasts its AIS messages and receives messages from all ships within VHF radio range. The area in which AIS messages can be received is called the ship’s “cell”. Each ship is in this way in the center of its own communication cell.

The practical size of the cell can be varied according to the traffic density on the

AIS channel. If the number of AIS messages begins to overload the network, the ship’s AIS system can automatically shrink its cell by ignoring weaker stations further away in favor of those nearby.

Under the SOTDMA protocol, each minute of time is divided into 2,250 timeslots.

An AIS report fits into one or several of these 2,250 timeslots, which are selected automatically based on data link traffic and projections of future actions by other

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stations currently on the network. When a ship first enters the cell of another ship, it takes an unoccupied timeslot. The AIS stations continually synchronize their slot selections with each other.

Timeslots and time-out periods are selected on a randomized basis. When a station changes its slot assignment, it announces to all other stations on the channel its new location and time-out for that location. Each station continually updates its internal “slot map” to reflect changes in occupied slots and timeouts. Special provisions are made for automatic conflict resolution in the event two stations end up in the same timeslot, to ensure that stations always choose unoccupied slots. In situations of high traffic density it may be necessary to reduce the number of ships in a communication cell, as described above. This enables time slots used by weak stations far away, to be used also by a station nearby. The AIS system applies very specific rules on how this reoccupation of timeslots is done.

The key to the SOTDMA scheme is the availability of a highly accurate standard time reference, to which all of the stations can synchronize their time slot assignments, in order to avoid overlap. This time reference is supplied by the precise timing signal in the GPS satellite message. Thus, GPS plays a critical role in AIS, providing the universal time reference as well as positioning data for each ship.

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AIS data transmissions utilize a robust 9.6 kbps FM /GMSK (Gaussian Minimum

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Shift Keying) modulation technique, which is specified in ITU Recommendation

M.1371.1. The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has designated two dedicated frequencies for AIS. They are 161.975 MHz (marine band channel

87B) and 162.025 MHz (channel 88B). In some parts of the world, such as the

United States, where these frequencies may not be available for AIS, other channels may be designated.

The ship’s AIS station has two independent VHF receivers, which are normally tuned to the two AIS frequencies, as well as one transmitter, which alternates its transmissions back and forth between the two. The shipborne system can also be retuned to other frequencies, for instance when operating under the control of a shore-based VTS. This can be done either manually or remotely by the AIS shore station.

AIS Message

AIS is designed to work autonomously and continuously in a ship-to-ship mode, but the specifications provide for switchover to an “assigned mode” for operation in an area subject to a competent authority responsible for traffic monitoring, with the data transmission intervals and timeslots set remotely by the shoreside authority. Alternatively, the AIS can work in a “polling mode” in which the data transfer occurs in response to interrogation from another ship or shore station.

Information provided by the AIS falls into several categories:

Static data

IMO number (where available)

Call sign and name

Ship’s name

Type of ship

Location of position-fixing antenna on the ship

(aft of bow and port or starboard of centerline)

Dynamic data

Ship’s position with accuracy indication and integrity status

Time in UTC

Course over ground

Speed over ground

Heading

Navigational status (e.g., “at anchor,” “not under command,” manually entered)

Rate of turn (where available)

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Voyage related data

Ship’s draft

Hazardous cargo (type)

Destination and ETA (at master’s discretion)

Safety-related messages

As needed

Dynamic information is derived from interfaces with the ship’s GPS and other sensors. Static information is programmed into the unit at commissioning. Voyage-related data is entered manually by the master through a password-protected routine. Safety messages can be inserted at any time by the ship or shore station. The static and voyage-related data are transmitted every six minutes, when amended or on request (for instance, when interrogated by a Vessel Traffic

System operator). Safety messages are sent as needed. The update rates for dynamic information will depend on the ship’s status and speed, according to the following schedule:

At anchor

0-14 knots

0-14 knots and changing course

14-23 knots

14-23 knots and changing course

23+ knots

23+ knots and changing course

3 minutes

10 seconds

3.3 seconds

6 seconds

2 seconds

2 seconds

2 seconds

The AIS specifications also allow for insertion of brief binary messages from ships or shore stations. Such messages might include notices to mariners, navigational warnings, tides and currents, weather forecasts, SAR communications and ship-specific instructions from a VTS operator. The AIS standard also includes formats for transmission of differential GPS error correction data. This can provide valuable redundancy to existing beacon DGPS systems in critical navigation areas.

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MX420/AIS the Total Shipboard GPS/DGPS/AIS

Solution

There are two MX420/AIS models, namely:

MX420/AIS Basic, and

MX420/AIS Navigation System

The MX420/AIS Basic provides control and display interface to the MX531 AIS transponder and other navigation sensors, while the MX420/AIS does all this and also provides complete DGPS navigation functions. The MX420/AIS incorporates:

• a Control and Display Unit (CDU) for GPS, DGPS and AIS (MX420/AIS)

• a combined GPS and Beacon receiver sealed in a “smart antenna” radome (MX421B)

• an IMO-compliant AIS transponder (MX423)

The MX420 Navigation System is built to meet all existing applicable international marine standards, and it is designed to be compliant also to future standards through software upgrades.

The MX420 CDU collects and decodes AIS reports from other stations and provides a readout of information from all AIS-equipped ships and shore stations. Data can be viewed in text or graphic form. It gathers inputs from ship’s sensors and organizes the data for transmission via AIS. The CDU is also used for entering AIS static and voyage-related information for AIS broadcasts, as well as system setup functions. High-speed serial data ports are provided for outputs to the ECDIS, ARPA or other shipboard systems. An extra port has been provided for a ship’s pilot to plug into the AIS system.

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AIS System Setup

Automatic Identifaction System

Prior to using the MX420/AIS CDU, it is necessary to configure the AIS menus under the CFG key, namely:

AIS Config

AIS Static

AIS Voyage

To access the AIS configuration setups, follow the procedure below.

AIS Config Setup

The MX420/AIS was designed to work with several types of AIS transponder systems. The “Transponder Type” setup allows the operator to customize the

MX420/AIS display to work with either a SAAB (R3) or ATLAS transponder

(other selections may become available in the future).

The “Static Config Update” setup is used to determine where the “AIS Static” configuration information can be updated from. Two possible selections are the

MKD (MX420/AIS) or ECDIS (a PC-based charting system). This setting is important to determine where the configuration setup will be done and to ensure that all subsystems contain the same AIS configuration information.

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Follow the procedure below to select the “Transponder Type” and “Static Config

Update” settings:

1. Press the CFG key.

2. Press the E key (cursor will be on SAAB).

3. Press the ‘Change’ softkey to toggle to ATLAS.

4. If you need to pass control to ECDIS, press the Down arrow key to highlight the “Static Config Update” line.

5. Press the ‘Change’ softkey to ECDIS (MKD is the default selection).

6. Press the E to exit.

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Configuring the AIS Static Setup

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The AIS Static Setup contains both the ship’s static data and AIS transponder configuration. This setup must be done after installation or at any time changes are made to the ship’s AIS transponder unit.

It is important to note that critical AIS static setup items (such as MMSI, IMO,

Ship name & Call Sign) are password protected. Setup items that require administrator password are indicated in the Display Field Descriptions below.

If an invalid or missing password is used, an ‘AIS Alarm’ is displayed and the entry will be rejected. Press the ‘Cancel alarm’ softkey to continue.

Follow the procedure below to enter the required AIS static information for SAAB transponder:

1.

Press CFG key.

2.

Highlight the AIS Static under the ‘Item’ column.

3.

Press the E key to start editing the AIS Static setup.

4.

The “AIS Connected (Port 5): - No” will be highlighted, press the Change softkey to change it to “Yes”.

5.

Move the highlight to other required setup items and enter the numeric values or press the Change softkey to toggle the value.

6.

Press E key when done editing the AIS Static menu.

More AIS Static configuration parameters are available by scrolling down using the down arrow cursor key as shown below.

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Note: A total of 37 lines are available under the AIS Static menu. If only 10 lines are listed, the MX420 may not be communicating with the transponder. Verify that the “AIS Connected” value is set to YES and the correct transponder type is selected.

Display Field Descriptions:

AIS, ECDIS, PILOT, Long Range, Ext. GPS Connected:

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Use the softkey to select Yes or No. Yes means that the selected unit is connected to the MX420.

ECDIS, PILOT, Long Range, Ext. GPS Port:

Use the softkey to select the serial port to which the device is connected. “AIS Port” is pre-selected to NMEA5, Long-Range Communication port is NMEA 6, ECDIS is on NMEA 7 and the Pilot port is on NMEA 9.

ECDIS and PILOT Msg Config:

Use the softkey to select between IEC or PAIS protocol for the communication standard used with the associated device. IEC protocol is preferred for most AIS interface.

Long Range Reply:

Use the softkey to select between AUTO, Manual or Off. In Manual mode, the user is prompted to reply to the Long-Range system when interrogated. In Auto mode, the MX420/AIS automatically sends a reply when interrogated. In Ext. Appl (External Application) mode, the MX420/AIS passes the request onto the high-speed ports (ECDIS & Pilot), and waits for their response to prepare answer back to long range system.

Password Level: (available only in SAAB transponder type selection)

Use the softkey to select between User or Administrator. Changing parameters related to the AIS transponder will require the administrator password. Editing the following transponder settings below requires the administrator password.

MMSI: A 9-digit Maritime Mobile Service Identity number used for identification of ship and message (administrator password required).

Note: When editing critical transponder setup items use the administrator password. The password card is located at the last page of this operator’s manual.

Ship: Enter the vessel name up to 20 characters (administrator password required).

The symbol

 indicates name is not available.

Call Sign: Enter the 7 character vessel’s call sign (administrator password required). The symbol

 indicates call sign is not available.

IMO Number: Enter the 9-digit IMO identification number when available (administrator password required).

Default Power: Use the softkey to select between High or Low power

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(administrator password required). For SAAB transponder only.

Chnl A, Chnl B TX Mode: Use the softkey to select between Transmit or

Silent (administrator password required). This selection is available under

SAAB transponder type selection only.

Chnl A, Chnl B Chnl: Enter the operating channel number for channels A and B

(administrator password required). Refer to table A.1 for valid VHF channels used in AIS. This field is available only when the SAAB transponder type is selected.

Table A.1 AIS VHF Channels

Valid VHF Channels Used in AIS

1- 28 2001-2005

60-88

201-228

260-287

2007

2018-2028

2060-2066

2078-2088

1001-1005

1007

1018-1028

1060-1066

1078-1088

2201-2207

2218-2228

2260-2266

2278-2287

1201-2005

1218-1228

1260-1266

1278-1287

MX421 and External GPS:

Use the softkey to select between Primary and Secondary. The

MX421 is defaulted as the primary source of GPS data while the Ext. GPS is set as the secondary.

MX421 Ant A, B, C, D:

These are four dimensions from the bow, stern, port beam, and starboard beam to the horizontal reference point on the ship for the MX421 GPS antenna used by the MX420/AIS unit. The sum of A + B is the length of the ship in meters, and the sum of C + D is the width of the ship in meters.

Default values are zeroes.

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Ext GPS Ant A, B, C, D:

Specify the position offset of the external GPS antenna (similar to the Int.

GPS Ant A,B,C,D).

AIS GPS Ant A, B, C, D:

Specify the position offset of the GPS antenna used in the MX423 AIS transponder (administrator password required).

AIS Antenna F/A and AIS Antenna P/S:

Specify the position offset of the navigation point on the vessel. Field available when transponder type is ATLAS.

Height Over Keel: Enter 4 digit height (i.e. 999.9) in meters.

Softkey Descriptions:

Used to enter the administrator password to change critical AIS transponder setups that require the administrator password.

Push to send the keel depth to the transponder.

Used to toggle through various selections available in the field.

C

D

Antenna

Location

Antenna Offset

For SAAB Transponder Type:

How to change transponder settings under the AIS Static configuration using the administrator password?

1. Press the CFG key.

2. Highlight the AIS Static menu.

3. Press the E key to start editing.

4. Using the cursor key move the cursor to “Password Level: User” and press

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the softkey to toggle to Administrator.

5. Move the cursor down to MMSI, Ship or Call Sign field.

6. Press the softkey.

7. Enter the administrator password indicated on the password card located at the last page of this manual (i.e. admin)

To enter the example password “admin” do the following:

a. Press the #1 key to bring up the lowercase letter “a”.

b. The cursor will advance to the next character.

c. Press #2 key 1 time to bring-up the letter “d”.

d. Press the #5 key one time for letter “m”.

e. Press the #3 key 3 times for letter “i”.

f. Press the #5 key 2 times for letter “n”.

g. Press the Done softkey.

8. Move the cursor to the MMSI number and enter the desired value.

9. Move the highlight to “Ship:” and spell out the name of the vessel (up to 20 alphanumeric characters).

10. Move the highlight to “Call Sign:” and enter up to 7 characters.

11. To change other setup items use the cursor key to scroll down or up and enter the number or name required or press the available.

12. At the end of editing, press the E key to exit.

softkey when

Configuring the AIS Voyage

Information about the ship’s destination, ETA time and date, number of passengers/crew and type of vessel are entered in the MX420 for each voyage or whenever needed.

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AIS Voyage Parameter Descriptions:

Nav Stat - Press the softkey to select specific status. This setup item controls the AIS status icon shown on the upper-right corner of the display. See section below for all available nav-stat icons and descriptions.

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Destination - Enter the 20 character destination name. A string of

 indicates the destination has not been set.

ETA Time - Enter the estimated time of arrival at the desired destination.

ETA Date - Enter the estimated date of arrival at the desired destination.

Draught - Enter draught height in meters.

No. of People - Enter the number of people on board (1-8191).

Ship/Cargo Type - Use the softkey to toggle ship cargo choices.

Refer to table A.2 for possible ship type values (0-255).

Softkey Descriptions:

- used to toggle through various values available in the field.

- press this softkey to send the information about the number of people on-board to the transponder for broadcasting.

Nav Stat Icons and Descriptions:

Vessel underway

Not Defined

Vessel not commanded, limited maneuverability, limited by draught, aground or reserved for future use.

Ship is anchored or moored

MX420 not communicating with transponder

Note: The displayed icons located on the top-right corner of the screen is set to blink off and on every 3 seconds to allow the operator to see what is behind it and is not considered an alarm condition. An every second blinking is an alarm condition.

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Table A.2 ID Numbers Used in AIS

Identifier No.

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

Special craft

Pilot Vessel

Search and rescue vessel

Tugs

Port tenders

Vessels with anti-pollution facilities or equipment

Law enforcement vessels

Spare – for assignments to local vessel

Spare – for assignment to local vessel

Medical transports (as defined in the 1949 Geneva Conventions and

Additional Protocols)

Ships according to Resolution No. 18 (Mob-8.3) 59

First digit (*)

1-reserved for future use

2-WIG

Second Digit (*)

0-All ships on the type

Other Ships

First digit (*)

-

Second digit (*)

0-Fishing

3-see right column

4-HSC

5-see above

1-Carrying DG, HS, or MP

IMO hazard of pollutant category A.

2-Carrying DG, HS, or MP

IMO hazard or pollutant category ,

3-Carrying DG, HS, MP

IMO hazard or pollutant

4-Carrying DG, HS, or MP

IMO hazard or pollutant category C.

5-reserved for future use

-

3-vessel

-

-

1-Towing

2-Towing and length of the tow exceeds 200m or breadth exceeds 25m

3-Engaged in dredging or underwater operations.

4-Engaged in diving operations

5-Engaged in Military

Operations

6-Sailing 6-Passenger ships

6-reserved for Future use

7- Cargo ships 7-reserved for Future use

8-Tankers 8-reserved for Future use

-

-

-

7-Pleasure craft

8-reserved for future use

9-Other types of ships

9-No additional information 9-reserved for future use

DG: Dangerous Goods

HS: Harmful Substances

MP: Marine Pollutants

(*) Note: The identifier should be constructed by selecting the appropriate first and second digit

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AIS Function Key

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Several AIS display pages are available under the AIS key. Pressing the AIS key repeatedly will scroll through the following AIS screens (paging can also be done by using the left or right arrow keys after pressing the AIS key), namely:

AIS1 - OWN SHIP DATA

AIS2 - REMOTE SHIP LIST

AIS3 - RX SAFETY MSGS

AIS4 - TX SAFETY MSG

AIS5 - TX SAFETY LIST

AIS6 - REGIONAL AREAS

AIS7 - LONG RANGE LIST

AIS8 - AIS DATA LINK (SAAB transponder only)

AIS9 - AIS STATUS

AIS10 - AIS PASSWORD (SAAB transponder only)

AIS 1 – OWN SHIP DATA

This display shows the ship’s information transmitted by the AIS transponder.

Information such as ships’s name, MMSI #, call sign, IMO #, ship type/cargo, navigation status are all configured under the AIS Static setup, while the destination and ETA are taken from the AIS Voyage setup. It also gives you an idea which GPS is being used under the GPS Source field and its antenna offset data.

Display Field Descriptions:

Name:

MMSI:

Vessel’s name

Maritime Mobile Service Identity number used for identification of ship and message

Ship/Cargo Type: Ship & Cargo Type (see table A-1 for values)

AGE:

Nav Stat:

Age of the information on the display, in seconds

Navigation status as entered in AIS Voyage setup

CALL SIGN: Assigned radio call sign

IMO:

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GPS Source: Source of the GPS information in use. The choices are Primary

(MX421, MX521 or MX525 smart GPS sensors), Secondary (external GPS attached to the MX420 CDU), and Backup (Transponder

Lat/Lon:

GPS).

Position fix of the GPS in use.

GPS Ant Pos: In-use GPS Antenna location (A, B, C & D values see below) with

HDG:

COG:

ETA:

ROT:

SOG: reference to aft of bow and port or starboard of centerline.

Gyro reading, in degrees.

Course Over Ground (degrees)

Estimated time of arrival (date & time).

Ship’s Rate-Of-Turn, in degrees per minute.

Speed Over Ground (knots)

Destination: Operator entered destination under the AIS Voyage setup screen..

C

D

Antenna

Location

GPS Antenna Offset Diagram

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AIS 2 - Remote Ship List

This display shows a list of ships equipped with AIS transponders that are being tracked within VHF range. The list can be sorted by range from your location or by bearing. Because of space limitation, only 7 vessels are displayed per page. More data can be displayed by pressing the softkey.

softkey then pressing the

Pressing the softkey will show the display below (note the BRG range indicated on the top-right corner of the display). You can scroll left or right by pressing the increments.

or softkey to list other ships around you in 15 degree

Display Field Description:

TGT: Target number of MMSI database for quick vessel access. TGT corresponds with vessels shown on the PLOT3 display. The icon indicates the vessel type.

AIS2 icons and their meaning:

(Flag) Class A or Class B vessel

Base Station

Search and Rescue (SAR)

Aids to Navigation

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MMSI: Defines the unique vessel ID

RNG: Range (meters) from your ship to the remote vessel

BRG: Bearing (degrees) from your ship to the remote vessel

NAME: Name of remote vessel

Softkey Descriptions:

- User can choose to have a list of MMSIs displayed in 15 degrees increments.

- Shift bearing search by 15 degrees left

- Shift bearing search by 15 degrees right

- User can choose to display the MMSIs by distance relative to the vessel

- Additional softkeys are available

- Shows the next 7 MMSIs

- Shows the previous 7 MMSIs

- Return to the original softkey setup

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AIS 3 - RECEIVED (RX) SAFETY MESSAGES

This display stores all AIS safety messages broadcast by other AIS stations or messages addressed to your ship. The MX420/AIS will retain the last 100 messages received. You have the option to manually delete the message by pressing the

softkey. When the number of messages exceeds 100, the oldest message will be overwritten.

Display Field Descriptions:

RECEIPT TIME -

SENDER MMSI -

MODE -

Date and time the message was received

MMSI of the originator of the message

ADDRESSED - sent only to this vessel

BROADCAST - sent to all vessels

Text Message received.

Softkey Descriptions:

- press this softkey to display the next message received (maximum of 100 messages are stored in memory)

- press this softkey to display the previous message received

- delete the displayed message

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AIS 4 - TRANSMIT (TX) SAFETY MESSAGE

This display allows you to write and send short text messages dealing with safety at sea and broadcast it to all AIS equipped vessels or address it to a specific station.

Display Field Descriptions:

OUTPUT CHNL - This field specifies which channel is to be used for sending the safety message. User can scroll through four different settings. The data displayed in this field can be altered by pressing the E key then press the

softkey repeatedly to toggle through 4 choices, namely: Auto Select, Channel A, Channel B or Both A&B. Default value is Auto Select.

MODE- This field shows whether the message is to be sent to a specific MMSI

(addressed) or to all (broadcast). Pressing the softkey will select either ADDRESSED or BROADCAST

TGT

- This field gives the short target number which is directed to the appropriate MMSI.

MMSI - This field indicates the MMSI number related to the target (TGT) number selected to send the text message.

TEXT String - Enter the text message to be sent using the alphanumeric keypad.

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Softkey Descriptions:

The softkeys can be displayed by pressing the E key first.

Operator’s Manual

- Each time this soft key is pressed, the transponder channel selection is changed. The following values are available:

AUTO SELECT - transponder determines on which channel to broadcast the information

CHANNEL A - broadcast on channel A only

CHANNEL B - broadcast on channel B only

BOTH A & B - broadcast on both channels

- This softkey toggles the output mode between ADDRESSED or BROAD-

CAST. When addressed is selected, the MMSI number will be displayed automatically when the TGT number is specified.

- Pressing this softkey sends the text message to the transponder for broadcasting.

- Show more softkeys

- Pressing this key sends the number of people (specified in the AIS Voyage setup) to the transponder.

- Pressing this softkey commands the transponder to send the Height Over

Keel as set in the AIS Static configuration screen.

-

Shows the previous softkeys

Note: Don’t forget to press the E key to exit the editing mode.

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AIS 5 - TX SAFETY LIST

Automatic Identifaction System

This display allows you to scroll through the safety messages you transmitted under the AIS 4 (TX SAFETY MSG) display.

Display Field Description:

Transmit Time - Time the message was transmitted

Mode -

Message Field

Whether it was addressed or broadcast

Softkey Description:

- View next message

- View previous message

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AIS 6 - REGIONAL AREAS

Operator’s Manual

Two VHF and one DSC receiver channels have been designated for AIS use worldwide. These frequencies are:

AIS 1 (Channel 87B, 161.975 MHz, (2087)

AIS 2 (Channel 88B, 162.025 MHz, (2088)

DSC (Channel 70, 156.525 MHz)

Under normal masterless operation, the MX423 AIS transponder operates autonomously with other ships or AIS base stations using the AIS1 & 2 frequencies.

When entering areas controlled by a competent authority (i.e. Coast Guard) under

Vehicle Tracking System (VTS) rules, the MX423 AIS transponder can be polled and controlled by the VTS station. In this situation, data communication between ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore stations are done through the DSC frequency (channel 70). All VTS related activities are happening without any user intervention.

The controlling VTS base station schedules all ship’s data transmission and provides the regional parameters shown in AIS 6 display, such as:

Operating frequency, bandwidth and mode of Channel A & B receivers

Northeast and Southwest corner coordinates of the region

Zone size

Date and time tag

These parameters are stored in the memory bank of the AIS transponder and can be displayed in the MX420/AIS CDU. Up to eight regions can be stored by the transponder. The AIS constantly checks the stored region boundaries and compares it to its own position. If the distance to the region boundaries is greater than

500 miles from its own position or the time tag was older than five weeks, those stored regions will be erased from memory.

The operator (administrator) has the option to do a full or partial editing of the regional parameters when needed. The conditions below have to be observed when editing:

Use the correct channel numbers (see table A-1, page 143 or in the AIS card)

Latitude difference should be no less that 20 NM or larger than 200 NM

Longitude difference should be no less than 20 NM or larger than 200 NM

The zone size should be no less than 1 square mile or larger than 8 square miles

Distance to the zone is less than 500 NM from you current position

Manual entries violating any of the above conditions will be rejected by the AIS transponder without notifying the operator. If the region memory is full, the oldest regional memory will be replaced by a newly accepted one.

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Display Field Descriptions:

REGION Region ID (1- 8)

IN USE YES if the ship is currently operating in the displayed region or NO if not

TIME Time in the region, HH:MM format

CHANNEL - Channel number assigned to channels A & B

BAND -

TX/RX -

Normal or Narrow bandwidth

Transmit and receive channel status

Values: (N) the channel is not in use

(Y) the channel is in use

POWER Power level (High or Low)

NE LAT, NE LON, SW LAT, SW LON - Northeast and Southwest corner coordinates of the region area

ZONE SIZE - in nautical miles

Updated at:

Date and time tag of the regional parameters

Softkey Descriptions:

- softkey used to display information for the next region.

- softkey used to display information for the previous region.

- request new regional parameters from the transponder.

Note: The MX420 will inform the operator if the zone size or delta Lat/Lon are too small. Also, the vessel’s position must be within 500 Nm of the region or the AIS will not accept the input.

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AIS 7- LONG RANGE (LR) DISPLAY

Operator’s Manual

This display shows a list of queries by other AIS stations going through the

INMARSAT-C or other long-range communication systems. The MX420/AIS can be set to respond to long-range interrogations either automatically, manually (default) or by external application. When the setting is in AUTO, the MX420 will provide the requested information automatically. When in MANUAL, the operator needs to press the softkey to reply. This softkeys can be brought up by pressing the

E key. Every time a long range query is received, the MX420 will pop-up a message window accompanied by an audio alarm. When in “Ext Appl” mode the external application will need to respond to the MX420/AIS with permission to reply.

To look at the long-range list, press the AIS key several times until it shows the AIS 7

Long Range screen (as shown below).

Display Field Descriptions:

ID

TIME

MMSI`

REPLY

- Query index number (0-99)

- Time when the long-range message was received (HH:MM)

- ID of requesting station

- YES-means the query has been answered

NO - means no reply has been sent yet

ABCEFIOPUW - an ‘X’ under each letter heading denotes the information requested in the interrogation message

Reply message description:

A - Ship’s: name, call sign and IMO number

B - Date and time of message composition

C - Position

E - Course over ground

F - Speed over ground

I - Destination and Estimate Time of Arrival (ETA)

O - Draught

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P - Ship/Cargo type

U - Ship’s: length, breath, type

W - Persons on board

Softkey Descriptions:

Pressing the E key will bring up the following softkeys:

press this softkey to advance the display to show the next page of information.

press this key to show the previous page of information.

this softkey becomes available only when Long Range inquiry is received, otherwise it will not be there.

To reply to long-range interrogation in manual mode, do the following:

1. Press the

9

AIS

YZ

key several times until the AIS 7 screen appears.

2. Press the E key to show the softkeys.

3. Press softkey. A pop-up window requesting for an ID number will appear.

4. Enter the listed ID number to reply to.

5. Press E key to exit.

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AIS 8 – AIS DATA LINK STATUS

Operator’s Manual

This display is present only when the transponder type selected is the SAAB type in the AIS Config screen. This screen gives the user an idea of how busy is the AIS transponder. Total loading should not be more than 80% on each channel for efficient operation.

Display Field Descriptions:

Age: Number of seconds when last message was received (1-999).

Mode: The AIS transponder operation can either be autonomous or assigned.

Load: AIS receiver throughput (0 – 100%).

Total MMSIs: Total number of vessels using the AIS system (0 - 500).

Note: This display is available only under SAAB transponder selection. It is not available when ATLAS transponder is selected.

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AIS 9 – AIS STATUS

This display shows the operational status of the AIS transponder.

The table below is a list of possible text messages generated by the AIS transponder:

T e x t M e s s a g e s

A IS : U T C C lo c k L o s t

A IS : P rim a ry E x te rn a l D G N S S In U s e

A IS : P rim a ry E x te rn a l G N S S In U s e

A IS : B a c k u p D G N S S In U s e (B e a c o n )

A IS : B a c k u p D G N S S In U s e (M s g 1 7 )

A IS : B a c k u p G N S S In U s e

A IS : P rim a ry E x te rn a l S O G /C O G In U s e

A IS : B a c k u p S O G /C O G In U s e

A IS : H D G D a ta In U s e

A IS : R O T D a ta In U s e

A IS : O th e r R O T S o u rc e In U s e

A IS : C h a n n e l M a n a g e m e n t P a ra m e te rs C h a n g e d

A IS : S e c o n d a ry E x te rn a l D G N S S In U s e

A IS : S e c o n d a ry E x te rn a l G N S S In U s e

A IS : S e c o n d a ry E x te rn a l S O G /C O G In U s e

A IS : U T C C lo c k O K

A IS : B o o t S e q u e n c e In P ro c e s s

Table A.3 - AIS 9 Display Messages

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Automatic Identification System

AIS 10 - AIS Password

Operator’s Manual

This screen is available when the transponder type selected is SAAB under the AIS

Config menu.

For security purposes, two authorization levels are provided in the MX420 and SAAB transponder, namely:

User (default password “user”)

Administrator (see password card for default password)

The user level can control most of the “AIS Static” setups, except for the: MMSI, Ship

Name, Call Sign, and IMO. These settings are critical to the proper operation of the

AIS system and will require an administrator password when editing.

The AIS password is printed on a tear-off page located at the end of this manual. Use the default administrator password after installation to enter the ship’s name, IMO #,

MMSI #, call sign, default power and transmitter A & B modes. Please detach this page and store it in a safe place for security. You will need the administrator password again when changing any of the configuration items that controls the transponder or when assigning a new administrator password.

Note: If you decide to change the default administrator password, make sure you use a password that you will not forget. You should use a minimum of 4 characters (maximum of 8) and avoid using special characters like $,* or >. The password is case sensitive.

Remember if you forget or lose the password, you will not be able to make changes to the transponder setups under “AIS Static”. We have no way of recalling your personal password. However, we can reset the transponder to the default password. This can only be done in the factory.

The AIS 10 screen allows you to change the default passwords of the user or administrator level authorization. You need to type the current password first before you can change it.

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Softkey description:

Press the E key to show the two softkeys below:

pressing this softkey will toggle the password level to either a user or administrator.

sends the new password to the AIS transponder. Password change is not effective until this softkey is pressed.

How to change the administrator or user password?

1. Press the

9

AIS

YZ

key several times until the ‘AIS 10 - AIS Password’ screen is displayed.

2. Press the E key.

3. Make sure the “PASSWORD LEVEL” is set to ADMINISTRATOR. If not, press the TOGGLE LEVEL softkey. (Substitute with the USER level to change the User

Password)

4. Enter the current password. To bring up the lowercase letters, press the key with the desired letter and hold it down for about 3 seconds. Once the first letter is in lowercase the succeeding letters will be in lowercase. You may have to press the numeric keys once or twice to get the desired letter (i.e. to get the letter “i”, press the #3 key 3 times). The cursor will advance to the next character automatically when you pause for more than 2 seconds. Use a 4-character minimum password.

A password can be up to 8 characters.

5. Press the down arrow cursor key to move the cursor to ‘NEW ADMINISTRA-

TOR PASSWORD:’ field.

6. Enter the new password.

7. Press the softkey to save the new password into the AIS transponder.

8. Write down the new password and store it in a secure place.

Note: This display is available only under SAAB transponder selection. Not shown under ATLAS.

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PLOT 3 – AIS Plot Screen

Operator’s Manual

The PLOT3 screen is accessed by pressing the PLOT key several times until the

PLOT3 screen is shown. This display shows a graphical representation of the area surrounding the vessel. All boats equipped with AIS that are within the display resolution will be shown. Each boat icon has an index number next to it corresponding to the target number shown in the “AIS2 - Remote Ship List” display. The boat icons are oriented according to their heading. The boat in the center of the screen is your ship. To zoom-in press the key.

Softkey Description:

- This softkey enables the user to quickly view information for the next target. In addition to the ship identification data, the range and bearing from your ship to the target is also calculated.

- This softkey enables the user to quickly view information for the previous target.

- This softkey enables the user to quickly access information for a specific target in the list by entering its ID number. It gives access to information from all vessels in the database. The displayed vessels are the same ones listed in the AIS2 Remote Ship List display. The

MKD will not accept invalid targets, or targets for which there is no information.

- Zoom In.

- Zoom Out.

Plot 3 Icons:

Class A or B vessel

Base Station

Search and Rescue (SAR)

Aids to Navigation

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Datum List

Appendix B - Datum List

Operator’s Manual

The receiver supports more than 100 datums. Table A-1 provides the names and abbreviations for these datums.

Table A-1. Datum Names and Abbreviations

WGS-84 W84

WGS-84 + OFFSET

WGS-72 wpo

W72

EUROPEAN 1950

NAD 27 (CONUS)

EUR

NAS

NORTH AMERICAN 1983 NAR

ADINDAN

AFGOOYE

ADI

AFG

AIN EL ABD 1970

ANNA 1 ASTRO 1965

ARC 1950

ARC 1960

ASCENSION ISL. 1958

AIN

ANO

ARF

ARS

ASC

ASTRO BEACON E

ASTRO B4 SOROL ATL

ASTRO DOS 71/4

ASTRONOMIC ST. 1952

AUSTRALIAN 1966

AUSTRALIAN 1984

BANGLADESH

BELLEVUE (IGN)

BERMUDA 1957

BOGOTA OBSERVATORY

ATF ast

SHB

ASQ

AUA

AUG ban

IBE

BER

BOO

CAMPO INCHAUSPE

CANTON ASTRO 1966

CAPE

CAPE CANAVERAL

CARTHAGE

CHATHAM 1971

CHUA ASTRO

CORREGO ALEGRE

DJAKARTA (BATAVIA)

DOS 1968

EASTER ISLAND 1967

EURO 1950 (Western)

EURO 1950 (Cyprus)

EURO 1950 (Egypt)

EURO 1950 (Iran)

EAS ewe ecy eeg eir

EURO 1950 (Sicily)

EUROPEAN 1979

FINNISH - KKJ esi

EUS fin

GANDAJIKA BASE gan

GEODETIC DATUM 1949 GEO

GUAM 1963

GUX 1 ASTRO

GUA

DOB

CAI

CAO

CAP

CAC

CGE

CHI

CHU

COA

BAT

GIZ

HJORSEY 1955

HONG KONG 1963

INDIAN (VIETNAM)

INDIAN (INDIA)

IRELAND 1965

ISTS 073 ASTRO 1969

JOHNSTON IS. 1961

KANDAWALA

KERGUELEN ISLAND

NAD 27 (CANADA)

NAD 27 (CANAL ZONE)

NAD 27 (CARIBBEAN)

NAD 27 (CENT. AMER)

NAD 27 (CUBA)

NAD 27 (GREENLAND)

NAD 27 (MEXICO)

OBERVATORIO 1966

OLD EGYPTIAN

OLD HAWAIIAN

OMAN

O.S.G.B 1936

PICO DE LAS NIEVES

PITCAIRN ASTRO 1967

PROV. S. CHILEAN 63

PROV. S. AMER. 1956

PUERTO RICO

QATAR NATIONAL

QORNOQ

REUNION

ROME 1940

RT 90 SWEDISH

SANTO (DOS)

SAO BRAZ

SAPPER HILL 1943

SCHWARZECK

SOUTH AMERICAN 1969

SOUTH ASIA

SOUTHEAST BASE

SOUTHWEST BASE

TIMBALAI 1948

TOKYO

TRISTAN ASTRO 1968

VITI LEVU 1916

TOY

TDC

MVS

WAKE-ENIWETOK 1960 ENW

ZANDRIJ ZAN

OGB

PLN

P I T

HIT

PRP

PUR

QAT

QOU

REU

MOD swe

SAE

SOA

SAP

SCK

SAN

SOA seb swb

T I L ncz ncr nca ncu ngl nmx nob

OEG

OHA

FAH

HJO

HKD ivi iin

IRL

IST

JOH

KAN

KEG ncd

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Beacon List

Appendix C - Beacon List

Operator’s Manual

ALGERIA

The following list of known DGPS beacon transmission sites is compiled from government agencies and several publications. There may be other beacon sites available which are not on the following list, as the network continues to grow. You can usually find more information regarding available beacon stations from the maritime authority in the country you are in. MX Marine assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information which follows; it is only provided as a matter of convenience.

ID:700 ID: 713

RAX CAXINE LT

36º00’N.02º57’E

287.0 kHz xxx baud

Range: 200 n.m.

ID: -------

AUSTRALIA

ALBANY, WA

35º05’ S.117º54’E.

315.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:711

BRISBANE, QLD.

27º04’ S. 153º03’E.

294.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:707

CAPE FLATTERY,

QLD.

14º57’ S 14518’E.

304.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:700

CAPE SCHANCK

38º30’ S.144º53’E.

314.0 kHz

200 baud

.

CORNY POINT

12º00’ S.131º00’E.

316.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:710

HORN ISLAND

10º36’ S.142º18’E.

320.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:702

INGHAM, QLD.

18°33'20"S 146°18'21"E

306.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 708

KARRATHA

20º45’ S.116º27’E.

304.0 kHz

200 baud

ID:701

MACKAY, QLD.

21°06'12"S 149°12'41"E

315.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 704

MALLACOOTA, VIC.

37°34'05"S 149°44'10"E

318.0 kHz

200 baud

PERTH, WA

31°47'53"S 115°56'01"E

306.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 712

SYDNEY, NSW

33°59'11"S 150°58'40"E

308.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 703

WEIPA, QLD.

12°39'13"S 141°51'37"E 9

316.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 709

BAHRAIN

AL BANDER 26°07'N

50°39'E

298 KhZ

200 baud

ID: 480, 481 140

BELGIUM

HASSELT

50º56’N. 05º20’E.

287.0 kHz

Baud: 200

ID: xxx

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Operator’s Manual

Proposed

OOSTDYCK

51º16’N. 02º26’E.

311.5 kHz

Baud: 200

Proposed

OOSTENDEN PHARE

51º14’N.02º55’E.

312.0 kHz

200 baud

Range: 119 n.m.

ID:420

REF1: xxx

Proposed

BERMUDA

ST. DAVIS HEAD

32º22’ N.64º39’W.

323.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 950

BRAZIL

ABROLHOS

17°57'53"S 38°41'38.2"W

290.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 461

ARACAJU

10°58'10.7"S

37°02'11.1"W

320 kHz

100 baud

ID: 468

CALCANHAR

05°09'36.8"S °29'15.2"W

305.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 467

172

Beacon List

CANIVETE

00°30'31.6"S 0°24'50.1"W

310.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 463

ILHA RASA

26°S 43°06'W

315.0 kHz

100 baud

MOELA

24°02'51.9"S 6°15'42.8"W

305.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 462

RIO GRANDE

32°08'54.1"S 2°06'11.7"W

290.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 464

SANTA MARTA

28°36'16.2"S

48°48'50.1"W

310 kHz

100 baud

ID: 466

SAO MARCOS

02º29’ N.44º18’W.

300.5 kHz

100 baud

SÃO TOMÉ

22°02'32.3"S

41°03'10.7"W

300.0 kHz

100 aaud

ID: 465

BULGARIA

CAVARNA

43º25’ N. 28º22’E.

300.0 kHz

Range: 100 n.m.

CANADA

GREAT LAKES

POINT PETRIE

43º50’ N. 77º09’ W.

303.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

PORT WELLER

43º15’ N. 79º13’W.

302.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

SOMBRA

42º43’ N. 82º29’W.

306.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

TROIS RIVIERES

46º23’ N. 72º27’W.

321.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:928

REF1: 314

REF2: 315

LAUZON

46º48’ N. 71º09’W.

Version 2.0

Beacon List

314.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:927

REF1: 316

REF2: 317

ST JEAN SUR

RICHELIEU

46º19’ N. 73º18’W.

308.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:929

REF1: 312

REF2: 313

WIARTON

44º42’ N.81º08’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:918

REF1: 310

REF2: 311

EAST COAST

Planned:

HALIFAX

44º40’ N. 63º36’W.

TBA kHz

200 baud

ID:938

REF1: 328

REF2: 329

EAST POINT

46º27’ N. 61º58’W.

314.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:937

REF1: 330

REF2: 331

RIVIERE DU LOUP

47º45’ N. 69º36’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:926

REF1: 318

REF2: 319

MOISIE

50º12’ N. 66º07’W.

314.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:925

REF1: 320

REF2: 321

PT. ESCUMINIAC

47º40’ N. 64º47’W.

TBA kHz

200 baud

ID:936

REF1: 332

REF2: 333

CRANBERRY

ISLAND

45º19’ N. 60º55’W.

286.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:934

REF1: 336

REF2: 337

RIGOLET

54º15’ N. 58º30’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:947

REF1: 348

Operator’s Manual

REF2: 349

CAP. DES ROSIERS

48º51’ N.64º12’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:924

REF1: 322

REF2: 323

LA ROMAINE

50º12’ N.60º41’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:923

REF1: 324

REF2: 325

DEVIL’S HEAD

49º07’ N.58º24’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:943

REF1: 344

REF2: 345

CAPE BONAVISTA

48º42’ N.53º05’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:943

REF1: 346

REF2: 347

PARTRIDGE ISLAND

45º14’ N.66º03’W.

311.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:939

REF1: 326

REF2: 327

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WESTERN HEAD

43º59’ N.64º39’W.

296.0 kHz, 100 baud

ID:935

REF1: 334

REF2: 335

CAPE RACE

46º39’ N.53º04’W.

288.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:940

REF1: 338

REF2: 339

PORT AUX

BASQUES (NFLD)

47º34’ N.59º09’W.

290.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:941

REF1: 340

REF2: 341

PISTOLET BAY

51º29’ N.55º48’W.

317.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:944

REF1:

REF2:

WEST COAST

TRIPLE ISLAND

54º17’ N.130º52’W.

308.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

POINT

ATKINSON

49º19’ N.123º15’W.

320.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:902

REF1: 302

REF2: 303

RACE ROCKS

48º18’ N.123º32’W.

309.9 kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

Planned:

ALERT BAY

50º35’ N.125º55’W.

309.9 kHz

100 baud

ID:909

REF1: 300

REF2: 301

TOFINO

48º18’ N.123º32’W.

309.9 kHz

200 baud

ID:908

REF1: 304

REF2: 305

SANDSPIT

53º14’ N.131º48’W.

TBA kHz

100 baud

ID:906

REF1: 305

REF2: 306

CHINA

BEI TANG

39º06’ N.117º43’E.

310.5 kHz

Beacon List

200 baud

ID: BT

REF1: 608

REF2: 609

QING HUANG DAO

39º55’ N.119 º37’E.

287.5 kHz

200 baud

ID: QH

REF1: 606

REF2: 607

DA SAN SHAN

38º52’ N. 121º50’E.

301.5 kHz

200 baud

ID: DS

REF1: 602

REF2: 603

WANG JIA MAI DAO

36º04’ N.120º26’E

313.5 kHz

200 baud

ID: MD

REF1: 614

REF2: 615

BAO HU

20º00’ N.110º56’E

310.5 kHz

200 baud

ID: BH

REF1: 652

REF2: 653

SHANGHAI

xxºxx’ N.xx ºxx’E

XXX.X kHz

100 baud

ID:

REF1:

Beacon List

REF2:

16 Stations Planned

DENMARK

HAMMERODDE

55º18’N. 14º46’E.

289.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:451

REF1: 700

REF2: 701

SKAGEN

57º45’N. 10º36’E.

296.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 453

REF1:

REF2:

BLAAVANDS HUK

55º33’N. 08º05’E.

290.0 KHz

100 baud

ID:452

REF1:

REF2:

ESTONIA

NARVA

59º28’N.28º02’E.

295.5 kHz

Range: 100 n.m.

RISTNA LT.

58º56’N.22º04’E.

307.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:530

840

REF 1:

REF 2:

FINLAND

KLAMILA

60º30’N.27º30’E.

287.0 kHz

Range: 135 n.m.

KOKKOLA

63º50’N.23º10’E

290.5 kHz

Range: 135 n.m.

KUOPIO

63º00’N.27º30’E

295.0 kHz

Range: 38 n.m.

MARJANIEMI

65º02’N.24º35’E

314.5 kHz

Range: 135 n.m.

PORKKALA

59º58’N.24º23’E

293.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:400

REF1:600

REF2:

PORVOO

60º12’N.25º50’E

292.5 kHz

Range: 135 n.m.

MÄNTYLUOTO

61º36’n.21º28’E.

287.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:401

REF1: 601

REF2:

OUTOKUMPU

62º41’N.26º01’E.

304.5 kHz

Operator’s Manual

100 baud

ID:403

REF1: 603

REF2:

PUUMALA

61º24’N.28º14’E.

290.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:402

REF1: 602

SAVONLINNA

61º55’N.28º45’E.

Range: 38 n.m.

TURKU

60º26’N.22º13’E

301.5 kHz

Range: 108 n.m.

VAASA

63º13’N.21º10’E

294.0 kHz.

Range: 135 n.m.

FRANCE

ECKMUHL

47º48,N. 04º23’W.

312.5 kHz

100 Baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

GATTEVILLE

49º42,N. 01º16’W.

299.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

ILE DE GROIX

PEN MEN

Operator’s Manual

47º39,N. 03º31’W.

309.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

LES BALEINES

46º15,N. 01º34’W.

305.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

100 Baud

GERMANY

KOBLENZ

50º22,N. 07º35’E.

302.5 kHz

Range: 122 n.m.

LES SABLES

46º31,N. 01º48’W.

307.0 kHz

Range: 108 n.m.

CAPE FERRET

44º39,N. 01º15’W.

310.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CAP BEAR

42º31,N. 03º08’E.

304.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

WUSTROW

54º20,N. 12º23’E.

308.0 kHz

200 Baud

ID:491

HELGOLAND,

DÜNE

54º11,N. 07º54’E.

298.5 kHz

200 Baud

ID:492

CAP S MATHIEU

PHARE

48º20,N. 04º0846’E.

310.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

ZEVEN

53º17,N. 09º15’E.

303.5 kHz

Range: 154 n.m.

PONT DE BUIS

48º18,N. 04º0546’E.

308.5 kHz

Range: 108 n.m.

PORQUEROLLES PHARE

42º59,N. 06º12’E.

286.5 kHz

Range: 195 n.m.

REVELLATA

(Corsica)

42º35,N. 08º46’E.

294.5 kHz

ICELAND

REYKJANES

63º49,N. 22º42’E.

293.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:411

BJARGTANGAR

65º30,N. 24º31’W.

300.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:412

SKAGATA

Beacon List

66º07,N. 20º06’W..

289.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:413

RAUFARHÜFN

66º27,N. 15º27’W..

289.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:414

DJUPIVOGUR

64º39,N. 14º16’W..

291.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:415

SKARDSFJARA

63º31,N. 17º59’W..

287.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:416

IRELAND

LOOP HEAD

52º34,N. 09º56’E.

293.0 kHz

Range: 150 n.m.

MIZEN HEAD

51º27,N. 09º48’E.

284.0 kHz

100 baud

ID:430

REF1: 660

TORY ISLAND

55º16,N. 08º15’E.

288.5. kHz

Beacon List

100 baud

ID:435

REF1: 670

WICKLOW HEAD

52º58,N. 06º00’E

306.5

Range: 150 n.m.

ITALY

C FERRO

21º09’N. 09º31’E

298.0 kHz.

Range: 150 n.m.

S MARIA D LEUCA

39º47’N. 18º22’E

292.0 kHz

Ragne: 150 n.m.

S VITO LO CAPO

38º11’N. 12º44’E

306.5 kHz

Range: 150 n.m.

TRIESTE

45º41’N. 13º46’E

284.5 kHz

Range: 150 n.m.

VIESTE

41º53’N. 16º11’E

292.5 kHz

Range: 150 n.m.

JAPAN

TURUGI-ZAK

I

35º08’ N.139º40’E.

309.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

DAIOH-ZANI

34º16’ N.136º54’E.

288.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

Names Unknown:

45º31’ N.141º56’E.

295.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

40º00’ N.144º18’E.

309.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

43º22’ N.140º28’E.

316.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

42º58’ N.144º23’E.

288.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

41º25’ N.140º05’E.

309.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

41º26’ N.141º28’E.

Operator’s Manual

302.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

38º57’ N.139º50’E.

288.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

37º51’ N.136º55’E.

295.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

30º16’ N.141º35’E.

316.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

35º42’ N.140º52’E.

295.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

34º53’ N.132º02’E.

305.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

33º52’ N.129º41’E.

295.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

Operator’s Manual

REF2:

33º05’ N.139º51’E.

302.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

33º15’ N.134º11’E.

295.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

31º59’ N.128º21’E.

302.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

31º22’ N.131º20’E.

309.0 kHz

100/200 baud

ID:

REF1:

REF2:

LATVIA

VENTSPILS

57º22,N. 21º31’E.

308.5. kHz

100 baud

LITHUANIA

KLEIPADA

55º43,N. 21º05’E.

304.5 kHz

Range: 50 n.m.

NIDA

55º18’N. 21º00’E.

315.5 kHz

Range: 20 n.m.

NETHERLANDS

GILZE RIJEN

51º37’N. 04º56’E.

302.0.5 kHz

Range: 100 n.m.

HOEK VAN

HOLLAND

51º59,N. 04º07’E.

312.5 kHz

100 baud

ID:425

REF1: 650

REF2: 651

IJMUIDEN PHARE

52º28’N. 04º35’E.

301.0 kHz

Range: 49 n.m.

VLIELAND PHARE

53º18’N. 05º04’E.

294.0 kHz

Range: 119 n.m.

NORWAY

ANDENES

69º20’N. 16º08’E.

311.0 kHz

Range: 162 n.m.

BJORNAYA

74º30’N. 19º00’E.

301.0 kHz

Range: 200 n.m.

EKOFISK

56º35’N. 03º12’E.

289.0 kHz

Range: 100 n.m.

FAERDER

50º01,N. 10º31’E.

310.5 kHz

Beacon List

100 baud

ID: 500

REF1: 780

FRUHOLMEN

71º06’N. 23º59’E.

309.5 kHz

Range: 162 n.m.

UTSIRA

59º18,N. 04º52’E.

313.0. kHz,

100 baud

ID: 505

REF1: 785

UTVAER

61º02,N. 04º30’E.

314.0. kHz,

100 baud

ID: 507

REF1: 787

SVINOEY

62º19,N. 05º16’E.

302.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 508

REF1: 788

REF2:

HALTEN

64º10,N. 09º24’E.

313.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 510

REF1: 790

REF2:

SKOMVAER

67º24,N.11º52’E.

301.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 513

REF1: 793

Beacon List

REF2:

LISTA

58º06,N.06º34’E.

304.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 503

REF1: 783

REF2:

SKLINNA

65º12,N.10º59’E.

303.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 511

REF1:

REF2:

TORSVAAG

70º14,N.19º30’E.

284.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 516

REF1:

REF2:

VARDOE

70º23,N.31º09’E.

305.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 520

REF1:

REF2:

TORUNGEN

58º23,N.08º48’E.

299.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 501

REF1:

REF2:

HELNES

71º03,N.26º13’E.

308.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 518

REF1:

REF2:

BELLSUND

77º23,N.13º57’E.

302.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 523

REF1:

REF2:

POLAND

DZIWNOW

54º01,N.14º44’E.

283.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 481

REF1:

REF2:

JAROSLAWIEC

54º33’N.14º44’E.

295.0 kHz

Range: 49 n.m.

ROZEWIE

54º49,N.16º33’E.

301.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 482

REF1:

REF2:

PORTUGAL

Planned

CARVOEIRO

39º22’N.09º24’W.

Operator’s Manual

311.5 kHz

Range: 200 n.m.

HORTA

38º32’N.28º37’W.

308.0 kHz

Range: 300 n.m.

LECA

41º12’N.08º42’W.

290.0 kHz

Range: 100 n.m.

PORTO SANTO

33º04’N.16º21’W.

287.5 kHz

Range: 200 n.m.

SAN MIGUEL

37º44,N.25º39’W.

312.5 kHz

Range: 200 n.m.

SAN VICENTE

37º02,N.09º00’W.

305.5 kHz

Range: 200 n.m.

RUSSIA

ASTRAHANSKY

54º41,N.47º35’E

283.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

BALTIYSK

54º38,N.19º54’E.

286.5 kHz

100 baud

DGEDGINSKY

65º12’N.36º49’E

Operator’s Manual

283.5 kHz

Range: 170 n.m.

GORKOVSKY

59º50’N.30º10’E

288.5 kHz

Range: 54 n.m.

KANINSKY

68º39’N.43º18’E

284.5 kHz

Range: 130 n.m.

KODOSHSKIY 1

44º06’N.39º02’E

289.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

KODOSHSKIY 2

44º06’N.39º02’E

308.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

NOVOROSSIYKAY 1

44º36’N.37º58’E

292.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

NOVOROSSIYKAY 2

44º36’N.37º58’E

315.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

SHEPELEVSKY 1

59º59’N.29º08’E

298.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

SHEPELEVSKY 2

59º59’N.29º08’E

311.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

TAGANROGSKY

47º12’N.38º57’E

286.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

TEMIRYUKSKIY 1

45º20’N.37º14’E

285.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

TEMIRYUKSKIY 2

45º20’N.37º14’E

303.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

TONKY

69º51’N.61º07’E

303.5 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

TYSP NAVOLOKSKY

69º44’N.33º06’E

315.0 kHz

Range: 110 n.m.

SPAIN

CABO DE GATA

36º43,N. 02º11’W.

298.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO DE LA NAO

38º44,N. 00º14’E.

297.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO DE PALOS

37º38,N. 00º41’W.

302.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO FINISTERRE

42º53,N. 09º16’W.

296.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

Beacon List

CABO MACHICHACO

43º27,N. 02º45’W.

285.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO PENAS

43º39’N. 05º51’W.

295.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO SALOU

41º03’N. 01º10’E.

291.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CABO SAN

SEBASTIAN

41º53’N. 03º12’E.

313.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CALA FIGUERA

39º27’N. 02º31’E.

294.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

CASTELLON

39º58’N. 00º01’E.

286.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

ESTACA DE BARES

43º47’N. 07º41’W.

293.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

LA ENTALLADA

28º13’N. 13º56’W.

284.0 kHz

Range: 111 n.m.

MAHON

180

Version 2.0

Beacon List

39º52’N. 04º18’E.

293.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

MALAGA

36º43’N. 04º25’W.

299.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

PUNTA ROSCA

28º01’N. 16º33’W.

285.0 kHz

Range: 111 n.m.

PUNTA LLOBREGAT

41º19’N. 02º39’E.

288.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

PUNTA SILLA

43º24’N. 04º25’W.

289.0 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

ROTA

36º38’N. 06º23’W.

303.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

TARIFA

36º00’N. 05º39’W.

302.5 kHz

Range: 97 n.m.

SWEDEN

KAPELLSKAR

59º43’ N.19º04’E.

307.5 kHz

Range: 130 n.m.

ÖSKÄR

60º32’N. 18º23’E.

291.5 kHz

? baud

ID: 463

Version 2.0

HOBURGEN

56º55’N. 18º09’E.

302.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 465

KULLEN

56º18’N. 12º27’E.

293.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 466

BJURÖKLUBB

64º29’ N.21º34’E.

311.5 kHz

100 baud

Range: 130 n.m.

HÅLLÖ

58º20’ N. 11º13’E.

297.0 kHz

200 baud

ID: 467

UNITED KINGDOM

ENCRYPTED

SIGNALS

ST. CATHERINE’S

POINT

50º34’ N. 01º18’ W.

293.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 440

REF1: 680

REF2:

LIZARD

49º57’ N. 05º12’ W.

284.0 kHz

100 baud

ID: 441

REF1: 681

Operator’s Manual

REF2:

POINT LYNA

S

53º25’ N. 04º17’ W.

304.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 442

REF1: 682

REF2:

RHINNS OF ISLAY

55º40’ N. 06º30 ‘W.

293.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 443

REF1: 683

REF2:

BUTT OF LEWI

S

58º31’ N. 06º16’ W.

289.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 444

REF1: 684

SUMBURGH HEAD

59º52’ N. 01º16’ W.

304.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 445

REF1: 685

REF2:

GIRDLE NESS

57º08’ N. 02º03’ W.

311.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 446

REF1: 686

REF2:

FLAMBOROUGH

HEAD

54º07’ N. 00º04’ W.

302.5 kHz

181

Operator’s Manual

100 baud

ID: 447

REF1: 687

REF2:

NORTH

FORELAND

51º22’ N. 01º27’ E.

310.5 kHz

100 baud

ID: 448

REF1: 688

REF2:

Planned: 16 Stations

UNITED STATES

ANNETTE ISLAND,

AK

55º04’N.131° 37’W

323 KHz

100 baud

ID: 889

REF 1: 278

REF 2: 279

Message: TYPE-9

COLD BAY, AK

55°11’N.162°42’ W

289 KHz

100 baud

ID: 838

REF 1: 296

REF 2: 297

Message: TYPE-9

GUSTAVUS, AK

58°25’N.135°42’ W

288 KHz

100 baud

ID: 892

REF 1: 284

REF 2: 285

Message: TYPE-9

KENAI, AK

60°40’N.151°21’ W

310 KHz

100 baud

ID: 896

REF 1: 292

REF 2: 293

Message: TYPE-9

KODIAK, AK

57°37’N.152°12’ W

313 KHz

100 baud

ID: 897

REF 1: 294

REF 2: 295

Message: TYPE-9

MILLER’S FERRY, AL

32°05’N.087°24’ W

320 KHz

200 baud

ID: 865

REF 1: None

REF 2: None

Message: TYPE-9

MOBILE POINT, AL

30°14’N.088°01’ W

300 KHz

100 baud

ID: 813

REF 1: 026

REF 2: 027

Message: TYPE-9

CAPE MENDOCINO, CA

40°26’N.124°24’ W

292 KHz

100 baud

ID: 885

REF 1: 270

182

Beacon List

REF 2: 271

Message: TYPE-9

PIGEON POINT,CA

37°11’N.122°23’ W

287 KHz

100 baud

ID: 883

REF 1: 266

REF 2: 267

Message: TYPE-9

POINT ARGUELLO,

CA

34°34’N.120°39’ W

321 KHz

100 baud

ID: 882

REF 1: 264

REF 2: 265

Message: TYPE-9

POINT BLUNT, CA

37°51’N.122°25’ W

310 KHz

200 baud

ID: 884

REF 1: 268

REF 2: 269

Message: TYPE-9

POINT LOMA, CA

32°40’N.117°15’ W

302 KHz

100 baud

ID: 881

REF 1: 262

REF 2: 263

Message: TYPE-9

CAPE HENLOPEN,

DE

38° 47’N.075°05’W

298 KHz

200 baud

Version 2.0

Beacon List

ID:.05

REF 1: 010

REF 2: 011

Message: TYPE-9

CAPE CANAVERAL, FL

28°28’N.080°33’W

289 KHz

100 baud

ID: .09

REF 1: 018

REF 2: 019

Message: TYPE-9

EGMONT KEY, FL

27°36’N.082°46’ W

312 KHz

200 baud

ID: 812

REF 1: 024

REF 2: 025

Message: TYPE-9

MIAMI, FL (Virginia Key)

25°44’N.080°10’ W

322 KHz

100 baud

ID: 861

REF 1: 020

REF 2: 021

Message: TYPE-9

KOKOLE PT, HI

21°59’N.159°45’W

300 KHz

2

00 baud

ID: 880

REF 1: 260

REF 2: 261

Message: TYPE-9

UPOLU POINT, HI

20°15’N.155°53’ W

286 KHz

200 baud

ID: 879

REF 1: 258

REF 2: 259

Message: TYPE-9

ROCK ISLAND, IL

42°00’N.090°14’ W

311 KHz

200 baud

ID: 863

REF 1: None

REF 2: None

Message: TYPE-9

ENGLISH TURN, LA

29°53’N.089°56’ W

293 KHz

200 baud

ID: 814

REF 1: 028

REF 2: 029

Message: TYPE-9

CHATHAM, MA

41°40’N.069°57’ W

325 KHz

200 baud

ID: 802

REF 1: 004

REF 2: 005

Message: TYPE-9

BRUNSWICK, ME

43°53’N.069°57’W

316 KHz

100 baud

ID:.00

REF 1: 000

REF 2: 001

Message: TYPE-9

CHEBOYGAN, MI

45°39’N.084°28’ W

292 KHz

Operator’s Manual

200 baud

ID: 836

REF 1: 112

REF 2: 113

Message: TYPE-9

DETROIT, MI

42°18’N.083°06’ W

319 KHz

200 baud

ID: 838

REF 1: 116

REF 2: 117

Message: TYPE-9

NEEBISH ISLAND,

MI

46°19’N.084°09’ W

309 KHz

200 baud

ID: 835

REF 1: 110

REF 2: 111

Message: TYPE-9

SAGINAW BAY, MI

43°38’N.083°50’ W

301 KHz

100 baud

ID: 837

REF 1: 114

REF 2: 115

Message: TYPE-9

UPPER KEWEENAW,

MI

47°14’N.088°37’ W

298 KHz

100 baud

ID: 831

REF 1: 102

REF 2: 103

Message: TYPE-9

WHITEFISH POINT,

Version 2.0

183

Operator’s Manual

MI

46°46’N.084°57’ W

318 KHz

100 baud

ID:834

REF 1: 108

REF 2: 109

Message: TYPE-9

ST LOUIS, MO

38°37’N.089°45’W

322 KHz

200 baud

ID: 862

REF 1: 154

REF 2: 155

Message: TYPE-9

VICKSBURG, MS

32°20’N.090°55’ W

313 KHz

200 baud

ID: 860

REF 1: 150

REF 2: 151

Message: TYPE-9

FT MACON, NC

34° 42’ N 76° 41’ W

294 KHz

100 baud

ID: 807

REF 1: 014

REF 2: 015

Message: TYPE-9

PORTSMOUTH HARBOR,

NH

43°04’N.70°43’ W

288 KHz

100 baud

ID: 801

REF 1: 002

REF 2: 003

Beacon List

Message: TYPE-9

Message: TYPE-9

SANDY HOOK, NJ

40°28’N.074°00’ W

286 KHz

200 baud

Site ID: 804

REF 1: 008

REF 2: 009

Message: TYPE-9

FT STEVENS, OR

46°12’N.123° 57’ W

287 KHz

100 baud

ID: 886

REF 1: 272

REF 2: 273

Message: TYPE-9

WILDWOOD, NJ

38°57’N.074°51’ W

301 KHz

200 baud

ID: 111

REF 1: 038

REF 2: 039

Message: TYPE-9

ISABELLA, PR

18°28’N.067° 04’ W

295 KHz

100 baud

ID: 817

REF 1: 034

REF 2: 035

Message: TYPE-9

MONTAUK POINT, NY

41°04’N.071°52’ W

293 KHz

100 baud

ID: 803

REF 1: 006

REF 2: 007

Message: TYPE-9

CHARLESTON, SC

32°45’N.079°51’ W

298 KHz

100 baud

ID: 808

REF 1: 016

REF 2: 017

Message: TYPE-9

YOUNGSTON, NY

43°14’N.078°58’ W

322 KHz

100 baud

ID: 839

REF 1: 118

REF 2: 119

Message: TYPE-9

MEMPHIS, TN

35°28’N.090°12’ W

310 KHz

200 baud

SALLISAW, OK

35°22’N.094°49’ W

299 KHz

200 baud

ID: 866

REF 1: None

REF 2: None

184

Version 2.0

Engineering Mode Operator’s Manual

Appendix D- Engineering Mode

The Engineering Display, which is activated in CFG1 Operation, enables an expanded series of display screens in some of the functions.

In general, these screens are used by the technician during troubleshooting or by MX Marine engineers during testing and software debugging. This section describes what information is relevant to you, or the information we need to help you troubleshoot your MX420.

Note: Information which is not described here is unsupported, which means MX Marine will not

expand or provide any more information than what is provided in this manual.

If you should enable these screens, they will be turned off automatically the next time power is cycled on the MX420.

AUX7 - Unit Information & Self Test

When the Engineering Display is active, the AUX7 screen adds one line of detail to display the engineering level that is turned on:

In addition, you can press the E function key and run a complete self test by pressing the Make Selftest softkey. The first display of the self test is a keypad test. Press each function and softkey once. When you have pressed each once the test will automatically advance to the

Traffic Light test. Observe that the three traffic lights go from dim to bright. Press OK if they illuminate correctly or Fail if they don’t.

Version 2.0

185

Operator’s Manual Engineering Mode

The CDU will go on to conduct a Contrast test. Observe that the display goes through its full range of contrast from white to black.

Press OK if it varies correctly or Fail if it doesn’t. Next, the CDU will conduct a Backlight test. Observe that the display goes through its full range of illumination. Press OK if it varies correctly or Fail if it doesn’t.

Then, the CDU will conduct a Keylight test. You may need to dim the lights in the room or shade the keyboard so that you can see the backlights behind the function and softkeys. Observe that the keypad backlights go through their full range of illumination. Press OK if it varies correctly or Fail if it doesn’t.

186

Upon completion of the above tests, a Test Results screen will be displayed. In addition to the visual tests which you witnessed, the

CDU also performs background tests on the program memory (FLASH

ROM) and the real-time Clock. These tests check about 90% of the

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CDU. The items which it does not check are the input and output ports, the GPS and Beacon receivers in the antenna.

If one of the background tests fail, you can try clearing the CDU’s memory to see if the problem will clear. However, when you clear the memory (also known as a Cold Start), you will erase all waypoints and configuration settings. A cold start sets the CDU back to factory default settings.

Otherwise, record the failure(s) and contact your dealer or MX Marine to arrange for service or repairs. It is possible, but unlikely, that a cold start will correct other failures noted during the selftest. MX Marine will need the CDU serial number (from the rear panel) and the Software

Version number to help you further.

Press the E key when you are finished viewing the results.

CDU Cold Start - Clearing Memory to Factory Default

When you Cold Start the CDU, you will erase all of your waypoints and configuration settings. A cold start sets the CDU back to factory default settings. Perform this procedure if the CDU becomes non-responsive, fails one of the self tests described above, or starts acting very unusually.

To perform the cold start:

1. Turn the CDU off. There are three methods you can use:

A) Press the On/Off function key and select the Yes softkey, this causes a software shut down of the CDU.

B) Press and hold the On/Off function key for up to 5 seconds, this causes a hardware shut down of the CDU.

C) Turn power off at the circuit breaker panel feed or power supply which feeds the CDU. This is the preferred method.

2. Hold the right most softkey down while applying power to the

CDU; continue holding the softkey until you hear a normal

key click for the softkey.

3. Release the softkey.

4. Press the POS function key. If the position reads N 00

°

00.0000,

W 000

°

00.0000, then the CDU was properly reset. If it does not, try the procedure again.

A common source of memory corruption is an aged Lithium memory back-up battery. This will result in either a slow deterioration of memory retention or it may abruptly dump all its memory.

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MX Marine recommends the battery be changed every 2 to 3 years of operation by an authorized technical dealer. Marine electronics dealers or radio shops will typically stock the replacement battery, Lithium type CR2032, 3V.

GPS - GPS CDU Troubleshooting

GPS3 - Visible Satellite Information

This screen provides some basic information about the MX421 smart

GPS antenna performance, in that it is basically an extension of GPS1 screen. It tells you what satellites are available to track at the moment under the PRN number. The signal strength of satellites under track is in the second column labeled S/N. The weakest signal strength that the GPS receiver can track is 25. However, any satellite with a signal strength under 32 is considered troubled, and the GPS receiver will not use that satellite in the navigation solution. Troubled satellites tend to cause position jumps and greatly reduce the accuracy of the GPS position fix.

The EL, AZ, and STA values represent the satellite’s Elevation and

Azimuth, and Almanac Status respectively.

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Low signal to noise (S/N) quality numbers may be an indication of local interference from on-board electronic equipment such as Radar,

INMARSAT, VHF, SSB and other high power transmitters. Review the installation of the entire system to ensure you have followed proper procedures for cabling, power, and, most importantly, grounding and antenna placement. The majority of these problems will be resolved by better grounding and antenna location selection. Regarding grounding, the water intake for the engine, or any other electrical ground relying on the engine or generator for Earth ground, is not good for the

GPS and especially the beacon receiver.

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GPS4 - GPS Position Uncertainty

Operator’s Manual

This screen presents a bar graph representing the HDOP for the past

23 hours. If you are trying to do precision work or navigation in the same general area (within 100 miles) as the day before, you can look at this screen to see when the best HDOP periods are. The GPS constellation shifts back 4 minutes per day. That means you can expect the

GPS coverage to be virtually the same today as it was yesterday.

The small 1 hour gap in the bar graph represents the 24th hour. The gap is provided to ease the readability of the bar graph for the present time. The dashed line extending horizontally from the 4 represents the current HDOP Limit Alarm, which is set in CFG Position. The current

HDOP and VDOP values are given in the upper window.

MX Ant Reset & CSI Reset Tools

Special tools are available in the MX420 CDU that can be used to reset the GPS and Beacon engines in the MX421. Use them only in extreme cases when the GPS or beacon receiver fails or takes too long to lockon. The “MX Ant Reset” softkey will clear the satellite almanac memory of the GPS engine and reset all settings of the antenna to factory default conditions. The “CSI Reset” softkey resets the differential beacon board.

MX Ant Reset Procedure:

This procedure will work only under Engineering level mode.

1. Press the AUX key several times to bring up the AUX7 screen.

2. Press the left-most softkey 3 times (to bring-up Eng’g level 3).

3. Press the E key.

4. Press the “MX Ant Reset” softkey to reset the GPS engine (or the “CSI Reset” softkey to reset the beacon engine).

5. Press the E key to exit.

6. Press the GPS key to display the GPS or DGPS Status screen.

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Appendix E - Dual Control Head Mode

The Dual Control mode, which is enabled in the CFG Dual Contr. screen, allows you to connect two MX 420 CDUs in a Master / Slave configuration where a common data base is shared between the two

CDU control heads. This configuration also allows you to use one antenna connected to the Master unit for both CDUs. This configuration requires an MX 420/8 for a master unit and a MX 420/2 or MX 420/

8 slave unit. The remaining data port/s, the MOB/Event input port, and the alarm output ports are still available on each unit for individual use on each CDU.

The hardware interface is accomplished by connecting NMEA Output

1 to NMEA Input 1 between the two units. Refer to the Installation &

Service Manual for the appropriate pin outs.

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MX 420/8

MASTER UNIT

CABLE A

PORT 1

BRN [NMEA1 IN (A)]

BRN/WHT [NMEA1 IN (b)]

4

5

PRPL [NMEA1 OUT (A)]

PRPL/WHT [NMEA1 OUT (B)]

SHIELD

6

7

1

MX 420/2 or MX 420/8

SLAVE UNIT

CABLE A

PORT 1

1

6

7

4

5

SHIELD

PRPL [NMEA1 OUT (A)]

PRPL/WHT [NMEA1 OUT (B)]

BRN [NMEA1 IN (A)]

BRN/WHT [NMEA1 IN (B)]

No Antenna

Connected

The interface between the two units takes place over a high speed data link. The master unit must be connected to the antenna. The master unit receives the NMEA signals from the MX421 antenna and pass it along to the slave unit at a one second rate. Due to the high speed data link, there is virtually no visible position delay between the two units.

When the two units are first configured as master and slave, the master unit mirrors to the slave, and the Common Data Base (see Table E-

1) is downloaded from the master to the slave. This function also takes place each time the units are powered up. If you happen to have the

CFG1 Dual Control screen active, the status bar will indicate Mirror-

ing during the database update period.

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Table E-1. Master/Slave Common Database

Data Base

Present Position

Time

Date

Routes

Waypoints

Reset XTE

DGPS Setup

Dual Control Alarms

Man Over Board

Comments

Update once per second

Update once per second. Displayed in the same mode on both units.

Only one unit can make changes at any given time.

Only one unit can make changes at any given time.

Only one unit can make changes at any given time.

Only one unit can make changes at any given time.

Only one unit can make changes at any given time.

The items detailed in Table E-2 are independently controlled at the individual CDU heads.

Table E-2. Independently Controlled Functions

Data Base

Plotter Setup

GPS Engineering

Display

Dual Control Setup

Lighting Setup

DGPS Displays (slave reflects the conditions in master)

NMEA Out

Waypoint Sorting

Comments

Navigate Displays

Position Displays

Auxiliary Displays

Tide Displays

GPS Displays (slave reflects the conditions in master)

Printer Out 2

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Turning Master and Slave Units Off

Dual Control Head Mode

Before turning the power off to either the master or slave unit, make sure you go to the CFG1 screen and disable the dual control function.

If the master unit is turned off while in dual control mode, the slave unit will not be connected to the antenna nor display a position. The unit that remains on will alarm until the data link is reestablished, the unit is turned off, or Dual Control is turned off.

Dual-Control Integrity Monitoring

The Dual-Control Integrity Monitoing (IM) feature is an optional feature wherein two independently navigating MX420/8 units connected as a master/slave configuration can compare their position solutions.

The unit that has the best position accuracy becomes the controlling unit. Its Position, Speed and Course calculations are used for display, navigation and data output. The basic requirements are; they are both MX420/8 models with each own GPS/DGPS smart antenna and both have the IM option enabled.

This IM feature can be found under the CFG/Dual Control menu in units that has the IM license. This menu item is normally hidden and will show only when the slave MX420/8 unit has been detected.

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Appendix F - Demonstration Mode

Operator’s Manual

This enables the CDU to function as though you are under way, even though you are completely stationary. The default setting is No. When set to Yes, all three Traffic Lights will be illuminated, and a D symbol is displayed in the upper left corner of every display. Generally speaking, this feature is used by MX Marine and your dealer for show room or trade show demonstrations. However, you can use it as a training tool until you become familiar with the CDU. You can also use it to output

NMEA 0183 records on the data ports to test and demonstrate other devices such as autopilots, chart plotters, and radars.

In the CFG Operation screen, activate the Demonstration Mode by selecting Yes.

Follow:

Active Route: causes the CDU to use the route loaded in RTE1 screen.

Rhumb Line: causes the CDU to follow the bearing you input in this screen under Demonstration COG.

Demonstration SOG: causes the CDU to simulate a speed of up to 99 knots. Slower speeds of 5 to 25 knots provide the best demonstration results.

Demonstration COG: causes the CDU to simulate a course over ground of up to 359.9 degrees when Follow is set to Rhumb Line.

To setup your course, load the desired waypoints into RTE1. Notice that the CDU loads your point of departure as N 00, W 000.

Operator’s Manual Demonstration Mode

Before you adjust your position, set your WPT Pass Criterion to Dis-

tance in the CFG1 Navigation screen. To adjust your position, pick a point near your first waypoint. A distance of 1 or 2 miles from the first waypoint is good to start with. Go to the POS1 screen and press E.

Next, press the NAV function key, then the E key. Press the Reset XTE softkey. Press the E key. This resets your cross-track error and updates the active route in RTE1 with the adjusted position.

Now just use the CDU as you normally would. You can output NMEA

0183 data records to other devices. Be careful, however, other instru-

ments will interpret the data as completely valid. So, don’t run the

Demonstration Mode while you are underway and connected to devices that are being used in real time, like your autopilot.

Glossary Operator’s Manual

Glossary

AIS - Automatic Identification System.

A shipboard broadcast transponder system in which ships continually transmit their ID, position, course, speed and other data to other nearby ships and shoreline authorities on a common VHF radio channel.

ALARM

Message by which the navigator signals the occurrence of an event.

The alarm is indicated by an audible tone and/or a message (or icon) on the display.

ALMANAC

Library of coarse satellite orbital characteristics used to calculate satellite rise times, set times, angles of elevation, etc. Almanac data is valid for 181 days.

ALTITUDE

The height of the antenna over mean sea level.

AMBIENT

Surrounding or encompassing environment.

ANTENNA HEIGHT

The height (over the waterline) in which the antenna is installed.

This value is used in 2D mode only.

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

See BAROMETRIC PRESSURE.

APPARENT WIND ANGLE (AWA)

The angle of the wind as measured on the moving vessel relative to the heading of the vessel. An AWA of 0° indicates a wind from straight ahead, whereas 180° indicates a wind from straight astern.

An AWA of 90° indicates a wind perpendicular to the vessel from its starboard side.

APPARENT WIND SPEED (AWS)

The speed of the wind as measured on the moving vessel.

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Assigned Mode

A transponder operates in an assigned mode if it is instructed by an external system to follow certain dictated rules, such as, which slots to use for transmission.

Autonomous Mode

A transponder operates autonomously if it is independent of external control.

A

UX

Auxiliary Port – A communication port on the AIS transponder, which can be used for NMEA or RTCM, input.

AZIMUTH

In satellite navigation, the angular distance measured on the horizon circle in a clockwise direction from the north point in the horizon to the satellite point in the horizon.

BAUD

Transmission rate unit of measurement for binary coded data (bit per second).

BEARING

BIT

The direction of one terrestrial point from another, expressed as angular distance from North, clockwise through 360°.

Short form of Binary Digit. The smallest element of data in a binarycoded value.

bps

Bits Per Second.

CENTRAL MERIDIAN

The meridian (see MERIDIAN) that passes through the center of the referenced grid (Zero longitude).

CHARACTER STRING

Contiguous characters (other than spaces) in a message.

CHECKSUM

The value sent with a binary-coded message to be checked at the receiving end to verify the integrity of the message.

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CLICK (KEYBOARD)

The audible tone generated when a key is activated.

CLOCK

A precisely-spaced, stable train of pulses generated within an electronic system to synchronize the timing of digital operations within the system.

CLOCK OFFSET

The differences between the times at the CDU/processor tracking a satellite, the satellite itself, and GPS system time.

C/A CODE

See COARSE/ACQUISITION CODE

COARSE/ACQUISITION (C/A) CODE

The NAVSTAR satellite signal that may be accessed by civilian members of the user community.

COEFFICIENT OF EARTH FLATTENING

The value F that quantitatively describes by how much the earth’s ellipsoid semimajor axis (A) is shorter than the semiminor axis (B).

F = (A-B)/A.

COG

See COURSE OVER GROUND

COMPASS BIAS

Angle of misalignment between the steering compass and the keel line of the vessel or long axis of the vehicle.

COMPASS DEVIATION

See DEVIATION.

COMPASS HEADING

Compass reading before correction for deviation and variation.

COMPASS MAGNETIC VARIATION

See MAGNETIC VARIATION.

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COURSE

Glossary

The horizontal direction in which a vessel is steered or intended to be steered, expressed as angular distance from north clockwise through 360°. (Strictly the term applies to direction through the water, not the direction intended to be made good over the ground).

The course is often designated as true, magnetic, or compass as the reference direction is true, magnetic, or compass, respectively.

COURSE LINE

A line, as drawn on a chart, extending in the direction of a course

(Rhumb Line).

COURSE OVER GROUND

Course made good relative to the sea bed.

CROSS TRACK ERROR (XTE)

The perpendicular distance from the vessel to the actual course line (track) as defined in the active route.

CURSOR

A flashing rectangle superimposed on a character position in the display window, indicating that a character may be entered in that position, or that the existing character may be changed via the keyboard.

DATUM

The framework on which the coordinates used to define position on the Earth’s surface are based. In the navigator, a datum is defined by the following parameters:

A and I/F. Size and shape of a reference ellipsoid.

DX, DY, DZ. Position of the reference ellipsoid origin in relation to the satellite datum ellipsoid origin.

DEAD RECKONING

The process of determining changes of position based on measured speed and course over measured time periods.

DECCA LINES OF POSITION (LOPs)

The phantom Decca Lines of Position used in the navigator are based on mathematical models. Local deviations in propagation

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speed are not included. The calculated positions may therefore differ from positions obtained from dedicated Decca receivers by several hundred meters.

DEFAULT

A condition that the navigator assumes automatically if no other condition is initiated by the operator.

DEVIATION (COMPASS)

Magnetic compass reading error due to local magnetic field influences.

DGPS

See DIFFERENTIAL GPS.

DIFFERENTIAL GPS (DGPS)

A method of refining GPS position solution accuracy by modifying the locally computed position solution with correction signals from an external reference GPS CDU (monitor).

DILUTION OF PRECISION (DOP)

A figure of merit for the quality of GPS-derived position and clock bias estimates, based on the geometry of the selected satellite constellation. The smaller the DOP, the less the magnification of the range measurement error into position and clock bias errors. Generally, the more spread out the satellites, the lower the DOP. The most common DOPs are as follows:

HDOP - Horizontal dilution of precision.

GDOP - Geometric dilution of precision.

PDOP - Position dilution of precision.

VDOP - Vertical dilution of precision.

EARTH FLATTENING COEFFICIENT

See COEFFICIENT OF EARTH FLATTENING.

ECDIS (Electronic Chart Display and Information System)

EDIT

To modify existing display data via the keyboard.

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EDIT MODE

Glossary

The state in the navigator where it is possible to enter or change data. EDIT MODE is accessed by pressing the E-key. Press the Ekey once more to ENTER the data into the memory and leave EDIT

MODE.

ELEVATION ANGLE

The angle made by the line-of-sight range to the satellite and the horizontal plane of the navigator antenna. Thus, the elevation angle is 90 degrees when the satellite is overhead and 0 degrees when it first appears on the horizon. Satellites whose maximum elevation angle is less than 5 degrees are not good candidates for providing an accurate position (latitude and longitude) update.

ELLIPSOID

A spheroid whose north-south axis is shorter than the east-west axis (oblate spheroid).

ENTER

To store data in the memory of the navigator.

EPHEMERIDES (Singular: EPHEMERIS)

Tabulations of accurate data describing celestial position and health of the satellites over a 24-hour period. The data is uploaded to the satellites every 12 hours.

ETA

Estimated Time of Arrival. Calculated on basis of the distance to the destination and the current (or estimated) speed.

FATDMA

Fixed Access Time Division Multiple Access – Data link access protocol used by base station transponders to allocate transmission slots on the data link. These slots are fixed and will thus not change until the base station transponder is re-configured.

FILTER TIME

If the GPS signals are distorted by Selective Availability (S/A) the

COG and SOG readings will be unstable, especially at low speeds.

In order to smooth out the readings you can adjust the COG/SOG

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filter time (CFG 1, COG SOG)

FLUX GATE COMPASS

A magnetic compass sensor without needle or card, whose two- or three-phase sinusoidal output is a heading reference. Interfaced to the navigator via the NMEA interface.

FM

Frequency Modulation – The method by which a signal offsets the frequency in order to modulate it on a data link.

FORCE HEALTHY

A feature of the navigator that permits the user to override the data flag in the almanac that tells the navigator that the quality of the data from a satellite is inadequate for navigation. This feature should be used only with the greatest care.

FORCE UNHEALTHY

A feature of the navigator that permits the operator to inhibit a satellite position update even though the quality of the data from that satellite apparently is acceptable.

FUNCTION

A specific operational capability of the navigator.

FUNCTION KEY

A key on the front panel of the navigator that selects a specific function.

GEODETIC

Associated with the science of Geodesy, which includes the means of determining absolute position with uniform accuracy at all points on the Earth’s surface.

GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATES

Angular displacements along parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude on an ellipsoidal surface. Ellipsoidal coordinates.

GEOID

The Earth’s surface with all topographical undulations removed

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(equipotential surface) so that all points on the surface approximate mean sea level.

GEOIDAL HEIGHT

Deviations of the geoid above and below the ellipsoid due to nonuniformity of the Earth’s mass. Geoidal height is positive when the deviation is outward from the central volume of the ellipsoid, and negative when it is inward.

GDOP (Geometric Dilution of Precision)

An indicator of the accuracy in position (latitude, longitude, altitude, and time). See DILUTION OF PRECISION.

GFSK

Gaussian-Filtered-Shift-Keying – A standardized method of modulating digital data prior to transmission on a data link.

GMSK

Gaussian-Minimum-Shift-Keying – GFSK using BT-products and modulation index which optimizes the modulated signal.

GNSS

Global Navigation Satellite System – A common label for satellite navigation systems (such as GPS and GLONASS).

GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)

The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System, which consists of orbiting satellites, a network of ground control stations, and user positioning and navigation equipment. The system has 24 satellites plus 3 active spare satellites in six orbital planes about 20,200 kilometers above the earth.

GLONASS

A satellite navigation system developed and operated by

Russia.

GMT

Greenwich Mean Time. See also UNIVERSAL TIME COORDI-

NATED.

GPS LOG

A feature of the navigator that measures the sailed distance based on the GPS signals rather than a water distance sensor.

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GPS SYSTEM TIME

Time corrected to Universal Time Coordinated (UTC) and used as the time standard by the user segment of the GPS system.

GREAT CIRCLE NAVIGATION

Navigation based on a Great Circle calculation. The advantage of

Great Circle navigation is that it brings you the shortest way through the active route. The disadvantage is that a Great Circle track may differ from the straight rhumb line that is easily drawn on a Mercator projected chart. Great Circle navigation is recommended for ocean voyages only. The advantage increases by higher latitude (north or south).

HDOP (Horizontal Dilution of Precision)

An indicator of the two dimensional accuracy in position (latitude and longitude). See DILUTION OF PRECISION.

HEADING

The direction in which the vessel is pointed, expressed as angular distance from north clockwise through 360 degrees. HEADING should not be confused with COURSE. The HEADING is constantly changing as the vessel yaws back and forth across the course due to the effects of sea, wind, and steering error.

HEADING-TO-STEER

The angle of track required to steer the vessel or vehicle from its present position to its planned destination point. This angle differs from heading, which is its present angle of track with respect to true north.

HEALTH

See SATELLITE HEALTH.

IEC

International Electro-technical Commission.

IMO

International Maritime Organization

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INCLINED PLANE

Glossary

A geometric surface that is tilted with respect to another arbitrary reference plane (for example, the Earth’s equatorial plane).

INITIALIZE

To enter constants into the navigator to enable it to start positioning and/or navigating accurately.

INTERFACE

Electronic circuits that permit the passage of data between different types of devices; For example, the speed and heading interface circuit permits data from a speed log and compass to pass to the navigator processor.

IONOSPHERE

A layer of ionized air about 80 kilometers (50 miles) above the earth’s surface.

IONOSPHERIC INTERFERENCE

Distortion imparted to a broadcast radio signal as it passes through the ionosphere.

ITDMA

Incremental Time Division Multiple Access – Access protocol for pre-announced transmissions of temporary or non-repeatable character. It is also used during data link network entry.

ITU

International Telecommunication Union.

KALMAN FILTER

A software routine that produces the navigation solution (see NAVI-

GATION SOLUTION).

KEY LOCK

Disabling the E-key so that data entries cannot be inadvertently made.

LED

Light Emitting Diode.

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LEG

One of the segments in a route.

LEEWAY

The leeward drift of the vessel from the true course due to wind.

LOCAL TIME ZONE

The time zone (see TIME ZONE) in which the navigator is located.

LOCAL TIME ZONE OFFSET

The number of hours by which the local time zone differs from

Universal Time Coordinated.

LORAN-C TIME DIFFERENCES (TDs)

The phantom Loran-C Time Differences used in the navigator are based on mathematical models. Local deviations in propagation speed and Additional Secondary Factors (ASF) are not included in the algorithm. The calculated positions may therefore differ from positions obtained when using a dedicated Loran-C receiver by several hundred meters.

MAGNETIC DEVIATION

The error introduced into the steering compass reading by nearby ferrous metal mass distorting the earth magnetic flux field surrounding the compass.

MAGNETIC HEADING

Direction, as sensed by the steering compass, in relation to magnetic north.

MAGNETIC NORTH

Direction in the plane of the observer’s horizon toward the earth’s north magnetic pole.

MAGNETIC VARIATION

The angle by which magnetic north varies from true north at any given point on the earth’s surface. This value is automatically added to the magnetic heading input to provide true heading for calculation and display purposes.

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MENU

Glossary

A list of functions in the display. Selection of a function from the list is accomplished with either the toggle key or the soft keys.

MERCATOR CHART

A map developed by Mercator projection wherein the curved surface of the Earth’s ellipsoid is projected onto a cylinder and the cylinder is “unwrapped” to form a flat representation of the ellipsoid.

MERIDIAN

The circumference line of a meridian plane. The meridians define longitude. A special case meridian is the Greenwich meridian, whose longitude is 0 degrees and to which all other meridians are referenced.

MMSI

MOTION DYNAMICS

Characteristics of changes in attitude and location of a moving object according to its application and/or environment. For example, vessels at sea in rough waters may have low forward velocity but high-rate, short-term changes in attitude due to yaw, pitch and roll.

NAVIGATION SOLUTION

The mathematical derivation of navigation components (for example, speed, heading, set, drift) from a series of satellite position updates plotted over time.

NMEA

National Marine Electronics Association. The NMEA electronics interface specifications have been developed under the auspices of the Association. The NMEA 0183 is an internationally recognized specification for interfacing marine electronics. NMEA 0183 version 2.1 is identical to IEC 1162-1.

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PARALLEL

The perimeter of a parallel plane in the earth’s ellipsoid. The parallels define latitude. A special case parallel is the equator, whose latitude is 0 degrees and to which all other parallels are referenced.

PARITY BIT

A bit added to, or subtracted from, a binary coded message for parity checking purposes.

PARITY CHECK

A simple statistical operation performed by the software that monitors binary coded data being transmitted to verify that the received message is the same as the transmitted message.

PARITY CONVENTION

In checking message parity (refer to PARITY CHECK), the software may be designed to check either odd parity or even parity.

The choice is called parity convention: either odd or even parity convention. Under odd parity convention rule, the binary-coded message has the parity bit set to make up an odd number of message bits. Under even parity convention rules, the binary-coded message has the parity bit set to make up an even number of message bits.

P-CODE

A limited-access signal broadcast by the NAVSTAR satellites currently available only to military users.

PDOP (Position Dilution of Precision)

An indicator of the accuracy in position (latitude, longitude, and altitude). See DILUTION OF PRECISION.

PLANE PROJECTION

The technique of converting the curved surface of the Earth to a flat surface to represent a map.

P olled Mode

A transponder is in a polled mode during a request-response session only. Distinguish this from a station, which is polled into certain slots. This station is first polled and then enters assigned mode.

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POSITION UPDATE

Glossary

The redefining of position by analysis of satellite orbital data as referenced to time.

PRN

See PSEUDORANDOM NUMBER.

PROCESSOR

The processor circuit card in the console that controls system operations and computes the positioning/ navigation solutions.

PROMPT

A message on the display instructing the operator to make a keyboard entry.

PSEUDORANDOM NUMBER (PRN)

The identification number of a GPS satellite.

PSEUDO-RANGE

Range that includes errors due to clock offset.

PSP

Presentation System Port – A communication port on the AIS transponder used as an interface to external systems, i.e. the

MX420.

PULSE SPEED SENSOR

Speed log whose speed output signal is defined by a pulse rate output.

RANGE RESIDUAL

The difference between the expected satellite range and the measured satellite range for the last measurement taken from each satellite in the constellation.

RATDMA

Random Access Time Division Multiple Access – Access protocol for transmissions which have not been pre-announced.

This is used for the first transmission during data link network entry or for messages of non-repeatable character.

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REFERENCE COMPASS

The compass against which the steering compass (see STEERING

COMPASS) may be calibrated.

REFERENCE ELLIPSOID

A mathematical description of the Earth’s ellipsoidal shape (see

ELLIPSOID), which is the reference frame for positioning computation.

REFERENCE GPS MONITOR

A GPS CDU whose precise (surveyed) position is known. It compares its own GPS position solution to the surveyed position and generates correction values as a function of the position coordinate differentials. The correction values are transmitted to user

GPS CDUs for use as corrections to their own GPS position solutions.

RESET

To return stored values to either the default value or zero in memory.

RHUMB LINE

The course of a vessel that keeps a constant compass direction, drawn as a line on a chart or globe and cutting across all meridians at the same angle. A rhumb line is a straight line on a Mercator chart.

RHUMB LINE NAVIGATION

Navigation based on Rhumb Lines. See also GREAT CIRCLE NAVI-

GATION.

RMS

See ROOT MEAN SQUARED.

ROOT MEAN SQUARED (RMS)

A statistical measure of probability, stating that an expected event will happen 68% of the time. In terms of position update accuracy,

68 position updates out of 100 will be accurate to within specified system accuracy.

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ROUTE

Glossary

A route is a sequential list of waypoints describing a planned voyage. The active route is the route used for the actual navigation of the vessel.

RTCM

Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services.

S/A

See SELECTIVE AVAILABILITY

SATELLITE HEALTH

Go or no-go message for each satellite included in the almanac data. The message states whether or not the measurements from those particular satellites can be relied upon for accurate results.

SATELLITE SIGNAL

Transmitted electromagnetic energy from a GPS satellite whose time of arrival is measured by the navigator to calculate the position of the navigator antenna.

SELECTIVE AVAILABILITY (S/A)

A system whereby the accuracy of GPS is reduced. S/A is controlled by the U.S. Department of Defense.

SEMIMINOR AXIS

The distance from the center of the earth’s ellipse to the ellipse surface as measured along the polar axis. It is identified symbolically with the letter B, and it varies according to the reference datum used for position coordinates.

SENSOR

A device that detects a change in a physical stimulus and turns it into a signal that can be measured.

SET AND DRIFT

The direction and the speed of the water over ground (current).

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SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO (S/N)

Quantitative relationship between the useful and non-useful part of the received satellite signal. A high S/N indicates a good receiving condition.

S/N

See SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO

SOFTWARE

Values programmed and preloaded into memory. The values represent a permanent set of instructions for running the automatic functions (computations) of the navigator.

SOG

See SPEED OVER GROUND

SOTDMA

Self Organized Time Division Multiple Access – An access protocol, which allows autonomous operation on a data link while automatically resolving transmission conflicts.

SPACE SEGMENT

The orbiting satellite part of the Global Positioning System.

SPEED OVER GROUND

Speed in relation to the sea bed.

SPHEROID

See ELLIPSOID.

STEERING COMPASS

The compass used for navigation. It may be a direct-reading compass from which the heading may be entered into the navigator via the keyboard; or, it may be an electronic heading sensor that enters heading data to the navigator via an optional interface.

TDMA

Time Division Multiple Access – An access scheme for multiple access to the same data link.

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TIME OFFSET

Glossary

The number of hours and minutes by which the TIME ZONE differs from UTC (see below).

TIMEOUT

In the navigator, the automatic return to normal operation from edit mode if left unattended. The timeout delay is set in CFG 1, Opera-

tion.

TIME ZONE

One of 24 longitudinal segments around the world, each generally

15 degrees and 1 hour wide. Please check locally for the exact time zone offset relative to UTC (see below).

TRACK

In routes: The course lines between the waypoints.

In the plotter: The line showing the past movements of the vessel.

TRANSDUCER

A device that transfers power from one system to another in the same or in different form. See also SENSOR.

TRIP LOG

In the navigator, an easily resetable sum log that accumulates the distance sailed over ground based on the GPS signals. See also

GPS LOG.

TRUE HEADING

Direction in relation to true north. True heading is compass heading corrected for MAGNETIC DEVIATION and VARIATION. The true heading used by the navigator for navigation calculations is a composite of magnetic heading input from the NMEA compass, magnetic variation as calculated by the navigator, and the values entered into the compass deviation table.

TRUE NORTH

Direction along the meridian of the observer to the north pole.

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TRUE WIND ANGLE (TWA)

Similar to APPARENT WIND ANGLE, but compensated for the motion of the vessel. TWA and AWA are equal if the vessel is not moving.

TRUE WIND DIRECTION (TWD)

The direction of the wind over ground, expressed as an angular distance from north clockwise through 360°.

TRUE WIND SPEED (TWS)

The wind speed relative to either ground or water rather than to the moving vessel.

UNCERTAINTY

In the navigator, an indication of the expected accuracy expressed as the radius of a circle around the calculated (displayed) position.

The uncertainty is expressed in meters or feet. The calculation of uncertainty is based on the HDOP value.

UNIVERSAL TIME COORDINATED (UTC)

Greenwich mean time corrected for polar motion of the Earth and seasonal variation in the Earth’s rotation.

UPDATE

See POSITION UPDATE.

UTC

See UNIVERSAL TIME COORDINATED.

UTM

See UNIVERSAL TRANSVERSE MERCATOR.

UNIVERSAL TRANSVERSE MERCATOR

Alternative grid system used in harbor areas and for land applications instead of latitude and longitude.

VDL

VHF Data Link.

VDOP (Vertical Dilution of Precision)

An indicator of the accuracy in altitude. See DILUTION OF POSI-

TION.

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VELOCITY MADE GOOD (VMG)

Glossary

The speed by which the vessel is moving in the upwind direction.

When tacking, the optimization should be based on VMG (assuming that TWD is expected to be fairly constant). See also

WAYPOINT CLOSURE VELOCITY.

VHF

Very High Frequency – A set of frequencies in the MHz region.

VISIBLE SATELLITE

A satellite whose orbit has placed it above the earth’s horizon (elevation angle >0°) from the location of the navigator and is, therefore, available for acquisition. The navigator will not use satellites with an elevation angle < 5°.

VMG

See VELOCITY MADE GOOD.

VTS

Vessel Traffic Service

WAYPOINT

A point, usually along the track of the vessel or vehicle, whose position coordinates may be stored in the navigator. The point position is the basis for the heading, range, heading-to-steer, estimated time of arrival, and steering display calculations.

WAYPOINT CLOSURE VELOCITY (WCV)

The speed the vessel is moving in the direction of the next waypoint.

WCV should be used for optimization in cases where TWD is expected to vary drastically before the waypoint is reached. See also

VELOCITY MADE GOOD.

WAYPOINT PASS CRITERIA

The criterion by which the navigator determines the passing of a waypoint. The criterion is selected in CFG 1, Navigation.

WCV

See WAYPOINT CLOSURE VELOCITY.

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WORLD GEODETIC SYSTEM (WGS)

Worldwide datums (WGS 72 and WGS 84) used for satellite navigation systems. The main difference between WGS 72 and WGS 84 is a small eastward shift. The resulting difference in position will normally be 0.01 minute of longitude, which will not be noticeable on charts of scale 1:50 000 or smaller. You may thus use the WGS 84

Plus Offset datum with charts marked with a WGS 72 offset. All charts will eventually be converted to WGS 84 datum.

X-TRACK ERROR (XTE)

See CROSS TRACK ERROR.

1PPS

One Pulse Per Second – A timing signal generally provided by

GNSS receivers.

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Be sure to reference the title and identification number of this manual:

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Torrance, CA 90505

USA or write your comments on the Reader Comment Sheet on the next page and mail it to us.

Reader Comment Sheet

MX420 Operator’s Manual P/N 3508 102 70040

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PRODUCT WARRANTY AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

MX Marine products are warranted by MX Marine (the “Seller”) to original purchaser (the “buyer”) for use only to be free of all defects in material and workmanship for a period of twelve (12) months from date of purchase by Buyer.

If during the warranty period, the MX Marine products or parts thereof (“Product”) are found to be defective in material or workmanship, Seller shall repair or replace the defective Product, at the discretion of the Seller.

In order to claim this warranty service, Buyer shall return the defective Product, together with proof of purchase to Seller or its authorized service representative and pay all transportation charges, duties, and taxes associated with the return of the Product to Seller. Seller shall reimburse Buyer for costs of the return to Buyer of Product found to be defective and covered by this warranty.

Product which is repaired or replaced under the warranty is covered by this warranty for the remainder of the original warranty period or for a period of ninety (90) days after return shipment to Buyer, whichever is longer.

SELLER’S MAXIMUM LIABILITY ARISING FROM USE OF SELLER’S PROD-

UCT SHALL NOT EXCEED AND BUYER’S REMEDY IS LIMITED IN ANY

EVENT TO REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT AND REIMBURSEMENT FOR COSTS

ASSOCIATED WITH THE RETURN OF THE DEFECTIVE PRODUCT AS PRO-

VIDED HEREIN; AND SUCH REMEDY SHALL BE THE BUYER’S ENTIRE

AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY.

This warranty does not apply to failure of any equipment not sold to Buyer by

Seller, or to any Product which has been subjected to misuse, lightning strike, accident, or improper installation, maintenance or application, nor does it extend to any Product which has been repaired or altered by anybody other than the Seller or its authorized service representative, unless such repair or alteration was authorized in writing by Seller. This warranty also does not apply to batteries and losses or damage due to the batteries. Since the GPS system on which the Product operates is furnished by the U.S. Government, not Seller, the Seller shall not be responsible for the GPS system or changes in the GPS

System availability, coverage or accuracy.

THIS PRINTED LIMITED WARRANTY IS ACCEPTED BY BUYER IN LIEU OF

ANY OTHER WARRANTY FOR THE PRODUCT, WHETHER EXPRESSED

OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY

OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

IN NO EVENT SHALL SELLER BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSE-

QUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND OR NATURE, INCLUDING, BUT NOT

LIMITED TO LOSS OF PROFIT OR REVENUE, COMMERCIAL LOSS, DAM-

AGE TO OR LOSS OF PROPERTY, ARISING FROM OR RELATED TO THE

USE OF THE PRODUCT.

REQUEST FOR SERVICE

MX Marine is represented by a worldwide network of service representatives who are available to service the complete range of marine products.

Contact MX Marine for the location of your nearest authorized service representative.

A Division of NAVICO, Inc.

23868 Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 201

Torrance, CA 90505

USA

Attn: Field Service

Phone: (310) 791-8213

Fax: (310) 791-6108

E-Mail: [email protected]

You will need to know your unit’s model, serial number, and software version when contacting Leica for service. Record the serial number, and software version below.

Model number: ____________________

Serial Number:_____________________

Software Version:___________________

MX420/AIS PASSWORDS

Administrator

:

admin

(For MX423, MX531 & MX535 models)

Users

:

user

(for MX423 (SAAB R3) transponder only)

Note:

For security reasons, cut-out this page and store in a safe place after installation and setup. You need the administrator password to change critical AIS

Staticsettings.

MX Marine (US)

A Division of NAVICO, Inc.

23868 Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 201

Torrance, CA 90505

USA

+1 310 791 8213 Telephone

+1 310 791 6108 Fax

Internet: www.mx-marine.com

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