View the FLL Safety Manual - Frost Lake Logging Ltd.

View the FLL Safety Manual - Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
ENVIRONMENTAL, OCCUPATIONAL
HEALTH & SAFETY MANUAL
FROST LAKE LOGGING LTD
ENVIRONMENTAL,
OCCUPATIONAL
HEALTH
&
SAFETY MANUAL
FROST LAKE LOGGING LTD
© Copyright Free Spirit Ventures Inc.
January 2008
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Purpose:
This guide has been designed to be a practical resource for defining,
implementing and monitoring a Safety Program.
It is designed to help
companies, all levels of supervision and workers to understand what is required
to effectively implement an Environmental, Health and Safety Management
System and employ effective methods for creating a safety culture at work.
Disclaimer:
This guide has been designed to provide accurate and authoritative information.
It is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering
legal or other professional advice. The information included herein represents the
opinion of the developer and should be in no way be construed as being either
official or unofficial policy of any government body.
Nor can it be assumed that all acceptable safety measures are contained in this
reference material, or that the Authority having Jurisdiction for your workplace
may require other or additional measures. If there is any conflict between this
information and the current Workers Compensation Act, Occupational Health and
Safety regulation and related policies, the Act, the Regulation and policies shall
take precedence.
When implementing an Environmental Health & Safety Management System, a
comprehensive guide can ensure an operation will be attempting to apply ―Best
Practices‖. Providing both Supervision and the workforce with the Rules, Policies
and Procedures for safely performing their work processes, this minimizes the
potential for incidents, injuries or fatalities.
The information provided in this guide has been produced with the best intention
of being researched to meet the latest in standards and regulations. However,
application of this information by companies, supervisors and employees is their
responsibility. Applying the contents of this manual does not guarantee results,
due diligence on the part of the individuals and companies will go a long way to
ensure that.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
Manual Objectives .............................................................................................. 1
1.1
Health and Safety Policy ......................................................................... 3
1.2
The Health and Safety Accord of the BC Forest Industry ........................ 5
1.3
Petroleum Industry Guiding Principles for Worker Safety ........................ 7
2.0
Environmental, Occupational Health & Safety Management System
(EOHSMS) .......................................................................................................... 9
2.1
Commitment, Leadership & Participation................................................. 9
2.1.1 Management Representatives
2.1.2 Worker Participation
2.2
Responsibilities ..................................................................................... 10
2.2.1 Structure and Responsibilities
2.2.1.1
Principal Contractor
2.2.1.2
Independent Contractor (Employer)
2.2.1.3
Supervisors (Owner/Operator
2.2.1.4
Employee (Worker)
2.2.1.5
Prime Contractors
2.2.1.6
Suppliers
2.2.1.7
Visitors
2.2.2 Contractor Management System
2.2.2.1
Contractor Selection Process
2.2.2.2
Contractor / Consultant Pre-Work
& Monitoring Process
2.2.2.3
Contractor / Consultant Responsibilities
2.2.2.4
Contractor / Consultant Standards
2.2.2.5
Annual Review
2.3
Hazard and Risk Management .............................................................. 15
2.4
Legal and Other Requirements ............................................................. 16
2.5
Communication ..................................................................................... 17
2.6
Inspections ............................................................................................ 20
2.7
Accident/Incident Investigations ............................................................ 21
2.8
Documentation and Records ................................................................. 22
2.9
Training, Awareness and Competence .................................................. 23
2.10
Emergency Preparedness and Response ............................................. 25
2.11
Disability Management .......................................................................... 27
2.11.1 Return to Work Program
2.11.2 Responsibilities of Injured Employee
2.11.3 Troubled Employee
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2.12
3.0
Management Review............................................................................. 28
2.12.1 Review and Continual Improvement
2.12.2 Monitoring and Measurement
2.12.3 Continued Improvement
General Policies and Procedures ...................................................................... 31
3.1
General Rules ........................................................................................ 31
3.2
Disciplinary Procedure .......................................................................... 32
3.2.1 Policy – Progressive Discipline
3.2.2 Positive Discipline Program
3.3
Right to Refuse Unsafe Work ................................................................ 35
3.4
Radio and Cell Phone Procedures ........................................................ 37
3.4.1
Policy on Radio Use
3.4.2
Radio Protocol and Procedures
3.4.3
Cell phone Protocol & Procedures
3.4.3.1
Background
3.4.3.2
Employers Have a Responsibility
3.4.3.3
Cell Phone Procedure
3.4.4
Rules of Road / Radio Calling Procedures
3.5
Impairment on the Job........................................................................... 41
3.6
Working Alone / Man-check Procedure ................................................. 42
3.6.1
General
3.6.1.1
Machine Operators
3.6.1.2
Supervisors, Mechanics & Lowbed Operators
3.6.1.3
Working Alone or At Night
3.6.2
Man-check System Policy
3.7
De-Energization and Lockout Procedure ............................................... 44
3.7.1
Electrical, Mechanical, Air, Hydraulic & Physical
3.7.2
Truck Lockout Procedure
3.8
Personal Protective Equipment ............................................................. 46
3.8.1
Safety Headgear (Hard Hat)
3.8.2
HI-VIS Apparel
3.8.3
Gloves
3.8.4
Safety Footwear
3.8.5
Hearing Protection
3.8.6
Eye Protection
3.8.7
Leg Protection Devices
3.8.8
Fire Retardant Clothing
3.8.9
Respiratory Protection
3.9
Policy on Seatbelt Use .......................................................................... 50
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3.10
Climatic Conditions................................................................................ 51
3.10.1 Cold Stress
3.10.2 Heat Stress
3.10.3
`
4.0
Wind
3.11
Chainsaw Safety ................................................................................... 60
3.12
Steep Slope Skidding ............................................................................ 61
3.13
Working in Close Proximity.................................................................... 62
3.13.1 Feller Bunchers
3.13.2 Skidders
3.13.3 Processors / Loaders
3.14
Working from an Elevation .................................................................... 63
3.14.1 Ladders
3.15
Bear & Cougar Awareness .................................................................... 65
3.15.1 Bear Safety
3.15.2 Cougar Safety
3.16
Firearm Safety ....................................................................................... 66
3.17
Security .................................................................................................. 66
3.17.1 Site Security
3.17.2 Equipment Security
Emergency Response ....................................................................................... 67
4.1
First Aid ................................................................................................. 67
4.1.1
Employer Responsibilities
4.1.2
Requirements for Reporting Accidents and
Obtaining First Aid Treatment
4.1.3
Serious Injury
4.1.4
First Aid General
4.1.5
First Aid Evacuation
4.1.6
Evacuation by Road or by Air
4.1.7
Fatality
4.2
Spill Contingency Planning .................................................................... 71
4.2.1
Spill Response and Reporting Requirements
4.2.2
Closure Plan
4.3
Fire Management .................................................................................. 73
4.3.1
Welding and Burning
4.3.2
Arc Welding
4.3.3
Oxy/Acetylene Welding or Burning
4.3.4
How to Use Your Fire Extinguisher
4.3.5
How to Inspect Your Fire Extinguisher
4.3.6
Types of Fires
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5.0
4.4
Natural Disasters ................................................................................... 80
4.4.1
Landslides/Avalanches
4.3.1.1
Landslides
4.3.1.2
Landslide Safety Assessment
4.4.2
Avalanche Hazards in the Spring
4.5
H2S Release – Initial Response Strategy............................................ 83
Environmental Standards .................................................................................. 85
5.1
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) ............. 85
5.2
Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) ........................................... 86
5.2.1 Overview
5.2.2 Responsibilities
5.2.3 Documentation and Placards
5.3
Forest and Range Practices Act (FRPA) ............................................... 89
5.3.1 Plans & Maps
5.3.2 Riparian Management Areas
5.3.2.1 Storing Materials and Chemicals
5.3.2.2 Fueling Equipment
Harvesting
5.3.3 Soil Conservation
5.3.3.1 Soil Disturbance
5.3.3.2 Preventing Damage
5.3.4 Handling of Investigations
5.3.5 Due Diligence
5.3.6 Marking Standards, Ribbons and Paint
5.4
Fuel Handling, Transportation and Storage ........................................... 94
5.4.1 Small Containers < 230 L
5.4.1.1
Design
5.4.1.2
Operations
5.4.1.3
Transportation
5.4.1.4
Documentation & Training
5.4.2 Small TDG Tanks < 450L
5.4.2.1
Design
5.4.2.2
Operations
5.4.2.3
Documentation & Training
5.4.3 Large TDG Tanks > 450L
5.4.3.1
Design
5.4.3.2
Operations
5.4.3.3
Transportation
5.4.3.4
Documentation and Training
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6.0
7.0
Safe Work Practices .......................................................................................... 99
6.1
General Safe Work Practices for Workers ............................................. 99
6.2
Safe Work Practices – Camp .............................................................. 100
6.3
Safe Work Practices – Camp Catering ................................................ 100
6.4
Safe Work Practices – Barricades ....................................................... 101
6.5
Power Equipment and Tools ............................................................... 102
6.5.1
Re-occurring Hazards
6.5.2
Safety Guards
6.5.3
Suspended Loads
6.5.4
Lifting Manually
6.5.5
Compressed Air
6.5.6
Power Lines
6.5.7
Excavations
6.5.7.1
Utility Identification
6.5.7.2
Hand Digging
6.5.7.3
Mechanical Excavation
6.5.8
Backfill
6.5.9
Hydro-vac
6.5.10 Preparation of Right of Ways
6.5.11 Traffic Control
6.5.12 Compressed Air Tools
6.5.13 Small Engine Equipment
6.5.14 Rigging
6.5.15 Housekeeping
Harvesting Safe Work Procedures .................................................................. 115
7.1
Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) ............................................... 116
7.2
Falling SOP ......................................................................................... 116
7.2.1
Preparing to Fall
7.2.2
Commencing to Fall
7.2.3
Falling Safe Work Practices
7.3
Bucking (SOP) .................................................................................... 122
7.3.1
Preparing to Buck
7.3.2
Commencing to Buck
7.3.3
Safe Work Practices
7.4
Mechanized Harvesting Standard Operating Procedures .................... 124
7.4.1
Mechanized Harvesting Standards
7.4.2
General Start Up
7.4.3
Operational Procedures
7.4.4
Servicing Machinery
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7.4.5
7.4.6
7.4.7
7.4.8
Equipment on Muskeg and Ice Bridges
Mechanized Falling SWP
Skidding (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SWP
7.4.7.1 Skidding – Chokerman SWP
Mechanized Limbing and Bucking SWP
7.5
Loading Operations Standard Operating Procedures .......................... 141
7.5.1
Loading - Standard Operating Procedures
7.5.2
Maintenance
7.5.3
Preparing to Load
7.5.4
Loading
7.5.5
Loader – Grapple SWP
7.5.6
Loader - Butt-n-Top/Heel Boom SWP
7.6
Log Hauling, Low-bedding & Hiab Operations ..................................... 149
7.6.1
General Requirements
7.6.2
Safe Driving
7.6.3
Log Hauling - On the Logging Block
7.6.4
Truck Loading Procedures
7.6.5
Applying Wrappers
7.6.5.1 Definitions
7.6.5.2 General Rules
7.6.5.3 Option One
7.6.5.4 Option Two
7.6.5.5 Option Three
7.6.6
Cut-to-Length (CTL) Safe Loading Procedures
7.6.7
Log Hauling - In the Mill Yard - General
7.6.7.1 Driver‘s Rights & Responsibilities For Safety
7.6.7.2 Log Yard Unloading Procedures
7.6.7.3 Banding
7.6.7.4 Unwrapping Station Procedures
7.6.7.5 Trailer Loader Safe Work Procedures
7.6.8
Lowbed SWP
7.6.9
Hiab SWP
7.7
Maintenance Safe Work Procedures ................................................... 166
7.7.1
Maintenance Precautions
7.7.2
Supervisor SWP
7.7.3
Parts Person SWP
7.7.4
Field Mechanic SWP
7.7.5
Truck Mechanic / Servicemen WSP
7.7.6
Mechanics Helper SWP
7.7.7
Welder SWP
7.7.8
Clean Up
7.8
Blow-down Logging Operations ........................................................... 189
7.8.1
Buncher & Grapple Skidder Operators
7.8.2
Hand-bucker/Faller and Line Skidder
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8.0
7.9
Road & Road Maintenance SOP ......................................................... 190
7.9.1
Building Roads
7.9.2
Logging Right-of-ways
7.9.3
Right-of-ways Landings
7.9.4
Road Construction / Logging General Inspections
7.9.5
Road Construction-Sub-grade Construction
7.9.6
Road Maintenance
7.9.7
Road Deactivation
7.9.8
Crawler Unit SWP
7.9.9
Grader SWP
7.9.10 Loader SWP
7.9.11 Gravel Truck SWP
7.9.12 Packer SWP
7.9.13 Forklift Operator SWP
7.9.14 Excavator SWP
7.9.15 Crane/Pile Driver
7.10
Stream and River Crossings................................................................ 213
7.10.1 Drainage Structures
7.10.2 Installation of Culverts
7.10.3 Installation of Forest Road Bridges
7.10.3.1 Permanent Bridges
7.10.3.2 Temporary Bridges
7.10.4 Personnel Involved
7.10.4.1 Excavator
7.10.4.2 Chainsaw Operator
7.10.4.3 Gravel Truck
7.10.4.4 Crawler Unit
7.11
Cut-to-Length Operations .................................................................... 221
7.11.1 Harvester
7.11.2 Forwarder
7.11.2.1 Forwarder Safe Work Procedures
7.11.2.2 Forwarder SWP
Crew Transportation ........................................................................................ 227
8.1
Crew Buses & Vehicles ....................................................................... 227
8.2
All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV) ................................................................... 230
8.2.1 Operating Guidelines
8.2.2 Operating the ATV
8.3
Snowmobiles ....................................................................................... 232
8.4
Motorboats .......................................................................................... 234
8.4.1
Prevention & Safety
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8.5
9.0
Aircraft................................................................................................. 235
8.5.1
General
8.5.2
Fixed Wing
8.5.3
Helicopter Safety
8.5.4
Aircraft Emergency Equipment
Forestry ............................................................................................... 239
9.1 Slash Burning ............................................................................... 239
9.2 Operating Burning Sloop ............................................................... 240
10.0
Camp .................................................................................................. 241
11.0
Other Reference Material ................................................................................ 243
Appendices ................................................................................................................ 245
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APPENDIX A Legal Requirements and References
Appendix A1 OH&S Regulations
APPENDIX B Forms
Appendix B1
Appendix B2
Appendix B3
Appendix B4
Appendix B5
Appendix B6
Appendix B7
Appendix B8
Appendix B9
Appendix B10
Appendix B11
Appendix B12
Appendix B13
Appendix B14
Appendix B15
Appendix B16
Appendix B17
Appendix B18
Appendix B19
Appendix B20
Appendix B21
Appendix B22
Pre Work Meeting / Hazard Identification Form(Oil & Gas)
Safety Meeting / Site Orientation – Forestry Operations
Accident / Incident Report Form
Accident / Incident Investigation Form
Daily Tailgate Meeting Form
New Worker - Personal Information Record /Orientation Checklist
Personal Training and Qualifications Record
Trainee Checklist
Safety Inspection Report Forms
Field Level Hazard Assessment Form
Risk Assessment Form & Protocol
Example Form for Doing a Hazardous Task Inventory
Conducting and Testing Emergency Response Procedure (ERP)
Working Alone Checklist & Form
First Aid Assessment Checklist
Air Medi-Vac Information Card
Emergency Response Procedure & Plan (Blank)
Emergency Response Phone Numbers
Spill Report Form
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Disciplinary Actions Report
Corrective Action Log (CAL)
Contractor Sign In Form
APPENDIX C Policies and Procedures
Appendix C1
Appendix C2
Appendix C3
Appendix C4
Appendix C5
Appendix C6
Appendix C7
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Guidelines to Tailgate Safety Meetings
Inspections Policy and Procedure
Incident Investigation Policy and Procedure
Disability Management Policy
Drug and Alcohol Policy
Harassment in the Workplace Policy
Visitor Safety Policy
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1.0 MANUAL OBJECTIVES
The objective of this manual is to present the guide for developing a comprehensive
Environmental, Occupational Health and Safety Management System (EOHSMS). This
framework is based on:
1.
2.
3.
4.
WorkSafe BC OH&S Regulation and Act.
CSA Standard – Z1000-06 Occupational Health and Safety Management.
BCFSC SAFE Company Standards.
Petroleum Industry Standards.
This system provides the basic elements for an effective Safety Program that is described in
Section 2. Environmental issues are met by implementing the criteria of the Forest and
Range Practices Act (FRPA), ISO 14001 and other certification criteria as it applies to the
operational perspective of the work force.
While it is true that we cannot control all aspects of the environment in which we operate,
we certainly have the ability to control "how" we operate. It is the procedural aspects of risk
management that this booklet emphasizes. The need for this emphasis became very
evident when an examination of the circumstances involving fatal injuries indicated that in
almost all cases safe operating procedures were not followed. The same premise also can
be applied to all environmental impacts.
The basic cause of these accidents, and others before and since, is an inadequate
awareness of, respect for, and enforcement of safe operating procedures.
An effective EOHSMS enables an organization to manage occupational health and safety
issues as an integrated part of its overall business operations. In an integrated system, the
health and safety of workers are key concerns in all aspects of the organization‘s
operations, including production, human resources, administration, finance, maintenance,
and purchasing.
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It is hoped that this program will assist employees in reducing the risks associated with
logging and forestry activities by providing basic information that can be used by companies
to develop an effective program for their operations.
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1.1 FROST LAKE LOGGING LTD. HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. wants it‘s workplace to be a healthy and safe environment. To
achieve this, our Company will establish and maintain an Occupational Health and Safety
Program designed to prevent injuries and disease. Our employer is responsible for
providing workers with adequate instruction in health and safety and for addressing unsafe
situations in a timely, effective manner. All workers and service contractors are required to
work safely and to know and follow our Company guidelines for Safe Work Procedures.
Our success in managing safety will be achieved through these beliefs:
 All Accidents are preventable.
 Management is responsible and accountable for preventing injuries.
 Employees have a right to a safe workplace but also a responsibility to work safely.
 Operations will comply with current legislation and regulations.
 Employees have the right and responsibility to refuse unsafe work.
 Employees and Contractors are accountable for following Safe Work Practices.
 Management will regularly review and update procedures.
Success is everyone returning home each day to their families without injury.
Goals
To achieve 'zero' recordable incidents through safe working habits.
Objectives
 Maintain safe, clean working conditions.
 Be cooperative in our Safety Program.
 Abide by and enforce safety rules.
 Promote a genuine interest in safety and health through:
a. Regular meetings with workers for discussion of Health and Safety matters.
b. Role modeling of Safe Work Practices.
Roles and Responsibilities
Each employee/supervisor is expected to review and understand this Safety Program
before commencing work. Safety incidents or near misses will be reported to Frost Lake
Logging's office within 24 hours.
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Employer's Responsibilities
 Establishing the Health and Safety Program
 Conducting an annual review in July of each year
 Training supervisors
 Providing a safe and healthy work environment
Supervisors' Responsibilities
 Providing a Health and Safety Orientation to new workers
 Providing ongoing training to workers
 Taking part in inspections and investigations
 Reporting any safety or health hazards
 Correcting unsafe acts and conditions
Workers' Responsibilities
 Learning and following Safe Work Procedures
 Correcting hazards or reporting them to supervisors
 Participating in inspections and investigations where appropriate
 Using Personal Protective Equipment where required
 Helping to create a safe workplace by recommending ways to improve the
Health and Safety Program
Scott Kirschke
President
Date:
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1.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY ACCORD OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST
INDUSTRY
Our Key Beliefs:
•
•
•
We believe that all fatalities and injuries are preventable.
We believe in a culture where the health and safety of all workers is an over-riding
priority.
We believe that excellence in health and safety is important to our long-term success.
Shared Responsibility:
•
•
•
We are collectively and individually responsible for the safety of all workers and all worksites.
Individuals must assume responsibility for their own safety and the safety of co-workers by
following all safety rules, procedures and practices; by refusing to perform unsafe work; and
by taking collective responsibility for the unsafe conduct of others.
Tenure holders, licensees and Prime Contractors must take a leadership role in ensuring
worker health and safety and assuring accountability for safety on the worksite.
Recognition of Safety Performance and Practices:
•
•
•
The commitment to health and safety is to all workers, not just direct employees. When
engaging contractors, sub-contractors and others to provide services, the selection process
and administration of contracts will include recognition and support of good Safety
Performance and Practices.
Employers will recognize and support the safety performance of their employees.
All owners of forested lands, tenure holders and licensees will give weight to the safety
record and current practices of companies in the awarding of contracts and in the
determination of fees and levies.
Commitment to Training and Supervision:
•
We understand the importance of workers being fully prepared for the work they do and the
provision of competent supervisors who will insist on and enforce Safe Work Practices. All
workers on the worksite must be competent and fully trained and certified for the work they
are performing.
Legislation:
•
It is understood that the regulatory environment of the Forest Industry can have profound
impacts on safety. Accordingly, government ministries and agencies must take into account
the importance of health and safety when developing, reviewing and drafting applicable
areas of law and regulation.
Continual Improvement:
•
We are committed to the on-going improvement of our practices and support efforts to
develop and implement new methods, procedures and technologies that have the potential
to improve safety.
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2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM (EOHSMS)
2.1 COMMITMENT, LEADERSHIP & PARTICIPATION
Commitment, leadership and effective participation are crucial to the success of an
EOHSMS.
Management is committed to providing leadership for EOHS and assumes responsibility for
the EOHSMS.
This responsibility means management will:
 Establish, actually promote and maintain the EOHSMS.
 Provide appropriate resources to plan, implement, check, review and correct the
EOHSMS.
 Define roles, assign responsibilities, establish accountability and delegate authority to
implement an effective EOHSMS.
 Ensure workers are consulted and participate in the development of this EOHSMS.
2.1.1 MANAGEMENT REPRESENTATIVES
All Supervisors are deemed representation of Management and as so, are charged with the
responsibility to ensure the EOHSMS is established, maintained and reviewed.
2.1.2 WORKER PARTICIPATION
Workers will participate in the EOHSMS through:
 Established workplace Health and Safety Committee and meetings.
 Assisting with inspections, hazard identification and control, incident investigation,
audits, job hazard analysis, emergency planning and response and development of
operating procedures.
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2.2 RESPONSIBILITIES
2.2.1 STRUCTURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES
All groups in the industry - principal contractors, independent contractors, supervisors and
employees - share in the overall responsibility for accident prevention. It is important that
each have a clear understanding of their respective responsibilities. Refer to Occupational
Health and Safety Regulation (OHSR) Division 3; Sections 115 to 124.
2.2.1.1
PRINCIPAL CONTRACTOR
Every owner of a workplace must:
a)
provide and maintain the owner‘s land and premises that are being used as a
workplace in a manner that ensures the health and safety of persons at or near
the workplace, and
b)
Give to the Employer or Prime Contractor at the workplace the information known
to the Owner that is necessary to identify and eliminate or control hazards to the
health or safety of persons at the workplace.
The Principal Contractor must ensure the continuing coordination of the Occupational
Health and Safety activities for their contractors.
Refer to OHSR Division 3; Sections 115 and 119, and Part 26; Section 26.2.
2.2.1.2
INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (EMPLOYER)
The Independent Contractors are Employers in their own right, and are therefore
responsible for ensuring effective Accident Prevention Programs are developed and
followed by all of their employees.
This includes ensuring adequate planning,
communication, supervision and training of crewmembers in the safe performance of their
jobs. Refer to OHSR Division 3; Sections 115 to 119 and Part 26; Section 26.2.
Employer:
 Will ensure the health and safety of all workers working for that employer and any
other workers present at the workplace at which that employer's work is being
carried out. All work techniques and procedures are designed to reduce risk of
injury. Will ensure all workers are given adequate instruction, training, supervision
and know their responsibilities.
 Will establish Occupational Health and Safety policies and programs in accordance
with the regulations.
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 To provide to the Employer's workers the information, instruction, training and
supervision necessary to ensure the health and safety of those workers in carrying
out their work and to ensure the health and safety of other workers at the workplace.
 To provide and maintain in good condition protective equipment, devices and
clothing as required by regulation and ensure that these items are used by the
workers.
 To consult and cooperate with the joint committees and worker health and safety
representatives for the workplace of the Employer and with Board and Officers of the
Board.
 To cooperate with the board, officers of the board and any other person carrying out
a duty under the regulations.
2.2.1.3
SUPERVISORS (OWNER/OPERATOR)
The Supervisor (owner/operator) is in charge of implementing all aspects of the program.
Their most important responsibilities are to train each crew member in Safe Work
Procedures, to develop each crew member's respect for safety, and to continually check
work areas to ensure Safe Work Practices are being followed and undue hazards are
eliminated. Refer to OHSR Division 3; Sections 117.
The Supervisor/foreman:
 Will ensure the health and safety of all workers under the direct supervision of the
Supervisor, be knowledgeable about the OH&S Regulation and comply with the
regulations and any applicable orders.
 Ensure that employees working under their responsibility are knowledgeable of the
proper procedures, and that they follow these procedures where applicable. It is
important that each have a clear understanding of their respective responsibilities.
 Is responsible for ensuring effective Accident Prevention Programs are developed
and followed by all employees.
 Are to train each crew member in Safe Work Procedures, to develop each crew
member's respect for safety, and to continually check work areas to ensure Safe
Work Practices are being followed and undue hazards are eliminated.
 Will be responsible for reviewing policy and regulations with employees once a year,
and shall ensure that employees understand and observe these at all times.
 Will enforce policies, Safe Work Practices and Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation, which apply to the work location for which they are responsible.
 Will ensure that all personnel wear and/or use the correct personal protective
equipment in the proper manner.
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 Will thoroughly investigate all incidents and/or accidents in a fact-finding, not faultfinding manner to prevent the same or worse from happening again.
 Will ensure that all hazardous conditions receive prompt corrective action.
 Will consult and cooperate with the joint committees and worker health and safety
representatives for the workplace of the Employer and with Board and Officers of the
Board.
2.2.1.4
EMPLOYEE (WORKER)
Individuals must recognize and accept responsibility for their own safety and that of their
fellow workers. Refer to OHSR Division 3; Section 116.
This includes the responsibility to report to work in good physical and mental condition, be
constantly aware of hazards, follow Safe Work Practices at all times, and promptly report
any injury or incident so that proper treatment can be rendered and corrective action can be
taken.
If in doubt regarding a job procedure or the safety involved, consult with your Supervisor
before proceeding with a particular task.
New employees at the time of induction shall be made aware of the Company's General
Policy.
Worker:
 Will wear appropriate protective equipment, which shall be provided for specific
hazards, on the job. This equipment shall be maintained in good condition.
 Shall be knowledgeable of, and comply with all Safe Work Procedures, and shall
contribute to the ongoing maintenance of a safe working environment.
 Must recognize and accept responsibility for his or her own safety and that of their
fellow workers.
 Will not to engage in horseplay, verbal abuse or acts that may endanger fellow
workers and management staff.
 Ensure that the worker's ability to work without risk to their health or safety, or the
health and safety of any other person, is not impaired by alcohol, drugs or any other
causes.
 Will report to your Supervisor or Employer any contravention of the regulations,
absence of or defects in any protective equipment, device or clothing, or the
existence of any other hazard, that the worker considers is likely to endanger the
worker or any other person.
 Shall know and abide by the following regulations and safe working procedures.
These are designed for the protection of all employees and for efficient operation.
 Will respect the right of other employees to a smoke-free environment.
 Will understand that it is their responsibility to refuse unsafe work conditions. There
are no repercussions for refusing unsafe work.
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2.2.1.5 PRIME CONTRACTORS
The Prime Contractor of a multiple-employer workplace must:
 Ensure that the activities of employers, workers and other persons at the workplace
relating to occupational health and safety are coordinated, and
 Do everything that is reasonably practicable to establish and maintain a system or
process that will ensure compliance with this Part and the regulations in respect of
the workplace.
Each employer of workers at a multiple-employer workplace must give to the Prime
Contractor the name of the person the Employer has designated to supervise the
Employer‘s workers at that workplace.
2.2.1.6 SUPPLIERS
General duties of suppliers
Every supplier must:
 Ensure that any tool, equipment, machine or device, or any biological, chemical or
physical agent, supplied by the supplier is safe when used in accordance with the
directions provided by the supplier and complies with this Part and the regulations.
 Provide directions respecting the safe use of any tool, equipment, machine or device,
or any biological, chemical or physical agent, that is obtained from the supplier to be
used at a workplace by workers.
 Ensure that any biological, chemical or physical agent supplied by the supplier is
labeled in accordance with the applicable federal and provincial enactments.
 If the supplier has responsibility under a leasing agreement to maintain any tool,
equipment, machine, device or other thing, maintain it in safe condition and in
compliance with this Part, the regulations and any applicable orders.
2.2.1.7
VISITORS
While visiting any contractor‘s worksite visitors must:
 Check in with supervision to ensure they receive safety orientation and are aware of
all safety requirements
 Abide by all posted rules
 Wear required PPE
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
2.2.2
CONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
2.2.2.1 CONTRACTOR SELECTION PROCESS
 Contractor will submit a resume of their safety status regarding, injury statistics,
safety record and WSBC orders prior to hiring.
 Frost Lake Logging Ltd. will check the WSBC accounts record prior to hiring.
 The Contractor must be SAFE Companies certified or registered.
 The Contractor will sign on to the Frost Lake Logging Ltd. OH&S program prior to
starting work.
 Contractor will attend the same orientation process as the employees of Frost Lake
Logging Ltd.
2.2.2.2 CONTRACTOR/CONSULTANT PRE-WORK AND MONITORING PROCESS
 Contractor will attend all pre-work functions and operate as all employees of Frost
Lake Logging Ltd. are required to do.
 The Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Supervisor will observe, record and evaluate the
performance of the Contractor.
2.2.2.3 CONTRACTOR/CONSULTANT RESPONSIBILITIES
 Contractor will appoint attend all safety meeting held by Frost Lake Logging Ltd...
 Contractor will notify Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Supervisor of all incident/near-misses
that occur.
 Contractor will adhere to all safety requirements of Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Safety
Program.
2.2.2.4 CONTRACTOR/CONSULTANT STANDARDS





Work to minimize Time Loss Accidents
Address WSBC orders immediately.
Be up for review if Contractor receives WSBC sanctions.
Be up for review upon incurring a fatality
Be up for review if there are too many outstanding CAL items.
2.2.2.5 ANNUAL REVIEW
The management of Frost Lake Logging Ltd. will review the record of the Contractor at the end of
the season. Above items summarized in an annual review.Any issues that arise from this will be
discussed at the seasonal meetings as well as a meeting with Management.
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2.3 HAZARD AND RISK MANAGEMENT
A ―Hazard‖ is defined as ―any source having the ability to cause harm or damage, or a
situation which has the potential to cause harm or damage.‖
Risk Management is measuring and developing controls to avoid the identified hazard. The
following segments define how this operation develops Risk Management.
From prior assessment it has been determined that all facets of work that is covered in this
manual experience a moderately high level of hazard exposure. Main injury exposure
comes from accessing, exiting and servicing of this equipment. All work procedures
address these concerns. Any new processes will be assessed and work procedures will be
developed to address hazards identified.
Thorough planning can go a long way towards minimizing risk once work gets underway.
Anticipate problems of terrain and seasonal weather problems. Before work begins,
ambulance and emergency response procedures must be organized. Refer to OHSR Part
3; Sections 3.14 to 3.21.
SAFETY PLANNING
Pre-work Hazard Identification
 Prior to commencing work in a new area, a formal inspection of the area will be done
to identify local hazards and conditions. This inspection will be documented with
hazards noted.
 A pre-work meeting with other employees (if applicable) will be conducted and the
results of the inspection reviewed. This pre-work meeting will be documented and
available for viewing at the request of WorkSafe BC (WSBC). The pre-work checklist
is located in Appendix B-B1 – Pre-Work Safety Meeting / Hazard Identification
Form
 Other hazards noted in the work area or access to the work area will be reported to a
Supervisor immediately.
Periodic Hazard Monitoring
 Regular inspections of the work area will be conducted in order to monitor existing or
new hazards.
 Some activities, such as falling, require planning on a daily basis to ensure changing
conditions are considered.
 The time of year in which the work takes place must also be considered, as dust,
rain, snow and other weather conditions affect the safety of workers.
 Emergency procedures, including use of helicopters and ground transportation for
evacuation, must be available and all employees must be instructed in the methods
to be used to transport injured workers. The emergency transportation vehicle must
be kept available at all times.
 The workers must know the location of first aid equipment and the first aid attendant.
 Where conditions change daily (i.e. weather, proximity to other workers, etc.)
planning must be done each day before the work begins.
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2.4 LEGAL AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Access to Legislation and Regulations
Employees will have access to legislation and regulation through the following methods:
1. Access on home computer:
 Occupational Health and Safety (OSH) Act and Regulations
http://www2.worksafebc.com/publications/OHSRegulation/Home.asp
 Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) (enforced under
Federal and Provincial Legislation – see link for explanation)
http://www.worksafebc.com/publications/health_and_safety/whmis/pub_40_20_20_2
0.asp
 TDG Act and Regulations http://www.tc.gc.ca/tdg/menu.htm
2. Other materials that can be referenced are kept on site in the ETV Unit:
 Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS)
3. The following will be kept in the office for the workers to access:
 Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Act and Regulations
 Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
 TDG Act and Regulations
Incorporation of legislation and regulation into policies and SOP’s
When developing any new SOP or safety policy, the Company will ensure that the policy
has considered all legal and regulatory requirements.
Updating employees regarding changes to legislation or regulation
Management will be responsible for staying current with all changes to legal requirements
and passing all relevant information on to employees. Additional employee training will be
scheduled if necessary.
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2.5 COMMUNICATION
SCOPE
This section outlines how communication about safety is conducted within Frost Lake
Logging Ltd. operations.
Formal safety meetings will be held at least once per month. Tailgate meetings will be
conducted as the need arises such as after a near miss incident or a serious accident. Prework safety meetings will be held at the start of each new harvesting and/or road
construction operation. All of these safety meetings must be formally documented and
turned into the office with the employee time reports.
Communication between management and workers is done through (A) Meetings, and (B)
Other.
(A)
Safety Meetings
1. Seasonal startup General Safety Meeting.
2. Safety/pre-work meeting.
3. Tailgate safety meetings. See Appendix B 5 Tailgate Safety Meeting Form.
4. Shop/Office Safety Meetings
5. Management safety meetings.
6. Joint Occupational Health & Safety Committee - Safety Steering Committee
Meetings.
1.
General Safety Meeting
 Well be held at the start of the summer and winter seasons and/or any other
significant event.
 Promotes and reviews changes in health and Safety Program.
 Reviews and gets worker input into safety training programs.
 Reviews first aid attendants and equipment requirements.
 Attended by all workers and management.
 Reviews safety trends and statistics.
 Encourages worker input.
 Develops action plans for suggestions and ideas.
 Documented on general safety meeting form.
2.
Safety pre-work at the start of new operations
 Includes all safety issues pertinent to the work site.
 Discusses any hazards that are specific to the new operations and reviews the
Hazard Assessment form.
 Reviews recent company incidents, accidents, and near misses from bush,
roads, and scales, and road marshal program.
 Held at the start of each new work site or monthly for large work sites.
 Attended by all workers on site.
 Documented on the safety meeting/pre-work form.
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3.
Tailgate Safety Meeting
 Promote employee awareness of occupational health, safety and wellness.
 Performed every day.
 Used when a new worker comes on site.
 Used when a new hazard develops.
 Used for temporary workers that require specific instructions, i.e. fallers.
 Documented on tailgate safety meeting form.
4.
Management Safety Meetings
 Held by management to discuss issues pertaining to safety.
 Develops action plans and timelines for actions.
 Reviews accident investigations and near misses.
 Documented in the management meeting book.
5.
Shop/Office Safety Committee Meetings
 Held monthly.
 To discuss safety issues with worker representatives.
 To address any crew safety concerns.
 Documented in the management/safety committee meeting book.
6.
JOH&S - Safety Steering Committee Meetings
 Held quarterly or as required.
 To discuss safety issues with worker representatives.
 To address any crew safety concerns.
 Documented in the management/safety committee meeting book.
(B)
OTHER
1. Bulletin board at shop.
2. Monthly newsletter.
3. Handouts.
1.
Bulletin Board at Shop/Office
 Located in lunch room at shop in town.
 Contains safety information, i.e.: hazard alerts, safety info, minutes of tailgate
safety meetings, etc.
2.
Monthly Newsletter
 Contains safety information, i.e.: hazard alerts, safety info.
3.
Handouts
 Put in Company and worker vehicles.
 Hazard alerts or bulletins that management feels are important or affect crew
safety.
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Documentation of Safety Meetings:
 Minutes will be taken at all of the safety meetings in order to keep a written record of
all safety items and assigned actions that arise during the meting.
 The meeting minutes are to be distributed to attendees and other relevant
individuals.
Follow-up of Actions from Safety Meetings:
 All actions that are assigned in the safety meetings are to be documented in the
safety meeting minutes and tracked using a tracking sheet.
 All actions will be assigned to an individual, or a group of individuals, and will be
assigned a completion date.
 All actions will be reviewed at the following meeting to determine the progress of the
action, and any updates or changes that need to be made to action items will be
addressed at that time.
 All changes and updates to the action items will be documented at the safety
meetings.
 It is the responsibility of the Supervisor to ensure that it is completed within the
designated timeframe.
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2.6 INSPECTIONS
All work locations will have a minimum of a monthly inspection according to Inspection
Policy (Appendix C-C2). This inspection will be performed according to procedure.
Appropriate inspection checklists (Appendix B-B9) will be used to document these
inspections.
Regular safety inspections are a means of forcing a critical look around for hazards that
might tend to be overlooked in your day-to-day activities. Refer to OHSR Division 3;
Sections 178 to 186.
Inspections should focus on condition of tools, machinery, equipment, work methods,
practices and on compliance with safe operating procedures (Appendix B-B9).
Problems identified should have the required corrective action noted, as well as who will
take the action and when it will be done.
Equipment, Maintenance and Testing
On a regular basis, equipment and supplies will be maintained and tested. These items will
include, when applicable:
 crew transportation vehicles
 ATV
 ETV
 fire equipment
 tools
 first aid supplies
 Shop
 mobile equipment
See Appendix B - B9 - Safety Inspection Reports for detailed inspection checklists
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2.7 ACCIDENT / INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS
All accidents and incidents including "near-misses" must be reported and a follow-up
investigation must be carried out. The investigation should be conducted by person(s)
knowledgeable in the type of work involved and conducted in an orderly sequence. Senior
Management must be notified. Refer to Incident Policy/Procedure (Appendix C-C3).
Incident / Accident Report and Investigation forms (Appendix B-B3 and B4) are to be used
to document these events.
 Accident will be reported to Frost Lake Logging's Office within 24 hours and
assistance will be provided in completing an accident investigation.
Recommendations and follow-up will be implemented in a timely fashion as outlined
in the accident report.
 Near miss incidents will also be reported and an investigation completed.
These are opportunities to learn from mistakes:
 All employees are to report to Supervisor, incidents requiring first aid treatment or
medical treatment from a doctor, incidents involving equipment damage and any
other incidents, which could have caused serious injury and/or damage to Company
equipment as soon as possible.
 Accident investigation forms are filled in by the Supervisor in charge of the operation
where the incident/accident occurred.
 Establish the sequence of events leading to the accident.
 Identify all contributing factors in the sequence of events.
 Develop practical recommendations, which will eliminate or minimize the risk of
recurrence.
 Implement the recommendations.
 Follow-up to ensure corrective action has been taken.
 Forward to Joint Safety Committees.
 Any near miss incidents are to be reported immediately.
Refer to OHSR Division 10; Sections 172 to 177.
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2.8 DOCUMENTATION AND RECORDS
Documentation is maintained in order to implement the EOHSMS effectively and assess conformance with
requirements of the standards.
Documents and Records tracked by this organization are (Typical Inputs -not limited to):
DOCUMENTATION &
RECORDS
APPLICATION
WHERE FOUND
Health and Safety Program &
Policy
Safety program gives guidance to application of safety
process.
Posted in main office,
worksite, with supervisor.
BCFSC Standards
Guidelines for implementation of safety program
With Safety manual,
workers‘ handbook and
posted at the Company
office
SOPs, SWPs
Workers procedures for safe application of their job
In Company manual, and in
equipment
Emergency Response,
Assessments and Drills
Guidelines for effective response to emergency situations
In Company manual
OH&S inspection reports
Monthly documented review of work site
Filed with head office
Safety Meetings
Regular communication with workers concerning safety issues
Filed with head office, and
posted
Incident/Near-miss, Injury
Reports
Root cause investigation defining corrective action
Filed with head office, and
posted
Orientation – New Hire,
Contractors, Visitors
New Hires, Contractors and Visitors introduction to operation
and safety aspects.
Filed with head office
Training records
Identified training
Filed with head office
Management Meetings and
Reviews
Systematic review by management of effectiveness of safety
program
Filed with head office
OH&S management system
audit reports
Safe Companies Review of program
Filed with head office
Equipment Maintenance
Logs/Reports
All equipment must be maintained in safe operating condition.
Documentation of repairs and services is required and to that
end each piece of equipment should have a system that
readily informs the operator of the condition of that unit. This
can be an equipment log book, mechanics service logs or
management prevention maintenance tracking system.
Refer to OHSR Part 16, Sections 16.3.
Maintained on equipment,
with mechanic or kept in
mobile shop.
Hazard identification, risk
assessment and risk control
records
Required review of new work function or equipment to
establish Safe Work Procedures.
Added to Safety manual for
reference and training,
PPE issues and PPE
maintenance reports
If required, documentation of PPE maintenance programs.
Filed with head office
Hearing Tests
Annually performed
Filed with head office
WHMIS/MSDS Sheets
MSDS sheets required on worksite
Filed with head office, on
site
Legislative & Jurisdictional
information
Information to readily available for worker reference
With Safety Manual and in
office
Corrective Acton Log (CAL)
Compilation of all action items generated from multiple
sources.
Fill in at time of hire
Updated monthly and
distributed.
File at office
Contractor Selection Checklist
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2.9 TRAINING, AWARENESS AND COMPETENCE
Don't assume that new crew members are competent just because they have indicated that
they have the experience.
Office staff will initially screen applicants for a position and take the time to check
employment references to confirm desired experience and document it.
Training programs begin with orienting all new employees on their first shift at work. Refer
to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.3.
New Employee and Contractor Orientation
New employees and contractors should receive a copy of this manual. Supervisors will
perform a safety orientation that includes the items on the ―Safety Induction‖ list below and a
review of the relevant contents and intent of this manual.
Supervisors will hold regular safety meetings every month. All employees and contractors
are expected to attend.
When orienting new or regular employees to a new job:
 Begin by demonstrating the job to them - one step at a time
 Let them show you they understand the job
 Turn the trainees loose gradually
 Check back frequently
 Keep training records for future reference
(Appendix B-B6)
Anticipate the training needs of regular crew members. Training programs for experienced
workers aren't intended to tell them anything they didn't already know - but to maintain a
high level of awareness (Appendix B-B6 & Appendix B-B7).
1.
The training program is designed:
a)
To verify competence of worker to operate specific equipment
(Appendix B-B6 & B7).
b)
To ensure workers are aware of:
i)
Application of EOHSMS program.
ii)
Their OHS rights and responsibilities.
iii)
The importance of compliance and potential consequences
of non-compliance.
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Frost Lake Logging‘s Training Objectives are:
 Frost Lake Logging will provide opportunities for the training and education
necessary to promote a safe work environment for the employees and
subcontractors.
 Frost Lake Logging will ensure that each worker is educated and trained in a manner
that gives them the ability to meet minor emergencies successfully.
Component of Frost Lake Logging‘s Training Program include:
1. New employees:
 Will review a copy of Frost Lake Logging‘s Health and Safety Policy.
 Will review a copy of all applicable Safe Work Procedures, Hazard Prevention,
Emergency Preparedness Procedures, Emergency Response Procedures and
Administrative Procedures.
 A Supervisor will spend individual time with the new worker to ensure that all
aspects of the Occupational Health and Safety Program are fully understood.
2. Educational and training courses/resources offered to employees include (not limited
to):
 Orientation and induction with Safe Work Procedures when the employee's job
function is changed.
 WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System) training and
access to MSDS‘s.
 TDG (Transportation of Dangerous Goods) training.
 Level 1 First Aid and Transportation Endorsement.
 S100 Fire Management
3. Refresher courses:
 Refresher courses will be offered as necessary to aid employees in keeping
current in matters of safety.
4. Field training sessions:
 Pre-work and Tailgate safety meetings will be conducted with the employees to
discuss pertinent safety matters
 Demonstrations and drills will be conducted to educate the employees to proper
safety standards and to test emergency response procedures.
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2.10
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE
Established First Aid and Emergency Procedures
 First Aid and First Aid Attendants will be on site as required by the WSBC.
See Emergency Preparedness (B – B13), Working Alone Checklist (B B14)
First Aid Attendants and First Aid Kit Requirements B – B 15) for detailed First Aid
requirements.
 The first aid personnel will be identified to all employees during the pre-work
meeting.
 Serious Injury procedures will be followed as per Appendix B
B 17 Emergency Response Plan and Procedure. and
B 16 Air Medi-vac Information
 Emergency first aids and evacuations will follow the procedures in Appendix B –
B 17 Emergency Response Procedures
B 16 Air Medi-vac Information Cards and Information
 Fatality procedures will be as follows:
 Correct any immediate unsafe conditions that may cause dangers to
yourself or others.
 Leave the accident site exactly as it is if possible. (for WSBC and RCMP)
 The First Aid Attendant will take care of the accident scene and attend to
the care of the body.
 Notify Company representatives immediately.
 Ensure a Doctor and/or ambulance has been called.
 Notify the RCMP – 911 and WSBC immediately if Company rep has not
already done so.
 DO NOT NAME THE VICTIM OVER THE RADIO.
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Fire Procedures
 Fire equipment and personnel certification will be on site as required by WSBC and
the MOF.
 Fire reporting and response procedures will be followed as per Appendix B
B 13 Conducting & Testing Emergency Response Procedure (Response Drill for
Medical, Fire and Hazardous Spills) and Apollo Forest Products Ltd. annual Wildfire
Plan.
Hazardous Spill Response Procedures
 Spill containment equipment and personnel training will be present on site as
required by Apollo Forest Products Ltd. Environmental Management System. Spill
Kits will also contain the necessary Personal Protective Equipment needed for
petroleum and antifreeze related spills.
 Hazardous material spill response procedures will be followed as per B – B13
Conducting & Testing Emergency Response Procedure (ERP)
(Response Drill for Medical, Fire & Hazardous Spill Response) and
Apollo Forest Products Ltd current Spill Prevention and Response Plan.
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2.11
DISABILITY MANAGMENT
Frost Lake Loggings policy regarding Injury Management / Return to work is as follows:
 All employees have the right to return to their jobs following an injury or illness if the
employee is able to perform the duties of that job.
 This policy applies whether the illness or injury suffered by an employee is
occupational or non-occupational in nature.
 No employee will be allowed to return to any type of work if there is a reasonable
belief that the employee or others are put at risk of injury, or if the employee's
eventual recovery will be delayed as a result.
 Successful reintegration of the employee is based on a cooperative approach
developed by the employee, the employer, the employee's representatives and other
stakeholders.
 Company will designate an Injury Management (IM) Coordinator to oversee
coordination and overseeing of the Company IM Program. All employees will be
made aware of whom this individual is.
2.11.1
RETURN TO WORK POLICY
The Company will make every reasonable effort to ensure employees who are disabled as a
result of injury or illness have the opportunity to regain their productive potential and
maintain their self esteem through reintegration into the work force in as timely manner as
their conditions permit.
2.11.2
RESPONSIBILITIES OF INJURED EMPLOYEE
 Reports the injury or illness as soon as possible to their direct Supervisor.
 Provides appropriate medical information as requested by IM Coordinator to assist in
identifying personal limitations.
 Advise IM Coordinator, Supervisor and Management immediately of any change in
circumstances that may affect the return-to-work process.
 Attends all medical and rehabilitation appointments and undertakes graduated or
modified return to work activities that have been agreed as appropriate by medical
resources.
2.11.3
TROUBLED EMPLOYEE
Where an employee‘s work performance begins to deteriorate unexpectedly and there is a
possibility of abuse of alcohol/drugs or other factors, such as family problems contributing to
the deterioration, the situation should be dealt with before it becomes intolerable.
The Employer should offer this assistance to an employee on a confidential basis.
Most communities have counseling services available that can determine the problem and
refer the individual to the appropriate help.
Such individuals should be encouraged to seek, or be referred to, these services.
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2.12
MANAGEMENT REVIEW
2.12.1
REVIEW AND CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT
Senior Management shall review the organization‘s EOHSMS during Spring Breakup to
ensure its continual suitability, adequacy and effectiveness. This review shall include an
assessment of the need for changes to the EOHSMS, including OHS Policy and Objectives.
This review should:
 Evaluate the ability of the EOHSMS to meet the overall needs of the organization and
its stakeholders including workers and regulatory authorities.
 Evaluate the effectiveness of the EOHSMS in reducing work related injuries and
incidents.
 Identify what actions are needed to remedy any deficiencies.
 Provide feedback and establish EOHSMS priorities.
 Evaluate previous management reviews for effectiveness.
2.12.2 MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT
In order to be able to assess the EOHSMS, there must be areas monitored and measured.
These results will provide the necessary feedback for improvement.
Activities to be monitored and measured for annual review are:
Proactive Monitoring
a) Implementation of corrective action plans
b) OHS objectives and targets
c)
Assessments of training
d) Inspections
e) Work environment, activities
f)
Worker health
g) Compliance with OH&S Regulations
Reactive Monitoring
a) Trends in work related injuries and incidents
b) Frequency and severity of injuries and incidents
c)
Worker Return to Work program
d) Property/equipment loss
e) Content and quality of related records
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2.12.3
CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT
Opportunities for continued improvement should be sought in:
 OH&S Policy, objectives and targets.
 Results of Hazard and Risk Identification & Assessment.
 Results of monitoring and measurement.
 Reporting of incidents.
 Outcomes of management review.
 Corrective and preventative actions.
 Recommendations for improvement from workers.
 Changes in regulatory requirements.
 Results of audits.
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3.0 GENERAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
3.1 GENERAL RULES
Violations of the following regulations are subject to disciplinary action, up to and
including Termination.
1. Theft or removal from the premises, of any Company, or worker property, without proper
authorization.
2. Intentionally misusing, destroying or damaging any Company or Worker property.
3. Use of chemical – alcoholic beverage, non-medical drugs, illegal drugs, non-prescribed
drugs, non-dispensed drugs – or abuse of prescribed drugs during work hours, or on
Company property.
4. Unauthorized possession of firearms or explosives on Company property.
5. Insubordination. Interfering or refusing to cooperate with Supervisors or workers in the
performance of their duties.
6. Absent without leave, tardiness, excessive absenteeism or leaving the site during work
shift without permission or notification.
7. Provoking or instigating a fight, during working hours, on Company property.
8. Reporting to work while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. Possessing alcohol
or non-medical drugs while on Company work site.
9. Violating a safety rule or regulation
10. Sleeping on the job.
11. Operations, use or possession of machines, tools or equipment to which the worker has
not been assigned or trained on.
12. Performing a job other than assigned job without notification or authorization.
13. Horseplay is not permitted anywhere on the premises.
Note: Numerical sequence does not necessarily denote degree of violation or
infraction.
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3.2 DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURE
3.2.1 POLICY - PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINE
The Company, in order to maintain high standards for the workplace and regulatory
adherence, must ensure that all employees are aware of and following policy and
procedures in place. Those individuals whose actions contravene Company policy will be
disciplined using the Company Discipline Policy.
Employees (logging, log hauling or other) for the Company are subject to the Policies and
Company Discipline Policy.
For most worker's, Counseling and coaching from their Supervisors is usually enough to
keep their performance on track. However, for certain incidents, or for repeated violations
of Company Policies, a more formalized procedure must be followed. Disciplinary action is
intended to correct behavior.
It is administered essentially to improve performance when other normal methods have
failed. The principle of progressive discipline allows a worker the opportunity to improve
their performance and also establish a clear understanding with their Supervisor as to the
standards of performance required.
It is very important to understand that the following steps are a guideline only. The various
steps of discipline may not apply in a "step-by-step" fashion. When determining the
appropriate discipline for any conduct, the Company will carefully evaluate all the
circumstances involved, including worker's previous disciplinary record. Certain workplace
conducts under certain circumstances can justify the imposition of a more serious penalty
than that previously received.
3.2.2 POSITIVE DISCIPLINE PROGRAM
We have established guidelines for behaviour, which are designed to assist employees in
working harmoniously and safely as a team. We cannot list all possible problems that may
come up, and each case is considered with regard to its specific circumstances. Most of the
guidelines are outlined in this manual. Others not listed may be considered common sense
or normal behaviour. They would include such items as, but not limited to, coming to work
under the influence of drugs or alcohol, threatening or fighting with another employee, or
stealing property from another employee or the plant.
It is the Company‘s position to look upon discipline as a means of correcting behaviour. As
such, we comply with the concept of progressive discipline. In most instances, discussion
with your Supervisor will correct the behaviour. Based on the severity of the incident, the
following will occur:
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STEP #1 - VERBAL WARNING
For repeat minor offences or for infractions of a more serious nature.
A - Supervisor is to inform the employee of the problem.
B - Supervisor is to explain and ensure that the employee understands the problem and
what is required to correct it.
C -Supervisor is to document, file, and copy to employee.
STEP #2 – 2nd VERBAL WARNING
STEP #3 - WRITTEN WARNING
For a serious violation of Company policy, or for a repetition of an offence with prior
discipline imposed, which will ultimately result in suspension or discharge should the
performance not improve.
A - Employee is to receive a formal written warning that his/her work habit is incorrect.
B - Supervisor is to explain and ensure that the employee understands the problem and
what is required to correct it.
C - Employee signature is required, to be documented and filed.
STEP #4 - SUSPENSION
Under normal circumstances, there should be two Verbal and one Written Warning on file
before advancing to a suspension. For a serious violation of Company policy, or for a
repetition of an offence with prior discipline imposed, which will result in discharge should
the performance not improve. Generally a one-day suspension, however, depending on the
violation, a more severe suspension or termination may be imposed.
A - Employee is to receive a written suspension.
B - Supervisor is to explain the seriousness of the problem and to ensure the employee
knows how to correct it.
C - Supervisor is to counsel the employee regarding any personal problems, which may be
affecting his/her work performance. Help or assistance is to be offered.
D - Employee's signature is required, to be documented, and filed.
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STEP #5 - TERMINATION
Previous attempts at corrective discipline have not been successful in improving an
employee's performance.
As a result, the Company is severing the employment
relationship. Termination is likely, even with no prior record, for an incident of theft, threats
or acts of violence, assaulting a Supervisor, severe insubordination, or other serious
offences.
Supervisor must consult with manager before discharging any employee in step #5.
VIOLATIONS WARRANTING DISCIPLINE
These violations are separated into 3 groups to be used as a general guideline as to the
degree of discipline required.
Group #1:
A violation in Group #1 will result in normal disciplinary procedures:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Late for work
Failure to maintain work quality standards
Non-productive work habits
Unsafe acts or violation of safety regulations
Personal work on Company time
Group #2:
A violation in Group #2 will result in an immediate suspension from one to three days.
A second offence could result in worker being discharged.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Reporting to work with physical or mental facilities impaired by alcohol or drugs.
Threatening other workers for any reason.
Insubordination.
AWOL: Absence Without Leave.
Group #3:
A violation in Group #3 is grounds for immediate
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(I)
dismissal.
Absence without notice for more than 3 days.
Fighting on Company property.
Theft of Company or other workers' property.
Willful damage to Company property or property of fellow workers.
Consumption of alcohol during working hours on Company property.
Use of drugs for other than medical purposes on Company property.
Possession of illegal weapons or explosives on Company property.
Willfully falsifying application for employment or other data requested by the Company.
Instigating or causing an illegal work stoppage.
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SUMMARY
These are only some of the common violations. Others may occur and will have to be dealt
with as relative to these guidelines as possible.
The Supervisor has significant discretionary power. In some cases he may feel harsher
action is necessary than that stated in this disciplinary procedure. The Supervisor must,
however, ensure consistent discretionary decisions.
No record of discipline against a worker for minor offences should be held indefinitely. The
worker should have the opportunity through continued good performance to clear his record.
Where a worker receives no written discipline for a period of one year, all warning slips for
Group #1 type violations shall be kept on file for record purposes only and will not be used
in future disciplinary action.
3.3
RIGHT TO REFUSE UNSAFE WORK
BILL #14 - REFUSAL OF UNSAFE WORK
Workers‘ Compensation Board (Occupational Health & Safety) Amendment Act - BILL 14
PART 3: RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES REFUSAL OF UNSAFE WORK
Procedure for refusal OH&S Regulation 3.12
(1)
A person must not carry out or cause to be carried out any work process or operate or
cause to be operated any tool, appliance or equipment if that person has reasonable
cause to believe that to do so would create an undue hazard to the health and safety
of any person.
(2)
A worker who refuses to carry out a work process or operate a tool, appliance or
equipment pursuant to subsection (1) must immediately report the circumstances of
the unsafe condition to his or her Supervisor or Employer.
(3)
A Supervisor or Employer receiving a report made under subsection (2) must
immediately investigate the matter and
(a) Ensure that any unsafe condition is remedied without delay, or
(b) If in his or her opinion the report is not valid, must so inform the person who
made the report.
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(4) If the procedure under subsection (3) does not resolve the matter and the worker
continues to refuse to carry out the work process or operate the tool, appliance or
equipment, the Supervisor or Employer must investigate the matter in the presence of
the worker who made the report and in the presence of
(a) A worker member of the occupational health and safety committee,
(b) A worker who is selected by a trade union representing the worker, or
(c) If there is no occupational health and safety committee or the worker is not
represented by a trade union, any other reasonably available worker selected by
the worker.
(5)
If the investigation under subsection (4) does not resolve the matter and the worker
continues to refuse to carry out the work process or operate the tool, appliance or
equipment, either the Supervisor, or the Employer, and the worker must immediately
notify an officer, who must investigate the matter without undue delay and issue
whatever orders are deemed necessary.
Non discriminatory action OH&S Regulation Part 3, Section 3.13.
(1)
(2)
A worker must not be subject to discriminatory action as defined in section 150 or Part
3 of the Workers Compensation Act because the worker has acted in compliance with
section 3.12 or with an order made by an officer.
Temporary assignment to alternative work at no loss in pay to the worker until the
matter in Section 3.12 is resolved is deemed not to constitute discriminatory action.
Note: The prohibition against discriminatory action is established in the Workers
Compensation Act Part 3, Sections 150 through 153.
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3.4
RADIO/CELLPHONE PROCEDURES
3.4.1 POLICY ON RADIO USE
1.
Radio frequency usage is coordinated by the principal Contractor (timber owner).
2.
Use only those frequencies assigned to an area or road.
3.
Radio use is restricted to calling kilometer location and important messages.
4.
Communication systems policy includes 2 way radios, intercom systems, etc.
Please follow proper procedures - be polite, do not interrupt when others are using
the radio. Be specific and timely in your communication.
5.
If you think your message or transmission has been blocked, repeat your message,
or ask for confirmation from another radio-equipped vehicle.
6.
Location by kilometer and road name is the only method to be used for calling
location. Do not use geographical markers or other nicknames for location.
7.
When stopping on, leaving or re-entering a haul road, advise others of your status
and location.
8.
Use logging block or work channel for other communications.
9.
Misuse includes idle chatter not relating to business, and the use of profane, obscene
words and/or language is unacceptable!
10.
Any profane or obscene language used by an employee or Contractor will result in
action being taken by Department of Transportation towards the violator.
11.
There are stiff penalties imposed by Canadian Regulation for misuse of transmitted
communications, therefore the rules must be followed and enforced.
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3.4.2 RADIO PROTOCOL AND PROCEDURES (Autotel, Sat-Tel)
Manuals for the operation of all vehicle radios and Autotel - Sat-Tel should be located in the
glove compartment.
A copy of the radio channels and frequency list chart should be carried with the radio.
To access the BC Radio Tel channel available in the area are calling from:
 Press the transmit button for approximately 6 seconds and then release. If the
Operator does not answer, try again.
 Once the Operator answers, ask for privacy. This will block out your part of the
conversation for anyone who might be listening other than the party you have called.
The party you are talking to will still be heard by all monitoring that channel. The
receiving party should be informed that others can hear their portion of the
conversation, even on privacy.
 After the Operator has indicated you have privacy, give your Telus number and then
give the number that you would like to call.
 If during your conversation there is a period of time that nobody is talking, key your
transmitter once every 20 seconds to maintain the connection. If this is not done, the
connection will be severed and your call will be terminated.
Do Not give your Telus number to anyone, because it can be used by anyone with access
to a Telus transmitter.
If there is already someone using the channel that you are on, try another channel or wait
until that party has finished their conversation. Usually upon the completion of their
conversation the Operator will come on the line and ask if there is any other traffic. At this
time you should indicate YES and then proceed with your call. If the connection is cut
without the Operator coming on, key the transmitter as soon as you hear the connection is
severed.
If the Operator is difficult to hear there is a good chance the party you are calling will not
hear you at all. Try another channel, or move to a better location.
If there is no ringing noise after the transmitter has been keyed, and the Operator has not
answered, then another channel must be tried or you must move to a different location.
Telus should only be used for business calls, or for calling home to give notification that
your arrival may be delayed.
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3.4.3 CELLPHONE PROTOCOL AND PROCEDURES
3.4.3.1 BACKGROUND
Numerous experimental studies demonstrate that:
 Using a cell phone while driving slows the driver‘s reaction time by 18%
 Cell phone use increases the risk of rear-end collisions by twofold
 Using a cell phone while driving reduces visual field attention
 Cell phone conversation increases the probability of missing red lights
 Talking to a passenger is different because a passenger can see the traffic
situation and adapt the conversation accordingly or warn the drivers of an
imminent danger
3.4.3.2 EMPLOYERS HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY:

Employers could be liable for motor vehicle collisions involving their employees
who were using cell phones while driving
 In Miami, a jury awarded a woman $20.9 million in 2001 after she was injured in
a car crash caused by a salesman making a cell phone call between
appointments
 A $30 million lawsuit was filed against the law firm Cooley Godward when one
of their associates while driving and talking on a cell phone fatally ran over a
15-year old girl in March of 2000
3.4.3.3 CELL PHONE PROCEDURE
Employees are reminded that when driving a vehicle for Frost Lake Logging Ltd., whether
the vehicle is Company-owned or otherwise, you have one and only one responsibility and
that is driving the vehicle. Safe driving requires 100% attention to the task at hand. Using a
cell phone while driving leads to an increased risk of having an accident through distraction
and/or a lack of attention to driving.
To ensure your safety, using mobile phones, cell phones, text pagers, or two-way radios,
whether for work or personal use, while driving is strictly forbidden.
Please advise callers of this Company's cell phone policy.
Rule of the road for your cell phone use:

Refrain from placing or receiving unnecessary calls. Allow voice mail to handle call
the call for you.
 Do not place calls while driving. Pull over first or have a passenger place/answer the
call.
 Never pick the phone up off the floor while driving. Pull over and park first.
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3.4.4 RULES OF ROAD / RADIO CALLING PROCEDURES
Drive defensively - Expect the Unexpected
1. All traffic must drive on the ‗RIGHT‖ side of the road.
2. Drivers shall slow down for oncoming traffic, when passing a stopped vehicle, and when
meeting any road maintenance equipment.
3. Drive at a safe speed. Beware of hazardous conditions such as:
 Freezing rain or snow.
 Extreme dust, fog or smoky conditions.
 Soft sub grade or high volume of traffic.
4. All vehicles must operate with headlights on.
5. All ―EMPTY‖ traffic will clear ―LOADED‖ traffic in pull-outs when required.
6. Vehicles must not stop on haul road except at a safe passing point or a pullout: in case
of a breakdown, flares or reflectors must be utilized and other road users informed.
7. Forestry roads are radio assisted not radio controlled. Drive accordingly.
8. Never pass any vehicle without notifying them on the radio and receiving the ―OK‖. The
lead vehicles are responsible for slowing down, providing room and advising ―OK‖ signal
to vehicle requesting to pass and announcing the location of the pass.
9. Observe proper radio use protocol:
 Call ―EMPTY‖ or ―LOADED‖ followed by kilometer (LOADED 242)
 Avoid visiting - needless chatter and foul language will not be tolerated.
 Keep volume of AM/FM radios low, so that it does not interfere with
road
radio.
 Stay on designated road channel. (No scanning while driving)
 Only one two-way radio per vehicle.
10. Switch channels only when you can see the road frequency change sign.
11. Empty vehicles call ―EMPTY‖:
a) When entering a new road
b) All posted ―CALL EMPTY‖ signs
c) When you are unsure of the location of oncoming traffic.
d) Wide loaded low beds traveling in the empty direction call all ODD empty
kilometers and identify yourself as a wide load.
e) Fuel trucks traveling in empty direction call all ODD empty kilometers
f) Logging trucks hauling logs in empty direction call all ODD empty
kilometers.
12. Loaded vehicles call:
a) All loaded traffic call all ―EVEN‖ loaded kilometers plus other posted loaded signs.
b) Stoppage and duration as well as subsequent starts.
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3.5
IMPAIRMENT ON THE JOB
Impairment in the workplace can have tragic results. Complete and constant awareness of
hazards is critical.
If an individual suspects that a crewmember's judgment is impaired, he should check the
suspicion out or advise the Supervisor. While this action can be awkward, the alternative of
ignoring the situation can have far greater consequences.
OHSR Part 4; Sections 4.19 and 4.20 indicate the responsibility of the Supervisor and
employee when this situation arises:
"A person must not enter or remain at any workplace while the person's ability
to work is affected by alcohol, a drug or other substance so as to endanger the
person or anyone else."
Persons reporting to work under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or using alcohol or drugs
on Company property will be taken home immediately and subject to disciplinary action.
Refer to Policy/Procedure (Appendix C-C5).
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3.6
WORKING ALONE / MAN-CHECK PROCEDURE
Where an employee works alone and could be injured without anyone knowing, a suitable
man check system must be developed and used. In addition to the checks at regular
intervals, a check at the end of the work shift must be done. The location and condition of a
worker should never be "assumed". Refer to OHSR Part 4; Sections 4.21, 4.22, 4.23 and
Part 26; Sections 26.6, 26.23 and 26.28. (Working alone records, excluding fallers)
3.6.1 GENERAL
3.6.1.1 MACHINE OPERATORS
 Whenever possible, machines should work together and check on each other.
 All machines working alone will have a working radio inside of the cab.
 All operators working alone will have a personal first aid kit (or better) in clean condition
inside the machine.
 All operators will follow the Frost Lake Logging ltd. man check system.
 All Supervisors will ensure the man check system is in place before isolated work
begins.
3.6.1.2 SUPERVISORS, MECHANICS & LOWBED OPERATORS
Whenever possible, all fieldwork should be conducted with a partner. When working in the
bush, the following safety equipment is optional items to be carried:





hand-held radio, with spare battery and list of channels
Survival kit (space blanket, hooks, first aid kit, etc.)
pencil flare projector
crack flares and signal flares
bear repellent and bear bangers
3.6.1.3 WORKING ALONE OR AT NIGHT
Working alone at night is not permitted without a defined monitoring process. Special checkin arrangements must be made prior to working alone during the day according to WSBC
regulation 4.
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Other Ideas:
 When leaving your truck, leave a note and/or map in the vehicle and indicate
estimated time of return.
 Inform others in the area, contractors, and camp-road crews, what your plans are.
 Firearms may be used for personal protection. It is the holder's responsibility to
follow all applicable laws and regulations.
3.6.2 MAN-CHECK SYSTEM POLICY
All logging, road maintenance, and silviculture will follow the Frost Lake Logging ltd. Man
Check System when a worker is working alone.
The Man-Check System must ensure that all workers are contacted at least once every two
hours to ensure the worker is able to secure assistance in the event of an injury or other
misfortune.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Man Check System:
1. Ensure all workers working alone or in isolation are checked every two hours and
when they leave the work site. If work process or location becomes hazardous,
check intervals must be shortened.
Procedures will be reviewed and documented before isolated work commences.
Faller‘s well-being to be ensured every ½ hour and at the end of the work shift.
Refer to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.3(f).
2. Acceptable means of checking:
Visual checks are preferred, but audible is acceptable.
ascertained.
Must be positively
Radio or telephone checks are acceptable, if there is a predetermined check-in
times and verification of those intervals.
3. Missed check-ins:
If a crewmember misses a check-in due to radio problems, it is their responsibility
to make their way towards other members of the crew. Upon failing to receive a
check-in, the crew supervisor will attempt to locate the unaccounted crew person.
He or she, at their discretion, will utilize other crew members as they see fit. If the
unaccounted person cannot be located within one hour of the check-in, the
unaccounted person should be considered missing and reported as such,
consistent with the Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan (EPRP).
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3.7
DE-ENERGIZATION AND LOCKOUT PROCEDURE
3.7.1 ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL, AIR, HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL
OHSR Part 10; Section 10.2, 10.3 requires:
That if any work is to be performed on a piece of equipment the individuals involved must
ensure that all hazards due to inadvertent movement of any parts of the equipment are
controlled.
In order to achieve the requirements of the above regulation the following is a
recommended procedure for compliance.
Each worker who works up in the machinery or equipment requiring lockout procedures
shall be responsible for:
 Ensuring all elevated parts and hydraulic cylinders are in the rest position.
 Securing the control devices by removal of key, or application of tag-out
implementing lockout bar or other suitable means of rendering the power source
inactive.
 Know what components are operated by sensors or ―eyes‖ and those components
are secure or inactive.
 Removal of his own tag on the completion of his work.
 After lockout procedures have been applied, the operator or the person working on
the equipment shall check the effectiveness of the lockout.
 In the case of pneumatic and hydraulic power, residual pressure must be drained off.
Locking-out upstream pressure in pneumatic or hydraulic lines also locks in
downstream pressure, which could cause an unwanted cycling of a machine.
Sudden release of this pressure can be injurious; therefore it is recommended that
the residual pressure be drained off slowly. This can be done by hand, by opening
the bleed-off valves and this could be included in the lock out procedures, if the
lockout valves do not incorporate automatic bleeders.
Common Booby Traps in Lockout Systems:
a)
System not enforced and supervised.
b)
Failure to use the lockout process.
c)
Leaving key in ignition or not tagging.
d)
Not checking that the lockout process has been
followed.
e)
Failure to use tags if required.
f)
Not identifying all switches, valves and disconnects to the equipment.
g)
Assuming equipment is operable.
h)
Assuming the job is too small to merit locking out.
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3.7.2 TRUCK LOCKOUT PROCEDURE
Lockout procedure of logging trucks, lowbeds and other mobile equipment is to be used in
the event of having to stop for a breakdown or mechanical problems.
IF POSSIBLE STOP IN A SAFE FLAT, WIDE LOCATION

Notify other traffic you are stopping.

Apply applicable parking brake (maxi, etc)

Apply trailer brakes and check they are applied.

Park unit in gear and shut off engine.

Make sure you are wearing your PPE when you get out of the unit.

Block the wheels if the problem is mechanical and you are required to be in front,
under or in line of the unit travel.

Put hazard triangles or markers out.

Work on the truck only if it is safe to do so, if not wait for help.

It may be necessary for have assistance in directing traffic around the unit.

Once repairs are complete advise traffic the road is clear, that you are mobile and
your location.
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3.8
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Scope: Policy applies to all workers in the forest (harvest contractor employees, logging
truck drivers, gravel truck drivers, sand truck drivers, lowbed drivers, silviculture workers,
etc). The expectation is that these rules will be followed not only on block, but also on
access roads, gravel pits, main haul roads, highways, and mill sites.
Purpose: Personal Protective Equipment is the foundation to developing a safety culture
within all organizations. Without employees committed to wearing their PPE, a successful
safety program can never be achieved. Management, Staff, Owners, Employees, and
Subcontractors must meet the following PPE standard:
3.8.1 SAFETY HEADGEAR (HARD HAT)
The acceptable safety headgear must meet the requirements of the OHSR Part 8;
Section 8.11.
 Wear a red or orange hard hat at all times on Licensee / Contractor worksites and
all road systems while outside of machines/vehicles.
 Also exempted are mechanics working in tightly confined areas. They must wear
a hardhat if they start walking around site.
3.8.2 HI VIS APPAREL
 High visibility vests, in good condition and clean enough to be clearly visible,
must be worn in all active logging areas, marshalling yards, and scale sites.
 Coveralls meeting the WSBC Standard: PPE 2 High Visibility Garment - Personal
Protective Equipment Standard 2 are also satisfactory.
Must meet the requirements of OHSR Part 8; Section 8.24 and Part 26; Section
26.7(1).
3.8.3 GLOVES
 Suitable gloves must be used to protect the hands for
leather, rubber, latex etc…)
the job performed (i.e.
Refer to OHSR Part 8; Section 8.19.
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3.8.4 SAFETY FOOTWEAR
A worker's footwear must be of a design, construction, and material appropriate to
the protection required. To determine appropriate protection the following factors
must be considered: slipping, uneven terrain, abrasion, ankle protection and foot
support, crushing potential, temperature extremes, corrosive substances, puncture
hazards, electrical shock and any other recognizable hazard. Refer to OHSR Part
8; Section 8.22.
Safety toe boots (CSA Green Triangle) must be worn where there is a risk of
crushing injury or injury resulting from heavy objects falling on the foot (eg.
servicing equipment).
3.8.5 HEARING PROTECTION
If it is not practicable to reduce noise levels to or below the exposure limits in
OHSR Part 7; Section 7.2 the Employer must provide and maintain hearing
protection and ensure that the hearing protection is worn as required by
OHSR Part 7; Section 7.13.
3.8.6 EYE PROTECTION
Appropriate eye protection must be worn where there is a potential of eye
hazards. OHSR Part 8; Section 8.14. Face shields are designed to protect the
eyes and face from heavy impact, flying particles. Visors may be used but
safety glasses must be used around helicopters to protect eyes from flying
debris.
3.8.7 LEG PROTECTION DEVICES
Employees operating chain saws, for any reason, must wear
suitable leg protective devices. Use of a chainsaw on a regular
basis, bucker pants will be worn, however, if using a chainsaw
occasionally, protective chaps which are easily strapped on may be worn.
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3.8.8 FIRE RETARDANT CLOTHING
All workers who are engaged in any activity at our operating locations that are exposed to
situations where fire and explosion hazards regularly exist, are required to wear an
outermost layer of clothing that is fire retardant. The standards will meet, at a minimum, the
standard recognized by the petrol-chemical industry for fire retardant clothing or the
standards developed by the Canadian General Standards Board.
Fire Resistant clothing (Proban or Nomex) must be worn by all
employees associated with oil and gas operations. No one is
allowed to wear outer clothing made of nylon, polyester or other
meltable fabrics unless they are specifically designed to withstand
flash-fires.
Must meet the requirements of OHSR Part 8; Section 8.24.
3.8.9
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Employees exposed to high concentration of dust, vapors, gases, noxious or toxic vapors,
paint vapors, or an oxygen deficient atmosphere must wear respiratory protection devices
appropriate to the material to which they may be exposed.
Employees working in conditions requiring the use of respirators must be clean-shaven
where the respirator seals to ensure a positive fit.
Respiratory protection is needed when ventilation is not sufficient to remove welding fumes
or when there is risk of oxygen deficiency.
Using Respirators


Select and use respirators in compliance with your workplace regulation.
Seek expert advice and initiate a proper respiratory protection program.
Respirators are of two basic types: air-purifying respirators and air-supplying respirators.
For each type a number of styles are available, including half and full face piece masks. The
selection of the proper respirator depends on the type of work being performed, the amount
of contaminant produced and the concentrations, toxicity, and permissible exposures to
harmful substances in the air.
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Air-Purifying Respirators
For situations involving exposure to moderate amounts of non-toxic welding fumes, air
purifying respirator masks provide adequate protection. They do not offer any protection if
the atmosphere is low in oxygen or contains hazardous gases.
Disposable, single-use dust masks give limited protection from welding fume and are not
generally recommended, particularly when the fume has toxic components. Multi-use
respirators consist of a face piece with replaceable filter cartridges that remove particulate
matter such as fumes and dust. The mask may be a half or full face piece and to be
effective requires a good seal around the rim; beards and moustaches do not allow a proper
seal.
Air-Supplying Respirators
Air-supplying respirators are the preferred system since they supply you with clean air.
These respirators provide breathing air from a remote source.
Fit tests
 A respirator which requires an effective seal with the face for proper functioning must
not be issued to a worker unless a fit test demonstrates that the face piece forms an
effective seal with the wearer's face.
 Other personal protective equipment that is to be worn at the same time as a respirator
and which could interfere with the respirator fit must be worn during a fit test.
 After a respirator is issued to a worker, the fit test must be repeated at least annually to
ensure that the face seal remains effective.
Field Fit check
Before each use of a respirator, which requires an effective seal with the face for proper
functioning, a worker must perform a positive or negative pressure fit check.
Checklist for care of respirators
 Inspect the respirator before and after each use and during cleaning.
 Replace all parts that are cracked, torn, broken, missing or worn.
 Follow the manufacturer's instructions.
Repair, cleaning and storage
 Do not clean with solvents.
 Follow the manufacturer's instructions.
All Personal Protective Equipment must be maintained in good
working condition.
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3.9
POLICY ON SEATBELT USE
Purpose:
Seatbelts have been proven to save lives and reduce severity of injuries during accidents
involving pickups, trucks, and in equipment. Frost Lake Logging Ltd will take a zero
tolerance for employees, contractors, and subcontractors not wearing these proven safety
devices.
Policy:
All users of roads (pickups, trucks, lowbeds, gravel trucks, etc.) – 100% use of seatbelts by
all employees, contractors, and subcontractors.
Logging equipment with ROPs – 100% use of seatbelts in logging equipment.
Consequences:
Workers caught not wearing PPE will first be given a verbal warning, then a written warning
and then he/she may be suspended if the problem persists.
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3.10
CLIMATIC CONDITIONS
Winter conditions present additional hazards that must be watched for.
Work must not be conducted in any forestry operations where a potential hazard of
avalanche exists until an assessment is made of the hazard and procedures developed to
control the hazard.
If new employees start in the summer months, they may not have any knowledge of winter
hazards and must be made aware of them before an accident happens.
All working areas and trails will, of course, be slippery, due to the ice and snow. Extra
caution is required while walking, climbing over blow-down and operating machinery and
chainsaws.
Field personnel working by themselves during the winter should ensure that their vehicles,
snowmobiles and personal effects have the appropriate survival gear needed for the winter
conditions.
If a worker is exposed to an environment with an equivalent chill temperature less than -7º
C, a heated shelter must be made available near the worker and the worker must be
instructed to enter the shelter at the onset of symptoms of impending hypothermia. A
heated vehicle may be used as a heated shelter.
Refer to OHSR Part 7; Section 7.65 and Table 7- 4.
Adequate outer clothing is also important for all workers to avoid injuries from frostbite.
3.10.1
COLD STRESS
Jobs or workstations that are at risk of exposing the worker to the risk of hypothermia or
cold related injury are to be identified.
When work is being done outside and the temperature drops below -7°C (19°F):
1. A heated shelter must be made available near the worker (200 ft). A heated vehicle may
be used as the heated shelter.
2. The worker must be instructed to enter the shelter at the onset of symptoms of
impending hypothermia or frost bite.
3. When cold surfaces are present, precautions must be taken to prevent frostbite from
contact with these surfaces. Wear the proper winter gloves and other personal protective
equipment.
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4. If work takes place outdoors in ice or snow covered areas and there is a risk of injury to
the eyes, workers must wear eye protection.
5. If a worker is required to perform work with the bare hands and there is a risk of cold
related injury to the hands, provision must be made for warming the worker‘s hands to
prevent the cold-related injury.
Note: Warm air jets, radiant heaters, or warm contact plates may be used to warm the
hands. Hand warming is not the recommended first aid treatment for frostbite.
Accidental exposure:
When it can be reasonably anticipated that a worker may be exposed to hazardous cold
conditions outdoors as a result of an unplanned event, the worker at risk must be provided
with clothing and equipment to protect them from the cold and/or a heated place must be
made available.
Clothing:
1. In cold conditions workers must wear adequate insulated clothing.
2. If clothing becomes wet so that its insulating value is impaired, the worker must be
provided with the opportunity to change into dry clothing in a heated shelter, or allow
their clothing to dry out.
3. To protect the extremities, protective footwear, and head covering and/or face masks
appropriate to the hazard must be worn if there is a danger of frost bite to the
extremities.
4. Protective gloves or mittens will be provided to protect the hands from the cold and the
work being performed.
In increasing hazard (danger of freezing of exposed flesh within one minute) or high hazard
(flesh may freeze within 30 seconds):
1. Workers will work with a partner or where that is not practical, a Supervisor or another
worker will check on the worker at regular planned intervals.
2. All workers that work in these conditions will be trained to recognize the signs of
frostbite, hypothermia or other cold related injury.
3. Workers showing signs of hypothermia or cold related injury will be removed from further
exposure and assessed by first aid.
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4. The Employer will ensure that workers will also be trained in proper re-warming
procedures, proper use of clothing, proper eating, and proper drinking practices, and
Safe Work Procedures appropriate to the work that is to be performed.
Proper apparel:
All employees must wear the proper clothing to work to fit the weather conditions. You must
wear clothing to keep you warm and protected. There could also be a wind factor. The fact
is if you work inside or outside you will be exposed to the cold weather in winter or just to
get to work, so dress appropriately. It could be colder going into or coming out of a mill with
the time difference. If you always dress for coldest you are protecting yourself.
Be aware:
In winter type conditions, use caution as the walkways can be covered in ice and snow. Be
aware of slipping hazards. Watch for mobile equipment. Roadways can be slick even when
sanding has been done. The mobile equipment may not be able to stop as fast as it can on
a dry surface.
Also remember that steel conducts cold. If you touch cold steel you can get frostbite.
Watch out for ice and snow hanging down from roof tops and other high places it could
break loose and fall, hitting you. If you see ice and snow hanging from something and you
believe that it is a danger, tell a Supervisor so they can have it removed.
Signs and symptoms of Hypothermia:
Mild Hypothermia:
1.
2.
Shivering is present to maximize heat production.
A decreased pulse, to minimize further heat loss.
Moderate Hypothermia:
1. Confusion, decreased level of consciousness, inappropriate behavior.
2. Progressive decrease in level of consciousness. Shivering is inhibited.
3. Heart rate slows. Irregularities in the heartbeat may be detected. Respiratory rate fails.
4. The pulse may become difficult to find. There is a risk of developing cardiac arrest,
especially with rough handling. Pupils are dilated.
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Severe Hypothermia:
1.
Coma may develop. Increased muscular rigidity. Slow heart rate. Pupils may be dilated
and poorly reactive. Further decrease in respiratory rate.
2.
Absent of pulses and no respirations. There may be no response to painful stimuli.
3.
Maximum risk of cardiac arrest.
WE ALL LIVE AND WORK IN THE NORTH. WE ALL KNOW WHAT WINTER CAN BE LIKE. BE
PREPARED. DRESS PROPERLY. USE CAUTION ON SLICK ROADS AND WALKWAYS. HAVE YOUR
VEHICLE WINTERIZED AND CARRY BLANKETS, AND A CANDLE OR TWO, IN CASE YOUR VEHICLE
BREAKS DOWN COMING TO, LEAVING WORK OR AT ANY TIME.
DO NOT PUT YOURSELF IN DANGER AT WORK OR AT HOME,
DUE TO WINTER CONDITIONS...OR AT ANY TIME!!
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EQUIVALENT CHILL TEMPERATURE
Actual Temperature reading (Celsius)
Estimated Wind
10
5
0
-5
-10
-15
-20
-25
-30
-35
-40
-45
-50
0 calm
10
5
0
-5
-10
-15
-20
-25
-30
-35
-40
-45
-50
8
9
3
-2
-7
-12
-18
-23
-28
-33
-38
-44
-49
-54
16
4
-2
-7
-14
-20
-27
-33
-38
-45
-50
-57
-63
-69
24
2
-5
-11
-18
-25
-32
-38
-45
-52
-58
-65
-72
-78
32
0
-7
-14
-21
-28
-35
-42
-50
-56
-64
-71
-78
-84
40
-1
-8
-16
-24
-31
-38
-46
-53
-60
-67
-76
-82
-90
48
-2
-10
-17
-25
-33
-40
-48
-55
-63
-70
-78
-86
-94
56
-3
-11
-18
-26
-34
-42
-50
-58
-65
-73
-81
-89
-96
64
-3
-11
-19
-27
-35
-43
-51
-59
-66
-74
-82
-90
-98
Speed in km/h
LOW HAZARD
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INCREASING
HIGH HAZARD
HAZARD
Flesh may freeze within 30 seconds.
Risk of exposed, dry skin
Danger from
*wind speeds of greater than 65 km/h
being affected in less
freezing of
have little additional effect.
than 1 hour. Awareness
exposed flesh
of hazard low.
within 1 minute.
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3.10.2
HEAT STRESS
Preventing Heat Stress:
Hot conditions put your body under a lot of stress. Physical activity stresses the body even
more. When heat is combined with physical activity, loss of fluids, fatigue and other
conditions can lead to a number of heat related illnesses and injuries. Death is even
possible.
Heat stress is commonly associated with warm weather. It‘s true that warm weather
increases the number of heat stress injuries and illnesses. However, warm weather isn‘t
the only cause of heat stress. Heat stress can occur at any time the surrounding
temperature is elevated. Even if the weather is cool, you may work in warm areas, indoors
and out.
Causes of heat stress:
Six main factors are involved in causing heat stress. Please be aware of the following:






Temperature
Humidity
Movement of air
Radiant temperature of the surroundings
Style and type of clothing
Physical Activity
Adjusting to these factors and/or controlling them will reduce the chance of heat stress.
Acclimatization:
Your body can adjust to working in a warm environment through a process known as
acclimatization.
This process involves gradually increasing the amount of time you spend working in a hot
environment. The gradual increase will allow your body to properly adjust to the heat.
Even if acclimatized, conditions can occur that can affect our body‘s ability to cool itself.
 Bright sunshine
 High humidity
 Sources of heat in the workplace
If you are away from work for a few days, or you experience a brief period of cooler
temperatures while working, you will need to re-acclimatize yourself. Ensure breaks are
taken in an area that will permit you to cool off.
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Engineering controls to control heat stress:





Engineering controls can be implemented to reduce the possibility of stress.
Exhaust hot air or stream away from the work area.
Open windows if possible.
Use fans to circulate air.
Reduce the physical demands of work by using mechanical equipment if possible.
Administrative controls to prevent heat stress injuries:
Schedule tasks to avoid heavy physical activity during the hottest parts of the day.
Electrolyte replacement drinks help also. Make sure everyone understands the signs and
symptoms of heat stress.
Common sense precautions:
 Dress properly for the job. Wear lightweight clothing, which allows moisture to
evaporate quickly.
 Wear reflective clothing or cooling suits for jobs, which require them.
 Use extra caution if you are required to wear clothing on the job which limits
evaporation (you can succumb to heat stress much more quickly).
 Drink plenty of fluids.
Heat stress injuries:
There are a number of types of heat stress injuries. Some are annoying but not very
serious. Others can quickly lead to life threatening situations. Know what to look for. It is
important! This is especially true because the more serious heat stress conditions cause
the victim to become disoriented and unaware of their condition. People who are
overweight, physically unfit, suffer from heart conditions, drink too much alcohol or are not
acclimatized to the temperature are at greater risk of heat stress and should seek or follow
medical advice.
Major heat stress injuries are:
Heat rash
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-Is caused by a hot, humid environment and plugged sweat glands.
-Is bumpy red rash, which itches severely; it is not life threatening,
but is very annoying.
-Dry clothes that help sweat evaporate will reduce the chance of heat
rash.
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Heat cramps
develop,
-Are painful muscle cramps cause by loss of body salt through excessive
sweating.
-To prevent heat cramps, drink plenty of non-alcoholic, caffeine free fluids
while working in a hot environment.
-Anyone suffering from heat cramps should be watched carefully for signs
of more serious heat stress. If cramps persist or other symptoms
seek medical attention immediately.
Heat Syncope
(sin-co-pay) -Is sudden fainting caused by reduced blood flow to the head.
-The victim‘s skin will be cool and moist and their pulse will be weak.
-Immediate medical attention is needed in the event of syncope.
Heat
-Results from inadequate salt and water intake Exhaustion and is a sign the
body‘s cooling system is not working.
-The victim will sweat heavily, their skin will be cool and moist, their pulse
weak, and they will seem tired, confused, clumsy, irritable or upset, they
may breathe rapidly - even pant - and their vision may be blurred. The
victim may strongly argue that they are okay even with these obvious
symptoms.
-If you suspect heat exhaustion, don‘t let the victim talk you out of seeking
immediate medical attention. Heat exhaustion will affect their ability to
exercise good judgment.
-Until medical help arrives, try to cool the victim and offer sips of cool water
as long as the victim is conscious. Immediate medical attention is required.
-Heat exhaustion can quickly lead to heat stroke.
Heat Stroke -Is the deadliest of all heat stress conditions. It occurs when the body‘s
cooling system has shut down after extreme loss of salt and fluids.
-The body temperature will rise; the victim‘s skin is hot, red and dry.
-Their pulse is fast, and they may complain of headache or dizziness.
-They will probably be weak, confused and upset.
-Later stages of heat stroke cause a loss of consciousness and may lead to
convulsions.
-In the event of heat stroke, seek medical attention.
-Until help arrives, try to cool the victim and offer sips of cool water if the
victim is conscious.
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Buddy system:
Recognizing heat stress is very important, particularly since the victim may not realize what
is happening. If you work alone in a hot environment, develop a ―buddy system‖ so
someone will check in on you periodically to look for signs of heat stress.
Drinking water:
In the course of a day‘s work in the heat, a worker may produce as much as 2 to 3 gallons
of sweat. Because so many heat disorders involve excessive dehydration of the body it is
essential that water intake during the workday be about equal to the amount of sweat
produced. Most workers exposed to hot conditions drink fewer fluids than is needed
because of an insufficient thirst drive. A worker, therefore, should not depend on thirst to
signal when and how much to drink. Instead the worker should drink 5 to 7 ounces of fluids
every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in the body.
Special Considerations:
Preventing heat stress is a matter of controlling the factors that cause it. Use the
precautions and do not hesitate to seek assistance if you suspect heat stress. Your good
health depends on it!
Heat acclimatized workers do not lose as much of their salt in their sweat as do workers
who are not adjusted to the heat. The average American diet contains sufficient salt for
acclimatized workers even when sweat production is high. If for some reason, salt
replacement is required, the best way to compensate for the loss is to add a little extra salt
to the food. Salt tablets should not be used.
During unusually hot weather conditions lasting longer than 2 days the number of heat
illnesses usually increases. This is due to several factors, such as progressive body fluid
deficit, loss of appetite (and possible salt deficit), build up of heat in living and work areas,
and break down in air conditioning equipment. Therefore, it is advisable to make a special
effort to adhere rigorously to the above preventive measures during these extended hot
spells and to avoid any unnecessary or unusual stressful activity. Sufficient sleep and good
nutrition are important for maintaining a high level of heat tolerance. Workers who may be
a greater risk of heat illnesses are: the obese, the chronically ill and older individuals.
The consumption of alcoholic beverages during prolonged periods of heat can cause
additional dehydration. Persons taking certain medications (for blood pressure, diuretics, or
water pills) should consult their physicians in order to determine if any side effects could
occur during excessive heat exposure. Daily fluid intake must be sufficient to prevent
significant weight loss during the workday and over the workweek.
3.10.3
Wind
Wind can create very dangerous working conditions particularly around old growth,
decayed snags, and retained patches and trees. Keep aware of changing wind conditions.
If it becomes too windy to work safely, leave the work site immediately.
If you are unsure if it is too windy – it probably is.
Always leave the work site immediately if small branches and debris are falling. Avoid
dangerous conditions as you exit the work site.
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3.11
CHAINSAW SAFETY
All operators must be adequately trained in the use of the chainsaw.
Chainsaws are to be maintained in good running order.
When starting a chainsaw, place it on a stump or other firm foundation. Never start a
chainsaw on your knees.
Shut the chainsaw off when cleaning it.
Fuel to be carried in ULC approved containers only.
Be aware of the hot exhaust system when servicing and filling.
Do Not start the chainsaw at the refueling location.
Do Not smoke while refueling the chainsaw.
Fit handles on all files; do not carry files in your pocket.
Shut the chainsaw off when carrying it any distance.
When carrying the chainsaw, keep the bar to the rear to avoid falling on the chain if you
trip.
To reduce risk of kickbacks, keep a firm grip on the chainsaw with your thumb underneath
the handhold and avoid touching limbs or other objects with the tip of the bar.
Chain brakes are to be maintained in good order.
Stop chain of chainsaw when moving from cut to cut.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Hi Vis Hard Hat, blaze orange
Hi Vis Vest or Jacket
Leg Protection Devices
Suitable Footwear
Gloves
Hearing Protection
Eye Protection (glass or screen)
Personal First Aid Kit
Fire Extinguisher
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3.12
STEEP SLOPE SKIDDING
On slopes greater than 35%, skidder operators should be aware that there are additional
hazards.
The operator should abide by the following:
 Wear seat belts at all times.
 When a steep slope is encountered, a site plan will be made to maximize both
safety and production.
Without skid trails the following criteria should be
observed:
Refer to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.16.
 Rubber-Tired Skidders
35%
 Feller Bunchers, Crawler Tractors
40%
 Other Forestry Equipment
50%
- specifically designed for use on steep slopes
i.e. Light Flotation Forwarders
When short, steep pitches that exceed these slopes are encountered, the following
procedure must be followed:
 Ensure you operate your machine straight up and down the slopes, not across
them. This includes traveling down slopes or backing up to the drag before
grappling on to it.
 Do not swing machines on steep slopes. Swinging drastically changes your center
of gravity and can easily lead to a fatal roll over.
 Utilize bladed trails where necessary to avoid machine travel across steep slopes.
All steep slopes will be reviewed by the equipment operator and/or Supervisor on a site
specific basis.
The Supervisor should note all discussions regarding a particular plan to deal with steep
slopes in their daily journal.
Weather conditions also play a crucial role in deciding whether or not it is safe to skid a
particular slope (wet, slippery slopes during rain, frozen, slippery slopes during winter).
Each operator must evaluate their own comfort level when operating on steep slopes in
accordance with this procedure.
IF YOU FEEL IT IS UNSAFE TO WORK ON A PARTICULAR STEEP SLOPE - DON'T!!!
Contact your Supervisor and develop an alternate plan such as use of a hand faller and/or
hoe chuck with chokers from a safe work area for your machine (i.e. a skid trail or flatter
ground).
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Exceeding these slopes will jeopardize equipment stability. These slopes may be
exceeded, if a proper site plan is in place. If going straight up or down, the path must be
clear of obstructions so the unit will not have to turn at an angle to the slope.
The slope percent is defined as a rise over run, i.e.: if a hill side climbs 35 feet in 100 feet
horizontal distance, the slope is 35%.
If skid trails are part of the approved logging plan, ensure that they are built flat enough
that the drag will not slide off the trail.
If a curve is required make sure the radius is large enough that the drag will remain on the
trail and not be "pushed" over the edge by the cut bank.
Be cautious of trying to pull too large a turn on steep slopes; it can push the machine on
slippery or frozen slopes, or it can spill off the skid trail and pull the unit over the edge.
When operating on steep slope skid trails, remain on the skid trail - pull mainline out to the
logs.
Ensure the turn is winched up tight to the unit when skidding steep slopes. This helps
prevent runaways that can upset the skidder.
When operating on a steep slope, be aware of rocks and logs, which may become
dislodged and come downhill striking the skidder or operator. This material can also roll
downhill and strike workers on the landing.
3.13
WORKING IN CLOSE PROXIMITY
Harvesting operations usually try to operate each phase of the process separate and in a
form of natural progression. However as the block is logged operations start to overlap
and can find themselves working in close proximity. The risks associated with this hazard
can be minimized by following these procedures:
3.13.1
FELLER BUNCHERS
 When skidders are required to skid within the two-tree distance of a feller buncher,
the Skidder Operator shall contact the Buncher Operator and the Buncher Operator
will cease operation and advise the skidder that he may move within the restricted
area. Upon exiting the area the Skidder operator will give the all clear and the
Buncher may resume operation. Contact shall be by radio or visual.
 When a Buncher is operating adjacent to active roads or cutting a line up to an
active road the following must be in place:
a) Signs must be posted advising falling in the area.
b) Vehicle operators must advise the Buncher Operator
that they wish to pass and do not pass until
acknowledged by the Buncher Operator.
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3.13.2 SKIDDERS
Skidder operators find themselves working close to nearly all equipment. As most units
now have radios, contact must be made before approaching within operating radius of any
equipment. Then that operator must acknowledge it is safe to proceed. If no radio is
available, eye contact and acknowledgement of intention must be received before
proceeding.
3.13.3
PROCESSORS / LOADERS
Skidders and vehicles (Logging Trucks, etc.) are potentially the most likely units to be in
close proximity. All units must request permission to pass and receive acknowledgment
from the operator. Units will know it is safe to pass when the operator has lowered the
boom to the ground as well as acknowledging their presence.
3.14
WORKING FROM AN ELEVATION
To work on elevated platforms, workers must be aware of the requirements for safe use of
ladders, scaffolds and fall protection.
OHSR Part 11; Section 11 states:
The Employer must provide a fall protection procedure and protection for workers
that are required to work from a height of 10 feet or more.
Fall Protection Plan
 Fall protection can come in the forms of fall restraint or fall arrest. Fall restraint is
any method that prevents the worker from falling off the work position, i.e.: guard
rails, lanyard and belt or other acceptable conditions. Fall arrest is the harness and
lanyard that prevents the worker from hitting the surface below.
Ensure workers are aware of the requirements of this procedure and are implementing the
required Fall Protection Plan.
If fall arrest is required:
USE a full body harness
USE a fire resistant lifeline or lanyard. Anchor your line to a secure attachment point.
INSPECT your line for damage and replace it if necessary.
USE the proper length of line for your elevation length.
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3.14.1 LADDERS
 FOLLOW safe ladder use procedures as established in your workplace.
 SUPPORT a ladder at the bottom with ladder shoes and tie it off at the top.
 FACE the ladder when ascending and descending, using both hands.
 DO NOT extend a ladder away from the wall more than 1/4 of the perpendicular
height of the ladder. The ladder should extend 3 feet (.9 metres) above the top of
the top landing.
 DO NOT stand on the top two rungs of a ladder.
 DO NOT carry loads up a ladder. Use hoisting equipment.
 DO NOT use metal ladders with electrical equipment or near overhead wires.
Inspection
When should you inspect ladders?
 Inspect new ladders promptly upon receipt
 Inspect ladders before each use
 Check the condition of ladders that have been dropped or have fallen before using
them again
What should you look for when inspecting any ladder?
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Missing or loose steps or rungs (they are loose if you can move them by hand)
Damaged or worn non-slip feet
Loose nails, screws, bolts or nuts
Loose or faulty spreaders, locks and other metal parts in poor repair
Rot, decay or warped rails in wooden ladders
Cracks and exposed fiberglass in fiberglass ladders
Cracked, split, worn or broken rails, braces, steps or rungs
Sharp edges on rails and rungs
Rough or splintered surfaces
Corrosion, rust, oxidization and excessive wear, especially on treads
Twisted or distorted rails. Check ladders for distortion by sighting along the rails.
Using a twisted or bowed ladder is hazardous.
 Missing identification labels
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3.15
BEAR AND COUGAR AWARENESS
3.15.1 Bear Safety
 Where the risk of bear encounters is high, personnel should attend a Bear
Awareness course.
 Carry adequate protection (bear spray or an air horn) when
working in high-risk areas.
 If you meet a bear do not turn and run immediately.
 Make sure the bear is aware of your presence, watch the
bear, and back up cautiously.
 If the bear moves towards you, use bear spray or climb a
tree as high and fast as possible. Continue to make noise.
Tips About Bears
They run as fast as horses – uphill and
down.
Bears climb trees.
They have an excellent sense of smell
and hearing and better sight than most
people believe.
They are very strong and defend their
personal space.
They aggressively defend food and
cubs.
Avoiding Bears
Be alert.
Look for signs of recent bear activity. Including
droppings, tracks, digging, and claw marks on
trees.
Make your presence known by talking loudly,
clapping, singing or occasionally calling out.
Back up cautiously.
Stay away from dead animals.
Be aware and try to avoid high-risk areas (salmon
spawning streams, etc.) by season. Never attempt
to separate or walk between a sow and cubs.
3.15.2 Cougar Safety
 A cougar's primary prey is deer. It will also feed on wild sheep, elk, rabbits, beaver,
raccoons, grouse, and occasionally livestock.
 Cougars are most active at dusk and dawn. However, they will roam and hunt at
any time of the day or night and in all seasons.
Tips About Cougars
Cougars range from 40 – 60kg.
Cougars are most active at dusk and
dawn but do roam and hunt any time
of day and in all seasons.
During late spring and summer is
when young cougars search for their
own territory and when most cougar
encounters occur.
Avoiding Cougars
Hike in a group of two or more and make lots of
noise.
Watch for signs of cougars — tracks, covered kill
— and avoid these areas.
Never approach a cougar. Always give a cougar
an avenue to escape – never corner it. Stay calm
and talk to the cougar. Do not run or turn your
back. Do all you can to enlarge your image. Fight
back.
Hunting Season Precautions
Check all roads within your working area for hunters before entering the woods.
Wear bright colors. ―No Hunting‖ signs are available for posting on road access.
Hunting rifles and bows are not permitted in Company vehicles.
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3.16
FIREARM SAFETY
Anyone having firearms on the worksite must conform to all Firearm Restrictions required
by Legislation.
NEVER point a firearm at anything you do not want to shoot. Avoid all horseplay with any
firearm.
NEVER climb a fence, tree, or jump a ditch with a loaded firearm.
NEVER carry a firearm with the hammer fully cocked.
Keep your firearm unloaded when you are not using it.
If a firearm is to be sighted in or target practice to be performed advise persons in area
before shooting.
Unload your gun immediately when you have finished shooting, well before you bring it into
a vehicle, camp or home. Store firearms and ammunition separately.
3.17
SECURITY
It is the responsibility of the contractor to ensure that adequate security precautions are in
place that will promote a safe and secure work area for both the workforce and public.
3.17.1 SITE SECURITY
Adequate temporary fencing shall be installed to deter access to work areas, especially
around excavations.
All plans and work procedures shall be followed to ensure best practices in keeping
workers from being exposed to hazards.
Contractor‘s vehicles shall be parked in designated areas and vehicle traffic through the
work area kept to a minimum.
The contractor will ensure all workers, subcontractors, and suppliers arriving on site
comply with Prime Contractor‘s Orientation for man check. This is sign in/out process. In
the event of an incident, these individuals will be checked at the muster point location
against this man check sheet.
3.17.2 EQUIPMENT SECURITY
All equipment will be locked and elevated parts lowered
to ground at the
end of each shift or when the equipment is going to be left
unattended. Parking
of units should be done in such a manner that it makes it difficult for vandals to move.
Master switches are to be off and units adequately immobilized.
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4.0 EMERGENCY RESPONSE
These procedures reference the Employer and worker to the requirements of the existing
Occupational Health & Safety Regulation. Additional information can be provided by the
Prime Contractor (Licensee) and should be referred to for supplemental information.
4.1
FIRST AID
Part 3 of the Occupational Health & Safety Regulation (OHSR) requires Employers to
make provisions to ensure that their workplaces have first aid coverage.
EMPLOYER’S RESPONSIBILITIES
4.1.1
 Conduct an assessment to determine the level of first aid service that must be
provided for a workplace (Refer OHSR Part 3, Section 3.16(1) to (3).
See Appendix B-B15 First Aid Assessment Checklist).
 Develop and implement first aid procedures (Refer OHSR Part 3, Sections
3.16(4) and Sections 3.17 to 3.19).
 See EH&S Manual Sections 4.1.2 to 4.1.4 and Appendices:
B16
B17
B18 & B19
B20
First Aid Assessment Checklist
First Aid Evacuation Information Sheet
Emergency Response Procedures Checklist
Emergency Response Phone Numbers
REQUIREMENTS FOR REPORTING ACCIDENTS AND OBTAINING
FIRST AID TREATMENT
Supervisors shall inform each worker that all injuries, regardless of how slight, must be
reported to the Supervisor immediately, who shall make available first aid treatment.
All Supervisors shall have a first aid kit in their vehicles for immediate use.
The Supervisor and First Aid Attendant shall ensure that every injury receiving First Aid
treatment is reported and recorded in an approved Record Book at the job office or with
the First Aid Attendant.
4.1.3
SERIOUS INJURY
 The First Aid Attendant on site shall be notified immediately by radio of any
injury. The reporting party should specify:
o the location of the injured worker
o the nature of the accident
o the time of the accident
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 Simultaneous notification shall be given to all Supervisors within radio range.
 Additional help will be summoned as necessary.
 All workers called to the accident site must remain until dismissed by the
attendant.
 Should the ETV be dispatched, all radio traffic shall be kept at a minimum and
other traffic should clear the road.
 All work processes may stop if assistance is required to aid in details of
transportation.
 The First Aid Attendant will accompany the patient to camp in the ETV,
designating driver and assistants as the situation dictates.
 If the situation warrants, the attendant may request the immediate Supervisor to
arrange for Provincial Ambulance or a Medi-vac to meet the ETV en-route to
expedite more rapid transport to the medical facility.
 HELICOPTERS WILL NOT FLY AT NIGHT.
 Any or all of the crew may be called upon to assist in transport or Medi-vac
procedures.
 The hospital shall be notified of the estimated time of arrival and all pertinent
medical information by the FAA or designated person.
4.1.4
FIRST AID GENERAL
All injuries must be reported to the First Aid Attendant immediately. Failure to do so may
delay a claim for compensation. Refer to OHSR Division 5; Sections 53 to 78.
The First Aid Attendant shall be in complete charge of all First Aid treatment of injured
workers until medical aid is available.
All workers on compensation must notify their Employer or Supervisor the day they are
found fit for work by their doctor.
Learn the medi-vac procedures and know the location of the operation.
Learn who the First Aid Attendant is, and where he/she works.
Learn where you are located.
Learn the type of communications you have at your work site.
Calling For Assistance:
a.
b.
c.
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Try to remain calm
Request on radio for First Aid and give your location even if you do not get an
answer, someone may hear you
Repeat on other channels
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4.1.5 FIRST AID EVACUATION
The First Aid Attendant shall make the decision whether an injured worker should be
transported by air or ground transportation to the nearest hospital or other place of medical
treatment.
A First Aid Attendant shall, if they deem it necessary, accompany an injured worker being
transported to medical aid.
In the event of an Injured Person Who Requires Transportation, either by ambulance or
helicopter, the following procedures should be followed:
 Provide First Aid immediately to the injured person. Make them comfortable, keep
them warm, but unless they are in danger of further injury from their location, Do
Not Move Them.
 Contact the closest First Aid attendant.
 Contact Ambulance service dispatch.
See Appendix B-B18 Emergency Response Phone Numbers.
If the ambulance dispatch cannot be reached, Contact the Office.
Advise Location of the Accident, giving geographic location, include information on nearest
landmarks, i.e. lakes, camps, etc., distance from hospital by road, road number, etc.,
weather in area, if helicopter use is considered. Provide longitude and latitude.
Provide information as to the Nature of Injuries, and How the Injury Was Caused, i.e.
struck by tree, hit by log, etc. and Approximate Time of Injury.
Inform Radio Channel to be monitored and Assign Someone to monitor the radio. If
contact was made by radio telephone, Give Them Your Radio Telephone Number so that
they may call you back if they require additional information.
Specify if Ambulance Attendant Required.
Advise them if there is an Industrial First Aid Attendant on site and whether or not they
wish to move the injured person.
Determine whether they are sending an ambulance by road or helicopter. If ground
ambulance, ask if they wish to be escorted to your location. If they do, dispatch a vehicle
to meet the ambulance.
Supervisor will be responsible to contact the Manager and to notify the appropriate
agencies WSBC, RCMP, etc., and Preserve the Accident Site as best as possible for
investigation purposes.
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4.1.6 EVACUATION BY ROAD OR BY AIR
1. In case of emergency, using Monkman or Apollo Repeater frequencies, call any of
the first aid attendants and your Supervisor. Briefly describe what is required and
your location. Do not use the patients name on the radio.
Radio Channels:
Monkman - 159.600
Apollo Repeater - 153.590 (Rx) 157.400 (Tx)
2. Anyone who is designated by the first aid attendant or is able to place a call can
radio for emergency transportation.
3. Call the Provincial Ambulance Service at 1 800 461 9911 and explain to them that
you will meet them at a preferred meeting point (Usually the Leo Creek - Tachie Rd
Junction at 40km on the Tachie Rd).
Let the Ambulance Service know that you will be running on L&M Frequency
(151.655) heading down the Leo Creek FSR and what time you expect to be at the
meeting point.
4. If an air evacuation is necessary, call the Provincial Ambulance Service at 1 800
461 9911 and explain that you require an air ambulance using one of the following
helicopter companies:
Pacific Western Helicopters:
Or:
Interior Helicopters:
Prince George - (250) 562 7911
Fort Saint James - (250) 996 8644)
 Let them know you require a helicopter that can accommodate a spine board for
patient evacuation (it is also important to ask what side the stretcher sits in so
that you can position the patient on the proper side facing the attendant).
 Make sure you also give them your location as well as the Latitude/Longitude for
the area (which is available off of your Logging Plan Maps).
Appendix B-B15 Appendix B-B16 Appendix B-B17
Appendix B-B18
First Aid Assessment Checklist
First Aid Evacuation Information
Emergency Procedures Checklist
Emergency Response Phone Numbers
4.1.7 FATALITY
 Correct any immediate unsafe conditions that may cause dangers to yourself or
others.
 Leave the accident site exactly as it is if possible. (for WSBC and RCMP)
 The first aid attendant will take care of the accident scene and attend to the care of
the body.
 Notify Company representatives immediately.
 Ensure a doctor and/or ambulance has been called.
 Notify the RCMP - 911 and WSBC immediately if Company rep has not already
done so.
 Do not name the victim over the radio.
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4.2
SPILL CONTINGENCY PLANNING
4.2.1 SPILL RESPONSE & REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
Spilled chemicals should be effectively and quickly contained and cleaned up. All spills
must be reported to their immediate Supervisor, warn other employees, and mark the area
of contamination to prevent further exposure to other workers.
Continual leaks must be stopped. When a spill occurs all reasonable and practical action
shall be taken, having due regard for the safety of the public and the operator, to stop,
contain and minimize the effects of the spill.
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Supervisor has primary responsibility for coordinating the response to emergencies,
including chemical spills. Supervisors should ensure that employees are familiar with these
procedures and receive any necessary training. All employees should follow these
procedures in the event of a spill. Supervisors are responsible for filling out the Spill
Report and submitting it to their immediate Supervisor.
See Appendix B – B19 Spill Report Form
The Company will ensure there is a spill kit on site at all times.
Spill Response Action Steps:
1. SAFETY
 Take charge of the situation.
 Ensure that there are no immediate hazards (sources of ignition, unstable tank in
the event of roll-over etc…).
2. STOP
 Identify the product.
 Block flow of the spilled product (upright, turn-off, plug leak).
3. PREVENT FIRE
 Eliminate all ignition sources in case the spilled product is flammable.
 Extinguish any flames.
4. WARN OTHERS
 Evacuate if necessary.
 Enforce no smoking at the spill site.
5. CONTAIN
 Take safety precautions by donning the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment
(goggles, gloves, rubber boots, and coveralls).
 Use spill kit commercial absorbents, sawdust, dirt berms, ditch blocks to contain the
spill.
 Direct spill away from any watercourses.
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6. NOTIFY SUPERVISOR
 Promptly report all spills to your Supervisor.
7. REPORT SPILL
 Refer to Apollo Forest Products Ltd. Spill Prevention and Response Plan for
appropriate reporting and clean-up procedures.
NOTE: If you are cleaning up a spill yourself, make sure you are aware of the hazards
associated with the materials spilled, have adequate ventilation, and proper personal
protective equipment. Treat all residual chemical and cleanup materials as hazardous
waste.
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
All spills greater than 100 litres that are not contained, must be reported to
the MoWLAP by calling the Provincial Emergency Reporting Hotline at
1-800-663-3456. (YOU MUST DIAL 9 FOR AN OUTSIDE LINE)

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

Provincial Emergency Hotline: 1-800-663-3456
Department of Fisheries & Oceans: 250-851-4950
Conservation Officer: 558-1776
RCMP/FIRE/AMBULANCE: 911
Ministry of Water Land and Air Protection: 1-866-632-8600
4.2.2 CLOSURE PLAN
Any contaminated soils must be handled accordingly.
Remove all waste materials from the site.
Develop a good pollution prevention program, this would reduce the need for site clean-up
/ restoration and thus reduce additional cleanup costs.
Written notice should be sent to MoWLAP that site cleanup was done and site is no longer
in use.
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4.3
FIRE MANAGEMENT
Fire hazards must be removed if and when possible.
Fires must be reported immediately and employees must assist in bringing them under
control.
All employees must be familiar with the method of reporting fires and in the use of fire
fighting equipment. Standard of instruction is S100 Fire Management.
All employees should be trained in fire prevention and emergency evacuation procedures.
Refer to OHSR Part 4; Section 4.16.
Any fire extinguishers which have been used must be replaced immediately and the used
one returned to the foreman for recharging. Playing with fire extinguishers is prohibited.
Checking for unseen fires after machines have been shut down is recommended.
All fire tools and equipment are plainly marked 'FIRE' as are all Fire Boxes and Stations.
All handles and heads of tools are painted Fire Red for identification. Fire tools which have
been used must be cleaned or replaced.
Fire Reporting:
Step 1
Call Provincial Fire Control:
1 800 663 5555 (*5555 from a cellular phone)
Or
Prince George Fire Center
1 250 565 6126
Step 2
Fires thought to be within the Company's area of responsibility should be reported to:
Apollo Forest Products Ltd.
1 250 996 8297
And
Ministry of Forests (Vanderhoof)
1 250 567 6363
Useful Information When Reporting a Fire:
When reporting a fire, relate all the information needed on the Initial Fire Report Form to
the Fire Control Center. See Apollo Forest Products Ltd's Annual Wildfire Plan for this
form and more detailed information.
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When a Fire Occurs:
 Stop operations and notify the rest of the crew.
 Refer to the above list for additional phone numbers if required. The reporting
person shall remain available to communicate details of the fire suppression activity
taken and what may be required.
 The remaining crew shall begin immediate action on the fire to their level of safety
and competence.
 The person in charge of the crew during suppression operations will continue to
supervise the efforts until relieved by the Licensee representative or forest service
personnel.
If Alone:
 DO NOT take action on an intense fire yourself. If the fire is beyond your ability,
notify the Forest Service immediately and follow their instructions.
 Take immediate action on the fire if you believe you can control it yourself.
Hand tools used in fire fighting are simple and effective, but they can be dangerous when
used carelessly. Abide by the following safety rules to decrease the risk of injury to
yourself and to fellow crew members:
 Hand tools should be kept in safe working conditions
 Keep sharp edges covered or shielded when not in use to prevent accidental impact
and to protect the edge of the tool
 Do not leave tools where they may be walked on. Lean them against a tree or rock
 Secure tools to be transported
 Carry tools at waist level and not over the shoulder. This will allow you to throw the
tool clear if you fall and will prevent injury to yourself or others
 When walking along a hillside, carry tools on the downward side
 Pass tools to others, handle first. Never throw them
 Maintain a 3 meter distance from co-workers when walking or working
 Hand tools should be used only for the purpose for which they were designed
 Tools with mushroom heads, split and defective handles or other defects must not
be used.
Fire Safety Tips:
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





01/18/07
Know what the fire is doing at all times.
Base all actions on the current and expected behavior of the fire.
Plan escape routes for everyone and make them known.
Be alert, keep calm, think clearly, and act decisively.
Maintain prompt communications with your crew, your boss, and adjoining forces.
Maintain control of your crew at all times. Stay together as a crew.
When you are working with tools, keep a safe distance from other fighters.
Your feet are your worst hazard. Keep sure-footing at all times to avoid injury.
Be Alert for rolling rocks or rolling logs when your are walking or working on slopes.
Observe NO SMOKING restrictions in certain designated areas.
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Emergency Preparedness Procedure - Fire Equipment Requirements
Timber Harvesting, Road Construction, Road Maintenance & Deactivation
3 People or Less On
Worksite
3 People or More On
Worksite
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for
machinery with large
engines
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for
working with small
engines
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for people
1 - Pulaski or Mattock
1 - Pulaski or Mattock
1 - Pulaski or Mattock
1 - Round nosed
shovel
1 - Round nosed
shovel
1 - Round nosed
shovel
1 - Fire extinguisher
with a ULC rating of
at least 1A5BC
1 - hand tank pump
containing at least
18L of water
1 - hand tank pump
containing at least
18L of water
1 - Fire extinguisher
with a ULC rating of
at least 3A10BC or
an integral fire
suppression system
1 - personal fire
extinguisher charged
with at least 0.225 kg
(0.5lbs) of fire
extinguishing
chemical
1 - Appropriate fire
suppression system
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for people
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for
working with small
engines
Mandatory Fire
Equipment for
machinery with large
engines
1 - round nosed
shovel, pulaski or
mattock for each
person
1 - round nosed
shovel, pulaski or
mattock for each
person
1 - hand tank pump
containing at least
18L of water for
every 3 persons
1 - hand tank pump
containing at least
18L of water for
every 3 persons
1 - Fire extinguisher
with a ULC rating of
at least 1A5BC
1 - Appropriate fire
suppression system
1 - personal fire
extinguisher charged
with at least 0.225 kg
(0.5lbs) of fire
extinguishing
chemical
1 - Fire extinguisher
with a ULC rating of
at least 3A10BC or
an integral fire
suppression system
1 - Pulaski or Mattock
1 - Round nosed
shovel
Hot Work (Cutting, Grinding, Welding
etc…)
Mandatory Fire Equipment
2 - Fire extinguishers with a ULC rating of at
least 3A10BC
1 - Round nosed shovel
2 - hand tank pumps containing at least 18L of
water
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4.3.1 WELDING AND BURNING
 Most industrial fires are started by burning or welding equipment and many of these
have developed into fires of major proportions with property damage running into
the tens of millions of dollars and, in some cases, loss of life.
 Refer to OHSR Part 12; Sections 12.112 to 12.126.
 Never weld a tank, pipeline or portable container without making absolutely sure
that it is free of any explosive or toxic vapours.
 Chemical or other approved extinguishers must be checked before starting work
and the extinguishers must be at the point of work at all times.
 Always use a water hose in preference to a chemical extinguisher except in the
case of electrical, oil or grease fires.
 No cutting, burning or air arcing shall be done in such a way as to endanger other
workers.
4.3.2 ARC WELDING
 All welders shall wear proper welding helmet with approved safety lens.
proper fitting clothes and gloves are to be worn.
Also,
 Handle your arc welding equipment with respect. High voltage handled carelessly
can cause injury or death.
 Make sure all connections on your welding equipment are tight and insulated and
that connections are not placed on flammable material.
 When arc welding, ensure the ground is close to work and firmly attached.
 Never change polarity when under load.
 Use proper eye protection when chipping or grinding.
 NEVER run a fuel-driven welder in a confined space,
carbon monoxide can build up quickly.
 Be sure your machine is properly grounded.
 Avoid standing on damp ground when arc welding.
 Keep the connection of the electrode lead to the holder tight to avoid over heating
which will burn your hands.
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4.3.3 OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING OR BURNING
 Ensure all fittings and gauges are in good working order. Never allow gauges to
become oil contaminated.
 Cylinders must be upright and at least 10 feet from operation.
 At the end of operation ensure gauges are off and lines drained.
 Wear appropriate eye protection.
 Never use oxygen for cleaning or ventilation - it will promote fire if there is a fire
source. Oxygen can saturate your clothes and a spark can set them on fire.
 All hose and torch connections must be leak proof.
 Shield welding area from other workmen.
 Use backflow devices on both the oxygen and the acetylene hoses to prevent ―suck
back‖, a condition where the gases are mixed within the torch or hoses.
 Replace protective caps on all cylinders not in use.
 Keep boots tightly laced and coveralls buttoned so slag won‘t get between your foot
and boot.
 Use ear plugs when there is a chance of hot slag entering your ear.
 Properly clean fuel containers before welding.
 Remove or carefully guard fuel tank on machines being welded.
 Do not cut towards oxygen or acetylene bottles.
 Do not use pressure in excess of 15 pounds on any acetylene gauge.
 Always wear hearing protection when using the air arc.
 Always wear gauntlet type gloves while welding or cutting.
 Wear leather aprons or jackets if you are required to work under heavy sparks.
 Protect chrome rods, glass and machined surfaces from splatter.
 Identify hot objects.
 Make sure there are no inflammable materials near work area.
 Store all bottles in a secured position with safety caps screwed on. Separate area
should be used for full and empty bottles.
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4.3.4 HOW TO USE YOUR FIRE EXTINGUISHER
Before implementing the following steps, upend the extinguisher and rap firmly against
side of canopy or other solid surface to loosen contents.
Pull the pin.
Aim extinguisher nozzle at the base of the flame.
Squeeze trigger while holding the extinguisher upright.
Sweep the extinguisher from side to side, covering the area of the fire.
Remember:
Should your path of escape be threatened
Should the extinguisher run out of agent
Should the extinguisher prove to be ineffective
Should you no longer be able to safely fight the fire
Then Leave the Area Immediately
4.3.5 HOW TO INSPECT YOUR FIRE EXTINGUISHER
 Know the locations of your extinguishers.
 Make sure the class of extinguisher is safe to use on fires likely to occur in the
immediate area.
 Check the seal. Has the extinguisher been tampered with or used before?
 Look at the gauge and feel the weight. Is the extinguisher full? Does it need to be
recharged?
 Make sure the pin, nozzle and name plate are intact.
 Report any missing, empty or damaged extinguishers to the appropriate person at
your workplace.
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4.3.6 TYPES OF FIRES
Class A These fires consist of wood, paper, rags, rubbish and other ordinary
combustible materials.
Recommended Extinguishers: water, through the use of a hose, pump type
water cans, or pressurized extinguishers.
Fighting the Fire: soak the fire completely, including the smoking embers.
Class B
Flammable liquids, oil and grease.
Recommended Extinguishers: dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide.
Fighting the Fire: Start at the base of the fire and use a swinging motion from
left to right, always keeping the fire in front of you.
Class C
Electrical Equipment
Recommended Extinguishers: carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units).
Fighting the Fire: Shut off the power. Use short bursts on the fire. When the
electrical current is shut off on a Class C fire, it can become a Class A fire when
the materials around the electrical fire become ignited.
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4.4
NATURAL DISASTERS
Natural disasters may include landslides, earthquakes, floods and avalanches.
Standard response for any emergency is the basic three steps:
Step 1:
Warn people, secure area and ensure no danger to self.
Step 2:
Give assistance and minimize danger.
Step 3:
Notify Employer, Regulatory Bodies and work with remediation of
emergency.
4.4.1 LANDSLIDES/AVALANCHES
In any operation where there may be a risk of a landslide or avalanche:
 The risk must be assessed in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board;
 If a risk is found to be present, written Safe Work Procedures must be developed
meeting the requirements of the standard; and

Workers must be educated in Safe Work Procedures.
4.4.1.1 LANDSLIDES
See applicable EPRP
―Assessed in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board‖ means:
(1)
(2)
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The forestry operation is subject to the requirements of the Terrain Stability Mapping
Guidebook and the Gully Management Guidebook (currently required prior to PHSP
and LP approval). An experienced professional engineer or geo-scientist must
complete this process, with extensive experience in terrain stability assessments.
This process results in a terrain stability classification 1 through 5. Class 4 and 5 are
considered to have a moderate to high failure potential and should only be
accessed during favorable conditions and with due regard for conditions or
procedures that may trigger a slide event. Any attempt to log class 4 or 5 areas
significantly increases the risk of worker exposure to landslides, debris torrents and
avalanches. Proper procedures must be developed to reduce the risk.
If terrain stability mapping has not been undertaken, any slopes in excess of 60% or
slopes identified by field staff as having indicators of instability must be evaluated by
a professional engineer or geo-scientist.
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(3)
Because slides, avalanches and debris torrents may initiate well above a forestry
operation, the assessment procedure must include an evaluation of air photos by
experienced professional engineers or geologists to determine if such an upslope
hazard exists.
4.4.1.2 LANDSLIDE SAFETY ASSESSMENT
See applicable EPRP
Landslides that initiate at older logging roads located above active forestry operations can
pose a serious threat to worker safety.
To reduce this risk, all persons responsible for forestry operations are advised to have
professional engineers or geologists, with extensive experience in terrain stability
assessments, evaluate the stability of any roads lying above active or proposed logging
areas where landslide activity could endanger worker safety.
Assessments should take place immediately where logging or road-building is active on
slopes below these older roads.
The assessments should evaluate the following:
 Stability of upslope roads,
 Effects of roads‘ drainage works on the stability of terrain below such roads,
 Potential for landslide initiation, and
 Potential landslide run-out zones.
Where terrain stability concerns are present, the person responsible for the forestry
operation should implement Safe Work Procedures, which act to protect forest workers
from landslide hazards.
These procedures could include, but are not limited to:
 Immediate deactivation of road systems to control potential stability problems,
 Implementation of seasonal rainfall or snowmelt shutdown guidelines (in some
situations snowmelt may act in a similar manner to heavy rain), and
 Relocation of forestry activity to safer areas.
Road deactivation may not always result in complete stabilization of a slope.
Consequently, any deactivated roads lying above active or proposed logging/road building
operations should be assessed in the same manner as non-deactivated roads.
Similar precautions should be taken where road construction or road deactivation is taking
place above active logging operations.
The persons responsible for the forestry operation are also advised to carry out these road
stability assessments for any older roads located above any camp or other installation
where workers will be living or working, or above other areas where public safety may be a
concern.
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Individual work locations, (cut banks, gullies, below side-casts, etc.) are to be evaluated by
a competent individual to determine and identify potential risks.
OH&S Regulation 26.17
When weather conditions create hazards to workers, additional precautions must be taken
as necessary for the safe conduct of the work.
4.4.2 AVALANCHE HAZARDS IN THE SPRING
In mountainous terrain, do not stop in any gullies, stream channels, alluvial fans or open
areas if there is any possibility that they may be snow avalanche slide paths. Such terrain
must not be frequented until the avalanche hazard has been assessed and a safety
management plan is in place.
Be aware of possible avalanche hazard when working on any steep slope (more than 50%)
covered with more that about 75cm of snow.
Use qualified experts to assess all steep, snow-covered slopes above roads and working
areas, to ensure that they will not be prone to avalanche. Steep, older clear cuts above
working areas or active roads should be viewed with particular caution.
Be aware that any unusual weather conditions (rapid warming, heavy rains, and warm
winds) will quickly cause any avalanche hazard to increase. In springtime, be especially
wary on or under south-facing slopes during warm afternoons.
Besides threatening workers, avalanches may also damage equipment, block roads and
cutoff access (including emergency access). These secondary effects must be recognized
and managed if work is done in avalanche-prone terrain.
Be aware that avalanche control is of limited use in forest operations and may give a false
sense of security. For example, during springtime when it is warm, slopes stabilized one
day can become just as dangerous the next.
Restrict blasting to one-time, specific problems (such as removing a large snow cornice
from above a gully that crosses an active road) and make sure that such operations
comply with all WSBC regulations.
New avalanches are the surest sign of high avalanche danger. Until the danger has been
assessed and has subsided, suspend operations and do not work to clear avalanche
debris if a new slide has occurred.
Although avoidance of hazard is the key to safety, workers unavoidably exposed to
avalanche hazard must be equipped with avalanche rescue equipment (transceivers,
probes and shovels), training and knowledge in the use of this equipment, and be properly
trained in rescue procedures. It must be stressed that transceivers do not reduce the
hazard or impact of an avalanche – they make it easier to find someone buried in a slide
and so should not be used to justify working in otherwise hazardous terrain.
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Consult local experts and avalanche information Web sites, provide avalanche awareness
courses, assemble avalanche rescue equipment, formulate rescue plans, and check the
weather and the depth of local snow packs if working in avalanche-prone terrain. If at all
possible, delay working in avalanche-prone areas until the threat of avalanches is no
longer a concern.
When working in steep terrain, use the rainfall shutdown guidelines that include provisions
for factoring in the snowmelt.
4.5
H2S RELEASE - INITIAL RESPONSE STRATEGY
Seven Step Initial Response Strategy for a Hydrogen Sulphide Release:
1.
EVACUATE
Get to a safe area immediately.
Move upwind if release is downwind of you.
Move to higher ground if possible.
2.
ALARM
Call for help (man down) - sound alarm or call by radio.
3.
ASSESS
Do a head count.
Consider other hazards.
4.
PROTECT
Put on breathing apparatus (SCBA) before attempting rescue.
5.
RESCUE
Remove victim to a safe area.
6.
REVIVE
Apply artificial respiration and CPR if necessary.
7.
MEDICAL AID
Arrange transport of victim to a medical facility.
In the case of an emergency, workers are required to protect themselves, alert others
and alert the Company Representative to initiate the emergency response plan.
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5.0
ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS
5.1
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
The Employer has the responsibility to implement a WHMIS program and to ensure an
overview of the program on orientation.
When working with potentially hazardous materials, the Workplace Hazardous Materials
Information System (WHMIS) regulations must be adhered to and the basic elements must
be communicated to all employees. MSDS sheets are located in each of the shop vans as
well as in the kitchen at camp. All employees must complete the online or self
administered WHMIS training program annually.
The Supervisor will ensure that all employees within his specific worksite are instructed
and demonstrate that they understand WHMIS requirements. Instructions are to be
updated annually or as required.
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) will be readily available to workers either in printed
format or available through the Supervisor by electronic means.
All products intended for use by the Company's employees will be received through the
Supervisor.
No new products will be accepted without current MSDS.
All new MSDS's will be forwarded to the Employer before being released to the workers.
Workplace labels are to be used where no supplier label is available or on portable
containers into which a product has been transferred.
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5.2
Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG)
5.2.1 OVERVIEW
The Consignor (Shipper): is the person who offers a shipment for transport. That person
must ensure that the goods are:
 Know the classification
 Complete a shipping document
 Mark and label packages
 Ensure that placards are available, if necessary
The Carrier: is the person who transports the goods - the driver must ensure that the
goods are:
 Check the shipment before accepting
 Load goods properly
 Attach placards, if necessary
 Carry and deliver documents with the goods
If an accident or spill involving dangerous goods occurs during any phase of transport, the
person in charge of the goods at that time is responsible for reporting the incident. They
must immediately notify the following:
 The local police of that province
 Their Employer
 The owner of the vehicle
 The owner of the consignor of the goods
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Other accidents or incidents, which may have to be reported, are included in the definition
of Dangerous Occurrence:
 Damage to a bulk container of dangerous goods
 A transportation accident involving Radio-actives
 And unintentional fire or explosion involving dangerous goods
Before dangerous goods can be shipped, they must be classified. It is the responsibility of
the manufacturer to determine which of the 9 Classes their product fits into, along with the
Division and Packing Group.
Dangerous goods are separated into 9 Classes, based on a long established international
system. Different colors, symbols and numbers are used to indicate the type of danger
presented by each Class.
The order of the Classes does not indicate relative danger. Class 1 does not contain the
"most dangerous" products and Class 9 the "least dangerous".
For every shipment of dangerous goods, the shipping document must include certain basic
information. The shipper, carrier and consignee must be identified; the dangerous goods
must be described; and a 24-hour emergency contact number must be provided.
The document must be dated and will be signed or marked by the shipper.
Section 3.5 of the TDG regulations list many items which may be required on a shipping
document.
The following items are required for every shipment of dangerous goods:
 Date of document
 Shipper‘s name and address
 Consignee‘s name and address
 A description of the dangerous goods (in order):
 Shipping name
 Primary classification
 Product identification number
 Packing group
 Quantity of dangerous goods, including number of packages
 A 24 hour emergency telephone number
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5.2.2 RESPONSIBILITIES
The shipper must ensure that the goods are properly classified and documented and shall
sign and date the shipping document.
The loader shall ensure that the trailer is of the proper type for the dangerous goods and
ensure the placards are placed on the vehicle prior to loading.
The driver shall compare their instructions with the shipping documents and if there are
any discrepancies, the driver should seek clarification from their dispatcher prior to
accepting the shipment.
The driver must ensure, before leaving the shipper's premises, that the tank is free of leaks
and that the placards are properly applied.
During transportation, one copy of the shipping document must be kept either in a pouch in
the driver's door or within the
driver's reach when they are seated in the driver's seat.
If the driver is not in the cab, a second copy shall be in the driver's possession.
When a trailer containing dangerous goods is dollied off, one copy of the shipping
document shall be left with the person in charge of the area.
Any placards that are lost or become damaged while in transit must be replaced.
Upon delivery, the driver shall provide the receiver with a copy of the shipping document.
A copy of the original shipping document marked "Empty-Last Contained" shall accompany
the vehicle after unloading if it still contains any dangerous residues.
When making multiple deliveries or split loads, the driver shall, after each delivery, indicate
on or attach to the shipping document, the change in the quantity or the dangerous goods.
5.2.3 DOCUMENTATION AND PLACARDS
All shipments of dangerous goods must be accompanied by a shipping document
containing specific information.
Placards identifying the class of dangerous goods being transported MUST BE ON
DISPLAYED ON:
 Cargo tanks and tank containers containing dangerous goods or residues of
dangerous goods from a previous load requiring a placard.
 Vehicles containing any quantity of poison gases, corrosive gases, organic
peroxides, radioactive materials or hazardous wastes.
 Vehicles containing more than 500 kgs of all other classifications of dangerous
goods.
The placard and UN numbers shall be displayed on all four sides of the vehicle.
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5.3
FOREST AND RANGE PRACTICES ACT (FRPA)
Step 1:
Step 2:
Step 3:
Always read and understand your plans and maps.

This is risk assessment

get the information you need to be able to make good decisions on the risks
Always match your plan and map to what you find on the ground and then check
that you can do the work.

This is the beginning of risk assessment

think before you start to make sure that you can do what is required in the
plan

decide the level of risks involved with the required tasks

be aware that there could be resource features that are not identified on the
plan
Stop and ask if you cannot follow the plan and map.

Risk management is knowing when something cannot be done because of
high risk

If in doubt, stop and ask

Standard Operating Procedures are in place to help provide direction when
the plan cannot be followed. Stop work and inform your Supervisor

You must stop work if you come across an unidentified resource feature
Step 4:
01/18/07
Know your responsibilities. Ask if you are unsure.

knowing your responsibilities is part of managing risk

All workers should know their role in minimizing the risk of environmental
impacts through good forest practices
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5.3.1
PLANS AND MAPS
Plans and Maps Should Have:









North arrow
Scale (i.e. 1:10,000 means 1cm on map = 100m in the field)
Cutblock name and field marking, i.e. paint / ribbon color or blazes
Cutting permit and hammer mark
Road name/number and stations, paint and/or ribbon colors used for centerline,
slope stakes etc.
Date of map or map version
―Drafted‖ and/or ―Approved by‖
Explanation of map symbols used
Explanation of color coding
Do Not deviate from the plan without permission from your Supervisor.
No one can or should make any changes to ribbon lines or location even if there is an
obvious better location "When in doubt - stop work and ask your Supervisor".
If you see something that is obviously in a poor location and may lead to environmental
damage, you must inform your Supervisor or Company person before you proceed.
Always match your plan and map to what you find on the ground and then check that you
can do the work.
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5.3.2 RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT AREAS
Riparian Management Areas (RMA's) are usually associated with some of the most
sensitive sites on the block.
The Riparian Management Area (RMA) is the area adjacent to a stream. RMAs for larger
streams consist of a Riparian Reserve Zone (RRZ) and a Riparian Management Zone
(RMZ). RMAs for smaller streams, those without fish populations, or streams flowing into a
community watershed consist of Riparian Management Zone (RMZ) only.
A variety of operational practices may be applied in the RMZ, ranging from clear-cutting to
individual tree selection, while only very few activities are permitted in the RRZ. Your plans
will specify which operational practices are permitted in the RMZ and RRZ.
RMA's are defined to maintain water quality, stream channel function and the aquatic
ecosystem diversity by minimizing negative environmental impacts to lakes, wetlands and
streams.
Machine traffic is not allowed within 5 meters of any stream bank, intermittent or not,
ribboned or not.
If the ribbons are not there, follow the Standard Operating Procedures, stop work and
inform the Supervisor.
Fall trees away from streams, lakes and wetlands. If this is not possible, check with your
Supervisor, or leave the trees standing.
Unless the plans allow you to, do not fall or yard trees across streams.
Do not disturb or remove any natural materials that help keep the banks of streams, lakes
or wetlands stable. This includes root systems.
Do not dump slash and other debris in streams, lakes or wetlands. Also be sure that you
do not deposit this debris in areas like tributary streams. It could end up in other bodies of
water.
5.3.2.1 STORING MATERIALS AND CHEMICALS
You cannot store materials like fuel, chemicals or culverts in a Riparian
Management Area.
5.3.2.2 FUELING EQUIPMENT
You cannot fuel large equipment like bulldozers and skidders in Riparian
Management Area.
You can fuel hand held equipment like chainsaws in Riparian Management Areas.
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5.3.2.3 HARVESTING
You cannot harvest trees in a Reserve Zone.
The only exception is when you get special permission in writing from the District
Manager; an official from the Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks; and
sometimes a Department of Fisheries and Oceans official or if a safety issue
warrants removal.
5.3.3 SOIL CONSERVATION
5.3.3.1 SOIL DISTURBANCE
You must not disturb the soil more than the amount specified in the Silviculture
Prescription.
5.3.3.2 PREVENTING DAMAGE
Make sure all crewmembers know where sensitive or unstable soils are.
Do Not build, excavate or blade trails unless the plans approve it.
When possible, use the snow pack as a barrier between heavy equipment and the
soil.
On sensitive soils, use equipment that puts as little pressure as possible on the
ground.
Build ditches where necessary, to maintain natural drainage patterns, and to avoid
concentrating water flow.
Fall trees away from wet sites.
If operations are damaging the soil during poor weather conditions, shut them
down.
5.3.4 HANDLING OF INVESTIGATIONS
If a government agency starts to ask questions about something that may be in
contravention of the FRPA, ask them if this is an investigation.
If the answer is YES, you must contact your Supervisor or his alternate as soon as
possible.
Refuse to answer any questions without having a Supervisor present.
Answers to questions should be restricted to firsthand knowledge of facts. Your opinion
must not be volunteered and Do Not admit guilt.
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Do Not sign or initial any statements they have prepared.
You Should Ask:
 under what statute or regulation is the investigation being conducted
 what environmental incident is being investigated
 who is being investigated; the Company, individuals or both
 insist that all questions be written and answers will be given at a later date
You Should:
 Take comprehensive notes during the investigation. Take time after the
government official leaves to summarize what took place
 request copies of any photos they take
 request copies of all written statements about to be taken
 insist that all questions be written and answers will be given at a later date
If you haven't contacted the Supervisor, then do so at the earliest opportunity, or within 24
hours.
5.3.5 DUE DILIGENCE
Due Diligence, is simply the worker exercising reasonable judgment in carrying out his or
her duties.
Following a work plan given to you by your Supervisor; if you can do the work, stopping
and checking if you are unsure.
Asking questions when you are unsure of something in the plan or when difficult situations
come up.
Doing your job the way a reasonable, competent worker should in a situation.
Without proper instruction, proper direction, and proper control elements, the Company,
the contractor and their Supervisors are liable under the Forest Practices Code.
5.3.6 MARKING STANDARDS, RIBBONS AND PAINT
Standardization of field marking is in progress and you may encounter a lot of
inconsistencies between blocks.
It is important to understand what each colored ribbon represents in that block.
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5.4
FUEL HANDLING, TRANSPORTATION and STORAGE
5.4.1 SMALL CONTAINERS < 230L - Canisters, Jerry Cans, Drums
5.4.1.1
DESIGN
 Containers < 230L, used to store flammable or combustible liquids, must meet
appropriate design criteria and be properly labeled according to WHMIS.
 Containers must not leak, and must be sealed with a proper fitting lid or cap.
5.4.1.2




OPERATIONS
Safety/Spill Awareness
Spills of TDG Class 3 - flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial
Emergency Program (PEP) at 1-800-663-3456.
Post Spill Response Procedure and have appropriate spill response equipment
available.
Liquid spills and leaks shall be removed with the aid of absorbents and disposed of
in an acceptable manner.
Fire extinguishers must be on site, approved and current.
Dispensing
 All sources of ignition must be eliminated or removed while refueling.
 No smoking must be enforced around flammable liquids.
 Containers must not be filled beyond their safe filling level; this level should be
approximately 90% capacity.
Storage
 Use equipment boxes to store containers of 5 gallons (23 litres) or less, this keeps
the containers from bouncing out of the vehicle.
 Store in such a way so as to prevent drips, leaks and spills from entering into the
environment.
 Fuel caches: contain by using mobile drum containment unit, geotextile material or
some other means to contain volume being stored and use properly constructed
facility for storing more than 4 drums.
5.4.1.3
TRANSPORTATION
Load Security
 All drums must be transported upright and properly secured to the vehicle to prevent
shifting or swaying in any manner.
 Tie downs are to be in good condition and have a marked safe working load
sufficient to restrain load secured.
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5.4.1.4 DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING
 TDG training or documentation is not required if the total fuel capacity of all
containers is < 2000L.
5.4.2 SMALL TDG TANKS < 450 L - Truck Box Fuel Tanks
5.4.2.1 DESIGN
 Containers < 450L, used to store flammable liquids, must meet UN31 standard,
placarded and properly labeled according to WHMIS.
 Containers manufactured to ULC/ORD 142.13 standard may be used until January
1, 2010.
5.4.2.2













01/18/07
OPERATIONS
Safety/Spill Awareness
Spills of TDG Class 3 - flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial
Emergency Program (PEP) at 1-800-663-3456.
Post Spill Response Procedure and have appropriate spill response equipment
available.
Liquid spills and leaks shall be removed with the aid of absorbents and disposed of
in an acceptable manner.
Fire extinguishers must be on site, approved and current.
Dispensing
All sources of ignition must be eliminated or removed while refueling and ensure
static electrical charges are controlled. No smoking must be enforced around
flammable liquids.
Post a sign with site-specific fuel handling and operational procedures.
Containers must not be filled beyond their safe filling level; this level should be
approximately 90% capacity.
Nozzles are to meet acceptable standards, if fitted with an integral hold-open device
it must be fitted with an automatic shut off and break-away coupling.
Do Not jam nozzle open and leave unattended.
Fuel dispensing pumps must be maintained and meet all applicable standards.
Hoses and nozzles must be maintained in good repair, nozzles placed in some form
of drip containment.
Do not fuel or service machinery within a riparian management area or lakeshore
management area.
Install permanent filling funnel and an overflow protection whistle on all slip tanks.
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Storage
 Secondary containment is required if a tank that is > than 230L is removed and left
in fixed location for any length of time.
 Secondary containment is not required for tanks mounted in trucks.
 The slip tank shall be secured to the vehicle using either security straps or bolt/weld
to frame of truck.
 Place a thick rubber mat or plywood under the slip tank to prevent the tank from
rubbing on the truck box platform and preventing stress cracks.
 Ensure that the slip tank is regularly inspected for leaks and cracks.
5.4.2.3
DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING
 TDG and Spill Response training recommended, however, documentation is not
required.
5.4.3 LARGE TDG TANKS > 450L - Tank Vehicles
5.4.3.1
DESIGN
Tank Trucks
 Must meet CSA B620-1987 standard, placarded and properly labeled according to
WHMIS.
 Inspection Requirements:
inspection by a registered facility
visual inspection every two years and pressure tested every 5 years
Trailers & Semi Trailers
 Must meet UN31A or UN31B standards, ULC/ORD standard is acceptable until
January 1, 2010, placarded and properly labeled according to WHMIS.
 Inspection Requirements:
5.4.3.2




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OPERATIONS
Safety/Spill Awareness
Spills of TDG Class 3 - flammable liquids > 100L must be reported to the Provincial
Emergency Program (PEP) at 1-800-663-3456.
Post Spill Response Procedure and have appropriate spill response equipment
available.
Liquid spills and leaks shall be removed with the aid of absorbents and disposed of
in an acceptable manner.
Fire extinguishers must be on site, approved and current.
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Dispensing
 All sources of ignition must be eliminated or removed while refueling and ensure
static electrical charges are controlled. NO SMOKING must be enforced around
flammable liquids.
 Post a sign with site-specific fuel handling and operational procedures.
 Containers must not be filled beyond their safe filling level; this level should be
approximately 90% capacity.
 Nozzles are to meet acceptable standards, if fitted with an integral hold-open device
it must be fitted with an automatic shut off and break-away coupling.
 Do not jam nozzle open and leave unattended.
 Fuel hose length must not exceed 4.5m, or 6m where a retracting system is used.
 Hoses and nozzles must be maintained in good repair, nozzles placed in some form
of drip containment.
 Do not fuel or service machinery within a riparian management area or lakeshore
management area.
5.4.3.3





TRANSPORTATION
Trailers:
ensure surge brakes on all trailers are working
use dual chain connection to vehicle
trailer certified and licensed for road use by the Motor Vehicle Branch
ensure all the appropriate lights are working
use only an appropriate locking hitch connection
Skid Mounted Fuel Tanks:
 transport by low bed trailer over extended distances
 tank should be inspected and certified yearly
 skids must be protected by a cradle to prevent heavy wearing and chafing of the
tank




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Non-commercial Fuel Trucks:
ensure parking brakes and chock blocks are maintained
the tank shall not be leaking or damaged
dome covers shall be closed and secured at all times
close valves and lock valve cabinet when not operating
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Containment:
 Grade the site to divert and contain an accidental spill.
 Size of containment must be sufficient size to contain the volume of the tank plus
10%.
 Select a site that will be least likely to cause an impact on the environment should a
spill occur.
 Should have a spill containment system.
 Containment system should be covered to minimize the accumulation of rain or
snow.
5.4.3.4
DOCUMENTATION & TRAINING
 Documentation required for more than 2000L and TDG, Spill Response training
required.
 Empty tanks being low-bedded must have ―Residue - Last Contained‖ on shipping
document.
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6.0
SAFE WORK PRACTICES
6.1
GENERAL SAFE WORK PRACTICES FOR WORKERS
 It is the responsibility of every employee to be familiar with safety regulations and comply
with them.
 Use prescribed personal protective equipment:
o
Eye protection – Safety glasses or face shield.
o
Head protection – suitable cloth cap to protect the head from dust, dirt, etc. Hard hats
must be worn if overhead hazards are present.
o
Hi-Vis Vests are required if the worker will be exposed to moving equipment.
o
Foot protection – safety-toed work boots with non-slip soles are required.
o
Hand protection – suitable gloves to protect the hands for the job performed.
o
Leg protection – required only if a chain saw is being utilized in the job site.
o
Hearing protection – deci-damps or muffs are required.
o
Respiratory Aids – should be available to the worker as the need arises due to the job
hazards.
 Use the correct tools and equipment for the job.
 Report all injuries.
 Correct and report to Supervisor all unsafe conditions and acts.
 ‗Horseplay‘, fighting, and tampering with equipment is prohibited.
 Verbal, physical, and sexual harassment will not be tolerated.
 No employee shall use or be under the influence of drugs or alcohol while on the job or
operating Company equipment.
 Follow instructions. If you are unsure of the correct method of doing the job, contact you
immediate Supervisor.
 Do not operate equipment, vehicles or machinery without the proper training and
permission from the Supervisor.
 Tools and equipment not in safe operating condition must be reported to the Supervisor.
 For operation of equipment:
 Emergency Equipment
 First Aid Kits – a kit should be kept on the piece of equipment in case of laceration or a
puncture wound, check with the Supervisor as to what sized kit is required.
 Fire extinguishers.
 Fire Tools – as per the Supervisor‘s direction.
 Communications radios – if the piece of equipment will be separated from the main body of
workers for a period of time.
 Practice good housekeeping at all times.
 Set a good example.
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6.2
Safe Work Practices - Camp
 Premises of the camp shall be maintained in such condition that employees shall
not be endangered.
 Regular inspections shall be made of the camp premises to ensure that safe
working conditions are maintained.
 Fire extinguishers and smoke alarms shall be checked on a monthly basis.
 Emergency lighting shall be in place and operational in the event of a power failure.
 Eye, ear and respiratory aids shall be provided where needed to ensure safety at all
times for the employee.
 Adequate illumination should be provided to ensure the proper safety for the
employees.
 Every flight of stairs greater than four risers shall be equipped with handrails.
 Floors and walkways used by workers shall be maintained free from tripping
objects, spillage of liquids, and in good repair.
 No materials should be stacked or stored in such a manner to constitute a hazard
for the employee. Materials should be strapped or secured, if unstable.
 Proper ventilation shall be provided for the employees if hazardous vapors are
present.
 Set a good example
 No smoking while refueling vehicles or equipment
6.3
Safe Work Practices - Camp Catering
 Proper footwear with non-slip soles shall be worn to prevent slipping or stumbling.
 Open-foot shoes or sandals are not permitted in the kitchen. Employees shall not
enter the dining or kitchen area with bare feet.
 Exhaust fans shall be operational when using the grill or stoves to prevent
excessive heat and fumes
 Employee shall be aware and understand how to operate the CO 2 system (fire
suppression) in the kitchen area.
 Fire extinguishers shall be inspected monthly.
 Floors and walkways used by employees shall be maintained free from tripping
objects, spillage of liquids and in good repair.
 No materials should be stacked or stored in such a manner to constitute a hazard
for the employee. (Materials should be strapped or secured, if unstable).
 Electrical plug-ins or devices should not be operated or handled with wet hands
where electrical shock could occur.
 Gloves shall be worn when handling abrasive, acidic, or caustic substances.
 Good housekeeping should be practiced to ensure cleanliness and hygiene for the
other employees.
 Set a good example.
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6.4
Safe Work Practice
- Barricading and Posting Falling Hazard Areas
Responsibility
 It is the responsibility of the Supervisor to provide barricading and posting signs
to prevent injury where fallers and/or machines create an overhead falling
hazard.
 It is the responsibility of all fallers or operators to notify the Supervisor when
hazardous falling by roadways will commence.
 No worker or vehicle shall proceed past a barricade point without permission
from the Supervisor or radio communication permission from the faller or
operator doing the falling.
 No worker or vehicle shall proceed past a barricade point without permission
from the Supervisor or radio communication permission from the faller or
operator doing the falling.
Procedures
 Appropriate ―Active falling in progress‖ signage will be posted when falling is not
hazardous to the roadway.
 In areas where the falling is hazardous to the roadway, the road will be closed to
all vehicular traffic.
 Signs with ―Active falling in progress – Radio contact required before
proceeding‖ and the radio frequency will be posted on the sign.
 A barricade partially obscuring the roadway will accompany signs closing a road.
 Fallers or falling machines will carry signs and/or barricades in their vehicles to
post and place as necessary
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6.5
POWER EQUIPMENT AND TOOLS
No worker shall use any power tool, or similar type of equipment, unless he/she is familiar
with the use and operation of the equipment or had received specific instruction in its use
and operation.
Instruction in the use, handling and maintenance of power tools, or similar tools, will be
given to workers who require it.
Only qualified or specially trained workers may alter, repair, or otherwise tamper with
electrical equipment or electrical tools.
6.5.1 RE-OCCURRING HAZARDS
All safety hazards regardless how minor in nature shall be addressed by the Supervisor. If
maintenance is required, the Supervisor will direct in a prompt manner. The progress will
be communicated back to the employee as soon as possible. If the hazard cannot be dealt
with in a timely fashion, then the Supervisor shall communicate this back to the employee
giving a completion date if possible. The Supervisor shall ensure the area is safe until it
has been repaired.
6.5.2 SAFETY GUARDS
No employee of the Company is permitted to intentionally
impair or render ineffective any safety guards installed for the
workers.
remove,
protection of
6.5.3 SUSPENDED LOADS
No worker may enter under any suspended load for any reason unless the load is
restrained by blocks, chains or another way of preventing the load from descending
unexpectedly.
6.5.4 LIFTING - MANUALLY
Employees when lifting manually must be aware of proper lifting techniques, and personal
endurance so as not to endanger their back. All precautions and mechanical aids when
necessary shall be implemented.
Lifting Tips
Size up the load:
 Look at the weight label on the package.
 Lift one corner to gauge the weight.
Stretch & exercise:
 Stretch exercises will warm up the back, arm and leg muscles.
 Cold stiff muscles are easily injured.
Plan your route:
 Ensure you know where you are going with the object.
 Check the route for obstacles.
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
If walking a long route with your load, pre-plan stop spots for short rests, or
better yet, use a hand truck for long distances.
Protect your hands:
 Examine all loads for sharp edges, metal staples or leaks.
 Wear gloves where necessary. Especially for protection from excessively hot or
cold objects
Lift the object properly:
 Get close to the article and center your body over
your feet.
 Bend your knees.
 Keep your spine straight.
 Use your leg muscles to push yourself straight.
 Raise your eyes. This will keep your spine in correct
alignment.
Keep the load close to your body:
 This will exert less force on your back.
Make sure your vision is clear:
 Ensure you can clearly see over the load. If vision is blocked, you could trip and
fall.
To change direction:
 Move your feet rather than twisting your body to change direction.
Unload properly:
 Plan ahead. An ideal height would be waist height to prevent unnecessary
bending.
Difficult loads:
 Ask for assistance. Try to find someone close to your height. This will make the
lift easier.
 Decide who team leader is when more than one person is involved in the lift.
Coordination of movements will prevent sudden starts or stops and changes in
weight distribution.
 Use mechanical assistance such as hand truck, or pallet mover, (ensure you
know proper operation procedures of the equipment. If not, ensure you ask your
Supervisor).
 To lift an awkward object (such as a sack), bend at the knees and grasp it at
opposite corners. Gradually straighten your legs and push yourself up. Hold the
load close to your body and at about waist height.
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6.5.5 COMPRESSED AIR
Compressed air hoses present a serious hazard when used incorrectly, or when fittings
become worn or damaged. Compressed air must never be used to clean hair, face, arms,
hands or clothing. Blowing dust from clothing on the body can cause skin damage,
ruptured eardrums, and eye injuries and, if used on skin where a small cut is present, air
may enter the bloodstream.
Horseplay with air hoses, such as disconnecting them with the feet, or startling others by
blowing air at them, is extremely dangerous and will not be tolerated.
When using compressed air to clean parts of machinery, protective screening and goggles,
or a face shield must be worn. Restraining devices shall be used on connections of hoses
and/or pipes, which are under pressure, when inadvertent disconnection could cause a
reaction harmful to workers.
Subject to OH&S Regulation Part 4, Section 4.42, compressed air shall not be used for
blowing hazardous dusts or other harmful substances from clothing being worn by workers.
WSBC has had recent recorded cases of serious injury caused by this practice. Therefore,
it is advisable to use extreme caution with compressed air.
Using compressed air for blowing down equipment can be extremely dangerous.
6.5.6 POWER LINES
Qualified personnel only, are to operate equipment in the immediate area of a power line.
If at any time a piece of equipment or load on a truck comes in contact with a Power Line
DO NOT get out of the machine or truck. If Not hooked on the line attempt to drive away
slowly from the Power Line. Radio or contact the Supervisor immediately.
Should evacuation of vehicle or equipment be necessary while in contact with a Power
Line, jump as far away from equipment as possible, land with both feet closed together,
then jump away from the vehicle by hopping with both feet.
Never allow anyone to come near the equipment or truck while it is hooked onto the Power
Line.
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6.5.7 EXCAVATIONS
Excavations must be carried out in accordance with Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation Part 20. A professional engineers report addressing support structures or
sloping requirements including written instruction, may be required on certain types or
excavations.
6.5.7.1
UTILITY IDENTIFICATION
Prior to the start of excavation, utility services in the area must be located and marked;
 electrical
 telecommunication
 gas
 water
 sewer
6.5.7.2
HAND DIGGING
Workers Must:
Not hand-dig a vertical wall deeper than - 1.22 meters (4 feet)
Note: depth is limited to protect workers who are hand digging inside the ditch.
When hand digging, the mechanical equipment must be stopped.
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6.5.7.3
MECHANICAL EXCAVATION
Excavation slopes or shoring must be inspected daily or more frequently if required and
must be determined to be sound.
The sides of an excavation must be trimmed or scaled to remove any loose material that
could endanger workers.
A level area extending 1 meter (3.5 feet) back from the edge of the trench must be
maintained free of materials and equipment.
An excavation over 1.5 metres (5 feet) a ladder must be available in the immediate area of
the workers. The ladder shall be as such a length that it goes from the bottom of the
excavation and extend 1 meter above the ground.
Under no circumstances may excavated material be piled so that it endangers workers.
Case 1 (trench or bulk excavation) - maximum slope of excavated face, shown as line AB,
in hard and solid soil is 3 horizontal to 4 vertical.
Case 2 (trench or bulk excavation) - maximum height of vertical portion, shown as line AB
is 1.2 metres (4 feet)
For Case 2 (trench or bulk excavation), the maximum possible slope of the excavated face
BC for the corresponding height of the lower vertical cut AB is as follows:
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Height of line AB
Centimeters feet
up to 30
30 to 60
60 to 90
90 to 120
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Maximum slope of line BC
(in hard and solid soil)
up to 1
1 horizontal (H) to 1 vertical (V)
1 to 2 3H to 2V
2 to 3 2H to 1V
3 to 4 3H to 1V
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Manufactured or prefabricated support systems including trench boxes and shoring cages
must be designed and certified by professional engineer. The certification must show how
and for what soil types and depths the support system may be used, and must be available
at the site during the use of the system.
No worker shall enter a trench or excavation unless Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation have been met.
A worker does not have to be completely buried in soil to be seriously injured or killed.
Workers who have been only buried up to their waist have died as a result of the pressures
exerted by the soil on their bodies.
Excavations in, or near, back-filled or previously excavated ground are especially
dangerous since the soil is loose and does not support itself well.
Water increases the possibility of a cave in. The increased water pressure exerted on the
soil can be the final factor in causing the walls to collapse.
It is not safe to assume that because the sides of an excavation are frozen that it is safe to
enter. Frozen ground is not an alternative to proper shoring.
Should a ditch or excavation fail, do not attempt rescue with mechanical equipment.
6.5.8 BACKFILL
No backfilling shall be commenced until all workers are clear of working area.
The operator of any equipment employed in backfilling operations shall ensure that all
workers are in the clear before approaching the ditch, or dumping the load.
Dumping of loads will be as directed by the spotter signals to be used shall be in place
prior to dumping.
Special attention must be paid to all overhead Hydro, Power and Telephone lines.
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6.5.9 HYDRO - VAC
Locate, stake and identify the facility to be excavated and all facilities near the excavation
using standard procedures.
With station or other facility compounds it may be necessary to use ―as built‖ site drawings
and Hydro-Vac to accurately locate pipe and other buried objects.
Park Hydro-Vac truck on stable ground making sure that it will not affect any above-ground
or buried facilities.
Begin removal of the soil around the targeted facility ensuring that the appropriate personal
protective equipment is worn. If the excavation site is to be left unattended, the entire site
must be fenced off.
Care must be taken to ensure that the trench walls conform to all applicable regulations
prior to entry.
6.5.10 PREPARATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAYS
Working Close to Overhead Power Lines:
All Managers and Supervisors shall be familiar with the provisions of Sections 19 of the
Industrial Health and Safety Regulation on working in proximity to electrical conductors,
especially overhead power lines.
Occupational Health and Safety Regulation regarding working close to overhead power
lines shall be applied wherever work must be performed close to power line conditions.
Supervisors shall ensure that where power lines may contact Company equipment in
normal use, the Hydro Company is to be immediately notified to modify the lines to permit
specifications.
6.5.11 TRAFFIC CONTROL
Control of traffic in construction zones shall be done in accordance with Occupational
Health and Safety Regulation.
Where required, a traffic control plan must be submitted to local regulatory authorities.
All personnel engaged in flagging will be dressed as follows:
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
High visibility vest

Fluorescent stop and slow paddles

And during the night a red flashlight or similar signaling devise
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All traffic signs and traffic control devices used on the job site will be installed for the safety
and convenience of the traveling public.
Barricades, blinkers, or flares, warning signs and/or temporary fencing shall be erected on
each side of the road or railroad before excavation commences.
6.5.12 COMPRESSED AIR TOOLS
Hearing protection shall be worn by any worker who is in proximity of a working air tool that
exceeds the safe noise level (85 dba.).
When connecting air hoses, a positive lock system is to be used such as safety clips on
universal type fittings or anti-whip lines.
Hoses and fittings are to be checked periodically for damage.
Air supply at the compressor shall be shut off and the tool bled before disconnecting a
hose.
It shall be ensured that all guards, covers, controls or other safety devices are not missing
or inoperative.
The immediate work area shall be kept clear of all unauthorized personnel.
An air tool shall not be used for any purpose other than that for which it was intended.
6.5.13 SMALL ENGINE EQUIPMENT
When refueling small gas engines the temperature of the equipment will be cool enough to
avoid combustion in the event of spillage.
All engines will be operated in a well-ventilated area. If required to operate in deep
trenches or enclosed vans, sufficient ventilation or exhaust hoses must be used.
6.5.14 RIGGING
Occupational Health and Safety Regulation Part 15.
The working load on wire ropes, chains, slings, hooks and fittings shall not exceed the safe
working load warranted by the manufacturer.
If safe working load is unreadable contact the Supervisor as the rigging may be deemed
unsafe, therefore new rigging may be provided.
DO NOT guess on safe working load.
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Ropes, wire ropes, slings, chains, hooks, and fittings shall be inspected thoroughly at
regular intervals and when found to have deteriorated to such an extent as to make them
unsafe for use, they shall be discarded.
When shackles are used, shackle pins shall be secured to prevent accidental withdrawal.
When U-bolt type clips (wire rope clips) are used for fastening wire rope, the U-bolt shall
be installed so that it bears on the short or "dead" end of the rope and the number of clips
and their spacing and torque shall be as follows:
Diameter
of
Wire Rope
Inches
1/4
5/16
3/8
7/16
1/2
5/8
3/4
7/8
1
1-1/8
1-1/4
1-1/2
1-3/4
2
2-1/8
2-1/4
MM
6
8
10
11
13
16
19
22
25
29
32
38
44
51
54
57
Number
of
Clips
Spacing Between
Clips Centre
To Centre
Amount of Rope
Turn Back From
Thimble
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
8
8
1-1/28
251
2-1/4 57
2-1/26
376
102
4-1/2 114
5-1/4 133
152
7 178
8 203
9 229
10-1/2 267
305
13 330
14 356
4 3/4
5 1/2
6 1/2
7
11 1/2
12
18
19
26
34
37
48
53
71
72
73
Double saddle type clips shall be used in similar numbers and spacing.
Where a wedge socket connector is used as a wire rope terminal, the dead end of the rope
shall be looped back on itself and secured with a single cable clip.
Slings shall be protected from sharp corners of the load and adjusted to equalize the strain
before the load is lifted.
Gloves shall be worn by workers when handling wire rope.
The pull on an eye-bolt shall always be in line with the bolt
A lift shall never be made with a kink, knot or twist in a chain or wire rope.
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Hooks:

All hooks shall be of forged steel or built up steel and no hooks shall be used for
purposes for which they were not designed.

Hooks which have opened more than 15% of the normal throat opening measured
at the narrowest point, or twisted more than 10 degrees from the original plane of
the hook, or are cracked or otherwise defective, shall be permanently removed
from service.

Hooks, shackles, etc. should have the name of the manufacturer and capacity
indicated.
See Occupational Health and Safety Regulation Part 15; Figures 15-1 for Standard
Hand Signals.
6.5.15 HOUSEKEEPING
Good housekeeping is a basic part of accident and fire prevention and is more than
cleanliness; it is cleanliness and order. Employees must cultivate good housekeeping
habits, which shall be maintained by observing the following practices:
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all working areas shall be kept clean and free from obstructions at all times

working areas shall be left clean and tidy on the completion of work assignments
and at the end of each shift

any spillage or leaks must be reported to the Supervisor for cleanup Immediately

garbage, scrap and waste must be placed in metal containers for disposal

all exits must be clear of obstructions

All substandard conditions must be reported immediately
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7.0 HARVESTING SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
In order to ensure that all work is performed with a minimum amount of hazard to
employees, a guide to Safe Work Procedures must be developed for all jobs.
Effective communication between workers is a must on any logging operation. Workers
must know where everyone is at all times and must have an established procedure to
advise others of their movements if they are considering entering a dangerous area.
Many fatalities and serious injuries have occurred when a tree has been felled onto a
fellow worker, a machine has struck a worker, or a tree being skidded has jill-poked. The
comment most often heard is "I Didn't Know He Was There".
The work areas of employees in a logging operation are continually overlapping and
changing (for example, the faller and skidder operator) and extreme caution must be taken
to ensure effective communication.
Before entering an active falling area, an adequate signaling procedure must be
established and enforced. (Refer to Section 3.12 Working in Close Proximity)
Workers must keep themselves physically fit and mentally alert at all times. Any form of
impairment is deadly, and must not be permitted.
Each job has requirements for personal protective equipment, and workers must be
adequately instructed in the proper use of such equipment. Employees must then use and
care for this equipment. (Refer to Section 3.7 PPE)
In a logging operation, the actions of one worker has a big impact on the safety of others.
IT IS IMPERATIVE that all crew members wear Hi-Vis clothing and Hi-Vis hard hats when
working around logging equipment and helicopters. Refer to OHSR Part 8; Sections 8.11
and 8.24, and Part 26; Section 26.7.
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7.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP)
All operations will be in accordance with occupational health and safety regulations,
Company and contractor policies.
All operations will be conducted in accordance with Ministry of Forest regulations and
Company fire pre-organization plan.
All operations will be conducted in accordance with Ministry of Environment regulations,
Company fuel, hazardous waste and spill procedures and ISO14001 Environmental
Management System.
Operations that are not in accordance with approved plans or procedures will be reported
immediately to the contractor or Company Supervisor.
7.2 FALLING SOP
7.2.1 PREPARING TO FALL
No worker must be allowed to fall trees until he has demonstrated to his Employer that he
is qualified to do so, in accordance with the WSBC and BC Faller Training Standard.
Fallers and Buckers Procedures comply with the WorkSafe BC Occupational Health and
Safety Regulation Part 26; Sections 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30.
Fallers must have an up-to-date Logging Plan Map.
Fallers must stop work if encountering a boundary or ribbon line not covered in a briefing
by the Logging Contractor Supervisor.
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Contractor must ensure that the fallers are aware of:
 PPE requirements
 Different falling specifications required in the Logging Plan Map, Road Permit,
Cutting Permit, ribboning convention and/or Silviculture Plan
 Riparian areas, special management areas, wildlife trees and the prescriptions for
these areas
 Utilization standards
 All safety, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation, fire prevention requirements
and regulations
 Walk and/or review work area with Supervisor before falling begins or on a new
block
 All paint and ribbon lines and their significance
 Sign pre work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 Man check procedure
Man check or Buddy System
Fallers will follow Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Man Check System for fallers:
The responsibility of who is checking on whom must be assigned and this responsibility
must be carried out.
 When a Supervisor is called upon for other matters the Supervisor will designate
another worker to assume the responsibility of carrying out the man check system.
 Right-of-way fallers will not work more than twenty minutes walk from transportation
or First Aid facilities.
 When two fallers are working together they must:
 Stay 2 tree lengths apart
 Notify each other when approaching worksite
 Follow discussed plan from Supervisor
 Fallers and/or other workers designated in a checking system should, wherever
possible, eat lunch together.
 A checking system must be in place to ensure that all workers are accounted for at
the conclusion of each shift.
 Qualified assistance will be readily available to fallers in case of difficulty,
emergency or injury.
Fallers must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before a tree is felled.
The distance between fallers at work and other workers shall be not less than two tree
lengths.
Fallers shall be located within a reasonable distance of other workers so the safety checks
can be made. Where this is not possible, a more formal man check system is to be
followed.
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Should any person wish to approach within two tree lengths of active falling, they must first
receive a signal from the faller indicating that it is safe to approach.
Adjacent brush or snow must be cleared away so that there is adequate workroom and a
quick get-away route in the event of trouble.
The faller will maintain radio contact or visual contact with Supervisor and fellow workers at
predetermined man check times.
All snags will be felled concurrently with standing green trees.
When within range of a traveled road or railway track in use, no trees shall be felled unless
effective means are used to stop all approaching traffic until the tree is felled.
Check carefully and frequently to ensure that the tree you are about to fall cannot strike
any standing or running line of any equipment.
Do not start to cut a log or tree if the log or tree is considered to be in dangerous
circumstances, or if there is a reasonable probability that the cut cannot be completed.
Do not attempt to fall a tree if wind conditions are adversely affecting the control of the
direction of fall or the reaction of the tree to the cutting.
Carefully examine the area in which you are about to fall, for dangerous trees or widowmakers.
Take extra care when preparing to fall a tree when snow is on the branches.
Ensure wedging tools are readily available before starting a cut.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Know Emergency Spill Procedures.
7.2.2 COMMENCING TO FALL
Review rib boning convention.
Review and follow management objectives in regards to diameters, length, quality and
species.
Never leave a partially cut or hung-up tree standing. Bring it down or report it to the
Supervisor immediately.
Domino falling is prohibited.
Cut-block boundaries and riparian areas to be felled during daylight hours.
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Review and comply with all requirements of Riparian Management Area as identified in the
Silviculture Prescription or the Logging Plan Map.
Operate equipment to minimize fiber loss.
Have and review map identifying sensitive areas in relation to natural features and terrain,
to ensure feasibility of approved skid direction.
Observe all conditions of any special management areas.
Fall within approved areas only.
Position slash according to Cutting Permit and Logging Plan Map.
Dangerous trees shall be felled before live trees, and when possible into open areas.
When falling dangerous trees, minimize use of wedges due to the danger from breaking
limbs or tops.
All dangerous trees within the block and on boundaries are to be felled concurrent with
operations.
Trees are not to be felled to outside of boundaries unless specifically authorized in writing.
Trees are to be felled away from creeks, draws, lakes, special management areas, and
wildlife areas.
Do not cut off either corner of the holding wood on the tree unless it is required to
overcome a falling difficulty.
Do Not work under hang-ups; knock them down with another tree.
Use wedges for control of the tree; be certain wedges are started in good time.
Make your undercuts and backcuts horizontal. The back cut should generally be 2 to 3
inches above the level of the undercut. Clean out the undercut completely and ensure
sufficient holding wood is maintained and that the back cut is higher than the undercut to
provide a step on the stump.
Fallers must ensure that any obstruction to felling is cleared and a safe escape route to a
predetermined safe position is prepared.
Ensure falling direction and pattern is designed to minimize site degradation in skidding
operations.
When a tree starts to fall, quickly move away to a safe distance. Never turn your back on a
falling tree.
Watch for limbs, broken tops, etc., being thrown back as the tree falls.
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If you intend to use a "pusher tree" to overcome a falling difficulty, select a sound tree otherwise use a different method.
Fallers must watch for build-ups of ice and snow on the trees that could break off and fall
on them when they start to cut or wedge the tree.
Adequate escape paths become crucial as it is difficult to move wearing snowshoes and
there is usually only the one route away from the tree.
Dangerous Tree Falling:




All main roads and active secondary roads will be inspected for dangerous trees.
Any identified dangerous trees found will be felled.
Any dangerous trees past what the buncher cannot reach will be hand felled.
Dangerous trees on or outside the cut-block boundary will be felled in conjunction
with the block and will not be utilized without written authorization.
 Fall oversize dangerous trees, as soon as the area is safe to fall in, a hand faller will
go in and fall the dangerous trees.
Where conditions require the skidding of felled timber located within two tree lengths of the
faller, the following procedure will apply:
 During winter logging it is imperative that the faller, skidder operator/chokerman
work as a team, and as directed by the faller and/or Supervisor.
 Fallers must walk out to where they can see the chokerman/skidder operator and
give the "all clear" signal.
 The faller shall present the signal only when it is safe for the skidding crew to enter.
The signal shall be the slapping of the top of the hard hat with the palm of the hand.
 At no time shall fallers leave their trees cut up while the skidding crew is in the area
picking up a turn.
 Fallers must not resume work until they have ensured that the chokerman/skidder
operator is in the clear, at least two tree lengths away.
 Chainsaws shall not be running while the chokerman/skidder operator is picking up
the turn.
 The chokerman/skidder operator shall be a safety watch and ensure that no one
enters the falling areas while the faller is felling.
 At no time shall the chokerman/skidder operator be with the faller during the felling
of the tree unless they are required to assist in overcoming a particular falling
difficulty.
 When felling, it is imperative that at least two tree lengths of space be maintained
between the faller and the chokerman/skidder operator.
 If the potential of sliding logs exists, this distance must be greater.
 No person may enter the felling area until the faller makes himself visible and
presents the "all clear" signal.
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7.2.3 Falling SAFE WORK PRACTICES
Keep caulks in good condition.
Inspect equipment routinely and make repairs as required.
When moving tools and chainsaws, do not attempt to carry more than you can safely
handle.
Ensure a round nose shovel and a fire extinguisher are at the fuel site.
When limbing with an axe or chainsaw, stand with both legs on the opposite side of the log
from the side you are limbing.
Avoid jumping on chunks - they may roll or twist.
Wear stagged pants to prevent tripping.
Watch for loose bark; this is a slipping hazard.
Watch for persons attempting to get your attention for permission to enter the falling area.
Should any hazardous condition be found to exist which is not covered in the falling and
bucking procedure, consult your Supervisor immediately for assistance.
Fallers should attempt, if at all possible, to take coffee and lunch with one another, or with
another member of the crew.
Fallers must be equipped with some means of a signaling device, with which emergency
signals can be relayed.
Fallers will work tighter cooperatively with all workers on the crew.
Fallers will keep the rest of the crew aware of all safety, production, work layout and
sensitive ground issues as they arise.
Faller may request others for assistance whenever required.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Hi Vis Hard Hat, blaze orange
Hi Vis Vest or Jacket
Hearing Protection
Gloves
Eye Protection (glasses or screen)
Leg Protection
Whistle and/or radio
Caulk Boots
Personal First Aid Kit and /or pressure dressing
Fire Extinguisher
Axe
Wedges (2)
Read: BC Falling Standards Part 1 & Part 2.
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7.3
BUCKING SOP
7.3.1 PREPARING TO BUCK
No worker must be allowed to buck trees until he has demonstrated to his Employer that
he is qualified to do so, in accordance with the WSBC Faller Bucker Training Program.
Fallers and Buckers procedures comply with Workers' Compensation Board Occupational
Health and Safety Regulation Part 26; Sections 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 & 30.
Do not start to buck a log or tree if the log or tree is considered to be in dangerous
circumstances, or if there is a reasonable probability that the cut cannot be completed.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Know Emergency Spill Procedures.
7.3.2 COMMENCING TO BUCK
Review and follow management objectives in regards to diameters, length, quality and
species.
Operate equipment to minimize fiber loss.
Observe all conditions of any special management areas.
Buck within approved areas only.
The bucker will maintain radio contact or visual contact with Supervisor and fellow workers
at all times.
All logs on landing will be spread and limbed with a skidder prior to the bucker processing
the wood.
Decked wood will be checked for defects and limbs.
Position slash according to Cutting Permit and Logging Plan Map.
Buckers must ensure that any obstruction to bucking is cleared and a safe escape route to
a predetermined safe position is prepared.
Watch for pivot points and scissor log configurations when bucking.
When bucking a log or tree lying on the incline, stand on the upper side of the log.
Wait until the logs have been spread by the skidder or loader and they are all laying flat on
the ground before commencing bucking.
Be certain you are not standing on the whip side when bucking.
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If you are trimming logs on a loaded truck, be aware of the potential for a chainsaw
kickback, and ensure that no one is standing near you.
Logs, which have been partially bucked, must be marked by cutting an X into each end
and reported to the Supervisor.
Buckers are to control traffic on landings.
Keep landing clear of debris and vehicles.
Be sure all danger trees that are within striking distance of the landings are removed.
Keep clear of loaders and skidding machines at all times. Never turn your back to an
approaching machine.
Do not start limbing or bucking until chokers are removed.
Make sure logs are in a secure position before unhooking the chokers.
Never walk under a log that is being held up by a loader.
Service and fuel saw in a designated area, well clear of traffic flow.
7.3.3 SAFE WORK PRACTICES
Keep caulks in good condition.
Inspect equipment routinely and make repairs as required.
When moving tools and saws, do not attempt to carry more than you can safely handle.
Ensure a round nose shovel and a fire extinguisher are at the fuel site.
When limbing with an axe or saw, stand with both legs on the opposite side of the log from
the side you are limbing.
Avoid jumping on chunks - they may roll or twist.
Wear stagged pants to prevent tripping.
Watch for loose bark; this is a slipping hazard.
Watch for persons attempting to get your attention for permission to enter the bucking
area.
Should any hazardous condition be found to exist which is not covered in the bucking
procedure, consult your Supervisor immediately for assistance.
Buckers should attempt, if at all possible, to take coffee and lunch with one another, or with
another member of the crew.
Buckers must be equipped with some means of a signaling device, with which emergency
signals can be relayed.
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7.4
MECHANIZED HARVESTING STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
7.4.1 MECHANIZED HARVESTING STANDARDS
All mechanized equipment is to be fitted with the necessary operator protective screens as
required by Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section
6.21.
All mechanical equipment is to have manufacturer‘s operator manual in the machine for
easy reference by the operator.
Damaged windows must be replaced as soon as possible.
The cab of every unit must be fitted with a secondary exit, which is not blocked by any part
of the structure and does not exit into the engine compartment.
Repairs must be performed by qualified personnel.
All Slope limitations of the specific machine and other rated capacities must be observed.
Fire suppression system to be maintained and precautionary measures taken to keep high
hazard areas clear of debris.
Contractor must ensure that the operators are aware of:
 Different falling specifications required in the Logging Plan Map and/or Silviculture
Plan.
 Riparian areas, special management areas, wildlife trees and the prescriptions for
these areas.
 Utilization standards.
 All safety, Occupational Health and Safety Regulation, fire prevention requirements
and regulations.
 Walk and/or review work area with Supervisor before falling begins or on a new
block.
 Sensitive sites, i.e.; wet areas, compaction.
 What the detrimental site degradation limit is.
 All paint and ribbon lines and their significance.
Do not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs near streams, creeks, river,
lakes, or wet lands.
When parked, a minimum clearance of three (3) feet shall be maintained behind the
counterweight.
Ensure tracks are properly caulked for winter conditions.
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7.4.2 GENERAL START UP
 All workers will wear required personal protective equipment.
 All accidents and near misses will be reported to the Supervisor.
 Ensure you have a Prework before start up.
 Participate in safety meetings.
 Know fueling and emergency spill procedures.
 Know who the First Aid Attendant is and where the first aid equipments is onsite.
 Check safety hatch is operational, from inside and outside weekly).
 Know the radio channel you are to operate on.
 Check for ―DO Not Operate‖ tag.
 Check Log Book entries.
 Inspect machine to ensure it is in safe operating condition.
 Always use 3-point contact when mounting or dismount machine.
 Ensure good housekeeping is maintained.
 Ensure other personnel are clear of machine before moving.
 Ensure hydraulic lock is in working condition.
 Put all waste in appropriate containers.
 Check area when stopping and getting out of machine for overhead and other
hazards.
 Man check systems must be established as needed and effectively utilize.
 Supervisors are responsible to ensure all workers are accounted for at the end of
the shift.
 Always start engine sitting in operator‘s seat.
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7.4.3 OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
 Always stay in operator‘s seat when operating.
 Ensure seatbelts are worn all times.
 Ensure that you are aware of onsite hazards and know the procedures for working
near them.
 Maintain a two-tree length distance from other operators and equipment unless a
plan is in place. If for any reason an operator has to leave his unit it must be parked
a minimum of two tree lengths from any operational area.
 Work to the capability of yourself and your unit, if you feel Unsafe STOP and make
a plan with your Supervisor.
 Operate at safe speeds.
 If at anytime the machine becomes unstable – shut it down and get help.
 When parked, a minimum clearance of three feet shall be maintained behind the
counterweight.
 Before leaving the unit, the unit must be immobilized and any elevated parts
lowered to the ground.
 Follow lockout and or de-energization procedures when conducting repairs or
maintenance.
 Put ―Do Not Operate‖ tag on key if machine is unsafe, inoperable or being repaired.
 Keep doors closed so that guarding is effective.
 At the end of the shift the operator will complete a visual inspection and notify the
Supervisor of any imminent problems. If there are mechanical problems found at
any time during the shift the Supervisor should be made aware of these as soon as
possible to schedule mechanics and repairs. All entries must be noted in the
logbook.
 Use fall protection when working more than 10 feet off the ground.
 Make sure machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and other
debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
 If operator leaves early he must notify the Supervisor.
 Do not walk on unstable logs or log decks.
 Do not use neutral when going downhill.
 No riders are allowed on the machine, except an authorized trainee or maintenance
person.
 Do not keep loose articles in the cab.
 Operator will be responsible to service all grease points on the machine once every
shift. If there are grease nipples that have failed they will be replaced by the
operator. If the grease point does not take grease properly after replacing the
nipple, the operator must notify the on site Supervisor immediately, so that the
problem can be fixed as soon as possible.
 Clean tracks out at the end of shift.
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 Stop work immediately if rutting, sloughing, or erosion is occurring.
 Do not operate within five (5) metres of a wetland, lake, river, stream or creek,
unless otherwise stated in the Logging Plan.
 Do not spin tracks or wheels, or cause other ground disturbance.
 Do not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs, near streams, creeks,
rivers, lakes or wetlands.
 The machine shall be fueled by the operator as required. If the machine is in close
proximity to fuel source during the shift it is a good practice to fill at this time to
reduce traveling the machine at the end of the shift.
7.4.4 SERVICING MACHINERY
 Ensure you remove all hazards:
o Shut off hydraulic pressure by engaging the lock out switch in the cab.
o Remove residual pressure by operating each lever and switch with the engine
shut off but the master switch on.
 Always place machine head firmly on the ground before servicing.
 Never stand in direct path of saws and/or other moving parts.
 Never directly face a faulty hydraulic component as it could lead to serious burn
injuries.
 Never work between feed rollers and/or other moving parts that could lead to
crushing injuries.
 Never stand directly under the boom unless it is on the ground and/or supported.
 Never stand in front of the boom unless it is chained securely to the machine.
 Always wear a fall restraint harness when working on top of machinery.
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7.4.5 EQUIPMENT ON MUSKEG AND ICE BRIDGES
On oil and gas winter projects, equipment operators will be exposed to the hazards related
to partially frozen or un-frozen muskeg as well as frozen ice bridges across streams and
rivers. Extra care must be taken when operating near or on top of frozen muskeg and ice
as the heavy machine may break through the frozen surface. Should your machine break
through the ice/muskeg, ensure that you open your cab door immediately so that you do
not become entrapped in the machine should it begin to sink right through. If possible,
radio for assistance and then leave the machine for solid ground.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. processor in its‘ icy grave – Red Earth Creek, Alberta – December 31, 2006
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7.4.6 MECHANIZED FALLING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators are aware of:
impact and potential hazards
 Walk and/or review marked area with Supervisor before falling begins or on a
new block
 Different falling specifications required in the Logging Plan
 Riparian areas, special management areas, wildlife tree and the prescription for
these areas
 Utilization standards
 Sensitive sites, i.e.; wet areas, compaction
 What the detrimental site degradation limit is
 All paint and ribbon lines and their significance
2. Equipment
1. Check unit‘s status:
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
Inspection, prepare
 For faulty equipment
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
for startup
 Leaks, worn parts
first aid kit, lights, brakes
2. Elevated parts
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
3. Slipping and tripping
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
hazards
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
3. Equipment Startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Slipping and tripping
1. Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
hazards
2. The operator must:
 Before leaving unit, lower elevated parts to the ground, disengage hydraulic
system. Refer to OHSR Part16; Section 16.36
4. Falling Process 1. Steep slope, ground
1. The operator must:
Safety
conditions, positioning of

Discuss plan with your Supervisor before starting steep area
bunches, proximity to
 Know the limitations of you and your unit, if you fell unsafe or unsure STOP and
others, high stumps
notify your Supervisor.
2. When working on a steep slope incline, do not work around the slope. Rather work
uphill and deadhead downhill
3. When working on a slope avoid extending the boom out near its limits and swinging
with a tree in the head
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7.4.6 MECHANIZED FALLING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
4. Falling Process –
Safety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Steep slope, ground
conditions, positioning of
bunches, proximity to
others, high stumps (cont)
2. Working in proximately
to other workers or
equipment
3. Uncontrolled falling, tops
4. Power line contact
5. Maintenance/saw
service
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Injury to worker, struck by,
cuts to hand
130
PROPER PROCEDURE
4. Cut trees as close to the ground as possible. Avoid high stumps and loose debris
that could cause machine to come unstable.
5. Make smooth gradual movements with the unit. Quick moves may cause tops to
break off and fall onto the cab or hang up in other trees
6. Be aware of rock areas, frozen ground, side cuts, ditches and unstable areas near
roads and operate carefully.
1. When working in proximity to others:
 Persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 When working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 Operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before a
tree is felled
 Workers must observe the two-tree length rule as required by hand fallers
1. Dangerous Tree Falling:
 Dangerous trees are to be felled progressively
 Any dangerous trees past what the buncher cannot reach will be hand felled
 The feller buncher at the time of falling right-of-way, will fall all the dangerous
trees that can reach from the right-of-way boundary and the material will be
utilized
 Dangerous trees on or outside the cut block boundary will be felled in
conjunction with the block and will not be utilized without written authorization
 Where oversize dangerous trees are encountered in a feller buncher
operation, if double cutting is allowed the tree must be felled immediately
 The buncher operator will make certain that the first pass drags are not
situated so as to rub up against or pivot around the dangerous trees
1. Before falling in proximity of power lines, contact BC Hydro to ensure all safety
precautions are taken.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Shut saw off before getting out of machine
Ensure all elevated parts are lowered to ground
Shut down computer, electric and hydraulics
Tag out master key
Release hydraulic pressure when working on machine (top of tank on Madill)
Wear gloves when changing teeth
Beware of pinch points for hand when changing teeth.
Inspect saw for cracking on a regular basis
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.6 MECHANIZED FALLING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
6. Falling Process
Environmental
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other
131
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Work near cutblock boundaries and riparian areas environmental impact only
during daylight hours.
2. Must stop work if encountering a boundary or ribbon line not covered in a briefing
by the Logging Supervisor.
3. Must stop work immediately if you cannot find ribbons or locate yourself on the
map.
4. Ensure falling direction and pattern is designed to minimize site degradation in
skidding operations.
5. Trees are to be felled away from wetlands, creeks, rivers, draws, lakes, special
management areas, and wildlife areas.
6. Lay trees to avoid skidding across wet ground, ―frog holes‖ or swales.
7. Trees are not to be felled outside of boundaries unless specifically authorized
in writing.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.7 SKIDDING (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
2. Hearing Protection (as required) 3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
7. Personal First Aid Kit
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that:
impact
 Operations are conducted in accordance with Occupational Health and Safety
General safety issues and
Regulation and Forest and Range Practices Act.
hazards
 operators are aware of which way timber must be skidded
 operators are aware of different equipment specifications for each treatment
unit within the block
 Operators are aware of what detrimental site degradation is (rutting, sloughing,
erosion). The skidder operator must be aware of the site degradation limits
 operators are aware of utilization standards
 Logging Plan Map is reviewed in relation to natural features, sensitive areas
and terrain to ensure feasibility of approved skid direction
 the operator reviews and complies with all requirements of Riparian
Management Area as identified in the Silviculture Prescription or Logging Plan
Map
 operators are aware of all paint and ribbon lines and their significance
 operators monitor progress on regular basis with respect to soil and weather
conditions and shut down as required
 operator does an on site review and walk locations as required to ensure
familiarity with job requirements
 operator signs pre-work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 operator reviews and follows management objectives in regards to leave tree
(species, size, distribution)
 operator avoids damaging leave trees and operates the equipment to
minimize fiber loss
2. Equipment
1. Check unit‘s status:
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
Inspection,
prepare
 For faulty equipment
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, lights,
for startup
 Leaks, worn parts
brakes, mainline and chokers
2. Elevated parts
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
3. Slipping and tripping
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
hazards
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
 Visual check for leaks, cracks, undercarriage irregularities, etc., prior to
starting unit
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7.4.7 SKIDDING (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
3. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1.
1.
4. Skidding Process
- Safety
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
1. Steep slope, ground
conditions, high stumps rollover
1. Log control or decking Other workers, rollovers
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Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting
equipment.
1.
The operator must:
 When working on a steep slope incline, do not work around the slope.
Refer to Steep Slope Procedure Pg. 37.
 Travel at a safe speed
 When winching align the machine with the direction of pull
 Make sure all verbal and WSBC approved hand signals are used and
understood before moving machine or lines
See OHSR Part 26; Section 26.34.
 Do not enter an active falling area, stay a minimum of two tree lengths
away unless the faller has signaled okay to enter and has stopped falling.
This same rule applies to Mechanical Falling
 When operating with tire chains, watch for stick and branches that may get
caught and flipped into the cab or towards others
 Try to align machine straight with bundles or slightly turned to leaver side
when picking up bundles
 Make sure chains are in good condition and tight
 If you fell unsafe or unsure at any time STOP and notify your Supervisor
 Do brake check before going up hill
1. When skidding:
 Flatten any logs or sticks sticking out at an angle (jill pokes) that happen as
you are skidding an area
 When pushing or grapple lifting up into a deck stay at right angles, be aware
the deck is unstable and may fall apart
 Watch the location of ditch when putting a drag in to the pile (tires may fall
in and cause the machine to roll)
 Be aware of unstable cuts and banks
 When driving off a deck do no let go of drag until front wheels are on the
ground
 When pushing up into a deck make sure logs do not roll over or slide out
onto another work area or road
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.7 SKIDDING (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
4. Skidding Process
Safety (cont‘d)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Proximity to others, jillpokes
4. Skidding Process
- Safety (cont‘d)
3. Where conditions require
the skidding of felled
timber located within two
tree lengths of the falling
process
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PROPER PROCEDURE
1. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 skidders working in conjunction with processors must have an established
system of communication and procedure for working in the same area
 when entering a landing make sure buckers and loaders are in the clear
 before leaving unit, all elevated parts must be lowered to ground, parking
brake set and transmission placed in neutral
1. Working safely within two tree lengths:
 during winter logging it is imperative that the faller (buncher), skidder
operator/chokerman work as a team, and as directed by the faller and/or
Supervisor
 fallers must walk out to where they can see the skidder operator/chokerman
and give the all clear signal
 The faller shall present the signal only when it is safe for the skidding crew to
enter. The signal shall be the slapping of the top of the hardhat with the palm
of the hand. This can be accomplished by the buncher by giving the all clear
over the radio
 at no time shall fallers (bunchers) leave their trees cut up while skidding crew
is in the area picking up a turn
 falling process shall not resume until it has been determined that the skidding
crew is in the clear at least two tree lengths away
 chainsaw shall not be running while the skidding crew is picking up the turn
 skidding crew must maintain the two tree length distance while falling is in
progress
 the skidding crew shall be a safety watch and ensure that no one enters the
falling areas while the falling is in progress
 at no time shall the skidder operator be with the faller during the felling of the
tree unless they are required to assist in overcoming a particular falling
difficulty
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.7 SKIDDING (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
4. Skidding Process
- Safety (cont‘d)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
4. Hidden Hazards, Slippery
(frozen) conditions also
increase the hazard of
trees and logs ―running
away‖ after being felled or
decked. Trees frequently
get totally or partially
buried in snow, making it
difficult to see when a
tree is bound up or
―loaded‖.
4. Skidding Process
Safety (cont)
5. Skidding Right-of-Way
5. Skidding Process
- Environmental
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
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PROPER PROCEDURE
4. Hidden Hazards
 the skidder operator will pull all drags clear of dangerous trees before turning
 watch whip action of logs being skidded
 skidding a tree from the snow may also move another unseen buried tree, so
ensure all workers are clear of the turn
 ensure wood felled or pushed into decks do not escape into other work areas
 when using the blade to de-limb a deck of logs ensure there are no workers
exposed to the process
 In roadside logging, grapple skidders are often required to pull their drags up
onto the deck and then walk the unit straight ahead and down off the deck.
Care must be taken not to release the grapple until the front tires are firmly on
the ground, otherwise the movement of the logs may cause the skidder to flip.
Keep the unit heading straight; turning the skidder during the maneuver may
also cause a rollover
 If you use your unit to push over a dangerous tree, back the unit up to the
dangerous tree and push with the fairlead. This allows a higher point of contact
and better control than pushing with the blade
 do not work in areas where there is a danger of pushing trees, rocks and other
debris into an active work area
5. Right-of-way procedure
 Do not enter an active falling area; stay a minimum of two tree lengths away.
 When pushing a tree over, remove the tension out of the trees by using the
blade or winch so that they may be bucked without danger of tree springing
back.
 Do not create a hazard for worker who must follow.
1. No skid road to be constructed without the following being completed:
 Location must be inspected by Contractor Supervisor and Company
Supervisor prior to construction.
 Must be ribboned prior to construction.
 Must be authorized by the Ministry of Forests in writing.
2. Other Environmental procedures:
 Bladed trails must maintain surface drainage patterns and minimize runoff and
soil erosion until trail is either rehabilitated or deactivated.
 must not side-cast material where there is a high chance of landslide
 skid road width must be minimized but wide enough for safe skidding
 the Ministry of Forests must authorize temporary stream crossings
 crossings must be constructed so as to minimize disturbances
 crossings will be removed and rehabilitated as per Silviculture Plan and
Logging Plan Map
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.7 SKIDDING (Line/Grapple/Crawler) SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
5. Skidding Process
- Environmental
(cont‘d)
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HAZARDS/CONCERNS
136
PROPER PROCEDURE
 slope trails toward the inside bank, never outwards
 skidding shall be done in a manner that minimizes damage to roads, culverts and
ditches
 do Not spin wheels or tracks or cause other ground disturbance while skidding in
block, piling logs at roadside or landings or when constructing Skid Bridges
 do Not construct bladed Skid Road or remove stumps without authorization of
Company Foreman
 do Not alter location of streams of water courses
 do Not skid across stream, river, creek, wetland, ―frog holes‖, or swales
 crossing wet areas, sensitive areas and creeks at approved designated crossing
only
 ensure no logging debris or sedimentation enters a stream or water course
 minimize damage to standing timer and tree that must be left standing as per
operational requirements report
 wherever possible, travel only on the mat of limbs and tops left by the harvester
 shall conduct and record a 100 step site degradation survey when required by
Supervisor
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.7.1
SKIDDING - Chokerman SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Toed Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that:
impact
 operations are conducted in accordance with Occupational Health and Safety
General safety issues
Regulation and Forest and Range Practices Act
 worker is aware of what detrimental site degradation is (rutting, sloughing,
erosion)
 logging Plan Map is reviewed in relation to natural features, sensitive areas
and terrain to ensure feasibility of approved skid direction
 workers are aware of all paint and ribbon lines and their significance
2. Skidding Process
1. Working with equipment,
 Do not enter an active falling area, stay a minimum of two tree lengths away
hidden hazards, general
unless the faller has signaled okay to enter area and has stopped falling. Use
safety issues
Occupational Health and Safety Regulation approved hand signals for
communication with skidding crew
Refer to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.34
 stay in the clear within the operator‘s line of vision when possible, above the
machine and always out of the bight of lines being winched
 watch out for dangerous trees and trees with damaged roots that may fall
without warning
 do not ride on machines
 do Not walk on balancing or unstable logs
 watch for and report jaggers on cables
 watch for and advise the machine operator of any hazardous conditions
 operator signs pre-work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 when working on a slope, set chokers from the uphill side of the log whenever
possible
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.8 MECHANIZED LIMBING & BUCKING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators are aware of:
impact, ERP
 the licensee‘s log quality and utilization standards
 sensitive sites, i.e.; wet areas, compaction
 procedures for accessing first aid
 fueling procedures and spill response
See SOP 6.4.4 – 6.4.3
2. Equipment
1. Check unit‘s status:
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
Inspection,
prepare
for faulty equipment
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
for startup
leaks, worn parts
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
2. Elevated parts
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
3. Slipping and tripping
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
hazards
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
first aid kit, lights, brakes, cutting heads, cables
See SOP 6.4.4 – 6.4.3
3. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Slipping and tripping
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
hazards
4. Processing
1. Ground conditions,
1. The operator must:
- Safety
positioning of logs
 ensure the unit is working on a stable work area
 logs are not being decked in such a manner that they may slide into other work
areas
 where conditions allow, do not work on the haul roads, rather in the area
between the road and slash
 the machine must be positioned with sufficient clearance from standing timber
to prevent the boom and tree being processed from striking, pushing or pulling
over any standing tree
 Make smooth gradual movements with the unit. Quick moves may cause tops
to break off and fall onto the cab or hang up in other trees
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.8 MECHANIZED LIMBING & BUCKING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
4. Processing
- Safety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Working close to other
equipment and workers
on the ground
3. Leaving Unit
5. Processing
- Quality control
1. Working outside of unit
while measuring log lengths
and
top sizes by hand
and recording findings
6. Saw
Change/Maintenance
1. Injury to worker, cuts
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139
PROPER PROCEDURE
2. When working in proximity to others:
 use a communication system in the form of adequate hand signals or two-way
radio communication to enable people/equipment to approach or pass the
processor
 stop operation and lower boom to the ground when other equipment is passing
 never pass boom or logs over workers
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
3. The operator must:
 before leaving unit, lower the boom to the ground, disengage hydraulic system
Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
1. All processors must have a copy of current log quality specs and be aware of mill
destinations and sorting procedures
2. The operator must:
 lay out check logs on a clear flat area
 if on night shift advise man check contact that you are leaving your unit and
when you will check back in
 lower all elevated parts and ensure unit is de-energized
 do not walk on balancing or unstable logs or log decks
 ensure all appropriate PPE is on
 if checking logs on decks ensure worker has adequate non-slip footwear or
caulks
1. When making or replacing saw chains make sure;
 hydraulic lockout is on
 computer is shut down
 machine is shut off
 elevated parts are lowered to ground
 wear gloves
2. When working on boom or saw head, head should be on ground, stable log or
chained to prevent creeping.
3. When releasing pressure off a grease or hydraulic cylinder never stand in direct line
of fitting or nipple and loosen slowly.
4. Inspect saws and chains for damage on a regular basis
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.4.8 MECHANIZED LIMBING & BUCKING SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
7. Processing
- Environmental
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
140
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Processed wood will not be decked in ditches, near culverts and/or in riparian
areas.
2. Processor operators will adhere to licensee‘s log quality standards.
3. Do Not deposit processed logs within Riparian Management Area, Machine Free
Zones, or across any marked boundary.
4. Ensure water flow in ditches, culverts and streams remain unrestricted.
5. Process logs in such manner as to not damage or impact boundary or leave trees.
6. Fuel or service equipment outside of Riparian Management Areas, unless it is
necessary to move broken down equipment.
7. Inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that may cause spill, leaks or
ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift.
8. Report promptly to the Logging Supervisor adverse environmental impacts whether
actual or potential impact may exist.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5
LOADING OPERATIONS
7.5.1 LOADING STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Refer to applicable road user and transportation procedures.
Operators are directly responsible for the safe operation of their units at all times. Refer
to OHSR Part 16; Sections 16.3 and 16.5.
Contractor must comply with the standards in OHSR Part 16; Sections 16.2 and 16.48
(guarding of loader, broken windows, railing, etc.).
All operators must wear high visibility hardhats and vests when out of their units.
All equipment operators must wear seatbelts while moving.
Operators shall ensure that all workers are safely in the clear before initiating or
continuing the motion of any mobile equipment.
Although operators are responsible, it is also the responsibility of buckers and other
workers to stay clear of any area considered to be hazardous due to the movement of
such equipment.
Landing workers in charge of traffic control shall be thoroughly instructed in this
procedure.
7.5.2 MAINTENANCE
The operator must complete a quick visual check for leaks, cracks, undercarriage
irregularities, etc., prior to starting machine.
The operator must check the fluid levels prior to starting the machine.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Know Emergency Spill Procedures. Refer to EMS/ISO Binder
The operator will be responsible to service all grease points on the machine once every
shift. If there are grease nipples that have failed they will be replaced by the operator. If
the grease point does not take grease properly after replacing the nipple, the operator
must notify the on site Supervisor immediately, so that the problem can be fixed as soon
as possible.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
The machine will be fueled by the operator as required. If the machine is in close
proximity to fuel source during the shift, it is a good practice to fill at this time to reduce
traveling the machine at the end of the shift.
At the end of the shift the operator will complete a visual inspection and notify the
Supervisor of any imminent problems. If there are mechanical problems found at any
time during the shift the Supervisor should be made aware of these as soon as possible
in order to schedule mechanics and repairs.
7.5.3 PREPARING TO LOAD
Logs should be decked to facilitate loading:
 keep all butts or ends even
 turn logs that should be loaded butt ahead
 position log decks to eliminate extra maneuvering when loading
 have all logs bucked, limbed and stamped when required
All truck drivers must be in view, in the clear, or their whereabouts known before the
equipment or logs are moved. Truck drivers must wear high visibility hardhats and vests
at all times when within the boundaries of the logging area.
Always use proper signals when directing truck movements. Audible signals must be
given before moving mobile equipment:
 one blast of horn to stop
 two blasts of horn to back up
 three blasts of horn to move ahead
Providing that the loader can easily handle the trailer, the lifting- strap should be properly
positioned on the trailer. Lift the trailer off with caution and ensure that the trailer liftingstrap has not deteriorated.
If the drivers are hooking up the reach themselves, this method can still be used by the
loader operator lowering the boom, which causes the trailer to move ahead slightly so it
can be coupled.
With some trucks, the compensator can also be moved to facilitate hook up.
If the truck is to be backed into the reach and coupled without help, the trailer lifting-strap
can be repositioned slightly to permit the reach end to lift off the ground before the trailer
wheels are lifted.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
The person hooking up the trailer should always stand off to the side to enable the
operator to see the reach end and hitch.
The truck must be always positioned properly for loading before hooking up the trailer.
If the deck is beside the truck, logs shall not be picked up from it until the driver and/or
other workers have finished their duties, retired to a safe location, and the driver is in the
cab of the truck.
7.5.4 LOADING
To ensure stakes remain at a safe angle, logs shall be laid tight to minimize slack in the
stake cable.
Logs shall be well positioned in their lay, without crowding, to avoid excessive strain on
the stake-line and stakes.
Bunk and face logs must extend beyond bunks. Place short logs in the centre of the
load.
Bunk and stake logs shall extend not less than 30 cm beyond the bunks or stakes.
Logs shall be loaded clear of the bulkhead to avoid being bunk-bound on corners.
When loading small diameter logs, two tiers should be used as bunk and stake logs
before loading short logs into the load.
Never place split, cracked or shattered logs on the bunk or against the stakes.
Not more than one-third of the weight of the logs shall extend beyond the trailer bunk, or
beyond the ends of the logs supporting them.
Logs shall be loaded to ensure the stability of the vehicle and load when in transit.
Care should be taken to properly balance the load, especially on off-highway trucks. A
side heavy load, or a load with too much weight on the trailer, could cause a truck to tip
over or spin out under wet or icy conditions.
Workers are not permitted to stand on the cab platforms of trucks when loading by
conventional methods. If this occurs, the loader operator shall cease loading until the
worker is removed.
See OHSR Part 26; Section 26.74.
A distinctive signal to indicate load is finished should be used. Using a radio instead of
audible signal is acceptable; always receive confirmation of any communication.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5.5 LOADER - GRAPPLE SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
7. Personal First Aid Kit
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
impact and hazards
 review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any
special clauses
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions of
any Special management Areas
 deck logs away from water bodies, power lines and pipelines
 utilization standards
 load within approved area only
 position slash according to Cutting Permit and Logging Plan Map
1.
2. Equipment
Inspection, prepare for
startup
1. Check unit‘s status:
 for faulty equipment
 leaks, worn parts
2. Elevated parts
3. Slipping and tripping
hazards
4. Loading Process
- Safety
1. Handling, decking logs
2. Working with truckers
3. Loading trucks
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144
Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
first aid kit, lights, brakes
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
1.
The operator must:
 Wear seatbelt when operating the machine.
 ensure buckers and truck drivers are in the clear before moving
 use WSBC approved hand signals or other appropriate means for
communication
 never allow anyone to ride in or on the unit, it is not designed for carrying
passengers
2. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
loading
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5.5 LOADER - GRAPPLE SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
4. Loading Process
- Safety (cont)
1. Handling, decking logs
2. Working with truckers
3. Loading trucks
Loading:
 When loading, equipment should travel at moderate speeds where control can
be maintained
 Never try to lift or carry a load that is too heavy for that particular unit
 Ensure that there is a sufficient work area on the landing or roadside for all
activities
 Keep clear of any spread of logs that the bucker is still working on. The chance
of bumping a log and causing injury is too great
 Properly position logs in the grapple before raising them clear of the ground
 Do Not swing logs over workers
 When approaching a truck with a grapple full of logs, avoid traveling with the
grapple at full height. Keep the grapple low until near the truck, and then raise
the grapple. This will ensure better control of the loader at all times
 All loads must be restrained by grapples when binders and cinches are being
placed on the loaded truck
Refer to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.68
 Before leaving unit, lower the grapple to the ground, set the parking brake and
put the transmission in neutral Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
5. Loading Process Environmental
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
1.
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PROPER PROCEDURE
3.
The operator must:
 Monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions
and shut down as required
 Cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you
come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 Conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 Inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills, leaks
or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 Not deck wood outside designated landing or roadside areas; no decking
outside of block
 Clean out ditches concurrent with load-out.
 Contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5.6 LOADER – BUTT-N-TOP/HEEL BOOM SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
impact and safety hazards
1.
2. Equipment
Inspection,
for startup
1. Check unit‘s status:
for faulty equipment
leaks, worn parts
2. Elevated parts
3. Slipping and tripping
hazards
1.
prepare
3. Equipment startup
01/18/07
1. Workers in danger area
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
146
Contractor must ensure that the operators:

have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions of
any Special management Areas

sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding

deck logs away from water bodies, power lines and pipelines

review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any pecial
clauses

utilization standards

load within approved area only

position slash according to Cutting Permit and Logging Plan Map
See SOP Sections 6.4 & 6.5
Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first
aid kit, lights, brakes
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
2. Check and maintain the lines, blocks, hoses, etc. daily.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
See SOP Sections 6.4 & 6.5
Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Check counterweight clearance before operating loader.
Do not allow anyone into the articulating area of the machine unless it is shut off.
Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and other
debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5.6 LOADER – BUTT-N-TOP/HEEL BOOM SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Loading Process Safety
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Handling, decking logs
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. The operator must:
 ensure buckers and truck drivers are in the clear before moving
 use WSBC approved hand signals or other appropriate means for
communication
 never allow anyone to ride in or on the unit, it is not designed for carrying
passengers
2. Working with truckers and
other workers
2.
When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
loading
3. Loading trucks
3.
Loading:
Refer to Sections 6.5 - Loaders, 6.5.1 – Maintenance, 6.5.2 - Preparing to
Load, 6.5.3 - Loading
 check counterweight clearance before operating swing-type loaders (minimum
3 feet)
 never try to lift or carry a load that is too heavy for that particular unit
 avoid positioning the unit too close to the truck being loaded as it restricts the
movement of the loader
 ensure the loader is positioned on relatively flat ground before picking up logs
 ensure that there is sufficient work area on the landing or roadside for all
activities
 keep clear of any spread of logs that the bucker is still working on. The chance
of bumping a log and causing injury is too great
 do Not swing logs over workers
 when picking logs up with boom fully extended, keep the load low until brought
in towards unit; this will maintain stability
 all loads must be restrained when binders and cinches are being placed on the
loaded truck
Refer to OHSR Part 26; Section 26.68
 before leaving unit, lower the boom to the ground, disengage hydraulic system
Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
147
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.5.6 LOADER – BUTT-N-TOP/HEEL BOOM SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
5. Piling
6. Loading ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
Rollovers, jill pokes
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
148
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Make sure slash is stable before starting to work on it
 Pack with head or rake
 Move tracks back and forth with head or rake in low position
 Test stability before starting to pile
2.
Remove possible hazards as they occur
 Jill pokes
 Falling debris
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Build piles so they will not collapse on machine
Keep debris off machine
Keep a fire watch on recently worked areas during hot season
Know and have escape routes
Work areas in a way that ensures access and escape routes, stay clear for you and
the machine.
1.
The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions
and shut down as required
 cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you
come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills, leaks
or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 not deck wood outside designated landing or roadside areas; no decking
outside of block
 clean out ditches concurrent with load-out contain all waste daily and remove
from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.6
LOG HAULING, LOWBEDDING & HIAB OPERATIONS SOP
7.6.1 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Refer to applicable Road User and Log Transportation Safety Procedures, and
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Trucker EH&S Handbook.
 Log truck drivers must sign off a copy of the current Log Transportation Safety
Procedure manual before receiving a load of logs.
 Drivers must possess a valid and correct type driver‘s license as required by the
Province of British Columbia including air endorsement certification and provide a
driver‘s abstract to Frost Lake Logging Ltd. as proof.
 Trucks shall have a truck number posted on the driver‘s side that is easily visible
for the scale operators. This number must be approved prior to hauling.
 All Logging Trucks delivering to licensee Scale Sites must have Vehicle
Identification Numbers (VIN) posted on the front of their vehicle. See VIN policy in
this book.
 Operators must do regular daily pre inspection checks to ensure that log transport
trucks are maintained, equipped and operated the requirements of the WSBC
Regulation, the Motor Vehicle Act and Regulations including Division 37 – National
Safety Code Regulations. Drivers must be prepared to show this pre trip inspection
to inspectors.
 All trucks must meet the Commercial Transport regulations pertaining to the
hauling of logs, haul road use, weights and sizes. A copy of the Commercial
Vehicle Inspections Program Certificate must be provided, if requested.
 Operators are to have updated/current log books at all times, if applicable.
 Logging trucks must be equipped and maintained to meet Occupational Health and
Safety Regulation. Refer to OHSR Part 26; Sections 26.65, 26.66, 26.72 and
26.73.
 Log haul trucks and low beds must comply with the EMS requirements for the
Company (e.g.: Spill Kits, Work Instructions, etc.)
 All truck drivers and low-beds must have a copy of the latest Emergency
Preparedness Plan (ERP) in their truck, and be prepared to discuss the contents.
 Drivers are responsible for all permits (restricted routes, long load, highway
crossings, operating authority permits, etc.)
 Hi-visibility hard hats, hi-visibility vest and proper footwear must be worn at all
times when the driver is out of the cab.
 Trucks must be equipped with first aid equipment, fire extinguisher, roadside flares,
load flags, long load light for hauling after dark, shovel, axe, pulaski and sufficient
binders and cinches to secure the load.
 Safety chains shall be in place on trailer reaches when towing a trailer.
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 Stake cables and lifting straps shall be kept in good condition and replaced as
required.
 Ensure log trucks and trailers meet all regulations and standards
 In accordance with OHSR Section 26.79 to 26.83 (inclusive), no hauling should
take place if to do so would create an undue hazard to the truck driver‘s health and
safety.
 If an unsafe condition exists the truck driver must report the circumstances to a
supervisor immediately.
 Where a motor vehicle is involved in an accident on a Forest Road, the driver or
person in charge of the vehicle shall report the accident to the office. Pine View
Trucking Ltd will contact other agencies as applicable. In case of a serious injury or
FATAL ACCIDENT, WCB and RCMP are to be contacted IMMEDIATELY.
 Sections of the Motor Vehicle Act and all other acts normally in effect still apply to
these roads; i.e.: speeding, overloads.
 Logging trucks must be equipped and maintained to meet Occupational Health and
Safety Regulations. Refer to OHSR Part 26; Sections 26.65, 26.66, 26.72 and
26.73.
 Know Emergency Spill Procedures.
 Radio transmissions are for business only. Idle chatter is not acceptable. Inform
the individual that idle chatter should be conducted on a low priority channel and
that it is interfering with road safety.
 Radio channels are posted at the start of each road. No other channels are to be
used on the Forest Road System.
 Generally, only the loaded vehicles call their mileage. Exceptions are: graders,
sand trucks, wide loads, fuel trucks, Empties call when changing channels, entering
new roads or at designated signs.
7.6.2 SAFE DRIVING
 Seat belts must be worn when vehicle is in motion.
 Drive according to road conditions. Do Not rely on the radio.
 All road signs are to be obeyed. The Motor Vehicle Act applies to logging roads as
well.
 All vehicles shall operate on the right side of the road
 Do Not call both ways every time you meet a vehicle, unless that vehicle doesn't
have a radio, or you deem it necessary.
 Call as per procedures, regardless of time of day or amount of traffic.
 When overtaking any vehicle, identify location, intentions and confirm clearance
before passing.
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 Use extreme caution when meeting approaching vehicles.
 Clearing for oncoming traffic shall be done on the right hand side of the road,
except in designated areas.
 When stopping for any reason, identify your location and intentions. In case of
breakdowns, flares or reflectors must be used.
 When stopping, leaving, or entering a haul road, advise road name and direction.
 In transit stop to check load and tighten wrappers as conditions require.
 Travel at safe speed limits dictated by road conditions.
 It is the responsibility of the truck driver to regulate their activities with regard to
unsafe road or weather conditions (ice, snow, speed, mud, visibility).
 Be aware of log swing at the front and rear of the trailer when meeting approaching
traffic and when driving in city traffic.
 Trucks both empty and loaded must slow to a safe speed when passing stopped
vehicles, road graders and road maintenance activities.
 No unauthorized person should ride in the driver‘s compartment.
 During the winter, trucks must carry tire chains.
 Chains should be used at the driver‘s discretion when roads are slippery.
 No loose articles are to be carried in the cab of the truck. All items in the operator‘s
compartment should be secured.
 All binders shall be adjusted as required, in transit, to ensure the load is secure.
 Be aware of log swing at the front and rear of the trailer when meeting oncoming
traffic, turning corners and when driving in town traffic.
 Check duals periodically for rocks that may be lodged between them.
 Operators must regularly check tires, steering mechanism, air system brakes,
bunks, wrappers, stakes, stake cables, lights and trailer to ensure their vehicle is in
sound operating condition.
 All vehicles must operate with headlights ON, except when stopped to clear a
vehicle in the dark; then headlights, including daytime running lights, are to be
turned off and park lamps left on.
 Use your back-up lights when meeting other traffic to check for logs that have
worked their way loose and are sticking out.
 No one will be permitted to ―jump rides‖ on the running boards of a moving truck.
 Drivers should carry pieps (avalanche beacons) in areas of avalanche hazards.
Pieps must be turned on when traveling through the avalanche hazard area. Areas
will be identified as having avalanche and Pine View Trucking Ltd will monitor
avalanche hazard bulletins and post in scale house when operations are active in
drainages. Signs will be posted identifying areas of avalanche hazard.
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7.6.3 LOG HAULING – ON THE LOGGING BLOCK

On the block, only the posted radio frequency is to be used between loader and
truck.

Empty trucks traveling to landings shall travel at safe speeds and give right-of-way
to loaded trucks and crew buses.

High visibility hard hats and apparel must be worn on landings and when tightening
wrappers and checking loads.

When backing onto landings, ensure workers and equipment are in the clear sound back-up warning.
7.6.4 TRUCK LOADING PROCEDURES

Do Not go under the reach of a trailer.

Ensure trailer reach is securely fastened, brake, air hose and safety chains are
connected and air tanks are charged.

The driver should be in the cab or stand in a visible, safe location (in front of the
truck) during the loading process and ensure the load is properly placed onto the
trailer.

Ensure you have visual contact with the loaderman

The loader man will not load a truck that doesn‘t have a certified bullboard.

No one shall tag the load or work on truck, while it is being loaded.

When loading short logs in the interior of a long log load, the outer logs (bunk and
stake logs) must be of sufficient strength to preclude the load breaking in the
middle.

The truck driver must be looking of unsafe loading hazards while the load is being
placed on the truck.

The truck driver will notify the loader man immediately of any issues over the radio.

The truck driver is responsible for ensuring that the log delivery ticket is completed
accurately
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
All timber-mark stamping and paper work that is required by the Ministry of Forests
must be completed before leaving the landing or cut block.

When timber mark stamping occurs on the landing, only stamp logs when the
loader is well away from the truck.

Ensure correct timber mark is properly marked on the load before leaving the block:
o on the left hand side, (driver's side) close to the front
o on the right hand side, close to the front

Inspect the load before leaving the landing, paying particular attention to protruding
branches, logs not contained within the stakes, any short logs which could slide or
roll off the load.

Driver and loader men are responsible for how the truck is loaded. If something is
not right, it is up to the Log truck driver and loader man to have it corrected.
DO NOT LEAVE THE LOADING AREA UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS CORRECTED.
 Truck drivers shall not load themselves or otherwise work alone unless a buddy
system or man check system is in place.

Stop to check load and tighten wrappers as conditions require.

CLEAN UP LOADS - OVERWEIGHTS:

Clean up loads will be paid up to a maximum of 1,500 kgs over legal axle weight
when highway restrictions are not in effect. This is the maximum allowed under the
Motor Vehicle Act Regulations. Weights over this amount pose a safety risk to both
the driver and approaching traffic and are in violation of the Occupational Health
and Safety Regulation.
7.6.5 APPLYING WRAPPERS
A minimum of two binders and cinches should be affixed to the load of logs to secure
the load before leaving the landing. A loaded truck may move a short distance from the
loading area before securing the load only if the movement will not present a hazard to
any workers
There is several safe ways to apply wrappers to a load. All ways should be considered
to ensure driver reduces their exposure to potential hazards. Both loader operator and
driver should be involved in this decision process and ensure the load is safe. The
following are acceptable methods of applying wrappers and should be situation
specific on which way is used.
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7.6.5.1
DEFINITIONS
Safe location: Best if within sight of loader operator, means an area that affords
good footing and is out of the way of site operations. Not two or more
kilometers down the road or at the stamp hammer.
Secure Lay:
Means that a log is secured between two logs in the row below.
Hazards: Dangers to driver, such as shorts on top of load, log with crook or
deformity that is not secure in the lay or excessively high load.
Driver Safe Position: While loading, either in or in front of cab of the unit. On
restrained side of load when placing wrappers on. If having the
wrappers drape over by loader, the driver must stay at side of cab.
At no time will the driver do any activities around the unit while
being loaded.
7.6.5.2
GENERAL RULES
The loader man and the truck driver must ensure the load is safe prior to wrappers
being placement. The loader man must confirm the top of the load is safe. The
truck driver must confirm that the side opposite the loader is safe.
All off-highway log loads MUST be secured by the loader prior to wrappers
being placed on the load – No exceptions.
Before placing wrappers on load:
 Driver to stand in a safe location, visible to the loader man.
 The loader man will secure load with the loader.
 The truck driver will wait for the signal from the loader man before proceeding to
place wrappers on the load.
Off-highway Wrapper Placement:
 Place wrappers so that they do not interfere with the forks of the unloading
machine. They should be placed within two feet of the truck stakes.
 The loader man and the truck driver must confirm the load is safe prior to the
wrapper placement:
 The loader man must confirm the top of the load is safe.
 The truck driver must confirm the off side to the loader is safe.
 The loader man and the truck driver must examine the load to ensure there are
no small chucks, pieces, sweepers or limbs hanging off the load.
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 The loader man and the truck drive shall look for logs that may become
dislodged and logs that protrude over the stakes.
 The truck driver shall have all unsafe issues corrected before placing wrappers
on leaving the loading area.
Highway long loads DO NOT require securement by the loader man, EXCEPT
when:
 Loader man cannot see the top of the load
 The truck driver is not comfortable placing wrappers without having the load
secured.
Where the loader man and truck driver have decided securement is not required,
the truck will pull ahead to the nearest level location and place wrappers on load.
Logging trucks are NOT to leave loader until wrappers and cinches are installed
and Sweepers are removed or adequately secured, unless otherwise determined
safe to move.
Before placing wrappers, ensure there are no small log pieces, which may
dislodge, or stems protruding from the load, and have the load secured by the
loader on the side the wrappers are being installed.
Before leaving the block, place two wrappers on the load at least three meters
apart and fasten securely.
Look up when throwing and securing wrappers - watch for logs.
Always look up when throwing binders over the load. When pulling binders off,
always walk away from the truck. Never stand directly alongside the truck or
beneath the load when load is not secured.
7.6.5.3
OPTION ONE
If all logs are full length (no shorts), bunk to bunk and the centre of all logs are
below the stakes the driver may move forward to a safe location and apply
wrappers.
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7.6.5.4
OPTION TWO
Off highway load where the loader operator and driver have determined that the
logs are secured within the lay of other logs the driver has the option of moving to a
safe location and applying wrappers. The driver may request the loader operator to
drape wrappers over load.
The following procedure must be followed:
 Loader operator confirms load to be secure

Driver stays at the front of load next to cab.

Loader operator moves grapple at ground level to the driver.

Driver places (throws) chain end of wrapper through grapple.

Loader operator places wrapper over load.

Repeat with second wrapper.

Driver then cinches load.
7.6.5.5
OPTION THREE
If the loader operator feels the load is not stable or too high for safe wrapping of
load without restraining load, the loader operator must advise the driver the load
will be restrained. The wrappers can be draped as in Option Two and the load
restrained while the driver applies cinches. Or the load is restrained while the
driver throws the wrappers on and then cinches the load. At no time should the
driver walk on the unrestrained side of the load until the wrappers are on.
7.6.6 CUT-TO-LENGTH (CTL) SAFE LOADING PROCEDURES
 All logs MUST be loaded secure in the lay.
 All logs MUST be below the stake height (maximum 4,15m or 13‘6‖).
 All logs MUST be restrained by a minimum of two wrappers.
 Loads DO NOT require securement by the loader man, EXCEPT where:
o Shorts have been loaded on top of the load.
o The loader man cannot see the top of the load.
o The truck driver is not comfortable placing wrappers without having the load
secured.
 The expectation for CTL loads is that SHORT LOGS be placed within load.
Short logs are defined as logs that won‘t reach from stake to stake.
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 In the event that shorts are placed on top of the load, these loads MUST be
secured by the loader man, prior to wrapper placement by trucker. In addition,
the loader man must ensure the shorts on top of the load are restrained by a
minimum of two wrappers. Loader man is responsible for informing the trucker
when additional wrappers are required to restrain short logs on top of load.
 Trucker must abide by request of loader man to put on additional wrappers on
the load. Shorts on top of the load that are not restrained by two wrappers will
automatically be fined as an ―Unsafe Load‖.
 Where the loader man and truck driver decide securement is not required, the
trucker will pull ahead to the nearest level location and place load wrappers.
 The placement of wrappers while the truck is being loaded is strictly
prohibited. This includes the wrapping of CTL bundles, while subsequent
bundles are being loaded on the truck.
 Before putting wrappers on the load the truck drive must again have a close
look at all sides of the load to ensure there are no hazards. If any hazards are
found they must be corrected prior to applying the wrappers.
7.6.7 LOG HAULING - IN THE MILL YARD - GENERAL
Refer to applicable Road User and Log Transportation Safety Procedures.
 High visibility hardhats, Apparel (blaze orange), Safety Glasses and Safety
footwear must be worn in log yards.
 Smoking is not permitted in log yards. There are designated smoking
areas throughout the plant only.
 Log Yard speed limit is 25 km/h maximum. Observe all posted speed limits.
 When going on or off the weigh scale the maximum allowable speed is
restricted to 5km/hour.
 Always approach log yard area with caution.
 For trucks to move safely within the log yard and receive direction from loaders, all
trucks must have the radio frequency.
 Loaders have the right-of-way in the log yard. Never drive behind log yard
equipment unless the operator waves you on. Always assume the operator
does not see you.
 Travel with lights on.
 All truck passengers must remain at the scale house until the truck unloads
and weighs out. Truck passengers must be 12 years of age and older. A
passenger is allowed beyond the scale house for training purposes of a new
driver only. The driver in training must wear the required personal protective
equipment.
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 Before any wrappers are removed, the load must be restrained by using the
Unwrapping Station. If the Unwrapping Station is down, loads can be
restrained by a Letourneau or wheel loader. Wrappers are NOT to be taken
off at the banding station. Banding is not a substitute for wrappers
 Do Not remove wrappers from load until it is restrained by log loader or other
suitable means. Be in view of operator until load is restrained. Minimum two
wrappers on a load, three wrapper loads may have center wrapper removed prior
to restraint. Once wrappers are removed there is no access around load.
 A worker may cross under a boom of mobile equipment only when the boom
is at rest on a load of logs. The boom will be used as a restraint for the logs
on a truck
 If there are any problems or questions please discuss with the Frost Lake
Logging Ltd. Supervisors.
 The use of cellular phones is prohibited while driving the vehicle on site.
7.6.7.1
DRIVER’S RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR SAFETY
 Wear the required Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
 Comply with the rules and safety procedures within the log yard area as
informed or posted.
 Report unsafe acts or damage to Supervisor immediately
 You have the right to refuse unsafe work
7.6.7.2
LOG YARD UNLOADING PROCEDURES
 Hard hats, hi-visibility attire, safety toed boots (green triangle-CSA
approved) , must be worn AT ALL TIMES when the driver and the trainee
driver are outside the cab of the truck
 Drivers are to check the radio frequency for the correct frequency of the mill
yard upon entering the mill area
 All loaders have the right of way on the mill/yard site
 No passengers are to ride in truck beyond the weigh scales. Unless driver in
training is attending
 Wait for the verbal STOP signal from the loader operator (via radio
communications)
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7.6.7.3 BANDING
 Pull truck up to the Banding Station.
 Obey all banding station traffic light signals.
 The load must be parked no further than 2 feet from the edge of the banding
station.
 Stand clear and allow Banderman to throw band over the front of the load.
 Truck driver to pass the front band under the load and back to the
Banderman.
 Stand clear and allow Banderman to throw band over the back of the load.
 Truck driver to pass the back band under the load and back to the
Banderman.
 Self loaders are permitted to load their trailers anywhere in the yard except
on the main road in the middle of the yard.
WRAPPERS ARE NOT TO BE REMOVED
UNTIL LOAD IS ASSESSED AND SECURED!
7.6.7.4 UNWRAPPING STATION PROCEDURES
 All trucks must use the unwrapping station.
 Truck drivers are to proceed as directed by the Scale house to the
unwrapping station.
 The truck has to be parked close enough to the unwrapping station that the
restraining arms touch the load when applied. If the unwrapping station is
being repaired, trucks can use the Letourneau to restrain the load.
 Follow all posted instructions in wrapper removal area.
 All restraining arms must be lowered.
 When lifting the load securing arms, be aware of pinch areas.
 Be aware of load arm bounce back.
 BEFORE removing wrappers LOOK UP & AROUND your load. Assess
effectiveness of the log restraint area. If your assessment reveals
unsecured logs or you think there may be unsecured logs in your load, call
the Letourneau or wheel loader operator on the radio to secure your load
instead of using the securing arms. Do this BEFORE removing wrappers.
When removing wrappers stand in a safe area. A log could roll off load.
 Remove wrappers from load.
 Once wrappers are removed, driver will then lift the load securing arms.
 Do not exit or enter from the back of the unwrapping station.
 Reduce yard speed when wrappers are removed to prevent logs from
bouncing out of load.
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In the event that the wrapper station or trailer loader is not operational the
following procedures will take place:
Wrapper removal with the log stacker:
1. The log stacker will unload from the passenger side.
2. Upon stopping, the driver will walk to the front of the truck. When and only
when the log stacker has the load secured and eye contact has been
made, the driver will pull off the wrappers, taking them to the front of the
truck, in sight of the stacker operator to roll up! The stacker will not lift the
load until the driver has signaled all clear.
Wrapper removal with front end loader:
Log truck driver procedures in the event of the stacker breaking down the
following procedure will take place:
1.
Front-end loader will secure load from the driver‘s side.
2.
Upon stopping, driver will walk immediately to rear of truck. When load is
secured by loader and eye contact is made, the rear wrapper will be
removed first. The driver may not walk under the raised boom when going
to remove the front. wrapper. He must walk around the back of the loader.
When front wrapper is removed, proceed to front of truck to roll them up.
The loader is not to move until driver has signaled all clear.
3.
The loader will go to the passenger side to pick load off. The driver will
assist loader with back and forward motion as required to off-load, if logs
get hung up on stakes.
7.6.7.5 TRAILER LOADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
 Familiarize yourself with the crane operations.
 Make sure lift hook is firmly hooked
 While loading your trailer inspect the lifting strap for damage
 Be sure not to walk under a trailer that is suspended in the air
 Keep trailer straight by pushing or pulling on the tires by using provided pike
pole.
 There should be only one operator to avoid‖ pinch points‖ with others
 When letting trailer down, make sure it is in proper position before letting all
the way down, as the hook is self-releasing.
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 After the hook is clear of the truck, push the reset home button located in
the building‘s post. This will automatically resent the crane for the next truck
in line.
 Report any malfunctions of the trailer loader, including frayed cable to the
scales immediately
 In the event the trailer loader is broken down, the log stacker will return to
where the truck was off-loaded and load it after the stakes are folded down.
Assist load stacker in getting the lift strap onto the fork by standing on
driver‘s side and pushing it onto the fork. The stacker will not lift the trailer
until the driver is back in the cab.
 Proceed to the Outbound Scale.
CAUTION: The wide forks on the stacker are very hard on lifting straps, so check
them regularly!!!
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7.6.8 LOWBED SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Toed Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment
1. Pre-trip inspection
1. Operator must ensure the pre-trip book is filled out daily:
Inspection,
prepare
 for faulty equipment
2. Check fifth wheel connection, jaws, and electrical lines.
for startup
 leaks, worn parts
3. Ensure:
 there is proper and adequate blocking
 chains and cinches are in good condition
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
2. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
3. Lowbed ProcessSafety
1. Loading/Unloading
 stability of unit
 rollover hazard
loading equipment
 poorly secured or
marked loads as a
hazard to road users
2. Load Securement
01/18/07
1.
See SOP 6.4 & 6.6
1. Notify Supervisor when entering and leaving worksite
2. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
3. Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
4. Make sure the machine footholds, areas that worker is required to walk on are
clean of grease, oil, bark and other debris to prevent slipping when entering or
leaving unit.
1. Ensure:





2.
162
Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
the ground is solid and level
there is room for maneuvering the load
sufficient clearance overhead and around unit
the truck is properly secured
no sideways hauling is permitted
The operator:
 shall wear provided seatbelts
 move equipment slowly and under control at all times
 block, secure and mark loads according to DOT specifications
 all loose debris is cleared off or secured to deck
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.6.8 LOWBED SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
3. Lowbed ProcessSafety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
3. Workers in proximity of
loading/unloading
4. Hauling
 load stability
 road conditions
4. Lowbed ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
163
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
loading
1. The operator:
 shall be aware of load characteristics: center of gravity, deck movement,
cornering concerns, clearances and braking concerns
 shall be aware of road traffic and conditions
 shall check securement regularly
Observe SOP 6.6
 Use load marking devices
 Use pilot car as required
 Use cables and chains that are in good condition and capable of adequately
securing loads
 Engage swing lock when machine is on lowbed
1. The operator must:
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills or
leaks
2. The operator must:
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.6.9 HIAB SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Toed Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment
1. Pre-trip inspection
1. Operator must ensure the checklist is performed:
Inspection,
prepare
 for faulty equipment
2. Check fifth wheel connection, jaws, electrical lines.
for startup
 leaks, worn parts
3. Ensure:
 there is proper and adequate blocking
 chains and cinches are in good condition
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
1. Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
2. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
1.
1.
2.
3. Hiab Process- Safety
1. Loading/Unloading
 stability of unit
 rollover hazard
loading equipment
 poorly secured or
marked loads as a
hazard to road users
1.
2. Hoist operation
 lifting hazards
1.
Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
Make sure the machine footholds, areas that worker is required to walk on are
clean of grease, oil, bark and other debris to prevent slipping when entering or
leaving unit.
Ensure:
 the ground is solid and level
 there is room for maneuvering the load
 sufficient clearance overhead and around unit
 the truck is properly secured
The operator:
 shall use rated lifting chains and straps
 shall ensure workers are clear of loads being lifted and tag lines are used to
control loads
 shall wear provided seatbelts
 move equipment slowly and under control at all times
 block, secure and mark loads according to DOT specifications
3. Load Securement
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7.6.9 HIAB SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
3. Hiab Process- Safety
(cont‘d)
4. Hiab ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
4. Workers in proximity of
loading/unloading
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
loading
5. Hauling
 load stability
 road conditions
1.
The operator:
 shall be aware of load characteristics: centre of gravity, deck movement,
cornering concerns, clearances and braking concerns
 shall be aware of road traffic and conditions
 shall check securement regularly
 observe Sections 6.7.1 and 6.7.2
1.
The operator must:
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills or
leaks
2.
The operator must:
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
165
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7
MAINTENANCE SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
All operations will be in accordance with occupational health and safety regulations,
Company and contractor policies.
All operations will be conducted in accordance with MoWLAP regulations, Company fuel,
hazardous waste and spill procedures and ISO14001 Environmental Management System.
Operations that are not in accordance with approved plans or procedures will be reported
immediately to the contractor or Company Supervisor.
7.7.1 MAINTENANCE PRECAUTIONS
All equipment repairs are to be performed according to manufacturer‘s service manual.
The serviceman or mechanic may be unfamiliar with many of the systems on this machine.
This makes it important to use caution when performing service work. A working knowledge
of the system and/or component is important before the removal or disassembly of any
component.
Because of the size of some of the machine components, the serviceman or mechanic
should check the weights noted in this Manual. Use proper lifting procedures when
removing any components.
Following is a list of basic precautions that should always be observed.
1. Read and understand all warning plates and decals on the machine before operating,
lubricating or repairing the machine.
2. Always wear protective glasses and protective shoes when working around machines.
In particular, wear protective glasses when pounding any part of the machine or its
attachments with a hammer or sledge. Use welder‘s gloves, hood/goggles, apron and
other protective clothing appropriate to the welding job being performed. Do not wear
loose-fitting or torn clothing. Remove all rings from fingers when working on
machinery.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
3. Disconnect battery and discharge any capacitors before starting to work on machine.
Hang ―Do Not Operate‖ tag in the Operator‘s Compartment.
4. If possible, make all repairs with the machine parked on a level, hard surface. Block
machine so it does not roll while working on or under machine.
5. Do not work on any machine that is supported only by lift jacks or a hoist. Always use
blocks or jack stands to support the machine before performing any disassembly.
6. Relieve all pressure in air, oil or water systems before any lines, fittings or related
items are disconnected or removed. Always make sure all raised components are
blocked correctly and be alert for possible pressure when disconnecting any device
from a system that utilizes pressure.
7. Lower the bucket, blade, ripper or other implements to the ground before performing
any work on the machine. If this can not be done, make sure the bucket, blade, ripper
or other implement is blocked correctly to prevent it from dropping unexpectedly.
8. Use steps and grab handles when mounting or dismounting a machine. Clean any
mud or debris from steps, walkways, or work platforms before using. Always face
machine when using steps, ladders and walkways. When it is not possible to use the
designed access system, provide ladders, scaffolds, or work platforms to perform safe
repair operations.
9. To avoid back injury, use a hoist when lifting components which weigh 23 kg (50 lb) or
more. Make sure all chains, hooks, slings, etc. are in good condition and are in the
correct capacity. Be sure hooks are positioned correctly. Lifting eyes are not to be side
loaded during a lifting operation.
10. To avoid burns, be alert for hot parts on machines which have just been stopped and
hot fluids in lines, tubes and compartments.
11. Be careful when removing cover plates. Gradually back off the last two bolts or nuts
located at opposite ends of the cover or device and pry cover loose to relieve any
spring or other pressure, before removing them completely.
12. Be careful when removing filler caps, breathers and plugs on the machines. Hold a
rag over the cap or plug to prevent being sprayed or splashed by liquids under
pressure. The danger is even greater if the machine has just been stopped because
fluid can be hot.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
13. Use only the recommended tools which are listed for a specific procedure. Be sure
the tools are in good condition and that you fully understand how to use them before
performing any service work. Failure to use the listed tools can cause damage to
components or serious personal injury or death.
14. Reinstall all fasteners with same part number. Do not use a lesser quality fastener if
replacements are necessary.
15. Repairs which require welding should be performed only with the benefit of the
appropriate reference information and by personnel adequately trained and
knowledgeable in welding procedures.
16. Do not damage wiring during removal operations. Reinstall the wiring so it is not
damaged nor will it be damaged in operation by contacting sharp corners, or by
rubbing against another object or hot surface. Do not connect wiring to a line
containing fluid.
17. Be sure all protective devices, including guards and shields, are properly installed
and functioning correctly before starting a repair. If a guard or shield must be removed
to perform the repair work, use extra caution.
18. Always use lift arm supports to keep bucket arms raised and bucket tilted down when
maintenance or repair work is performed which requires the bucket in the raised
position.
19. Loose or damaged fuel, lubricant and hydraulic lines, tubes and hoses can cause
fires. Do not bend or strike high pressure lines or install ones which have been bent or
damaged. Inspect lines, tubes and hoses carefully. Do not check for leaks with your
hands. Pin hole (very small) leaks can result in a high velocity oil stream that will be
invisible close to the hose. This oil can penetrate the skin and cause personal injury.
Use cardboard or paper to located pin hole leaks.
20. Tighten connections to the correct torque. Make sure that all heat shields, clamps
and guards are installed correctly to avoid excessive heat, vibration or rubbing against
other parts during operation. Shields that protect against oil spray onto hot exhaust
components in even of a line, tube or seal failure must be installed correctly.
21. Do not operate a machine if any rotating part is damaged or contacts any other part
during operation. Any high speed rotating component that has been damaged or
altered should be checked for balance before reusing.
22. On track-type machines, be careful when servicing or separating tracks. Chips can
fly when removing or installing a track pin. Wear safety glasses. Track can unroll very
quickly when separated. Keep away from front and rear of machine. The machine can
move unexpectedly when both tracks are disengaged from the sprockets. Block the
machine to prevent it from moving.
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7.7.2 SUPERVISOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Know and
 Know, understand and enforce Company policies.
Understand the
 Know, understand and be familiar with all safe Operation work procedures and
Operation
lockout procedures in your immediate area and any area you may be required
to enter.
 Know the requirements of the OH&S Regulation with regards to mobile
equipment and shops.
 Do Not tamper with electronic devices unless properly instructed as to the
procedure.
 When entering any area, take all necessary precautions not to put yourself or
anyone else in a dangerous situation.
 Review Safe Work Procedures with your employees biannually.
 Inspire, motivate, train and coach employees to be safe and productive and to
prevent problems from occurring in all aspects of production, maintenance and
mobile equipment.
 Ensure employees know the placement and use of buttons for their job
functions.
 Ensure employees use and exercise correct safe working procedures when
performing their job.
 Before starting equipment, ensure co-workers are clear of working area.
2. Effective
 Be accountable for a safe worksite.
Supervision
 Maintain a positive approach to employees.
creates a Safe
 Employee‘s safety concerns must be given the Good Labor highest priority.
Worksite and
 Trust your co-workers.
Relations
3. Working Around
 Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and Equipment forth.
Equipment
 Stay within the operator‘s vision.
 NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
 Do Not enter equipment hazards zone.
 Never take for granted that the truck driver or equipment operators can see you.
 Do Not walk under suspended loads.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.2 SUPERVISOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
4. Working Around
Any Type of
Fumes and
Airborne Toxins
5. Access and Egress
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Do Not Jump – personal
safety


6.
Use Lights During
Poor Visibility
Times
7. Operation
Injury to co-workers


8. Lifting
Pulled muscles or back
strain
Workers in danger area
9. Using Tools
10. Condition and
Location of Tools
11. Safety
Personal injury form
defective equipment
12. Chemical CleanUp
Skin and eye irritation
01/18/07
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
 Appropriate respiratory equipment is used.


















170
Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
At dawn, dusk, and during dusty periods, etc.
Check to make sure no one will be endangered when operating the machine.
Ensure Operators know they are directly responsible for the safe operation of
their units at all times.
Develop good communication with co-workers.
Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects.
Use only approved proper tools.
Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
Frequently check air hoses and clamps.
Do Not weld or use torches near chemicals, compressed air or flammable
liquids.
Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Grinders must be fitted with guards before using.
Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
Know and recognize worksite hazards.
Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times.
Wear proper personal protective equipment.
Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.3 PARTS PERSON SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment Usage
 Only persons authorized by a Supervisor are to operate any machines.
2. Check Forklift
Only authorized
personnel are to
operate machines.
Injury to operator,
pedestrians or co-workers,
scalds or burns
Eliminate downtime





Mechanical deficiencies


3. Working Around
any Type of Fumes &
Airborne Toxins
4. Working Around
Equipment








5. Access and Egress






6. Lifting
7. Condition and
Location of Tools
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Personal injury from
defective equipment
171
Check machine and complete forklift checklist prior to starting machine. To be
checked at the start and end of each shift.
Check fuel, oil and water levels.
Check windows, lights, tires, etc. on machine.
Check brakes and hydraulics.
Check if forks work properly - tilt up, down, forward and backward. Shift to side
also.
Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
Appropriate respiratory equipment is used.
Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and Equipment forth.
Stay within the operator‘s vision.
NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
Do Not enter equipment hazards zone.
Never take for granted that the truck driver or equipment operators can see you.
Do Not walk under suspended loads.
Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects
Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Grinders must be fitted with guards before using
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.3 PARTS PERSON SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
8. Using Tools
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
9. When Using
Compressed Air
to Blow Off
Machines
10. Fueling
Foreign objects in eyes
Puncture
wounds
from
objects in the airline
Fire, explosions, burns to
body
Spills
11. Safety
12. Chemical CleanUp
13. Housekeeping
01/18/07
Skin and eye irritation
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
172
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Use only approved proper tools.
 Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
 Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
 Frequently check air hoses and clamps
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
 Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
 After use, hang up hose





NO Smoking near or around fueling area.
Know emergency spill procedures.
Shut engine off before fuelling.
Wear leather gloves.
Keep
fittings
free
of
dust
and
tightened
securely.
Filling Propane Tank:
 Make sure bleed off valve on filler hose is shut.
 Connect filler hose to tank securely and open bleeder valve on tank.
 Push start and fill tank to 85%.
 When full to 85%, shut off pump, close bleeder valve on tank and open bleeder
valve on filler hose.
 Disconnect filler hose from tank and place on propane tank frame.
 Check for leaks
 Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
 Know and recognize worksite hazards.
 Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times
 Wear proper personal protective equipment.
 Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
 Keep the work area neat and clean at all times
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.4 FIELD MECHANIC SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Prepare for Start-Up Personal safety
 Complete visual check of machine.
of Machinery
 Check oil and coolant levels.
 Check brake operation.
 Understand all safety precautions and warnings pertaining to the machine.
 Understand the signals for controlling equipment operations.
 Signals shall be given by one worker.
 Check that the machine is equipped with the proper fire extinguisher, which
Faulty Equipment
have been inspected as recommended.
 Check that all covers and guards are in place and secure.
 Clean the windshield, mirrors, steps, grab bars and compartment before start
up.
Tripping, slips, falls and poor
 Wire rope connectors and hydraulic lines shall be of an approved type.
visibility
 Follow recommend manufacturers and Company policies and procedures.
2. Working Around
 Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and Equipment forth.
Equipment
 Stay within the operator‘s vision.
 NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
 Do Not enter equipment hazards zone.
 Never take for granted that the truck driver or equipment operators can see you.
 Do Not walk under suspended loads.
3. After Start-Up
 Check oil and air pressures and operation of other gauges and lights.
 Visual check for coolant and oil leaks.
 Unplug machine (if plugged in during winter months).
 Operate controls and check hydraulic operation.
 USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN MOVING MOBILE EQUIPMENT - ensure no
one is working in or around equipment.
 The provided seat belt must be worn. See OH&S Regulation Part 16;
Workers in danger area
Sections 16.22 and 16.33.
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7.7.4 FIELD MECHANIC SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
4. Servicing,
Repairing and
Maintaining Mobile
Equipment
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Machine collapse
5. Working Around
Any Type of Fumes
and Airborne Toxins
6. Testing or
Servicing Equipment




Personal safety
Faulty equipment
Mechanical deficiencies
01/18/07
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Ensure mobile equipment is in a safe condition to operate at all times.
 Repair and/or report safety problems to Supervisor.
 USE EXTREME CAUTION when welding or cutting. (All required safety
equipment must be used.)
 Ensure all tools and repair equipment is in satisfactory condition to effect
repairs.
 Use proper and safe rigging procedures where appropriate and when required.
 Fire suppression system to be maintained and precautionary measures taken to
keep high hazard areas clear of debris.
 Raised blades, booms or other equipment components shall be secured with
blocking or approved safety supports during maintenance.
 During maintenance activities, equipment shall be locked out or when lock out is
not possible, a sign posted on controls identifying that the Equipment is not
operational
 Equipment shall be serviced to not less than the manufacturer‘s specifications.
 The machine must be shut down before any adjustments or repairs are done.
 Repairs must be undertaken while any part of the machine is in motion, except
oiling and greasing may be carried out with the power unit only left running and
if done under the direction of an operator who remains at the controls of the
machine.
 Ensure walking areas are free from oil, grease, ice, etc
 Do Not leave equipment running while adjusting or fueling.
 Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
 Appropriate respiratory equipment is used.
174
Ensure all guarding is in place.
Do Not place yourself in the ―bite‖.
Check for adequate turning or maneuvering clearance.
Check for proper operation of all controls and protective devices while moving
slowly in an open area i.e. left and right steering, all brakes work, engine
governor control level, and other devices such all lights, backup alarm and
horns all work.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.4 FIELD MECHANIC SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
7. Operation
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Personal injury, equipment
damage
Falling off, possibility
serious injury
8. Parking
9. Use Lights During
Poor Visibility
Times
10. Access and
Egress
of
Runaway machine causing
damage or injury to coworkers
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
Injury to co-workers
Do Not Jump! – personal
safety
11. Lifting
Pulled muscles and back
strain
12. Condition and
Location of
Tools
Personal
injury
defective equipment
01/18/07
from
175
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Operators are directly responsible for the safe operation of their units at all
times.
 Develop good communications with co-workers.
 Equipment must be under control at all times and must be operated at safe
speeds.
 Always look behind before backing up.
 Do Not make sudden turns, or turns at high speed. This could cause the
machine to upset.
 Ensure all vehicles are parked at a safe distance away from other machines.
 No worker shall hold onto any part of the rigging or the machine while the
machine is in motion.
 Park on level ground.
 Lower the machine‘s equipment/attachments to the ground before leaving the
cab when parking. See OH&S Regulation Part 16; Section 16.36.
 Before leaving the unit, the park brake shall be set.
 When stopped and the operator dismounts the unit it shall be locked or
rendered incapable of being started by an unauthorized person.
 At dawn, dusk, and during dusty periods, etc.








Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects
Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Grinders must be fitted with guards before using
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.4 FIELD MECHANIC SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
13. Using Tools
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
14. Using
Compressed Air to
Blow off Machinery
Foreign objects in eyes
15. Fueling Machines
Puncture wounds from
objects in the airline
Fire, explosions, burns to
body
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Use only approved proper tools.
 Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
 Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
 Frequently check air hoses and clamps
 Do Not weld or use torches near chemicals, compressed air or flammable
liquids.
 Use appropriate eye protection with grinders, hammering pins, cutting cable and
operating cutting torches.
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
 Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
 After use, hang up hose





Shut off equipment when refueling.
Do Not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs, near streams,
lakes or water bodies.
NO Smoking near or around fueling area.
Know emergency spill procedures.
Wear leather gloves.






Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
Know and recognize worksite hazards.
Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times
Wear proper personal protective equipment.
Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
Keep the work area neat and clean at all times
Spills
16. Safety
17. Chemical CleanUp
18. Housekeeping
01/18/07
Skin and eye irritation
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
176
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.5 TRUCK MECHANIC/SERVICEMAN SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre Start-Up
Personal safety
 Complete Visual Check of machine.
Machinery
Mechanical deficiencies
 Check oil and coolant levels.
 Check brake operation.
2. After Start-Up
 Check oil and air pressures and operation of other gauges and lights.
 Visual check for coolant and oil leaks.
 Unplug machine (if plugged in during winter months).
 Operate controls and check hydraulic operation.
 USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN MOVING MOBILE EQUIPMENT - ensure no
one is working in or around equipment.
3. Servicing,
Personal safety
 Ensure mobile equipment is in a safe condition to operate at all times.
Repairing and
 Repair and/or report safety problems to Supervisor.
Maintaining Mobile
 USE EXTREME CAUTION when welding or cutting. (All required safety
Equipment
equipment must be used.)
 Ensure main power or tag out are used where applicable
 Ensure all tools and repair equipment is in satisfactory condition to effect
repairs.
 Use proper and safe rigging procedures where appropriate and when required.
 Fire suppression system to be maintained and precautionary measures taken to
keep high hazard areas clear of debris.
Machine collapse
 Raised blades, booms or other equipment components shall be secured with
blocking or approved safety supports during maintenance.
 During maintenance activities, equipment shall be locked out or when lock out is
not possible, a sign posted on controls identifying that the Equipment is not
Faulty equipment
operational.
 Equipment shall be serviced to not less than the manufacturer‘s specifications.
 The machine must be shut down before any adjustments or repairs are done.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.5 TRUCK MECHANIC/SERVICEMAN SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
3. Servicing,
Repairing and
Maintaining Mobile
Equipment Cont’d
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Faulty equipment
4. Working Around
Any Types of Fumes
and Airborne Toxins
5. Parking
Personal safety


Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
Appropriate respiratory equipment is used.
Runaway machine causing
damage or injury to coworkers


Park on level ground.
Lower the machine‘s equipment/attachments to the ground before leaving the
cab when parking. See OH&S Regulation Part 16; Section 16.36.
Before leaving the unit, the park brake shall be set.
When stopped and the operator dismounts the unit it shall be locked or
rendered incapable of being started by an unauthorized person.
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
6. Condition and
Location of Tools
Personal injury from
defective equipment
7. Using Tool
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Repairs must be undertaken while any part of the machine is in motion, except
oiling and greasing may be carried out with the power unit only left running and
if done under the direction of an operator who remains at the controls of the
machine.
 Ensure walking areas are free from oil, grease, ice, etc
 Ensure all repair equipment and tools are in satisfactory condition to effect
repairs.
 Do Not leave equipment running while adjusting or fueling.




Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Grinders must be fitted with guards before using.





Use only approved proper tools.
Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
Frequently check air hoses and clamps
Do Not weld or use torches near chemicals, compressed air or flammable
liquids.
Use appropriate eye protection with grinders, hammering pins, cutting cable and
operating cutting torches.

8. When Using
Compressed Air to
Blow off Machinery
01/18/07
Foreign objects in eyes
Puncture wounds from
objects in the airline
178



Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
After use, hang up hose.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.5 TRUCK MECHANIC/SERVICEMAN SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
9. Fueling Machines
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Fire, explosions, burns to
body
Spills
10. Lifting
Pulled muscles or back
strain
11. Safety
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Shut off equipment when refueling.
 Do Not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs, near streams,
lakes or water bodies.
 NO Smoking near or around fueling area.
 Know emergency spill procedures.
 Wear leather gloves.
 Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
 Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
 Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects
 Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
 Know and recognize worksite hazards.
 Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times
 At dawn , dusk, and during dusty periods, etc.
12. Use Lights During
Poor Visibility
Times
13. Access and
Egress
Injury to co-workers
Do Not Jump!- personal
safety


14. Equipment
Maintenance
15. Housekeeping
Slips and falls


Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
Ensure walking area is free from oil, grease, ice, etc.

Keep yard neat and tidy at all times.


Wear proper personal protective equipment.
Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
16. Chemical CleanUp
01/18/07
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
Skin and eye irritation
179
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.6 MECHANICS HELPER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Prepare for Start-Up Personal safety
 Complete Visual Check of machine.
of Machinery
 Check oil and coolant levels.
 Check brake operation.
 Understand all safety precautions and warnings pertaining to the machine.
 Understand the signals for controlling equipment operations. One worker shall
give signals.
 Check that the machine is equipped with the proper fire extinguisher, which
have been inspected as recommended.
 Check that all covers and guards are in place and secure.
Poor visibility
 Clean the windshield, mirrors, steps, grab bars, and compartment before startup.
Tripping and falls
 Wire rope connectors and hydraulic lines shall be of an approved type.
2. Working Around
Equipment






Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and Equipment forth.
Stay within the operator‘s vision.
NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
Do Not enter equipment hazards zone.
Never take for granted that the truck driver or equipment operators can see you.
Do Not walk under suspended loads.
3. After Start-Up





Check oil and air pressures and operation of other gauges and lights.
Visual check for coolant and oil leaks.
Unplug machine (if plugged in during winter months).
Operate controls and check hydraulic operation.
USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN MOVING MOBILE EQUIPMENT - ensure no
one is working in or around equipment.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.6 MECHANICS HELPER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
4. Servicing,
Repairing and
Maintaining Mobile
Equipment
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Personal safety
Machine collapse
Faulty equipment
5. Working Around
Any Types of Fumes
and Airborne Toxins
6. Testing or
Servicing Equipment
01/18/07
Personal safety
181
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Ensure mobile equipment is in safe condition to operate at all times.
 Raised blades, booms or other equipment components shall be secured with
blocking or approved safety supports during maintenance.
 During maintenance activities, equipment shall be locked out or when lock out is
not possible, a sign posted on controls identifying that the Equipment is not
operational.
 Equipment shall be serviced to not less than the manufacturer‘s specifications.
 The machine must be shut down before any adjustments or repairs are done.
 Repair and/or report safety problems to Supervisor
 Ensure main power or tag out are used where relevant.
 USE EXTREME CAUTION when welding or cutting. (All required safety
equipment must be used).
 Use proper and safe rigging procedures where appropriate and when required.
 Fire suppression system to be maintained and precautionary measures taken to
keep high hazard areas clear of debris.
 Repairs must be undertaken while any part of the machine is in motion, except
oiling and greasing may be carried out with the power unit only left running and
if done under the direction of an operator who remains at the controls of the
machine.
 Ensure walking areas are free from oil, grease, ice, etc
 Ensure all repair equipment and tools are in satisfactory condition to effect
repairs.
 Do Not leave equipment running while adjusting or repairing components.


Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
Appropriate respiratory equipment is used.




Ensure all guarding is in place.
Do Not place yourself in the ―bite‖.
Check for adequate turning or maneuvering clearance.
Check for proper operation of all controls and protective devices while moving
slowly in an open area i.e. left or right steering, all brakes work, engine governor
control level, and other devices such as all light, backup alarm, and horns all
work.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.6 MECHANICS HELPER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
7. Operation
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Workers in danger area
Personal injury, equipment
damage
Falling off, possibility of
serious injury
8. Parking
Runaway machine causing
damage or injury to coworkers
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers
9. Use of Lights
During Poor Visibility
Times
10. Access and
Egress
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Check to make sure no one will be endangered when operating the machine.
 Visual check the machine.
 Operate the equipment in accordance with the requirements of the OH&S
Regulation Part 16; Sections 16.5 and 16.4.
 Operators are directly responsible for the safe operation of their units at all
times.
 Develop good communications with co-workers.
 Equipment must be under control at all times and must be operated at safe
speeds.
 NO passengers are to be in the cab of the machine.
 Always look behind before backing up.
 Do Not make sudden turns, or turns at high speed. This could cause the
machine to upset.
 Ensure all vehicles are parked at a safe distance away from other machines.
 No worker shall hold onto any part of the rigging or
the machine while the
machine is in motion.




Injury to co-workers

At dawn, dusk, and during dusty periods, etc.
Do Not Jump! – personal
safety


Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.

01/18/07
Park on level ground.
Lower the machine‘s equipment/attachments to the ground before leaving the
cab when parking. See OH&S Regulation Part 16; Section 16.36.
Before leaving the unit, the park brake shall be set.
When stopped and the operator dismounts the unit it shall be locked or
rendered incapable of being started by an unauthorized person.
182
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.6 MECHANICS HELPER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
11. Equipment and
Machine Maintenance
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Slips and falls
12. Lifting
Pulled muscles or back
strain
13. Condition and
Location of Tools
14. Using Tools
Personal injury from
defective equipment
15. Using
Compressed Air to
Blow off Machines
16. Fueling Machines
Foreign objects in eyes
Puncture wounds from
objects in the airline
17. Safety
18. Chemical CleanUp
19. Housekeeping
01/18/07
Skin and eye irritation
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers, tripping & falling
183
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Ensure walking area is free from oil, grease, ice, etc.
 The operator is responsible for maintaining the unit in a safe operating condition
at all times.
 Regularly inspect the equipment at least twice per shift.
 Inspect equipment, hoses, etc. for wear and tear leaks or ground disturbances.
 Frequently check air hoses and clamps.
 Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
 Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
 Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects.
 Ensure tools are in good working condition.
 Grinders must be fitted with guards before using.
 Use only approved proper tools.
 Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
 Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
 Frequently check air hoses and clamps
 Do Not weld or use torches near chemicals, compressed air or flammable
liquids.
 Use appropriate eye protection with grinders, hammering pins, cutting cable and
operating cutting torches.
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
 Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
 After use, hang up hose.
 Shut off equipment when refueling.
 Do Not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs, near streams,
lakes or water bodies.
 NO Smoking near or around fueling area.
 Know emergency spill procedures.
 Wear leather gloves.
 Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
 Know and recognize worksite hazards.
 Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times.
 Wear proper personal protective equipment.
 Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
 Keep the machines and work areas neat and clean at all times.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.7 WELDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment Usage
 Only persons authorized by Supervisor are to operate any machines.
2. Prepare for Start-Up Workers exposed to moving
 Workers exposed to moving equipment.
equipment
 Ensure workers are aware of your presence.
 Check for possible hazards.
 Understand all safety precautions and warnings pertaining to the machine.
Personal safety
 Ensure that the proper fire extinguisher, which has been inspected as
recommended, is close by.
Workers in danger area
 Ensure no one is in the area of welding.
3. Operation
 Check to make sure there is adequate ventilation.
Clean all areas as
 Ensure that there is adequate means of access and egress.
instructed by your
 Inspect all slings before you use them.
Supervisor
 Make sure co-workers know of your presence in a specific area.
 Do Not enter an area when equipment is running.
 Replace all safety guards that have been removed.
4. Working Near
 Exercise extreme caution when working in the proximity to equipment.
Operating
 Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and forth.
Equipment
 Stay within the operator‘s vision.
 NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
 Do Not enter equipment hazards zone.
 Never take for granted that the operator can see you.
5. Welding
 Do Not leave the welding site unattended.
 Ensure eye protection is used and other workers are not exposed.
 Ensure that there is adequate shielding to protect other workers from exposure
Welding flash to yourself and
to the welding arc in the shop and/or in the field.
 Do Not breathe in welding fumes.
co-workers
 No cutting or welding shall be done in such a way as to endanger yourself or
other workers.
 When welding in confined spaces effective respiratory equipment shall be made
Injury to co-workers
available and used.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.7 WELDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
6. Cylinders
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
7. Working Around
any types of Fumes
and Airborne Toxins
8. Fire Hazards and
Safety
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Cylinder valves shall be closed when equipment is not in use.
 Compressed gas cylinders will not be hoisted by slings or magnets, dropped or
subjected to impact.
 Cylinders will be kept upright, and shall be secured against falling during
storage, transportation or use.
 Cylinders shall not be handled by means or regulators or used as rollers or work
supports.
 Acetylene cylinders, which have been stored or transported in a horizontal
attitude, shall be placed in a vertical position for at least one hour before use.
 Full and empty cylinders shall be kept separated and identified.
 Oxygen or acetylene cylinders shall not be used as a prop while cutting nor
shall an arc be struck on any cylinder.
 At the end of operation ensure that the tanks are turned off and lines are
drained.
 Ensure the area is or can be well ventilated.
 Appropriate respiratory equipment must be used.










9. Fire Extinguishers
10. Condition and
Location Of
Tools
Personal injury from
defective equipment

01/18/07
185
Keep flammable materials away from areas where the welding is being
performed.
NEVER weld a tank, pipeline or portable container without making absolutely
sure that it is free of any explosive or toxic vapors.
Burning or welding equipment starts most industrial fires.
Chemical or other approved extinguishers must be checked before starting work
and the extinguisher must be at the point of work at all times.
Know and recognize worksite hazards.
Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times.
Extreme caution shall be taken to prevent fires in dry areas.
Fire extinguisher must be on site while working.
Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Check equipment at frequent and regular intervals for defects, particularly for
defective cable when working in wet areas.
Grinders must be fitted with guards before using.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.7 WELDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
11. Using Tools
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
12. Using
Compressed Air to
Blow off Machines
13. Chemical CleanUp
14. Lifting
Foreign objects in eyes
Puncture wounds from
objects in the airline
Skin and eye irritation
15. Access and
Egress
Do Not jump! – personal
safety
16. Working Around
Equipment
17. Housekeeping
01/18/07
Pulled muscles or back
strain
Slips and falls
Slipping when entering or
leaving
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers, tripping and
falling
186
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Use only approved proper tools.
 Always wear eye protection when using air tools.
 Do Not use air tools for any other purpose other than what it is intended for.
 Frequently check air hoses and clamps.
 Do NOT weld or use torches near chemicals, compressed air or flammable
liquids
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
 Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
 After use, hang up hose.
 Wear proper personal protective equipment.
 Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
 Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
 Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
 Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects.
 Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
 Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
 Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
 Make sure the footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil and other debris.

Keep are of movement clean at all times.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.8 CLEAN UP SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Safety Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Vest (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment Usage
Unqualified workers could
 Employer must ensure worker is qualified to operate to equipment any piece of
cause damage to equipment
equipment.
and expose other workers to
 Only persons authorized by a Supervisor are to operate any machines.
 Do Not start or stop any equipment unless you are fully conversant with its
hazards
operation.
2. Access and Egress
Do Not jump! – personal Employee must:
safety
 Use proper means of dismounting equipment.
Slips and falls
 Use caution when entering or leaving the unit, use the provided steps and
handholds.
 Use the Three Point contact method for entering and exiting equipment.
3. Working Around
Workers in danger area
Worker must:
Equipment
 Be alert to heavy equipment moving back and forth.
Working in proximity to
 Stay within the operator‘s vision.
 NEVER turn your back on oncoming traffic.
others
 Never take for granted that you can be seen by the driver.
 Make sure co-workers know of your presence in a specific area.
Working around supported When working around equipment under repair:
equipment
and
under
 Ensure blocking is stable.
 Do Not walk under suspended loads.
suspended loads
4. Lifting
Pulled muscles or back
 Follow proper lifting procedures, exercise caution and get help when needed.
strain
 Work on solid ground when lifting equipment.
 Get help before lifting or moving heavy objects.
5. Condition and
Personal
injury
from
 Ensure tools are in good working condition.
Location of
Tools
defective equipment
 Check equipment at frequent and regular intervals for defects, particularly for
defective cable when working in wet areas.
 Grinders must be fitted with guards before using.
6. Using Compresses
Foreign objects in eyes
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
Air to Blow off
 Do Not use compressed air to blow off clothing.
Puncture
wounds
from
Machines
objects in the airline
 After use, hang up hose.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.7.8 CLEAN UP SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
JOB STEPS
7. Fueling Machines
CONCERNS/HAZARDS
Fire, explosion, burns to
body
8. Chemical Clean-Up
Skin and eye irritation
PROPER PROCEDURE
 Shut off equipment when refueling.
 Do Not fuel or service machine, or carry out avoidable repairs, near streams,
lakes or water bodies.
 NO Smoking near or around fueling area.
 Know emergency spill procedures.
 Wear leather gloves.
 Wear proper personal protective equipment.
 Follow written chemical procedures. See WHMIS Section 5.1 Page 72.
 Know emergency spill procedures.
Spills
9. Safety
10. Housekeeping
01/18/07
Personal safety and safety of
co-workers, tripping and
falling
188






Keep flammable materials away from areas where welding is being performed.
Know and recognize worksite hazards.
Ensure all the appropriate personal protective equipment is worn at all times.
Know all necessary clean-up areas. Obtain a list of main clean-up areas from
your Supervisor.
Clean all areas as instructed by your Supervisor.
Keep area of movement clean at all times.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.8
BLOW-DOWN LOGGING OPERATIONS
7.8.1 BUNCHER AND GRAPPLE SKIDDER OPERATORS
The operator must complete a quick visual check for leaks, cracks, undercarriage
irregularities etc. prior to starting machine.
The operator must check the fluid levels prior to starting the machine.
Buncher first bucks the blow-down and tries to arrange the drag for the skidder.
Buncher then falls the standing timber.
The skidder removes the drag.
Whenever the units are in close proximity, there must be either radio control or visual
contact before work commences.
7.8.2 HAND-BUCKER / FALLER AND LINE SKIDDER
Hand-bucker/faller goes in and bucks off what he feels he can buck safely. This is a
judgment call - when in doubt - LEAVE IT!! Fall the standing timber concurrently if they
are not bound up.
Hand-bucker/Faller moves along a face in this manner.
Line Skidder operates at least two tree lengths away.
Once the face is skidded, the Hand-bucker/Faller returns to buck and fall another strip.
The skidding should have eased some of the tension. Again, if in doubt - LEAVE IT!!
In the event of falling difficulties, bound saw, hung-up trees, blow-down jackpot, etc., the
Hand-bucker/Faller shall notify the skidder operator and foreman. The problem should
be assessed and a solution implemented.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9
ROAD & ROAD MAINTENANCE SOP
Contractor Supervisor and equipment operator review permit requirements including
Road Permit, Cutting Permit, Logging Plan Maps, ribboning convention, with emphasis
on any special clauses.
7.9.1 BUILDING ROADS
You cannot build a road in a Reserve Zone unless approved by the Forest Service and
BC Environment.
You cannot build a road turnout in a Riparian Management Area unless approved by the
Forest Service and BC Environment.
When you install culverts on Fish Bearing Streams, you must prevent the fill material
from entering the streams.
Ensure Bridge Installation and Stream Crossing Checklists are used.
7.9.2 LOGGING RIGHT-OF-WAYS
Road Construction/Contractor Supervisors must ensure that all operations are
conducted so as to maintain natural drainage patterns BEFORE, DURING and AFTER
completion of operations.
Falling must be directed away from stream crossings and riparian zones.
The Company does NOT PERMIT crossing of fish bearing streams prior to the issuing of
written instructions.
Skid bridges must be utilized at all stream crossings or as designated by the Area or
Road Construction Supervisor.
Falling:
 fallers, buncher operators and contractor Supervisor must walk and/or review work
area with Supervisor before they start work in a new area which should include
centerlines, landings, streams and riparian management areas, prior to
commencement of operations
 All trees within the right-of-way must be felled. Dangerous trees within reach of
road surface and landings shall be felled concurrent with operations
 variances of right-of-way width must be approved by area Supervisor
 right-of-way falling should occur during daylight hours
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.3 RIGHT-OF-WAY LANDINGS
Size and location of landings are specified in the approved plan.
Ideal landing shape is rectangular with tapered ends.
Turnouts should be located at landing locations where feasible.
All wood will be skidded to and decked within the landing area and should not extend
into standing timber.
Licensee personnel will mark approximate landing locations.
constructed within 40 meters of a watercourse.
No landings to be
Landings must not be stripped unless authorized by a Licensee Supervisor.
Decks must not impede road construction operations or drainage patterns.
Landing piling should be concurrent with load out or as discussed with Area Supervisor.
Ditches must extend along the entire length of the landing adjacent to the road.
7.9.4 ROAD CONSTRUCTION/LOGGING GENERAL INSPECTIONS
Construct roads, bridges, and install culverts, primarily during daylight hours or under
adequate artificial lighting.
Each operation or block will be inspected for compliance with government
regulations/policies, Company policies, plans and prescriptions. An inspection sheet will
be filled out.
Ensure you obtain a copy of the pre-work notes, which must be kept in the machine at all
times.
Ensure you fully understand the map information and operational requirements before
starting work.
Onsite review and walk locations are required to ensure familiarity with job requirements.
Sign pre-work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Do not alter location of stream or water course.
When building bridges, use equipment suitable for lifting logs or other supports.
Do not drop debris in river, streams, creeks, lakes or wetlands.
Know Emergency Spill Procedures.
Review ribboning convention.
Have and review logging plan map identifying sensitive areas.
Observe all conditions of any special management area.
Confine all operations to within approved area only.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Position slash and overburden according to Road Permit, Cutting Permit and Logging
Plan Map.
Review and comply with all requirements of Riparian Management Area as identified in
the Silviculture Prescription or the Logging Plan Map.
Monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil, weather conditions and shut
down as required.
Maintain natural surface drainage patterns during each phase of construction.
Make sure that cut and fill banks are properly sloped, rock scaled and compacted as
required.
Control sub-surface drainage consistent with natural drainage patterns.
Cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you come
upon an unidentified site or resource feature.
Minimize damage to standing timber and trees that must be left standing, as per the
operational requirements report.
Minimize site disturbance at all times.
7.9.5 ROAD CONSTRUCTION-SUBGRADE CONSTRUCTION
Sub-grade construction specifications are set forth (for each section) in the Road or
Cutting Permit.
Temporary or permanent drainage systems must be built concurrently with sub grade
construction.
The width of the sub grade will be as specified in the Road Permit.
The sub grade shall be constructed with mineral soil. One or more of the following
methods; scattering, piling and burning, or burying will dispose of slash and debris. The
method to be used will be decided by a Licensee Supervisor.
Slash and debris must not be disposed of into a watercourse.
Debris piles or berms must be breached as necessary to allow drainage.
The grade should be kept crowned during construction to prevent the accumulation of
surface water.
For each approved road crossing of a watercourse, limit the equipment crossing location
to the area that will be occupied by the sub grade.
Turnouts should be intervisible or a minimum of 3 per kilometer. Turnouts are to be built
on the empty side of the road.
Roads must be constructed in conformance with the approved layout and design.
Skid bridges must be utilized at all stream crossings or as designated by the Area
Supervisor or his designate.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Grass seeding of the right of way will occur by the first spring season following
construction.
Make sure ditches are constructed to adequate depths, are free of debris and have
proper ditch blocks.
Culverts should not extend more than 50 cm past sub grade on inlet side.
Culverts should follow contour of slope up to 25%.
Culvert pond at inlet to be no more than 25 cm deep.
Perched culverts should have a 30 cm plus riprap spillway, fabric apron or flumes to
prevent erosion.
Culverts over 90 cm shall be installed with a minimum bedding below culvert base of 30
cm of inert durable sand, gravel and or crushed rock particles. The bedding shall be
prepared in such a manner as to prevent unequal settlement along length of culvert.
The backfill for the culvert should be of the same material.
Use techniques to control siltation.
The culvert should have at least 30 cm fill over the top, or ½ the diameter of the culvert,
whichever is greater.
Place enough suitable fill material that will not erode.
Conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; protect fish and fish habitats;
and maintain natural drainage patterns.
Creeks and Streams:
 culverts must maintain natural course of streams whether seasonal or continuous
 before culverts installation, creeks must be assessed for fisheries potential
 culverts should maintain natural watercourse
 all culverts greater than 100 cm and/or culverts in fish bearing streams require
written procedures for installation and operating time frames prepared by
Company Supervisor responsible for engineering or road construction
 culverts should provide for 100 year flood
 all culverts > 100 cm in diameter must be installed with excavator and fill must be
compacted
 build trails only in the locations shown on the Logging Plan Map
 during bladed trail construction, ensure that movement of soil and depth of cut are
kept to a minimum, and are within any limits set out in the Logging Plan Map
 cross wet areas, sensitive areas, and creeks at approved designated crossings
only
 when a bladed trail has to cross a creek, ensure the skid bridge construction SOP
is followed
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 ensure strippings and soil are not deposited below the high water mark of a creek
or water body
 ensure that no materials are removed from the area that could destabilize a
stream bank
 minimize site disturbance at all times
7.9.6 ROAD MAINTENANCE
Supervisor and equipment operator review permit requirements including; deactivation
plan and maps, field marking convention, with emphasis on any special clauses.
Onsite review and/or walk locations as required to ensure familiarity with job
requirements.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Know Emergency Spill Procedures.
Have and review map identifying sensitive areas.
Observe all conditions of any special management area.
Confine all operations to within approved area only.
Monitor progress on regular basis with respect to soil, weather conditions and shut down
as required.
Maintain natural surface drainage patterns during each phase of construction.
Ensure graded material is not deposited or positioned to enter into a watercourse.
Conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; maintain natural drainage
patterns; reduce the potential for slumps, slides and rock fall; and control road surface
runoff.
Keep ditches and culverts free of debris.
Control subsurface drainage consistent with natural drainage patterns.
Remove industrial waste and garbage concurrent with operations.
Do not push mud outside of road width approved in Operational Documents.
7.9.7 ROAD DEACTIVATION
Contractor Supervisor and equipment operator review permit requirements including
deactivation plan and maps, field marking convention, with emphasis on any special
clauses.
Onsite review and/or walk locations as required to ensure familiarity with job
requirements.
Sign pre-work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding.
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Do not begin deactivating any new ground without approval and discussions with the
Supervisor.
Ensure that no materials are removed from the area that could destabilize a stream
bank.
Ensure that no excavated materials are piled in such a way as to become unstable.
Ensure that waterbars and cross-ditches are left clear and functional with adequate
protection, depth and size.
Fuel and service equipment away from all water bodies and in designated areas only.
Know emergency spill procedures.
Review field marking convention.
Have and review map identifying sensitive areas.
Observe all conditions of any special management area.
Confine all operations to within approved area only.
Review and comply with all requirements of riparian management area as identified in
the silviculture prescription, road permit, cutting permit, or the Logging Plan Map.
Monitor progress on regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions and shut
down as required.
Maintain natural surface drainage patterns during each phase of construction.
Control subsurface drainage consistent with natural drainage patterns.
Remove industrial waste and garbage concurrent with operations.
Ensure all materials used in designated crossing are removed from water courses, and
merchantable timber is utilized.
Contain all waste daily and remove it from the work site regularly.
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7.9.8 CRAWLER UNIT SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
impact and hazards
 review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any special
clauses
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions of
any Special management Areas
 know where burden and waste material must be placed
 utilization standards
See SOP 6.4 & 6.8
2. Equipment
1. Check unit‘s status:
Inspection,
prepare
 for faulty equipment
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
for startup

leaks, worn parts
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first
2. Elevated parts
aid kit, lights, brakes
3. Slipping and tripping
 Check running gear, tracks, etc.
hazards
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
3. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Slipping and tripping
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
hazards
3. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and other
debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
4. Operating Process1. Rollover hazards - steep
1. The operator must:
Safety
ground
 wear seatbelts when operating the machine
 know where edge of roadway is at all times
 wear seatbelts when operating the machine
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7.9.8 CRAWLER UNIT SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Operating ProcessSafety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Pushing or clearing
ground
3. Working in proximity to
others
5. Operating ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
197
PROPER PROCEDURE
2. The operator must:
 ensure workers are in the clear before moving
 use WSBC approved hand signals or other appropriate means for
communication
 never allow anyone to ride in or on the unit, it is not designed for carrying
passengers
 before leaving unit, lower the blade to the ground, set the parking brake and
lock gear selector Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
 watch for limbs, jill pokes that may slip past blade into operator‘s cab
 walk right-of-way and check ground, slope, etc., before starting operation
 build stable fills on side slopes and test carefully before proceeding to work on
them
 build grade wide enough for machine to work on
 flatten all jill pokes or hazards as you work
 remove danger tree or damaged tree as you get to them
 work carefully around ditches and side cuts
 use stumps, logs or slash to create crossings for soft ground
 use caution on rock, frozen or steep ground
3. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
1. The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions
and shut down as required
 cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you
come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills, leaks
or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.9 GRADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how
to avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
impact and hazards
 review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any
special clauses
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions
of any Special management Areas
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
 utilization standards
 know where burden and waste material must be placed
See SOP 6.4 & 6.8
2. Equipment
1. Check unit’s status:
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
Inspection,
 for faulty equipment
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
prepare for startup
 leaks, worn parts
first aid kit, lights, brakes
 Check running gear, tracks, etc.
2. Elevated parts
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
3. Slipping and tripping
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
hazards
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
3. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Slipping and tripping
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting
hazards
equipment.
3. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and
other debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
4. Operating Process1. Rollover hazards - steep
1. The operator must:
Safety
ground
 wear seatbelts when operating the machine
 know where edge of roadway is at all times
 watch for limbs, jill-pokes that may slip past blade into operator‘s cab
 use caution on rock, frozen or steep ground
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7.9.9 GRADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Operating ProcessSafety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Pushing or clearing ground
3. Working in proximity to
others
5. Operating ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
199
PROPER PROCEDURE
2. The operator must:
 side-shift blade to reach side of road; keep blade inside wheels when
roading unit. Keep grader in centre of road on fill, shifting the blade
sideways to edge of the road in the event the blade kicks the unit sideways
 grade short stretches of road completely; keep turnouts graded and free of
oversized rocks
 before leaving unit, lower the blade to the ground, set the parking brake and
lock gear selector. Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
3. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual
sign from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 watch all traffic, especially when backing onto roads
 use caution when approaching active logging areas
1.The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather
conditions and shut down as required
 cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when
you come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills,
leaks or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas
only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.10
LOADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how
to avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
See SOP 6.4 & 6.8
1. Equipment
Check unit‘s status:
Inspection,
 for faulty equipment
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
prepare for startup
 leaks, worn parts
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
first aid kit, lights, brakes
Elevated parts
 Check running gear, tracks, etc.
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
Slipping and tripping hazards
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
 keep tire pressures at manufacturers pressure and monitor
2. Equipment startup
Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Slipping and tripping hazards
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting
equipment.
3. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and
other debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
4. Keep boom, bucket or grapple as low as possible when traveling
3. Pre-work
Aware of environmental impact 1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
and hazards
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions
of any Special Management Areas
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
4. Operating Process- 1. Rollover hazards - steep
1. The operator must:
Safety
ground
 wear seatbelts when operating the machine
 watch for limbs, jill-pokes that may slip past blade into operator‘s cab
 use caution on rock, frozen or steep ground
 operate on stable ground
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7.9.10 LOADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Operating ProcessSafety
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Working in pit
3. Loading trucks
PROPER PROCEDURE
2.
The operator must:
 do Not push trees, or roll stumps, logs or rocks into standing timber
 not let truckers out on the blind side of truck when being loaded
 ensure pit face Does Not exceed reach of loader - bench if necessary
 do not undermine banks
 keep banks tapered and request help when they become vertical and too
high
 keep pit surface as level as possible
 keep work area as flat as possible
 Do Not travel with bucket high - work with bucket as low as possible
 Do not operate when people are walking in the pit
 Before leaving unit, lower the blade to the ground, set the parking brake and
lock gear selector. Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
 Remove large rocks or debris from work area
3.
Do not load truck when:
 Driver is working on truck
 Driver is walking around pit
 Truck is not in a good position
 4.
Load trucks as evenly as possible
1.
4. Working in proximity to
others




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When working in proximity to others:
persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual
sign from the operator before approaching
when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
know where all personnel are in the pit
do not allow anyone into the articulating area of the machine unless it is
shut off
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.10 LOADER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
5. Loading ProcessEnvironmental
01/18/07
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
202
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions
and shut down as required
 inspect culverts for environmental or stability concern; mark washouts/road
holes; watch for protruding rock and other debris
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills, leaks
or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
2. Fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.11 GRAVEL TRUCK SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how
to avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Equipment
1.Check unit‘s status:
1. Operator must ensure pre-trip book is filled out.
Inspection,
 for faulty equipment
prepare for startup
 leaks, worn parts
2. Slipping and tripping
1. Be aware of hazardous areas discussed in pre-work and follow discussed
hazards
procedures
See SOP 6.4 & 6.8
2. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting
equipment.
3. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and
other debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving unit.
1.
Keep fingers away from jammed tailgate, use bar or lever
2. Slipping and tripping
2.
Never work under raised box without first blocking the box securely.
hazards
3. Process- Safety
1. Stability of unit, hazards
1. Ensure:
around truck while loading
 the ground is solid and level
 there is room for maneuvering
Loading/Unloading
 loader operator is aware of where the operator is at all times - effective
communication
 when approaching other equipment, get clearance from the operator before
passing
 do not back under loader or leave loader until signaled
 stay in truck while being loaded
 do not walk around pit while equipment is operating
 do not work on truck while being loaded
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7.9.11 GRAVEL TRUCK SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
3. Process- Safety
(cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
2. The operator:
 shall wear provided seatbelts
 move equipment slowly and under control at all times
 use headlights at all times
 drive appropriately to all road conditions
 Follow rule of road and radio calling procedures
 Do not permit unnecessary passengers.
 Trainees and Supervisors permitted
 Sound horn when backing up
Working in proximity
loading/unloading
2. Hazard around equipment,
unit stability
1.
Hauling
3.
1.
4. ProcessEnvironmental
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
01/18/07
Load stability, road
conditions
204
When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
loading and unloading
 follow signals from spread cat or grader operator
 do not move the truck on rough or soft ground with the box raised
 ensure wheels are on stable ground before lifting box
The operator:
 shall be aware of load characteristics: centre of gravity, cornering concerns,
clearances and braking concerns
 shall be aware of road traffic and conditions
1. The operator must:
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills,
leaks or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
2. The operator must:
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.12 PACKER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear 2. Hearing Protection (as required)
3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Footwear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Apparel
7. Personal First Aid Kit
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how
to avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
See SOP 6.4 & 6.8
1. Equipment Inspection, 1. Check unit‘s status:
prepare for startup
 for faulty equipment
1. Notify foreman when entering or leaving worksite
 leaks, worn parts
2. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
2. Elevated parts
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher,
3. Slipping and tripping
first aid kit, lights, brakes
hazards
 Check running gear, tracks, etc.
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
 Check tire pressure on a regular basis
2. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
2. Slipping and tripping
2. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting
hazards
equipment.
3. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and
other debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
3. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
impact and hazards
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions
of any Special Management Areas
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
4. Operating Process1. Rollover hazards
1. The operator must:
Safety
 wear seatbelts when operating the machine
 know where edge of roadway is at all times
 watch for limbs, jill-pokes that may slip past unit into operator‘s area
 use caution on soft or steep ground
2. The operator must:
 Approach edges of fresh built roads carefully as they may be soft.
 Do not turn sharply on uneven ground
 Be aware that the machine can slide sideways when vibrator is on.
(especially on sloped ground)
 When packing ditches go straight in and straight out
 Before leaving unit, set the parking brake and hydraulic lock. Refer to
OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
 wear dust mask and eye protection when working in dusty conditions
 Always look behind you before backing up.
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7.9.12 PACKER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Operating ProcessSafety (cont)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
3. Working in proximity to
others
5. Operating ProcessEnvironmental
1. Damage to soil, drainage
and other environmental
impact
01/18/07
206
PROPER PROCEDURE
3. When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 watch all traffic, especially when backing onto roads
 use caution when approaching active logging areas
1. The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather
conditions and shut down as required
 cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you
come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills,
leaks or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.13 FORKLIFT OPERATOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. Hart Hat
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection
6. High Visibility Apparel
3. Gloves
4. Safety Footwear (when required)
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. WHMIS
Exposure to hazardous
 Refer to MSDS and training
materials can contribute to
serious health effects
2. Check Forklift
Injury to operator,
 Check machine and complete forklift checklist prior to starting machine. To be
Only authorized
pedestrians or co-workers,
checked at the start and end of each shift.
personnel are to
scalds, burns
 Check fuel, oil and water levels.
operate machine.
Eliminate downtime
 Check windows, lights, tires, etc. on machine.
Driver must be familiar
Mechanical deficiencies
 Check brakes and hydraulics.
with particular type of
 Check if forks work properly — tilt up, down, forward and backward. Shift to
machine.
side also.
3. Operation
Injury to operator,
 Start machine by turning master key on.
pedestrians or co-workers
 Check gauges to ensure that they read NORMAL.
 Seat belts must be worn when operating forklifts on unpaved portions of the
yard.
 Operate machine safely and courteously with respect to fellow workers,
pedestrians and other vehicles.
Machine boom collapse
 Be alert to surrounding conditions and operate at a safe speed.
 Always carry forks at lowest possible position, both empty and loaded.
 Never carry a rider unless for training or maintenance inspection.
 DO NOT enter under an elevated load unless securely blocked.
Crush injury
 Never place arms or legs between frame and mast.
 DO NOT make sudden turns, or turns at high speed. The high centre of gravity
Equipment damage,
personal injury
can cause the machine to upset.
 If machine overheats, shut down machine and notify the Supervisor
Immediately.
 If overheating, do not move machine until mechanic has authorized you to do
so.
 When leaving Forklift, to exit by using 3 point contact.
 Develop good communication with co-workers.
 Always look behind before backing up.
4. Load Pick Up
Injury to workers, falling
 Sound horn when approaching load where people are working.
loads
 Approach load with forks at proper level.
 Have load centered on forks.
 Use care and caution around workers.
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7.9.13 FORKLIFT OPERATOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
5. Elevated Load
6. Servicing Work
Areas
7. Handling materials
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
Tipping of machine, personal
injury to yourself and coworkers
Damage to equipment, injury
to co-workers
Unstable piles for co-workers
and self
8. Blind Corners
Collision, pedestrian injury
9. Fuelling Machine
Fire, explosion, frost burns to
body
Spills
10. Shut-Down
Inadvertent movement of
equipment, slipping, falling
and tripping
11. Parking
Run-away machine causing
damage or injury to coworkers
12. Blowing Down
Forklift
Debris in eyes, overheating,
fire hazard.
When using
Compressed Air cleaning off machine
with air hose.
Foreign objects in eyes,
puncture wounds from object
in airline
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PROPER PROCEDURE
 Allow no one to walk under load. DO NOT leave elevated load. Drive with
extreme care.

Use extreme caution when placing loads on hoists, dollies, chains, etc. Sound
horn to warn workmen.
 Place spacers properly between loads.
 Be sure loads are placed in proper rows.
 If an accident should occur, do not move machinery or change the accident
scene. Contact your Supervisor immediately.
 Sound horn (short blasts) to make yourself evident to anyone in the area.
Approach with care and caution.
Before Changing Propane Tank:
 Shut engine off before fuelling.
 No smoking near or around propane tank.
 Wear leather gloves.
 Keep fittings free of dust and tightened securely.
Changing Propane Tank
Disconnect filler hose from tank and place on propane tank frame. Check for leaks.
 Lower boom to the ground.
 Apply parking brakes.
 Shut off engine at breaks, end of shift, or when leaving machine for an extended
period of time.
 All operators are responsible for cleanliness of their cabs, i.e.: garbage, dust,
sunflower seeds, etc.
 DO NOT block alleyways, doorways or fire equipment. Park in designated
areas only. Lower forks, shut off motor, set brake. (exception in the winter
time).
 Turn engine off at end of shift or when leaving machine for an extended period
of time.
 Must use goggles provided. Must be done within first hour of work.
 Wear eye protection and gloves when using compressed air to blow down.
 DO NOT use compressed air to blow off clothing.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.13 FORKLIFT OPERATOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
13. Footwear
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
Foot injuries
14. Hard Hats
15. Hearing protection
16. Torn / No gloves
17. Lifting
Serious head injuries
Hearing loss
Slivers, cuts
Pulled muscles or back
strain
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PROPER PROCEDURE
 Steel-toed footwear must be worn at all times.
 Safety foot wear must be maintained in a safe condition and worn properly i.e.:
laced up correctly.
 Hard hats must be worn at all times.
 Hearing protection must be worn when required.
 Wear proper gloves when necessary.
Follow proper lifting procedure, exercise caution and get help when needed.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.14 EXCAVATOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment: 1. High Visibility Safety Headgear 2. Hearing Protection (as required) 3. Gloves (as required)
4. Safety Toed Footwear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Vest
7. Personal First Aid Kit
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
1. Contractor must ensure that the operators:
impact
 review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any special
clauses
 utilization standards
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions of
any Special management areas
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
2. Equipment
1. Check unit‘s status:
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
Inspection,
 for faulty equipment
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
prepare for
 leaks, worn parts
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
startup
2. Elevated parts
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
3. Slipping and tripping
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
hazards
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first
aid kit, lights, brakes
3. Equipment
1. Workers in danger area
1. Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
startup
2. Slipping and tripping
1. Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
hazards
2. Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and other
debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
4. Process - Safety
1. Excavating and moving
1. The operator must:
material
 ensure and truck drivers are in the clear before moving
 use WSBC approved hand signals or other appropriate means for
communication
 never allow anyone to ride in or on the unit, it is not designed for carrying
passengers
 avoid positioning the unit too close to the truck being loaded as it restricts the
movement of the excavator
2. Ditches & Culverts:
 ensure that there is sufficient work area for all activities
 check counterweight clearance before operating (minimum 3 feet)
 ensure safeguards are implemented when excavations are in excess of 1.2m
(4ft)
Refer to OHSR Part 20; Sections 20.78 - 20.95; Table 20-1; Figure 20-1, 20-2, 20-3
 watch for dangerous trees, jillpokes, loose logs and material
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7.9.14 EXCAVATOR SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
JOB STEPS
4. Process - Safety
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
2. Working with truckers and
other workers
3. Hoe chucking/decking
5. ProcessEnvironmental
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and other environmental
impact
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PROPER PROCEDURE
1.When working in proximity to others:
 persons wishing to approach an operating machine must receive a visual sign
from the operator before approaching
 when working adjacent to traveled areas there must be a positive means of
traffic control
 operators must ensure that all workers are clear of the hazardous area before
operating
2.
The operator must:
 before leaving unit, lower the boom to the ground, disengage hydraulic system
Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.36
 The operator must:
 never try to lift or carry a load that is too heavy for that particular unit
 ensure the loader is positioned on relatively flat ground before picking up logs
 when picking logs up with boom fully extended, keep the load low until brought
in towards unit; this will maintain stability
 not deck wood outside designated landing or roadside areas; no decking
outside of block
1. The operator must:
 monitor progress on a regular basis with respect to soil and weather conditions
and shut down as required
 cease operations in the immediate vicinity and report to Supervisor when you
come upon an unidentified site or resource feature
 conduct operations to: minimize siltation into water bodies; site disturbance;
natural drainage patterns; damage to leave tree, culverts, ditches, etc.
 inspect equipment, hoses, etc., for wear and tear that might cause spills, leaks
or ground disturbance. Inspections shall occur at least twice per shift
 contain all waste daily and remove from the work site regularly
 fuel and service unit away from all water bodies and in designated areas only
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.9.15 CRANE / PILE DRIVER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Vest
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Toed Footwear
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-Work
1. Aware of environmental
Contractor must ensure that the operations:
impact
 review permit requirements, ribboning convention, with emphasis on any special
clauses
 utilization standards
 have and review map identifying sensitive areas and observe all conditions of
any Special Management Areas
 sign check-off sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding

2. Equipment
Inspection,
prepare for startup
1. Check unit‘s status:
 for faulty equipment
 leaks, worn parts
2. Elevated parts
3. Slipping and tripping
hazards
3. Equipment startup
1. Workers in danger area
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
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Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Air Systems -drains separator, dust bowl
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, escape hatch, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first aid
kit, lights, brakes
Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Always use three-point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
Make sure the machine footholds and floors are clean of grease, oil, bark and other
debris to prevent slipping when entering or leaving machine.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.10
STREAM AND RIVER CROSSINGS
7.10.1 DRAINAGE STRUCTURES
Prior to start-up, refer to any site plans or silviculture prescriptions instructions
applicable to the site.
Construct bridges, culverts, ditches and fords to maintain natural drainage patterns by
intercepting surface and subsurface drainage. Install bridges or culverts at all crossings
of established permanent or seasonal watercourses so that they are structurally sound,
functional and stable. Place cross drain culverts to prevent ponding of ditch water, and
water accumulations from seepages, which may lead to ditch erosion in steeper ground.
Timing of Drainage Construction
If at the time of sub-grade construction, a machine cannot cross a watercourse without
negative impact on fish habitat or water quality, the final crossing structure must be
installed immediately. Use geotextiles on gravel deck bridges and wooden culverts. Do
not install culverts smaller than the size indicated on the plans; apply a minimum fill of
60cm (2 ft.). Control and minimize sedimentation during installation of drainage
structures. Observe fisheries window during construction of structures and ensure fish
passage.
Gravel Removal
Gravel or fill from Riparian management Areas must not be removed.
Approved Crossings
Minimize machine use in streams, and confine activities to one stream crossing location
within the road clearing width.
Maintain Stream Bank and Channel Stability
Prevent channel disturbances while constructing, deactivating or working around bridges
and culverts. Maintain the area adjacent to the crossing in its natural state. Leave
stable natural material, embedded material and roots systems undisturbed. Obey the 5
metre track-free zone along all stream banks except where the road has been approved
to cross the stream.
Ditch Blocks
Install ditch blocks on the down-slope side of the culvert inlets, made impervious and of
non-erodible material. Ensure that the top of the ditch block is 15-30 cm below the level
of the road surface to prevent road washout if the culvert becomes plugged.
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Armored Outflows and Sumps
Culvert outflows must not direct water onto potentially unstable ground, and must be
armored with rip-rap where erodible soils are encountered. Catch basins (sumps) must
be constructed at culvert inlets where soil erosion is a concern. Do not place unprotected
fill below the high water mark of any flood plain. Fills must not interfere with water flows
at culvert intakes and outlets, and must be protected where there is risk of erosion.
7.10.2 INSTALLATION OF CULVERTS
1. Bury all metal culverts on fish streams (except for baffled culverts or culverts placed
on stream grades <0.5% gradient) such that they lie below the natural streambed a
minimum of 300 mm or 20% of the vertical rise for pipe arches, whichever is
greatest, and a minimum of 300 mm or 20% of the diameter for round pipes, which
ever is greatest, and are placed at or near the natural stream gradient of the stream
crossing.
Figure 1: Typical culvert profile with fill slope & bed protection measures
2. Fill the culvert bed to the natural streambed level using clean riprap or angular rock
of a size equal or greater than the D90 particle size present in the natural stream
channel (Figure 2). Larger, multi-plate culverts may be backfilled using small
machinery (such as a Bobcat or backhoe) before the upper plates are secured,
provided care is taken to avoid plate damage. It may be acceptable at some sites to
allow natural sedimentation to achieve design elevations of the simulated streambed.
However, natural sediment transport must be sufficient to achieve the desired bed
characteristics and some riprap must be introduced to initiate deposition so that the
desired roughness value is achieved for fish passage.
3. Space introduced material 450 - 600 mm apart throughout the bottom of the culvert
and size to project a minimum of 200 mm into the stream flow (Figure 2). Also give
consideration to the effect of natural re-grade and the possibility of initiating nickpoint migration upstream to a point where fish passage is prevented. This can occur
in streams that lack sufficient natural sediment loading to fill the culvert.
4. Ensure that the culvert is of sufficient length to avoid side slope material entering the
culvert or flow channel.
5. Because alignment is critical for the culvert to function properly, fit the culvert to the
natural stream channel. Smaller culverts set at an angle to the channel can cause
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bank erosion and develop debris problems. Where the potential for erosion exists,
add riprap. With larger pipe sizes some skew can lead to favorable water depths for
fish passage by concentrating flow to one side of the culvert, thereby creating greater
depth and velocity variability across the bottom profile.
Figure 2: Embedded culvert showing placement of riprap to simulate streambed
6. Complete the work as fast as possible and conduct all bedding and backfill
operations in dry conditions. To work on a dry bed, divert the stream flow during
installation.
7. Prepare and grade the culvert bed to conform to the design slope of the installation.
This operation is critical and should be checked using an engineer‘s level. The
culvert barrel must be set to the appropriate depth below the streambed and at the
same gradient as the stream crossing. The culvert foundation and trench walls must
be free of logs, stumps, limbs or rocks that could damage the pipe.
8. Geotextiles can be used to prevent loss of fines and gravel due to seepage from the
culvert bed (Figure 1). The fabric at the inlet is intended to block most of the
seepage that can occur along the pipe. One seal at the inlet should be adequate for
smaller culverts.
However, with larger installations, seepage from other source areas has been shown
to accumulate, and it is recommended that a second geotextile seal near the outlet
end, be considered as a precaution against loss of fines due to piping under the
culvert. Geotextile Seals should not be necessary where concrete aprons are used.
9. Where high fills are required (over 2xD) or where base strata material is subject to
settlement under traffic loads (i.e., soft gravel), camber the bed 0.5% times the length
of the culvert at mid-length.
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10. Pay attention to bedding and backfilling operations, as they are critical for properly
installed culverts. Refer to figure 3 and 4 for specifications pertaining to fill materials
and compaction requirements for round pipes and pipe arches. Fill material must be
compacted throughout the entire backfill process using a hand-operated compactor
and working equally on both sides of the culvert to avoid mis-shaping the culvert.
Base and sidewall material should be compacted evenly in maximum lifts of 150 250 mm. Care must be taken to ensure the haunches of pipe arch structures are
supported with clean, compacted granular material as specified. Do not allow any
rocks, limbs or debris to come in contact with the pipe.
11. Provide R/6 or a 300 mm minimum of backfill over the culvert before any traffic
crosses over the culvert, to prevent crushing or mis-shaping. In all cases, heavy
equipment should not bear down on the culvert until the compacted fill is complete
over the top of the crown.
12. Protect the inlet and outlet side slopes of the road sub-grade from erosion and
sloughing by armoring the fill with riprap for a distance of 1.5 diameters (D) on each
side of the culvert and toeing into the streambed (Figure 1). Consider extending
riprap along any erodible stream bank above and below the culvert inlet and outlet,
but keep disturbance to only that which is needed to protect fill or prevent blockage
of stream flow. Riprap should be placed a minimum of 1D above the height of the
culvert where deep fills are required.
13. Where the new culvert is opened to water, watch for the need to add more rock
armor. After checking the installation, close any dewatering channel.
14. Develop road approaches to the new culvert only as the final phase of construction.
15. Push layers of fill into place and carefully compact them to build up and maintain a
consistent road grade. Be sure that a minimum of 300 mm of compacted backfill
covers the top of the culvert or as specified to meet loads and rating requirements
(Figure 4). Side ditches should not drain directly into the stream, but should be
diverted where possible onto stable forested vegetation that can filter sediments
before reaching the stream. Ensure that adequate cross drainage is in place before
the culvert, to minimize the volume of water handled at the crossing.
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Figure 3: Backfill envelope for round culvert showing bedding and compaction
requirements.
16. Begin re-vegetation all exposed mineral soil as soon as possible after completing the
installation.
Figure 4: Backfill envelope for pipe arch culvert showing bedding and compaction
requirements
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7.10.3 INSTALLATION OF FOREST ROAD BRIDGES
7.10.3.1
PERMANENT BRIDGES
A typical permanent bridge installation is shown in Figure 5. An important concern with
permanent bridges that employ wooden decks is the use of preserved wood. Some
preservatives are toxic to fish and should be avoided. When installing timber decked
bridges avoid cutting and drilling within the wetted perimeter wherever possible.
The following steps outline the general installation procedures for bridges.
Figure 5: Profile of a typical permanent bridge installation.
1. Set footings back from the stream channel so that excavation and backfilling do not
encroach on the observed high water mark of the stream.
2. Operate all equipment from above the top of the stream bank and use silt fences to
isolate the work area and contain sediments from the work site during construction
and installation.
3. Use pre-cast concrete pads, footings or steel pilings. Pour-in-place concrete should
be avoided except on rock strata clear of the channel.
4. Where water seepage is encountered during excavation before a sound, undisturbed
bearing strata has been reached, consider deepening the excavation and backfilling
it with compacted shot rock before putting in the pre-cast pads into place.
5. Place riprap at a 1.5H:1V slope gradient along stream banks, under the bridge, and
upstream and downstream of the bridge where erosion is possible. Riprap should
extend above high water level and should be of a size specified by the design
engineer to resist predicted velocities of stream flow.
6. Where deck panels are made ―composite‖ with girders, fill joints with high, earlystrength concrete. The underside of the joints must be securely blocked off to avoid
concrete dripping into the stream below. Similarly, when joints are filled with
bituminous for removable structures, ensure the lower part of the joints are well
sealed with a non-toxic filler.
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7. Level approaches to the bridges for approximately 6 m. Avoid road gradients down
to the bridge crossing that allow road drainage onto the bridge. Using geotextile
reinforcing in the granular approach backfill or paving with asphalt will minimize potholing and sediment-laden ponding at bridge abutments.
8. Do not allow side ditches to drain directly into the stream. Divert them where
possible onto stable forest vegetation that can filter sediments before reaching the
stream. Ensure adequate cross drainage is in place before the bridge approach to
minimize water volume directed into the approach ditches at the bridge sites.
Consider the use of rolling grades to divert road surface runoff.
7.10.3.2
TEMPORARY BRIDGES
A typical temporary logging bridge showing several decking options is illustrated in
Figure 6. These bridges differ considerably from permanent or semi-permanent
structures, and are more like large log culverts. The following steps outline the general
installation procedure for temporary bridges.
Figure 6: Profile of a typical temporary bridge installation showing several decking
options.
1.
Set cribs sufficiently back from the top of the stream bank to avoid disturbing the
stream channel.
2.
Set sill logs as close to the scour depth as possible without disturbing the stream.
3.
Allow for and place riprap in front of the bottom sill of the crib to provide scour
protection.
4.
For gravel-decked bridges, use geotextile filter fabric to fully cover the stringers
and prevent road material from entering the stream.
5.
Ensure cribs are of sufficient length to retain approach-road side slopes.
6.
Debark all face logs and tie back joints.
construction proceeds, using clean shot rock.
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Fill rock cribs progressively as
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.
Provide curb logs on both sides of the bridge to prevent gravel from dropping into
the stream. Similarly, modular decks should not have gaps that allow road
material to enter the stream.
8.
Use rough-sawn, untreated wood for log bridges with timber decks and cross ties.
Ensure deck planks are over the full width of the bridge between curbs.
7.10.4 PERSONNEL INVOLVED
7.10.4.1
EXCAVATOR
See Excavator SWP Section 6.5.6, page 113
7.10.4.2
CHAINSAW OPERATOR
See Chainsaw Safety Section 3.13, page 40
7.10.4.3
GRAVEL TRUCK
See Gravel Truck SWP Section 6.9.11, page 162
7.10.4.4
CRAWLER UNIT
See Crawler Unit SWP Section 6.9.8, page 153
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7.11
CUT-TO LENGTH OPERATIONS
7.11.1 HARVESTER
Reference Section 6.0 - Harvesting Safe Work Procedures; Section 6.1, 6.4.1&
6.4.3
7.11.2 FORWARDER
Reference Section 6.0 - Harvesting Safe Work Procedures; Section 6.1 & 6.4 SOPs.
Emergency Equipment (to be maintained in machine)
1 Personal First Aid Kit
1 Fire Extinguisher with a 1A 5BC rating
1 Fire Extinguisher with a 3A 10BC rating or Integral Fire Suppression System
Fire Tools (1 shovel, 1 Pulaski, 1 hand tank pump)
Emergency Spill Response Kit
Emergency Equipment (to be with vehicle)
1 Level 1 First Aid Kit
1 Fire Extinguisher with a 3A 10BC rating
Fire Tools (1 shovel, 1 Pulaski, 1 hand tank pump)
Emergency Spill Response Kit
Two-way Radio
7.11.2.1
FORWARDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURES
Reference Section 6.0 - Harvesting Safe Work Procedures;
Section 6.1 & 6.4 SOPs.
 Do not overload bunks, create unstable loads, or cause machine to become top
heavy/unstable.
 Do not swing logs over other equipment or workers.
 Do not operate on slopes greater than 35% without additional Safe Work
Procedures.
 Work up/down slopes rather than across the slope.
 Use tire chains for steering axles when traction conditions require.
 Ensure tracks are adequately corked for frozen ground conditions.
 Watch for large stumps, depressions or other objects that could cause machine to
upset.
 Use caution when approaching the roadside, and watch for other workers,
machines or vehicles.
 Do not build unstable log decks.
 Lower the boom and grapple to the ground or onto bunks before leaving the
machine.
 Set the brakes and lockout hydraulics before leaving the machine.
Unless approved in the manufacturer‘s guidelines or by a professional engineer, Written
Procedures are required whenever forwarding on slopes greater than 35%.
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7.11.2.2
FORWARDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE
Personal Protective Equipment:
1. High Visibility Safety Headgear
5. Eye Protection (as required)
2. Hearing Protection (as required)
6. High Visibility Vest
3. Gloves (as required)
7. Personal First Aid Kit
4. Safety Footwear – steel toed boots with non slip soles & good ankle support
NOTE: The purpose of this Safe Work Procedure is to identify hazards that may exist or arise while performing your job and to instruct you how to
avoid or eliminate those hazards.
JOB STEPS
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Pre-work
1. Aware of environmental
2. Contractor must ensure that:
impact
 operators are aware of which way timber must be forwarded
general safety issues
 operators are aware of different equipment specifications for each treatment unit
within the block
 operations are conducted in accordance with Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation and Forest and Range Practices Act
 Operators are aware of what detrimental site degradation is (rutting, sloughing,
erosion). The forwarder operator must be aware of the site degradation limits
 operators are aware of utilization standards
 Logging Plan Map is reviewed in relation to natural features, sensitive areas and
terrain to ensure feasibility of approved skid direction

 the operator reviews and complies with all requirements of Riparian
Management Area as identified in the Logging Plan Map
 operators are aware of all paint and ribbon lines and their significance
 operators monitor progress on regular basis with respect to soil and weather
conditions and shut down as required
operator reviews and follows management objectives in regards to leave tree
(species, size, distribution)
 operator avoids damaging leave trees and operates the equipment to minimize fiber
loss
 operator does an on site review and walk locations as required to ensure familiarity
with job requirements
 operator signs pre-work sheet acknowledging discussion and understanding
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7.11.2.2
JOB STEPS
2. Equipment
Inspection,
for startup
FORWARDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
prepare
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
1. Check unit‘s status:
 for faulty equipment
 leaks, worn parts
2. Elevated parts
3. Slipping and tripping
hazards
PROPER PROCEDURE
1. Operator must ensure the following checks are performed:
 Hydraulic System - hoses, oil levels, leaks
 Mechanical -check & tighten belts, check battery, drain water from fuel
 Lubrication - check engine oil, check all oil reservoirs, radiator coolant
 Safety Checks - seatbelt, guarding, spill kit, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, lights,
brakes, mainline and chokers
3. Equipment startup
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1. Workers in danger area
2. Slipping and tripping
hazards
223
1.
1.
Visual check for leaks , cracks, undercarriage irregularities, etc., prior to starting unit
Ensure no workers in equipment operating area.
Always use three point contact when entering, leaving and inspecting equipment.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.11.2.2
FORWARDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
4. Forwarder Process
- Safety (cont‘d)
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
3. Where conditions require
the forwarding of felled
timber located within two
tree lengths of the falling
process
PROPER PROCEDURE
3. Working Safely within two tree lengths:
 during winter logging it is imperative that the faller (buncher), forwarder operator
work as a team, and as directed by the faller and/or Supervisor
 fallers must walk out to where they can see the forwarder operator and give the all
clear signal
 The faller shall present the signal only when it is safe for the forwarder to enter. The
signal shall be the slapping of the top of the hardhat with the palm of the hand. This
can be accomplished by the buncher by giving the all clear over the radio
 at no time shall fallers (bunchers) leave their trees cut up while forwarder is in the
area picking logs
 falling process shall not resume until it has been determined that the forwarder is in
the clear at least two tree lengths away
 chainsaw shall not be running while the forwarder is picking up the turn
 forwarder must maintain the two tree length distance while falling is in progress
4. Hidden Hazards, Slippery
(frozen) conditions also
increase the hazard of
trees and logs ―running
away‖ after being felled or
decked. Trees frequently
get totally or partially
buried in snow, making it
difficult to see when a
tree is bound up or
―loaded‖.
5. Forwarding Right-of-Way
 the forwarder1 shall be a safety watch and ensure that no one enters the falling
areas while the falling is in progress
 at no time shall the forwarder be with the faller during the felling of the tree unless
they are required to assist in overcoming a particular falling difficulty
4.
Hidden Hazards
 the forwarder will load all logs clear of dangerous trees before turning
 picking up a tree from the snow may also move another unseen buried tree, so
ensure all workers are clear of the turn
 ensure wood felled or pushed into decks do not escape into other work areas
 do not work in areas where there is a danger of pushing trees, rocks and other
debris into an active work are
5.



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Right-of-way procedure
do not enter an active falling area; stay a minimum of two tree lengths away.
when pushing a tree over, remove the tension out of the trees by using the
blade or winch so that they may be bucked without danger of tree springing back.
do not create a hazard for worker who must follow.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
7.11.2.2
FORWARDER SAFE WORK PROCEDURE (cont’d)
JOB STEPS
5. Forwarding Process 1.
- Environmental
HAZARDS/CONCERNS
Damage to soil,
drainage and other
environmental impact
PROPER PROCEDURE
1.
No skid road to be constructed without the following being completed:
 Location must be inspected by Contractor Supervisor and Company Supervisor prior to
construction.
 must be ribboned prior to construction.
 must be authorized by the Ministry of Forests in writing.
2.
Other Environmental procedures:
 Bladed trails must maintain surface drainage patterns and minimize runoff and soil erosion
until trail is either rehabilitated or deactivated.







must not side-cast material where there is a high chance of landslide
skid road width must be minimized but wide enough for safe forwarding
the Ministry of Forests must authorize temporary stream crossings
crossings must be constructed so as to minimize disturbances
crossings will be removed and rehabilitated as per Logging Plan Map
slope trails toward the inside bank, never outwards
forwarding shall be done in a manner that minimizes damage to roads, culverts and
ditches
 do Not spin wheels or tracks or cause other ground disturbance while skidding in block,
piling logs at roadside or landings or when constructing Skid Bridges
 do Not construct bladed Skid Road or remove stumps without authorization of Company
Foreman





do Not alter location of streams of water courses
do not forward across stream, river, creek, wetland, ―frog holes‖, or swales
crossing wet areas, sensitive areas and creeks at approved designated crossing only
ensure no logging debris or sedimentation enters a stream or water course
minimize damage to standing timber and tree that must be left standing as per Operational
requirements Report
 wherever possible, travel only on the mat of limbs and tops left by the harvester
 shall conduct and record a 100 step site degradation survey at least once a day during
snow free forwarding operations
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8.0
CREW TRANSPORTATION
8.1
CREW BUSES AND VEHICLES
Drivers of crew buses/vehicles must possess valid driver‘s license as required by the
Motor Vehicle Branch. It is good practice to have the driver provide a driver‘s abstract
annually.
Crew buses/vehicles must be maintained in sound operating condition. They must be
checked daily to ensure good condition of the brakes, steering, fuel, oil, coolant, tires
and lights. The vehicle must be equipped with first aid equipment, fire extinguishers,
axe, shovel, roadside flares and when required, tire chains.
Chainsaws, tools, fuel, rigging or other equipment must not be carried in the driver's
cab or passenger compartment of any crew bus, vehicles or crummy.
Hazardous materials, such as flammable and volatile materials, must be carried in an
isolated compartment which is accessible only from outside the vehicle, and are
securely fastened and fitted with adequate ventilation and drainage facilities, and if
internal to the vehicle, separated from the crew compartment by an approved firewall.
Drivers must always be aware of weather and road conditions and drive accordingly.
Do Not rely on the radio.
All road signs are to be obeyed. The Motor Vehicle Act applies to logging roads as
well.
All vehicles shall operate on the right side of the road.
Clearing for oncoming traffic shall be done on the right hand side of the road, except in
designated areas.
When stopping, leaving, or entering a haul road, advise road name and direction.
All vehicles operating on radio-controlled roads must have working two-way radios with
the correct road channels.
When overtaking any vehicle, identify location, intentions and confirm clearance before
passing.
All vehicles must slow down when approaching or passing road maintenance activities.
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When stopping for any reason, identify your location and intentions.
breakdowns, flares or reflectors must be used.
In case of
Radio channels are posted at the start of each road. No other channels are to be used
on the Forest Road System.
Extreme caution must be exercised when meeting or passing other vehicles.
Radio transmissions must be restricted to calling road locations, emergency messages
and important messages pertaining to operations.
Radio transmissions are for business only. Chatter is not acceptable. Inform the
individual that idle chatter should be conducted on a low-priority channel and that it is
interfering with road safety.
Call as per procedures, regardless of time of day or amount of traffic.
Generally, only the 'Loaded' vehicles call their mileage. Exceptions are graders, sand
trucks, wide loads, fuel truck, etc. 'Empties' call, but not at every km.
Do Not call both ways every time you meet a vehicle, unless that vehicle doesn't have
a radio, or you deem it necessary.
Explosives must not be carried in any crew bus, vehicles or crummy.
Passengers must be boarded and discharged in safe locations and only when the
vehicle has come to a complete stop.
Any defects, which might affect the safety of workers, shall be corrected before
workers are carried in the vehicle.
Crew buses/vehicles must travel with headlights on at all times, except when stopped
to clear a vehicle in the dark when headlights, including daytime running lights, are to
be turned off and park lamps left on.
All crew buses/vehicles shall be properly maintained, and shall be thoroughly
inspected each day before being used to transport workers.
Crew bus/vehicle drivers must be familiar with Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation, Motor Vehicle Branch and Industrial Transportation Act regulations
pertaining to crew transport. Refer to OHSR Part 17; Sections 17.1 to 17.27.
Seat belts must be worn, where provided.
No Smoking in crew vehicles.
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Check engine, lights, horn, windshield wipers, brakes, steering, wheels and wheel
nuts, tires, rear view mirrors, door handles and locks, gas, oil, radiator, battery, first aid
kit and fire extinguisher daily.
No animal shall be transported in the operator's cab or passenger compartment of any
vehicle transporting workers.
All passengers must vacate vehicle and motor must be shut off when driver fuels up.
No Smoking in area.
Crew Buses/Vehicles regularly or primarily used to transport workers shall:

Be fitted with adequate service brakes and a mechanical parking brake. The
latter shall be engaged when the vehicle is left unattended

Be equipped with first aid equipment, as specified by the first aid regulations.
Such crew buses/vehicles shall be operated by competent drivers licensed in
accordance with the provisions of the Motor Vehicle Act of BC.
Operators of vehicles in which workers are being transported shall not pass a moving
loaded logging truck, except under suitable road conditions and then only upon the
signal from the driver of the logging truck.
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8.2
ALL - TERRAIN VEHICLES (ATV)
8.2.1 OPERATING GUIDELINES
Pre-trip inspection should be run through before starting the vehicle.
The Employer must ensure that each All - Terrain Vehicle (ATV's) operator is properly
trained in the safe operation of the vehicle. Training must cover these six points:
 the operator's pre-trip inspection
 use of personal protective apparel
 operating skills according
manufacturer's instructions
to
the
ATV
 basic mechanical requirements
 loading and unloading the vehicle, if this is a job requirement
 safe procedures for steep slope maneuvering
Refer to OHSR Part 16; Sections 16.52(2) and 16.53.
Operators on ATV must wear headgear, eye protection and hearing protection meeting
the requirements of the CSA standards. Refer to OHSR Part 16; Section 16.54.
The ATV must be maintained in a safe operating condition and the operator must use
the ATV in accordance with the instructions in the operator's manual.
Ride four-wheel ATV's only. Refer to OHSR Part 16; Sections 16.49 to 16.55.
Since ATV's are small and low to the ground, they are not as visible as larger vehicles.
Use lights, reflectors and highly visible flags so that the ATV is easier to be seen.
Never ride the ATV on public roads or Forest Service Roads.
Never ride the ATV with alcohol or drugs in the bloodstream.
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8.2.2 OPERATING THE ATV
Before beginning to operate the ATV, three questions should be considered:
a)
Is the operator ready?
b)
Is the ATV ready?
c)
Have the hazards of the environment and tasks been considered?
The Operator:
Operators should be familiar with the ATV owner's manual, particularly with the
operation and safety aspects of the manual.
All operators should be trained before operating the ATV. Refer to OHSR Part 16;
Section 16.53.
Operators must be physically and mentally capable of handling the ATV safely. They
must be alert, awake and clear-headed. They must wear the appropriate personal
protective equipment.
Always keep your ATV under control. Slow down whenever conditions demand it,
such as on slippery, rough terrain, on slopes or near canals and ditched banks. Ride
within your own limitations and those of your ATV.
Stop at all blind intersections, coming out from between rows of trees or shrubs onto a
headland or road.
Do Not overload the front and/or rear carriers; Keep the load balanced.
Driving after dark increases the risk of an accident. Even with lights, many hazards
cannot be seen.
Ride off road only, never on public roads. Merely crossing a public road is dangerous
and illegal. Driving on paved surfaces will damage tires rapidly.
Control of the ATV on paved surfaces is more difficult.
"Learning by trial and error can be hazardous to your health".
Loading and unloading of an ATV onto or off a carrier vehicle must be done in a safe
manner.
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The ATV:
The ATV should be maintained in accordance with the owner's manual.
Give special attention to the tires, brakes and throttle.
Tasks and Environmental Hazards:
Consider the tasks and travel plans for the day or trip.
Give special attention to roads, terrain, slopes, canals, ditches, blind intersections,
trees, shrubs, and other vehicles, etc., which might cause accidents.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Helmets
Eye Protection
Hearing Protection
Clothing Suitable for the Environmental Conditions
Gloves and Clothing Which Covers the Ankles, Legs and Arms to the
Wrists
8.3
SNOWMOBILES
Operators and passengers of the snowmobile shall wear approved safety helmets,
suitable eye protection, winter helmet liners and cold weather face guards where
weather necessitates.
The track of the snowmobile should be cleaned of snow and/or slush before leaving
the machine for a period of time to prevent freeze up. If possible, leave the
snowmobile facing down hill on the packed trail before going to work and try to park
the machine in the lee of the wind.
The Employer must ensure that each snowmobile operator is properly trained in the
safe operation of the vehicle.
Become aware of the effects of wind chill factor on exposed skin and dress
accordingly. Learn the signs and symptoms of hypothermia and its treatment.
Hypothermia is the greatest hazard encountered in snowmobile travel.
Avoid areas where avalanches are possible. Travel in heavily treed areas, tops of
ridges or flat areas away from avalanche paths.
Survival Gear and Repair Kits should be carried at all times.
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Suggested Additional Equipment:
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Extra fuel in safe containers
Map and compass
Snowshoes or skis
Knife
Candles
Extra clothing
Tool kit and spare parts
Block and tackle
Flashlight and extra batteries
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
High energy food
Bright tarp or plastic sheet
Large metal cup, small pot
First aid kit
Flares
2-cycle gas
Axe or saw
Waterproof matches
De-icer
If travel over lakes or rivers is absolutely necessary, test the thickness of the ice
beforehand and avoid areas of fast flowing water.
Beware of hidden obstacles such as fence wires and boulders.
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8.4
MOTOR BOATS
8.4.1 PREVENTION AND SAFETY
Regardless of the type of boat you have, it must be equipped with safety equipment
that is in good operating order, easily accessible and of the type approved by the
Canadian Department of Transport.
Operator required to have an Operator
Competency card.
The Minimum Required Equipment For A Boat Up To 5.5 Meters In Length Is:
 The law requires that all boats to be equipped with one approved lifejacket
or approved personal flotation (PFD) device for each person on board. Take
good care of the lifejacket or PFD. It should not be used to kneel on or as a
bumper for the boat. Check its buoyancy regularly and allow the flotation
device to dry out. It should be kept in a dry, well ventilated, easily
accessible place
 Must have a radio or other means of communication with a camp or land
base station
 Two oars or two paddles
 One hand-held bailer or one manual pump
 One Class B-I fire extinguisher
 Lights must comply with "Collision Regulations" if permanently fitted
 sound signaling device
Safety equipment requirements change as the boat size changes. Refer to the "Safe
Boating Guide" to determine the exact equipment needed for the boat that will be
used.
All crafts must be licensed and have the standard decal and capacity plate attached to
the boat. Determine the number of persons you can carry safely - Overloading is
dangerous.
When Fueling the Boat
Take These Precautions:
·
moor the boat securely
·
shut off engine
·
make sure all passengers are ashore
·
don't smoke and extinguish all open flames
·
take portable tanks ashore
·
don't use electrical switches
·
ground nozzle against filler pipe, don't overfill, wipe up any spillage, turn on
blower for at least five minutes and check for vapor odors
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8.5
AIRCRAFT
8.5.1 GENERAL
Everyone should endeavor to make flying as safe as possible by observing the
following rules and guidelines:
1 Ask for a pre-flight safety briefing from the pilot before flying in any unfamiliar
aircraft to become familiar with safety features and equipment on the aircraft.
Ask questions if you are unsure about anything.
2 Determine and avoid active blasting and road construction areas before
entering operations.
3 Never encourage a pilot to do anything that appears unsafe or to fly in any
aircraft that you consider unsafe.
4 All sharp instruments must be securely fastened down and have points and
sharp edges sheathed.
5 Always take a handheld portable radio when dropped off by helicopter. Test the
radio before and after the pilot flies away.
6 Check with the pilot about carrying bear spray on the aircraft. Bear spray must
be carried in an appropriately sealed container and stored in the baggage
compartment.
7 Do not get in or out of an aircraft without the pilot‘s consent.
8 Stay clear of propellers on airplanes and both rotors on a helicopter. Never
approach an idling helicopter that is parked on a hill from the up-hill side.
Always approach from the side where the horizontal rotor is well off the ground.
When approaching or departing from a helicopter always remain within the
pilot‘s view and proceed under his direction. Walk under blades in a crouched
position. Secure all loose equipment and or gear when approaching the
helicopter.
9 Load cargo slowly and deliberately. Do not throw, drop, or jam it into the cabin
or storage compartment. If in doubt let the pilot secure the cargo. Never throw
anything from a helicopter when the rotors are turning. Never carry anything on
your shoulders or overhead when approaching or departing from a helicopter.
Pack small articles in sacks or larger boxes in order to facilitate efficient
handling.
10 All passengers should be aware of aircraft operation including doors, seat belts,
headphones, etc.
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8.5.2 FIXED WING
Transportation of workers by aircraft must be done in accordance with the applicable
regulations of the Department of Transport Canada.
All persons involved shall be given adequate pre-job instruction and where necessary,
trail operations training before actual operations commence.
Fasten seat belt on entering the aircraft and leave it
buckled until pilot signals you to get out.
Passengers should be aware of the location of lifejackets
or flotation devices on float planes.
Personal baggage and equipment should be properly secured.
The pilot is in complete charge of the aircraft. His orders must be obeyed at all times
when working on or traveling in an aircraft.
Cargo should not restrict the use of emergency or regular exits.
Cargo carried inside the cabin with passengers should be secured by nets, strapping
or other tie-down to prevent shifting in flight and possible injury or fatality to
passengers in the event of a crash or hard landing.
8.5.3 HELICOPTER SAFETY
Approach or leave, after you have made eye contact and have received notification
from the pilot.
When approaching and/or leaving the helicopter, do so in a crouching manner for extra
clearance from the main rotor.
Approach or leave on the down-slope side, to avoid the main rotor. Approach or leave
in pilot's field of vision, to avoid tail rotor.
Carry tools horizontally, below waist level, never upright or over the shoulder.
Hold onto hard hat when approaching or leaving machine, unless chin straps are used.
Fasten seat belt on entering helicopter and leave it buckled until pilot signals you to get
out.
If leaving machine at the hover, get out and off in one smooth, unhurried motion.
Do not touch Plexiglas surfaces or any of the moving parts; tail rotor linkage, etc.
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Keep heliport clear of loose articles; water bags, ground sheets, empty cans, etc.
Keep cooking fires well clear of heliport.
Loading assistants should always be supplied with plastic eye shields.
After hooking up cargo sling, move forward and to the side to signal pilot, to avoid
entanglement and getting struck with loaded sling.
When directing the helicopter for landing, stand with your back to wind and arms
outstretched toward landing pad.
When directing pilot by radio, give no landing
acknowledgment, as pilot will have both hands busy.
instructions
that
require
When Moving a Larger Crew:
·
brief them on safety as noted on the previous page
·
keep them together and well back at the side of the landing zone. This gives the
pilot a chance to land quickly in the event he has a problem during landing or
take-off
·
have the crew face away from helicopter during the landing and take-off
·
Have each crew member look after their own personal gear
·
have the crew members paired off and ready to get on board as soon as the pilot
gives the signal
Stay at least 15 meters away from the helicopter when the rotor blades are in motion,
unless authorized by the pilot.
When nearer than 15 meters, approach or leave from the front or from side, near the
front, where the pilot can always see you.
Unless equipped with safety goggles or glasses, do not watch landing, take-offs, or
hovering, closer than 30 meters from the helicopter.
Stay away from tail rotor at all times, and see that others do likewise.
No smoking within 15 meters of heliport or helispot.
No smoking within 15 meters of gas and oil supply dump.
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Never crawl under the frame or skids of the helicopter with it hovering, unless a safety
frame is available.
Never refuel the helicopter
AUTHORIZATION from pilot.
without
proper
GROUND
CONNECTION
AND
8.5.4 AIRCRAFT EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Emergency rations of a suitable quantity to meet Ministry of Transport regulations
for the number of persons being carried
First aid kit
Sleeping bags sufficient to accommodate all passengers
A tent large enough to accommodate all persons on board
Portable compass
An axe
A signaling mirror
A hunting knife
Fire makers (matches in waterproof container)
Snare wire
Fishing tackle and fishing net
Cooking utensils
Survival booklet
Snow shoes
Extra socks and mittens
Mosquito repellent
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9.0
FORESTRY
9.1
SLASH BURNING
Crew Boss: Check on-site burning conditions and review ignition pattern, effect of
slope and fire spread, wind, etc., that may modify or change burning plan.
Conduct a thorough on-site briefing prior to ignition of slash. Crew to be informed not
only of their own responsibilities but also of the actions of others in the overall ignition
sequence.
Crew must be made familiar with the burn site-escape routes and safety zones.
All ignition lines should be established moving into or across the wind.
Use buddy system - maintain visual contact and place inexperienced personnel
between experienced slash burners.
A careful analysis of manpower requirements to be made for every burn with the
objective of holding on-site numbers to a minimum.
Proper mixture 3 to 1 (3 parts diesel and 1 part gas). Too much gas is dangerous.
Fuel and an ignited burner are not to be moved together.
Store and mix fuels away from water bodies and only in designated areas.
Use Company-approved burners only (no open pails or cans).
Use of radio communication is recommended.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Gloves
Hi Vis Hard Hat, blaze orange
Suitable Footwear
Hi Vis Vest or Jacket
Personal First Aid Kit
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9.2
Operating Burning Sloops
Oil and gas pipeline clearing usually requires the use of a burning sloop or dredge in
which the fire is contained. This sloop is dragged behind a skid cat or excavator on
runners. Ensure that the sloop is kept on relatively flat ground during burning
operations and that all ground crews are a safe distance from it during transport down
the right-of way should it accidentally tip over. Use common sense when igniting fires
within the sloop to ensure that you are not burned.
Burning sloop in use – Red Earth Creek, Alberta – January, 2007
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10.0
CAMP
The Employer must provide accommodations and meals that meet minimum sanitary
conditions. Refer to OHSR Part 25.
The Camp Must Be Located Where It Is Free From Hazards Including:




Hazardous trees and dangerous trees in or near the camp
High water, flooding or mud slides
Road traffic
Movement of mobile equipment
When Locating The Camp, Consider:






Water supply
Location of privies (distance, wind direction)
Kitchen location (away from sleeping areas)
Fire hazards
Bear problems
Access of emergency evacuation, and normal movement of people and
supplies
 Drainage
 Fuel storage area
Camps - the Regional Health Boards and Community Health Serviced Societies
administer the Industrial Camps Health Regulations. If Board officers, in the course of
their duties, find conditions in camps which may be of concern under the Industrial
Camps Health Regulations, the matter will be referred to the attention of the
appropriate officials. Refer to OHSR Part 25.
WSBC Inspectors may impose any assessments provided in their respective.
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11.0
OTHER REFERENCE MATERIAL
WSBC Occupational Health and Safety Regulation
Ministry of Water, Lands, Air Protection
Safety Guide to Cougars - Ministry of Forests
Safety Manual - Mineral Exploration in Western Canada
Forest Practices Code - Guideline for Stream Crossings
Petroleum Industry Standards
Developed by:
Free Spirit Ventures Inc.
8545 Willow Cale Forest Road
Prince George, BC V2N 6Z9
Phone: (250) 563-9992
Fax:
(250) 561-2675
Email: [email protected]
WEB: www.safetypays.ca
Brian V. Brown, AScT, CRSP, CHSC, CCEP
Environmental, Health & Safety Consultant
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APPENDICES
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APPENDIX A
Legal Requirements and References
A1
1/30/2008
OH&S Regulations
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B
Forms
Appendix B1
Appendix B2
Appendix B3
Appendix B4
Appendix B5
Appendix B6
Appendix B7
Appendix B8
Appendix B9
Appendix B10
Appendix B11
Appendix B12
Appendix B13
Appendix B14
Appendix B15
Appendix B16
Appendix B17
Appendix B18
Appendix B19
Appendix B20
1/30/2008
Pre Work Meeting / Hazard Identification Form (Oil & Gas)
Pre Work Safety Checklist – Forestry Operations
Near Miss/Hazard Identification Form
Accident / Incident Investigation Form
Safety Meeting Minutes Form
New Worker - Personal Information /Orientation Checklist
Personal Training and Qualifications Record
Trainee Checklist
Logging Safety Inspection Report Forms
Field Level Hazard Assessment Form
Risk Assessment Form & Protocol
Example Form for Doing a Hazardous Task Inventory
Conducting and Testing Emergency Response Procedures (ERP)
First Aid Assessment Checklist
Emergency Response Procedure & Plan (Blank
Emergency Response Phone Numbers
Spill Report Form
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. Disciplinary Actions Report
Corrective Action Log (CAL)
Contractor Sign In Form
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B1 PRE-WORK SAFETY MEETING / HAZARD IDENTIFICATION FORM
(OIL AND GAS OPERATIONS)
Health Safety & Environment Meeting
Foreman
Project
Area
No.
Attending
Date
Pre-work
.
Tailgate
Progress
.
No. In
Crew
Client
Job Description or Requirement:
Major Risks or Potential Hazards:
Hazard Assessment and Controls:
Hazard Assessment
Hazard Controls (Preventative Measures)
Personal Protective Equipment Required:
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Signature of Workers:
Name and Title (Please Print)
Signature
Notes and / or Comments:
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APPENDIX B2
PRE-WORK SAFETY CHECKLIST
Date of Pre-Work meeting: _________________________________________
Location:________________________________________________________
Safety
Environmental
Comments
Yes No N/A Yes No
N/A
Site Assessment Issues (** required prior to starting of work)
Stream or water body issues (i.e. sufficient
water levels for removal, contamination issues,
siltation issues)
Environmental hazards and special conditions
have been reviewed (Riparian Management
Areas [RMA], Wildlife tree patch [WTP],
archeological sites)**
Safety hazards and special conditions have
been reviewed (overhead hazards, irregular
terrain, steep slopes, isolation aspects, etc.)**
Lighting Issues (i.e. setup for night work,
sufficient light at critical points)
General Issues
Required personal protective equipment for the
worksite has been reviewed (hard hat zones,
hi-vis vests, steel-toed footwear, bucking
chaps, hearing protection, gloves, etc.)**
Workers have been made aware of where
documents are located that can assist them in
safety and environmental issues (WSBC
regulations, Orientation Manual, Emergency
Preparedness & Response Plan, MSDS
sheets, etc.)
Emergency Response Issues (all applicable issues must be reviewed prior to starting of work)
Evacuation Plan completed and reviewed
First Aid or Medical response procedures have
been reviewed for this worksite (location of
ETV, First Aid kits, First Aid attendant, how the
Evacuation plan works for this location)
Description
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Description
Yes
Safety
No N/A
Environmental
Yes No
N/A
H2S response procedures have been reviewed
for this worksite if applicable (if wells are
immediately adjacent, how the workers would
be notified if there was a leak; what to do if a
leak occurs)
Spill response procedures have been reviewed
for this worksite if applicable (location of all spill
kits, contents of kits are complete, precautions
taken for this worksite if creeks, sensitive areas,
etc. are present)
Natural disaster procedures have been
reviewed for this worksite (slide potentials,
flooding, high winds)
Fire response procedures have been reviewed
for this worksite for summer work (location of
fire tools and equipment, who will take charge if
a fire is discovered, how the responsibilities will
be distributed if a fire has to be fought, etc.)
Location of phones, phone numbers, latitude
and longitude coordinates, and methods of
calling for help for any response emergency has
been discussed with the worker
Special Issues, conditions, or hazards
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Comments
Workers receiving this pre-job instruction
I understand the instructions given to me in this pre-job meeting, and accept the legal
responsibility to conduct my actions accordingly.
Name
Person conducting pre-job
1/30/2008
Signature
Signature
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B 3
NEAR MISS/HAZARD IDENTIFICATION FORM
Company Name:
Location:
Personal Information (optional):
Name:
Contact Number:
Near Miss/Hazard Data:
**Customer**
Location:
Date:
Time:
(24 hr clock)
Near Miss/Hazard to:
People 
Equipment 
Process/Production 
Environment 
People, equipment and/or process involved:
Description of Near Miss/Hazard: Describe in detail the Near Miss/Hazard
being identified:
Potential Risk:
Intolerable 
Tolerable 
Low 
Use the Hazard & Risk Assessment Matrix on the inside cover to complete this section.
Suggested action(s) that may be taken to prevent further incidents or
eliminate/control the identified hazard and by whom.
Supervisor Name:
Action(s) Approved by:
Date:
Action(s) Implemented: YES / NO (if no, explain below)
Date:
Should the contents of this document be communicated to other stations?
YES / NO (if no, explain below)
If action(s) was (were) taken, briefly explain what was done:
Manager Signature:
1/30/2008
Date:
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B4
ACCIDENT / INCIDENT INVESTIGATION
Incident Information
Property
Damage
Near Miss
First Aid
Attendant Name:
Fatality
Medical Aid
Lost Time
Other
Worker‘s Name:
Occupation:
Years Experience in This Job:
Date of Incident:
Date Reported:
Total Years of Service:
Time of Incident:
Time Reported:
PM
PM
AM
AM
Location of Incident:
Witnesses:
Category of Incident
Traveling To & From
Work
Forestry Field
Activities
Trucking
Silviculture
Harvesting
Construction
Road Construction
Bridge Construction
Maintenance & Repair
Laceration/Cut
Abrasion/Scratch/Bruise
Type of Injury
Sprain / Strain
Fracture
Description of Body Part Injured:
Description & Estimate of Property Damage:
Accident / Incident Details
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Cause Analysis
Type of Event (check all that are applicable)
Struck Against (running,
bumping into)
Struck By (hit by moving object)
Fall From Elevation to Lower
Level
Fall From Same Level (slips &
fall, trip over)
Contact with (electricity, heat,
cold, radiation, caustics, toxics,
biological, noise)
Caught In (pinch & nip points)
Abnormal Operation
Caught On (snagged, hung)
Product Contamination
Caught Between/Under (crushed or amputated)
Equipment Failure
Environmental Release
Distraction / Lack of Attention
Overstress, overpressure, overexertion,
ergonomic
Direct or Immediate Causes (check all that are applicable)
Operating at Improper Speed
Using Defective Equipment
Failing to Use PPE properly
Failure to Wear Seatbelt
Under Influence of Alcohol and/or
Drugs
Using Equipment Improperly
Inadequate Communications/Process
Failure to Follow Procedure/Policy/Practice
Failure to Identify Hazards and Risk
Failure to Communicate/Coordinate
Inadequate Guards or Barriers
Failure to Secure
Road Conditions
Failure to Warn
Failure to Check/Monitor
Poor Housekeeping/Disorder
Weather Conditions
Inadequate Instructions/Procedures
Inadequate/Improper Protective Equipment
Improper Loading
Improper Lifting
Basic / Root Cause (check all that are applicable)
Emotional Disturbance
Inability to Comprehend
Fatigue due to lack of rest
Improper conduct that is condoned
Preoccupation with problems
Lack of situational awareness
Improper handling of materials
Giving inadequate policy, procedures,
practices or guidelines
Inadequate instructions, orientation
and/or training
Improper performance is rewarded
(tolerated)
Inadequate inspection and/or
monitoring
Improper attempt to save time/effort
Improper Supervisory example
Inadequate performance feedback
Inadequate or improper controls
Inadequate work planning or programming
Confusing directions/demands
Inadequate communication of standards
Inadequate development of standards
Inadequate verbal communication between
Supervisor and person
Inadequate assessment of needs, risks and/or
hazards
Drugs
Frustration
Lack of experience
Lack of Coaching
Inadequate discipline
Improper Loading
Inadequate update training
Exposure to Health
Hazards
Inadequate preventative
maintenance
Inadequate human factors/
ergonomics
Inadequate communication between shifts
Description of Root Causes
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Actions to Prevent Reoccurrence (Include Action, Responsibility, and Completion Date)
Action Plan #1:
Responsibility:
Due Date:
Action Plan #2:
Responsibility:
Due Date:
Action Plan #3:
Responsibility:
Due Date:
Investigation Sign Off
Investigated By:
Cont. Owner Review:
□
Signature:
Signature:
Date:
Date:
Witness Statements Attached.
NOTE: Whenever possible, the names and addresses of dependents/next of
kin should be obtained in all serious injury or fatal investigations.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Appendix B5
SAFETY MEETING MINUTES
General Information
Date of Meeting:
Location of Meeting:
Time of Meeting:
Attendance Record
Name
Name
Agenda items brought forward
Item
New agenda topics
New Item
Requires Action
Discussion Notes
Requires Review
Corrective Action
By Who
Time meeting adjourned:
Date & time of next meeting:
Minutes taken by:
Additional Comments may be recorded on Back
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B6
NEW WORKER PERSONAL INFORMATION &
ORIENTATION CHECKLIST
Confidential information to be released only to medical personnel in the event of an emergency)
Name of Worker / Contractor:
Address:
Date of birth:
Weight / Height:
Doctor:
Date:
Age:
Health Care Number:
Are you taking medication? If yes, please list:
Are you allergic to penicillin?
 Yes
 No
Do you suffer from other allergies?
 Yes
 No
If yes, what?
Do you have any other medical problems?
 Yes
 No
If yes, what?
Have you had tetanus shot in the past 5 yrs?
 Yes
 No
Do you wear glasses?
 Yes
 No
Do you wear dentures?
 Yes
 No
Do you wear contacts?
 Yes
 No
Do you have any medical problems, disabilities or previous injuries that may affect your ability to conduct
your job in a safe and efficient manner?
 Yes
 No
If yes, explain:
In the event of an injury or illness, who shall we contact?
Name:
Relationship:
Address:
Phone Number:
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B6
Project Supervisor:
Hire Date:
New Worker:
Date
Follow-up
Performed Date
Topics to Cover
Introduction
• Safety Manual Location
• Document Flow and Control (HR)
• Who your supervisor is
Commitment & Involvement
• Review Employee Handbook: Working Alone, and Violence in the Workplace, policies and
Safety Rules. Have worker read, sign off.
• Drug & alcohol use on the job is strictly forbidden.
Hazard Identification & Communication
• Must report all hazards, near misses, incidents, unsafe acts, environmental concerns and
conditions to your Supervisor as soon as possible (Worker can report anonymously; there will
be no consequences for reporting)
• Location of Hazard/Near Miss Alert Forms and discuss location of Incident Reports
• Explain Safety Meeting Form and frequency. Worker is to participate
Rules & Procedures
• Worker to visually inspect vehicles, tools, equipment and PPE before use
• Worker to review all Job Hazard Analysis/Task Hazard Analysis
• Discuss right to refuse work where imminent danger exists and report to Project Manager
ASAP
Emergency Response
• MSDS location and hazardous materials
• ERP location (office & site-specific) & review emergency procedures
• Location of fire extinguisher, first-aid kit, emergency supplies, ETV and First Aid Attendant
Training & Orientation
• Review PPE requirements
• Review how to wear, maintain and clean PPE
• Be prepared for extreme temperatures and dress accordingly
• Complete Worker Information Form (Appendix B7)
Incident Management & Investigation
• Worker is to report all incidents and injuries to Supervisor immediately who will fill out Incident
Report ASAP (Appendix B4)
• Worker must cooperate in investigations if requested and could be asked to provide a witness
statement
Worker Acknowledgement
I acknowledge receipt of Frost Lake Logging Ltd‘s training and orientation program along with its
policies, rules and procedures. I agree to follow Frost Lake‘s Safety Program as set out in the
Safety Manual.
Signature:
1/30/2008
Print Name:
Date:
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B7
PERSONAL TRAINING AND QUALIFICATIONS RECORD
Name of Worker:
Date of
employment:
Previous Experience
Field of Experience
Years of experience
Type of Equipment
Certificates and Licenses
Date of Expiry
Startup Training Summary
Category
Description
Required
Orientation training
On-the-job training
TDG Awareness
H2S Awareness
Accident Investigation
training
Inspection training
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Optional
Legislative and
Regulatory
WHMIS
TDG Certification
H2S Certification
Level 1 First Aid w/
transport
S-100 fire suppression
Yes
Company environmental
Environmental awareness
Fuel management
Waste product disposal
Yes
Yes
Yes
Company safety
(Supervisor only)
(Supervisor only)
1/30/2008
Date
received
By:
Yes
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B8
TRAINEE CHECKLIST
Name: ____________________________
Position: __________________________
Date: _____________________
Explained
Understood
1. Job Description:
 Man check Procedures
 Safety Concerns
 Equipment
 Safe Work Procedures
 Operations
 Trouble Shooting Duties
 Clean up Duties
 Breakdown Duties
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2. Performance Expectations of:
 Management
 Supervisor
 Fellow Workers
 Yourself








3. Job Performances:
 Explanation of Performance
 Involvement in Problem Solving
 Performance Review and Evaluation
 Follow Up

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4. Informed of Safety Equipment:
4.1
To Be Worn At All Times
 Hi Vis Hard Hat
 Hi Vis Vest
 Safety Footwear

4.2
Safety Equipment – Job Specific
Eye Protection
Fall Protection
Gloves
Hearing Protection
Fall Arrest
Power Saw Leg Protection
Signal Device
Personal First Aid
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Explained
Understood
5. Informed on Safety Procedures:
 Man check System
 First Aid
 WHMIS
 Spill Response
 Fire Evacuation

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6. Indoctrination Tour:
 Location of First Aid Supplies
 Location of ETV
 Operational Flow of Work Site
 Location of Spill Kit
 Operation of Equipment

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
7. Work Site Goals:
 Safety
 FPC
 Productivity






8. Company Expectations:
 Safety
 Attendance
 Punctuality
 Reliability
 Quality
 On the Job Performance

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Performance Expectations: ______________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
Goal Setting: __________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
Performance Review and Evaluation: ______________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
Follow Up: ____________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
Completed Copy Of This Form To Be Placed In Employees Personnel File.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B9
LOGGING SAFETY INSPECTION
Date: ___________________ Name: _______________________________
Buncher Operator
PPE

Hi-vis Hard Hat & Vest

Hearing Protection

Proper Footwear

Seat Belt
Skidder Operator
PPE

Hi-vis Hard Hat & Vest

Hearing Protection

Proper Footwear

Seat Belt
Equipment

Guarding - good condition

Escape hatch functioning

Oil leaks

Housekeeping good
Equipment

Guarding - good condition

Access/Egress

Oil leaks

Housekeeping good

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Windows
Access/Egress
Procedure

Two Tree Length Distance

Pushovers/ Hang-ups Removed

Danger trees removed
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
Workers in Clear
Working according to plan
Site Degradation minimized
Cut-up trees left
Safety on Steep Grades
Safe work procedures known
Knows who and where FA is

Man check being followed
Windows
No jaggers
Skidder Brakes
Procedure

Jillpokes Removed from Trail

Park Machine when Hooking Up

Entering Landing or road side
safely

Safety on Steep Grades

Safety on Switch Backs

Safety on Skid Trails

Knows who and where FA is

Man check being followed

Safe work procedures known

Two Tree Length Distance

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Workers in Clear
Site Degradation minimized
Working according to plan
Comments: ___________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Processor Operator
PPE

Hi-Vis Hard Hat & Vest

Hearing Protection

Proper Footwear

Seat Belt
Crawler Operator
PPE

Hi-Vis Hard Hat & Vest

Hearing Protection

Proper Footwear

Seat Belt
Equipment

Guarding in good condition

Escape hatch functioning

Oil leaks

Housekeeping good

Windows in good condition

Access/Egress in good condition
Equipment

Guarding in good condition

Access/Egress in good condition

Oil leaks

Housekeeping good

Windows in good condition
Procedure

Workers in Clear

Working according to plan

Site Degradation minimized

Safety on unstable ground

Safe work procedures known

Knows who and where FA is

Man check being followed

Man check being followed
Procedure

Two Tree Length Distance

Workers in Clear

Entering landing/road side safely

Safety on Steep Grades

Safety on Switch Backs

Safety on Skid Trails

Knows who and where FA is

Safe work procedures known
Loader Operator
PPE

Hi-Vis Hard Hat & Vest

Hearing Protection

Proper Footwear

Seat Belt
Trucker
PPE

Hi-Vis Hard Hat & Vest

Suitable Footwear

Wrappers Installed

Seat Belt

In Clear During Loading


Equipment

Guarding in good condition

Escape hatch functioning

Oil leaks

Housekeeping good

Windows in good condition

Access/Egress in good condition
Safe work procedures known
Knows who and where FA is
Visitors in Area

Hi-Vis Hard Hat

Hi-Vis Vest

Safety Instructions
Comment: ______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Procedure
First Aid
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Workers in Clear
Working according to plan
Site Degradation minimized
Safety on unstable ground
Safe work procedures known
Knows who and where FA is
Man check being followed
Kit Number:
Blankets
Stretchers and Splints
Oxygen
ETV
Qualified Attendant
Evacuation Procedures
Clean and well kept
General Safety

Wearing Eye Protection

Man check being followed

Buckers in Safe Zones when Logs are being Moved

Safety Procedures when Falling on or near Haul Roads

Trucks in Safe Area During Loading

Specific Instruction to other Worker(s)

Radio Communication
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B10
FIELD LEVEL HAZARD ASSESSMENT FORM
nd
Check off the hazards that apply to this job. List the item # in the 2 column (other side). Identify
rd
the plans to eliminate or control them in the 3 column (other side).
Environmental Hazards
1. Avalanche/Slide Potential
2. Fire Hazard
3. Dust/Mist/Fume
4. Noise in area
5. Extreme temperatures
6. Spill potential
7. Waste containers needed
8. Waste properly disposed
9. Other workers in area
10. Weather conditions
11. MSDS reviewed
Ergonomic Hazards
12. Awkward body position
13. Over extension
14. Prolonged twisting bending
motion
15. Working in a tight area
16. Lift too heavy/awkward to lift
17. Parts of body in line of fire
18. Repetitive motion
19. Hands not in line of sight
20. Working above your head
Access/Egress Hazards
21. Slips/trips
22. Road Conditions
23. Signage
24. Hoisting (tools, equipment)
25. Excavation
(alarms, routes, ph. #)
Overhead Hazards
26. Foreign bodies in eyes
27. Hoisting or moving logs
overhead
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Logging Hazards
28. Proper tools used
29. Tools inspected
30. Equipment inspected
31. Others working adjacent
Mechanical Hazards
32. Saw changes
33. Hydraulic maintenance
34. Working on/near energized
equipment
35. Fire extinguisher
Personal Limitations/Hazards
36. Procedure not available
for task
37. Confusing instructions
38. No training for task or tools
to be used
39. First time performing the
task
40. Micro break
(stretching/flexing)
41. Report all injuries to your
Supervisor
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It is important that all hazards have plans to eliminate them and the plans are
put in place.
Ensure that all associated permits are closed off at the end of the job.
Remember: ―Stop & Think‖ & ―See It Again For The First Time‖.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
FIELD LEVEL HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Company Name:
Task Location:
Date:
Emergency Meeting
Work to be done:
Location:
Identify and prioritize the tasks and hazards below, then identify the plans to
eliminate/control the hazards.
TASKS
HAZARDS
PLANS TO
ELIMINATE/CONTROL
Warning ribbon needed?
Yes 
No 
Is the worker alone?
If yes, explain:
Yes 
No 
Job Completion
Are there hazards remaining? If yes, explain:
Yes 
No 
Were there any
Yes 
If yes, explain:
incident/injuries?
No 
Please print and sign below (all members of the crew) prior to commencing work and
initial when task is completed or at the end of the shift.
Signature Below:
Foreperson’s Name & Signature Below:
All names and signatures should be legible
1/30/2008
Reviewed by Name & Signature:
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B 11
RISK ASSESSMENT FORM & PROTOCOL
Project Name:
Project Location:
Date:
Page: ___ of ___
Supervisor:
Identify and describe all hazardous conditions that could occur: (i.e.
equipment, workers, weather, trip hazards, traffic, buildings,
overhead, etc.) Use the Risk Hazard Assessment checklist.
Estimated severity of
injury: (see Note 1)
Estimated likelihood of
injury:
Minor = 1
Unlikely = 1
Serious = 5
Possible = 5
Major = 7
Probable = 7
Fatal = 10
Certain = 10
Estimated Level of
Risk:
(see Note 2)
Estimated severity X
estimated likelihood
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Reviewed on Tailgate Safety Meeting?
Yes ___
No ___
Assessment Completed By: ___________________________________
Tailgate Meeting # ___________________
Date Reviewed: ______________________
Note 1: Use the following descriptions as a guide:
Fatal Major (Normally irreversible: permanent spinal damage, loss of sight,
amputation/crushing, respiratory damage)
Serious (Normally reversible: loss on consciousness, burns, fractures)
Minor
(Bruising, cuts, light abrasions, sprains)
Note 2: Use the estimated level of risk to set the priority for implementing safe measures. The higher the estimated level of risk, the more urgent it is to
implement safer solutions.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
B 11
RISK ASSESSMENT PROTOCOL
To establish risk, we use a ranking system developed by the U.S. National
Safety Council. Two things are being determined:
 How severe an injury would be if it occurred and,
 What the probability is that it could happen

Severity
1. Imminent danger (e.g. causing death, widespread occupational illness, loss of
facilities)
2. Serious (e.g. severe injury, serious illness, property and equipment damage)
3. Minor (e.g. non-serious injury, illness, or damage)
4. Negligible/OK (e.g. minor injury, requiring First Aid or less)
5.
Probability
A. Probable – likely to occur immediately or soon
B. Reasonably probable – likely to occur eventually
C. Remote – could occur at some point
D. Extremely remote – unlikely to occur
Example of ranking a hazard
A Company worker must ride an ATV over deactivated roads to perform a
task.
 What is the hazard?
Flipping or rolling over of the ATV
 What would be the severity?
#1 or #2
 What is the probability?
#B
 Final ranking
1B or 2B
Both of these rankings are ―High Risk‖, and would need some type of
‗control‘ in place to minimize the chances of it happening (lessen the
probability) or the effects if it did occur (reducing the severity).
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
1/30/2008
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B12
EXAMPLE FORM FOR DOING A HAZARDOUS TASK INVENTORY
Severity
Probability
1 = Imminent Danger
A = Probable
2 = Serious
B = Reasonably probable
3 = Minor
C = Remote
4 = Negligible
D = Extremely remote
Activity
Hazard
Risk Ranking
Severity
Probability
Control Measures
Created by:
Date
GR, JR
Aug 2003
GR, JR
Aug 2003
Shop Work
Mechanical
Welding
10/14/2010
Falling & crushing
objects
2
B
Burns (chemical)
2
C
Respiratory damage
2
C
Fire or explosion
2
C
Eye injury
2
B
Slipping/Tripping
2
B
Compressed air injury
2
C
Burns (hot objects)
3
A
1) Use of adequately rated lifting devices, 2) worker
instruction on the use of lifting devices, 3) regular
inspections to ensure condition
1) Battery carriers, 2) availability of rubber gloves, 3) eye
wash/first aid kit, 4) goggles or face shields, 4) WHMIS
training, 5) proper ventilation
1) Use of respirators/face masks, 2) proper ventilation, 3)
WHMIS training, 4) limit exposure duration
1) Adequate fire extinguishers, 2) fire suppression training,
3) removal or proper containment of flammable
substances in areas where sparks or open flames are
present
1) Use of proper eye and face protection, 2) use of
equipment guards, 3) use of the proper tools (in the case
of chipping or hammering)
1) Install more electrical outlets, 2) avoid use of long
extension cords unless they are flat on the floor, 3) keep
floor clutter confined to the immediate workspace, 4) pick
up hoses, cords, and debris immediately after job is
complete
1) Worker training on use of compressed air, 2) good
condition of hoses and fittings, 3) bottles secured
1) Use of face shields, heavy gloves, work boots, leathers,
and adequate fitting clothing, 2) available first aid kit and
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Activity
> Tank welding or
pressure testing
Hazard
Risk Ranking
Severity
Probability
Fire or explosion
1
B
> Torch cutting
Flashback, hot slag,
melting, concrete
damage
2
B
> Welding process
Arc flash, fire, electrical
damage, respiratory
damage
2
B
Hot metal chips, injury
from high-powered
drill, flying metal
fragments
2
B
> Drilling, tapping,
or hammering
Control Measures
Created by:
Date
GR, SB
Aug 2003
eyewash station
1) Proper steaming of tanks, 2) proper ―sniff test‖, 3)
special worker training on tank welding process, 4) use of
proper air gauge, 5) tank testing training
1) Flashback arrestors installed, 2) regular inspections to
ensure hoses and gauges in good condition, 3) bottles
secured, 4) connections free of oil and grease, 5) removal
of flammables from the cutting area, 6) sheet metal on
floor to protect concrete
1) Wear safety glasses under helmet to prevent arc flash,
2) use of respirator when welding in close quarters, 3)
adequate ventilation, 4) disconnect battery cables when
welding on equipment, 5) knowledge of extinguisher
locations
1) Safety glasses and/or face shields always worn, 2)
drilled material should be secured, 3) drills should be
equipped with secondary brace, 3) soft hammer used for
striking hardened objects
Forestry Activities
Residual Falling
10/14/2010
Being cut by saw
2
A
Being struck by
tree
1
B
Tripping or falling injury
(hoe or ripper
disturbance)
2
A
1) Wearing adequate PPE, 2) ensure the saw is properly
maintained and running satisfactorily, 3) take a firm grip on
the saw before beginning the cut, 4) stand to the side
when cutting, 5) use proper notching and back cut
techniques, 6) wear heavy gloves when sharpening the
saw and a file with an appropriate handle
1) Maintain two tree lengths from other fallers, 2) use signs
and or spotters when falling near paths and roads, 3)
check the lean and tree soundness and look up to check
for overhead dangers, 4) check wind direction, 5) use
proper notching and back cutting techniques, 6) have
escape routes cut out and ready for use, 7) step back to
the right or left, maintaining eye contact with falling tree, 8)
site orientation before starting work
1) Use the map effectively to know your position when
moving around the falling zone, 2) Move slowly and
deliberately from position to position, 3) try to carry out
residual falling before leaf out, 4) cut out emergency trail
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Activity
Hazard
Risk Ranking
Severity
Probability
Inadequate FA
response due to
isolation
2
B
Forest Fire
2
C
ATV use
Engineering &
Layout
10/14/2010
ATV injuries (head,
spinal cord, broken
bones)
2
B
Lack of FA response
due to isolation
2
B
Wild animal attack
2
C
Slips and falls
2
B
Control Measures
Created by:
Date
GR
Aug 2003
when necessary
1) Always work in pairs, 2) complete emergency
evacuation plan and review procedures before starting
work, 3) test communication equipment before beginning
project, 4) ensure back up plan in place if FA attendant is
injured
1) Refill saw over mineral soil whenever possible, 2) no
smoking during the fuelling up process or around the
saws, 3) allow saw to cool before refueling, 4) carry pocket
type fire extinguishers
See engineering and layout
1) Use of approved headgear, 2) ATV training, 3) regular
inspections to ensure equipment in good condition, 4) use
of steep slope procedures, 5) use of ATV loading and
unloading procedures
1) Use of proper Man check procedures, 2) ensure
communication equipment works on site, 3) work in pairs
wherever possible, 4) carry personal First Aid kit, 5) have
FA training
1) Wear high-visibility clothing, 2) carry deterrent or
firearm, 3) have available satellite phone when working
alone in the bush, 4) have bear or animal awareness
courses
1) Wear quality footwear with good ankle support and sole
protection, 2) survey the terrain before making your ascent
or descent
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B13
CONDUCTING AND TESTING EMERGENCY
RESPONSE PROCEDURES (ERP)
RESPONSE DRILL/TEST FOR MEDICAL, FIRE & SPILLS EMERGENCY
Operating Area/Location:
Date:
Conducted by:
Personnel in Attendance
Scope of the Drill
Example scenario: A worker
has suffered a heart attack and
collapses. Setup: Place the
worker in a prone position a
distance away from the vehicle.
Description
Yes
Summary of the Drill results
No
Explanation
Knowledgeable, trained
personnel were available for this
drill
Appropriate communication
equipment was available
Emergency information was
available and effectively utilized
Proper outside emergency
contacts were notified in a timely
manner
All essential steps were followed
for this drill (see back of form)
Proper reports and
documentation were completed
This drill demonstrated positive
results
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Action Items
Example: further
crew training is
required;
additional First Aid
equipment is
required; contents
of FA kits need
upgrading
Suggested drill steps and sequence
1
Assess the scene for danger before approaching, and note the
amount of victims requiring treatment
2
Briefly examine the victim's condition and note type of injury
8
Provide the following information to medical assistance:
1) patient information and condition, 2) whether land or
air transport is required, 3) geographic location, 4) Lats &
Longs, 5) your name
3
Summon the on site First Aid Attendant and additional assistance
(Supervisor, other workers)
9
If air evacuation is required, identify and/or prepare a
landing location for the aircraft
4
Stay with the patient until the FA attendant arrives. If no Attendant
is available, proceed to step #5.
10
Load patient into ETV/Ambulance or Aircraft
5
Provide First Aid to your level of training, following appropriate
protocol (ABC, body survey, etc.)
11
Complete all required reports and documentation (Patient
chart, First Aid treatment book, WSBC forms)
6
As help arrives, delegate responsibilities and prepare the patient
for transport
7
Contact outside medical assistance for land or air transport and
provide appropriate information (step 8)
Actual drill steps and sequence
Completed
successfully?
Step #
Description
Deficiency or Issue
Yes
10/14/2010
No
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B14
FIRST AID ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
1. Define Workplace:
Factor
Number
Factor
Indication
of one
workplace
1
Location or locations under
the control of one employer.
Yes
2
Person controlling the location
or locations leased or in some
similar way formally transferred
control of part to another person.
3
Locations controlled by one
person are separated by locations
controlled by another person
4
Locations of one employer more
than 20 minutes apart from each
other.
Yes
5
Public highway separates locations
of one employer from each other
in urban area.
Yes
6
Locations of one employer 20
minutes or less from each other
in rural area.
Yes
7
Though adjoining, locations of
one employer is separated
by physical barriers.
Yes
8
Though controlled ultimately by
one person, locations are under
different administrative structures.
Yes
10/14/2010
Indication
of separate
workplace
Yes
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Generally yes,
but depends on
circumstances.
See 6
2.
Determine the number of workers who may require first aid at any
given time.
Workers more than 20 minutes from central workplace have independent
assessment of first aid needs.
Where lodging provided the number considered is all on shift and those in the
lodging.
Workers considered part of an assessment:
-Operators that are expected to be there on a daily basis
-Supervision that is expected to be there on a daily basis
-Field mechanics that provided on a daily basis
Workers that are not considered part of the assessment:
 Log truck drivers
 MOF, WSBC or other regulatory bodies
 Other supplier‘s mechanics that are there for short durations (i.e.: one
day or less)
 Visitors
 Licensee supervision
3.
Determination of level of risk.
Due to distance to medical aid
Operation of heavy equipment and nature of work and tools used in this
industry.
History of injuries, accidents know for this industry
It can be stated that logging is a high risk industry.
4.
Assess transportation needs.
Is the employer more than 20 minutes surface travel time to medical
treatment facility?
Will the BC Ambulance Service be able to respond to an injury at the
workplace within the 20 minute period?
5. Application of Assessment
Apply tables 1 & 2 to determine levels of first aid service.
6.
Assessment must be conducted as required and results documented.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Table 5: This table applies to a workplace that an employer determines under section
3.16 (2) (b) of the Regulation creates a high risk of injury and that is more than 20
minutes surface travel time away from a hospital.
Column 1
Number of
Item
workers per
shift
Column 2
Supplies, equipment,
and facility
Column 3
Level of first aid
certificate for
attendant
Column 4
Transportation
 Personal first aid kit
1
1
2
2-5
3
6-10
 Level 1 first aid kit
 ETV equipment
Level 1 certificate
with Transportation
Endorsement
ETV
4
11-30
 Level 3 first aid kit
 Dressing station
 ETV equipment
Level 3 certificate
ETV
5
31-50
 Level 3 first aid kit
 First aid room
 ETV equipment
Level 3 certificate
ETV
6
51-200
 Level 3 first aid kit
Level 3 certificate
 First aid room
 Industrial ambulance
 Level 1 first aid kit
Level 1 certificate
Industrial
ambulance
equipment
7
201 or more  Level 3 first aid kit
2 attendants, each
 First aid room
with Level 3
 Industrial ambulance certificates
equipment
Industrial
ambulance
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
FIRST AID ASSESSMENT 20___
The following table reflects the minimum WSBC standards. This Assessment
meets or exceeds these standards.
Company Name: ______________________________________________
1.
Workplace Hazard Rating: _________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
2.
Job functions, work processes and tools: ______________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
3.
Types of injuries that can potentially occur: _____________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
4.
Minimum supplies, equipment and facilities required from
table below. Supplemental equipment required: _________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
5.
First Aid Attendant (FAA) required: ___________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
6.
Transportation: __________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
Note: An ETV does not have to be a dedicated vehicle. It must be able to take a
full stretcher while leaving room for the FAA to perform his duties.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B 15
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURE & PLAN
O.F.A. Attendants Present
Supervisor(s) Present
Employees Present
Yes
No












Have Emergency Radio Procedures and frequencies been established?
Have all safety issues and hazard concerns related to this project been established?
Have the project location and emergency phone sheets been filled out?
Has the on-site First Aid Attendant and ETV location been identified?
Has the on-site marshalling point / safe escape routes been discussed?
Has the Man Check / Working Alone procedure been reviewed?
Safety Issues and Project Specific Hazard Concerns Discussed:
Upon completion and review of this form, it must be posted at the project site and its
location made known to the crew (i.e. on-site shop reefer).
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
In Case Of Emergency
We Are Located At (Camp)
Frost Lake Camp - 38.5km on Leo Creek FSR
CP/Block #
Latitude / UTM
124d 52m 43s
10U 6088478
Latitude / UTM
Radio Frequencies in Use:
Longitude / UTM
54d 55m 43s
10U 379544
Longitude / UTM
Tx
Rx
Road Channel:
Bush Channel:
Loading Channel:
Repeater Channel:
In Case of Medical Emergency (Specific - Fort Saint James Operations):
1. In case of emergency, using Monkman or Apollo Repeater frequencies, call any of the
first aid attendants and your Supervisor. Briefly describe what is required and your
location. Do not use the patients name on the radio.
2. Anyone who is designated by the first aid attendant or is able to place a call can radio for
emergency transportation.
3. Call the Provincial Ambulance Service at 1 800 461 9911 and explain to them that you
will meet them at a preferred meeting point (Usually the Leo Creek - Tachie Rd Junction
at 40km on the Tachie Rd). Let the Ambulance Service know that you will be running on
L&M Frequency (151.655) heading down the Leo Creek FSR and what time you expect
to be at the meeting point.
4. If an air evacuation is necessary, call the Provincial Ambulance Service at 1 800 461
9911 and explain that you require an air ambulance using one of the following helicopter
companies:
Pacific Western Helicopters: Prince George - (250) 562 7911
Or:
Interior Helicopters:
Fort Saint James - (250) 996 8644)
 Let them know you require a helicopter that can accommodate a spine board for
patient evacuation (it is also important to ask what side the stretcher sits in so that
you can position the patient on the proper side facing the attendant).
 Make sure you also give them your location as well as the Latitude/Longitude for the
area (which is available off of your Logging Plan Maps).
 Complete an Air Medi-vac Information Card found on the next page of this document.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Air Medi-vac Information – Fort Saint James Area
Air Ambulance Dispatch: 1 800 461 9911
Pacific Western Helicopters:
Prince George - (250) 562 7911
Interior Helicopters:
Fort Saint James - (250) 996 8644)
Prince George Regional Hospital: (250) 565 2000
Fort Saint James (Stuart Lake Hospital): (250) 996 8201
Vanderhoof (St. John Hospital): (250) 567 2211
Mackenzie & District Hospital: (250) 997 3263
Smithers Hospital (Bulkley Valley District Hospital): (250) 847 2611
Name of person calling?
Contact Phone Number?
Contact Frequency/Name?
Location:
Latitude:
Longitude:
Geographic Description:
Destination
Number of Persons Injured?
Age
Sex
Approx. Weight?
Nature of Injury
Breathing Problems?
Yes
Is the patient Unconscious?
No
Yes
Is there uncontrolled bleeding?
No
Yes
No
Position of the patient (lying, sitting, standing)
Is a stretcher required?
Is the First Aid Attendant on site?
10/14/2010
Yes
No
Yes
No
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Lbs
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B16
SERVICE
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PHONE NUMBERS
PHONE NUMBER
RCMP
Ambulance
Hospital
SERVICE
PHONE NUMBER
Company Office
Forest Fire Report 1-800-663-5555
Aircraft Distress
1-800-567-5111
Provincial Emergency
Program
1-800-663-3456
Ministry of Environment
Canadian Transport
Emergency Centre 613-996-6666
Dangerous Goods Spills1-800-663-3456
Fisheries and Oceans
Helicopter
Companies:
Workers'
Compensation Board:
Pacific Western
PG
562-7911
McKenzie
997-6911
Fort St. James 996-8735
Vancouver Island 963-9884
Yellowhead
PG
964-2569
McKenzie
997-5575
Fort St.James996-5699
Vanderhoof 567-5777
Local WSBC Office
Vancouver
1-800-661-2112
Richmond1-604-273-3100 Weekdays
1-604-273-7711 Weekends
Air Ambulance
1-800-561-8011
LOCATION
POLICE
AMBULANCE
HOSPITAL
Prince George
Vanderhoof
Fort St. James
Fort St. John
Chetwynd
Mackenzie
911
567-2222
996-8269
785-8100
788-9221
911
911
1-800-461-9911
1-800-461-9911
785-2079
788-3522
1-800-461-9911
565-2000
567-2211
996-8201
785-6611
788-2236
997-3263
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B17
SPILL REPORT FORM
Spill Report Form
Name of Reporter: _______________________________________________
Telephone number: _________________________________________
Name of Company: ______________________________________________
Telephone number: _________________________________________
Location of Spill: _________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
Date/Time of Spill: ________________________________________________
Substance of Spill: ________________________________________________
Quantity: __________________________________________________
Cause and effect of spill: ___________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________
Measures taken to stop, contain, minimize the spill:
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Description of spill location and surrounding area:
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Further action required: _____________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Agencies on site: __________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Others notified of spill: ______________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Report completed by: _______________________________________________
Date: _______________
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX B 18
DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS REPORT
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS REPORT
Project Identification____________________________________________
Project Supervisor‘s Name_______________________________________
Employee Name_______________________________________________
Date and Time of Report___________
(DD/MM/YY)
____:____ am__ pm__
REPORT SUMMARY
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
Verbal Warning ____
Supervisor‘s Initials __________
Written Warning ____
Supervisor‘s Initials __________
Suspension ____
Supervisor‘s Initials __________
Termination ____
Supervisor‘s Initials __________
Supervisor Signature__________________________________
I acknowledge receipt of this report (worker signature)
___________________________________________________
Copies to:
Site Record
_________
10/14/2010
Employee
________
Head Office
__________
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Appendix B19
 Meetings
Safety
 Seasonal


 JOH&S

 Bush
Corrective Action Log
WSBC
Inspections
FSV
Tours
Bush
Monthly
Inspections
Shop
Monthly
Inspections
Incident/
Near-miss
Investigations
Equipment
Log Books
CORRECTIVE ACTION LOG (CAL)
Date
Reported
cc:
Corrective Action
Seasonal Meetings, JOH&S Meetings, (per meeting)
Safety Meetings (monthly)
Management & Supervisors (monthly)
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Person Responsible
Due Date
Date
Completed
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX 20
Contractor Selection Checklist
Yes
Description
GENERAL CONTRACTOR INFORMATION
WSBC Account: the contractor has an active account in good standing?
Has the contractor received WSBC orders?
Does the contractor have a positive ERA rating?
Does the contractor know who to notify at Frost Lake Logging Ltd for any
safety issues, incidents or unsafe conditions?
Will the contractor be hiring any subs, (if so they also must be SAFE
Companies certified)?
Has the contractor signed off on Frost Lake Logging Ltd Safety Program and
been put through the Orientation Checklist?
Has the contractor been advised to attend all safety meetings?
Has the contractor had WSBC orders/sanctions in the past two years?
CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS
SAFE Company Certification: the contractor has achieved certification to
the SAFE company standard
Date of Certification: __________ Certification #: ____________
Or: Is the Company SAFE Companies registered?
Has the contractor provided a safety record?
Has the contractor been advised to submit annual safety summaries?
Name of Principal Evaluator:
Signature
Date and Location of Selection Evaluation
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
No
N/A
Pass/Does not
Pass
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C
Policies and Procedures
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
10/14/2010
Guidelines to Tailgate Safety Meetings
Inspections Policy and Procedure
Incident Investigation Policy and Procedure
Disability Management
Drug and Alcohol Policy
Harassment in the Workplace Policy
Visitor Safety Policy
Vehicle Policy
Smoking Policy
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C1
GUIDELINES FOR TAILGATE SAFETY MEETINGS
FROST LAKE LOGGING LTD.
A Tailgate Safety Meeting must be documented and held prior to the start-up of any operation
in any new area or location, and before any work commences on any jobsite, usually
conducted at the beginning of the day.
A Tailgate Safety Meeting should include all Employees, Contractors, and Sub-Contractors. All
employees should be in attendance at time of safety meeting at the beginning of the day.
Topics to be covered should include:
• Emergency procedures
• Location of First Aid Station / First Aid Attendant, First Aid Policy
• Use of personal protective equipment (site specific)
• Common hazards (chemical and physical) in the workplace
• Boundaries, wildlife habitat, and private properties
• Applicable safe work procedures
• Communications – Radio procedures / cell phone coverage
• Review of site inspection reports / accident investigations
• Adoption of minutes of the previous meeting
A new Tailgate Safety Meeting should be conducted, when:
• Change in work procedures
• Introduction of new equipment
• Injury accident or incident
• New employee or contractor to workplace
Tailgate Safety Meetings should not become repetitious and should be read aloud.
Meetings should be conducted by Management, Supervisors/Foreman‘s or Safety Personnel.
Good time to review two Company rules and two safe work procedures, along with review of
Guiding Principles.
Formal safety meetings will be held at least once per month.
Tailgate meetings will be conducted as the need arises, such as after a near miss incident or a
serious accident.
Pre-work safety meetings will be held at the start of each new harvesting and/or road
construction operation.
All of these safety meetings must be formally documented on the following form and turned
into the office with the employee time reports.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C2
INSPECTIONS POLICY AND PROCEDURE
OH&S Regulation
Part 3
Workplace Inspections
Section 3.5 General requirement
Section 3.6 Inspection of tools and equipment
Section 3.5 Special Inspections
Section 3.6 Participation of the committee or representative
OH&S Guidelines
None
POLICY
Site inspections are to take place at a minimum of once a month. An inspection for hazards
and work conditions is to be performed at the initiation of any new work location. This should
coincide with the pre-work process. Additional inspections may occur when there has been an
incident or a new process implemented. Where practicable a Supervisor and worker shall
perform the inspection. Inspections are not to be limited to physical plant only but shall in
clued people and process
PROCEDURE
A. General:
1. Workplace inspections will be conducted on a monthly basis by the applicable
personnel.
2. If it is not practical to inspect the entire workplace once per month, due to the size or
complexity of the workplace then a monthly inspection of, at least part of the workplace
shall be conducted, in such a manner that the entire workplace will be inspected
throughout the course of the year. Another alternative is to include the inspection in the
pre-work for any new work location.
3. Inspections are to be conducted prior to the regularly scheduled H&S meeting,
preferably one week in advance. This allows for any observations and recommendation
identified in the inspection report to be discussed by the entire workforce.
4. A tentative schedule for workplace inspections should be developed and posted by the
Safety Committee at the beginning of each year.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
B.
Inspection:
1. Workplace inspections will be conducted by a Supervisor and at least on crew member.
2. The ―Inspection Checklist‖ found in Appendix B-B9, may be used as a guide and all
observed unsatisfactory conditions shall be recorded on that form.
3. The Inspection team shall record recommendations and assign responsibility for
corrective actions.
4. Copies of the Workplace Inspection will be:
(a)
Made available to all workers
(b)
Discussed at the next safety meeting.
(c)
Copied to Company office for filing
C
Analysis and Follow-up
1. The area Supervisor is responsible for reviewing the Workplace Inspection Report and
ensuring the corrective actions for each deficiency are being implemented.
2. The Workplace Inspection Report shall be completed by the area Supervisor within one
week and shall contain the following information:
(a)
The action taken or planned to be taken
(b)
The approximate completion date
(c)
The person responsible for implementing the action
3. Subsequent workplace inspections will review the items from previous inspections to
ensure the remedial actions resolved the concern.
NOTE:
This procedure outlines the proper process for the workplace inspections/audits to be
conducted by the workforce n compliance with the minimum requirements of the OH&S
Regulation.
Nothing in this procedure prevents Managers/Supervisors/ from conducting regular safety
related workplace inspections of workplaces under their jurisdiction to ensure continuous
application of workplace safety controls, to seek improvements to the companies OH&S
Program and to ensure a high level of safety/health awareness by employees at all times.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C3
WCA
Part 3
INCIDENT INVESTIGATION POLICY AND PROCEDURE
Division 10 Sections 172 – 177
Accident Reporting and Investigation
WCA Policy
Policy Item D10-172-1 Accident Reporting and Investigation
OH&S Regulation
Part 3
Section 3.4 Incident Investigation Reports
OH&S Policies or Guidelines
None
POLICY
Employee or contractor must notify the direct Licensee Supervisor of accident/incident or near
miss.
a) In the case of serious injury or death, the Licensee Supervisor will immediately
contact:
 The RCMP
 The WSBC at the following:1-888-621-7233
(604) 276-3301 (8:30 am-4:30 pm M-F)
1-866-922-4357 (after hours)
b) All other incidents within 24 hours of occurrence.
(1)
An employer must immediately notify the board of the occurrence of any accident that
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(2)
Resulted in serious injury to or the death of a worker,
Involved a major structural failure or collapse of a building, bridge, tower, crane,
hoist, temporary construction support system, or excavation,
Involved the major release of a hazardous substance, or
Was an incident required by regulation to be reported?
Except as otherwise directed by an officer of the board or a peace officer, a person
must not disturb the scene of an accident that is reportable under subsection (1) except
so far as is necessary to
(a)
(b)
(c)
10/14/2010
Attend to persons injured or killed,
Prevent further injuries or death, or
Protect property that is endangered as a result of the accident.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
PROCEDURE
Accident/Incident Investigation Form
A.
a)
Employee or contractor will complete an Accident/Incident Investigation form
focusing on identification of root cause(s), within five days of the incident.
Develop an action plan to eliminate or minimize/mitigate risk of reoccurrence.
Employee or contractor will review completed Accident/Incident Investigation form
with direct Licensee Supervisor to review root cause(s) and to determine final action
plan.
Licensee Supervisor will forward completed Accident/Incident Investigation form to
Woodlands Admin.
Admin will forward a copy of the investigation form to the Woodlands Safety
Committee and file the original.
Licensee Supervisor will conduct follow up actions to ensure that the action plan has
been carried out and that the risk of reoccurrence has been eliminated or minimized.
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
B.
Process:
The investigation will, as far as possible, try to determine:
1.
2.
3.
The cause or causes and all incidents leading to the cause of the accident/incident.
Unsafe conditions, acts or procedures that contributed to the accident/incident.
Recommendations for corrective action to prevent future similar occurrences.
The Employer in compliance with Division 10 of the Occupational Health and Safety
Regulation will:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Upon notification of an accident, as stated under Section 172, inform the WSBC
Industrial Health and Safety Division and give all pertinent information.
Preserve the accident scene until all forms of investigation have been completed. If the
scene must be disturbed, make a sketch or take photos to show original layout.
Work in co-operation with the Safety Committee, whenever possible, when investigating
accidents.
Ensure that the investigation kit is kept in readiness for use at all times.
Investigate all accidents that do not fall under Section 172; but require first aid and/or
medical treatment; or any incident that had the potential to cause serious injury.
Have someone from another area investigate to lessen the chance of "overlooking"
contributing factors.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
Investigation Kit:
 camera and film
 tape measure - 15m
 clipboard and pad
 ruler
 pencil and pens
 flashlight
 chalk (yellow and white)
 ten 4 inch spikes
 surveyors tape 15m - red
 accident investigation form
 checklist
C.
Points to Remember:
Be conscious of the feelings of others, particularly persons involved in the accident/incident.
Arrange for comfortable quarters to interview, such as your vehicle if necessary.
Keep in mind that some people may feel some guilt if serious injury or death occurred.
You will encounter individuals with personal biases; don't jump to any conclusion or pre-judge
other persons' accounts until you have all the facts.
Never slip and pass on information given to you in confidence by another party.
Stick around after you have finished your formal investigation - you‘ll be surprised at the
valuable information you can get from people who say, "I didn't want to say anything before but
…"
D.
Writing the Report:
Describe the events leading up to and including the accident in chronological order.
Be exact and specific in detail relating to the information obtained through the investigation.
Use as many sheets of paper as required for the report to describe what took place.
Attach in order all diagrams and photos relating to the accident, describing what each one is.
List your recommendations to treat or correct the cause of the accident. It should take into
consideration all possible cause with recommendations for remedy.
A follow-up should be made to ensure the correct recommendations have been carried out to
prevent future similar accidents.
If recommendations cannot be implemented or will be delayed, post such information, with
reasons, for workers' information.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
E.
WSBC REPORTING
Workers must report any injury as soon as possible.
A worker must report any injury or disabling occupational disease as soon as possible to the
Employer, or a representative of the Employer. Representatives of the Employer include the:
 Supervisor
 First Aid Attendant
 Agent in charge of the work where the injury occurred
 The report must include:
 The name of the worker
 The time and place of the occurrence
 A description of the disease or injury and its cause
In case of death, the worker's dependent makes the report.
For an occupational disease, the Employer to be informed is the one who last employed the
worker in the type of work that can cause the disease.
At the request of the Employer, the worker, if fit to do so, must give the Employer details of the
injury or occupational disease on a form prescribed by the board. The Employer supplies the
form to the worker.
If a worker fails to provide the information required, the claim for compensation will not be
allowed, unless the board is satisfied that:
 The information adequately describes the disease or injury and how it happened,
 The Employer or the Employer's representative had knowledge of it, or
 The Employer has not been prejudiced, and the board considers that the interests of
justice required that the claim be allowed.
Employers must report injuries, occupational disease, and death to the board.
An Employer must report every work-related injury and disabling occupational disease, or
allegation of an occupational disease to the board. The report must be made within three days
of the occurrence of the injury.
An Employer must report every work-related death immediately to the board and the board's
local representative.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
The report must be on the form prescribed by the board and must state:




the name and address of the worker
the time and place of the disease, injury, or death
the nature of the injury or alleged injury
the name and address of any physician or qualified practitioner who attended the
worker, and
 any other details required by the board or by regulation
An Employer who does not report to the board is committing an offence, unless Employer
has a good reason why the report could not be made and is excused by the board
The employee in conjunction with the WSBC, RCMP and Prime Contractor (if applicable) will
ensure next of kin has been notified.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C4
DISABILITY MANAGEMENT POLICY
POLICY
The Company will make every reasonable effort to ensure employees who are disabled as a result of
injury or illness have the opportunity to regain their productive potential and maintain their self esteem
through reintegration into the work force in as timely manner as their conditions permit.
Frost Lake Logging Ltd. policy regarding Injury Management/Return to Work is as follows:





All employees have the right to return to their jobs following an injury or illness if the
employee is able to perform the duties of that job.
This policy applies whether the illness or injury suffered by an employee is occupational
or non-occupational in nature.
No employee will be allowed to return to any type of work if there is a reasonable belief
that the employee or others are put at risk of injury, or if the employee's eventual
recovery will be delayed as a result.
Successful reintegration of the employee is based on a cooperative approach developed
by the employee, the employer, the employee's representatives and other stakeholders.
Company will designate an Injury Management (IM) Coordinator to oversee coordination
and overseeing of the Company IM Program. All employees will be made aware of who
this individual is.
The Company will follow the WSBC position on modified work:
 Appropriate and valuable in all cases where a suitable and productive job is available.
 Employer must be willing to offer job.
 Worker‘s attending physician must be consulted.
 Must not harm patient or slow recovery.
 Within reasonable limits, worker must agree to return to work.
 Token or demeaning work is not suitable.
 The WSBC adjudicator must make the decision (consulting doctor and Employer)
whether or not the job is suitable. This applies only in the case of an injured employee
returning to work after a compensable injury.
 The adjudicator must be made aware of the ―exact‖ nature of the job offered where in
doubt should personally investigate. Each case is judged on its own merits.
 The reasonableness of worker‘s refusal or acceptance must also be based on a true
understanding of the facts and accurate assessment of the job being offered by both
doctor and WSBC adjudicator.
Before modified work can go ahead the:
 WSBC adjudicator must be satisfied that job description is accurate and must consider
nature of work offered.
 Physician should have all necessary information at his disposal in order to provide
informed opinion on physical ability of injured worker to perform work.
 Job must be productive.
 Worker must agree to return to work. If the worker does not agree with returning to
work, the reasonableness of the disagreement must be investigated by the WSBC
adjudicator.
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PROCEDURE
An employee recovering from an injury will fill selective jobs and tasks when the jobs and tasks are
available. No make-work projects will be initiated. No regular employee will be replaced.
The Company will identify jobs that are considered as being suitable for modified work depending upon
the nature of the injury.
Responsibilities of Injured Employee




Reports the injury or illness as soon as possible to their direct Supervisor.
Provides appropriate medical information as requested by IM Coordinator to assist in identifying
personal limitations.
Advise IM Coordinator, Supervisor and Management immediately of any change in
circumstances that may affect the return-to-work process.
Attends all medical and rehabilitation appointments and undertakes graduated or modified
return to work activities that have been agreed as appropriate by medical resources.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C5
DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY
The Company, in order to maintain high standards for the workplace and regulatory
adherence, must ensure that all employees and contractors are aware of and following policy
and procedures in place. Those individuals whose actions contravene Company policy will be
disciplined using the Company Discipline Policy.
Employees and Contractors (logging, log hauling or other) for the Company will be subject to
the Policies and Company Discipline Policy.
Drug and Alcohol Policy
The effects of drug and alcohol on an individual pose a serious threat to the safety of that
individual and others around that individual.
Therefore, the use of alcohol and drugs is strictly prohibited.
Any employee or sub-contractor found using drugs or alcohol while working on a Company
worksite, in a Company vehicle, or when representing the Company will be terminated
immediately.
This also encompasses working while under the effects of drugs and alcohol administered
prior to the scheduled shift.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C6
HARRASSMENT IN THE WORKPLACE POLICY
The Company, in order to maintain high standards for the workplace and regulatory
adherence, must ensure that all employees and contractors are aware of and following policy
and procedures in place. Those individuals whose actions contravene Company policy will be
disciplined using the Company Discipline Policy.
Employees and Contractors for the Company will be subject to the Policies and Company
Discipline Policy.
Harassment in the Workplace
The effects of harassment on an individual pose a serious threat to the safety of that individual
and others around that individual.
Therefore, the use of harassment in the workplace is strictly prohibited. Any employee or subcontractor found using harassment while working on a Company worksite or representing the
Company will be disciplined as dictated under the Discipline Policy (three step policy).
Harassment is defined by Webster‘s dictionary as ―to annoy, to irritate, to trouble by constant
raids and attacks.‖ Harassment is committed by one or more persons against one or more
other persons.
Unacceptable behavior under this definition shall include but is not limited to:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Insulting Comments
Abusive Comments
Verbal Attacks
Unsubstantiated or Unsupported Complaints to Management
Uttering Non-violent or Veiled Threats
All complaints and investigations shall be carried out in confidence.
Please forward any complaints to your Supervisor by filling out an ―Employee Concern report.‖
These forms can be found in your Start Up package, at the worksite or from a Supervisor. An
alternative manner, if the previous options are unacceptable, is to contact the Head Office and
lodge your complaint.
Once a complaint is received an investigation shall occur with two Supervisors involved. If the
complaint is verified the Company shall act in a manner according to its Policies and Discipline
policy.
All complaints and investigations shall be carried out in confidence.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C7
VISITOR SAFETY POLICY
1. VISITOR NOTICE:
Welcome! Frost Lake Logging Ltd. is committed to making you visit a safe and healthy one for
you and others in the workplace. It is for that reason that we require all visitors to Frost Lake
Logging Ltd. grounds, facilities and workplace to abide by the following safety rules while
they‘re here.
IT TAKES THE EFFORTS OF EVERYONE WORKING TOGETHER – INCLUDING VISITORS
– TO MAKE A SAFE & HEALTHY WORKPLACE
2. HAZARD/EMERGENCY PLAN NOTIFICATION:
As part of the log in process, you will be given a sheet describing the hazards of the workplace
and the procedures to follow in the case of an emergency.
3. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT:
All visitors may be required to wear the following personal protective equipment while visiting
the shop area
 Safety Headgear
 Safety Eyewear
 Hearing Protection
4. RULES OF CONDUCT:
All visitors must obey the following rules of conduct at all times:
 Follow all verbal instructions and signs
 Don‘t touch or attempt to operate an y machine, device or equipment unless told to
do so
 Don‘t talk or engage in any pranks, horseplay, contests, feats of strength, running,
or rough and boisterous conduct
 Stay out of restricted areas
 Report all injuries or problems immediately, no matter how minor
5. NONCOMPLIANCE:
Visitors who fail to follow these policies will have their visiting privileges revoked and be asked
to leave. Frost Lake Logging Ltd shall not be responsible for injuries suffered to visitors as a
result of violating these rules.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C8
VEHICLE POLICY
OH&S Regulation
Part 17
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Transportation of Workers
17.1 Application
17.2 Employer’s responsibly
17.3 Seat belts
17.4 Riding restrictions
17.5 Securing equipment
17.6 Hazardous materials
17.7 Carrying animals
17.8 Passenger compartments
17.9 Boarding and leaving
OH&S Guidelines
G17.1to G17.9
Canada National Safety Code Standards
VEHICLE POLICY
The company in order to maintain high standards for the workplace and regulatory adherence
must ensure that all employees and contractors are aware of and following Policy and
Procedures in place. .
Employees and Contractors (logging, log hauling or other) for the company will be subject to
the Policies and Company Discipline Policy.
Company Vehicle Use Policy
As of January 1, 2008 no employee or contractor is permitted to use a company vehicle for
personal use without the direct consent of their supervisor. The company can not and will not
expose itself to any liability that may arise from an individual using a company vehicle for
personal use.
As of January 1, 2008 no employee or contractor is permitted to use a company vehicle for
personal use or for work use without a valid driver’s license. The company can not and will
not expose itself to any liability that may arise from an individual using a company vehicle for
personal use or for work use without a valid driver’s license.
Infractions to this policy will be dealt with as per the Discipline Policy.
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Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
PROCEDURE
Consideration should be given to integrating the C.M.V.R. Program with the Employers Public
Risk Management Policy. The potential of civil action with respect to motor vehicle accidents
and injuries is overwhelming.
Prudent employers may ensure that the legislated standards set out in the code will be
implemented by delegating someone within the corporate profile to maintain the following
mandatory records, logs and procedures.
* Mandatory Daily Vehicle Inspection (Circle Check) Form
* Mandatory Load Security and Covering Check "before the trip."
* Mandatory, Record (Log) of Maintenance assembled & kept current for each vehicle.
* Maintained Annually (CVOR) Commercial Vehicle Operators Registration.
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
APPENDIX C9
SMOKING POLICY
OH&S Regulation
Part 4 Environmental Tobacco Smoke
Section 4.81 Controlling Exposure
Section 4.82 Designated Areas
OH&S Guidelines
G4.81to G4.82
POLICY
 Smoking is prohibited in all enclosed areas within any company building or provided
accommodation.
 Smoking is not permitted while working in the bush unless employee is seated in a
designated area. This “area” may change as per clients’ requests and/or applicable fire
conditions present.
 Smoking is not permitted in company vehicles or mobile equipment.
“Non - compliance with this policy may result in fines and/or disciplinary action”.
PROCEDURE
The Environmental Tobacco Smoke, referred to in WSBC OH&S Regulation, Part 4, prohibits
smoking in enclosed workplaces, except in areas which may be designated by the employer for
that purpose if the employer so chooses.
Designated areas will be:
 PG Truck Shop - Outside
 FSJ Shop - Outside
 Leo Creek Camp – Designated Areas to be determined
 Bush – Designated Areas to be determined
EFFECTIVE DATE:
HISTORY:
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
.
10/14/2010
Frost Lake Logging Ltd.
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