Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Tookit Quick

Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Tookit Quick
Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator
Toolkit
Quick Start
CompactLogix Controller
XM Modules
Important User Information
Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the
Application, Installation and Maintenance of Solid State Controls (publication SGI-1.1 available from your local Rockwell Automation sales
office or online at http://literature.rockwellautomation.com) describes some important differences between solid state equipment and hardwired electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of uses for solid state equipment, all
persons responsible for applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.
In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or
application of this equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements
associated with any particular installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the
examples and diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in
this manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc., is prohibited.
Throughout this manual, when necessary, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.
WARNING
IMPORTANT
ATTENTION
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in a
hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or
economic loss.
Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death,
property damage, or economic loss. Attentions help you identify a hazard, avoid a hazard, and
recognize the consequence
SHOCK HAZARD
Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that
dangerous voltage may be present.
BURN HAZARD
Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that
surfaces may reach dangerous temperatures.
Where to Start
Follow this path to complete your Dynamix Surveillance application.
Chapter 1
Introduction & Hardware Selection
Chapter 5
Logix Integration for Fixed
Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Chapter 6
Logix Integration for Sequential
Chapter 7
FactoryTalk ViewME Integration
Chapter 3
Plan System Wiring
Chapter 8
System User Guide
Chapter 4
Prepare the Computer
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3
Where to Start
Notes:
4
Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Table of Contents
Preface
About This Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Required Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Chapter 1
Introduction to the Dynamix
Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Overview of the Dynamix Surveillance Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Data Collection Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Dynamix and Operations Driven Reliability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Components of the Dynamix Surveillance Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Choosing the Dynamix Configuration for Your Application . . . . . . . 23
Fixed vs. Sequential Concept. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Fixed vs. Sequential Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Applications Included in Toolkit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Reviewing Basic Panel Component Listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Dynamix Fixed Panel Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Dynamix Sequential Panel Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chapter 3
Plan System Wiring
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Plan System Wiring for Dynamix Fixed Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Plan System Wiring for Dynamix Sequential Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Chapter 4
Prepare the Computer
5Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
5
Table of Contents
Make Network Connections for Personal Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Set the IP Address for the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Configure the EtherNet/IP Driver in RSLinx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Chapter 5
Dynamix Logix Integration for
Fixed Monitoring
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Locate the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Assign IP Addresses to Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Browse the EtherNet/IP Network in RSLinx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Set DeviceNet Address and Download Configuration to the
XM Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Set the 1769-SDN Module’s DeviceNet Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Download the DeviceNet Configuration File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Open Logix Application File in RSLogix 5000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Save and Download Your Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Chapter 6
Dynamix Logix Integration for
Sequential Monitoring
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Locate the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Assign IP Addresses to Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Browse the EtherNet/IP Network in RSLinx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Set DeviceNet Address and Download Configuration to the
XM-122 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Set the 1769-SDN Module’s DeviceNet Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Download the DeviceNet Configuration File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Open Logix Application File in RSLogix 5000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Save and Download Your Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Chapter 7
Dynamix FactoryTalk ViewME
Integration
6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Load and Restore the FactoryTalk ViewME Application . . . . . . . . . . 97
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Table of Contents
Configure Local Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Test the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Download the Project to a Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Run the Project on a Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Chapter 8
Dynamix System User Guide
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Before You Begin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
What You Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Follow These Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Dynamix Surveillance System Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Dynamix HMI Navigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Use the Dynamix Main Menu Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Dynamix Navigation Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Dynamix Machine Mimic Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Dynamix Machine Bands Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Dynamix Machine Diagnostic Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Dynamix Machine Trend Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Dynamix Alarm Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Dynamix Panelview Plus Diagnostic Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Condition Monitoring Dashboard Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Dynamix XM Faceplates Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Use the Live XM Data Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Use the Band Settings Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Use the Sensor Settings Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Use the Spectrum Settings Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Use the Alarm Settings Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Perform XM Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
FacePlate Help Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
How to Find Fault Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Appendix A
Logix Base Program Overview
Basic Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Machine Routine Basic Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Add-On Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
User-defined Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Appendix B
Introduction to Vibration
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What is Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Vibration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Other Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Measuring Vibration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
What Causes Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
7
Table of Contents
Monitoring Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Overall Vibration Level Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Banding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Detecting Bearing Issues with Spike Energy™ (gSE) . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Vibration Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Appendix C
Plan Sensor Location and
Installation
Types of Transducers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Sensor Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
9000 Series Accelerometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Mounting Accelerometer and Velocity Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Mounting Non-contact Displacement Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Grounding Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Mounting Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Appendix D
Check COM Port Conflicts
Stop RSLinx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Appendix E
Rockwell Automation Project
Services
Base Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Additional Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Dynamix1000 Custom Configured Sub-Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Appendix F
Rockwell Automation Support
Services
Reliability Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Contact Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Callout Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Mentoring Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Network Worksheet
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
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Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Preface
About This Publication
Use this manual to help you set up a Dynamix Surveillance system. The quick start provides examples of
using a Logix controller to connect to multiple vibration sensors through XM modules and display vibration
information using the FactoryTalk View faceplates.
The examples are designed to get devices installed and communicating with each other in the simplest way
possible. The programming examples are not complex, and offer easy solutions to verify that devices are
functioning and communicating properly.
To assist in the design and installation of your Dynamix Surveillance system, application files and other
information is provided on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IAMSIMP-SP010.
The CD provides CAD drawings for panel layout and wiring, base Logix control programs, FactoryTalk View
(HMI) application files, and more. For a copy of the CD, contact your local Rockwell Automation distributor
or sales representative, or visit the Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at
http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the toolkit files.
The beginning of each chapter contains the following information. Read these sections carefully before
beginning work in each chapter.
• Before You Begin - This section lists the steps that must be completed and decisions that must be
made before starting that chapter. The chapters in this quick start do not have to be completed in the
order in which they appear, but this section defines the minimum amount of preparation required
before completing the current chapter.
• What You Need - This section lists the tools that are required to complete the steps in the current
chapter. This includes, but is not limited to, hardware and software.
• Follow These Steps - This illustrates the steps in the current chapter and identifies which steps are
required to complete the examples using specific networks.
Audience
This manual is for anyone interested in installing and configuring a Dynamix Surveillance system, or
integrating information from a Dynamix Protection system.
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9
Preface
Required Software
To complete this quick start, you will need the following software.
Rockwell Automation Software
Version
RSLinx Enterprise
2.50 or later
RSLogix 5000
16 or later
RSNetworx for DeviceNet
7.0
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition
5.00 or later
XM Serial Configuration Utility
5.02
Conventions
This manual uses the following conventions.
Text that is
Identifies
Example
click
Click left mouse button once while the cursor is positioned
on object or selection.
Click Browse.
Double-click
Click the left mouse twice in quick secession while the
cursor is positioned on object or selection
Double-click the application icon.
courier font
Type or enter text exactly as shown.
Type cmd
Expand
Click the + to the left of a given item/folder to show its
contents.
Expand 1756 Bus under I/O Configuration.
Right-click
Click right mouse button once while the cursor is positioned
on object or selection.
Right-click 1756 Bus icon.
Select
Click to highlight a menu item or list choice.
Select New Module from the pull-down list.
>APID Example<
Data to be typed at a prompt or in an entry field.
Enter >Example< for the name.
Check or uncheck
Click to activate or deactivate a checkbox.
Check the Disable Keying checkbox.
>
Shows nested menu selection as menu name followed by
menu selection.
Select File>Menu
10
Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Chapter
1
Introduction to the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator
Toolkit
Introduction
This chapter introduces you to the Dynamix Surveillance Solution. You make your Dynamix Surveillance
Toolkit hardware selection based on your application requirements. You can choose from the pre-configured
application options provided, or you can modify these to suit your application by selecting a different Logix
processor, XM module, I/O configuration, or PanelView Plus.
Before You Begin
Refer to Appendices B, C, and D if you are not familiar with Vibration Monitoring concepts, installing
sensors, or using the XM Serial Configuration Utility.
What You Need
Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010.
For a copy of the CD, contact your local Rockwell Automation distributor or sales representative, or visit the
Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the
toolkit files.
Overview of the Dynamix Surveillance Solution
Condition monitoring systems have long been used as part of a Condition Based or Predictive Maintenance
strategy to maximize equipment uptime, particularly via vibration monitoring on rotating machinery.
Rockwell Automation introduces a new solution for vibration monitoring that leverages the Integrated
Architecture to reduce cost and enable Operations Driven Reliability through simple vibration analysis tools
targeted for the average user – the Allen-Bradley family of Dynamix Surveillance solutions.
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11
Chapter 1
Introduction to the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit
Data Collection Categories
Vibration monitoring has traditionally fallen into three data collection categories: Walk-around, Online
Surveillance, and Protection.
Walk Around
A Walk-around condition monitoring program can be a cost-effective way to introduce a Predictive
Maintenance strategy. Maintenance personnel regularly collect data, analyze it, and then convert it into
maintenance recommendations. This approach also is common for in-depth investigation of single-point
issues identified by online systems.
With Dynamix Surveillance, many applications that traditionally utilized Walk-around approaches can now be
economically addressed via online surveillance, benefiting from the additional time savings and tools made
available by this approach.
Online Surveillance
Online Surveillance is suitable when data collection must be automated due to limited machine access,
insufficient resources for data collection, or when typical time to-failure is weeks, days or hours. Besides
being repeatable, these systems gather data that can be integrated easily with other key production process
information from the control system. Common issues are identified more quickly than with a Walk-around
program. In addition, automation tools such as basic alarms and analysis tools that are built into today's
software make it easy to identify and diagnose basic machinery problems.
The Dynamix Surveillance category is the primary focus of this toolkit.
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Chapter 1
Real-Time Protection
Real-time Protection provides continuous machinery monitoring. This method should be employed for
instantaneous failures to avoid collateral damage, protection of high speed machinery, or applications in
which a failure could compromise safety. It also will support critical applications in any industry where an
unpredictable failure could result in significant production loss.
This toolkit does not address Walk-around and Real-time Protection data collection although data from
protection systems can be integrated into the control and automation environment using these techniques.
Dynamix and Operations Driven Reliability
The Dynamix Surveillance Solution leverages the Integrated Architecture to change the nature of Condition
Based Maintenance vibration monitoring in the plant.
Traditionally, Maintenance and Operations personnel used a separate set of configuration, alarming, and
trending (C-A-T) tools to perform their jobs. This resulted in their roles being separate from each other.
Maintenance performed its function independent of Operations. The result was often a lack of understanding
within Operations of the importance of condition monitoring.
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Introduction to the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit
With the Dynamix Surveillance Solution, the familiar set of Integrated Architecture based tools can be used
by both Operations and Maintenance to detect and diagnose basic vibration issues.
Operations is now involved in detecting and diagnosing vibration problems, and avoiding the associated
downtime. This means they are now fully engaged in the Condition Based Maintenance process, resulting in
issues being identified and remedied in a faster and more efficient manner.
Although Dynamix can be a powerful resource for diagnosing many common vibration issues, it does not
replace the need for the expertise of a Vibration Analyst for more complex applications.
Components of the Dynamix Surveillance Solution
The Dynamix Surveillance Solution includes the XM Series of Dynamix measurement modules, the Logix
Programmable Automation Controller Family, and Dynamix Surveillance System Add-On Instructions and
Faceplates that leverage the Factory Talk View and PanelView Plus family of products.
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Chapter 1
XM Series of Intelligent Modules
• XM-160/161/162 Overall Machine Vibration Modules
The XM Overall Vibration modules are a series of intelligent 6-channel modules which are a cost
effective and flexible solution for general machinery monitoring. XM-160 series modules are suitable
for most rotating machinery applications where only a measure of the machines overall vibration is
necessary. These modules can operate stand-alone or are commonly incorporated into a Dynamix
Surveillance Fixed solution.
• XM-320/360/361/362 Process & Temperature Modules
The XM-320 Position module is a 2-channel general purpose monitor that supports axial position,
valve position, case expansion, and differential expansion.
The XM-360 Process module is a 6-channel general purpose process monitor that can be configured to
measure DC voltage or a current loop input. The XM-361 Universal Temperature module and the
XM-362 Isolated Temperature module are intelligent 6-channel temperature monitors. These modules
can operate stand-alone or can be incorporated into a Dynamix Surveillance solution.
• XM-440/441 Relay Modules
The XM-440 Master Relay module offers four high power relays suitable for use in most protection
applications. The XM-440 also supports linking of the XM-441 Expansion Relay modules.
• XM-120/121/122 Dynamic Measurement Modules
The XM-120 (standard) and XM-121 (low frequency) 2-channel intelligent general purpose monitors
that support measurements of dynamic inputs such as vibration, pressure and strain. The XM-122 gSE
Vibration module is an intelligent 2-channel special-purpose monitor that is uniquely suited for
monitoring of vibration in rotating equipment fitted with rolling-element bearings. These modules can
operate stand-alone or are commonly incorporated into a Dynamix Surveillance solution.
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This toolkit utilizes the XM-122 gSE Vibration Module.
Some advantages of the gSE module solution include:
• Two individually configurable channels per module
plus a tachometer input.
• Two scalable 4-20 mA outputs.
• The ability to set up to four custom frequency bands
per channel, to isolate and alarm on specific machine
frequencies of interest (like gear mesh frequencies,
bearing frequencies, etc.).
• Sixteen configurable alarms per module.
• XM is an intelligent device capable of taking action
(relay actuation) on programmed parameters.
• Optional automatic gathering and storage of data.
• Buffered signal access at the module for hand-held
data collector access.
• Connectivity through integrated DeviceNet to Logix controllers.
The XM-122 includes special circuitry and firmware that enable it to measure standard vibration, similarly to
the XM-120, and g's Spike Energy™ (gSE). gSE is a Rockwell Automation developed signal-processing
technique that provides an accurate measure of the energy generated by transient or mechanical impacts that
occur as a result of surface flaws in rolling-element bearings or gear teeth.
Inputs to each channel include standard Integrated Electronics Piezo Electric (IEPE) accelerometer, or any
voltage output measurement device such as a velocity or pressure transducer. In addition to vibration inputs,
the modules accept one tachometer input to provide speed measurement and order analysis.
Logix Programmable Automation Controller Family
For manufacturers, OEMs, and Systems Integrators in virtually every industry, the Logix Control Platform
increases productivity while reducing total cost of ownership. Unlike conventional architectures, the Logix
Control Platform provides fully integrated, scalable solutions for the full range of automation disciplines
using a single control platform, a single development environment, and using a single, open communication
protocol.
ControlLogix brings together the benefits of the Logix platform to provide you with the performance your
application requires in an easy-to-use environment. As part of the Logix Control Platform, you receive tight
integration between the programming software, controller and I/O to reduce development time and cost at
commissioning and during normal operation.
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Chapter 1
The example in this toolkit utilizes the
CompactLogix processor, but is scalable so that it
can be used in a ControlLogix application as well.
CompactLogix brings together the benefits of the
Logix platform in a small footprint with high
performance. Combined with Compact™ I/O,
the CompactLogix™ platform is perfect for
tackling smaller, machine-level control applications
with unprecedented power and scalability.
CompactLogix is ideal for systems that require
standalone and system-connected control.
Dynamix Surveillance System Add-On Instructions & Faceplates
The core of the Dynamix Surveillance System is the diagnostic and display function managed within the
Logix controller. Machinery specific Add-On Instructions automate the key system functions without the
need for redundant software packages or extra programming. These instructions are tightly coupled with
faceplates driven by the controller to display pertinent information about your machinery. Since the
information in the faceplates is driven by the controller, one set of screens is used to view any of the
machines being diagnosed by the system. This significantly reduces the complexity and increases the
reliability of the overall system and makes it easy to expand. The system is based upon FactoryTalk View ME
allowing these faceplates to be deployed on a PC or a PanelView+ Operator Interface and can be directly
coupled with higher level visualization software.
The following are the key functions of the Dynamix Add-On Instructions and sample screen shots of the
Dynamix Faceplates.
• Machinery Profiles
– Stored settings to define frequency bands and alarms for common machine types
– Allows for basic changes to the configuration from FactoryTalk View or RSLogix
– Not required for fixed monitoring, required for sequential monitoring
• Intelligent Advisory
– Translates monitoring data into actionable descriptions for common failure modes
– Connects information from multiple channels and can be customized for specific machines
• Trending
– Establishes baseline values
– Stores values at desired intervals and averages for day, week, month, and year summaries
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• Sequencing
– Manages multiple machinery profiles and the sequencing intervals
– Sequence dwell function allows continuous monitoring of one channel which pauses data gathering
for the system
• Sequential Monitoring Instruction
– Manages up to 20 machines
– Associates each machine type
– Establishes sensors I/O location
• Diagnostic Instructions
– Identifies modules on network
– Downloads machine configuration
– Defines intelligent advisory engine
– Uploads calculated values and alarms
– Drives operator interface
– Interfaces complex data with Predictive
Maintenance
– Parameters editable via local display
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Chapter 1
System & Machine Overview Faceplate Example
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Chapter 1
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Diagnostic Description & Diagnostic Trend Faceplate Example
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Chapter 1
Band Display & Configuration Faceplate Example
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Chapter 1
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Dynamix System Fault Detection Examples
Dynamix System Diagnostics
Heartbeat
HMI Comms
I/O Comms
XM Comms
Module Fault
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Reciprocating
forces
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Unbalance
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Sensor Fault
Gap Alarm
Primary Drive Systems
Motor
Steam Turbine
Gas Turbine
Diesel Engine
Intermediate Drive Systems
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Cavitation or flow
turbulence
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Miaslignment of pulleys Belt or chain
or sprockets
defects
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Gear mesh
problems
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Misalignment of
coupling or bearings.
Bent shaft.
Bearing misalignment,
bowed or eccentric roll.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Hydraulic or
aerodynamic
forces.
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Bearing misalignment, Bad bearings antibowed or eccentric roll. friction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Bearing misalignment, Bad bearings antibowed or eccentric roll. friction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Unbalance
Mechanical
looseness
Bearing misalignment, Bad bearings antibowed or eccentric roll. friction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Belt/Chain Drive
Gear Drive
General Machines
Fans & Blowers
Vertical Pumps
Centrifugal
Pumps/Compressors
Cooling Tower Fans
Vacuum Pumps
Cavitation or flow
turbulence
Cavitation or flow
turbulence
Cavitation or flow
turbulence
Bad bearings antifriction type (Early
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Bad bearings antifriction type (Late
stage)
Paper Machine Calender
Paper Machine Dryer
Paper Machine Press
Section
Paper Machine
Winders/Rewinders
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Chapter 1
Choosing the Dynamix Configuration for Your Application
There are two types of Dynamix Monitoring applications:
• Fixed Monitoring via dedicated sensor channels
• Sequential Monitoring via multiplexed sensor channels (using standard 1769-OW8I relay output cards)
Fixed vs. Sequential Concept
As illustrated above, the Fixed application utilizes DeviceNet to interface to three dedicated XM modules,
each with two channels, for a total of six vibration sensor inputs.
The Sequential application also utilizes DeviceNet, but only requires one XM-122 module. The two channels
of the single XM-122 are multiplexed through the 1769-OW8I relay card under control of the Logix
processor. The result is a sequential connection to the same number of vibration sensors. For a Surveillance
application where measurements do not have to be taken continuously, this is a very cost effective approach.
Note that the actual number of sensors interfaced by this method can be greater than six.
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Chapter 1
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Fixed vs. Sequential Considerations
Fixed Monitoring
• Dedicated channel monitoring with periodic intelligent analysis.
• Cost effective for low channel counts or monitoring overall vibration.
Sequential Monitoring
• Shared XM monitors cycle through many channels with periodic intelligent analysis.
• Most cost effective for high channel counts.
Applications Included in Toolkit
There are two applications included in this toolkit.
• Fixed Monitoring
• Sequential Monitoring
Fixed Monitoring Overview
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Chapter 1
The fixed monitoring application includes the following:
• CompactLogix L32E with EtherNet/IP connectivity for networking PanelView Plus Operator
Interface via EtherNet/IP
• DeviceNet connection to XM-122, XM-120, and XM-161 modules via 1769-SDN module
• Logix code and PanelView Plus application for interfacing two vibration sensors to the XM-122
• Panel layout drawings
Sequential Monitoring Application Overview
The sequential monitoring application includes the following:
• CompactLogix L32E with EtherNet/IP connectivity for networking and PanelView Plus Operator
Interface via EtherNet/IP
• DeviceNet connection to XM-122 module via 1769-SDN module
• Logix code and PanelView Plus application in conjunction with six 1769-OW8I relay cards provides
sequencing capability for up to 48 vibration sensors
• Wiring and panel layout drawings
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Chapter 1
Introduction to the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to set up your Dynamix Surveillance application.
Choose Dynamix
Surveillance
Application
Fixed
Plan System
Layout
Fixed
or
Sequential?
Sequential
Plan System
Layout
page 31
Plan System
Wiring
page 31
Plan System
Wiring
page 41
page 41
Prepare the
Computer
Prepare the
Computer
page 51
Logix Integration
for Fixed
page 51
Logix Integration
for Sequential
page 77
page 59
FactoryTalk
ViewME
Integration
FactoryTalk
ViewME
Integration
page 95
System
User
Guide
System
User
Guide
page 109
26
page 95
page 109
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Chapter 1
Reviewing Basic Panel Component Listings
Fixed Monitoring Application
Item
Qty
Description
MFG
Catalog
1
1
Concept Enclosure 20x20x10
HOF
CSD202010
2
1
Concept Panel 20x20
HOF
CP2020
3
1
Compact Logix L32E CPU
AB
1769-L32E
4
1
Compact Logix Power Supply
AB
1769-PA2
5
1
Compact Logix DeviceNet Comm
AB
1769-SDN
6
1
Compact Logix R.H. End Cover
AB
1769-ECR
7
1
XM-120 Dynamic Measurement Module
AB
1440-VST02-01RA
8
1
XM122 Vibration Module
AB
1440-VSE02-01RA
9
1
XM-161 Direct Vibration Module
AB
1440-VDRS06-06RH
10
2
XM-120/121/122/123 Terminal Base
AB
1440-TB-A
11
1
XM-161 Terminal Base
AB
1440-TB-H
12
2
Circuit Breaker
AB
1492-SP1D050
13
1
Circuit Breaker
AB
1492-SP1D100
14
1
Power Supply 24V DC 50 W
AB
1606-XLP50E
15
5
End Anchor
AB
1492-EAJ35
16
1
PanelView Plus 1250 Series
AB
2711-T12C4A1
17
2
Terminal Block/Strip
AB
1492-J4
18
2
Terminal Block/Strip
AB
1492-WG6
19
Mounting Rail 35 mm DIN
AB
199-DR1
20
Wireway 1x4 in Gray
Panduit
F1X4LG6
21
Wireway 2x4 in Gray
Panduit
F2x4LG6
22
Wireway 1x4 in White
Panduit
F1X4WH6
23
Wireway 2x4 in White
Panduit
F2X4WH6
24
Wireway Cover Gray 1 inch
Panduit
C2LG6
25
Wireway Cover Gray 2 inch
Panduit
C2LG6
26
Wireway Cover White 1 inch
Panduit
C2LWH6
27
Wireway Cover White 2 inch
Panduit
C2LWH6
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Sequential Monitoring Application
To maximize efficiency and cost savings, the Dynamix 1000 custom configured sub panel solution is available
from Rockwell Automation.
The completed sub-panel will be delivered to site along with standard panel wiring diagrams. The electrical
design package will consist of a standard system overview drawing and panel layout for each sub-panel.
The following is a list of the Dynamix 1000 sub-panels. The example in this toolkit utilizes the
1443-DYN1032.
Catalog
Description
1443-DYN1032
Sub-panel wired with CompactLogix L32E and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1769-L32E, 1769-SDN, 1769-PA4, 1769-ECR, 1440-VSE02-01RA, 1440-TB-A,
1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1443-DYN1035
Sub-panel wired with CompactLogix L35E and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1769-L32E, 1769-SDN, 1769-PA4, 1769-ECR, 1440-VSE02-01RA, 1440-TB-A,
1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1443-DYN1069
Sub-panel wired with Compact I/O and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1769-ADN, 1769-PA2, 1769-ECR, 1440-VSE02-01RA, 1440-TB-A, 1606-XLP30E,
other components as necessary
1443-DYN1061
Sub-panel wired with ControlLogix L61 and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1756-L61, 1756-ENBT, 1756-DNB, 1756-PA72, 1756-A7, 1440-VSE02-01RA,
1440-TB-A, 1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1443-DYN1062
Sub-panel wired with ControlLogix L62 and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1756-L62, 1756-ENBT, 1756-DNB, 1756-PA72, 1756-A7, 1440-VSE02-01RA,
1440-TB-A, 1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1443-DYN1063
Sub-panel wired with ControlLogix L63 and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1756-L63, 1756-ENBT, 1756-DNB, 1756-PA72, 1756-A7, 1440-VSE02-01RA,
1440-TB-A, 1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1443-DYN1056
Sub-panel wired with 1756 I/O and XM122 or equivalent
Typically contains: 1756-ENBT, 1756-DNB, 1756-PA72, 1756-A7, 1440-VSE02-01RA, 1440-TB-A,
1606-XLP30E, other components as necessary
1769-OW8I
CompactLogix 8 point isolated relay card
Quantity as required per CompactLogix application
or
1756-OX8I
ControlLogix 8 point isolated relay card
Quantity as required per ControlLogix application
9701-VWMR015AENE
FactoryTalk View ME Station Runtime 15 Display
Minimum requirement
or
2711P-T12C4A1
PanelView Plus 1250 Touch Standard Communications
Optional
1443-ICMPROJECT
Enclosure
Optional
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Additional Resources
Resource
Description
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure and troubleshoot the XM-122 module.
GMSI10-UM013
XM-120/121 Dynamic Measurement Module
User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM012
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-120/121 module.
XM-160/161/162 Direct Vibration Module User
Manual, publication GMSI10-UM025
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-160/161/162
module.
1769-L32E CompactLogix Controller Installation Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the module.
Instructions, publication 1769-In020
Compact Individually Isolated AC/DC Relay
Output Module Installation Instructions,
publication 1769-IN053
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the module.
Compact I/O DeviceNet Scanner Module
Installation Instructions, publication
1769-IN060
Provides details on how to install, wire, and troubleshoot the module.
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Notes:
30
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Chapter
2
Plan System Layout
Introduction
In this chapter, you layout the components selected in Chapter 1. Use the CAD drawings supplied on the
Dynamix Surveillance Accelerometer Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010, to add or remove components
to and from the basic Dynamix vibration panel systems.
You will choose a file, configure the Logix and drive modules, add axes if needed, and download the program.
Refer to the Logix programming manuals for additional device configuration and programming
requirements.
Before You Begin
• Choose the Dynamix configuration (fixed or sequential) for your application (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
What You Need
• Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010
• System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001
• System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Video, publication GMC-SP004
• XM-122 gSE Vibration Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM013
• XM-120/121 Dynamic Measurement Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM012
• XM-160/161/162 Direct Vibration Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM025
• Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1
For a copy of the CD, contact your local Rockwell Automation distributor or sales representative, or visit the
Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the
toolkit files.
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Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to plan your system layout within the enclosure.
Choose Dynamix
Surveillance
Application
Fixed
Load Dynamix
Fixed CAD
Drawings
page 33
Verify Your Dynamix
Fixed Panel
Layout
page 33
Download Other
Allen-Bradley
CAD Drawings
page 35
32
Fixed
or
Sequential?
Sequential
Load Dynamix
Sequential CAD
Drawings
page 36
Verify Your Dynamix
Sequential Panel
Layout
page 36
Download Other
Allen-Bradley
CAD Drawings
page 38
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Chapter 2
Dynamix Fixed Panel Layout
These are the instructions to layout the system components for the Dynamix Fixed Surveillance application.
Load Dynamix Fixed System CAD Drawings
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD provides CAD drawings, in DXF format, to assist in
planning the layout of your system. The drawings are designed to optimize panel space and to minimize
electrical noise.
1. Copy the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Open the Dynamix Fixed
Enclosure CAD files folder.
3. Use your CAD program to open
this and other CAD files.
– Dynamix 1000 Fixed 10PT
drawings
4. Identify additional layout needs
specific to your application.
Verify Your Dynamix Fixed Panel Layout
The Dynamix 1000 fixed panel layout is shown below. Included is the follow hardware:
• PanelView Plus 1250
• One XM-120 Vibration module
• One XM-122 gSE Vibration module
• One XM-161 Six Channel Overall Vibration module
• CompactLogix: 1769-PA2 power supply, 1769-SDN DeviceNet Communications module, 1769-L32E
processor, and 1769-ECR end cap
• 1606-XLP50E power supply
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Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Sample Information from Enclosure Files
D2
D1
C1
D3
C2
C3
IMPORTANT
The enclosure CAD drawings were designed using best-practices techniques as shown in the
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001. Refer
to this publication when making modifications to the Dynamix fixed panel layout.
Refer to the XM Modules User Manual for additional instructions specific to the XM module.
Refer to the 1606-XLP50E Installation Instructions, publication 41063-143-01, for additional
instructions on wiring the power supply.
Refer to Download Other Allen-Bradley CAD Drawings on page 35. Refer to the Literature Library
(http://literature.rockwellautomation.com) for access to publications.
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Plan System Layout
Chapter 2
Download Other Allen-Bradley CAD Drawings
1. Open your browser and go to http://ab.com/e-tools.
The Configuration and Selection Tools webpage opens.
2. Enter the >catalog number< of the
product.
3. Click Submit.
4. Click the Drawings
tab.
5. Click a file to
download.
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Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Dynamix Sequential Panel Layout
These are the instructions to layout the system components for the Dynamix Sequential Surveillance
application.
Load Dynamix Sequential System CAD Drawings
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD provides CAD drawings, in DXF format, to assist in
planning the layout of your system. The drawings are designed to optimize panel space and to minimize
electrical noise.
1. Copy the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Open the Dynamix Sequential
Enclosure CAD files folder.
3. Use your CAD program to open
this and other CAD files.
– Dynamix 1000 Sequential
48PT drawings
4. Identify additional layout needs
specific to your application.
Verify Your Dynamix Sequential Panel Layout
The Dynamix 1000 sequential panel layout is shown below. Included is the follow hardware:
• PanelView Plus 1250
• One XM-122 gSE Vibration module
• CompactLogix: 1769-PA2 power supply, 1769-SDN DeviceNet Communications module, 1769-L32E
processor, and 1769-ECR end cap
• 1606-XLP50E power supply
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Chapter 2
Sample Information from Enclosure Files
C2
D1
C1
C3
IMPORTANT
The enclosure CAD drawings were designed using best-practices techniques as shown in the
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001. Refer
to this publication when making modifications to the Dynamix sequential panel layout.
Refer to the XM-122 gSE Vibration Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM013, for
additional instructions specific to the XM-122 gSE Vibration module.
Refer to the 1606-XLP50E Installation Instructions, publication 41063-143-01, for additional
instructions on wiring the power supply.
Refer to Download Other Allen-Bradley CAD Drawings on page 38. Refer to the Literature Library
(http://literature.rockwellautomation.com) for access to publications.
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Chapter 2
Plan System Layout
Download Other Allen-Bradley CAD Drawings
1. Open your browser and go to http://ab.com/e-tools.
The Configuration and Selection Tools webpage opens.
2. Enter the >catalog number< of the
product.
3. Click Submit.
4. Click the Drawings
tab.
5. Click a file to
download.
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Chapter 2
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-122 module.
GMSI10-UM013
XM-120/121 Dynamic Measurement Module
User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM012
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-120/121 module.
XM-160/161/162 Direct Vibration Module User
Manual, publication GMSI10-UM025
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-160/161/162
module.
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise
Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise
Video, publication GMC-SP004
Information, examples, and techniques designed to minimize system failures caused by
electrical noise.
Rockwell Automation Configuration and
Selection Tools, website http://ab.com/e-tools
Online product selection and system configuration tools, including AutoCAD (DXF)
drawings.
Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding
Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of EtherNet/IP
modules.
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Notes:
40
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Chapter
3
Plan System Wiring
Introduction
In this chapter, you plan the cable layout for your system components placed in Chapter 2. Use the CAD
drawings supplied on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to assist in the routing of wires and
cables for your system components.
Refer to the Logix programming manuals for additional device configuration and programming
requirements.
Before You Begin
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system layout (refer to Chapter 2).
What You Need
• Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP00x
• CAD files from the Dynamix Accelerator Toolkit CD:
– Dynamix 1000 Fixed 10PT drawings for Fixed system
– Dynamix 1000 Sequential 48PT drawings for Sequential system
• XM-120/121 Dynamic Measurement Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM012
• XM-122 gSE Vibration Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM013
• XM-160/161/162 Direct Vibration Module User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM025
• Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1
• System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001
• System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Video, publication GMC-SP004
• Documentation that came with your other Allen-Bradley products
For a copy of the CD, contact your local Rockwell Automation distributor or sales representative, or visit the
Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the
toolkit files.
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Plan System Wiring
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to plan the installation and wiring of your system components within the
enclosure.
Choose Dynamix
Surveillance
Application
Fixed
Load Dynamix
Fixed CAD
Drawings
page 43
Routing Cables for
Your Dynamix
System
page 43
42
Fixed
or
Sequential?
Sequential
Load Dynamix
Sequential CAD
Drawings
page 46
Routing Cables for
Your Dynamix
System
page 46
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Chapter 3
Plan System Wiring for Dynamix Fixed Panel
These are the instructions to plan the cable layout for your Dynamix Fixed Surveillance application.
Load Dynamix Fixed CAD Diagrams
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD provides CAD diagrams, in DXF format, to assist in the
planning of your system wiring. The diagrams are designed to optimize panel space and to minimize electrical
noise.
1. Copy the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Open the Dynamix Fixed
Wiring Diagram CAD files
folder.
3. Use your CAD program to open
these and other wiring diagram
CAD files.
– Dynamix 1000 Fixed 10PT
files
4. Identify additional wiring needs specific to your application.
Routing Cables for your Dynamix Fixed System
The drawings for the Dynamix 1000 Fixed panel include noise zones, as shown below. The CAD drawings
are provided as examples of best-practice techniques used to minimize electrical noise, as covered in the
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001.
These wire channel designations for clean and dirty paths are supplied to assist in defining the best possible
paths to route your power, network, and accelerometer signal cables.
The wire channels marked D# are designated for power cables and other cables which may produce electrical
noise. The wire channels marked C# are designated for communication cables like Ethernet and DeviceNet
and for transducer signal cables.
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Sample Information from Fixed Enclosure Files
D2
D1
C1
D3
C2
C3
IMPORTANT
44
Refer to the XM Module User Manuals for installation and wiring instructions specific to the
connections of power, communications and transducer wiring. For other equipment shown in your
CAD drawings, refer to the installation instructions that came with those products.
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Chapter 3
Sample Wiring Diagram for Your Dynamix Fixed System
A sample wiring diagram (Dynamix_1000_Fixed 10pt_pg3) for the Dynamix 1000 fixed panel is shown
below.
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Plan System Wiring
Plan System Wiring for Dynamix Sequential Panel
These are the instructions to plan the cable layout for your Dynamix Sequential Surveillance application.
Load Dynamix Sequential CAD Diagrams
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD provides CAD diagrams, in DXF format, to assist in the
planning of your system wiring. The diagrams are designed to optimize panel space and to minimize electrical
noise.
1. Copy the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Open the Dynamix Sequential
Wiring Diagram CAD files
folder.
3. Use your CAD program to open
these and other wiring diagram
CAD files.
– Dynamix 1000 Sequential
48PT files
4. Identify additional wiring needs specific to your application.
Routing Cables for your Dynamix Sequential System
The drawings for the Dynamix 1000 Sequential panel include noise zones, as shown below. The CAD
drawings are provided as examples of best-practice techniques used to minimize electrical noise, as covered in
the System Design for Control of Electrical Noise Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001.
These wire channel designations for clean and dirty paths are supplied to assist in defining the best possible
paths to route your power, network, and accelerometer signal cables.
The wire channels marked D# are designated for power cables and other cables which may produce electrical
noise. The wire channels marked C# are designated for communication cables like Ethernet and DeviceNet
and for transducer signal cables.
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Chapter 3
Sample Information from Sequential Enclosure Files
C2
D1
C1
C3
IMPORTANT
Refer to the XM Module User Manuals for installation and wiring instructions specific to the
connections of power, communications and transducer wiring. For other equipment shown in your
CAD drawings, refer to the installation instructions that came with those products.
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Plan System Wiring
Sample Wiring Diagram for Your Dynamix Sequential System
A sample wiring diagram (Dynamix_1000_Sequential 48pt_pg3) for the Dynamix 1000 fixed panel is shown
below.
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Chapter 3
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
XM-120/121 Dynamic Measurement Module
User Manual, publication GMSI10-UM012
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-120/121 module.
XM-160/161/162 Direct Vibration Module User
Manual, publication GMSI10-UM025
Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-160/161/162
module.
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the XM-122 module.
GMSI10-UM013
Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding
Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise
Reference Manual, publication GMC-RM001
System Design for Control of Electrical Noise
Video, publication GMC-SP004
Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of EtherNet/IP
modules.
Information, examples, and techniques designed to minimize system failures caused by
electrical noise.
49
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Notes:
50
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Chapter
4
Prepare the Computer
Introduction
In this chapter, you configure network communication on your computer and install the necessary
programming and configuration software.
Before You Begin
• Verify that your computer meets the software’s system requirements for your edition of RSLogix 5000
and Factory Talk View ME software.
• Install RSLinx Classic software.
What You Need
• Personal computer
• RSLinx Classic software, version 2.50 or later
• Ethernet CAT5 cable to configure EtherNet/IP driver
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Chapter 4
Prepare the Computer
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to prepare your computer.
Make Network
Connections
page 52
Set the IP Address
for the computer
page 53
Configure the EtherNet/IP
Driver in RSLinx
page 54
Make Network Connections for Personal Computer
Connect the CAT5 Ethernet cable between
the Ethernet port on the computer and the
Ethernet switch.
Ethernet
switch
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Set the IP Address for the Computer
1. On your desktop, right-click My Network Places and
choose Properties.
2. Double-click Local Area Connection.
3. On the General tab, select Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) and click Properties.
4. Select Use the following IP address and
enter an IP address and Subnet mask for
your computer using the example shown, or
enter your own address.
5. Record the IP address and subnet mask in the Network Worksheet on the backcover.
6. Click OK, then click OK again.
7. Close all network windows.
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8. Select Run from the Start menu.
9. Type cmd and click OK.
10. Type ipconfig and press Enter.
11. Verify that the IP Address and Subnet Mask match what you entered in the Network Worksheet.
If these numbers do not match what you entered, contact your network administrator.
12. Close the cmd.exe window.
Configure the EtherNet/IP Driver in RSLinx
1. Launch RSLinx software.
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2. From the Communications menu, choose
Configure Drivers.
3. From the Available Driver Types,
select Ethernet/IP Driver.
4. Click Add New.
5. Click OK to accept the default name.
6. Click OK to Browse Local Subnet.
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Prepare the Computer
The EtherNet/IP driver is
added to the Configured
Drivers list.
7. Verify that the driver’s
Status is Running, and
click Close.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems,
publication ENET-UM001
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of
EtherNet/IP modules.
Tech Note # E47839422 available at:
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/knowledgebase/
Provides a description of a common Comms error dialog and its solution.
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Notes:
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Prepare the Computer
Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008
Chapter
5
Dynamix Logix Integration for Fixed Monitoring
Introduction
In this chapter, you configure your XM and RSLogix 5000 application files. XM and Logix application files
are included in the Controller Program Files folder on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD,
publication IASIMP-SP010.
Before You Begin
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system layout and wiring (refer to Chapter 2 and 3).
• Prepare the computer (refer to Chapter 4).
• If you connect all of the devices, including the computer, through an Ethernet switch, you can create an
isolated network. This chapter assumes you are using an isolated network. If you are not, contact your
network administrator to obtain IP addresses.
• Verify that power is applied to all devices.
• Copy the contents of the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer
hard drive.
What You Need
• Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010
• RSLogix 5000 software, version 16.0 or later
• RSLinx Classic software, version 2.50 or later
• XM Serial Configuration Utility , version 5.0.2
• Special serial cable, catalog number 1440-SCDB9FXM2
• BOOTP/DHCP utility, such as the one that ships on the RSLogix 5000 software CD.
• An Ethernet Address (MAC) for each device. Record these addresses in the Network Worksheet.
• An IP address for each device. If you are on an non-isolated network, obtain these addresses from your
network administrator. If you are on an isolated network, determine a numbering convention for your
IP addresses. Record these addresses in the Network Worksheet.
• Logix application file (Dynamix_Accel_Tookit_Fixed_v001.acd)
• RSNetWorx application file (Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.dnt)
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• XM Serial Configuration Utility application files
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_01_v001.122
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.120
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.16x
The application files are available on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD or from your local
Rockwell Automation distributor, or visit the Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at
http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the toolkit files.
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to configure your Dynamix Fixed Monitoring application.
Locate MAC ID of
1769-L32E
Set the 1769-SDN
DeviceNet Address
page
page61
61
Assign IP Addresses
to Devices
page 70
Download RSNetWorx
for DeviceNet file to
the 1769-SDN
page 71
page 61
Browse EtherNet/IP
Network in RSLinx
Load and Open Logix
Application File
page 73
page 64
Set DeviceNet Address &
Download Configuration to
the XM/120/122/161 Modules
Download and Run
Logix Program
page 74
page 64
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Terminology
Ethernet networks use these types of addresses:
Term
Definition
Ethernet Address
Each Ethernet device has a unique Ethernet address (sometimes called a MAC address). The
address appears as twelve digits separated by colons (for example, xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). It is
usually on a label on the device itself.
Each digit is a number in hexadecimal (0 to 9 or A to F). No other device in the world will have
the same address, and it can not be changed.
You use the Ethernet address to identify a device so you can assign it an IP address.
IP Address
In addition to the Ethernet address, an IP address identifies a node on an Ethernet network.
The IP address can be manually set. or you can use special software to automatically assign it.
An IP Address consists of four decimal integers separated by periods (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx). Each xxx
is a decimal value from 0 to 255. For example, an IP Address could be 192.168.0.1. The
selection of IP Addresses is beyond the scope of this quick start, so please contact your
network administrator or use the ones provided in the examples.
Once you set an IP address for a device, you generally reference the device by its IP address.
The examples in this quick start use IP Addresses to define communication paths to the
devices.
Locate the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E
Locate and record the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E. The MAC ID is located on a label on the right hand side
of the module below the product label. On the label the MAC ID is called the Ethernet Address.
Assign IP Addresses to Devices
This step assigns IP addresses to all the devices in your system, except for the PanelView Plus. The
BOOTP/DHCP utility is installed during the RSLogix 5000 software installation.
1. Launch BOOTP/DHCP Server utility.
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The BOOTP/DHCP Server utility is used to assign IP addresses to most of the devices in this quick
start.
2. If you are running this utility for the first time, you will get
this message Otherwise, skip to step 4.
3. Click OK.
You are then asked to enter the subnet mask. Skip to step
5.
4. From the Tools menu, choose Network Settings.
5. Enter the Subnet Mask from the Network
Worksheet.
6. Click OK.
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The Request History displays all the
devices on your network that need
IP addresses.
7. Double-click a request from one of
the devices.
8. Enter the corresponding IP address
that you selected from the Network
Worksheet.
If you are not using an isolated
network, obtain these numbers from
your network administrator.
9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 for all devices, except the PanelView Plus terminal.
If a device is power cycled, it will not retain its IP address unless you disable BOOTP/DHCP.
10. Select the first device in the Relation
List and click Disable
BOOTP/DHCP.
[Disable BOOTP/DHCP]
Command successful appears in the
Status bar.
11. Repeat step 10 for all devices, except
the PanelView Plus.
12. Close the BOOTP/DHCP Server utility.
If you are prompted to save changes, click No.
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Browse the EtherNet/IP Network in RSLinx
Click the RSWho button to view the EtherNet/IP driver and devices.
Set DeviceNet Address and Download Configuration to the XM Modules
Every XM measurement and relay module is shipped with a CD that contains a simple Windows program
that can be used to configure the module. This software, the XM Serial Configuration Utility, is installed on
your workstation.
The XM Serial Configuration Utility accesses the XM modules through the RS-232 serial port.
TIP
The XM modules have a special mini-connector on top of the module. This mini-connector
looks like a mini-USB connector but it an RS-232 interface. It can only be used with a serial
connection on your personal computer.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
serial port
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The XM Serial Configuration Utility allows you to fully configure an XM measurement module.You can read
and write configuration files, download and upload configurations from a module, and view acquired data
and alarm and relay status.
In addition, you view and configure "live time" values and alarm set points. This allows you to routinely
"tune" alarm set points and relay behavior after a machine has started up and live signals can be observed.
Observing the measured data is essential to make sure the measurement definition is appropriate for the
actual signal and that the module and sensors are properly installed and wired.
You will use the XM Serial Configuration Utility to set the DeviceNet Address and download configuration
files to the XM-122, XM-120 and XM-161 modules.
Reset the XM Module Relays
On top of the XM module is a single white
button used to reset the relays wired to the
module.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
Press the Reset button to make sure all latched
relays are reset. The Reset switch resets the
relays only if the input is no longer in alarm or
the condition that caused the alarm is no
longer present.
Press to reset
the relays
Connect XM Module to Personal Computer
Connect the computer to the XM module using the special serial cable (cat. no. 1440-SCDB9FXM2). The
connector that inserts into the computer’s serial port is a DB-9 female connector. The connector that inserts
into the module is mini-USB male connector.
TIP
For computers that do not have RS-232 ports, use the USB to Serial Adapter (cat. no. 9300-USBS)
to connect to the XM serial port.
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1. Launch the XM Serial
Configuration Utility.
The XM Serial Configuration
Utility appears.
2. Make certain power is applied to
the module.
3. Select the COM port setting on
the Configuration Utility screen.
The default is COM 1.
4. Locate the selected serial port on
the back of your computer and insert the DB-9
female connector into it. Tighten the
thumbscrews to ensure reliable connection.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
5. Insert the mini-connector into the USB-style
connector on top of the first module.
serial
connection
In this example, we are connecting to the
XM-122 module.
When the module is properly connected
to the computer, the Connection icon on
the Configuration Utility screen changes
from not connected to connected.
TIP
66
RSLinx may create a conflict on your COM port (see message below). Refer to Check COM Port
Conflicts on page 183 for help.
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Assign the DeviceNet Address to XM Module
ATTENTION
TIP
When you apply a new node address, it immediately overwrites the node address in the module
and causes the module to reset.
If you need help, press F1 to display the online help topic for the current tab or dialog box.
1. Click Configure on the Configuration
Utility screen
The Configuration Tool for the
connected XM module appears.
Click to
configure
module
2. Click the Module tab.
3. Enter the new Node address.
XM Module
Node Address
XM-120
1
XM-122
2
XM-161
3
4. Click Apply.
A confirmation message appears.
5. Click Yes to download the new node
address to the XM module.
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Download the Configuration to XM Module
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer.
2. From the File menu, choose Open.
3. Navigate to the Dynamix Fixed Logix
& Config Files\XM Configuration
Files folder on your computer and
select the appropriate configuration
file.
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_01_
v001.122 file
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v00
1.120
– Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.16x
4. Click Open. The name of the configuration file appears at the bottom of the Configuration Tool.
5. From the Device menu, choose Auto Save Configuration
to clear the check mark and disable Auto Save.
The Auto Save Configuration command allows the XM
module to automatically save its "active" configuration to
nonvolatile memory after downloading a configuration. At
power up, the active configuration is loaded and the module
transitions to Run mode.
In some instances, you will want an external system or device to program the module after power up. In
these situation, you do not want a configuration to be stored in the nonvolatile memory. For the
purposes of this example, we do NOT want to save the configurations to the modules nonvolatile
memory. Therefore, we disable the Auto Save Configuration.
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6. Click the tabs to make changes to the
parameters.
Refer to the XM Module User Manual
for a complete listing and description
of the XM parameters.
Press F1 for help.
7. From the Device menu, choose
Download to Device.
8. Click Yes to download the settings to the module.
9. If you see ADR Warning dialog box, click Continue
to continue the download.
When the download is complete, the Module Status
(MS) LED will turn solid green.
10. From the File menu, choose Close to close the
Configuration Tool.
11. Insert the mini-connector into the USB-style connector
on top of the second XM module in the system. There
are three XM modules in the fixed application.
The Connection icon on the Configuration Utility screen changes from not connected to connected.
Refer to Connect XM Module to Personal Computer on page 65 for more details.
12. Repeat steps on pages 67...69 to set the node address and download the configuration files to the other
two XM modules.
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Set the 1769-SDN Module’s DeviceNet Address
1. Launch RSNetWorx for DeviceNet software.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Node Commissioning.
3. Click Browse.
4. Under AB_ETHIP-2, expand the
CompactLogix Backplane and the
1769 CompactBus.
5. Expand the 1769-SDN and the
DeviceNet Port, and select the
1769-SDN Scanner Module.
6. Click OK.
7. If you receive a linking device
warning, click Yes.
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The Node Commissioning dialog box is
populated with the current settings for
the 1769-SDN module.
8. Select 0 for the node Address for the
1769-SDN and click Apply.
The node address is applied and a
confirmation is given in the Messages
box.
9. Record the address on the Network
Worksheet.
10. Click Close.
Download the DeviceNet Configuration File
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. From the File menu, choose Open.
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3. Navigate to the Dynamix Fixed Logix
& Config Files\RSNetworx
DeviceNet Files folder on your
computer and select the
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_
v001.dnt file.
4. Click Open.
5. Click Who Active to go online.
6. Under AB-ETHIP-2, expand the
CompactLogix Backplane and the
1769 CompactBus.
7. Expand the 1769-SDN and the
DeviceNet Port.
8. Record the 1769-SDN slot
number on the Network
Worksheet. You will need it later.
9. Select Port 2, DeviceNet and click
OK.
10. Click OK.
RSNetWorx software begins
browsing the network.
TIP
72
Once all of the devices on your
DeviceNet network appear, you
can click Cancel.
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11. From the Network menu, choose Download to
Network.
12. Click Yes.
The pre-configured Dynamix
Accelerator Toolkit DeviceNet
Network and device settings are
downloaded to the network.
13. Click Close.
Open Logix Application File in RSLogix 5000
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Navigate to the Dynamix Fixed Logix &
Config Files\Logix File folder.
3. Double-click the
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.acd
application file.
The RSLogix 5000 software launches and
your application file opens.
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Save and Download Your Program
You must download your program to the Logix controller.
1. Click the Verify Controller button on the RSLogix 5000 toolbar.
The system verifies your Logix controller program and displays
errors/warnings, if any.
2. From the File menu, choose Save to save the file.
3. Move the keyswitch on your controller to REM.
4. From the Communications menu, choose Who
Active.
5. Expand the network tree.
6. Select your controller and click Set Project Path.
7. Click Download.
8. Click Download.
9. From the Communications menu, choose Run
Mode.
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10. Verify the module LEDs are steady green.
– 1768-L32E OK status LED is steady green
– 1769-SDN OK status LED is steady green (if present)
– XM-122 MS (Module Status) and NS (Network Status) LEDs are steady green
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
Logix5000 Controllers Common Procedure
Provides details about creating and editing a program, communicating with modules,
Programming Manual, publication 1756-PM001 and configuring modules.
DeviceNet Modules in Logix 5000 Control
Systems User Manual, publication
DNET-UM004
Provides information on the installation, configuration, and operation of DeviceNet
modules.
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure and troubleshoot the XM module.
GMSI10-UM013
EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control
Systems, publication ENET-UM001
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of EtherNet/IP
modules.
ControlNet Modules in Logix5000 Control
Systems, publication CNET-UM001
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of ControlNet
modules.
XM Serial Configuration Utility Getting Results
Guide, publication XMSCU-GR002
Provides information to get you started using the XM Serial Configuration Utility
program to configure XM modules.
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Chapter
6
Dynamix Logix Integration for Sequential Monitoring
Introduction
In this chapter, you configure your XM and RSLogix 5000 application files for the sequential monitoring. XM
and Logix application files are included in the Controller Program Files folder on the Dynamix Surveillance
Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010.
Before You Begin
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system layout and wiring (refer to Chapter 2 and 3).
• Prepare the computer (refer to Chapter 4).
• If you connect all of the devices, including the computer, through an Ethernet switch, you can create an
isolated network. This chapter assumes you are using an isolated network. If you are not, contact your
network administrator to obtain IP addresses.
• Verify that power is applied to all devices.
• Copy the contents of the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer
hard drive.
What You Need
• Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010
• RSLogix 5000 software, version 16.0 or later
• RSLinx Classic software, version 2.50 or later
• XM Serial Configuration Utility , version 5.0.2
• Special serial cable, catalog number 1440-SCDB9FXM2
• BOOTP/DHCP utility, such as the one that ships on the RSLogix 5000 software CD.
• An Ethernet Address (MAC) for each device. Record these addresses in the Network Worksheet.
• An IP address for each device. If you are on an non-isolated network, obtain these addresses from your
network administrator. If you are on an isolated network, determine a numbering convention for your
IP addresses. Record these addresses in the Network Worksheet.
• Logix application file (Dynamix_Accel_Tookit_Sequential_v001.acd)
• RSNetWorx application file (Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential_v001.dnt)
• XM Serial Configuration Utility application file (Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential_v001.122)
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The application files are available on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD or from your local
Rockwell Automation distributor, or visit the Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at
http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the toolkit files.
Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to configure your Dynamix Sequential Monitoring application.
Locate MAC ID of
1769-L32E
Set the 1769-SDN
DeviceNet Address
page 79
Assign IP Addresses
to Devices
page 87
Download RSNetWorx
for DeviceNet file to
pagethe
871769-SDN
page 90
page 79
Load and Open Logix
File
pageApplication
90
Browse EtherNet/IP
Network in RSLinx
page 91
page 82
Set DeviceNet Address &
Download Configuration to
the XM-122 Module
Download and Run
Logix Program
page 91
page 92
page 82
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Terminology
Ethernet networks use these types of addresses:
Term
Definition
Ethernet Address
Each Ethernet device has a unique Ethernet address (sometimes called a MAC address). The
address appears as twelve digits separated by colons (for example, xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx). It is
usually on a label on the device itself.
Each digit is a number in hexadecimal (0 to 9 or A to F). No other device in the world will have
the same address, and it can not be changed.
You use the Ethernet address to identify a device so you can assign it an IP address.
IP Address
In addition to the Ethernet address, an IP address identifies a node on an Ethernet network.
The IP address can be manually set. or you can use special software to automatically assign it.
An IP Address consists of four decimal integers separated by periods (xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx). Each xxx
is a decimal value from 0 to 255. For example, an IP Address could be 192.168.0.1. The
selection of IP Addresses is beyond the scope of this quick start, so please contact your
network administrator or use the ones provided in the examples.
Once you set an IP address for a device, you generally reference the device by its IP address.
The examples in this quick start use IP Addresses to define communication paths to the
devices.
Locate the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E
Locate and record the MAC ID of the 1769-L32E. The MAC ID is located on a label on the right hand side
of the module below the product label. On the label the MAC ID is called the Ethernet Address.
Assign IP Addresses to Devices
This step assigns IP addresses to all the devices in your system, except for the PanelView Plus. The
BOOTP/DHCP utility is installed during the RSLogix 5000 software installation.
1. Launch BOOTP/DHCP Server utility.
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The BOOTP/DHCP Server utility is used to assign IP addresses to most of the devices in this quick
start.
2. If you are running this utility for the first time, you will get
this message Otherwise, skip to step 4.
3. Click OK.
You are then asked to enter the subnet mask. Skip to step
5.
4. From the Tools menu, choose Network Settings.
5. Enter the Subnet Mask from the Network
Worksheet.
6. Click OK.
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The Request History displays all the
devices on your network that need
IP addresses.
7. Double-click a request from one of
the devices.
8. Enter the corresponding IP address
that you selected from the Network
Worksheet.
If you are not using an isolated
network, obtain these numbers from
your network administrator.
9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 for all devices, except the PanelView Plus terminal.
If a device is power cycled, it will not retain its IP address unless you disable BOOTP/DHCP.
10. Select the first device in the Relation
List and click Disable
BOOTP/DHCP.
[Disable BOOTP/DHCP]
Command successful appears in the
Status bar.
11. Repeat step 10 for all devices, except
the PanelView Plus.
12. Close the BOOTP/DHCP Server utility.
If you are prompted to save changes, click No.
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Browse the EtherNet/IP Network in RSLinx
Click the RSWho button to view the EtherNet/IP driver and devices.
Set DeviceNet Address and Download Configuration to the XM-122 Module
Every XM measurement and relay module is shipped with a CD that contains a simple Windows program
that can be used to configure the module. This software, the XM Serial Configuration Utility, is installed on
your workstation.
The XM Serial Configuration Utility accesses the XM modules through the RS-232 serial port.
TIP
The XM modules have a special mini-connector on top of the module. This mini-connector
looks like a mini-USB connector but it an RS-232 interface. It can only be used with a serial
connection on your personal computer.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
serial port
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The XM Serial Configuration Utility allows you to fully configure an XM measurement module.You can read
and write configuration files, download and upload configurations from a module, and view acquired data
and alarm and relay status.
In addition, you view and configure "live time" values and alarm set points. This allows you to routinely
"tune" alarm set points and relay behavior after a machine has started up and live signals can be observed.
Observing the measured data is essential to insure that the measurement definition is appropriate for the
actual signal and that the module and sensors are properly installed and wired.
Reset the XM Module Relays
On top of the XM module is a single white
button used to reset the relays wired to the
module. Press the Reset button to make sure
all latched relays are reset.
The Reset switch resets the relays only if the
input is no longer in alarm or the condition
that caused the alarm is no longer present.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
Press to reset
the relays
Connect XM Module to Personal Computer
Connect the computer to the XM module using the special serial cable (cat. no. 1440-SCDB9FXM2). The
connector that inserts into the computer’s serial port is a DB-9 female connector. The connector that inserts
into the module is mini-USB male connector.
TIP
For computers that do not have RS-232 ports, use the USB to Serial Adapter (cat. no. 9300-USBS)
to connect to the XM serial port.
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1. Launch the XM Serial
Configuration Utility.
The XM Serial Configuration
Utility appears.
2. Make certain power is applied to
the XM-122 module.
3. Select the COM port setting on
the Configuration Utility screen.
The default is COM 1.
4. Locate the selected serial port on
the back of your computer and insert the DB-9
female connector into it. Tighten the
thumbscrews to ensure reliable connection.
1440-VSE02-01RA
gSE VIBRATION
5. Insert the mini-connector into the USB-style
connector on top of the first XM-122 module.
serial
connection
When the module is properly connected
to the computer, the Connection icon on
the Configuration Utility screen changes
from not connected to connected.
TIP
84
RSLinx may create a conflict on your COM port (see message below). Refer to Check COM Port
Conflicts on page 183 for help.
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Assign the DeviceNet Address to XM Module
ATTENTION
TIP
When you apply a new node address, it immediately overwrites the node address in the module
and causes the module to reset.
If you need help, press F1 to display the online help topic for the current tab or dialog box.
1. Click Configure on the Configuration
Utility screen
The Configuration Tool for the
connected XM module appears.
Click to
configure
module
2. Click the Module tab.
3. Enter 1 in the Node address.
4. Click Apply.
A confirmation message appears.
5. Click Yes to download the new node
address to the XM module.
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Download the Configuration to XM Module
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer.
2. From the File menu, choose Open.
3. Navigate to the Dynamix Sequential
Logix & Config Files\XM
Configuration Files folder on your
computer and select the
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential_
v001.122 file.
4. Click Open.
The name of the configuration file
appears at the bottom of the Configuration Tool.
5. From the Device menu, choose Auto Save Configuration
to clear the check mark and disable Auto Save.
The Auto Save Configuration command allows the XM
module to automatically save its "active" configuration to
nonvolatile memory after downloading a configuration. At
power up, the active configuration is loaded and the module transitions to Run mode.
In some instances, you will want an external system or device to program the module after power up. In
these situation, you do not want a configuration to be stored in the nonvolatile memory. For the
purposes of this example, we do NOT want to save the configurations to the modules nonvolatile
memory. Therefore, we disable the Auto Save Configuration.
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6. From the Device menu, choose Download to
Device.
7. Click Yes to download the settings to the module.
8. If you see ADR Warning dialog box, click Continue
to continue the download.
When the download is complete, the Module Status
(MS) LED will turn solid green.
9. From the File menu, choose Close to close the
Configuration Tool.
Set the 1769-SDN Module’s DeviceNet Address
1. Launch RSNetWorx for DeviceNet software.
2. From the Tools menu, choose Node Commissioning.
3. Click Browse.
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4. Under AB_ETHIP-2, expand the
CompactLogix Backplane and the
1769 CompactBus.
5. Expand the 1769-SDN and the
DeviceNet Port, and select the
1769-SDN Scanner Module.
6. Click OK.
7. If you receive a linking device
warning, click Yes.
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The Node Commissioning dialog box is
populated with the current settings for
the 1769-SDN module.
8. Select 0 for the node Address for the
1769-SDN and click Apply.
The node address is applied and a
confirmation is given in the Messages
box.
9. Record the address on the Network
Worksheet.
10. Click Close.
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Download the DeviceNet Configuration File
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. From the File menu, choose Open.
3. Navigate to the Dynamix Sequential
Logix & Config Files\RSNetworx
DeviceNet Files folder on your
computer and select the
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential
_v001.dnt file.
4. Click Open.
5. Click Who Active to go online.
6. Under AB_ETHIP-2, expand the
CompactLogix Backplane and the
1769 CompactBus.
7. Expand the 1769-SDN and the
DeviceNet Port.
8. Record the 1769-SDN slot
number on the Network
Worksheet. You will need it later.
9. Select Port 2, DeviceNet and click
OK.
10. Click OK.
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RSNetWorx software begins browsing the
network.
TIP
Once all of the devices on your
DeviceNet network appear, you
can click Cancel.
11. From the Network menu, choose Download to
Network.
12. Click Yes.
The pre-configured Dynamix
Accelerator Toolkit DeviceNet
Network and device settings are
downloaded to the network.
13. Click Close.
Open Logix Application File in RSLogix 5000
1. Make sure you copied the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer hard drive.
2. Navigate to the Dynamix Sequential
Logix & Config Files\Logix File
folder.
3. Double-click the
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential
_v001.acd application file.
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The RSLogix 5000 software launches and your application file opens.
Save and Download Your Program
You must download your program to the Logix controller.
1. Click the Verify Controller button on the RSLogix 5000 toolbar.
The system verifies your Logix controller program and displays
errors/warnings, if any.
2. From the File menu, choose Save to save the file.
3. Move the keyswitch on your controller to REM.
4. From the Communications menu, choose Who
Active.
5. Expand the network tree.
6. Select your controller and click Set Project Path.
7. Click Download.
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8. Click Download.
9. From the Communications menu, choose Run Mode.
10. Verify the module LEDs are steady green.
– 1768-L32E OK status LED is steady green
– 1769-SDN OK status LED is steady green (if present)
– XM-122 MS (Module Status) and NS (Network Status) LEDs are steady green
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
Logix5000 Controllers Common Procedure
Provides details about creating and editing a program, communicating with modules,
Programming Manual, publication 1756-PM001 and configuring modules.
DeviceNet Modules in Logix 5000 Control
Systems User Manual, publication
DNET-UM004
Provides information on the installation, configuration, and operation of DeviceNet
modules.
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure and troubleshoot the XM module.
GMSI10-UM013
EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control
Systems, publication ENET-UM001
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of EtherNet/IP
modules.
ControlNet Modules in Logix5000 Control
Systems, publication CNET-UM001
Provides details regarding the installation, configuration, and operation of ControlNet
modules.
XM Serial Configuration Utility Getting Results
Guide, publication XMSCU-GR002
Provides information to get you started using the XM Serial Configuration Utility
program to configure XM modules.
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Chapter
7
Dynamix FactoryTalk ViewME Integration
Introduction
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit contains faceplates that let you create displays to control and
monitor your XM modules using FactoryTalk View Machine Edition software. The application files are
included in the View App File folder on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication
IASIMP-SP00x.
After restoring the application, you configure the communications, test the project, download the program,
and run the application.
Before You Begin
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system layout (refer to Chapter 2).
• Complete your system wiring (refer to Chapter 3).
• Prepare the computer (refer to Chapter 4).
• Complete your Logix Integration procedures (refer to Chapter 5 or 6).
• Copy the contents of the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD to your personal computer
hard drive.
What You Need
• Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010
• FactoryTalk View Studio software, version 5.0 or later
• RSLinx Enterprise software, version 2.50 or later
• FactoryTalk ViewME application file (Dynamix_Accelerator_Tookit_v001.apa)
The application file is available on the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD or from your local
Rockwell Automation distributor, or visit the Integrated Architecture Tools and Resources website at
http://www.ab.com/go/iatools to download the toolkit files.
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Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to configure your FactoryTalk ViewME Dynamix Integrated Condition
Monitoring application.
Load and Restore FactoryTalk
ViewME Application File
page 97
Configure Communications
page 98
Test the Project
page 101
Download the Project
to the Terminal
page 102
Run the Project
on the Terminal
page 105
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Load and Restore the FactoryTalk ViewME Application
1. Copy the Dynamix Surveillance Toolkit CD to your personal computer.
2. Navigate to the View App Files folder.
3. Double-click the Dynamix_Accelerator_Toolkit_v001.apa application file.
4. Select Restore the FactoryTalk View
Machine Edition application.
5. Click Next.
IMPORTANT
Selecting Restore the FactoryTalk View Machine Edition application and FactoryTalk Local
Directory will cause the local security settings on your personal computer to substitute for
the security setting from the pre-configured application.
6. Click Finish.
After file restoration is complete,
the application closes.
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Configure Local Communications
The Local tab in Communications Setup reflects the view of the topology from the RSLinx Enterprise server
on the development computer. In this example application, the development computer is communicating to
the Control Logix L32E controller via Ethernet. Other Logix controllers can also be selected.
1. Apply power to your Logix controller.
2. Connect your Ethernet system communication network cable to your Logix controller and personal
computer.
3. Launch the FactoryTalk View Studio software.
4. Click the Existing tab.
5. Select your FactoryTalk ViewME
application file.
Dynamix Accel Toolkit 800x600 is used
in this example.
6. Click Open.
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7. Expand RSLinx Enterprise in the
Explorer window.
8. Double-click Communication Setup.
9. Click the Design (Local) tab.
10. Select the XM_to_CLX device
shortcut.
11. Expand RSLinx Enterprise to gain
access to your Logix controller.
0, 1769-L32E is used in this toolkit.
IMPORTANT
RSLinx Enterprise will autobrowse to the controller if the controller is available on
the network.
12. Select your Logix controller.
0, 1769-L32E is used in this toolkit. The slot number is 0. Yours could be different.
13. Make sure your Offline Tag File is correct.
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14. Click Copy from Design to
Runtime.
This configures the Runtime
(Target) communication.
15. Click Apply in the Device
Shortcuts window.
16. Click Verify.
17. Click Close in the Shortcut
Verifier window.
18. Click OK in the Communication Setup editor.
TIP
100
If you select the device shortcut (XM_to_CLX), the 1769-L32E ControlLogix controller is
highlighted. This indicates that the shortcut is correctly mapped to the controller, and
communication exits between your application on the development computer and the controller.
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Test the Project
FactoryTalk View Studio lets you create and test individual displays or the entire project so that you can
navigate and test all functionality before downloading your project to the terminal.
IMPORTANT
To test run the project, all communications must be configured first.
1. From the Application menu, choose Test
Application.
2. Click Yes if prompted to save changes.
The FactoryTalk View Studio software
compiles the project and runs it as if it were
executing on the desired terminal.
3. Test the functionality of the project and fix errors, as necessary.
4. Click Close [F3] to close this dialog box.
5. Enter >x< from the keyboard to end testing and shut down the application.
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Download the Project to a Terminal
1. From the Application menu, choose Create
Runtime Application.
2. In Save as type, choose Runtime 5.0
Application (*.mer).
3. In File name, enter a file name for the
application.
Dynamix Accel Toolkit 800x600.mer is
used in this example.
4. Under Conversion to development
application, select Always allow
conversion.
5. Click Save.
6. Click the File Transfer Utility button on
the FactoryTalk View Studio toolbar.
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7. Click the Browse button to
browse for the runtime file.
8. Select Dynamix Accel Toolkit
800x600.mer.
9. Click Open.
10. Browse for your PanelView Plus terminal.
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11. Click Download.
The file transfers to the PanelView
Plus.
12. Click OK when prompted.
13. Click Exit to close the Transfer
Utility dialog box.
14. From the File menu, choose Close to close the application.
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Run the Project on a Terminal
1. Apply power to the PanelView Plus terminal.
2. Connect your communication network cable to your PanelView Plus terminal and personal computer.
The FactoryTalk ViewME
Station window opens.
3. Click Load Application.
4. Use the up and down arrows to scroll
through the list of application files and
select the .mer file you intend to run.
Dynamix Accel Toolkit 800x600.mer is
used in this example.
5. Click Load.
6. Click Yes.
If you click No, the communications
settings from the project run previously
will be used instead.
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7. Click Yes.
If you click No, the FactoryTalk System
Directory for users and policies from the
project run previously will be used
instead.
8. Verify that the Dynamix Accel Toolkit
800x600.mer file appears in the current
application field.
9. Click Run Application.
10. Verify the functionality of the
application. Refer to Chapter 8 for
information on how to use a Dynamix
Condition Monitoring application.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
PanelView Plus Terminal User Manual,
publication 2711p-UM001
Provides descriptions and procedures for the use of the PanelView Plus terminal.
FactoryTalk View Studio online help
Contains procedures and information for all FactoryTalk View-specific topics.
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Chapter
8
Dynamix System User Guide
Introduction
In this chapter, you learn how to use a Dynamix system. You are guided through the pre-configured
FactoryTalk View ME screens that interface with the pre-configured Dynamix I/O Add-On Instructions.
You are guided through the different faceplate views, which provide the information you need to monitor
your devices and the Dynamix Intelligent Advisories.
Before You Begin
• Complete your system hardware selection (refer to Chapter 1).
• Complete your system layout (refer to Chapter 2).
• Complete your system wiring (refer to Chapter 3).
• Prepare the computer (refer to Chapter 4).
• Complete your Logix Integration procedures (refer to Chapter 5 or 6).
• Complete your FactoryTalk View ME Integration procedure (refer to Chapter 7).
What You Need
• Hardware installation and wiring complete with power applied
• Dynamix Logix application file (Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Fixed_v001.acd or
Dynamix_Accel_Toolkit_Sequential_v001.acd) downloaded to ControlLogix controller. Controller is
set to run.
• FactoryTalk ViewME application file (Dynamix_Accelerator_Tookit_v001.apa) downloaded to the
PanelView Plus terminal with Run Application activated on terminal.
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Follow These Steps
Complete the following steps to run the pre-configured Dynamix logix and faceplates to gain an
understanding of how to use these tools in your specific application.
Dynamix
Surveillance System
Overview
Dynamix Machine
Trend Displays
page 111
Dynamix HMI Navigation
page 120
Dynamix Alarm Displays
page 113
Dynamix Main Menu
Display
page 114
Dynamix Navigation
Bar
page 116
Dynamic Machine
Mimic Display
page 117
Dynamix Machine
Bands Display
page 118
Dynamic Machine
Diagnostic Display
page 119
110
page 121
Dynamix Panelview
Plus Diagnostic
Display
page 123
Condition Monitoring
Dashboard Display
page 124
Dynamic XM
Faceplates Overview
page 125
Use Live XM
Data Display
Use Sensor Settings
Display
page 129
Use Spectrum Settings
Display
page 130
Use Alarm Settings
Display
page 132
Perform XM
Functions
page 133
Faceplate Help
Display
page 134
How to Find Fault
Information
page 126
page 135
Use Band Settings
Display
page 127
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Dynamix Surveillance System Overview
This is an overview of the Fixed and Sequential Surveillance systems.
What Makes Up the Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit
The Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit is configured to monitor two machine trains.
1. Direct Drive Motor Pump
with Four Sensors:
– Sensor 1 - Motor Non
Driving End Bearing
– Sensor 2 - Motor Driving
End Bearing
– Sensor 3 - Pump Driven
End Bearing
– Sensor 4 - Pump Non
Driven End Bearing
2. Direct Drive Motor Fan with
Four Sensors:
– Sensor 1 - Motor Non
Driving End Bearing
– Sensor 2 - Motor Driving
End Bearing
– Sensor 3 - Fan Driven End
Bearing
– Sensor 4 - Fan Non
Driven End Bearing
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How the Machine Train Configuration & Intelligent Advisory Messages Work
The pre-configured Dynamix Add-On Instruction application that you downloaded to the controller in
RSLogix created the default parameters for the XM module as well as the Intelligent Advisory messages. The
illustration below shows how the Logix application links to the Dynamix XM-122 faceplate.
The Dynamic Mimic display provides an interface to the XM-122 module. It receives default configuration
values from the Machine Profile and sends the Machine Profile alarm values that it uses for Intelligent
Advisory messages. The XM Add-On Instruction links to the Messages instructions that reprogram the XM
module for the configuration parameters used.
The FactoryTalk View ME HMI application reads the data from the XM-122 Add-On Instruction. Using the
HMI application, you can edit the running parameters, send commands to download configuration settings
to the XM module, and download the default configuration to the XM module.
How the Sequential Surveillance Works
In the Dynamix Sequential Surveillance system, many sensor channels are multiplexed through one XM-122
module. Compact I/O isolated relay modules are used to sequence the channels. The XM-122 Add-On
Instruction is used to reprogram the XM module for each new set of channels. The Dynamix Sequential
Monitoring Add-On Instruction controls the sequencing of the relays and issues commands to the XM-122
Add-On Instruction to reprogram the XM module and start using the XM module data.
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A different instance of the XM-122 Add-On Instruction is used for each set of channels. Each instance holds
the data from the channel that it is monitoring. The HMI can read the channel data at any time. Most of the
time, the HMI reads the data held in the XM-122 Add-On Instruction from the last scan of the channels.
The Dynamix Sequential Monitoring Add-On Instruction runs on a 5 minute cycle time. Every 5 minutes, it
cycles to the next set of channels. Relay outputs are sequenced to direct the next two channels to the XM
module. The first 90 seconds of the cycle, the XM module is reprogrammed and the two new sensors are
powered up. For the next 3 1/2 minutes, the XM-122 Add-On Instruction starts collecting data from the
XM-122 module.
Dynamix HMI Navigation
The following illustration provides an overview of how to navigate between the Dynamix HMI faceplate
displays. The faceplate application navigation and display designs are based on a machine train.
TIP
The faceplate displays and display navigation are the same for the Fixed Surveillance and the
Sequential Surveillance systems.
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Use the Dynamix Main Menu Display
The Main Menu display appears when you run the HMI application. Use it to navigate between the other
displays. There are 12 grey boxes on the Main Menu display. Each grey box represent a machine-train that is
being monitored by the Dynamix system.
The following Main Menu display illustrates that there are two machine trains currently being monitored by
the Dynamix system.
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1. Press the Machine Train to
view its Machine Mimic
display.
See page 117 for more
information.
Machine Train Status:
Green is Normal
Yellow is Alert
Red is Danger
2. Press the Condition Monitoring Dashboard button to view the
Condition Monitoring Dashboard display.
See page 124 for more information.
3. Press the PV+ Diag button to view the PanelView Plus Diagnostic
display.
See page 123 for more information.
4. Press the Alarms button to view the System Alarm displays.
See page 121 for more information.
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Dynamix Navigation Bar
The Navigation Bar, at the bottom of all the displays, lets you select any machine display. The button with a
dark grey background indicates the display that you are currently viewing.
The Navigation Bar includes these buttons:
• Main Menu button will animate grey, yellow, or red based on the status of all the machines in the
system.
– Grey Background - The button will have a grey background when no machines are in alarm.
– Yellow Background - The button will have a yellow background if any machine is in alert.
– Red Background - The button will have a red background if any machine is in danger.
• Previous Machine button lets you view the previous machine train display.
• Next Machine button lets you view the next machine train display.
• Machine Overview button provides a graphical mimic of the machine train with the sensor locations.
• Machine Bands button lets you view a graphical representation of all the diagnostic readings with the
alarm levels. The measured band values are shown using bar graphs.
• Machine Diagnostic button lets you view the Intelligent Advisory diagnostic messages for the
machine train.
• Dynamix XM Faceplate buttons let you view live data and modify the XM parameters and values.
• Trend button lets you view real time and historical trends with alarm levels.
• Alarms button lets you view the current status of all the alarms, and acknowledge alarms and reset
alarm history timers.
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The navigation buttons change when you view the Trend display. Refer to page 120 for more
information about the Trend displays.
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Dynamix Machine Mimic Display
The Machine Mimic display lets you view a graphical representation of the machine train with the sensor
locations.
Press the Machine Overview button on the Navigation Bar to view the
Machine Mimic display.
.
Sensor name
XM module name
Channel status
Overall vibration value
Fan
Motor
Motor
Channel Status Indicator
Color
Description
Green
Normal
Yellow
Alarm
Red
Danger
Speed
XM module and channel names are displayed on each sensor. The display also shows the sensor status, speed,
and live overall vibration levels.
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Dynamix Machine Bands Display
The Machine Bands display lets you view a graphical representation of all the diagnostic readings with the
alarm levels.
Press the Machine Band button on the Navigation Bar to view the Machine Bands display.
Alert alarm level Danger alarm level
Vibration level
Live data value
shown in alert
Status Indicator
Maximum
scale
Units
Color
Description
Green
Normal
Yellow
Alarm
Red
Danger
Minimum
scale
Live data value
Channel status
Speed
The bands are shown using bar graphs. Each sensor has five bands. The color of the bar graphs change
depending on the status of the alarm value. Data values and channel status are shown below the bar graphs.
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Dynamix Machine Diagnostic Display
The Machine Diagnostic display lets you view the Intelligent Advisory diagnostic messages for the machine
train.
Press the Machine Diagnostic button on the Navigation Bar to view the Machine
Diagnostic display.
Shows the most prominent fault
Lists all the faults
Channel status
Status Indicators
Color
Description
Green
Normal
Yellow
Alarm
Red
Danger
The display shows the status of the machine’s most prominent fault as well as lists all the diagnostic faults that
the Dynamix system can detect and their status.
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Dynamix Machine Trend Displays
The Machine Trend displays let you view real time and historical trends of the diagnostic readings with alarm
levels. There are five trend displays for each machine train.
1. Press the Trend button on the Navigation Bar to view the Machine Trend
displays.
The Overall Trend display
opens. This display shows
the overall vibration values
with alert levels.
2. Press the Arrow control
buttons to scroll forward,
backward, and to the current
date and time.
The trend displays shows one
week of data at a time.
Move trend
display backward
Move trend display
to current date &
time
Change trend
scale pen
Move trend
display forward
3. Press the Next Pen button to change the scale of the trend to match a different pen.
The pens represent values on the trend chart. The pen icons are displayed at the right edge of the trend
chart. Note that all pens on the same trend display use the same scale.
The pen legend is shown
at the bottom of each
trend display.
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4. Press the Trend
Navigation buttons at the
bottom of the display to
view the diagnostic trends
for each channel.
Chapter 8
Trend Navigation Buttons
The button names include the XM module name and the channel name.
Dynamix Alarm Display
The Dynamix Alarm display lets you view the current status of all alarms. There are two displays: Alarm
Summary and Alarm History.
Press the Alarms button on the Navigation Bar to view the Alarm Summary display.
* indicates
the alarm
is On
Blue
line is
the
selected
alarm
An asterisk (*) appears next to the alarm when the alarm is on or active.
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Acknowledge an Alarm
1. Select the alarm that you want to acknowledge.
The line turns blue when you select it.
2. Press the Ack Alarm button to acknowledge the selected alarm.
3. Press the Ack All Alarms button to acknowledge all active alarms in
the system.
Use the Alarm History Display
The Alarm History display lets you see how long an alarm has been active, how many times the alarm has
been triggered, and whether the alarm is still active.
1. Press the Alarm History button.
The Alarm History display opens.
Accumulated
alarms on time in
hh:mm:ss
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2. Press the Clear Alarm History button to reset the alarm
history timers.
3. Press the Sort Alarms button to change the sort order of the
alarms.
4. Press the Alarm Status Mode button to change the display to
show all alarms, show only active alarms, or show alarm
history.
5. Press the Alarms button to return to Alarm Summary display.
Dynamix Panelview Plus Diagnostic Display
The Dynamix Panelview Plus Diagnostic display opens a PanelView Plus and FactoryTalk View ME debug
screen.
Press the PV+ Config button on the Main Menu to open the PanelView Plus
Diagnostic display.
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Press the PV+ Config button again to exit the Factory Talk View ME application and open the Factory Talk
View ME Status screen. From the Factory Talk View ME screen, you can exit the application if you are
running Factory Talk View ME on a PC. If you are running Factory Talk View Me on a Panelview Plus you
can reset the terminal (reboot).
Condition Monitoring Dashboard Display
The Condition Monitoring Dashboard display lets you view the diagnostic condition of the Dynamix system.
Press the Condition Monitoring Dashboard button on the Main Menu to open the
Dashboard display.
Status Indicators
124
Color
Description
Green
Normal
Yellow
Alarm
Red
Danger
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Dynamix XM Faceplates Overview
The Dynamix XM Faceplates let you view live data and modify the XM parameters and values for each XM
module used in the surveillance system.
Pre.ss the Faceplate button on the Navigation bar to launch the Dynamix XM Faceplates.
Below is an example of the Band Settings display.
Machine name
XM module name
Faceplate toolbar
Channel 1
data
Editable
parameter
Channel 2
data
Read-only
parameter
The faceplate toolbar, at the top of all faceplates, lets you select any faceplate display. The button with a dark
grey background indicates the display that you are currently viewing. The toolbar includes these buttons:
• Live XM Data button lets you view and analyze live XM data from the XM modules.
• XM Functions button lets you give commands to the XM Add-On Instructions, for example
download a configuration to the XM module.
• Band Settings button lets you view and modify the bandwidth for each band measurement.
• Sensor Settings button lets view and modify the characteristics of the sensor on each channel.
• Spectrum Settings button lets you view and modify the spectrum measurement settings for each
channel.
• Alarm Settings button lets you modify the alarm levels and disable alarms.
• Help button lets you view version information about the Faceplate and Add-On Instructions.
• Close button closes the Faceplate.
The left side of the faceplates shows Channel 1 data. The right side shows Channel 2 data. Parameters with a
grey background are read-only parameters. Parameters with a white background are editable parameters.
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Use the Live XM Data Display
The Live XM Data display lets you monitor and analyze live data from the XM modules.
Press the Live XM Data button on the faceplate toolbar to open the Live XM Data
display.
.
TIP
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The Machine Overview display, Machine Band display, and the Machine Diagnostic display show
the fault events that exist on each vibration channel. Refer to How to Find Fault Information on
page 135 for more information.
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Use the Band Settings Display
The Band Settings display lets you view the current band measurement settings and make changes if
necessary.
Press the Band Settings button on the faceplate toolbar to open the Band Settings
display.
Editable fields. Band values
entered in Orders
Values calculated
by Logix and loaded
in XM module
Change the Frequency Values for a Band
The band values are entered in Orders.
1. Press Min to change the minimum frequency to be included in
the band measurement for the specific Band.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >minimum value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Min value is updated with the new value.
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3. Press Max to change the maximum frequency to be included in
the band measurement for a specific band.
The numeric keypad opens.
4. Enter a new >maximum value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Max value is updated with the new value.
5. Repeat the steps to change the other Min and Max values.
Adjust the Speed
1. Press Speed Input.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >speed value< from the keypad and press Enter.
IMPORTANT
Enter a zero (0) if you want to use the XM module speed.
The keypad closes and the Speed Input value is updated with the new value.
Change Number of Calculated Bands
1. Press Calculated Bands.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Calculated Bands value is updated with the new value.
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Use the Sensor Settings Display
The Sensor Settings display lets you view the current sensor settings and make changes if necessary. The
sensitivity of the transducers may be different than the machine profile defaults. The sensitivity value is
included with the transducer’s documentation or it may be imprinted on the side of the transducer.
1. Press the Sensor Settings button on the faceplate toolbar.
The Sensor Settings display
opens.
2. To change the sensitivity of the transducer, press Sensitivity.
The numeric keypad opens.
3. Enter a new >sensitivity value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Sensitivity value is updated with the new value.
4. To enable/disable power to the transducer, press Power.
The numeric keypad opens
5. Enter one of the following and press Enter.
• >1< to enable (yes) power to the transducer.
• >0< to disable (no) power to the transducer.
The keypad closes and the Power value is updated with the new value.
6. To enable/disable synchronous sampling, press Synchronous.
The numeric keypad opens
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7. Enter one of the following and press Enter.
• >1< to enable (yes) synchronous sampling.
• >0< to disable (no) synchronous sampling.
The keypad closes and the Synchronous value is updated with the new value.
8. To change the native units of the transducer, press (Sensor
Units) Change Units to cycle between the units.
Stop pressing Change Units when the unit that you want is
highlighted.
9. To change the data units of the measured values, press
(Output Units) Change Units to cycle between the units.
Stop pressing Change Units when the unit that you want is
highlighted.
Use the Spectrum Settings Display
Use the Spectrum Settings display to view the current spectrum settings and make changes if necessary.
Press the Spectrum Settings button on the faceplate toolbar to open the
Spectrum Settings display.
.
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Change Maximum Frequency for the Spectrum Measurement
1. Press FMAX for a specific channel.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >fmax value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the FMAX value is updated with the new value.
3. Repeat the steps to change the other FMAX values.
Change Number of Averages
Number of Averages sets the number of individual data sets to be included when averaging measurements.
1. Press Number of Averages for a specific
channel.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >number of averages value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Number of Averages value is updated with the new value.
3. Repeat the steps to change the other number of averages values.
Adjust the Number of Lines in the Spectrum
Number of Lines determines the frequency or order resolution of the spectrum measurement.
1. Press Number of Lines for a specific
channel.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >number of lines value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Number of Lines value is updated with the new value.
3. Repeat the steps to change the other number of lines values.
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Use the Alarm Settings Display
Use the Alarm Settings display to change the alert and danger levels and disable and enable alarms.
Press the Alarm Settings button on the faceplate toolbar to open the Alarm
Settings display
Change Alarm Levels
Each alarm supports two levels (Alert level and Danger level).
1. To modify the alert value for a specific alarm, press Alert.
The numeric keypad opens.
2. Enter a new >alert value< from the keypad and press Enter.
The keypad closes and the Alert value is updated with the new value.
3. To change the danger value for a specific alarm, press Danger.
The numeric keypad opens.
4. Enter a new >danger value< from the keypad and press Enter.
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The keypad closes and the Danger value is updated with the new value.
5. Repeat the steps to change other Alert and Danger values.
Enable/Disable Alarms
1. Press Alarm Disable for the specified alarm.
The numeric keypad opens
2. Enter one of the following and press Enter.
• >1< to disable the alarm.
• >0< to enable the alarm.
The keypad closes and the Alarm Disable value is updated with the new value.
3. Repeat the steps to disable/enable other alarms.
Perform XM Functions
Use the XM Functions display to issue commands to the XM Add-On Instructions, such as download new
configuration settings to XM module or save a configuration to non-volatile memory.
1. Press the XM Functions button on the faceplate toolbar.
The XM Functions display opens.
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2. Press the Load Default Configuration button to load the
configuration values from the Machine Profile into the XM
Add-On Instruction settings.
This overwrites any settings that you made in XM Add-On Instructions.
3. Press the Download Configuration New button to download
the XM Add-On Instructions settings to the XM module.
4. Click the Save XM Configuration button to send a message
to the XM module to save the currently loaded configuration
to non-volatile memory.
FacePlate Help Display
The Help display shows the current version information.Press the Help button on
the faceplate toolbar to open the Help display.
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How to Find Fault Information
Main Menu Display
The Main Menu display indicates if any of the machine trains are experiencing a fault condition. The name of
the fault and its severity appear on the display as shown on the illustration below.
Displays machines in a fault condition
with fault severity, level, and fault name
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Affected Bearing
Use the following displays to view the faults on each vibration channel:
• Machine Overview display (as shown in illustration below)
• Machine Band display
• Machine Diagnostic display
Machine Overview Display
Shows faulted channel
and channel location
on the machine
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Timing of Fault
The Machine Alarm display shows the time and date of when the alarm occurred.
Machine Alarm Display
Fault start date and time
You can use the Trend displays to see if the alarm was caused by a sudden increase or a gradual increase over
time.
Machine Trend Display
Trend data range
(one week)
Trend time
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Severity of Fault
The Band display (shown below) shows the actual value of the fault with a bar graph. The alarm severity
levels appear on the right and left side of the bar graph. The yellow alert bar is on the right side of the bar
graph. The red danger bar is on the left side of the bar graph.
The alarm level markers can show you how much the current vibration level is above the alarm levels.
Machine Band Display
Value of vibration in between
alert and danger alarm levels
The Trend displays (shown below) show a trend value and a trend alert level. The severity of the fault can be
seen over time by comparing the values of the trend value pen and the trend alert level pen. The alert level
pen will be a straight line horizontally across the display.
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Machine Trend Display
Green line indicates the value
of unbalance which is just
at the Alert alarm level
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Dark green line marker indicates
the unbalance Alert alarm level
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Related Faults
The Machine Overview screen can be used to identify which bearing has the highest amplitude and is the
most likely source of a vibration problem.
A more detailed view can be seen on the Band display as illustrated below. For example, a machine that has
looseness/misalignment may have this condition only across a shaft that connects the motor to the driven
device
Machine Band Display
Looseness fault on motor
driving end bearing and pump
driven end bearing are related
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Bearing fault on pump
non driven end bearing
is not related
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Additional Resources
Resource
Description
PanelView Plus Terminal User Manual,
publication 2711p-UM001
Provides descriptions and procedures for the use of the PanelView Plus terminal.
FactoryTalk View Studio online help
Contains procedures and information for all FactoryTalk View-specific topics.
XM-122 gSE Vibration User Manual, publication Provides details on how to install, configure and troubleshoot the XM module.
GMSI10-UM013
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Appendix
A
Logix Base Program Overview
The pre-configured Logix program is a Rockwell Automation solution that helps machine builders and end
users streamline their Dynamix control programming. This application template provides a basis for using
motion control, understanding the principles of state programming, and creating a consistent program
structure.
The Logix program template:
• incorporates add-on instructions programming
• integrated Dynamix Machine profile add-on instructions and Dynamix XM add-on instructions into
your controller logic.
• provides a base structure, making it easier to write, use, and manage the code for your machine and
equipment.
• provide modularity in system programming.
• streamline the development of application programs.
Basic Program Flow
DeviceNet inputs are copied into controller scope tags using RSLogix DeviceNet Tag Generator. Each
machine routine is scanned. These routines contain the Dynamix Machine Profile add-on instruction and the
Dynamix XM-122 add-on instruction. Then the DeviceNet outputs are copied back to the DeviceNet
scanner.
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Fixed Monitoring Basic Program Flow
DeviceNetInputs
DeviceNetInputs
Machine_01
DeviceNetInputs
DeviceNetOutputs
Sequential Monitoring Basic Program Flow
DeviceNetInputs
DeviceNetInputs
Machine_01
DeviceNetInputs
Machine_02-xx
Dynamix_Sequential
Monitoring AOI
Dynamix_Sequential_
Monitoring
Sequencer
Outputs
DeviceNetOutputs
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Appendix A
Machine Routine Basic Program Flow
A routine is used for each machine integrated into the Dynamix system. Each routine uses a different
instance or a different type of Dynamix Machine Profile add-on instruction for each machine being
monitored by the system. The logic for each routine follows the same structure.
Fixed Machine Routine Flow
The routines examine the Dynamix Machine Profile add-on instructions and the associated Dynamix
XM-122 add-on instructions. For the 2-channel fixed machine example, we have only one Dynamix XM-122
add-on instruction.
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Sequential Machine Routine Flow
The routines examine the Dynamix Machine Profile add-on instruction and the associated Dynamix XM-122
add-on instructions. Since the sequential system has only one physical XM-122 module, access is controlled
by the Dynamix Sequential Monitoring add-on instruction.
Add-On Instructions
The pre-configured Logix program uses pre-configured user-defined add-on instructions. Add-on
instructions provide the basis for an object-oriented programming methodology where code is encapsulated
into pre-validated modules that can be easily reused without modification. This allows you to create
standardized libraries that can both reduce project development time and provide consistency to reduce
equipment startup and training expense.
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For example, the Dynamix_XM_122_gSE add-on
instruction contains all of the logic and tags to
interface to an XM-122 module.
The XM-122 add-on instruction reconfigures the XM module, filters the XM data, denounces alarms and
publishes alarm status.
User-defined Data Types
The pre-configured Logix program uses pre-configured user-defined data types (UDT). These are structures
that organize data, status information, and commands for machine process and equipment.
User-defined data types (UDT) can be imported into a Logix application with an add-on instruction. The
DeviceNet Tag Generator also imports user-defined data types when its ladder code is generated. The
Dynamix Accelerator Toolkit Logix application user-defined data types are imported with add-on instruction
or the DeviceNet Tag Generator.
In the example below, the Dynamix_122_Alarms user-defined data type stores all the alarm data from an
XM-122 module in an integer data type. A tag structure is created for each Dynamix XM-122 add-on
instruction based on this data type.
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Logix Base Program Overview
XM-122 Alarm Data User-Defined Data Type Example
A user-defined data type provides the following advantages.
• You can organize or group data logically, so that all of the data associated with a device can be grouped
together.
• Each individual piece of data (member) has a descriptive name, which creates a level of
self-documentation for your logic.
• You can use the data type to create multiple tags with the same data layout.
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Appendix A
Notes:
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Appendix
B
Introduction to Vibration
Machines of some kind are used to produce or process nearly everything we use or consume in our daily lives.
Companies who supply us with these products or services depend on these machines. To protect themselves
from unexpected down time, many companies implement a review process to try and stay ahead of possible
breakdowns. This review process can take many forms: scheduled maintenance cycles, periodic machine
condition health measurements, or continuous machine condition health measurements. There are several
types of machine condition health measurements. This appendix introduces you to vibration concepts.
For more detailed information about vibration, refer to the Introduction to Vibration Technology document
included on the Dynamix Accelerator Toolkit CD, publication IASIMP-SP010. The document is located in
the Additional Resources folder.
Rockwell Automation also provides training on vibration technology and the use of Rockwell Automation
products in vibration analysis. Contact your local distributor or Rockwell Automation representative for
details.
What is Vibration
Vibration is simply the motion of a machine or machine part, back and forth from its position of rest.
The simplest way to show vibration is to follow the motion of a weight suspended from a spring as is shown
below. This is typical of all machines since they too have weight and spring like properties.
Until a force is applied to the weight to cause it to move, we have
no vibration. By applying an upward force, the weight would
move upward, compressing the spring. If we released the weight,
it would drop below its neutral position to some bottom limit of
travel, where the spring would stop the weight. The weight
would then travel upward through the neutral position to the top
limit of motion and then proceed to fall again through the
neutral position. This motion will continue in the same manner
as the force is reapplied. Therefore vibration is a response of a
system to some internal or external excitation (stimulus) or force
applied to the system.
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Introduction to Vibration
Vibration Parameters
There are three industry wide accepted parameters of measure for vibration.
Displacement
Displacement is the measure of the total peak to
peak travel of the rotating part in the machine or
the machine itself. An easy way to understand the
measurement of Displacement is using a simple
mass and spring. When the mass attached to the
spring is put into oscillation, the motion will trace
out as shown in the illustration.
DISPLACEMENT AMPLITUDE
PeakPeak
Displacement is measured in units of mils (.001
inch) or microns (.001 millimeters).
Velocity
Minimum
Velocity
DISPLACEMENT
Velocity is a measure of speed at which the mass is
moving (or vibrating) as it undergoes oscillating
motion. Velocity tells us the rate at which
movement of the machine is changing. In this
illustration, notice that the minimum velocity
occurs at the maximum points of displacement and
the maximum velocity is at the minimum point of
displacement.
Period
Maximum
Velocity
TIME
Velocity is measured in units of inches per second
(ips) or millimeters per second (mm/s).
Minimum
Velocity
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Appendix B
Acceleration
Acceleration is a measure of the rate of change of
velocity. The maximum acceleration occurs at the
maximum points of displacement, which is also
when velocity is at a minimum.
DISPLACEMENT
Acceleration is measured in units of g’s or
meters/sec2 (m/s2).
Maximum
Acceleration
Other Parameters
Minimum
Acceleration
TIME
Maximum
Acceleration
In addition to Displacement, Velocity, and
Acceleration, there are two other parameters
important to understand: Amplitude and Frequency. Amplitude shows how much the machine is vibrating
and frequency shows the source of the vibration.
Period and Frequency
Period is the time required to complete one full cycle
of the vibration movement. (Time per Cycle).
Frequency is the inverse of the period, or Cycles per
Time.
CPM relates directly to the machine’s Revolutions per
Minute (RPM).
DISPLACEMENT
Although traditionally measured in Hz (Cycles per
Second), in vibration analysis frequency is usually
measured in units or Cycles per Minute (CPM) (60 x
Hz).
FREQUENCY = 1 / PERIOD
PERIOD
(TIME)
Amplitude
The vibration amplitude is the primary indicator of a machine's condition. The greater the amplitude, the
more severe the vibration. Amplitude can be measured in units of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and
gSE.
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Appendix B
Introduction to Vibration
Measuring Vibration
To determine whether to use displacement, velocity, or acceleration to measure vibration, consider what
happens when a wire or a piece of sheet metal is bent repeatedly back and forth. This repeated bending
eventually causes the metal to fail due to fatigue in the area of the bend. In many respects, this is similar to the
way a component in a machine fails – from repeated cycles of flexing caused by excessive vibration.
Using an example of bending a wire or a piece of sheet metal, there are two ways to lengthen the time until
fatigue failure occurs. For one, you can decrease the amount of bend; the less you bend the metal each time,
the longer the time required to reach a critical point of fatigue. And second, you can decrease the rate that
you are flexing the metal; the fewer the number of flexes per minute, the longer the time required for failure.
The severity of this bending action is a function of how far the metal is bent (amount of displacement) and
how often the metal is bent each minute (frequency). This relates directly to machinery vibration.Vibration
severity is a function of displacement and frequency. Increasing the amount of displacement, increasing the
frequency, or increasing both the displacement and the frequency will increase the severity of the bending
action and shorten the time to fatigue failure.
The same idea applies to machinery vibration. Measurements of displacement and frequency can indicate the
severity of a vibration condition. However, because measurement of vibration velocity takes both into
account, it is reasonable to conclude that vibration velocity is a direct measure of vibration severity.
When to Use Velocity
Since vibration velocity is directly related to vibration severity, for most general purpose measurements, it is
the preferred parameter for measurement. As a rule of thumb, vibrations occurring in the 600 to 60,000 CPM
frequency range are generally best measured using velocity.
When to Use Displacement
Under conditions of dynamic stress, displacement alone may be a better indicator of severity. We discussed
the effects of repeated bending related to the failure of a piece of sheet metal, but the sheet metal we used did
not demonstrate very well one of the properties of most rigid machinery components, the property of
brittleness – the tendency to break or snap when stressed beyond a given limit.
For example, consider a slow rotating machine such as a mine hoist drum, rotating at 60 RPM with a
vibration of 20 mils peak to peak displacement from rotor unbalance. In terms of vibration velocity, 20 mils
at 60 CPM is on 0.06 in/sec pk. This would be considered a very acceptable level of vibration for general
machinery. However, keep in mind that the bearing of this machine is being deflected 20 mils. Under these
conditions, failure may occur due to stress (displacement) rather then fatigue (velocity).
Displacement is typically the best indicator of vibration severity in frequency ranges below 600 CPM.
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Appendix B
When to Use Acceleration
Acceleration is closely related to force, and relatively large forces can occur at high frequencies even though
the displacement and velocity may be small. For example, consider a measured vibration of 1.5 mils at 6000
CPM. This corresponds to a velocity of 0.471 in/sec pk which may be considered rough vibration for general
machinery. This also corresponds to an acceleration reading of 0.77g. Next consider a vibration of 0.015 mils
at a frequency of 600,000 CPM. This vibration corresponds to a velocity of 0.471 in/sec pk. But in
acceleration the reading is over 70 g's, a huge amount of force.
Excessive force can cause a breakdown of the lubrication and ultimate failure of the bearings. So for high
frequencies, above 60,000 CPM, acceleration may be the best indicator of vibration severity.
What Causes Vibration
With few exceptions, mechanical troubles in a machine cause excessive vibration. Listed below are the most
common problems that produce vibration.
• Unbalance of rotating parts
• Misalignment of couplings and bearings
• Bad bearings – antifriction type
• Bent shafts
• Worn, eccentric or damaged gears
• Bad drive belts and drive chains
• Torque variations
• Electromagnetic forces
• Aerodynamic forces
• Looseness
• Rubbing
• Resonance
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Introduction to Vibration
Monitoring Vibration
Machine running speed is what is commonly called the base frequency. This is the basis for calculating the
potential defect frequencies that might be encountered. An example is a machine train with motor, belt drive,
and fan. The speed of the fan is 3600 RPM (base frequency 3600 CPM). We can use this information to
calculate the frequencies at which we expect to see potential defects such as blade pass, bearing outer raceway
defects, unbalance, misalignment, and other problems because each problem occurs at a unique frequency.
In the example below, a fan is running at a base frequency of 3600 RPM. The fan has 3 blades and 8 ball
bearings in the measured bearing race.
Defect
Multiple of Base Frequency
Unbalance
1 x RPM (3600 RPM)
Misalignment/Looseness
2 x RPM (7200 RPM)
Blade Passing Frequency (BPF)
BPF = # Blades x RPM (3 x 3600 =10,800 RPM)
Common Bearing Defect Frequencies
> 4 x RPM
TIP
For more details on bearing defect frequency analysis, see the Introduction to
Vibration Technology document located in the Additional Resource folder on the
Dynamix Surveillance Accelerator Toolkit CD.
Notice the complexity of the wave. It would be nice if we could break this wave apart into its separate
frequencies to more easily diagnose problems.
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Appendix B
In the illustration below, we can see there is a direct connection between the time domain (time versus
amplitude) and the frequency domain (frequency versus amplitude). The complex waveform is the
summation of the simple waveforms, which are shown as spikes (1X, 3X, 5X, 9X) on the frequency spectrum
plot.
Through the application of a mathematical operation known as Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), the time
based waveform can be converted into a frequency based spectrum. This allows us to identify each frequency
and its amplitude.
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Introduction to Vibration
A vibration spectrum is a 2 plane graph. The vibration amplitude is shown on the Y axis and the frequency is
shown on the X axis. The frequency is divided up into a number of lines. These lines can number in the
hundreds or thousands based on the resolution available in the measuring equipment. These lines reflect very
narrow collections of frequencies. For a 1000 Hz spectrum with 400 lines, each line is equal to 1000/400 or
2.5 Hz. Therefore, the first line is 0 to 2.5 Hz, the second line is 2.5 to 5 Hz and so on.
Overall Vibration Level Value
For many applications, the overall vibration level is used to define the condition of a machine. The overall
vibration level is defined as all the vibration energy within a defined band of frequencies. This is the formula
used to extract the overall vibration level.
The formula consists of taking amplitudes of
all frequency lines, squaring them, adding
them, and taking the square root.
The illustration below shows the impact of
increasing the amplitude of a low frequency
vibration. This increase has a significant impact to the overall vibration level. This is due to the fact that
squaring an already large amplitude results in an ever larger overall value.
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The following illustration shows the impact on the overall vibration level when a high frequency problem
begins to increase in a machine. This increase has a much lower impact on the overall vibration level.
Therefore, the overall vibration level is better suited for detecting vibration issues that typically occur at lower
frequencies, but not for higher frequency issues, such as bearing failure.
Since the response to a change in amplitude can be frequency dependent, there is a technique that allows us
to focus on specific frequencies and track their amplitude changes independent of the overall amplitude
change. This technique is called Banding.
Banding
Banding is defined as the creation of a specific group of frequencies which relate to a specific machine failure
mode. Here is a list of common terms to assist in understanding Banding.
• Band Value - This is amount of measured energy in units of acceleration, velocity, or displacement
inside the frequency window defined for the Band.
• Bandwidth - The width of the frequencies stipulated by the subtracting the minimum frequency from
the maximum frequency of interest when setting up a band.
• Band Alarm - This is an alarm that operates based on the value of energy in a specified range of
frequencies.
• One Times Band - Normally expressed as 1X Band. This band is set at the running speed of the
machine. Note that unbalance typically has a large amount of energy at one times the machine running
speed.
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Introduction to Vibration
The following illustrations show the effect of Banding applied to a spectrum. For this illustration, we will
construct four bands.
Each of the Bands (1 to 4) is configured over the ranges as shown above. The frequencies are represented in
multiples of the machines base frequency, also known as orders. The first order is the 1X running speed of
the machine. For our example above this would be 3600 RPM. The second order is the 2X running speed or
7200 RPM.
The bars represent vibration present at the given frequencies, and the amplitude of the bar represents the
severity of the vibration. The presence of vibration at 1X and 2X, the base frequency can be used to diagnose
machine vibration issues as shown. Note that the presence of vibration at 8X base implies an 8 blade fan may
be involved.
Additionally, by monitoring changes in vibration amplitude over time, potential problems can be identified as
indicated in this illustration. Here an alarm on Blade Pass is indicated.
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Appendix B
Detecting Bearing Issues with Spike Energy™ (gSE)
When flaws or defects begin to form in a bearing, the resulting vibration will appear as a series of short
duration spikes or pulses. The duration or "period" of each pulse generated by an impact depends on the
physical size of the flaw. The smaller the flaw, the shorter the pulse period. As the size of the defect increases,
the period of the pulse becomes longer. In the case of the pulses generated by initial bearing defects, the
periods are very short. Since the inverse of the period is frequency this means the vibration signal is seen at
very high frequencies. As time progresses, the flaw in the bearing becomes larger, the period becomes longer,
and the frequency becomes lower. Through experimentation it has been found that by the time the
fundamental pulse frequency has reduced to 5K Hz, bearing deterioration has generally reached a severe
level. To perform this measurement, Rockwell Automation developed specialized circuitry and created a
unique name to reflect the nature of the waveform produced, Spike Energy (gSE).
Spike Energy is a measure of the intensity of energy generated by repetitive transient impacts. These impacts
can be produced by surface flaws in rolling-element bearings, gear teeth or other metal-to-metal contacts,
such as rotor rub, insufficient bearing lubrication, etc. Spike Energy is also sensitive to pump cavitations, high
pressure steam or air flow, turbulence in liquids, control valve noise, etc.
Spike Energy measurement utilizes an accelerometer to detect the vibration energy over a pre-determined
high frequency range. The impacts tend to excite the mounted natural frequencies of the accelerometer as
well as the natural frequencies of machine components and structures. These resonant frequencies act as
carrier waves for the defect frequency. The intensity of impact energy is a function of pulse amplitude and
repetition rate.
Since its introduction, Spike Energy has been used successfully in many industrial applications and gained
acceptance in various industries. Spike Energy measurement can provide early indications of machinery faults
and is a very useful tool in vibration analysis. In addition to Spike Energy overall measurement, Spike Energy
spectrum and Spike Energy time waveform are available and used in diagnostic analysis.
The illustration shows a Rolling Element Bearing
with a cracked outer race.
Because this condition would produce a high
frequency vibration with a relatively small amplitude,
it would be difficult to detect using overall vibration
levels.
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Introduction to Vibration
The top graph is Overall Vibration, which shows no indication of the bearing issue while the bottom graph,
gSE Spike Energy signal, clearly shows an issue is developing.
Vibration Transducers
Vibration transducers are devices designed to sense the physical motion of a machine or a machine part and
convert this physical motion into an analog voltage output. For more information about transducers, refer to
Appendix C.
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Notes:
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Appendix
C
Plan Sensor Location and Installation
Selecting the vibration transducer is the first and key component in a measurement chain. Your selection
must exactly reproduce the characteristics being measured. Any information missed or distorted by the
transducer cannot be recovered later.
This appendix will help you with the process of selecting and installing vibration transducers.
Types of Transducers
There are three types of sensors commonly used in machinery condition monitoring.
• Accelerometers
• Velocity Transducers
• Non-contact Displacement Transducers
Accelerometers
An accelerometer is a seismic transducer made of a piezoelectric material which develops a charge output
based on the amount of applied force. The accelerometer picks up signals through direct contact with a
machine surface. Accelerometers are most effective when used on machines with rolling element bearings or
machines which transmit most of the machine movement to the housing of the machine. Accelerometers are
good general purpose transducers for measuring vibration in machines such as pumps, fans, motors and
general plant equipment.
Accelerometers are well suited in detecting the following machine frequencies.
• Shaft: 1x rpm, 2x rpm, Nx rpm
• Bearing frequencies
• Gear mesh frequencies
• Early detection of micro flaws in bearing races via Spike Energy (gSE)
There are two types of accelerometers.
• Voltage Output Accelerometer - This type of accelerometer has internal integrated electronics that
convert the charge signal of the crystal into a voltage. It is used for most general purpose applications.
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• Charge Output Accelerometer - This type of accelerometer requires additional electronics and
special low noise cable. It is used for high temperature applications.
Velocity Transducers
A velocity transducer is a seismic transducer. Like the accelerometer, this transducer picks up signals directly
(in contact with) a machine. Velocity transducers are most effective when used on machines with rolling
element bearings or machines that transmit most of the machine movement to the housing of the machine.
Velocity transducers are good general purpose transducers for measuring vibration in machines such as many
pumps, fans, motors and general plant equipment.
Velocity transducers are well suited in detecting the following machine frequencies of interest.
• Shaft : 1x rpm, 2x rpm, Nx rpm
• Some bearing frequencies
• Some gear mesh frequencies
There are two types of velocity transducers.
• Coil and magnet assembly where the coil is moving through the magnetic field.
• Accelerometer based assembly where an internal circuit integrates the acceleration signal and delivers a
velocity output.
Non-contact Displacement Transducers
A non-contact displacement transducer measures movement using an Eddy Current Field (magnetic field).
To do this, the non-contact transducer must be placed in close proximity to the machine part whose
movement is to be measured. Non-contacts are the best choice if the machine is medium to large and has a
journal (sleeve) bearing.
A non-contact displacement transducer system consists of three parts.
• The probe mounted in the machine.
• The extension cable that connects the probe to the probe driver.
• The probe driver (the electronics that drive the probe, detect the signal changes and generate the output
signal that is proportional to the machine vibration).
Non-contacts are traditionally installed in pairs called X position and Y position. And they are mounted 90
degrees apart.
For applications which require a non-contact displacement transducer, please contact Rockwell Automation
for assistance in selecting the correct devices.
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Appendix C
Below are the advantages and disadvantages of each sensor. Use this information to help you select your
sensor.
Sensor Advantages & Disadvantages
This sensor
Has these advantages:
Has these disadvantages:
Accelerometer
• traditionally the lowest cost vibration
transducer
• in some applications (gas turbines), the wide
frequency range allows them to pick up
extraneous signals which complicate accurate
vibration measurements
• measures vibrations ranging from 0.2 Hz to
30 Hz
Coil Magnet Velocity Sensor
• has no moving parts
• limited temperature range with the integrated
electronics
• works in temperatures as high as 900 °F
(482 °C) with low concern for noise in the
signal
• normally more expensive than accelerometers
• narrow frequency ranges which remove
unwanted signals in gas turbine
applications
Accelerometer Velocity Sensor
• removes the need for dual integration at the
vibration monitor to measure machine
vibration displacement
• better low and high frequency response
then the coil and magnet systems
Non-contact Displacement Sensor • signal from the transducer is a direct
measurement of the shaft movement inside
the bearing
• moving parts tend to wear out
• four bolt pattern instead of a single stud mount
• narrower frequency range which can remove
wanted signals specifically in low frequency
applications such as cooling tower fans
• normally more expensive than accelerometers
since they have more circuitry
• cannot use Spike Energy (gSE) for early
detection of bearing failure
• costly
• measures movement down to 0.0167 Hz
• Machine must be drilled and tapped or special
bracketing must be made for installation. You
cannot use epoxy on this transducer system.
• used for static measurements such as
machine thrust in steam turbine
applications
• Care must be applied during installation to
correctly space the probe tip from the shaft
surface
• best used for sleeve/journal bearing
applications on large machines
• Work only with a specific pickup, extension
cable and probe driver. You cannot intermix
these parts with other parts or parts from other
suppliers without possible system failure.
Sensor Selection
The process of selecting a sensor that will work for any given application can be generalized into the
following questions:
1. What temperature will the transducer will be exposed to?
2. What is the machine’s running speed?
3. How much space is available to mount the transducer?
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4. What kind of bearing (rolling element/anti-friction or sleeve/journal) is being measured?
5. How much moisture is present where the transducer is mounted?
6. Are there any hazardous area certifications?
For many applications, the following specifications will be true.
• Temperature - -54 °C (-65 °F)...121 °C (250 °F)
• Machine running speed - 300 rpm...7200 rpm
• Bearings - balls or rollers, commonly called rolling element or anti-friction.
• Diameter space - 1.25 ft diameter space with 8 ft headroom available to mount the transducer.
• Moisture - some moisture will be present but the transducer will never be submerged or subjected to
direct high pressure spray.
• Hazardous area - machine is not in a hazardous area or one that requires certifications.
If your application meets the above specifications, you may be able to use the 9300 Low Cost Accelerometer.
For applications that do not meet the above specifications, please contact Rockwell Automation for
assistance in selecting the right transducer.
9000 Series Accelerometers
The 9000 Series of accelerometers and velocity transducers cover a wide range of applications including low
frequency (less than 0.2 Hz), high frequency (up to 30 kHz), high temperature (up to 250 °C/500 °F), and
velocity output (internal integrator). The 9000 Series accelerometers are designed as shear mode
accelerometers. This design removes possible measurement errors caused by base flexing (common in
gearbox and machine tool applications), and temperature sensitivity from fast temperature changes (common
in processing machinery such as cranes, conveyors and pumps).
The 9000 Series accelerometers provide high frequency response allowing the capture of signals relating to
early bearing failure using Rockwell Automation's Spike Energy measurement. Here is a description of the
popular accelerometers to assist you in the selection process.
9300 Accelerometer
The 9300 Accelerometer is a low cost general purpose transducer. The 9300 accelerometer is good for many
general vibration applications such as small to medium motors, fans, blowers and pumps.
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9000A Accelerometer
The 9000A Accelerometer is a step above the 9300 and is a value choice where tight sensitivity specifications
are required. The 9000A has the same tight sensitivity as a premium priced accelerometer (+/- 5%) but is not
premium priced. The 9000A is a good choice where general purpose vibration measurements are made on
motors, fans, blowers, pumps, conveyors and general purpose rotating machinery.
9100 Accelerometer
The 9100 Accelerometer is a premium transducer. With its tight sensitivity (+/-5%), lower noise level and
wide frequency range (0.2 Hz...10 kHz) the 9100 is the accelerometer to select in applications where a single
transducer must perform well across a wide and diversified range of machines.
9100L Accelerometer
The 9100L Accelerometer is specifically designed for low frequency applications. With its high sensitivity
(500 mV/g) and very low Broadband Spectral noise (15 ug), the 9100L is the accelerometer to select in
applications like cooling tower fans and slow moving machinery.
Please contact Rockwell Automation if assistance is needed in selecting the proper accelerometer.
Mounting Accelerometer and Velocity Transducers
Best Mounting Practices
The most common practice is to mount the transducer directly to the machine. Most accelerometers and
many velocity transducers are designed to be stud mounted with a 1/4-28 threaded hole in the base. Follow
these mounting practices when mounting accelerometer and velocity transducers
• Get as close to the bearing, shaft, or gear that is to be measured.
• Make sure the mounting surface is a rigid structure mechanically and is directly connected to the
machine part to be measured (avoid the bell end of motors).
• Horizontal mounting is typical in most single transducer installations.
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Preparing the Surface
It is critical to prepare a flat, smooth and clean area at least as large as the base of the transducer. If the
surface is not prepared properly, some of the vibration energy will be lost and other sources of false signals
such as chatter (rocking back and forth of the transducer on the mounting surface) will be created.
Rockwell Automation recommends following the API 670 requirements for surface finish and flatness.
• Spot face the surface, then drill and tap a hole in the machine case or bearing housing where you want
to install the accelerometer. The surface finish should be within 0.8 micrometers (0.032 mil or 32
microinches) and flatness should be below 25 micrometers (1 mil).
• Clean the finished area to remove any rust, dirt, paint, or grease.
• Insert a set screw leaving enough of the screw above the machine case to attach the sensor. Typically
about 1/4 inch.
• Apply a thin coating of grease or silicone RTV to the surface.
• Use a torque wrench to attach the accelerometer.
Typical Surface Preparation Diagram
1.1 Times
Sensor Diameter
C
°
T 1
.001
B
170
√
C
A
A (in.)
B (in.)
Torque (in. lbs.)
TIP
64
1/4-28 Stud 1/4-28 Captive Screw
.250
.250
.350
.350
26
30
For transducers with three or four bolt mounting patterns, follow the same surface preparation
but drill and tape the additional holes. Adhesive is not suitable for these types of transducers.
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Appendix C
Mounting Sensors with Adhesive
If you cannot drill a hole into the machine surface, you can mount the accelerometer using adhesive. You can
mount the accelerometer directly to the machine, or you can mount a flat plate with a threaded stud. We
recommend mounting the flat plate with a threaded stud because it allows for easy removal of the
accelerometer when the machine needs servicing.
Adhesive
Comment
Loctite 325 with 707 Activator
Cyanoacrylate adhesive. Single component; sets up quickly; use at temperatures
below 200 °F (93 °C); surface must be clean and smooth, and remove by twisting
the accelerometer.
Versilok 406 - Lord Chemical Products
Structural adhesive. Water resistant; useful to 250 °F (121 °C); cures to full
properties at room temperature in 24 hours.
Mounting Sensors with a Bracket
Sometimes an accelerometer will not fit at the desired location because of an obstruction or a suitable flat
surface is not available. In these cases, it may be necessary to use a bracket extending from the machine at or
near the desired measurement point.
Make sure the bracket does not introduce any
extraneous vibrations. The bracket must not
bend or flex. Even a small amount of flexing
may result in unreliable vibration measurements.
As a general rule, even the shortest bracket will
require fabrication from ½ inch steel plate. The
bracket can be bolted or welded to the machine
(the more rigid the better) as shown in
illustration.
If you have any questions or concerns, contact
Rockwell Automation for assistance in bracket
placement and design.
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Mounting Examples
The following illustrations show some typical machine trains.
1. Centrifugal
Compressor Mounting
Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical (Y)
direction. The side view
shows transducer
mounting points in the
horizontal (X) direction.
2. Centrifugal Pump
Mounting Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical (Y)
direction. The side view
shows transducer
mounting points in the
horizontal (X) direction.
3. Agitator Mounting
Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical (Y)
direction. The side view
shows transducer
mounting points in the
horizontal (X) direction.
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Appendix C
4. Cooling Tower Fan
Mounting Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical
(Y) direction. The side
view shows transducer
mounting points in the
horizontal (X)
direction.
5. Fans & Blowers
Mounting
Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical
(Y) direction. The
side view shows
transducer mounting
points in the
horizontal (X)
direction.
6. Mixers Mounting
Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical
(Y) direction. The side
view shows
transducer mounting
points in the
horizontal (X)
direction.
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Appendix C
Plan Sensor Location and Installation
7. Motor/Generator
Sets Mounting
Example
The top view shows
transducer mounting
points in the vertical
(Y) direction. The
side view shows
transducer mounting
points in the
horizontal (X)
direction.
Additional Guidelines
• Typical best practice on large critical machines is to mount two accelerometers 90 degrees from each
other. One at the top (vertical or Y position) of the bearing and the other on the side of the bearing
(horizontal or X position). If two transducers are too costly, then use one and mount in the horizontal
direction.
• On small machine trains (Motor/Gear box/Pump) with direct coupling and a shaft less then 6 inches
between machines, a single accelerometer can be used to make the measurement for both bearing
points.
• Miss-alignment is typically detected by collecting an Axial (front face of bearing or Z position)
measurement.
• For low speed machines (300 rpm or slower), consider using the 9100L accelerometer.
• For high temperature (above 300 °F or 148 °C) installations, contact Rockwell Automation for
assistance in selecting the transducer.
Mounting Non-contact Displacement Transducers
Best Mounting Practices
Follow these mounting practices when mounting non-contact displacement transducers.
• Get as close to the bearing, shaft, or gear that is to be measured.
• Make sure the mounting surface is a rigid structure mechanically and is directly connected to the
machine part to be measured (avoid the bell end of motors).
• XY mounting is typical in most non-contact displacement transducer installations. Refer to Mounting
Examples on page 177.
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Appendix C
Mounting Guidelines
Here is a list of additional guidelines to consider when mounting non-contact displacement transducers.
• Rockwell Automation non-contact systems are available in two standard lengths, 5 meters and 9 meters.
If a different length is needed, contact Rockwell Automation.
• The probe can NOT be directly connected to the probe driver. The extension cable must be used.
• The extension cable can NOT be shortened.
• Excess cable is normally wound up in the probe driver housing.
• Standard non-contact systems are calibrated for a
target of 4140 steel. Other material will impact the
response curve. This does not mean the non-contact
transducer can not be used. A response curve must
be run with the non-contact to establish the
non-contacts sensitivity. At this point, you will be
able to decide if the non contact is suitable for the
application. See illustration for examples of
sensitivity changes from different targets.
• Non-contacts are used for static measurements as
well as vibration. A thrust measurement is a typical
static measurement.
• The mounting support needs to be as rigid as
possible. A weak mounting bracket may produce
ghost signals (signals created by the resonance of the
bracket) that will increase the overall measured
vibration and create a false trip of the machine.
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Plan Sensor Location and Installation
• The target surface must be free of scratches. If
it is not then false readings will be generated as
shown in the illustration.
• If the 3 times tip diameter clearance is not
available, shielded non-contacts may be
required. Please contact Rockwell Automation
for assistance.
Installing a non-contact sensor has
the following rules.
1. The machine target must be 3
times the surface area on the
non-contact probe diameter.
For example, if you are using
an 8 mm (3/8 in) probe, the
target surface area must have
a diameter of 24 mm (1 in).
2. There can not be any
obstructions for a space of 3
times the tip diameter around
the probe tip.
3. To avoid interaction between
two probes mounted
side-by-side, there must be a
clearance of 10 times the
diameter from adjacent probe
tip sides.
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Appendix C
Non-contacts are set at a defined distance from the target. To do this, use a feeler gauge, as illustrated below.
Mounting Examples
The sensor can be mounted on the outside of the bearing housing as shown below.
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Appendix C
Plan Sensor Location and Installation
The illustration below shows a view across the face of the bearing housing, perpendicular to the shaft.
Cables
Accelerometers, like the Rockwell Automation 9000 series, are well-suited
for driving long cables at frequencies up to 10 kHz. For high frequency or
transient testing over long cable (>100 ft or 30 m), the maximum
frequency is a function of C, V and Ic.
EXAMPLE
100 ft 30 pF/ft cable C = 3000 pF, sensor V = 5 V, Ic = 2 mA,
fmax = 10.2 kHz
Bulk Cable Recommendation
• Accelerometers - Belden 8761, PVC Insulation, 60 °C Max, or Belden 88761, Teflon FEP Insulation,
200 °C Max
• Non-contact sensors - Belden 8771, PVC Insulation, 60 °C Max, or Belden 88770, Teflon FEP
Insulation, 200 °C Max
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Appendix C
Cable Insulation Characteristics
Listed below are the characteristics of both PVC and FEP Teflon. In many applications, the use of PVC will
lower the cost. We advise you review the environment and carefully select the correct cable insulation.
Belden Cable Properties
Properties
PVC
FEP Teflon
Oxidation resistance
Excellent
Outstanding
Oil resistance
Fair
Outstanding
Low temperature flexibility
Poor to Good
Outstanding
Weather, sun resistance
Good to Excellent
Outstanding
Abrasion resistance
Fair to Good
Excellent
Electrical properties
Fair to Good
Excellent
Water resistance
Fair to Good
Excellent
Acid resistance
Good to Excellent
Excellent
Aliphatic hydrocarbon Gasoline, Kerosene, etc. resistance
Poor
Excellent
Alcohol resistance
Poor to Fair
Excellent
Underground burial
Poor to Good
Excellent
Grounding Requirements
• There should be only one ground in the system to avoid ground loop. Ground loop can introduce
erroneous signals.
• For permanent installations, use two conductor shielded cables for accelerometers or three conductor
shielded cables for non contacts to prevent electromagnetic (EMI) or radio frequency interference
(RFI). The shield should only be terminated at one end.
• Typically the shield is left open or not connected at the sensor end. It is tied to earth ground at the
instrumentation end.
• In the case of Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) that generate large amount of Radio Frequency (RF),
special shielding techniques are required. Contact Rockwell Automation for assistance.
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Appendix C
Plan Sensor Location and Installation
Mounting Accessories
Rockwell Automation offers the following items to assist in the installation of accelerometers.
Spot Face Tool
Spot face tools (for 1.25" diameter) quickly prepare
machinery surfaces for installation. The spot face tool is part
number EK-42053.
Flat Mounting Pads
Flat mounting pads accommodate magnetically mounted
sensors and may be adhesively attached or welded to machine
surfaces.
It is 1" diameter with 1/4 - 28 threaded hole. The flat
mounting pad is part number EK-44156.
Motor Fin Mounting Pads
The motor fin mounting pads are glued or welded to a motor
fin so the tip of the mounting pad is solidly held against the
motor housing. This allows vibration monitoring of motors
where no clearance has been allocated in the motor’s design
for a transducer mount.
– Part number EK-48253 (1.375" length)
– Part number EK-48255 (1.625" length)
– Part number EK-48254 (2.125" length)
– Part number EK-48256 (2.375" length)
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Appendix C
Epoxy
In applications where drilling and taping a mounting hole for the accelerometer is not practical, Rockwell
Automation offers epoxy. Based on the cost of an accelerometer, we advise against using epoxy to directly
adhere an accelerometer to a machine. This would not allow easy removal of the accelerometer when it came
time to service the machine. When an epoxy mount is required, we recommend you epoxy a flat mounting
pad or a fin mounting pad to the machine. This allows the accelerometer to be easily installed and removed
from the threaded mounting pad.
The epoxy part number is EK-44801. Each epoxy packet has sufficient epoxy to mount two mounting pads.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
9000 Series Accelerometer Selection Guide,
publication GMSI10-SG003
Provides information on accelerometers, accessories and other information to help you
select the proper accelerometer for your application.
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Plan Sensor Location and Installation
Notes:
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Appendix
D
Check COM Port Conflicts
If you have RSLinx running on your computer it may create a conflict on your COM port. Follow these steps
to remove the RSLinx conflict.
1. Launch RSLinx software.
2. Under Communications,
select Configure Drivers.
3. Select the driver that is
causing the COM port
conflict and click Stop.
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Appendix D
Check COM Port Conflicts
Stop RSLinx
RSLinx Classic and RSLinx Enterprise both run as a service by default. If you stopped the driver but there is
still a conflict, you may need to stop RSLinx Classic and RSLinx Enterprise
Stop RSLinx Classic
1. Launch RSLinx Classic Control Panel.
2. Click Stop.
Stop RSLinx Enterprise
1. Go to Start>Settings>Control Panel>Administrative Tools.
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Appendix D
2. Double-click Services.
3. Right-click RSLinx Enterprise and select Stop.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
RSLinx Classic Getting Results, publication
Linx-GR001
Provides information on how to get started using RSLinx Classic.
RSLinx Enterprise Getting Results, publication
LNXENT-GR001
Provides information on hot to get started using RSLinx Enterprise.
Tech Note # 49690 available at:
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/knowled
gebase/
Provides a description of a Com port error and its solution.
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Appendix D
Check COM Port Conflicts
Notes:
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Appendix
E
Rockwell Automation Project Services
If you are installing a new online condition monitoring system, or refurbishing an existing one, Rockwell
Automation can help you from start to finish. From setting up and commissioning standalone online
monitoring to complete installation of large, complex monitoring solutions, you will receive skilled resources
to ensure successful implementation of your project – from planning and design through installation, testing
and operation.
Base Functions
Project services required for sequential monitoring applications include the following base functions.
• Project Coordination
• Panel layout drawings
• Electrical drawing package
• Programming
• XM start up
• Surveillance system start up
• Logix and HMI customization
• Emonitor database start up
• Factory acceptance testing
Additional Functions
The following additional project services are available as required.
• Sensor installation engineering
• Sensor installation drawings
• Sensor installation onsite
• Site acceptance testing, start up, and commissioning
• Employee training
• Sub-contract management
• Turnkey project management
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Appendix E
Rockwell Automation Project Services
Dynamix1000 Custom Configured Sub-Panel
The Dynamix1000 system package will centrally coordinate project
documentation, sub-panel assembly, factory acceptance testing and
initial configuration of sample code Add-On Instructions.
Project coordination is in place from the receipt of an order through
the customer sign off. An internal Project Coordinator will be
assigned to put together a full equipment documentation package
and act as the point of contact and provide hardware installation
designs. The Project Coordinator will centrally supervise the
assembly, wiring and testing of each purchased sub-panel.
The completed sub-panel will be delivered to site along with standard panel wiring diagrams. The electrical
design package will consist of a standard system overview drawing and panel layout for each sub-panel.
Services Scope of Supply
Customer
Rockwell Automation
Project Coordination
X
Sub-Panel Assembly & Acceptance Testing
X
Dynamix Instructions & Faceplate Configuration
X
Electrical Drawing Package
X
Electrical Implementation
X
Mechanical Design & Implementation
X
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Appendix E
Notes:
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Appendix E
190
Rockwell Automation Project Services
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Appendix
F
Rockwell Automation Support Services
With Rockwell Automation Services, you will receive tailored solutions to help you implement your
Condition-based Maintenance (CbM) program. Services available to you include:
• Reliability Services
• Contract Services
• Callout Services
• Predictive Maintenance Mentoring Program
Reliability Services
Reliability Services give you the capability to see where you are today and create a maintenance strategy that
will meet your goals of the future.
To identify problem areas, Rockwell Automation conducts a reliability audit to benchmark Key Performance
Indicators (KPI) and create a strategic maintenance plan that optimizes your CbM program. Rockwell
Automation reliability specialists can then help you implement and manage the CbM program to assure
defined goals and objectives are achieved.
Our program specialists will advise you on program content, machinery criticality, collection frequencies,
alarm parameters, and appropriate monitoring technologies – or we can run your CbM program for you.
Our experience in large and small facilities across a range of industries coupled with a successful track record
and international service and support will help you evaluate the need for, and implement, a cost-effective
CbM strategy – or you can use our expertise to help fine tune your existing one.
Services include reliability audits, results assurance, and program management.
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Appendix F
Rockwell Automation Support Services
Contact Services
When you need to turn condition monitoring data into actionable CbM information, Rockwell Automation
can provide the certified resources for analysis of vibration, Infrared Thermography, oil and other condition
monitoring technologies. Services include data collection, vibration analysis, oil analysis, infrared
thermography, program management and online reporting tools.
A remote online reliability monitoring and analysis service is also available which provides expert analysis
based on remote connection to the on site surveillance system.
Callout Services
Do you occasionally need a fan balanced, Infrared Thermography performed or a critical oil analysis
completed to supplement your existing CbM program? Or, do you have a reliability problem that just can't be
solved? Our condition monitoring specialists are available on a callout basis to give you the help you need,
when you need it.
Callout services include standard vibration analysis and rotor balancing, Infrared Thermography, Condition
Monitoring System integrity, and high end analysis.
Mentoring Program
Rockwell Automation can provide a complete solution to take you from not having a Predictive Maintenance
program to a fully functioning, internally operated program. This includes a full range of formal and informal
training programs, remote data analysis services, and the hardware and software required to implement
manual or automated data collection programs.
In starting a program, it is essential that support and training is available in the right combination to ensure
that measurable benefits are achieved from the beginning and that you are fully qualified to assume
responsibility for the program in the future. At the same time, it is important to deliver these services and
training to you in a cost effective manner.
Rockwell Automation offers a 3-year mentoring program to assist you with getting your program functioning
and then optimized. The Rockwell Automation program is built on data collection being performed by you
and data analysis being performed remotely by Rockwell Automation vibration analysts. This is called our
Reliability On-Line program.
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Appendix F
• A Rockwell Automation Field Service Professional will come to your site for the initial program setup.
Our analyst will work with you to identify all of the machinery to include in the program, configure the
Emonitor database, and plan the data collection routes. The analyst will also install the Emonitor
software on your computer, and teach you how to load routes and collect data using the Enpac 2500
data collector. You will be instructed on loading data into your Emonitor database and uploading the
data to our server for remote analysis.
• Once the initial setup is complete, you will be responsible for the monthly data collection according to
the established data collection routes, and uploading the data to our server. The analyst will evaluate
your data and report the results back to you via a secure web site reporting tool within five business
days. Specific issues will be flagged and recommended remediation will be defined. Through monthly
conference calls and Web-Ex, the analyst will review the analysis with you and explain how remediation
recommendations were reached. You will be instructed on which Emonitor tools to use to facilitate the
analysis.
• During the first year of the program, your designated analyst will attend the Emonitor Basic
(EK-ICM141) and Vibration Analysis: Level I training classes.
• At the end of the first year, you will be capable of independently operating a basis vibration analysis
program.
• During the second year of the mentoring program, you will take the lead in analyzing the data each
month but will continue to upload the data to our analyst. Your analyst will be responsible for making
all the initial problem calls. The Rockwell Automation analyst will continue to independently evaluate
all the data and will review your maintenance recommendations. Our analyst will continue the monthly
conference calls and Web-Ex sessions to review the analysis results with your analyst, and to
demonstrate methods to more effectively analyze the data.
• Later in the second year, your analyst will attend the Emonitor Advanced and the Vibration Analysis:
Level II training classes.
• In the third year, you will function independently. Data will be uploaded to our server, but the data will
only be reviewed quarterly or upon request. Your analyst will attend the Vibration Analysis: Level III
training class.
• At the end of the third year, you will be fully capable of internally operating a high quality and very
effective PdM program.
• At all stages, our analyst will assist you in documenting and reporting the value of the program. Our
analyst will work with you to determine if additional technologies (oil analysis, thermography, ultrasonic
evaluation, etc.) need to be added to the program.
If at any time you decide that the resource requirements for an internally operated PdM program exceed the
desired investment levels, Rockwell Automation can provide complete data analysis services for as long as
desired under the Reliability On-Line program. Conversely, if Rockwell Automation provides the analysis
service under a Reliability On-Line contract, you still own all the data that has been collected and can assume
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Appendix F
Rockwell Automation Support Services
responsibility for the program at any time with all historical data loaded into the on-site database.
Table F.1 Hardware and Software Supplied
Catalog Number
Description
1441-PEN25-2C
Enpac 2500 with Standard accessories
1441-PEN25-KIT-BAL
Enpac 2500 Two Plane Balancing upgrade with Hardware Kit
EK-45148
Model 9000A Standard Accel Kit (includes accelerometer, cable, and magnet base)
Option A
9309-ODBS000ENE
Emonitor Workstation Unlimited (single PC only)
(Gupta/Centura database server is included)
Option B
9309-ODDX000ENF
Emonitor Factory Unlimited (networked - two simultaneous users)
(Database server not included. Requires MS SQL or Oracle)
Table F.2 Services Supplied
Catalog Number
Description
CSCMCONMENTOR-SERV
Program setup plus Emonitor install and training (4 days)
Monthly data analysis for 50 machines plus monthly mentoring via Web-Ex and
phone (2 years total)
Quarterly data analysis for 50 machines plus quarterly mentoring via Web-Ex and
phone (1 year total)
EK-ICM141
Emonitor Basic
EK-ICM101
Vibration Analysis Fundamentals
EK-ICM201
Vibration Analysis: Level I
EK-ICM221
Emonitor Advanced
EK-ICM261
Vibration Analysis: Level II
EK-ICM301
Vibration Analysis: Level III
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Appendix F
Notes:
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Appendix F
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Network Worksheet
EtherNet/IP
Enter EtherNet/IP data in the following table. Ethernet addresses (MAC) should be entered by using digits
1...9 and letters A...F. An example Ethernet address (MAC) is 00:00:BC:21:D7:BE.
Data For
Ethernet Address (MAC)
Assigned IP Address
Controller
Computer
Not needed.
PanelView Plus terminal Not needed.
For all EtherNet/IP addresses, the subnet mask is:
______.______.______.______
This quick start uses the example EtherNet/IP subnet mask:
225 255 255
0
______.______.______.______
DeviceNet Network
1769-SDN Module Information
Series No.
Node No.
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197
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Rockwell Automation
Support
Rockwell Automation provides technical information on the Web to assist you in using
its products. At http://support.rockwellautomation.com, you can find technical
manuals, a knowledge base of FAQs, technical and application notes, sample code and
links to software service packs, and a MySupport feature that you can customize to
make the best use of these tools.
For an additional level of technical phone support for installation, configuration, and
troubleshooting, we offer TechConnect support programs. For more information,
contact your local distributor or Rockwell Automation representative, or visit
http://support.rockwellautomation.com.
Installation Assistance
If you experience a problem within the first 24 hours of installation, please review the
information that's contained in this manual. You can also contact a special Customer
Support number for initial help in getting your product up and running.
United States
1.440.646.3434
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm EST
Outside United
States
Please contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for any
technical support issues.
New Product Satisfaction Return
Rockwell Automation tests all of its products to ensure that they are fully operational
when shipped from the manufacturing facility. However, if your product is not
functioning and needs to be returned, follow these procedures.
United States
Contact your distributor. You must provide a Customer Support case
number (call the phone number above to obtain one) to your distributor
in order to complete the return process.
Outside United
States
Please contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for the
return procedure.
Publication IASIMP-QS012A-EN-E - August 2008 199
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