Sigma 950 Full User Manual - English/Outside of Europe

Sigma 950 Full User Manual - English/Outside of Europe
DOC026.53.80408
Sigma 950
05/2014, Edition 3
User Manual
Table of Contents
Specifications ..............................................................................................................5
Factory installed options ..............................................................................................6
General information ................................................................................................10
Safety information ......................................................................................................11
Use of hazard information ..................................................................................11
Precautionary labels ...........................................................................................11
Confined space precautions ...............................................................................12
Certification ......................................................................................................... 12
FCC requirements ..............................................................................................13
Product overview .......................................................................................................14
Installation ...................................................................................................................14
Installation requirements for CE marked instruments ................................................ 14
Installation guidelines ................................................................................................15
Install a power supply (optional) ................................................................................15
Mechanical installation ............................................................................................... 16
Wall mounting (optional) .....................................................................................16
Suspension harness mounting (optional) ........................................................... 17
Manhole rung hanger mounting (optional) .......................................................... 17
Electrical installation ..................................................................................................17
Connector ports ..................................................................................................17
Connect to power ...............................................................................................18
Connect to a sampler (optional) .........................................................................18
Connect to sensors ............................................................................................. 18
Connect a submerged area/velocity bare-lead sensor cable to a
junction box .................................................................................................19
Connect an ultrasonic bare-lead sensor cable to a junction box ................. 21
Connect to a bubbler area/velocity sensor (optional) ......................................... 21
Optional device wiring ........................................................................................21
Connect a rain gauge (optional) .................................................................. 21
Connect a pH probe (optional) ....................................................................22
Connect an ORP probe (optional) ............................................................... 22
Make communications connections (optional) .................................................... 22
Plumbing ....................................................................................................................24
Install the bubbler line tubing ..............................................................................24
User interface .............................................................................................................24
Operation .....................................................................................................................26
Basic configuration ....................................................................................................26
Set the date, time and language ......................................................................... 26
Enable the screen saver (optional) .....................................................................26
Select the level sensor .......................................................................................26
Configure the program settings ..........................................................................26
Configure data logging .......................................................................................29
Advanced configuration .............................................................................................30
Communications .................................................................................................30
Configure RS232 communications .............................................................. 30
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Table of Contents
Configure the modem ..................................................................................30
Configure the 4–20 mA outputs ................................................................... 31
Configure the alarm relays ..........................................................................31
Configure the flow totalizer .................................................................................31
Configure set point sampling (optional) .............................................................. 32
Configure the stormwater program (optional) ..................................................... 33
Calibration .................................................................................................................. 33
Calibrate the ultrasonic depth sensor (standard or in-pipe) ................................ 33
Calibrate the submerged area/velocity sensor ................................................... 35
Calibrate the low profile velocity-only sensor ..................................................... 35
Calibrate the submerged depth-only sensor ....................................................... 35
Calibrate the bubbler ..........................................................................................37
Calibrate the pH probe .......................................................................................37
Calibrate the ORP probe ....................................................................................38
Calibrate the 4-20 mA output .............................................................................. 38
Start or stop a program ..............................................................................................39
Show the data log ......................................................................................................40
Maintenance ...............................................................................................................40
Clean the instrument .................................................................................................. 40
Replace the bubbler desiccant ..................................................................................41
Remove the moisture from the desiccant (optional) .................................................. 41
Troubleshooting .......................................................................................................41
General ......................................................................................................................41
Bubble depth sensor ..................................................................................................42
Submerged area/velocity sensor ...............................................................................43
Submerged depth-only sensor ................................................................................... 44
Ultrasonic sensor .......................................................................................................44
Low profile velocity-only sensor .................................................................................45
pH probe ....................................................................................................................45
Alarm codes ...............................................................................................................47
Do a diagnostic test ...................................................................................................49
Appendix ......................................................................................................................50
Primary device and head measurement locations ..................................................... 50
Manning roughness coefficients ................................................................................52
Batteries ..................................................................................................................... 54
SCADA-Modbus® system guidelines ......................................................................... 55
Introduction to SCADA-Modbus communications .............................................. 55
ASCII transmission mode ...................................................................................55
Address field .......................................................................................................56
Function field ......................................................................................................56
Data field ............................................................................................................56
LRC field .............................................................................................................56
Communication parameters ...............................................................................56
User memory customization ...............................................................................56
Modbus ASCII function codes supported ........................................................... 57
Query ........................................................................................................... 59
Response ....................................................................................................59
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Table of Contents
Instrument response time ............................................................................60
Complications with floating point values ............................................................. 60
Port expanders and protocol converters ............................................................. 61
Other reference material ..................................................................................... 61
SCADA-Modbus troubleshooting ........................................................................ 62
Replacement parts and accessories ............................................................... 63
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Table of Contents
4
Specifications
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
Specification
Details
Dimensions (H x W x D)
34.3 x 25.4 x 24.1 cm (13.5 x 10.0 x 9.5 in.)
Weight
5 kg (11 lb) without power source
Enclosure
NEMA 4X, 6 (front cover open or closed); ABS, UV light resistant
Pollution degree
2
Installation category
I
Protection class
III
Operating temperature
–10 to 65.5 °C (14 to 150 °F), 95% relative humidity, non-condensing
Storage temperature
–40 to 80 °C (–40 to 176 °F)
Power requirements and
options
12 VDC supplied from 7 A-Hr rechargeable gel lead-acid battery, 4 A-Hr rechargeable
Ni-Cad battery or non-rechargeable alkaline lantern batteries (2 x 6 VDC)
15 VDC supplied from 100–120 VAC input power supply or 230 VAC input power
supply
Fuses
F1 on CPU board: 2 A, 250 VAC, fast-blow, 5 x 20 mm
F1 and F2 on base board: 4 A, 125 VAC, slow-blow, 5 x 20 mm
F3 on base board: 1 A, 250 VAC, fast-blow, 5 x 20 mm
Display
Liquid crystal display (LCD) with backlight; auto-off when not in use for battery
operation; 8 line x 40 character in text mode, 60 x 240 pixels in graphics mode
Totalizers
8-digit resettable and 8-digit non-resettable software
Time base accuracy
±0.007% per day
Measurement modes
Flumes: Parshall, Palmer Bowlus, Leopold-Lagco, H, HL, HS, trapezoidal
Weirs: V-notch (22.5 to 120 degrees), compound V-notch, contracted/non-contracted
rectangular, ThelMar, Cipolletti
Manning Equation: round, U, rectangular and trapezoidal channels
Flow Nozzle: california pipe
Head versus Flow: custom programmable curve of up to 99 points
Level only: inches, feet, centimeters, meters
Area velocity: level-area table, circular pipe, U-shaped channel, trapezoidal channel,
rectangular channel
Power equation: Q = K1Hn1 + K2Hn2
Data logging
"Smart" dynamic memory allocation automatically partitions memory to supply the
maximum logging time.
Memory mode: slate or wrap-around
128 kB of RAM (standard): 17,280 readings maximum; 512 kB of RAM (optional):
115,630 readings maximum
Daily statistics: 32 days kept maximum
Recording interval (configurable)
Sampler output
12–17 VDC pulse, 100 mA maximum at 500 ms duration
English 5
Specification
Details
Communications
RS232 - up to 19,200 baud
Modem - 14,400 bps., V.32 bis. V.42, MNP2-4 error correction; V.42 bis MNP5 data
compression
SCADA - Modbus communication protocol (standard) through RS232 or optional
modem
4–20 mA outputs (maximum of 2), isolation voltage rating:
•
•
•
•
Between instrument and either 4–20 mA output: 2500 VAC
Between the two 4–20 mA outputs: 1500 VAC
Maximum resistive load: 600 Ω
Output voltage: 24 VDC, no load
Alarm relays (maximum of 4), form C relays, rated for 10 A at 120 VAC or 5 A at
240 VAC resistive load minimum; normally open and normally closed contacts
available
Certification
CE mark - some 950 models (such as 3248, 3522 and 2672). Refer to Installation
requirements for CE marked instruments on page 14.
CE mark - 230 V AC-DC power converter and cETLus 115 V AC-DC power converter
(UL/CSA 61010-1 Safety Standard)
Factory installed options
Specification
Details
Integral pH/temperature meter:
Note: pH and ORP cannot be measured at the same time.
Control/Logging
Log pH/temperature independent of flow or in conjunction with flow; sample
collection is controlled in response to value of low/high set points
pH/Temperature sensor
pH combo, ¾-inch NPT in-line, ryton, ASG V flat 100 Ω KTD/GND in glass, DJ with
porous gel Ag/AgCI gel in Dynagan out; CE cable
pH range
0 to 14 pH
Operating temperature
0 to 80 °C (0 to 176 °F) mpt
Dimensions (D x L)
1.9 x 15.24 cm (0.75 x 6 in.) with 1.9 cm (0.75 in.) npt (nominal pipe thread) cable
end
pH response time
5 seconds to 95% of full response
Mechanical totalizer:
General
6-digit, non-resettable mechanical units: ft3, gal, m3, liter, acre-ft
Pressure
100 psi maximum
ORP meter:
Reading
86 ± 15 mV at 25 °C (77 °F) in pH 7.00, saturated with Quinhydrone
Slope
170 mV at 25 °C (77 °F) in pH 4–7, saturated with Quinhydrone
Temperature range
0 to 80 °C (0 to 176 °F)
Rain gauge input:
General information
For use with a rain gauge that has a tipping bucket. Flow meter records rainfall data
in 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) increments.
Alarm relays:
General information
6 English
Four 10 A/120 VAC or 5 A/250 VAC form C relays, user configurable for any internal
or external data channel or event
Specification
Details
4–20 mA output:
General information
Two 4–20 mA analog outputs, optically isolated, configurable, 0.1 FS error
Resistive load
600 Ω maximum
Output voltage
24 VDC with no load
Insulation voltage
Between the flow meter and 4–20 mA output: 2500 VAC; between the two 4–20 mA
outputs: 1500 VAC
Communications:
RS232
19,200 baud maximum
Optional modem
14400 bps, V.32 bis, V.42, MNP2-4 error correction. V.42 bis MNP5 data
compression; MNP 10-EC Cellular Protocol
SCADA-Modbus
SCADA-Modbus® communication protocol (standard) with RS232 or optional
modem
Bubbler sensor:
Accuracy
±0.003 m (0.011 ft) linearity and hysteresis at 22 °C (72 °F)
Range
0.003 to 3.6 m (0.01 to 11.75 ft)
Operating temperature
18 to 63 °C (0 to 145 °F)
Compensated temperature 0 to 59 °C (32 to 138 °F)
Temperature error
± 0.09144 mm/°C (±0.0003 ft/°F) maximum error within compensated temperature
range per degree of change
Air inlets
Bubble source and reference port (with desiccant); fittings for remote air inlets
Filter
10 micron for bubble source inlet
Line purge
Bubble line: high-pressure purged at programmed intervals or in manual mode on
demand
Line Size
0.32 cm (0.125 in.) ID standard
Submerged depth only sensor:
Accuracy
+0.1% full scale (non-linearity and dysteresis)
Range
0.172 bar (2.5 psi): 0.01 to 1.75 m (0.04 to 5.75 ft)
Operating temperature
0 to 71 °C (32 to 160 °F)
Temperature error
0.172 bar (2.5 psi): 0.01 to 1.75 ± 12.2 to 1753 mm/°C (0.04 to 5.75 ft ± 0.006 ft/°F)
maximum error within compensated temperature range per degree of change
Air intake
Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected
Material
316 stainless steel body with titanium diaphragm
Cable
4-conductor polyurethane sensor cable with air vent
Cable length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard; 76 m (250 ft) maximum
Dimensions
2.54 x 17.2 cm (1.0 x 6.75 in.)
Probe frontal area
0.875 in.2
Weight
0.7 kg (1.5 lb)
English 7
Specification
Details
Downlooking ultrasonic depth sensor – 50 kHz:
Accuracy
0.3 to 3.0 m ± 0.003 m (1 to 10 ft ± 0.01 ft) at 22 °C (72 °F), still air, 40 to 70%
relative humidity
Range
Distance from sensor to liquid: 38.1 cm to 9.1 m (15 to 30 ft)
Span
0 to 8.84 m (0 to 29 ft)
Operating temperature
–18 to 60 °C (0 to 140 °F)
Temperature error
±0.0143256 m/°C (±0.000047 ft/°F) maximum error within compensated temperature
range per degree of change
Resolution
0.33528 mm (0.0011 ft)
Material
PVC housing with Buna-N acoustic window
Cable
4-conductor with integral stainless steel support cable
Cable length
Custom lengths available up to 15 m (50 ft)1
Crystal specification
50 kHz, 11.5° included beam angle
Dimensions (H x D)
Transducer only: 9.5 x 7 cm (3.75 x 2.75 in.)
Weight
0.7 kg (1.5 lb)
Downlooking ultrasonic depth sensor – 75 kHz:
Accuracy
0.3 to 3.0 m ± 0.003 m (1 to 10 ft ± 0.01 ft) at 22 °C (72 °F), still air, 40 to 70%
relative humidity
Range
Distance from sensor to liquid: 23 cm to 3.3 m (9 to 10.8 ft)
Span
0 to 4.57 m (0 to 15 ft)
Operating temperature
–18 to 60 °C (0 to 140 °F)
Temperature error
±0.0143256 mm/°C (±0.000047 ft/°F) maximum error within compensated
temperature range per degree of change
Resolution
0.33528 mm (0.0011 ft)
Material
PVC housing with Buna-N acoustic window
Cable
4-conductor with integral stainless steel support cable
Cable length
Custom lengths available up to 15 m (50 ft)1
Crystal specification
5° beam angle
Dimensions (H x D)
12.7 x 5.7 cm (5.0 x 2.25 in.)
Weight
0.7 kg (1.5 lb)
In-Pipe zero deadband ultrasonic depth sensor – 75 kHz:
Accuracy
0.038 to 2.4 m ± 0.003 m (0.125 to 8 ft ± 0.01 ft) at 22°C (72°F), still air, 40 to 70%
relative humidity
Range
Distance from sensor to liquid: 0 to 2.4 m (0 to 8 ft)
Span
0.038 to 4.57 m (0.125 to 15 ft)
Operating temperature
–18 to 60 °C (0 to 140 °F)
Temperature error
±0.00005 m/°C (±0.0001 ft./°F) maximum error within compensated temperature
range per degree of change
Resolution
0.019 cm (0.0075 in.)
8 English
Specification
Details
Material
Stat-Kon A-E ABS plastic
Cable
4-conductor
Cable length
Custom lengths available up to 15 m (50 ft)1
Crystal specification
7° beam angle
Dimensions (D x L)
Transducer only: 4.44 cm (1.75 in.) x 31.5 cm (12.4 in.)
Mounting
Dedicated mounting rings, permanent mounting bracket (installs directly to pipe
wall), adjustable mounting band kit
Connection
Bare lead connection through 3658 junction box or quick connect
Weight
0.7 kg (1.5 lb)
Low-profile velocity-only sensor:
Accuracy
±2% of reading; zero stability: < 0.52 cm/s (±0.05 ft/s)
Range
–1.52 to 6.1 m/s (–5 to 20 ft/s)
Resolution
0.3 cm/s (0.01 ft/s)
Response Time
4.8 seconds
Profile Time
4.8 seconds
Dimensions (L x W x H)
6.86 x 3.81 x 1.12 cm (2.7 x 1.5 x 0.44 in.)
Cable
Urethane jacket, (2x) RG174U coax cables, (4x) #22 AWG copper stranded
Cable Length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard2
Submerged area/velocity sensor:
Velocity measurement
Method
Doppler ultrasound twin 1 MHz piezoelectric crystals
Accuracy
± 2%
Range (recommended)
–1.52 to 6.1 m/s (–5 to 20 ft/s)
Zero stability
<0.015 m/s (<0.05 ft/s)
Minimum depth (typical)
2 cm (0.8 in.)
Depth measurement
Method
Pressure transducer with stainless steel diaphragm
Material
Accuracy
Polyurethane body, 316 series stainless steel diaphragm
(static3)
±0.16% full scale ±1.5% of reading at constant temp (±2.5 °C)
±0.20% full scale ±1.75% of reading from 0 to 30 °C (32 to 86 °F)
±0.25% full scale ±2.1% of reading from 0 to 70 °C (32 to 158 °F)
Depth range
Standard: 0 to 3 m (0 to 10 ft); extended: 0 to 9 m (0 to 30 ft)
Maximum allowable depth
Standard: 10.5 m (34.5 ft); extended: 31.5 m (103.5 ft)
Operating temperature
32 to 160 °F (0 to 71 °C)
Compensated temperature 32 to 86 °F (0 to 30 °C)
range
English 9
Specification
Details
Temperature error
0.005 to 3.5 m ±0.0022 m/°C (0.018 to 11.5 ft ± 0.004 ft/°F)
0.005 to 10.5 m ±0.006 m/°C (0.018 to 34.6 ft ± 0.012 ft/°F)
(maximum error within compensated temperature range per degree of change)
Velocity induced error on
depth
Compensated based on pipe geometry and flow velocity
Air Inlet
Atmospheric pressure reference is desiccant protected
Cable
Urethane jacket
Cable length
9.1 m (30 ft) standard
Bubbler area/velocity sensor:
Depth measurement
Method
Doppler principle / pressure transducer
Range
0.003 to 3.6 m (0.01 to 11.75 ft)
Accuracy
0.01 to 11.75 ft ± 0.011 ft (0.033 m), linearity and hysteresis at 22°C (72°F)
Operating temperature
–18 to 63 °C (0 to 145 °F)
Compensated temperature 0 to 59 °C (32 to 136 °F)
range
Temperature error
±0.09144 mm/°C (±0.0003 ft/°F) maximum error within compensated temperature
range per degree of change
Air inlets
Bubble source and reference port (with desiccant); fittings for remote inlets.
Filters
10 micron on bubble source inlet
Line purge
Bubble line: high-pressure purged at programmed intervals or in manual mode on
demand
Velocity measurement
Method
Doppler ultrasonic
Transducer type
Two identical 1 MHz piezoelectric crystals
Range
–1.52 to 6.10 m/s (–5 to 20 ft/s)
Zero stability
< 0.015 m/s (0.05 ft/s)
Accuracy
±2%
Minimum depth (typical)
2 cm (0.8 in.)
Operating temperature
–18 to 60 °C (0 to 140 °F)
Dimensions (H x W x L)
1.12 x 3.81 x 6.86 cm (0.44 x 1.5 x 2.7 in.)
Cable
Urethane jacket
Cable length
7.6 m (25 ft) standard
1
2
3
Contact the manufacturer if a longer cable length is necessary.
Custom cable lengths to 76 m (250 ft) are available.
For temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F) add ± 0.3 cm/°C (0.03 in./°F)
General information
In no event will the manufacturer be liable for direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential
damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual. The manufacturer reserves the right to
10 English
make changes in this manual and the products it describes at any time, without notice or obligation.
Revised editions are found on the manufacturer’s website.
Safety information
NOTICE
The manufacturer is not responsible for any damages due to misapplication or misuse of this product including,
without limitation, direct, incidental and consequential damages, and disclaims such damages to the full extent
permitted under applicable law. The user is solely responsible to identify critical application risks and install
appropriate mechanisms to protect processes during a possible equipment malfunction.
Please read this entire manual before unpacking, setting up or operating this equipment. Pay
attention to all danger and caution statements. Failure to do so could result in serious injury to the
operator or damage to the equipment.
Make sure that the protection provided by this equipment is not impaired. Do not use or install this
equipment in any manner other than that specified in this manual.
Use of hazard information
DANGER
Indicates a potentially or imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
WARNING
Indicates a potentially or imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious
injury.
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that may result in minor or moderate injury.
NOTICE
Indicates a situation which, if not avoided, may cause damage to the instrument. Information that requires special
emphasis.
Precautionary labels
Read all labels and tags attached to the instrument. Personal injury or damage to the instrument
could occur if not observed. A symbol, if noted on the instrument, will be included with a danger or
caution statement in the manual.
This is the safety alert symbol. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid potential
injury. If on the instrument, refer to the instruction manual for operation or safety information.
This symbol indicates that a risk of electrical shock and/or electrocution exists.
This symbol indicates the presence of devices sensitive to Electro-static Discharge (ESD) and
indicates that care must be taken to prevent damage with the equipment.
Electrical equipment marked with this symbol may not be disposed of in European domestic or public
disposal systems. Return old or end-of-life equipment to the manufacturer for disposal at no charge to
the user.
English 11
This symbol, when noted on the product, identifies the location of a fuse or current limiting device.
This symbol indicates that the marked item requires a protective earth connection. If the instrument is
not supplied with a ground plug on a cord, make the protective earth connection to the protective
conductor terminal.
Confined space precautions
DANGER
Explosion hazard. Training in pre-entry testing, ventilation, entry procedures, evacuation/rescue
procedures and safety work practices is necessary before entering confined spaces.
The information that follows is supplied to help users understand the dangers and risks that are
associated with entry into confined spaces.
On April 15, 1993, OSHA's final ruling on CFR 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces, became
law. This standard directly affects more than 250,000 industrial sites in the United States and was
created to protect the health and safety of workers in confined spaces.
Definition of a confined space:
A confined space is any location or enclosure that has (or has the immediate potential for) one or
more of the following conditions:
• An atmosphere with an oxygen concentration that is less than 19.5% or more than 23.5% and/or a
hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentration that is more than 10 ppm.
• An atmosphere that can be flammable or explosive due to gases, vapors, mists, dusts or fibers.
• Toxic materials which upon contact or inhalation can cause injury, impairment of health or death.
Confined spaces are not designed for human occupancy. Confined spaces have a restricted entry
and contain known or potential hazards. Examples of confined spaces include manholes, stacks,
pipes, vats, switch vaults and other similar locations.
Standard safety procedures must always be obeyed before entry into confined spaces and/or
locations where hazardous gases, vapors, mists, dusts or fibers can be present. Before entry into a
confined space, find and read all procedures that are related to confined space entry.
Certification
Canadian Radio Interference-Causing Equipment Regulation, IECS-003, Class A:
Supporting test records reside with the manufacturer.
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de classe A répond à toutes les exigences de la réglementation canadienne
sur les équipements provoquant des interférences.
FCC Part 15, Class "A" Limits
Supporting test records reside with the manufacturer. The device complies with Part 15 of the FCC
Rules. Operation is subject to the following conditions:
1. The equipment may not cause harmful interference.
2. The equipment must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by the party responsible for
compliance could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. This equipment has been tested
and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
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residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be required to
correct the interference at their expense. The following techniques can be used to reduce
interference problems:
1. Disconnect the equipment from its power source to verify that it is or is not the source of the
interference.
2. If the equipment is connected to the same outlet as the device experiencing interference, connect
the equipment to a different outlet.
3. Move the equipment away from the device receiving the interference.
4. Reposition the receiving antenna for the device receiving the interference.
5. Try combinations of the above.
FCC requirements
WARNING
Multiple hazards. Only qualified personnel must conduct the tasks described in this section of the
document.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has made rules which let this device be directly
connected to the telephone network. Standardized jacks are used for these connections. This
equipment should not be used on party lines or coin lines.
If this device is not operating correctly, it can cause damage to the telephone network. Disconnect
this device until the source of the problem is identified and the repair is completed. If this is not done,
the telephone company may temporarily disconnect service.
The telephone company can make changes in its technical operations and procedure. If such
changes affect the compatibility or use of this device, the telephone company must give sufficient
notice of the changes.
If the telephone company asks for information on the equipment that is connected to their telephone
lines, supply them with:
•
•
•
•
Telephone number to which the unit is connected
Ringer equivalence number* (1.4B)
USOC jack required (RJ11C)
FCC registration number*
The ringer equivalence number (REN) is used to identify how many devices can be connected to the
telephone line to which the unit is connected. In most areas, the sum of the RENs of all devices on
any one line should not be more than five. If too many devices are attached, the devices may not
receive calls correctly.
Equipment attachment limitations notice:
The Canadian Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification identifies that
the equipment is in conformance with specific telecommunications network protective, operational
and safety requirements. The Canadian Industry Canada label does not identify that the equipment
will operate to the satisfaction of the user.
Before this equipment is installed, get the permission of the local telecommunications company to
connect it to the facilities. Use an allowed method of connection. If allowed, increase the length of the
inside wiring associated with a single-line individual service as necessary with a certified connector
assembly (telephone extension cord). Be aware that compliance with these conditions may not
prevent service degradation in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be done by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility
identified by the supplier. Repairs or equipment changes made by the user or equipment
malfunctions can give the telecommunications company cause to ask the user to disconnect the
equipment. For the protection of the user, make sure that the electrical ground connections of the
*
Recorded on the device label
English 13
power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected
together. This precaution can be particularly important in rural areas.
The load number (LN) given to each terminal device identifies the percentage of the total load that
can be connected to a telephone loop that is used by the device. If a higher percentage of the total
load is applied, damage to the telephone loop can occur. The termination on a loop can be any
combination of devices whose total load numbers are not more than 100.
Product overview
This instrument is a portable, waterproof flow meter that is used with an attached sensor to measure
and record flow in open channels, full pipes and surcharged lines. This instrument can be used to
control a wastewater sampler.
The instrument enclosure is waterproof and corrosive gas resistant even with the front cover open.
The front cover has two lockable latches to prevent vandalism and unauthorized use of the keypad. A
software lock can also be enabled, which locks the keypad.
Typically, this instrument is used with a level sensor to measure flow when there is a primary
measuring device (e.g., flume, weir or pipe) that has a known level-to-flow relationship. The level
sensor measures the level of liquid in a channel that adds to the flow (referred to as the “head”).
Then, the instrument calculates the flow rate based on the head-to-flow relationship of the primary
device. In addition, this instrument can be used with a velocity sensor. The velocity sensor measures
the average velocity of the flow stream with a Doppler sensor that is under water. Then, the
instrument calculates the flow based on the current depth and the Continuity Equation: Wetted Area
× Velocity = Flow.
The communication features of this instrument include a standard RS232 port and optional internal
modem. Use the RS232 port for remote data transfer, remote programming and to update internal
software using flash memory (RS232 only). The Modbus ASCII protocol is used for SCADA
communication through the RS232 port.
Use InSight data management software to:
• Transmit the data log from the instrument to a PC
• Remotely configure the instrument
• Do other data manipulation using the RS232 port or the optional internal modem
Installation
DANGER
Multiple hazards. Only qualified personnel must conduct the tasks described in this section of the
document.
Installation requirements for CE marked instruments
Only the flow meter models, part numbers and options in Table 1 are approved for use in the
European Union (EU) according to the CE mark of the manufacturer.
Instruments with a CE mark have use and installation requirements that are subject to the European
Union’s Notified Body use limitations that follow.
• The Sigma 950 flow meter must be operated underground in sewers, drain pipes and similar
underground locations.
• The Sigma 950 flow meter must be connected to an AC mains source that is only used for
underground service. The AC mains power service cannot be used for residential locations.
If the Sigma 950 flow meter is operated in locations where there are high levels of RF energy or large
electrical transients, electromagnetic interference can cause performance-related problems.
However, these conditions are not typical in underground in sewers, drain pipes and similar
underground locations.
14 English
Table 1 Items approved for use in the European Union
Description
Item no.
950 combination flow meter with both AV and bubbler sensors
3248
950 flow meter with AV sensors only
3522
950 flow meter with bubbler sensors only
2672
AV sensor options (xx-xxx = depth range, fill option and cable length)
770xx-xxx
Bubbler sensor options (xxx = cable lengths)
88007-xxx
pH sensors with 7.6 m (25 ft) cable length
3328
pH sensors with 15.2 m (50 ft) cable length
5172
4–20 mA output option
2684
12 VDC battery option
1414
230 V, 50 Hz battery eliminator with continental European Union plug
5721400
230 V, 50 Hz battery eliminator with United Kingdom plug
6244500
230 V, 50 Hz battery eliminator with Italian plug
6244600
Installation guidelines
DANGER
Explosion hazard. The instrument is not approved for installation in hazardous locations.
The monitoring location can affect the accuracy of flow measurements. Select sites that have a
continuous, steady flow and the least amount of turbulence. Turbulence can make it difficult to
identify an average velocity in the flow stream. Obstructions, vertical drops, pipe bends and elbows
can cause turbulence and affect the accuracy of the flow measurements. Table 2 gives
recommendations to prevent turbulence.
Table 2 Recommendations to prevent turbulence
Site condition
Solution
Outfalls
Put the sensor in at least 10 times the highest expected level upstream of
the outfall.
Vertical drops in the channel floor
Put the sensor in at least 10 times the highest expected level upstream of
the vertical drop.
Put the sensor in at least 10 times the highest expected level downstream
of the vertical drop.
Elbows, sharp turns and “Y”
connections
Put the sensor in at least 10 times the highest expected level upstream of
the impediment.
Put the sensor in at least 10 times the highest expected level downstream
of the elbow, sharp turn or "Y" connection.
Install a power supply (optional)
Install the 12 VDC battery pack or the AC power converter from the manufacturer on the top of the
instrument. Refer to Figure 1.
English 15
Figure 1 Install a power supply
Mechanical installation
NOTICE
Do not use open screw holes on the rear of the instrument to hang additional equipment or instrument damage
can occur. The screw holes on the instrument can only hold the weight of the instrument.
Wall mounting (optional)
Attach the instrument to the optional wall mounting bracket, then install the instrument on a wall.
Refer to Figure 2.
Figure 2 Wall mounting
16 English
Suspension harness mounting (optional)
Attach the instrument to the optional suspension harness, then install the instrument in a manhole or
similar site.
1. Install the two captive ¼-20 mounting screws of the suspension harness in the two top holes on
the rear of the instrument.
2. Optional: Use the stainless steel clip on the top of the suspension harness to attach the optional
instrument support bracket for the suspension bracket or a similar support.
Manhole rung hanger mounting (optional)
Attach the instrument to the manhole rung hanger, then hang the instrument from a manhole ladder
rung that is a maximum of 4.4 cm (1.75 in.) in diameter. Refer to Figure 3.
Figure 3 Manhole rung hanger mounting
1 Manhole rung hanger
2 Suspension harness
Electrical installation
DANGER
Electrocution hazard. Always remove power to the instrument before making electrical connections.
Connector ports
NOTICE
Cover the connector ports that are not used with the waterproof caps. Water and unwanted material can cause
damage to the connector pins.
The connector ports are on the left side of the enclosure. The number and type of connector ports on
the instrument is not the same for all models.
English 17
Connect to power
If a power supply is not installed on the top of the instrument, connect a 12 VDC power source to the
12 VDC port, such as a:
•
•
•
•
Battery (Ni-Cad or lead acid)
AC power pack
Deep-cycle marine battery
Vehicle power outlet
Refer to Table 3 for wiring information.
Note: If the input voltage is less than 14.2 VDC, the instrument identifies the power sources as a battery. If the
input voltage is more than 14.2 VDC, the instrument identifies the power source as an AC power converter.
Table 3 12 VDC port wiring
Pin
A
Description
Pin
Protective earth ground
B
Description
12–17 VDC, unregulated
Connect to a sampler (optional)
Connect a wastewater sampler to the Sampler port with a multi-purpose cable, such as:
• Multi-purpose cable, 6-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on other end
• Multi-purpose cable, 6-pin connector on both ends
Refer to Table 4 for wiring information.
Table 4 Sampler port wiring
Wire color Pin Signal
Description
Rating
Input power
—
12 VDC (with battery) to 17 VDC
pulse (with AC power converter)
500 mA load maximum
Flow pulse output
500 ms pulse sent to the sampler to
stop sample collection
12 VDC (with battery) to 17 VDC
pulse (with AC power converter)
D
Sampler start
Signal sent to the sampler to start
and continue sampling
24 VDC maximum at 100 mA
load maximum
Red
E
Event input
Signal sent to the instrument when
a sample has been collected
—
Green
F
Bottle number input
Signal sent to the instrument that
identifies the sample bottle
—
White
A
12 VDC
Blue
B
Protective earth
ground
Yellow
C
Black
Connect to sensors
Connect a maximum of three sensors to the instrument with quick-connect sensor cables or barelead sensor cables. Refer to Table 5–Table 8 for wiring information.
When the sensor cable will go through conduit, use conduit that is 1-inch or larger, a bare-lead
sensor cable and a junction box. Refer to Connect a submerged area/velocity bare-lead sensor cable
to a junction box on page 19 or Connect an ultrasonic bare-lead sensor cable to a junction box
on page 21.
Note: Do not cut or splice a sensor cable because instrument malfunction can occur and make the warranty void.
Table 5 Ultrasonic depth sensor (Ultrasonic) port wiring
Pin
Description
A
temperature (+)
B
temperature (–)
18 English
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
Red
C
ultrasonic (+)
Silver
Black
D
ultrasonic (–)
Clear
Table 6 Submerged area/velocity sensor (Velocity) port wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
+12 VDC
Red
E
Transmit (ground)
Black shield
B
Protective earth
ground
Green
F
Transmit (+)
Black center
C
Receive (ground)
Black and
white shield
G
Depth (–)
Black
D
Receive (+)
Black and
white center
H
Depth (+)
White
Table 7 Low profile velocity-only sensor (Velocity) port wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
+12 VDC
Red
D
Receive (+)
Black and white
center
B
Protective earth
ground
Green
E
Transmit (shield)
Black shield
C
Receive (shield)
Black and
white shield
F
Transmit (+)
Black center
Table 8 Submerged depth only sensor (Sub Probe) port wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
V (+)
Red
C
signal (–)
Green
B
signal (+)
Yellow
D
Protective earth
ground
Black
Connect a submerged area/velocity bare-lead sensor cable to a junction box
When a submerged area/velocity bare-lead sensor cable is used, connect the sensor cable to a
junction box.
1. Remove the four cover screws, cover and cover gasket from the junction box.
2. Remove the cable-clamp hex nut on the junction box.
3. Push the sensor cable into the junction box. Connect the sensor cable to the junction box. Refer
to the wiring diagram on the cover of the junction box.
4. Connect the tube in the sensor cable to the clear tube in the junction box. The clear tube is
connected to the exit fitting. Refer to Figure 4.
5. Push the sensor cable farther into the junction box sufficient to make a slight loop in the wires and
tubing, then tighten the cable-clamp hex nut.
6. Attach the cover and cover gasket to the junction box with the screws.
7. Connect the clear tube that is on the top tube fitting on the air dryer canister to the brass tube
fitting on the junction box.
8. Connect the short, quick-connect sensor cable to the Velocity port on the flow meter.
English 19
Figure 4 Junction box probe and cable connection
1 Connect to Velocity port on
instrument
4 Cover gasket
2 Tubing from air dryer canister
5 Connector for sensor cable
wiring
3 Cover
6 Connection for sensor cable
tubing
20 English
7 Sensor cable port
Connect an ultrasonic bare-lead sensor cable to a junction box
When an ultrasonic bare-lead sensor cable is used, connect the sensor cable to the remote
ultrasonic sensor option (junction box). Refer to Figure 5.
Figure 5 Remote ultrasonic sensor option
1 Enclosure 13.97 x 22.86 x
4.0 cm (5.5 x 9.0 x 4.0 in.)
3 Connect to Ultrasonic port on
instrument
5 Ultrasonic transducer
2 Sensor cable (SE 818) to
instrument
4 Customer-supplied conduit
6 Sensor cable
Connect to a bubbler area/velocity sensor (optional)
Connect the bubbler area/velocity sensor cable to the Velocity port and the bubbler line port. A small
diameter tube in the sensor cable supplies air from the instrument to the sensor in the flow stream.
To connect a bare-lead sensor cable to the instrument:
1. At the instrument end of the conduit, connect the sensor cable to the instrument with a junction
box. Refer to Figure 4 on page 20.
2. Connect the bubbler line tube to the brass tube fitting in the junction box.
3. Connect another section of tube from the brass tube fitting to the top tube fitting on the air dryer
canister that is connected to the Intake port of the instrument.
4. Connect the Velocity port pins to the junction box terminals. Refer to the wiring information on the
junction box.
Optional device wiring
Connect a rain gauge, pH probe and/or ORP probe to the applicable connector ports on the
instrument if applicable.
Connect a rain gauge (optional)
Connect an external rain gauge with a tipping bucket to the Rain Gauge port. The rain gauge
supplies a dry contact closure to the instrument. Refer to Table 9 for wiring information.
English 21
Table 9 Rain gauge port wiring
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
A
+12 VDC source output
D
—
B
—
E
—
C
+12 VDC pulse input
F
—
Connect a pH probe (optional)
Connect the pH probe cable to the terminal strip in the junction box of the pre-amp interface. Then,
connect the 6-pin connector of the pre-amp interface to the pH port on the instrument.
Cable requirement: Pre-amp interface (6-pin connector on one end and a junction box with terminal
strips on the other end)
To attach the pH probe to the junction box of the pre-amp interface:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Attach the clear wire to one or the other screw on the terminal strip with the label GLASS.
Attach the black wire on the shield of the cable to the REF screw on the other terminal strip.
Attach the red wire to the GND screw on the terminal strip.
Attach the green and yellow wires to the screws with the label RTD (resistance temperature
detector). The green and yellow wires can be attached to either one of the other RTD terminal
screws because there is no polarity.
Connect an ORP probe (optional)
Connect the ORP probe cable to the terminal strip in the junction box of the pre-amp interface. Then,
connect the 6-pin connector of the pre-amp interface to the ORP port on the instrument.
Cable requirement: Pre-amp interface (6-pin connector on one end and a junction box with terminal
strips on the other end)
To attach the ORP probe to the junction box of the pre-amp interface:
1. Attach the clear wire to one or the other screw on the terminal strip with the label GLASS.
2. Attach the black wire to the REF screw on the other terminal strip.
3. Attach the red wire to the GND screw on the terminal strip.
Make communications connections (optional)
Use the RS232 port and/or the Modem port on the instrument and InSight data management
software to transfer data to a personal computer (PC) or on a telephone line. As an alternative, use
the RS232 port and/or the Modem port for SCADA-Modbus® communications.
Make communications connections to the instrument, then refer to Communications on page 30 to
configure the communications settings.
Note: Not all communication options have CE approval. Refer to Table 1 on page 15 for instrument models that are
approved for use in the European Union.
• RS232 port—Connect to a serial port (DB9 or DB25) on a PC that has InSight data management
software. Use an RS232 to PC cable assembly to make the connection. An optional extension
cable is available. As an alternative, use the RS232 port as a SCADA-Modbus interface.
• Modem port—Connect to a standard dial-up public telephone line or use as a SCADA-Modbus
interface. Use the modem line filter connector (2-pin connector) to make the connection. Refer to
Table 10.
Note: As an alternative, use the RJ11-style phone connector adapter for a modular connection. Refer to
Figure 6.
• 4–20 mA port—Connect to external devices, such as a chlorinator or a chart recorder. Use a
4–20 mA output cable assembly (4-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on the other
end) to make the connection. All the 4–20 mA outputs are on the one 4–20 mA port. Refer to
Table 11.
Note: Make sure to use an AC power converter to supply power to the instrument. Battery power does not
supply sufficient power for the 4–20 mA current loops.
22 English
• Alarm Relay port—Connect to external devices, such as horns or lights. Use an alarm relay cable
assembly (6-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on the other end) to make the
connection. Refer to Table 12 and Table 13.
Table 10 Modem port wiring
Pin
Wire color
Description
Pin
Wire color
Description
A
Red
Tip
C
—
12 VDC
B
Green
Ring
D
—
12 VDC reference
Figure 6 RJ11-style modular connector adaptor with cover removed
1 Modem cable assembly (2862)
3 Red wire
2 Green wire
4 RJ11 style adaptor (3188)
Table 11 4–20 mA port wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
Output A +
Yellow
C
Output B +
Red
B
Output A –
Black
D
Output B –
Green
Table 12 Alarm Relay 1 and 2 wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
Relay #1 normally open
Green
D
Relay #2 normally open
Green
B
Relay #1 common
Black
E
Relay #2 common
Black
C
Relay #1 normally closed
White
F
Relay #2 normally closed
White
Table 13 Alarm Relay 3 and 4 wiring
Pin
Description
Wire color
Pin
Description
Wire color
A
Relay #3 normally open
Green
D
Relay #4 normally open
Green
B
Relay #3 common
Black
E
Relay #4 common
Black
C
Relay #3 normally closed
White
F
Relay #4 normally closed
White
English 23
Plumbing
Install the bubbler line tubing
Note: The bubbler line tubing and the air dryer cartridges on the right side of the instrument are only used for depth
measurement unless the optional bubbler area/velocity sensor is connected to the Velocity port on the instrument.
1. Push 3.17 mm (1/8-in.) ID vinyl tubing over the Bubbler line port on the instrument. No clamps are
necessary.
2. Put the other end of the bubbler line tubing at the correct head measurement point for that
primary device. All weirs and flumes come with or can be retrofitted with a connection for the
bubbler line tubing.
If a bubbler area/velocity sensor is not connected to the Velocity port on the instrument, put the
other end of the tubing in the flow stream instead.
Note: Stainless steel bubbler tubing line extensions are available. Optional mounting bands with built-in bubbler
line tube connections for use in round channels are available.
• Make sure that the bubbler line tubing is lower than the instrument so that condensation in the
tubing drains out. Moisture in the bubbler line tubing slow the flow of air and cause incorrect
readings.
• Use the shortest length of bubbler line tubing possible to decrease moisture problems and
kinks.
• Use a single continuous length of tubing for the bubbler line tubing with no connections so
there are no air leaks.
• Put the end of the bubbler line tubing perpendicular (at a right angle) to the flow stream.
• Make sure that the open end of the bubbler line tubing is 2.5–5 cm (1–2 in.) below the lowest
expected level in the channel. Push LEVEL ADJUST to calibrate the reading shown to the
actual level in the channel.
• In a weir or flume, use a stilling well. Silt and sediment collection in a stilling well is not typical.
• In round pipes, use the mounting bands from the manufacturer or put the bubbler line tubing
along the wall in a slot or groove and cover it so it does not stick out into the flow stream and
collect unwanted material.
3. If the instrument is in a location where it can be temporary under water:
a. Attach a length of ¼-in. ID tubing to both the Reference port and the Intake port barbed
fittings.
b. Put the ends of the reference port tubing and intake port tubing in a location that is always
above water.
c. Attach both air dryer cartridges to the tubing. Make sure that the air dryer cartridge openings
(end caps) are down so that moisture, condensation and/or precipitation does not collect in
the vent openings of the air dryer cartridge. If the air dryer cartridge openings are up, damage
to the air pump and internal plumbing systems can occur.
Optional: Enable the auto-purge feature to remove unwanted material from the bubbler tube. When
enabled, a 1-second high pressure air purge occurs at the end of the selected time interval. From the
Main Menu, select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>BUBBLER>AUTO PURGE.
User interface
Refer to Figure 7 for the front panel features. Refer to Table 14 for display and key descriptions.
24 English
Figure 7 Instrument overview
1 Mechanical totalizer option
5 Display
9 Numeric keypad
2 Humidity indicator
6 Menu bar
10 ON key and OFF key
3 Status bar
7 Display button
4 Soft keys
8 Function keys
Table 14 Display bar and key descriptions
Key
Description
Mechanical totalizer
option
Shows the total flow (six digits) and supplements the internal software totalizers (one
resettable and one non-resettable). Refer to Configure the flow totalizer on page 31 to
see the current totals of the internal software totalizers.
To identify the total flow: Total flow = Nend – Nstart × Sfactor, where: N = number shown,
Sfactor = scaling factor
Humidity indicator
Changes from blue to pink when the humidity of the enclosure interior is more than 60%.
When the humidity indicator is pink, contact technical support to replace the internal
desiccant module.
Status bar
Left side—Program status (complete, running, halted or ready to start); Right side—
System alarm conditions (such as low memory battery or clogged bubbler line)
When in the settings menus, the status bar shows the values that can be selected (e.g.,
cm, ft, in., or m).
Soft keys
The function of each soft key shows on the display.
Menu bar
Left side—Time and date; Right side—Current menu
Display button
Sets the display to on when the front cover is closed. Push again to show additional
status information.
Note: After 3 minutes of no activity, the display switches off to decrease the battery use.
Function keys
MAIN MENU—Shows the Main Menu screen. The current action is stopped if changes
have not been accepted.
LEVEL ADJUST—Adjusts the flow meter to be the same as the current head (or level
contributing flow) in the channel
RUN/STOP—Starts (or continues) a program or stops the current program
Numeric keypad
Enters a numeric value
ON key and OFF key
Sets the instrument to on or off.
Note: The green indicator light near the ON key flashes when the instrument is on.
English 25
Operation
Basic configuration
Set the date, time and language
Before initial use, set the date, time and language.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Push MAIN MENU.
Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>LANGUAGE, then push SELECT.
Push CHANGE CHOICE to select the language, then push ACCEPT.
Push RETURN.
Select TIME/DATE.
Enter the hours and minutes with the keypad.
Enter the day and year with the keypad.
Note: To erase all the numbers from the fields, push CLEAR ENTRY.
8. Push CHANGE MONTH to select the month.
9. Push CHANGE AM/PM to switch between AM and PM.
10. Push ± to switch between 12-hour and 24-hour format.
11. Push ACCEPT to save the changes.
Enable the screen saver (optional)
Enable the screen saver to increase the life of the display. The screen saver automatically sets the
display to off after 3 minutes of no keypad activity.
Note: The screen saver is automatically enabled when the power source is a battery.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>SCREEN SAVER MODE.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE until ENABLED shows, then push ACCEPT.
Select the level sensor
Select the type of level sensor that is connected to the instrument.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>LEVEL SENSOR.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE until the applicable sensor shows, then push ACCEPT.
Configure the program settings
Before initial use, configure the program settings.
Note: To change only one setting in the program, push MAIN MENU. Select SETUP>MODIFY SELECTED ITEMS,
then select the applicable setting.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select SETUP>MODIFY ALL ITEMS. "FLOW UNITS" shows. Refer to the table that follows for
program setting descriptions.
To change a setting, push CHANGE CHOICE. To go to the next program setting, push ACCEPT.
Note: The velocity settings only show when the instrument is connected to a velocity sensor.
Option
Description
FLOW UNITS
Sets the measurement units for flow. Refer to Table 15.
LEVEL UNITS
Sets the measurement units for level.
PRIMARY DEVICE
Selects the primary device. Refer to Table 16.
26 English
Option
Description
PROGRAM LOCK
Enables or disables the program lock. The program lock prevents unauthorized use of
the keyboard and access via RS232 or modem. The program lock password is
9500 and cannot be changed.
SAMPLER PACING Enables or disables sampling. Sets the sample interval. Options: 100 gallons (gal),
liters (ltr), cubic meters (m3), acre-feet (af) or cubic feet (cf)
SITE ID
Sets the site ID (maximum of 8 digits). The site ID is on all data printouts. Use this
feature when multiple sites are monitored with a single flow meter or if data readings
from multiple flow meters are collected.
Note: A text site ID can be set with InSight data management software and an
RS232 connection.
TOTAL FLOW
UNITS
Sets the measurement units for total flow. Options: gallons (gal), liters (ltr), cubic
meters (m3), acre-feet (af) or cubic feet (cf)
VELOCITY
DIRECTION
Sets the direction of velocity. Options: UPSTREAM (NORMAL), DOWNSTREAM or
ALWAYS POSITIVE
VELOCITY UNITS
Sets the measurement units for velocity. Options: ft/s, m/s
VELOCITY
CUTOFF
Sets the velocity cutoff. Use when the site has low velocities and frequent low
particulate concentrations that prevent velocity measurements.
Example 1: Velocity cutoff = 0.20 ft/s, Velocity default = 0 ft/s
If the velocity is less than 0.20 ft/s, the meter saves a value of 0 ft/s until the velocity
increases to more than 0.20 ft/s.
Example 2: Velocity cutoff = 0.20 ft/s, Velocity default = 0.20 ft/s
If the velocity is less than 0.20 ft/s, the meter saves a value of 0.20 ft/s until the velocity
increases to more than 0.20 ft/s.
VELOCITY
DEFAULT
Sets the velocity value that is used when velocity cannot be measured.
Table 15 Flow unit options
Option
Description
Option
Description
Option
Description
gps
Gallons per second
mgd
Million gallons per day
cfd
Cubic feet per day
gpm
Gallons per minute
afd
Acre-feet per day
cms
Cubic meters per second
gph
Gallons per hour
cfs
Cubic feet per second
cmm
Cubic meters per minute
lps
Liters per second
cfm
Cubic feet per minute
cmh
Cubic meters per hour
lpm
Liters per minute
cfh
Cubic feet per hour
cmd
Cubic meters per day
lph
Liters per hour
Table 16 Primary device options
Option
Description
NONE – LEVEL
ONLY
No primary device is installed. Level measurement only
WEIR
Options: COMPOUND, CIPOLLETTI, CONTRACTED RECTANGULAR, NONCONTRACTED RECTANGULAR, THELMAR, V-NOTCH (22.5-120°) or COMPOUND VNOTCH
Select an option, then go to Table 17.
FLUME
Options: PARSHALL, TRAPEZOIDAL, H-TYPE, HL-TYPE, HS-TYPE, LEOPOLDLAGCO, or PALMER BOWLUS
Select an option, then go to Table 18.
English 27
Table 16 Primary device options (continued)
Option
Description
NOZZLE (california
pipe)
Enter the nozzle diameter.
POWER EQUATION
Set the level units and flow units. The equation that follows shows:
Q = K1Hn1 + K2Hn2
Enter values for the variables K1, K2, n1 and n2.
Options: K1 (0–9999.99), K2 (±0–9999.99), n1 (1–9.99) and n2 (1–9.99)
HEAD VS. FLOW
Enter a maximum of two tables of up to 100 user-defined head versus flow points.
Select MODIFY TABLE #1. Enter the level units and flow units. Enter the head (0–99.99 ft
or cm) and flow (0–99999.99). Then, select MODIFY TABLE #2.
Set the active table. Options: TABLE #1 or TABLE #2.
MANNING
EQUATION
Enter the pipe shape. Options: RECTANGULAR CHANNEL, U-SHAPE CHANNEL,
TRAPEZOIDAL CHANNEL or CIRCULAR PIPE
Enter the pipe diameter, percent slope (0.001–1.00) and manning roughness coefficient.
Options for pipe diameter: 101–6096 cm (4–240 inches). Refer to Manning roughness
coefficients on page 52.
Percent slope—1 unit per hundred units = 0.01 slope. For example, 1 m of decline for
every 100 m = 0.01 slope
AREA VELOCITY
Options: GEOMETRY or LEVEL-AREA TABLE
Select the method of calculating area, then go to Table 19.
Table 17 Weir options
Option
Description
Cipolletti
Enter the crest width. Options: 2.54–2438 cm (1–960 in.)
Contracted Rectangular
Enter the crest width. Options: 2.54–2438 cm (1–960 in.)
Non-Contracted Rectangular Enter the crest width. Options: 2.54–2438 cm (1–960 in.)
ThelMar
Enter the size. Options: 6, 8, 10, 12 or 15 inches
V-Notch
Enter the angle of notch in degrees. Options: 22.5–120°
Compound V-Notch
Enter the angle of notch in degrees (22.5–120°), notch depth in inches,
rectangular width (0–120 in. or 0–304 cm) and contracted or non-contracted
Table 18 Flume options
Option
Description
Parshall
Enter the flume size. Options: 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120 or
144 inches
Trapezoidal
Enter the flume size. Options: 60° S, 60° L, 60° XL, 45° 2", 45° 12"
H - Type
Enter the flume size. Options: 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 or 4.5 ft
HL - Type
Enter the flume size. Options: 3.5 or 4.0 ft
HS -Type
Enter the flume size. Options: 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 or 1.0 ft
Leopold-Lagco
Enter the flume size. Options: 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 21, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66 or
72 inches
Palmer-Bowlus Enter the flume size. Options: 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 48, 60 or 72 inches
28 English
Table 19 Area velocity options
Options
Description
Geometry
Circular Pipe—Enter the pipe diameter. Options: 10–610 cm (4–240 in.)
Rectangular Channel—Enter the width. Options: 10–2540 cm (4–999.99 in.)
Trapezoidal Channel—Enter the width of the channel bottom and top and the channel
depth. Options for all: 10– 2540 cm (4–999.99 in.)
U-shaped Channel—Enter the channel width. Options: 10–2540 cm (4–999.99 in.)
Level vs. Area
Table
Enter up to two tables of up to 99 user-defined level versus area points
Select MODIFY TABLE #1. Enter the level units. Enter the level (0–999.9 ft, inches, m or
cm) and area (1–99999.99 ft2, in2, m2 or cm2). Then, select MODIFY TABLE #2.
Set the active table. Options: TABLE #1 or TABLE #2.
Configure data logging
Select the input channels that are recorded to the data log.
Note: No readings are recorded to the data log until data logging is configured.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DATA LOG.
3. Enable or disable the data logging mode that is shown on the display. Refer to the table that
follows for data logging mode descriptions.
Option
Description
EXTENDED POWER
MODE
Uses the least amount of power. When enabled, a reading is recorded for each
enabled input channel each time the logging interval ends (e.g., 1 minute or
5 minutes).
POWER SAVE
Automatically selected when the instrument thinks a battery is the power source.
When enabled, a reading for each enabled input channel is collected once per
minute. Then, the average reading for each channel is recorded each time the
logging interval ends.
CONTINUOUS
When enabled, a reading for each enabled input channel is collected once per
second. Then, the average reading for each channel is recorded each time the
logging interval ends.
4. Select SET MEMORY MODE, then select an option.
Option Description
SLATE When the memory is full, no more readings are recorded to the data log and the program is
completed (stopped).
WRAP
When the memory is full, the oldest reading is discarded from the data log each time a new reading
is recorded.
5. Select the input channels to be recorded to the data log.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Select SELECT INPUTS.
Select one of the input channels shown.
Push CHANGE CHOICE until Logged shows, the push ACCEPT.
Select the logging interval for the input channel, then push ACCEPT. Refer to Table 20.
Enter more applicable settings for the input channel if applicable. Refer to Table 21.
Do steps b–e again to record more input channels to the data log.
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Table 20 Logging interval and days recorded – one input channel
Logging interval
Minutes
128 kB RAM
512 kB RAM
Days recorded (maximum)
Logging interval
128 kB RAM
Minutes
512 kB RAM
Days recorded (maximum)
1
12
80
12
144
963
2
24
160
15
180
1204
3
36
240
20
240
1606
5
60
401
30
360
2409
6
72
481
60
720
4818
10
120
803
Table 21 Additional input channel settings
Channel
Options
PROCESS TEMPERATURE
Logging interval, temperature units
Note: The temperature units can only be changed in this menu.
RAINFALL
Logging interval, rainfall units (inches or cm)
LEVEL/FLOW
Logging interval, level units, flow units
Advanced configuration
Communications
Configure RS232 communications
If a serial device is connected to the RS232 port, configure the RS232 settings.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>COMMUNICATION SETUP>RS-232 SETUP.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE to set the baud rate for data communications. Options: 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600 or 19200
4. Push ACCEPT.
Configure the modem
If a modem is connected to the Modem port on the instrument, configure the modem settings. When
an alarm occurs, the instrument will call and send an alarm code number that represents a specified
alarm condition. Refer to Alarm codes on page 47 for the alarm code numbers.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>COMMUNICATION SETUP>MODEM SETUP. Refer
to the table that follows for modem setting descriptions.
To change a setting, push CHANGE CHOICE. To continue to the next setting, push ACCEPT.
Option
Description
MODEM POWER
Set to ENABLED. Modem power is set to off when not in use to decrease battery usage.
DIAL METHOD
Select the type of phone service for the site phone line. Options: PULSE or TONE
PHONE NUMBER Enter the phone number the modem uses to send an alarm report to a PC with InSight
data management software. If the phone number is long distance, make sure to include a
“1” and the area code.
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Configure the 4–20 mA outputs
If the instrument has a 4–20 mA port, configure each of the 4–20 mA outputs to represent an input
channel.
Note: When the 4–20 mA outputs are disabled and the instrument is not fully off, the value of the 4–20 mA outputs
is 4 mA.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>4–20 mA OUTPUTS. Refer to the table that follows for
setting descriptions.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE until ENABLED shows. Push ACCEPT to continue.
4. Select OUTPUT A, then push ACCEPT. Refer to the table that follows for descriptions of the
4–20 mA output settings.
To change a setting, push CHANGE CHOICE. To continue to the next setting, push ACCEPT.
Option
Description
INPUT CHANNEL
Selects the input channel to be shown on the 4–20 mA output.
4 mA INPUT VALUE
Selects the value of the input channel to be shown as 4 mA on the 4–20 mA output.
20 mA INPUT VALUE Selects the value of the input channel to be shown as 20 mA on the 4–20 mA output.
5. Do step 4 again to configure the other 4–20 mA output if installed.
Configure the alarm relays
Configure the alarm relays to activate on specified conditions (e.g., low battery or low memory).
When an alarm occurs, an action is started (report through modem or set an alarm relay). Multiple
alarms can be enabled one at a time. Multiple alarms can be assigned individual trouble conditions,
individual relays or assigned to all the same alarm relay.
There are two types of alarms: trouble alarms and set point alarms. Set point alarms become active
when the parameter is more or less than the user-selected high and/or low set point selected.
Note: The Rate of Change alarm can be used with any primary device if the primary device is not identified as
area-velocity.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>ALARMS.
3. Select one of the alarm conditions shown on the display, then push CHANGE CHOICE and
ACCEPT to enable the alarm. Refer to Alarm codes on page 47 for descriptions of the trouble
alarms.
4. When a set point alarm is selected, set a high trip point or a low trip point, then enter the
deadband value if applicable.
The deadband setting prevents an alarm relay from switching on and off quickly when the reading
is at or near the trip point. The deadband is the amount of change that has to occur before the
alarm relay switches back to the other state.
5. Select an action to occur when the alarm comes on. Options: Set Relay #1, Set Relay #2, Set
Relay #3, Set Relay #4 or Report via Modem
Configure the flow totalizer
Set the scaling factor and flow units for the flow totalizers. The flow totalizers record the total flow
measured. The scaling factor shows when a total flow number shows. For example, when “TOTAL
(x1000): 465 gal.” shows, the scaling factor is 1000. Multiply 465 x 1000 to get the total flow.
Two software totalizers are standard: one that can be manually reset and one that cannot be
manually reset. A third mechanical totalizer option that cannot be manually reset is available. The
two software totalizers are automatically reset to zero when:
• The scaling factor for the totalizers is changed.
• The flow unit for the totalizers is changed.
• The primary device in the program is changed.
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• A new program is started.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>FLOW TOTALIZER>MODIFY SETUP.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE to set the scaling factor, then push ACCEPT. Options: X1, X10, X100,
X1000, X10,000, X100,000 or X1,000,000
Select a high scaling factor for applications with high flow rates. Select a low scaling factor for
applications with low flow rates.
Note: The scaling factor applies to all the totalizers.
4. Push CHANGE CHOICE to set the measurement units for flow, then push ACCEPT.
Note: This setting is independent of the flow units selected in the Setup menu.
5. To reset the totalizer, select RESET, then push YES. Reset the totalizer to get the total flow over
a specified period.
Note: The other totalizers are not affected when the totalizer is reset.
6. To see the current totals of both the resettable and non-resettable totalizers, select VIEW
TOTALS.
Configure set point sampling (optional)
If a sampler is connected to the instrument, configure the sampler to collect samples when a selected
reading is more or less than a selected set point. A maximum of 14 different water sources can be
collected from individually or at the same time.
Note: An input channel must be enabled in data logging before it can be used as sample trigger. For example, flow
must be recorded enabled in data logging before Flow Rate of Change can be a sampling trigger.
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>SETPOINT SAMPLING.
3. Select the sampling trigger to be used, then push SELECT. Refer to Table 22.
Note: A high and low sample trigger for the same condition can be enabled at the same time. There is no limit
to the number of sampling triggers that can be enabled at one time.
4. Push CHANGE CHOICE to enable the sample trigger.
5. Enter the set point value with the keypad, then push ACCEPT.
6. Enter a deadband value or time interval as applicable.
The deadband setting prevents sampling from switching on and off quickly when the reading is at
or near the set point. The deadband is the amount of change that has to occur before the
sampling stops or starts.
Table 22 Sample triggers
Sample trigger
Settings
LEVEL (HIGH or LOW)
High and/or low condition, deadband
FLOW (HIGH or LOW)
High and/or low condition, deadband
FLOW RATE OF CHANGE
High condition within time interval
TEMPERATURE (HIGH or LOW)
High and/or low condition, deadband
pH (HIGH or LOW)
High and/or low condition, deadband
RAINFALL
High condition within time interval
VELOCITY (HIGH or LOW)
High and/or low condition, deadband
32 English
Configure the stormwater program (optional)
If a rain gauge is connected to the instrument, configure the stormwater program. The stormwater
monitoring program agrees with the NPDES stormwater requirements. Stormwater monitoring
requirements can be different from state to state. Refer to the state regulatory groups for
recommendations on stormwater permit requirements for specified applications.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Push MAIN MENU.
Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>STORM WATER.
Push CHANGE CHOICE to enable the stormwater program.
Select a start condition.
Option
Description
RAIN
Sets the stormwater program to start when more than the selected amount of rainfall
occurs in the specified time period.
LEVEL
Sets the stormwater program to start when the level is more than the level limit.
RAIN AND LEVEL Sets the stormwater program to start when both the level and the amount of rainfall are
more than the selected limits.
RAIN OR LEVEL
Sets the stormwater program to start when the level or the amount of rainfall is more
than the selected limits.
Calibration
After electrical installation and configuration are completed, calibrate the bubbler, the attached
sensors, the attached probes (pH and/or ORP) and the 4–20 mA outputs if applicable.
Calibrate the ultrasonic depth sensor (standard or in-pipe)
Calibrate the ultrasonic depth sensor before initial use and when it is moved. Calibrate the ultrasonic
depth sensor with one of two methods: liquid depth (recommended) or sensor height. Use the sensor
height method only when liquid depth calibration is not possible.
• Liquid depth calibration—The depth of liquid in the channel that adds to flow must be known. In
a round pipe, the whole depth typically adds to flow. In a weir, only the depth that flows over the
weir plate adds to flow. Many flumes have specified requirements. Refer to Primary device and
head measurement locations on page 50. Liquid depth calibration is primarily used when access
to the primary device is available for a physical measurement of the liquid depth and there is water
flow in the channel.
• Sensor height calibration—The distance between the face of the ultrasonic sensor and the zero
flow point in the primary device must be known. The zero flow point in a primary device is the level
at which flow stops. In a round pipe, the zero flow point would typically be the invert or bottom of
the pipe. In a V-notch weir, the zero flow point occurs when the liquid behind the weir is level with
the bottom of the ‘V’. Sensor height calibration is typically used when access to the primary device
is difficult (such as confined space entry in a manhole) or there is no liquid flow. Compensation for
the internal deadband in the sensor housing is necessary for this calibration method.
Measurement uncertainty increases to 1.07 cm (0.035 ft) for a ±30 cm (±1 ft) change in level from
the calibration point.
Note: The beam of the sensor depends on the sensor frequency and sensor type (in-pipe or downlooking). The
beam can be as much as ±12° (–10 dB) as it moves away from the sensor. If the sensor is installed too high above
a narrow channel, the beam can be too wide when it gets to the bottom of the channel. If the beam is too wide,
false echoes from the sides of the channel walls can occur.
To calibrate the ultrasonic depth sensor:
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ULTRA-SONIC
SENSOR>CALIBRATE U-SONIC SENSOR.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE until the correct sensor type shows, then push ACCEPT. Options: INPIPE (in-pipe sensor) or STANDARD (downlooking)
English 33
4. Enter the ambient air temperature at the transducer location.
5. For the best results, wait 100 minutes to let the sensor get to the ambient temperature. Make sure
that the sensor is not in direct sunlight.
Note: The speed of sound in air changes with the temperature of the air. The ultrasonic sensor has
temperature compensation to help remove the effect of temperature variation under typical site conditions.
6. Push ACCEPT.
7. For liquid depth calibration (recommended):
a. Select LIQUID DEPTH.
b. Measure the liquid depth (head) of the liquid in the channel and enter the value, then push
ACCEPT.
8. For sensor height calibration:
a. Select SENSOR HEIGHT.
b. Measure the distance from the bottom of the sensor to the zero flow point of the primary
device.
For the in-pipe sensor, add 18 cm (7.09 in.) to the measured distance to get the total zero flow
distance. Refer to Figure 8.
c. Enter the measured distance, then push ACCEPT.
9. Optional: Set the invisible range to let the transducer ignore reflections from obstructions between
the sensor and the water surface (i.e., such as ladder rungs or channel side walls).
Note: When the invisible range is configured, add 18 cm (7.09 in.) to the range to adjust for the internal
deadband distance between the sensor, the reflector and the bottom of the sensor housing.
a. Select INVISIBLE RANGE.
b. Enter the distance to end of the invisible range with the keypad.
Do not extend the invisible range to where it is at or goes past the highest expected level in
the channel. Have a gap of at least 5 cm (2 in.) between the invisible range and the highest
expected level.
For the downlooking sensor, the distance must be more than the minimum deadband of
23 cm (9 in.) for the 75 kHz sensor and 38.1 cm (15 in.) for the 50 kHz sensor.
c. Push CHANGE CHOICE to select centimeters or inches, then push ACCEPT.
Figure 8 In-pipe sensor – side view
1 Pipe ceiling
5 45° deflector
2 Reflecting obstruction
6 Internal deadband, 18 cm (7.09 in.)
3 Minimum distance to the reflecting obstruction, 2 m
(82 in.)
7 Ultrasonic sensor
4 Distance from the sensor, 0 to 2.4 m (0 to 8 ft)
8 Pipe floor
34 English
Calibrate the submerged area/velocity sensor
Calibrate the submerged area/velocity sensor before initial use, when it is replaced and when the
difference between the level reading of the instrument and the independent verification
(measurement with a dipstick and ruler) is not constant.
Note: Differences in site conditions and measurement abilities can cause errors. These errors can cause small
changes in the difference between the level reading of the instrument and independent verification. These errors do
not identify a real change in the difference.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Push MAIN MENU.
Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>SUBMERGED PROBE.
Put the sensor flat on a table top or floor with the sensor (the plate with holes) down.
Push any key to continue.
Calibrate the low profile velocity-only sensor
Calibration is not necessary for the velocity-only sensor.
Calibrate the submerged depth-only sensor
Calibrate the submerged depth-only sensor before initial use, every 6 months and when the sensor is
replaced for the best accuracy. It is not necessary to calibrate the submerged depth-only sensor for
each use.
Items to collect:
• Graduated cylinder or bucket with at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water
• Ruler
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>SUBMERGED PROBE.
3. Push CHANGE CHOICE until the installation orientation (horizontal or vertical) of the sensor
shows, then push ACCEPT.
4. With the sensor out of the water, hold the sensor in the air in the orientation the sensor will be
installed in the flow stream, then push ACCEPT. Refer to Figure 9.
5. For vertical orientation:
a. Put the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a vertical orientation. Make sure that the
sensor does not move.
b. Push ACCEPT.
c. Measure the depth (D1) from the surface of the water to the first weld mark (around the
sensor body) above the breather vent holes. Refer to Figure 10. The weld mark identifies the
location of the internal diaphragm.
d. Enter the depth (D1) with the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
6. For horizontal orientation:
a. Put the sensor under at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water in a horizontal orientation. Make sure that
the sensor is stable.
b. Push ACCEPT.
c. Measure the depth from the bottom of the bucket to the surface of the water (D1). Refer to
Figure 11.
d. Enter the depth (D1) with the numeric keypad, then press ACCEPT.
7. Put the sensor back in the flow stream.
8. Push LEVEL ADJUST to adjust the level.
English 35
Figure 9 Sensor position
1 Horizontal
2 Vertical
Figure 10 Measure the submerged depth – vertical orientation
1 Gray band
2 Breather vents
3 Removable nose cone
Figure 11 Measure the submerged depth – horizontal orientation
36 English
Calibrate the bubbler
Calibrate the bubbler before initial use and at least once a year for the best accuracy.
Items to collect:
• Graduated cylinder with at least 16 cm (6 in.) of water
• Ruler
• 3.17 mm (1/8-in.) ID vinyl tubing, 1 m (3 ft)
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>BUBBLER>SET BUBBLE RATE.
3. Enter the bubble rate (1–5) for the bubbler line, then push ACCEPT. One bubble per second is
recommended. A higher bubble rate can increase the level reading because of friction on the
bubbler line tubing.
When a battery is the power source, set the bubble rate to 1 and auto purge interval to
30 minutes or higher to increase the battery life.
Note: Use the auto purge feature to keep unwanted material out of the bubbler line tubing instead of a high
bubble rate. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>BUBBLER>AUTO PURGE.
4. Install the 1 m (3 ft) of new bubbler line tubing to the Bubbler line port on the instrument.
5. Put the other end of the tubing in the graduated cylinder. Make sure that the tubing cannot move
in the graduated cylinder.
6. Select CALIBRATE BUBBLER.
7. Carefully measure the depth of the bubbler line with a ruler. Measure from the surface of the
water to the bottom of the bubbler line.
8. Enter the measured depth with the numeric keypad, the push ACCEPT.
The current reading is shown for reference.
9. Examine the bubble rate in a depth of water that is typical for the installation and adjust if
necessary to get one bubble per second.
If the bubble rate is set at a location other than the installation site, use the same inside diameter
and length of the bubbler line tubing that will be used at the site.
10. Push LEVEL ADJUST to adjust the level.
Note: For the best accuracy, push LEVEL ADJUST each time the bubble rate is changed.
Calibrate the pH probe
NOTICE
The pH probe is an application sensitive device. When used in corrosive environments, the accuracy and the life
of the probe decreases.
Calibrate the pH probe before initial use and after it is cleaned or replaced. Periodically inspect and
compare the pH probe readings to a hand-held pH meter to identify the optimum cleaning and
calibration schedule for the environment.
Items to collect:
• Thermometer
• Two pH buffers (4, 7 or 10 pH)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Push MAIN MENU.
Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ORP.
Put the probe in one of the pH buffers, then push any key.
Enter the temperature of the buffer solution with the numeric keypad, then push ACCEPT.
Push CHANGE CHOICE until the pH value of the buffer solution shows, then push ACCEPT.
Remove the pH probe from the buffer.
Rinse the pH probe with distilled water.
English 37
8. Put the probe in the second pH buffer, then push any key.
9. Push CHANGE CHOICE until the pH value of the second buffer solution shows, then push
ACCEPT.
10. If the error "pH Calibration Failed-Gain And/Or Offset Out of Range, Try Again” shows, do the
calibration again with fresh pH buffers. If the calibration is not successful, replace the pH probe.
Calibrate the ORP probe
Item to collect: DC power source (500 to 2000 mV) such as a regulated DC power supply or a
standard “C” cell battery (1500 mV)
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>ORP.
3. With the ORP junction box connected to the ORP port on the instrument, remove the ORP probe
from the ORP junction box.
4. Apply a positive DC reference voltage to the ORP probe terminals in the junction box as follows.
a. Connect the positive terminal of the DC power source to the terminal block screw with the
label GLASS.
b. Connect the negative terminal of the DC power source to the terminal block screw with the
label REF.
Calibrate the 4-20 mA output
Item to collect: Multimeter
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>4–20 mA OUTPUTS.
3. Connect the multimeter to the 4–20 mA current outputs. Refer to Figure 12 for the acceptable
methods.
4. Set the multimeter to 20 mA DC range or higher.
5. Select the output to calibrate. Options: OUTPUT A or OUTPUT B
6. Push any key to set the output signal to 4.00 mA.
7. Measure the current (mA) on the output with the multimeter.
8. Enter the measured value (mA) with the keypad, then push ACCEPT.
9. Push any key to set the output to 20.00 mA DC.
10. Measure the current (mA) on the selected output with the multimeter.
11. Enter the measured value (mA) with the keypad, then push ACCEPT.
12. Do steps 5–11 again to calibrate the other 4–20 mA output if installed.
38 English
Figure 12 Calibrate the 4–20 mA outputs
1 Multimeter in the current loop
2 4–20 mA device disconnected from the current loop
Start or stop a program
NOTICE
The data log is erased each time a program is started from the beginning. Before a new program is started, save
the data log to a PC with InSight data management software.
1. After the program settings are configured, push RUN/STOP to start a program.
Data logging starts. The 4–20 mA outputs, sampler control and alarm checking are active.
2. To stop a program, push RUN/STOP.
Data logging stops. "HALTED" shows on the status bar of the display. The 4–20 mA outputs stay
at the last value. The sampler control and alarm checking are disabled.
3. To continue a stopped program, select push RUN/STOP, then select RESUME.
Logging continues with the last logged value. The 4–20 mA outputs, sampler control and alarm
checking are active.
4. To start a new program, push RUN/STOP, then select START FROM BEGINNING.
The data log is erased. Data logging starts. The 4–20 mA outputs, sampler control and alarm
checking are active.
When a program is completed, data logging stops. The 4–20 mA outputs stay at the last value.
The sampler control and alarm checking are disabled.
English 39
A program is completed when one or more is true:
•
•
•
•
A logger is off.
A logger has no power or is stopped for more than 3 hours.
The memory mode is set to SLATE. The data log memory is full.
The program settings are changed.
When a program is completed, the program can only be started from the beginning.
Show the data log
The data log contains the readings for the selected input channels.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Push MAIN MENU.
Select DISPLAY DATA.
Select the input channel to show, then push SELECT.
Select an option.
Option
Description
DISPLAY
DATA
Shows the data log in table format. VIEW FROM START—Shows the oldest data point first.
VIEW FROM END—Shows the newest data point first. VIEW FROM TIME/DATE—Shows the
data points recorded on and after a specified time and date.
Note: The totals shown are the calculated totals of the logged data. If the date selected is
before available logged data, the totals shown will not be correct.
DISPLAY
BY GRAPH
Shows the data in graph format. GRAPH DAY—Shows the data for a date range (12 am to
12 am). GRAPH POINT IN TIME—Shows the data for a specified time and date (3 hours of
data). GRAPH PARTIAL DAY—Shows the data for part of a day.
The status bar shows the time, date, reading recorded at the location of the data cursor
(vertical line on graph).
Note: When less than 3 hours of data is shown on the display, all the data points show on the
graph. When more than 3 hours of data is shown on the display, the data points shown are
average values.
5. To move the data cursor on a graph:
• Push the LEFT and RIGHT arrows.
• Push a numeric key.
The numeric keys (0–9) represent a percentage. For example, push 5 to move the data cursor
to the middle of the graph (50%).
6. To see the data log for another input channel, push NEXT CHANNEL.
Maintenance
WARNING
Multiple hazards. Only qualified personnel must conduct the tasks described in this section of the
document.
DANGER
Electrocution hazard. Remove power from the instrument before doing maintenance or service
activities.
Clean the instrument
NOTICE
Do not use solvents to clean the instrument.
40 English
The instrument is maintenance free. Regular cleaning is not necessary for normal operation. If the
exterior of the instrument becomes dirty, wipe the instrument surfaces with a clean, moist cloth.
Replace the bubbler desiccant
When the desiccant beads in an air dryer cartridge become pink, replace the desiccant beads or the
air dryer cartridge. The air dryer cartridges are located on the right side of the instrument. The
desiccant beads in the dryer cartridges remove moisture from the air that is pulled into the instrument
for the bubbler.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Pull the air dryer cartridge out of the clip.
Turn the end cap of the dryer cartridge up.
Turn and remove the end cap from a dryer cartridge.
Remove the desiccant beads from the dryer cartridge.
Examine the white hydrophobic filter membrane that is in the end cap. If the membrane is not
white or has a blockage, replace the membrane. Make sure that the dull side of the membrane is
toward the incoming air flow.
6. Put new desiccant beads in the dryer cartridge.
7. Put the end cap on the dryer cartridge and turn to install.
8. Push the dryer cartridge back in the clip.
Remove the moisture from the desiccant (optional)
To use pink desiccant beads again, remove the moisture from the desiccant beads.
1. Remove the desiccant beads from the dryer cartridge.
2. Put the beads in an oven at 100 to 180 °C (212 to 350 °F) until the beads are blue again. If the
beads do not turn blue, discard the beads.
3. Let the beads become cool.
4. Put the beads in the dryer cartridge or in an air-tight container.
Troubleshooting
General
Problem
Possible cause
Solution
Instrument does not start
with AC power
There is a blown fuse or a
circuit breaker problem.
Make sure that there is power to the electrical
outlet. Connect a power supply.
Instrument does not start
with DC power
There is a blown fuse or the
battery power level is too low.
Make sure that the battery is supplied by the
manufacturer. Replace the battery with a fully
charged battery or connect to an AC power
converter.
Short battery life
The voltage range is not
sufficient.
Make sure that the gel cell or nickel cadmium
battery voltage is 12.6 to 13.4 VDC when at full
charge.
The battery power level falls
quickly.
Apply a charger to the battery until the battery is at
full charge. Wait 1 hour, then measure the battery
voltage. Replace the battery if the voltage is less
than 12 to 12.5 VDC within 1 hour. Refer to
Batteries on page 54 for tips to increase the
battery life.
The modem is operating.
Identify if the unit uses a modem. Supply
instruments that have an internal modem with AC
power.
English 41
Problem
Possible cause
Program complete
Solution
The program has completed
and no more data will be
logged.
—
No power was supplied to the
instrument for more than
3 hours.
Use an AC power backup option. Save the data log
to a PC, then start a new program.
The program was stopped for
more than 3 hours.
Save the data log to a PC, then start a new
program.
The memory mode is set to
SLATE and the data log
memory is full.
Set the memory mode to WRAP. Refer to Configure
data logging on page 29. Save the data log to a PC,
then start a new program.
Modem failure
The modem board has a
problem.
Contact technical support
No 4–20 mA
output/Totalizer stopped
The program was completed.
Start a new program.
The 4–20 mA outputs are not
enabled.
Enable the 4–20 mA outputs. Refer to Configure the
4–20 mA outputs on page 31.
Bubble depth sensor
Problem
No change in
bubbler depth
readings
Incorrect flow
totals
Bubbler depth
readings are
not accurate
42 English
Possible cause
Solution
The reference port
desiccant is pink.
There is a blockage in
the reference port.
Replace the bubbler desiccant. Refer to Replace the bubbler desiccant
on page 41.
The desiccant is blue.
There is no change in
the depth readings.
Remove the tube that connects the air dryer cartridge to the reference
port. If the depth readings go back to normal, the desiccant cartridge
has a blockage. To remove the blockage, carefully remove the end
caps of the air dryer cartridges. Inspect the air inlet area for unwanted
material. Make sure that the membrane does not have a coat of
grease.
The flume walls have
bows or bends.
Install the flume in a better site location.
The depth on the AV
meter is not correct.
Adjust the depth.
There is turbulence in
the flow.
Refer to Table 2 on page 15.
The bubbler is not
calibrated.
Calibrate the bubbler. Refer to Calibrate the bubbler on page 37.
The bubbler line
tubing has a
blockage.
Use the auto purge feature to remove the blockage. Select
OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>BUBBLER>AUTO
PURGE. Decrease the time interval for auto purge to 10 minutes.
Remove unwanted material from the bubble line with 40 to 50 psi of
compressed air or replace the bubble line.
Submerged area/velocity sensor
Problem
Zero velocity or velocity
signal lost some times
Possible cause
Solution
The sensor has sediment over it.
Remove sediment from the sensor.
The particulate levels in the channel
are low.
Stir the water in front of the probe and read
the signal strength. If the velocity signal
changes, the particulate level in the channel
is low.
Events that are not typical have
occurred.
Examine the event log for events that are
not typical and occurred near the same time
as the velocity signal problems.
There is radio interference in the
environment.
Move the instrument to a location with no
radio interference.
Loss of area velocity as
the primary device
There is a blown fuse on the CPU
board.
Contact technical support to replace the
blown fuse.
Velocity readings are not
accurate
There are obstructions that prevent an
accurate sensor reading.
Make sure that the obstructions are at least
five times the pipe diameters (5 × Dpipe)
downstream and ten times the diameters
(10 × D) upstream.
There are eddies and waves that
return the flow back into the pipe.
Move the probe to a different location.
The invert has an unusual shape such
as a rounded section in the middle of
the invert or drops that can cause a
draw-down effect.
Move the probe to a different location.
The mounting band and probe are not
in the correct position.
Examine the mounting band and probe to
see if the probe has moved.
English 43
Submerged depth-only sensor
Problem
Depth readings not accurate or
no change in depth readings
Possible cause
Solution
The sensor is not calibrated.
Identify if the sensor is calibrated. Calibrate
the sensor.
The sensor was moved to a
different instrument and is not
calibrated.
Calibrate the sensor when moved and
connected to a different instrument.
The desiccant has a blockage.
Replace the desiccant when it becomes pink.
Refer to Replace the bubbler desiccant
on page 41.
The depth reading is increasing Clean the reference line tubing. Calibrate the
because of water or unwanted
sensor. Refer to Calibrate the submerged
material in the reference line
depth-only sensor on page 35.
tubing.
Too much unwanted material
on the cable and mounting
band
The depth reading is
decreasing because of
unwanted material in the
diaphragm.
Remove the plate. Carefully clean out the
unwanted material.
There is silt on the sensor.
Remove the silt from the sensor.
The sensor mounting band is
not used correctly.
Put the cable along the edge of the mounting
band. Attach the cable to the mounting band
with nylon wire ties. Make sure that the cable
exits the tied area at (or near) the top of the
pipe so that the cable is not in the flow
stream.
Ultrasonic sensor
Problem
No signal from the ultrasonic
transducer
Depth readings not accurate or no
change in depth readings
Loss of ultrasonic as depth
measuring device
44 English
Possible cause
Solution
The transducer is not connected
to the instrument.
Make sure that the sensor cable is
connected to the instrument.
The cable is cut or broken.
Examine the sensor cable.
The temperature is not typical or
the new calibrated level cannot be
read.
Calibrate the sensor. Refer to Calibrate
the ultrasonic depth sensor (standard
or in-pipe) on page 33.
—
Use the data log to identify when the
problem started and if any other
problems occurred at the same time.
The sensor is not calibrated.
Calibrate the sensor. Refer to Calibrate
the ultrasonic depth sensor (standard
or in-pipe) on page 33.
Echo loss or ringing occurs, but
the echo is not sufficient for
detection
Examine the problem areas.
Transducer failure has occurred.
Replace the transducer.
There is a blown fuse on the CPU
board.
Contact technical support to replace
the fuse.
Ultrasonic board failure has
occurred.
Contact technical support.
Low profile velocity-only sensor
Problem
Zero velocity
reading or unstable
velocity readings
Possible cause
Solution
The sensor is not under water.
Make sure that the sensor is in water. Make sure
that the probe is under water at all times.
There are not sufficient suspended
solids in the water.
Put dirt in the water upstream of the sensor to
reset the sensor.
Look at the current status. Look for increased
velocity signals. Identify if the application is
correct.
Unstable velocity
readings
Unwanted material is over the
beveled face of the sensor.
Clean the sensor.
A problem occurs when the
instrument is connected to a laptop.
Make sure that the laptop that is connected to the
instrument is connected to a power inverter or has
a serial port that is not operating correctly.
There is electromagnetic interference
near the instrument or sensor cable
(such as a large pump motor).
Make sure that there are no electromagnetic
interferences. Remove interferences or move the
instrument and sensor cable away from the
interferences.
There is turbulence in front of the
sensor.
Make sure that there is no or little turbulence up to
6 m (20 ft) away from the sensor.
The probe is not facing the correct
direction.
Install the sensor facing the correct direction to
the flow.
There is noise on the RS232, AC
power lines or 4–20 mA output lines.
Disconnect the RS232, AC power line, and/or
4–20 mA output. Set the instrument to off and
then back on.
pH probe
Temperature changes—Large temperature changes affect the response of the pH probe. Very high
temperatures can cause the gel in the pH probe to expand and be pushed out through the porous
Teflon® junction. Then, when the temperature decreases, air is pulled in through the porous Teflon
junction. If the temperature increases again, the air expands and more gel is pushed out the junction.
This type of cycling will eventually cause probe failure.
Build-up of contaminants on the probe—In some environments, unwanted material, such as
grease, collects on the pH probe. In these environments, install the pH probe so that the water
“cleans” the probe. For example, install the pH probe so that probe tip is downstream so the cable
prevents damage to the probe tip. As an alternative, install the pH probe with the tip into the flow so
that the flow cleans the tip. In some environments, it is necessary to install the pH probe in a short
English 45
piece of perforated PVC pipe. In very dirty environments, install the probe in more than one piece of
perforated PVC pipe with the holes in the pipe offset.
Problem
Possible cause
Continuously reads
pH 14 or is above pH
14
There is an open
circuit in the glass or
reference electrode.
Slow response and/or
unstable readings
There is high
impedance in the glass
or reference electrode.
There is a ground loop
problem.
No response to a pH
change
Temperature reading
is constant or not
correct
Probe will not
calibrate
46 English
Solution
• Examine the cable and connector of the faulty electrode to
see if the cable has damage or is brittle. Discard the
electrode if damage is present.
• Examine the meter/electrode for intermittent continuity.
Replace the meter/electrode as necessary.
• Examine the bulb. Make sure that the bulb is filled with
solution. If not, shake the bulb (like a clinical thermometer)
to remove air in the pH bulb.
• Examine the bulb for a coating of unwanted material.
Replace the probe.
• Identify if the ground wire is connected correctly at the preamp junction box.
• Examine for continuity between the stainless steel lug on
the electrode and the ground wire at the interface.
• Examine an isolated sample. Put the probe in a beaker filled
with water. If the probe operates correctly in the beaker, but
not in the stream, connect the pre-amp ground directly to
the earth ground.
The temperature is not
correct.
Refer to “Temperature” symptom.
The glass bulb has a
crack.
If the readings are between 5.8 and 6.2 pH in all solutions,
examine the glass bulb. If the damaged is seen, discard.
The pH probe has a
short circuit.
If the reading is continuously 7.0 pH or 0.0 mV, examine the
cable. If there is no visible damage, remove the connector and
look for a short circuit. Replace the pH probe if faulty.
There is a high
impedance bridge.
Examine the connector for moisture or corrosion. If wet, rinse
well with distilled water and fully dry. Identify the cause of the
wetness and correct it.
The interface is wire
connections are not
correct.
Examine the interface wiring.
The thermistor is open.
Examine the interface wiring. Look for open at electrode RTD
wire. Disconnect and make a measurement. The reading
should be approximately 100–110 ohms.
There is a gain or
offset error.
• Make sure that the buffer solutions are fresh and have the
correct label.
• Make sure that probe and buffer temperatures are stable.
• Make sure that the wetting cap is removed.
• Examine the bulb for cracks or other damage.
• Make sure that the interface wires are connected correctly.
• Examine the interface connections for corrosion.
Alarm codes
Message
Code
Low Main
Battery
1
Battery pack voltage is
less than 11.5 VDC
If the battery pack is rechargeable, use a charger to
increase the power level of the battery pack. For nonrechargeable batteries, replace the batteries.
Memory Battery
2
Internal memory battery
is low
Contact technical support for service.
Low Slate
Memory
3
Available memory for
data logging is less than
20%
Save the data log to a PC. Stop the program and start a
new program.
Slate Memory
Full
4
Memory for data logging
is full
The memory mode is set to SLATE. No readings are
being recorded to the data log and the program is
completed (stopped).
—
U-Sonic Echo
Loss
Possible cause
6–9
Reserved for sampler
10
Pulse of sound sent but
no echo was received
Solution
—
The echo has been temporarily lost by a change in the
site conditions (i.e., floating unwanted material or foam in
the channel or wind).
Make sure that the ultrasonic transducer is level. Protect
the transducer from convection current. Echo loss must
be less than two hours. Calibrate the sensor. Refer to
Calibrate the ultrasonic depth sensor (standard or in-pipe)
on page 33.
Xducer Ringing
11
Return signal is received
too soon
The transducer is operating within the deadband. Make
sure that:
• The transducer is more than 38 cm (15 in.) from the
water.
• There are no obstructions on the front or sides of the
transducer.
• The transducer face is clean. If necessary, put a very
thin film of silicone grease on the transducer to keep it
clean.
• The correct rubber isolation washers are used with the
sensor.
U-Sonic Failure
12
Ultrasonic board sees an
error
The transducer is not connected. The cable has damage.
The transducer thermal sensor has damage.
RS485 Timed
Out
13
Communications
problem between the
instrument and a remote
ultrasonic sensor
Wait a few minutes. If the problem continues, there is a
problem with the velocity, ultrasonic or CPU board.
Contact technical support. Increase the logging interval
so there is more time to capture the signal.
—
Low Bubbler
Pressure
Clogged
Bubbler
14–15
Reserved for sampler
16
Bubbler does not have
sufficient air pressure
Replace the desiccant if pink. Inspect the bottom of the
air dryer cartridges and bubbler tubing for a blockage.
Inspect the air pump and reservoir. Inspect the bubble
tank for a leak.
The bubbler does not
come on during
initialization.
Set the instrument to off for 10 seconds and then set the
instrument to on. Listen for the bubbler pump to come on
during initization. If the pump does not come on, contact
technical support.
Bubbler line has a
blockage or is under
water more than
3 meters (10 feet)
Inspect the bottom of the air dryer cartridges and bubbler
tubing for a blockage. To remove a blockage in the
bubbler line tubing, use the auto purge feature. Select
OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTIONS>CALIBRATION>BUBBLER>AUTO PURGE.
17
—
English 47
Message
Code
High Level
18
The level is higher than
the alarm set point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High Flow
19
The flow rate is higher
than the alarm set point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High Flow Rate
of Chg.
20
The flow rate of change
is higher than the alarm
set point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High pH/ORP
21
The pH or ORP reading
is higher than the alarm
set point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High Process
Temperature
22
The process temperature
is higher than the alarm
set point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High Rainfall
23
The amount of rainfall is
higher than the alarm set
point.
Increase the alarm setpoint.
High CH1
24
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 1 analog input is
high.
High CH2
25
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 2 analog input is
high.
High CH3
26
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 3 analog input is
high.
High CH4
27
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 4 analog input is
high.
High CH5
28
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 5 analog input is
high.
High CH6
29
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 6 analog input is
high.
High CH7
30
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 7 analog input is
high.
—
31
High Velocity
—
32
Possible cause
—
The velocity is higher
than the alarm set point.
Solution
—
Increase the alarm setpoint.
33–36
—
Low Level
37
The level is less than the
alarm set point.
Decrease the alarm setpoint.
Low Flow
38
The flow is less than the
alarm set point.
Decrease the alarm setpoint.
Low pH/ORP
39
The pH or ORP reading
is less than the alarm set
point.
Decrease the alarm setpoint.
48 English
—
Message
Code
Possible cause
Low Process
Temp.
40
The process temperature
is less than the alarm set
point.
Low CH1
41
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 1 analog input is
low.
Low CH2
42
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 2 analog input is
low.
Low CH3
43
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 3 analog input is
low.
Low CH4
44
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 4 analog input is
low.
Low CH5
45
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 5 analog input is
low.
Low CH6
46
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 6 analog input is
low.
Low CH7
47
The signal on the
The channel alarms are user-selectable.
Channel 7 analog input is
low.
—
48
Low Velocity
—
49
Solution
Decrease the alarm setpoint.
—
The velocity is less than
the alarm set point.
50–53
—
Decrease the alarm setpoint.
—
—
Do a diagnostic test
1. Push MAIN MENU.
2. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED OPTIONS>DIAGNOSTICS.
3. Select a diagnostic test.
Option
Description
KEYPAD TEST
Push any function key, numeric key or soft key to identify if the key operates. The
display shows the key that was pushed.
LCD TEST
The text "THE DISPLAY WILL REMAIN INVERTED FOR 3 SECONDS" shows on
the display. All the other pixels are black (on).
DEMONSTRATION
GRAPH
Shows an example graph on the display that can be used for training purposes.
The status bar shows the time, date, measured value and unit of measure at the
intersection of the data cursor.
To move the data cursor, push the LEFT and RIGHT arrows or push a numeric key.
The numeric keys (0–9) represent a percentage. For example, push 5 to move the
data cursor to the middle of the graph (50%).
English 49
Option
Description
VELOCITY ANALYSIS
Shows the current velocity signal strength (percentage of the Doppler signal that is
received back by the velocity sensor) and the real-time velocity reading.
The nearer to 100% the signal strength is, the more stable the velocity reading will
be. If the signal strength is low (50% or less), the sensor is not installed correctly or
there is no particulate in the flow stream.
Note: A velocity sensor that is installed in the flow stream and connected to the
instrument is necessary to do a velocity analysis test.
EVENTS
Shows a list of the significant events that have occurred and when each event
occurred (on) and then went away (off). VIEW FROM START—Show the last event
to occur last. VIEW FROM END—Show the last event to occur first.
Appendix
Primary device and head measurement locations
Refer to Figure 13–Figure 18 for the head measurement locations in primary devices. Contact the
manufacturer of the primary device for more information if necessary.
Figure 13 Head measurement location – Parshall flume
1 Optional integral stilling well
50 English
Figure 14 Head measurement location – Palmer Bowlus flume
Figure 15 Head measurement location – Leopold-Lagco flume
Figure 16 Head measurement location – H flume
English 51
Figure 17 Head measurement location – round pipes
Figure 18 Head measurement location – Weir
1 4H (minimum)
3 H (maximum head)
2 2H (minimum crest height)
4 Head measurement location
5 Sensor
Manning roughness coefficients
Refer to Table 23 and Table 24 for the Manning roughness coefficients.
Table 23 Closed conduit – partly full
Metal
Steel
Cast iron
Wrought iron
Corrugated
Lockbar and welded
0.010
0.012
0.014
Riveted and spiral
0.013
0.016
0.017
Coated
0.010
0.013
0.014
Not coated
0.011
0.014
0.016
Black
0.012
0.014
0.015
Galvanized
0.013
0.016
0.017
Subdrain
0.017
0.019
0.021
Storm drain
0.021
0.024
0.030
—
0.008
0.009
0.010
Non-metal
Acrylic
52 English
Table 23 Closed conduit – partly full (continued)
Glass
Wood
Clay
Brick
Concrete
—
0.009
0.010
0.013
Stave
0.010
0.012
0.014
Laminated, treated
0.015
0.017
0.020
Common drainage
tile
0.011
0.013
0.017
Vitrified sewer
0.011
0.014
0.017
Vitrified sewer with
manholes, inlets,
etc.
0.013
0.015
0.017
Glazed
0.011
0.013
0.015
Cement lining
0.012
0.015
0.017
Culvert, straight and
free of debris
0.011
0.011
0.013
Culvert with bends,
connections and
some debris
0.011
0.013
0.014
Sewer with
manholes, inlet, etc.,
straight
0.013
0.015
0.017
Unfinished, steel
form
0.012
0.013
0.014
Unfinished, smooth
wood form
0.012
0.014
0.016
Unfinished, rough
wood form
0.015
0.017
0.020
Sanitary sewers
coated with sewage
slimes
0.012
0.013
0.016
Paved invert, sewer,
smooth bottom
0.016
0.019
0.020
Rubble masonry,
cemented
0.018
0.025
0.030
Table 24 Lined or built-up channels
Metal
Smooth steel
surface
Painted
0.011
0.012
0.014
Not painted
0.012
0.013
0.017
—
0.021
0.025
0.030
Neat surface
0.010
0.011
0.013
Mortar
0.011
0.013
0.015
Corrugated
Non-metal
Cement
English 53
Table 24 Lined or built-up channels (continued)
Concrete
Trowel finish
0.011
0.013
0.015
Float finish
0.013
0.015
0.016
Finished, with gravel
on bottom
0.015
0.017
0.020
Unfinished
0.014
0.017
0.020
Planed, untreated
0.010
0.012
0.014
Planed, creosoted
0.011
0.012
0.015
Unplaned
0.011
0.013
0.015
Plank with battens
0.012
0.015
0.018
Glazed
0.011
0.013
0.015
In cement mortar
0.012
0.015
0.018
Cemented rubble
0.017
0.025
0.030
Dry rubble
0.023
0.032
0.035
Smooth
0.013
0.013
—
Rough
0.016
0.016
—
0.030
—
0.500
Earth, straight and uniform
0.016
0.022
0.035
Earth, winding and sluggish
0.023
0.030
0.040
Rock cuts
0.030
0.040
0.050
Not maintained channels
0.040
0.070
0.140
Wood
Brick
Masonry
Asphalt
Vegetal lining
—
Excavated or dredged
Natural channels (minor streams, top width at flood 30.5 m (100 ft.))
Fairly regular section
0.030
0.050
0.070
Irregular section with pools
0.040
0.070
0.100
Batteries
12 VDC batteries from the manufacturer can be used to supply power to the instrument. Refer to the
power requirements in Specifications on page 5. There are no maintenance tasks for the batteries.
For maximum battery life:
• Do not apply charge to the lead-acid batteries for more than 24 hours.
• Do not apply charge to the nickel-cadmium batteries for more than 16 hours.
• Operate the batteries at an ambient temperature of 20 °C (70 °F). The recommended operating
temperature range is 5 to 35 °C (41 to 95 °F).
• Keep the batteries in a cool, dry place.
• Do not keep the lead-acid batteries in storage for longer than the storage times shown in Table 25.
• After storage for more than 1 week, make sure that nickel-cadmium batteries are at full power level
before use.
• Replace the batteries in the alkaline lantern battery pack with Eveready® Energizer® Model
Number 529 or EN529-CAN.
Nickel-cadmium cells can be kept in storage for extended periods of time, in a charged or a
discharged condition, without significant degradation in their performance. Refer to Table 26.
54 English
Note: At room temperature, the self-discharge rate of nickel-cadmium batteries can be as high as 2% per day.
When charged cells have been in storage for a long period of time, or at an elevated temperature, a change starts
in the negative electrode. The structure changes so that it is less reactive than a fresh cell. This structure will go
back to normal after one or two charge/discharge cycles.
Table 25 Storage time for a lead-acid battery
Storage temperature
Storage time (maximum)
0 to 20 °C
12 months
21 to 30 °C
9 months
31 to 40 °C
5 months
41 to 50 °C
2.5 months
Table 26 Storage time for a nickel-cadmium battery
Storage temperature
Storage time (maximum)
20 to 30 °C
9 months
30 to 40 °C
5 months
over 40 °C
3 months
SCADA-Modbus® system guidelines
Introduction to SCADA-Modbus communications
Refer to these guidelines when Modbus ASCII protocol is used to communicate directly with this
instrument through an RS232 or modem connection. A working knowledge of SCADA (supervisory
control and data acquisition), SCADA components and the different topologies used to build the
communications network are necessary. A basic understanding of the Modbus ASCII protocol is
necessary, so a description of the key parts of the protocol is supplied.
This section includes the setup process, but does not supply specific implementation details of any
particular MMI (man machine interface) or controller. However, the examples may reference some
manufacturers for illustrative purposes. The description of the Modbus ASCII protocol is suppied for
reference only and is not a tutorial. This section only supplies the description of Modbus ASCII for
this instrument.
Modbus, an open protocol, identifies how each instrument knows its device address, recognizes a
message sent to it, identifies the type of action to be taken and extracts any data or other information
contained in the message. This instrument and MMI communicate with a master-slave technique in
which only the master can initiate queries to a slave (950). The 950 will always be considered the
slave, never a master.
The master communicate with individual instruments or can send a message to the instruments
within its scope. Responses are never returned to broadcast queries from the master. The Modbus
protocol gives the format for the query of the master. The Modbus protocol puts the format of the
query in the device address, a function code that identifies the requested action, any data to be sent
and an error-checking field. The response message of the instrument is made with the Modbus
format which confirms the action to be done, any data to be returned and an error checking field.
ASCII transmission mode
This instrument communicates on standard Modbus networks with Modbus ASCII. In ASCII mode,
messages start with a colon (:), and end with a carriage return-line feed pair. The characters that can
be transmitted for all fields are hexadecimal 0–9, and A–F. When a message is transmitted over a
Modbus ASCII communication link, each character or byte is sent in the order of LSB (least
significant bit) to MSB (most significant bit). Table 27 shows a typical message frame.
English 55
Table 27 Typical message frame
Start
1 Char ‘:’
Address
Function
Data
LRC
END
(HEX)
(HEX)
(HEX)
(HEX)
(HEX)
2 Chars
2 Chars
n Chars
2 Chars
2 Chars ‘CRLF’
Address field
The address field of an ASCII message frame (0 to 247 decimals) is two characters that represent
the slave address. Individual slaves are given values between 1 and 247. A master puts the address
of the slave in the address field of the message frame. When the slave sends a response, the slave
puts its address in the address field of the message frame to let the master know which slave has
responded.
Set the device address of the instrument. Select OPTIONS>ADVANCED
OPTIONS>COMMUNICATIONS>MODBUS SETUP. Options: 0 to 247
Function field
The function code field of an ASCII message frame (1 to 255 decimals) is two characters that
represent the type of action the master has requested from the slave. Of these functions, this
instrument currently supports function 3 (read holding registers). When a message is sent from the
master to a slave device, the function field tells the slave what kind of action to do. For example, this
may include get the channel readings of level and velocity. When the slave responds to the master,
the slave sends the same function code field back to the master to identify a normal response. In the
event of an error, such as a parity error, LRC error or a request that cannot be handled, the slave will
not respond and the master will eventually identify a time-out condition.
Data field
The data field of an ASCII message frame consists of 'n' pairs of ASCII characters that represent
data sent to or from a slave device (this instrument). The data field in the master request includes
additional information that the slave must have before any action occur. This information can include
channel register addresses, the number of registers to read and the actual byte count in the data
field. For example, if a master requests that this instrument read the current status of a group of
channels (function code 03), the data field specifies the starting register and how many registers are
to be read. If no error occurs, the data field of the response from this instrument to the master
includes the data requested.
LRC field
The LRC field of an ASCII message frame is two ASCII characters that supply an additional level of
error checking to confirm the integrity of the communication media. The LRC field is one byte that
includes an 8-bit binary value. The LRC value is calculated by the transmitting device, which adds
the LRC to the end of the message. The receiving device calculates the LRC again and compares it
with the LRC value of the incoming message. If the two values are not equal, an error condition
occurs. The LRC is the sum of the successive 8-bit bytes of the message (with any carries
discarded) and then the result is completed. The LRC is the sum of all the values in the ASCII
message except for the leading ‘colon’ and ending <CR><LF>.
Communication parameters
To successfully communicate with this instrument with Modbus ASCII, set the communication
parameters of the master device at 7 bits, even parity, and 1 stop bit. The baud rate can be
configured to any value available on the instrument. With the exception of baud rate, make sure that
the communication parameters are not different from this format.
User memory customization
The most familiar component of SCADA networks is the programmable logic controller (PLC).
Because the network integrator is the most familiar with this type of device, the instrument emulation
of an existing PLC makes the process of integrating the instrumentation of the manufacturer into the
SCADA network simpler. Modbus ASCII uses a referencing system to identify the various types of
memory inputs and outputs. Each reference number has a leading digit that identifies its data type
(discrete input, discrete output, register input, register output) followed by a string of digits that
identifies its location in RAM. Refer to Table 28.
56 English
The memory data is kept in 16-bit words. Within the predefined function codes of the Modbus ASCII
protocol, the data fields are subject to interpretation by the device manufacturer. For example, this
instrument puts temperature information in registers 40001–40002.
Table 28 Modbus ASCII memory input/output referencing system
Reference indicator
Reference type
Description
0xxxx
Discrete output or coil
Binary
1xxxx
Discrete input
Binary
3xxxx
Input register
Real
4xxxx
Output holding register
Real
6xxxx
Extended memory register
Real
Modbus ASCII function codes supported
Currently, this instrument supports a read-only function to retrieve channel and total flow information.
All data addresses in the Modbus ASCII message are referenced to zero. Therefore, a reference to
holding register 40001 has the address of register 0000. The function code field specifies the type of
register accessed. Therefore, the 4XXXX is implicit.
Function 03: Read Holding Registers
Reads the register (4X reference) contents of the instrument as shown in Table 29–Table 32. The
addresses shown in Table 30 return a code that represents the unit of measure.
Table 29 Read holding register addresses – channel
Name
Type Size (bits)
Number of
registers
Start address Start address
Hi
Lo
Registers
Temperature
Float
32
2
00
00
40001–40002
Rainfall
Float
32
2
00
02
40003–40004
pH (or ORP)
Float
32
2
00
04
40005–40006
Level 1
Float
32
2
00
06
40007–40008
Velocity 1
Float
32
2
00
08
40009–40010
Channel 1
Float
32
2
00
0A
40011–40012
Channel 2
Float
32
2
00
0C
40013–40014
Channel 3
Float
32
2
00
0E
40015–40016
Channel 4 (DO)
Float
32
2
00
10
40017–40018
Channel 5 (DO
temperature)
Float
32
2
00
12
40019–40020
Channel 6 (conductivity)
Float
32
2
00
14
40021–40022
Channel 7 (conductivity
temperature)
Float
32
2
00
16
40023–40024
Flow 1
Float
32
2
00
20
40033–40034
Power
Float
32
2
00
26
40039–40040
English 57
Table 30 Read holding register addresses – units of measure of the channel
Name
Type
Size (bits)
Number of
registers
Start address Start address Registers
Hi
Lo
Temperature
Integer
16
1
00
31
40050
Rainfall
Integer
16
1
00
32
40051
pH (or ORP)
Integer
16
1
00
33
40052
Level 1
Integer
16
1
00
34
40053
Velocity 1
Integer
16
1
00
35
40054
Channel 1
Integer
16
1
00
36
40055
Channel 2
Integer
16
1
00
37
40056
Channel 3
Integer
16
1
00
38
40057
Channel 4 (DO)
Integer
16
1
00
39
40058
Channel 5 (DO
temperature)
Integer
16
1
00
3A
40059
Channel 6 (conductivity)
Integer
16
1
00
3B
40060
Channel 7 (conductivity
temperature)
Integer
16
1
00
3C
40061
Flow 1
Integer
16
1
00
41
40066
Table 31 Read holding register addresses – flow totalizer
Name
Type
Size (bits)
Number of
registers
Total flow 1
Float
32
2
00
4A
Integer
16
1
00
50
40081
Float
32
2
00
52
40083–40084
Total flow units
Total flow multiplier
Start address Start address
Hi
Lo
Registers
40075–40076
Table 32 SCADA-Modbus – units of measure codes
Unit
Code
Unit
Code
ML
1
GPH
26
AF
2
LPS
27
CF
3
LPM
28
GAL
4
LPH
29
L
5
MGD
30
M3
6
PH
31
IN
7
ORP
32
CM
8
PPM
33
FT
9
PPS
34
M
10
MGL
35
CM2
11
PCTSAT
36
FT2
12
MSIEMENS
37
58 English
Table 32 SCADA-Modbus – units of measure codes (continued)
Unit
Code
Unit
Code
IN2
13
MICROSIEMENS
38
M2
14
GRAMSPERKG
39
AFD
15
PCTPERDEGC
40
CFS
16
DEGREE_C
41
CFM
17
DEGREE_F
42
CFH
18
MILS
43
CFD
19
VOLTS
44
CMS
20
ft/s
45
CMM
21
MPS
46
CMH
22
PCT_O2
47
CMD
23
PCT_H2S
48
GPS
24
PCT_LEL
49
GPM
25
VDC
50
Query
Refer to Table 33 for the Modbus ASCII query form that specifies the starting register and number of
registers to be read. Refer to Table 34 for an example.
The master queries this instrument with a Read Holding Registers request, which implies a 4XXXX
register reference, to slave device address 01. The message asks for data from holding registers
40007–40008 to get the level information, which requires two registers to store the floating point
value.
Note: Registers are referenced from zero in the data field.
Table 33 Modbus ASCII query format
Start
Slave
address
Function
(03)
':'
Slave
address
Function
(03)
Start
address
high
Start
address
low
Number of
registers
high
Number of
registers
low
:
01
03
00
06
00
02
':'
Start
address
high
Start
address low
Number of
points high
Number of
points low
LRC <CR> <LF>
Table 34 Channel query to read level – example
Start
LRC <CR> <LF>
F4
<CR> <LF>
Response
The instrument responds with the transmission that shows a level reading of 15.0 inches. Refer to
Table 35.
The instrument response is the same address and function code, which identifies that there are no
problems in the communication between the master and instrument. The ‘Byte Count’ field identifies
how many 8-bit data items are being returned in the data field. With Modbus ASCII, this is one-half
the actual count of ASCII characters transmitted in the data portion of the response. The contents of
40007 are shown as two byte values of 00 00 hex, and the contents of register 40008 are shown as
English 59
two byte values 41 70 hex. Together, these values represent the floating point IEEE representation of
the level status.
Table 35 Transmission response that reflects a 15 in. level reading
Start
':'
Slave
address
Function
(03)
Byte
count
Data
high
Data
low
Data
high
Data
low
:
01
03
04
00
00
41
70
LRC <CR> <LF>
47
<CR> <LF>
Instrument response time
As a result of time lags associated with data acquisition, the instrumentation response to a SCADA
RS232 request could be a maximum of 12 seconds. Make sure that the SCADA system can support
this communication time lag. For example, in a Wonderware® application that operates a Modbus
ASCII DDE server, the COM port reply time-out must be set to 12 seconds. This is the amount of
time that the instrument will be given to reply to Modbus queries through this serial port.
Communication handshaking—This instrument has minimal communication handshaking. For the
instrument to identify an RS232 connection from an outside source, and to keep the RS232 hardware
active once communicating, the data terminal equipment (DTE) must assert and hold high the DTR
line of the DB9 connector (DSR of meter). This instrument does not support RTS/CTS hardware
handshaking. Refer to Table 36 for pin descriptions.
Note: DTE must be able to support a 12-second maximum response lag.
Table 36 Pin descriptions
Pin
Description
(DCD)1
Pin
Description
Pin
Description
1
Data carrier detect
4
Data terminal ready (DTR)
7
Request to send (RTS)
2
Received data (RD)
5
Signal ground (SG)
8
Clear to send (CTS)
3
Transmitted data (TD)
6
Data set ready (DSR)
9
Ring indicator
1
Not used
Complications with floating point values
The implementation of the Modbus protocol was based on the idea that this instrument would be
enabled to emulate a Modicon®, Compact 984 PLC. As a result, the same format that Modicon uses
is used for the storage and processing of floating point numbers. In addition, the Modbus protocol
does not define how floating point values are packed (stored) in the internal memory addresses or
“Registers” of this instrument. This instrument saves and processes floating point numbers in the
exact same format as the Modicon Compact 984 PLC.
All the current models of Modicon PLCs, including the Compact 984, put two bytes of data into each
register, which causes no problems. Unsigned two-byte (16-bit) integer values in the range of 0 to
65535 can be stored and retrieved from these registers without any problems or complications. The
complications occur when the stored value is a floating point value, which by IEEE definition, requires
4 bytes (32 bits). The IEEE standard for floating point values says in part that the eight most
significant bits represent the exponent and the other 23 bits (plus one assumed bit) represent the
mantissa and the sign of the value.
Since a data “word” is two bytes, a floating point value is represented by two data words. Because a
single Modicon register is one word (or 2 bytes), two consecutive Modicon registers are necessary to
store one floating point value.
The representation of a floating point value can be divided into a “High Order” and a “Low Order”
word. In addition, each word can be divided into a high order byte and a low order byte.
Table 37 and Table 38 show how a IEEE floating point value is typically represented and how the
Modicon stores a floating-point value.
The complications occur because Modicon does not store floating point values in this standard
(IEEE) format. Modicon stores floating point values the opposite way with the “Low-order” word in the
first register and the “High-order” word in the second register.
60 English
Since the Modbus protocol does not define how floating point values are handled or stored, some
Modbus-capable servers incorrectly use the normal, “High word—Low word” format to convert the
Modbus message response to the client application. Since Modicon stores the floating point values in
the opp0odbus and floating point numbers.
Table 37 IEEE floating point representation
First Register (e.g., 4001)
High word, high byte
High word, low byte
Second Register (e.g., 4002)
Low word, high byte
Low word, low byte
Table 38 Floating point values representation
First Register (e.g., 4001)
Low word, high byte
Low word, low byte
Second Register (e.g., 4002)
High word, high byte
High word, low byte
Port expanders and protocol converters
In some situations, there may not be a Modbus ASCII port available for use with this instrument. For
example, when it is necessary to install a instrument at a remote pump site that already has a single
Modbus line connected to a PLC that is used for pump control.
Port expanders are available from third party manufacturers that let several Modbus slave devices to
be connected to a single Modbus master device. Typically, a single port expander will have
3–5 separate Modbus ports on it. Depending on the manufacturer, the user may be able to configure
each of these ports for different communications parameters. So, not only does this type of port
expander let multiple slave devices be connected to a single Modbus master device, but it can also
be configured to convert incompatible communications parameters such as Modbus ASCII to RTU
(or vice versa), baud rate, parity, stop bits and so on.
In addition to these port expanders, other protocol converters from third-party manufacturers can be
used to convert other industrial protocols to Modbus ASCII.
Other reference material
SCADA ANSI Specification. ANSI/IEEE Std. C37. 1–1994.
Boyer, Stuart A. SCADA supervisory control and data acquisition. Research Triangle Park, NC:
Instrument Society of America. 1993.
MODICON. Modicon modbus protocol reference guide. North Andover, MA: MODICON, Inc.,
Industrial Automation Systems. 1996.
AEG Schneider Automation. Modicon ladder logic block library user guide. North Andover, MA: AEG
Schneider Automation, Inc. 1996.
English 61
SCADA-Modbus troubleshooting
Problem
Possible cause
The instrument responds
to only some Modbus
messages.
Some of the Modbus message
requests that were sent were not
valid.
• A request was sent to read
the value in a register address
higher then 40083.
• A request was sent to read
the value in a range of
registers and the range
includes a register address
higher than 40083.
The instrument does not
respond to any Modbus
message requests.
Solution
Make sure that Modbus message requests are
valid. The instrument only responds to valid
Modbus message requests.
Make sure that the register addresses in the
request only include 40001 through 40083.
The Modbus message does not
include the correct number of
registers for the type of data to
be returned.
Make sure that Modbus messages includes the
correct number of registers for the instrument to
accurately show the data on the display.
The device connected to the
RS232 port does not assert
(raise) the DTR line before the
Modbus messages are sent.
Make sure that the device connected to the
RS232 port asserts (raises) the DTR line (DB-9,
Pin 4 on the 1727 cable) before Modbus
messages are sent.
The instrument baud rate setting
is not the same as the baud rate
of the device communicating with
the instrument.
Make sure that the instrument baud rate is set to
the baud rate of the device communicating with
the instrument.
The device communicating with
the instrument is not configured
with the same communication
parameters as the instrument.
Make sure that the device communicating with the
instrument is configured with the same
communication parameters as the instrument
(7 data bits, 1 start bit, 1 stop bit and even parity).
For example, velocity is a floating point value
stored in register 40009–40010. Because two
registers are necessary for all floating point
values, the instrument would ignore a request to
read just the data in register 40009. The
instrument would respond correctly to a request to
read the data stored in both registers 40009 and
40010.
Note: The communications parameters of the instrument
are fixed (except for the baud rate) and cannot be
changed.
62 English
The first two characters of the
Modbus message do not include
the correct instrument address.
Make sure that the first two characters of the
Modbus messages sent include the correct
address for the instrument.
The Modbus message is Modbus
RTU.
Make sure that the device communicating with the
instrument is setup for Modbus ASCII.
Problem
Possible cause
The data values that are
returned when the
instrument is polled with
Modbus are not the
same as the data values
shown in the current
status screen of the
instrument.
Solution
The Modbus message request
includes the wrong registers for
the data channel.
Make sure that the Modbus message includes the
correct register address for the data channel. For
example, if polling for flow, make sure that the
server or MMI requests data from registers
40033–40034.
The Modbus message request
includes the wrong data format
for the data channel.
Make sure that the Modbus server or MMI
application is configured so that the correct data
format is selected for the data channel (register).
For example, when flow, level or velocity, which
are all floating point values, are requested, make
sure that the Modbus server or MMI is configured
to read these values as floating point values.
Contact the server or MMI manufacturer for
information on how to configure the application to
read the data in the correct format.
Replacement parts and accessories
WARNING
Personal injury hazard. Use of non-approved parts may cause personal injury, damage to the
instrument or equipment malfunction. The replacement parts in this section are approved by the
manufacturer.
Note: Product and Article numbers may vary for some selling regions. Contact the appropriate distributor or refer to
the company website for contact information.
Replacement parts
Description
Item no.
Air dryer tube with desiccant
5027
Desiccant for air dryer tubes
3624
Desiccant module, internal
787
Humidity indicator disc
2660
Hydrophobic filter membrane, for air dryer canisters, white
3390
Accessories
Description
Item no.
AC power converter, 100–120 VAC, 50–60 Hz
4455100
AC power converter, 230 VAC, 50 Hz, with Continental EU power plug
5721400
AC power converter, 230 VAC, 50 Hz, with UK power plug
6244500
AC power converter, 230 VAC, 50 Hz, with Italian power plug
6244600
Battery pack, gel lead-acid, 12 VDC, 7 A-Hr, rechargeable
Battery pack, alkaline, for
lantern1
1414
3893
Battery pack, Ni-Cad, 12 VDC, 4 A-Hr, rechargeable
1416
Bracket, manhole rung hanger
3533
Bracket, suspension harness mounting
2889
Bracket, instrument support, for suspension harness
5713000
English 63
Accessories (continued)
Description
Item no.
Bracket, wall mounting
2743
Cable, 4–20 mA output, 4-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on other
end, 7.6 m (25 ft)
2924
Cable, alarm relay, 6-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on other end,
7.6 m (25 ft)
2705
Cable, multi-purpose, 6-pin connector on one end and tinned wire leads on other end,
3 m (10 ft), for Sampler port2
941
Cable, multi-purpose, 6-pin connector on both ends, 3 m (10 ft), for Sampler port2
940
Cable, RS232 port to (DB9 or DB25) connector on PC
1727
Cable, extension, RS232 port to (DB9 or DB25) connector on PC
3358
Junction box, for ultrasonic sensor
3658
Junction box, for submerged area/velocity sensor
4730
Junction box, for submerged area/velocity sensor, cover gasket
2101
Modem cable assembly
2862
Modem line filter connector
4459
Pre-amp interface for ORP probe and pH probe
3323
Rain gauge with tipping bucket
2149
Remote ultrasonic sensor option, for cable extension (factory installed)
3170
RJ11-style phone connector adapter
3188
1
2
Batteries not included (two 6 VDC Eveready® Energizer® Model Number 529 or EN529-CAN batteries
recommended)
Cables with 7.6 m (25 ft) lengths and custom sizes are also available.
64 English
HACH COMPANY World Headquarters
P.O. Box 389, Loveland, CO 80539-0389 U.S.A.
Tel. (970) 669-3050
(800) 227-4224 (U.S.A. only)
Fax (970) 669-2932
[email protected]
www.hach.com
©
HACH LANGE GMBH
Willstätterstraße 11
D-40549 Düsseldorf,Germany
Tel +49 (0) 2 11 52 88-320
Fax +49 (0) 2 11 52 88-210
[email protected]
www.hach-lange.de
Hach Company/Hach Lange GmbH, 2013–2014.
All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.
HACH LANGE Sàrl
6, route de Compois
1222 Vésenaz
SWITZERLAND
Tel. +41 22 594 6400
Fax +41 22 594 6499
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