null  null
DevKit1207 Evaluation Kit

120MHz STM32F207IGT6 ARM Cortex-M3 32-bit Microcontroller

CPU Internal 1MBytes of Flash and 128 +4 KBytes of SRAM

1 USB2.0 OTG Full-Speed port and 1 USB2.0 OTG High-Speed port

3.5’’ 240x320 TFT color LCD with 4-wire Resistive Touch Screen

10/100 Ethernet with IEEE 1588v2, CAN2.0B, IrDA, TF, Audio, JTAG

Three axis linear accelerometer

Supports for uC/OS-II and FreeRTOS Real-time Operating Systems
User Manual
COPYRIGHT

DevKit1207 is trademarks of Embest Technology Co.,LTD.

STM32F207, STM32 F217 are trademarks of STMicroelectronics

Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows XP are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Important Notice
Embest has ownership and rights to the use of this document. Information in the
document is within the protection of copyright. Unless specifically allowed, any part of this
document should not be modified, issued or copied in any manner or form without prior
written approval of Embest Technology Co., LTD.
Page 1 of 155
Version of update records:
Rev
Date
Description
V1.0
2011-10-24
Initial version
V1.1
2011-12-30
Added Appendix I Operation Notes
Modified contents of Section 4.14 IWDG, Section
4.15 WWDG, Section 4.18.2 GSensor-LIS33DE to
avoid ambiguity
V1.2
2012-01-11
Added Appendix II PC-Development Platform
Added step 7) in Section 3.4 Flash Loader
V1.3
2012-04-06
Updated Figure 2-1 DevKit1207 Hardware Interface
Diagram, Figure 2-2 Hardware Dimensions Diagram,
Figure 3-15 Create New Project, Figure 3-19 Add file
groups to project, Figure 3-21 Finish file groups
adding, Figure 3-22 Add files to groups and Figure
3-24 Source flies have been added to groups.
Added Section 3.2 IAR EWARM
Added *.bin file support in Section 3.3 Flash Loader
Page 2 of 155
Contact:
If you want to order products from Embest, please contact Marketing Department:
Tel: +86-755-25635656 / 25636285
Fax: +86-755-25616057
E-mail: [email protected]
If you want to get technical assistance from Embest, please contact Technical Assistance
Department:
Tel: +86-755-25503401
E-mail: [email protected]
URL: http://www.armkits.com
Address: Room 509, Luohu Science &Technology Building, #85 Taining Road, Shenzhen,
Guangdong, China (518020)
Page 3 of 155
Contents
Chapter 1
Overview ....................................................................................................... 9
1.1
Product introduction ....................................................................................... 9
1.2
Features ....................................................................................................... 11
1.3
Getting Started Quickly ................................................................................ 14
Chapter 2
2.1
CPU .............................................................................................................. 16
2.1.1
CPU Introduction .................................................................................. 16
2.1.2
CPU Features ....................................................................................... 16
2.2
Hardware interface....................................................................................... 17
2.2.1
Power Input Jack .................................................................................. 17
2.2.2
AUDIO OUTPUT Jack .......................................................................... 18
2.2.3
SPEAKER and CAN Interface .............................................................. 18
2.2.4
Serial Ports ........................................................................................... 18
2.2.5
Ethernet Interface ................................................................................. 19
2.2.6
JTAG Interface ...................................................................................... 19
2.2.7
MicroSD Card Interface ........................................................................ 20
2.2.8
Camera Interface .................................................................................. 21
2.2.9
USB OTG_FS Interface ........................................................................ 22
2.2.10
USB OTG_HS Interface ....................................................................... 22
2.2.11
TFT_LCD Interface ............................................................................... 23
2.2.12
LED ....................................................................................................... 24
2.2.13
KEY ....................................................................................................... 25
2.2.14
CAN-related Jumper ............................................................................. 25
2.2.15
BootLoader-related Jumpers ................................................................ 26
2.2.16
MicroSD Card, RS232 and IrDA related Jumpers ................................ 26
2.3
Chapter 3
3.1
Hardware System ....................................................................................... 16
Hardware Dimensions.................................................................................. 27
Software Development .............................................................................. 28
MDK-ARM .................................................................................................... 28
Page 4 of 155
3.1.1
MDK-ARM Introduction......................................................................... 28
3.1.2
Building an existing MDK-ARM Project ................................................ 30
3.1.3
Create a New MDK Project .................................................................. 36
3.2
IAR EWARM................................................................................................. 45
3.2.1
IAR EWARM Introduction ..................................................................... 45
3.2.2
Building an existing EWARM Project.................................................... 46
3.2.3
Create a New IAR Project .................................................................... 49
3.3
Flash Loader ................................................................................................ 55
Chapter 4
4.1
Peripheral’s Examples............................................................................... 61
Description of the Standard Peripherals Library .......................................... 62
4.1.1
Libraries folder ...................................................................................... 62
4.1.2
Project folder ......................................................................................... 63
4.1.3
Utilities folder ........................................................................................ 63
4.2
GPIO example.............................................................................................. 64
4.3
NVIC example .............................................................................................. 65
4.4
EXTI example............................................................................................... 67
4.5
DMA example ............................................................................................... 67
4.6
ADC example ............................................................................................... 69
4.7
DAC example ............................................................................................... 70
4.8
USART example .......................................................................................... 71
4.8.1
USART_Printf ....................................................................................... 71
4.8.2
USART_IRDA ....................................................................................... 72
4.9
PWR example .............................................................................................. 73
4.10
RCC example ............................................................................................... 74
4.11
RTC example ............................................................................................... 75
4.12
SysTick example .......................................................................................... 77
4.13
TIM example ................................................................................................ 78
4.14
4.13.1
PWM_Output example ......................................................................... 79
4.13.2
TimeBase .............................................................................................. 80
IWDG example ............................................................................................. 81
Page 5 of 155
4.15
WWDG example .......................................................................................... 82
4.16
CAN example ............................................................................................... 83
4.17
FLASH example ........................................................................................... 85
4.18
I2C example ................................................................................................. 85
4.18.1
EEPROM .............................................................................................. 86
4.18.2
GSensor-LIS33DE ................................................................................ 87
4.19
I2S example ................................................................................................. 88
4.20
SDIO example .............................................................................................. 89
4.21
LCD_Touch example.................................................................................... 90
4.22
CRC example ............................................................................................... 91
4.23
RNG_Touch example ................................................................................... 92
4.24
Lib_DEBUG example ................................................................................... 92
Chapter 5
Ethernet Demonstration ............................................................................ 94
5.1
Description of Ethernet Demonstration........................................................ 94
5.2
Standalone demos ....................................................................................... 98
5.2.1
HTTP server demo ............................................................................... 98
5.2.2
TFTP server demo .............................................................................. 100
5.2.3
TCP_echo_client demo ...................................................................... 102
5.2.4
TCP_echo_server demo..................................................................... 103
5.2.5
UDP_echo_client demo ...................................................................... 105
5.2.6
UDP_echo_server demo .................................................................... 106
5.3
FreeRTOS demos ...................................................................................... 108
5.3.1
HTTP server netconn demo ............................................................... 108
5.3.2
HTTP server_socket demo ................................................................. 110
5.3.3
UDP tcp_echo_server_netconn demo ............................................... 110
Chapter 6
USB Examples .......................................................................................... 111
6.1
Description of USB Examples.................................................................... 111
6.2
USB_Device_Examples ............................................................................. 113
6.2.1
USB AUDIO device example .............................................................. 114
6.2.2
USB DFU device example .................................................................. 116
Page 6 of 155
6.2.3
USB MSC device example ................................................................. 121
6.2.4
USB HID device example ................................................................... 123
6.2.5
USB DualCore device example .......................................................... 125
6.2.6
USB VCP device example .................................................................. 127
6.3
USB_Host example.................................................................................... 131
6.3.1
USB MSC host example ..................................................................... 132
6.3.2
USB HID host example ....................................................................... 136
6.3.3
USB DualCore host example.............................................................. 139
6.4
USB_Host_Device example ...................................................................... 141
Chapter 7
uC/OS-II & uC/GUI Demo ......................................................................... 144
Chapter 8
G-Sensor Demonstration ........................................................................ 145
Chapter 9
Various Other Tests Scenario ................................................................ 147
9.1
LED and Key Testing ................................................................................. 147
9.2
ADC Testing ............................................................................................... 147
9.3
DAC Testing ............................................................................................... 147
9.4
USART Testing ........................................................................................... 147
9.5
IRDA Testing .............................................................................................. 147
9.6
CAN Testing ............................................................................................... 147
9.7
I2S Testing ................................................................................................. 147
9.8
MicroSD Card Testing ................................................................................ 147
9.9
RTC Testing................................................................................................ 148
9.10
Ethernet Testing ......................................................................................... 148
9.11
USB Testing ............................................................................................... 148
9.12
LCD_Touch Testing .................................................................................... 148
9.13
Camera Testing .......................................................................................... 148
Chapter 10 What’s in the BOX .................................................................................... 149
Appendix I Operation Notes ......................................................................................... 150
Appendix II PC-Development Platform ........................................................................ 151
Technical support & Warranty Service ........................................................................ 152
Technical support service ......................................................................................... 152
Page 7 of 155
Maintenance service clause ..................................................................................... 153
Basic notice to protect and maintenance LCD ......................................................... 154
Value Added Services............................................................................................... 154
Page 8 of 155
Chapter 1 Overview
1.1 Product introduction
The STMicroelectronics‟ STM32F207IGT6 flash microcontroller is from STM32F207xx
family, which is based on the high-performance ARM Cortex-M3 32-bit RISC core
operating at a frequency of up to 120MHz, with high-speed embedded memories
(1Mbytes of flash memory and 128Kbytes of system SRAM), 4Kbytes of backup SRAM,
2Kbits EEPROM and powerful peripheral functions, including digital camera module
interface, High-speed USB OTG, Full-speed USB OTG, Ethernet MAC, CAN2.0B, multiple
timers, ADCs and DACs, I2C, I2S, SPI, UARTs/USARTs, SDIO, LCD interface, RTC and
programmable IOs.
Embest
DevKit1207
Evaluation
Kit
is
a
complete
development
platform
for
STM32F207IGT6 devices which enables engineers to easily and rapidly evaluate,
prototype and test designs built around the STMicroelectronics STM32F207xx series
microcontrollers. The DevKit1207 board has exposed a full range of hardware peripherals
to support HS/FS USB OTG, Ethernet, CAN, Camera, Serial port, IrDA, TF card, LCD,
Touch screen, Audio, G-sensor, RTC, JTAG, etc. The kit is provided with an industrial-level
3.5 inch LCD screen.
In addition Embest has ported uC/OS-II and uC/GUI on this board. Embest also has
ported FreeRTOS real-time operating system for LwIP ethernet applications. Embest
provides the uC/OS-II BSP, FreeRTOS source code and plenty of software examples,
board schematic and user manual to help customer better understanding this board and
make development based on this borad easier.
Note: You are required to purchase a license for use uC/OS-II and uC/GUI in any
commercial application
Page 9 of 155
DevKit1207 can be used in the following applications:

Industrial Control

Medical Equipment

Home Automation

Human Interface

Consumer Electronics

Test and Measurement
DevKit1207 Function Block Diagram
Figure 1-1 DevKit1207 Function Block Diagram
Page 10 of 155
1.2 Features
DevKit1207 evaluation board is based on STM32F207IGT6 microcontroller and it
integrates all the functions and features of this IC‟s. The features of this board are as
follows:
Processor

STMicroelectronics STM32F207IGT6 Flash Microcontroller

ARM 32-bit Cortex-M3 CPU with ART accelerator, frequency up to 120MHz

Onchip 1Mbytes of Flash memory and 128+4Kbytes of SRAM

Flexible static memory controller that supports Compact Flash, SRAM,
PSRAM, Nor and Nand memories

LCD parallel interface, 8080/6800 modes

USB 2.0 High-Speed/Full-Speed Device/Host/OTG

10/100 Ethernet MAC, supports IEEE 1588v2 hardware, MII/RMII

2 CAN 2.0B interfaces;up to 4 USARTs and 2 UARTs, 3 SPI (30Mbit/s), 2
with muxed I2S

8- to 14-bit parallel camera interface (up to 48Mbytes/s)

1-/4-/8-bit SD/MMC/SDIO interface, supports up to 32Gbytes storage

Up to 140 I/O ports up to 60MHz

Up to 17 timers (two 32-bit timers), up to 120MHz

3 x 12-bit A/D converters, 2 x 12-bit D/A converters

Analog true random number generator

Low power, supports Sleep, Stop and Standby modes

Supports booting from Flash, System memory or SRAM

Supports ISP and IAP programming
External Memory

Onboard I2C compatible serial interface 2Kbits EEPROM

Micro SD card slot
Page 11 of 155
Audio interfaces

1 x stereo headphone output jack

1 x speaker output jack

1 x audio DAC output jack
LCD/Touch Screen

3.5 inch TFT color LCD (240 x 320-pixel RGB resolution, 262000 colors, 16-bit
8080 parallel interface, brightness control via PWM)

4-wire resistive touch screen
Data Transfer Interfaces

1 x 5-wire RS232 Serial Port

1 x USB2.0 OTG/Device/Host, High-speed, up to 480Mbps

1 x USB2.0 OTG/Device/Host, Full-speed, up to12Mbps

1 x 10/100 Ethernet with IEE 1588v2 (RJ45 connector)

1 x CAN2.0B interface

1 x IrDA transceiver
Input Interface and Other Facilities

1 x Camera interface

1 x Potentiometer (A/D converter)

2 x USER buttons

1 x RESET button

1 x WAKEUP button

20-pin standard JTAG interface

RTC battery socket (User needs to prepare battery, CR1220 model is
recommended)

1 x LED for Power indicator

2 x LEDs for USB OTG FS indicators

2 x LEDs for USB OTG HS indicators

4 x User LEDs

140 GPIO pins are all brought out
Page 12 of 155
Mechanical Parameters

Dimensions: 160 mm x 115 mm

Input Voltage: +5V

Power consumption: [email protected]

Working Temp.: -10 ℃ ~ 70 ℃

Humidity Range: 20% ~ 90%
Page 13 of 155
1.3 Getting Started Quickly
This section will tell the user how to understand and use DevKit1207 better and faster. For
more information please refer to the listed document and location.
For hardware development:
Hardware
system
Introduce CPU, expanded chip
and hardware interface
User Manual->2 Hardware System
CPU
Datasheet
Know principle and
configuration of STM32F2xx
CD->\HW design\datasheet\CPU\
Schematic
diagram of
DevKit1207
Know hardware principle of
DevK1207
CD->\HW design\schematic
Dimensional
drawing of
DevKit1207
Refer to the actual length and
height of DevKit1207 to bring
convenience for opening die
User Manual->2.3 Hardware
Dimensions
For software development:
Establish
developing
and
compilation
environment
Software
development
Test
functionality
of interface
Building and instructions for
MDK-ARM IDE
User Manual->3 Software Development
Standard peripherals driver
example and how to proceed
User Manual ->4 Peripheral‟s Examples
Introduction for Ethernet
drivers and applications
User Manual ->5 Ethernet
Demonstration
Introductions for USB
applications and development
User Manual ->6 USB
Examples
Introduction for migration and
development of uCos-II &
ucgui
User Manual ->7 uCos-ii & ucgui
example
Introductions for G-Sensor
application
User Manual ->8 G-Sensor application
Documentation and reference
manuals for software
development
CD-ROM ->\STM32F2x_Software_
programing_manual
CD-ROM ->\STM32F2xx_Application
note
Test the interface of the board
carrier
User Manual-> 9 Various Tests senario
Page 14 of 155
For marketing:
Hardware
CPU feature, board carrier
User Manual->1.1 Product introduction
system
interface data
User Manual->1.2 Features
Dimensional
Refer to the actual length and
drawing of
height of DevKit1207 to bring
DevKit1207
convenience for opening die
User Manual->2.3 Hardware
Dimensions
For learning personnel:
It is suggested to browse each section in each chapter of this Manual in order.
Page 15 of 155
Chapter 2 Hardware System
2.1 CPU
2.1.1 CPU Introduction
The ARM Cortex™-M3-based STM32 F2 series is built on ST‟s advanced 90 nm NVM
process technology with the innovative Adaptive Real-Time memory accelerator (ART
Accelerator™)
and
the
multi-layer
bus
matrix
offering
an
unprecedented
price/performance trade-off.
2.1.2 CPU Features
STM32F207IGT6 is characterized by a high degree of integration combining 1 Mbyte of
Flash memory and 128 Kbytes of SRAM with Ethernet MAC, USB 2.0 HS OTG, camera
interface, and hardware encryption support and external memory interface.
ST„s acceleration technology enables STM32 F2 MCUs to achieve up to 150 DMIPS at
120 MHz CPU which is equivalent to zero wait state execution, while keeping the dynamic
current consumption with 188 µA/MHz at an outstandingly low level.
Page 16 of 155
2.2 Hardware interface
Figure 2-1 DevKit1207 Hardware Interface Diagram
The following section gives in detail about the pin numbers and its function description of
various different IC‟s blocks present in DevKit1207.
2.2.1 Power Input Jack
Table 2-1 Power Input Jack
J1
Pin
Signal
Description
1
GND
GND
2
GND
GND
3
+5V
Power supply(+5V) 2A (Type)
Page 17 of 155
2.2.2 AUDIO OUTPUT Jack
Table 2-2 AUDIO OUTPUT Jack
J2
Pin
Signal
Description
1
GND
GND
2
Left
Left output
3
Right
Right output
4
Right
Right output
5
Left
Left output
2.2.3 SPEAKER and CAN Interface
Table 2-3 SPEAKER and CAN Interface
CON5
Pin
Signal
Description
1
CAN1_L
Low-level CAN bus line
2
CAN1_H
High-level CAN bus line
3
SPK_OUT+
PWM Speaker Output positive
4
SPK_OUT-
PWM Speaker Output negative
2.2.4 Serial Ports
Table 2-4 Serial Ports Interface
COM1
Pin
Signal
Description
1
NC
NC
2
RXD
Receive data
3
TXD
Transit data
4
NC
NC
5
GND
GND
Page 18 of 155
6
DSR
Data Set Ready
7
NC
NC
8
CTS
Clear To Send
9
NC
NC
2.2.5 Ethernet Interface
Table 2-5 Ethernet Interface
CON1
Pin
Signal
Description
1
TX+
TX+ output
2
TX-
TX- output
3
VDD3V3
3.3V Power for TX/RX
4
4&5
Connect to Shelter
5
7&8
Connect to Shelter
6
VDD3V3
3.3V Power for TX/RX
7
RX+
RX+ input
8
RX-
RX- input
9
LED1
Speed LED
10
VDD3V3
3.3V Power for LED
11
LED2
Link LED
12
VDD3V3
3.3V Power for LED
13
GND
GND
14
GND
GND
15
NC
NC
16
NC
NC
2.2.6 JTAG Interface
Page 19 of 155
Table 2-6 JTAG Interface
CON12
Pin
Signal
Description
1
VTREF
+3.3V power supply
2
VSUPPLY
+3.3V power supply
3
NTRST
Test system reset
4
GND
GND
5
TDI
Test data input
6
GND
GND
7
TMS
Test mode select
8
GND
GND
9
TCK
Test clock
10
GND
GND
11
RTCK
GND
12
GND
GND
13
TDO
Test data output
14
GND
GND
15
NSRST
Test system reset
16
GND
GND
17
DBGRQ
Connect to GND
18
GND
GND
19
DBGACK
Connect to GND
20
GND
GND
2.2.7 MicroSD Card Interface
Table 2-7 MicroSD Card Interface
CON4
Pin
Signal
Description
1
DAT2
Card data 2
Page 20 of 155
2
DAT3
Card data 3
3
CMD
Command Signal
4
VDD
VDD
5
CLK
Clock
6
VSS
VSS
7
DAT0
Card data 0
8
DAT1
Card data 1
9
CD
Card detect
2.2.8 Camera Interface
Table 2-8 Camera Interface
CON6
Pin
Signal
Description
1
GND1
GND
2
D0
NC
3
D1
NC
4
D2
Digital image data bit 0
5
D3
Digital image data bit 1
6
D4
Digital image data bit 2
7
D5
Digital image data bit 3
8
D6
Digital image data bit 4
9
D7
Digital image data bit 5
10
D8
Digital image data bit 6
11
D9
Digital image data bit 7
12
D10
NC
13
D11
NC
14
GND2
GND
15
PCLK
Pixel clock
16
GND3
GND
Page 21 of 155
17
HS
Horizontal synchronization
18
VDD50
NC
19
VS
Vertical synchronization
20
VDD33
+3.3V
21
XCLKA
Clock output a
22
XCLKB
NC
23
GND4
GND
24
FLD
NC
25
PWR_EN
Power Enable
26
RST
Reset the camera
27
SDA
I2C master serial clock
28
SCL
I2C serial bidirectional data
29
GND5
GND
30
VDDIO
+3.3V
2.2.9 USB OTG_FS Interface
Table 2-9 USB OTG_FS Interface
CON2
Pin
Signal
Description
1
VBUS
+5V
2
D-
USB Data-
3
D+
USB Data+
4
ID
USB ID
5
GND
GND
2.2.10 USB OTG_HS Interface
Table 2-10 USB OTG_HS Interface
CON3
Pin
Signal
Description
Page 22 of 155
1
VBUS
+5V
2
D-
USB Data-
3
D+
USB Data+
4
ID
USB ID
5
GND
GND
2.2.11 TFT_LCD Interface
Table 2-11 TFT_LCD Interface
CON7
Pin
Signal
Description
1
VDD5
+5V
2
VDD5
+5V
3
GND
GND
4
GND
GND
5
VDD33
+3.3V
6
VDD33
+3.3V
7
LCD_PWM
LED Dimming Control by PWM Signal
8
I2C_SCL
I2C master serial clock
9
I2C_SDA
I2C serial bidirectional data
10
TC_INT
Touch screen interrupt
11
LCD_RST
LCD reset
12
LCD_cs
LCD chip select
13
GND
GND
14
GND
GND
15
GND
GND
16
D0
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 0
17
D1
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 1
18
D2
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 2
19
D3
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 3
Page 23 of 155
20
D4
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 4
21
D5
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 5
22
GND
GND
23
D6
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 6
24
D7
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 7
25
GND
GND
26
D8
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 8
27
D9
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 9
28
D10
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 10
29
D11
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 11
30
D12
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 12
31
D13
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 13
32
D14
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 14
33
D15
16-bit 8080 parallel interface, Data bit 15
34
GND
GND
35
GND
GND
36
GND
GND
37
LCD_DC
LCD Parallel Interface
38
LCD_RD
Read signal
39
LCD_WR
Write signal
40
GND
GND
2.2.12 LED
Table 2-12 LEDs
LED 1~9
LED
Signal
Description
LED1
3V3
3.3V power indicator
LED 2
VBUS_FS
USB_FS indicator 1
LED 3
3V3
USB_FS indicator 2
Page 24 of 155
LED 4
VBUS_HS
USB_HS indicator 1
LED 5
3V3
USB_HS indicator 2
LED 6
PC.07
User-defined LED 1
LED 7
PG.08
User-defined LED 2
LED 8
PG.06
User-defined LED 3
LED 9
PD.12
User-defined LED 4
Note: There is a simple one to one relationship between LED1~LED4 in software
and LED6~LED9 in hardware
2.2.13 KEY
Table 2-13 KEYs
SW2~SW5
Key
Signal
Description
SW2
RESET
System reset key
SW3
WAKE_UP
System wake up key
SW4
USER1
User-defined key 1
SW5
USER2
User-defined key 2
2.2.14 CAN-related Jumper
Table 2-14 CAN-related Jumper
JP9
Jumper
Description
To enable the terminal resistor for the selected CAN, fit a
JP9
jumper on JP9.
Default setting: Fitted
Note: JP9 should be fitted in order to enable CAN working properly.
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2.2.15 BootLoader-related Jumpers
Table 2-15 BootLoader-related Jumpers
JP1 & JP2
Jumper
Description
Bootloader_BOOT0 is managed by pin 6 of COM1 (RS-232
DSR signal) when JP1 is closed. This configuration is used
JP1
for boot loader application only.
Default setting: Not fitted.
Bootloader_RESET is managed by pin 8 of COM1 (RS-232
CTS signal) when JP2 is fitted. This configuration is used
JP2
for boot loader application only.
Default setting: Not fitted.
Note: JP1 and JP2 should be kept not fitted if you don’t use BootLoader function.
2.2.16 MicroSD Card, RS232 and IrDA related Jumpers
Table 2-16 MicroSD Card, RS232 and IrDA related Jumpers
JP5 & JP6,JP7 & JP9,JP10 & JP11
Jumper
Group1
Description
JP5
When JP5 and JP6 fitted, PC10·and PC11are
JP6
connected to DATA2 and DATA3 pins of MicroSD
Card.
Group2
Group3
JP7
When JP7 and JP8 fitted , PC10·and PC11are
JP8
connected to TX and RX pins of MAX3243.
JP10
When JP10 and JP11 fitted,PC10·and PC11are
JP11
connected to TX and RX pins of TFDU6300.
Note: There should be just one group of jumpers fitted at the same time. If more
than one group of jumpers is fitted, some device may not work properly.
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2.3 Hardware Dimensions
The hardware dimensions of DevKit1207 (Units: mm):
Figure 2-2 Hardware Dimensions Diagram
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Chapter 3 Software Development
There are two main software development environments for STM32F2xx series MCU, Keil
MDK-ARM and IAR EWARM. The following sections will give a short description of these
software and show how to use them.
3.1 MDK-ARM
3.1.1 MDK-ARM Introduction
The MDK-ARM is a complete software development environment for Cortex™-M,
Cortex-R4, ARM7™ and ARM9™ processor-based devices. MDK-ARM is specifically
designed for microcontroller applications, it is easy to learn and use, yet powerful enough
for the most demanding embedded applications.
Features

Complete support for Cortex-M, Cortex-R4, ARM7, and ARM9 devices

Industry-leading ARM C/C++ Compilation Toolchain

µVision4 IDE, debugger, and simulation environment

Keil RTX deterministic, small footprint real-time operating system (with source
code)

TCP/IP Networking Suite offers multiple protocols and various applications

USB Device and USB Host stacks are provided with standard driver classes

Complete GUI Library for embedded systems with graphical user interfaces

ULINKpro enables on-the-fly analysis of running applications and records every
executed Cortex-M instruction

Complete Code Coverage information about your program's execution

Execution Profiler and Performance Analyzer enable program optimization

Numerous example projects help you quickly become familiar with MDK-ARM's
powerful, built-in features

CMSIS Cortex Microcontroller Software Interface Standard compliant
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The following block diagram illustrates the complete µVision4 software development
cycle.
Figure 3-1 Software development cycle
The STM32F2xx series MCUs require MDK4.20 and later versions. The demo version of
MDK4.22a with code limitation is supplied along with the kit in CD-ROM. User need to
purchase or get the license themselves in order to use MDK-ARM software without any
code limitations.
All MDK projects under folder \MDK-ARM in the CD-ROM are built with MDK4.22a. The
sections Building an existing MDK-ARM Project and Create a New MDK Project give a
short description of how to use the MDK-ARM to develop application software. For more
detail, please refer to the relevant documentation.
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3.1.2Building an existing MDK-ARM Project
In this section, ADC3_DMA as an example has been used to show how to configure an
existing MDK project.
1)
Open project.
Open the ADC3_DMA project from the directory as follow.
code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Project\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Examples\ADC\
ADC3_DMA\MDK-ARM
Click the icon to configure “Target options” as show in following picture.
Figure 3-2 Configure Target options
2)
In the opened window, select the "Device" tab, and select the MCU from the list, as
shown below:
Figure 3-3 Select the MCU model
3)
Select the "Output" tab if you want to MDK output HEX file, and select “Create HEX
File”.
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Figure 3-4 Select output file
4)
Select the “Debug” tab to choose Debug tool.

If you want to use ULINK, select “ULINK Cortex Debugger” (Default setting).
Figure 3-5 Select ULINK as Debug tool

If you want to use JLINK, select “Cortex-M/R J-LINK/J-Trace”.
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Figure 3-6 Select JLink as Debug tool
Click “Settings” to setup JLink. The “Max Clock” is suggested to be lower than
2MHz.Click”OK”, return to “Debug” window.
Figure 3-7 JLink settings
5)
Select “Utilities” tab to setup Flash Programming.
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
If you want to download programs with ULINK, please select “ULINK Cortex
Debugger” (Default Setting).As shown in following figure.
Figure 3-8 Select ULINK as program downloader

If you want to download programs with JLink, please select “Cortex-M/R
J-LINK/J-Trace”.
Figure 3-9 Select JLink as program download tool
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6)
Click “Settings” to configure Flash download. If you want MCU to reset and run
automatically after Flash downloading, please select “Reset and Run” option.
Figure 3-10 Flash download settings
7)
Click “Add” to add programming algorithm.
Select “STM32F2xx Flash On-chip Flash 1M” algorithm, and then click “Add”.
Figure 3-11 Add programming algorithm
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8)
Click “OK” to finish the setup and return to IDE window.
Figure 3-12 Finish target option setup
9)
Click “Build” or “Rebuild” to build or rebuild the project.
Figure 3-13 Build or Rebuild the project
10) Click “Download” to download program to MCU.
Figure 3-14 Download program
11) If you have selected “Reset and Run” option in step 6), MCU will reset and run
automatically after downloading. If haven‟t, you just need to press the Reset key on
the Evaluation board to run the MCU.
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3.1.3 Create a New MDK Project
This section shows how to create a new project with MDK-ARM.
1)
Open the directory of \code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo .Create a new folder and
name it „My project‟. Create a new folder in \My Project and name it, such as
ADC_example.
Copy source files and include files from the specified example, for example
ADC3_DMA, to the folder \ADC_example created in previous step.
main.c
stm32f2xx_it.c
stm32f2xx_it.h
system_stm32f2xx.c
stm32f2xx_conf.h
2)
Open MDK (KEIL µVision4). Click “Project”->”New uVision Project”.
Figure 3-15 Create New Project
Save the project in the folder of \ADC_example as ADC_example.
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Figure 3-16 Save project
3)
Then a dialog box of “Select Device for Target of Target …” will be opened. Please
select a device for the project. Here we select “STM32F207IG”.
Figure 3-17 Select the MCU model
4)
A dialogue box pops up to ask if you want to add Startup code to project.
The Startup Code performs configuration of the microcontroller device and
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initialization of the compiler run-time system.
You can select “Yes”, uVision will add it for you, or “No” then you need to add it by
yourself. Here we select “NO” and add it later.
Figure 3-18 Add startcode
5)
Now add file groups to project.
Right click on “Target”, select “Add Group…” and name the file group.
Figure 3-19 Add file groups to project
Select “Manage Components” and click icon to create new file group as shown in the
figure below.
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Figure 3-20 Add file groups to project with Manage Components
6)
Create 5 file groups as shown: User, Lib, STM32_EVAL, CMSIS, and MDK-ARM. As
shown below:
Figure 3-21 Finish file groups adding
Note: File groups are used to manage files of project.
7)

User Group: manage source files that user create

Lib Group: manage STM32F2xx Standard Peripherals Library

STM32_EVAl: manage board driver

CMSIS: manage CMSIS files

MDK-ARM: manage StartUp code
Add files to groups.
Right Click on group of User, select “Add files to Group „User‟...”
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Figure 3-22 Add files to groups
Add files from the created folder \My Project\ADC_example to the group of „User‟.
Figure 3-23 Add selected files to group
8)
Add files to the group of Lib, STM32_EVAL, CMSIS, and MDK-ARM same as done in
step 7).
The files need to be added to the group of Lib are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Driver\src
Note: Only related files need to be added. If you are unsure what files should be
added, you can add all files to group of Lib. However, it will increase compile
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time and code size.
The files need to be added to the group STM32_EVAL are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Utilities\STM32_EVAL\STM322xG_EVAL
Note: Only stm322xg_eval.c and stm322xg_eval_lcd.c need to be added to
group of STM32_EVAL.
The files need to be added to the group CMSIS are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\CMSIS\CM3\CoreSupport
Note: Only core_cm3.c need to be added to group of CMSIS.
The files need to be added to the group MDK-ARM are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\CMSIS\CM3\DeviceSupport\ST\STM3
2F2xx\startup\arm
Note: Only startup_stm32f2xx.s need to be added to group of MDK-ARM.
As the figure shown below, required source flies have been added to the groups.
Figure 3-24 Source flies have been added to groups
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9)
Setup Target options.
Click the icon “Target Options”,select „C/C++‟ tab to set C/C++ compiler specific tool
options like code optimization or variable allocation.
Figure 3-25 Setup Target options
There are two options we have to set.
Figure 3-26 C/C++ option
10) Add Preprocessor Symbols.
As several preprocessor symbols have been defined in project, we need to add them
to the column of „Define‟.
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Figure 3-27 Add Preprocessor Symbols
11) Add Include Paths.
Click the icon shown in the figure below.
Figure 3-28 Include Paths option
In „Folder Setup‟ dialog box, click icon shown below and add Include Paths.
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Figure 3-29 Add Include Paths
Include Paths have been setup as figure shown below.
Figure 3-30 Add Include Paths ok
12) Click „OK‟ to complete ‟C/C++‟ setup.
For setting the „Device‟, „Output‟, „Debug‟ and „Utilities‟ tabs, please refer to Building an
existing MDK-ARM Project.
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3.2 IAR EWARM
3.2.1 IAR EWARM Introduction
IAR Embedded Workbench is a set of highly sophisticated and easy-to-use development
tools for embedded applications. It integrates the IAR C/C++ Compiler™, assembler,
linker, librarian, text editor, project manager, and C-SPY® Debugger in an integrated
development environment (IDE). With its built-in chip-specific code optimizer, IAR
Embedded Workbench generates very efficient and reliable code for ARM devices. In
addition to this solid technology, IAR Systems also provides professional worldwide
technical support.
Feature

Modular and extensible IDE

Extensive device support

Highly optimizing C/C++ compiler

State-of-the-art C-SPY® debugger

Power debugging

C-SPY debugger target system support

RTOS support

IAR assembler

IAR ILINK Linker

IAR library and library tools

Comprehensive documentation

Free evaluation software
The STM32F2xx series MCUs require IAR EWARM 6.20 and later versions. All IAR
projects under folder \EWARM in the CD-ROM are built with IAR EWARM 6.30. User can
download the evaluation edition for free from www.iar.com.
The sections Building an existing EWARM Project and Create a New IAR Project give a
short description of how to use the IAR EWARM to develop application software. For more
detail, please refer to the relevant documentation.
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3.2.2 Building an existing EWARM Project
In this section, ADC3_DMA as an example has been used to show how to configure an
existing IAR EWARM project.
1)
Open project.
Open the ADC3_DMA project from the directory as follow.
code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Project\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Examples\ADC\
ADC3_DMA\EWARM
Figure 3-31 Configure options
2)
In the opened window, select General Options->Target tab, then select the device
from the list, as shown below:
Figure 3-32 Select the MCU model
3)
Select General Options->Library Configuration tab, then select Use CMSIS, as
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shown below:
Figure 3-33 Select Use CMSIS
4)
Select Linker->Config tab; then select the path of .linker configuration file (.icf). The
file is under specific project folder by default.
Figure 3-34 Edit linker configuration file path
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5)
Select Debugger->Setup tab to choose Debug tool (Default: J-Link/J-Trace).
Figure 3-35 Select Debug tool
6)
Select Debugger->Download tab, then select Verify download and Use flash loader.
Figure 3-36 Set download mode
7)
Click “OK” to finish the setup and return to IDE window.
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8)
Click “Make” to build the project.
Figure 3-37 Build the project
9)
Click “Download & Debug” to download program to MCU.
Figure 3-38 Download program
3.2.3 Create a New IAR Project
This section shows how to create a new project with IAR EWARM.
1)
Open the directory of \code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo .Create a new folder and
name it “My project”. Create a new folder in \My Project and name it, such as
ADC_example.
Copy source files, include files and icf file from the specified example, for example
ADC3_DMA, to the folder \ADC_example created in previous step.
main.c
stm32f2xx_it.c
stm32f2xx_it.h
system_stm32f2xx.c
stm32f2xx_conf.h
stm32f2xx_flash.icf
2)
Open IAR EWARM, click “Project”->”Create New Project”.
Figure 3-39 Open IAR EWARM
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3)
Select Empty Project in the opened window.
Figure 3-40 Create Empty Project
4)
Save the project in the folder of \ADC_example as ADC_example.
Figure 3-41 Save project
5)
Right click on project name in Workspace window, select Add->Add Group.
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Figure 3-42 Add Group
6)
Then a dialog box of “Add Group – ADC_example” will be opened. Enter Group name
in as shown below:
Figure 3-43 Add new group
7)
Create 5 groups as shown: CMSIS, EWARM, STM32F2xxStdPeriph_Driver, User and
STM32_EVAL. As shown below:
Figure 3-44 Finish groups adding
8)
Add files to groups.
Right Click on group of User, select Add->Add Files.
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Figure 3-45 Add files to group
Figure 3-46 Add selected files to group
9)
Add files to the group of CMSIS, STM32F2xxStdPeriph_Driver, STM32_EVAL, User,
EWARM same as done in step 8).
The files need to be added to group CMSIS are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\CMSIS\CM3\CoreSupport
Note: Only core_cm3.c need to be added to group of CMSIS.
The files need to be added to group of STM32F2xxStdPeriph_Driver are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Driver\src
Note: Only some files need to be added. If unsure which file should be added,
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all files can be added. However, it will increase compile time and code size.
The files need to be added to group STM32_EVAL are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Utilities\STM32_EVAL\STM322xG_EVAL
Note: Only stm322xg_eval.c and stm322xg_eval_lcd.c need to be added to
group of STM32_EVAL in this example.
The files need to be added to group MDK-ARM are located in
\code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Libraries\CMSIS\CM3\DeviceSupport\ST\STM3
2F2xx\startup\arm
Note: Only startup_stm32f2xx.s need to be added to group of MDK-ARM.
As the figure shown below, required source flies have been added to the groups.
Figure 3-47 Source flies have been added to groups
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10) Set include file paths.
Right click on project name in workspace window, then select Options->C/C++
Compiler->Preprocessor and enter the include files paths and define symbols.
Figure 3-48 Set include file paths
The include files‟ path for this example as below:
$PROJ_DIR$\..\..\Libraries\CMSIS\CM3\DeviceSupport\ST\STM32F2xx
$PROJ_DIR$\..\..\Libraries\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Driver\inc
$PROJ_DIR$\..\..\Utilities\STM32_EVAL
$PROJ_DIR$\..\..\Utilities\STM32_EVAL\STM322xG_EVAL
$PROJ_DIR$\..\..\Utilities\STM32_EVAL\Common
$PROJ_DIR$\
11) Click OK to finish include paths setup.
12) For the setting of other tabs, please refer to Building an existing EWARM Project
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3.3 Flash Loader
The STM32F20x and STM32F21xembedded Flash memory can be programmed using
incircuit programming or in-application programming.
In-application programming (IAP) can use any communication interface supported by the
microcontroller (I/Os, USB, CAN, UART, I2C, SPI,etc.) to download programming data into
memory. With IAP, the Flash memory can be reprogrammed while the application is
running. Nevertheless, part of the application has to have been previously programmed in
the Flash memory using ICP.
The in-circuit programming (ICP) method is used to update the entire contents of the
Flash memory, using the JTAG, SWD protocol or the boot loader to load the user
application into the microcontroller. ICP offers quick and efficient design iterations and
eliminates unnecessary package handling or socketing of devices.
The boot loader is located in system memory. It is used to reprogram the Flash memory by
using USART1 (PA9/PA10), USART3 (PC10/PC11), CAN2 (PB5/PB13), USB OTG in
Device mode (PA11/PA12) through DFU (device firmware upgrade).
Now we give a description to show how to downloader program to Flash memory using
boot loader (through USART3).
In order to test boot loader, please follow these steps:
1)
Install Flash Loader Demonstration software. The software is located in the folder of
CD-ROM–>Flash_Loader.
2)
Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9 connector
COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port. Make sure that jumpers JP1, JP2, JP7 and
JP8 are fitted, JP5, JP6, JP10 and JP11are not fitted.
3)
Plug in +5V power supply.
4)
Create HEX file with MDK-ARM.
Open MDK-ARM project, configure Target Option and select Create HEX file. Rebuild
the Project, generate HEX file.
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Figure 3-49 Configure Target Option
5)
Create HEX file or BIN file with IAR EWARM.
Open EWARM project, configure Options and select output format: Intel extended or
binary. Rebuild the Project, generate hex/binary file .
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6)
Open the Flash Loader software, configure UART.

Port Name:COM1 (Depending on the serial port that used)

Parity: Even or Odd

Baud Rate: 115200

Echo: Disable

Data Bits: 8(Default)

Timeout(s): 10(default)

Flow: None
Figure 3-50 Configure UART
7)
Press RESET button to reset the MCU.
8)
Click on “Next”, as following figure shown.
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Figure 3-51 Target is readable
9)
Click “Next” and select target MCU model.
Figure 3-52 Select MCU model
10) Click “Next”, and select the file that crated by step 4) or step 5).
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Figure 3-53 Select download file
11) Click “Next” to download the hex file to target device.
Figure 3-54 Start to download
12) Finish downloading and there will be a message as following figure shown
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Figure 3-55 Download operation finished successfully
13) Click “Close”. Remove jumpers from JP1 and JP2. Press RESET key then MCU start
to run.
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Chapter 4 Peripheral’s Examples
The STM32F2xx Standard Peripherals library provides a rich set of examples covering the
main features of each peripheral. Peripheral‟s examples are located in the folder
code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo\Project\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Examples.
Figure 4-1 Peripheral‟s example structure
Source files are provided for each example along with MDK-ARM projects. User can run
the selected example on DevKit1207 evaluation board directly. User can also tailor the
provided project template to run the selected example using his preferred toolchain.
Some examples may require additional hardware such as an oscilloscope. For further
information on the required hardware, please refer to the Readme file provided within
each example folder.
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4.1 Description of the Standard Peripherals Library
The file structure of the folder \code\STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Demo, is shown in figure
below.
Figure 4-2 Standard Peripherals Library structure
4.1.1 Libraries folder
This folder contains the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) for STM32F2xx Devices.
1)
CMSIS\CM3 subfolder
This subfolder contains the CoreSupport and DeviceSupport files.
CoreSupport files consist of:

core_cm3.c and core_cm3.h : Core Peripheral Access Layer, contains name
definitions, address definitions and helper functions to access Cortex-M3 core
registers and peripherals.
DeviceSupport files consist of:

startup_stm32f2xx.s: Provides the Cortex-M3 startup code and interrupt vectors
for all STM32F2xx device interrupt handlers with MDK-ARM and IAR.

stm32f2xx.h: this file contains the definitions of all peripheral registers, bits, and
memory mapping for STM32F2xx devices. The file is the unique include file used
in the application C source code, usually in the main.c.

system_stm32f2xx.c/.h: This file contains the system clock configuration for
STM32F2xx devices. It exports SystemInit() function which sets up the system
clock source, PLL multiplier and divider factors, AHB/APBx prescalers and Flash
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settings. This function is called at startup just after reset and before connecting to
the main program. The call is made inside the startup_stm32f2xx.s file.
2)
STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Driver subfolder
This subfolder contains sources of STM32F2xx peripheral drivers (excluding USB
and Ethernet).
Each driver consists of a set of routines and data structures covering all peripheral
functionalities. The development of each driver is driven by a common API
(application programming interface) which standardizes the driver structure, the
functions and the parameter names.
Each peripheral has a source code file, stm32f2xx_ppp.c, and a header file,
stm32f2xx_ppp.h. The stm32f2xx_ppp.c file contains all the firmware functions
required to use the PPP peripheral.
4.1.2 Project folder
This folder contains the source files of the DevKit1207 firmware applications.
1)
Peripheral_Examples subfolder
This subfolder contains a set of examples for some peripherals with preconfigured
projects for EWARM and MDK-ARM toolchains.
2)
STM32F2xx_StdPeriph_Template subfolder
This subfolder contains a project template that user can get a quick start to run an
example.
4.1.3 Utilities folder
This folder contains the abstraction layer for the DevKit1207 hardware and software.
It provides the following drivers:
1)
Common
This files provides text fonts for DevKit1207's LCD driver.
2)
FatFs_vR0.08a
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This file provides FatFs source code. FatFs module is an open source software to
implement FAT file system into small embedded systems. This is a free software and
is opened for education purpose, research and commercial developments under
license policy of following trems.
3)
STM32_EVAL\STM322xG_EVAL
This file provides:

set of firmware functions to manage Leds, push-button and COM ports

low level initialization functions for SD card (on SDIO) and serial EEPROM (sEE)
available on DevKit1207 evaluation board from STMicroelectronics.
The Section 4.2~4.23 describes the peripheral firmware examples provided for the
DevKit1207 evaluation board.
4.2 GPIO example
The GPIO folder contains two examples:

IOToggle

JTAG_Remap
IOToggle example shows how to use the GPIO port bit set/reset registers (BSRRL and
BSRRH) for I/O toggling.
JTAG_Remap example provides a short description of how to use the JTAG/SWD IOs as
standard GPIOs and gives a configuration sequence.
Let‟s see how to toggle GPIO‟s using IOToggle example in detail. .
IOToggle example
1)
Purpose
This example describes how to use BSRRH and BSRRL (Bit Set/Reset Register High
and Bit Set/Reset Register Low) for IO toggling. The duration between the ON and
OFF states depends on the inserted delay.
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2)
Description
In this example:

GPIOC, GPIOG and GPIOD clock is enabled.

Configure PC7, PG8, PG6 and PD12 in output pushpull mode

Three kinds of light effect.
When the program is executed, the four LEDs LED1, LED2, LED3 and LED4, which
connected to PC7, PG8, PG6 and PD12, are turned ON then OFF in an infinite loop.
The duration between the ON and OFF states corresponds to the inserted delay. Use
the USER1 and USER2 key to change the direction of LEDs.
Note: There is a simple one to one relationship between LED1~LED4 in software
and LED6~LED9 in hardware
4.3 NVIC example
The NVIC folder contains three examples:

DMA_WFIMode

IRQ_Priority

VectorTable_Relocation
DMA_WFIMode example shows how to enter into the system WFI mode by enabling
DMA transfer and how to wake-up from this mode using DMA End of Transfer interrupt.
IRQ_Priority example demonstrates the use of the Nested Vectored Interrupt Controller
(NVIC).
VectorTable_Relocation example describes how to relocate the CortexM3 vector table
into a specific address other than the default Flash memory base address.
Let‟s discuss IRQ_Priority example in detail to see how to use NVIC.
IRQ_Priority example
1)
Purpose
This example demonstrates the use of the Nested Vectored Interrupt Controller
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(NVIC).
2)
Description
In this example:

Configure 2 EXTI Lines (WAKEUP button EXTI Line and USER1 button EXTI
Line) to generate an interrupt on each falling edge and to use the SysTick
interrupt.

Using following parameters you can configure the above interrupts:
- WAKEUP button EXTI Line:
- PreemptionPriority = PreemptionPriorityValue
- SubPriority = 0
- USER1 button EXTI Line:
- PreemptionPriority = 0
- SubPriority = 1
- SysTick Handler:
- PreemptionPriority = !PreemptionPriorityValue
- SubPriority = 0
First, the PreemptionPriorityValue is equal to 0; the WAKEUP button EXTI Line
has higher preemption priority than the SysTick handler.
In the USER1 button EXTI Line interrupt routine the WAKEUP button EXTI Line
and SysTick preemption priorities are inverted.
In the WAKEUP button EXTI Line interrupt routine the pending bit of the SysTick
interrupt is set this will cause SysTick ISR to preempt the WAKEUP button EXTI
Line ISR only if it has higher preemption priority.
The system behaves as following:

The first time USER1 button EXTI Line interrupt occurs the SysTick preemption
become higher than WAKEUP button EXTI Line one. So when the WAKEUP
button EXTI Line interrupt occurs, the SysTick ISR is executed and the
PreemptionOccured variable becomes TRUE and the four leds (LED1, LED2,
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LED3, and LED4) start toggling.

When the next USER1 button EXTI Line interrupt occurs the SysTick preemption
become lower than WAKEUP button EXTI Line one. So when the WAKEUP
button EXTI Line interrupt occurs, the PreemptionOccured variable became
FALSE and the four leds (LED1, LED2, LED3 and LED4) stop toggling.
This behavior is repeated and performed in an infinite loop.
4.4 EXTI example
The EXTI folder contains one example:

EXTI_Example
EXTI_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure an external interrupt line.
2)
Description
In this example:

EXTI Line0 is connected to PA0 pin

EXTI Line15 is connected to PG15 pin
After EXTI configuration, a software interrupt is generated on the EXTI0 toggles
LED1.
After that, when falling edge is detected on EXTI Line0, LED1 toggles and when
falling edge is detected on EXTI Line15, LED2 toggles
4.5 DMA example
The DMA folder contains one example:

FLASH_RAM
FLASH_RAM example
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1)
Purpose
This example demonstrates how to use a DMA channel to transfer a word data buffer
from FLASH memory to embedded SRAM memory.
2)
Description
DMA2 Stream0 channel0 is configured to transfer the contents of a 32-word data
buffer stored in Flash memory to the reception buffer declared in RAM.
The start of transfer is triggered by software which enables DMA2 Stream0 channel0
memory-to-memory transfer and also enables the source and destination addresses
incrementing is also enabled.
The transfer is started by setting the Channel enable bit for DMA2 Stream0 channel0.
At the end of the transfer a Transfer Complete interrupt is generated since it is
enabled. The Transfer Complete Interrupt pending bit is then cleared.
When the DMA transfer is completed the DMA Stream is disabled by hardware. The
main application can check on the Stream Enable status to detect the end of transfer
or can also check on the number of remaining transfers which should be equal to 0 at
the end of the transfer.
A comparison between the source and destination buffers is done to check that all
data have been correctly transferred.
DevKit1207 evaluation board's LEDs can be used to monitor the transfer status:
- LED1 is ON when the program starts.
- LED2 is ON when the configuration phase is done and the transfer is started.
- LED3 is ON when the transfer is complete (into the Transfer Complete interrupt
routine)
- LED4 is ON when the comparison result between source buffer and destination
buffer is passed.
It is possible to select a different Stream and/or channel for the DMA transfer example
by modifying defines values in the file main.h.
Note: Only DMA2 Streams are able to perform Memory-to-Memory transfers.
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There are many different options to check for the DMA end of transfer:

By using DMA Transfer Complete interrupt.

By using DMA enable state (the DMA stream is disabled by hardware when
transfer is complete).

By using DMA Stream transfer counter value (the counter value is decremented
when transfer is ongoing and is equal to 0 at the transfer end).

By using DMA Transfer Complete flag (polling mode).
In this example methods 1, 2 and 3 are used to identify the DMA end of transfer (user
can select between method 2 and 3 by uncommenting relative code in the waiting
loop in the main.c file).
4.6 ADC example
The ADC folder contains four examples:

ADC3_DMA

DualADC_Interleaved_DMAmode3

DualADC_RegulSimu_DMAmode1

TripleADC_Interleaved_DMAmode2
ADC3_DMA example demonstrates how to use the ADC3 and DMA to transfer
continuously converted data from ADC3 to memory.
DualADC_Interleaved_DMAmode3 example demonstrates how to use the ADC
peripheral to convert a regular channel in Dual interleaved mode using DMA in mode 3
with 5Msps.
DualADC_RegulSimu_DMAmode1 example demonstrates how to use the ADC
peripheral to convert regular channels simultaneously in dual mode using DMA in mode 1.
TripleADC_Interleaved_DMAmode2 example demonstrates how to use the ADC
peripheral to convert a regular channel in Triple interleaved mode using DMA in mode 2
with 6Msps.
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Let‟s see how to use ADC with DMA in detail.
ADC3_DMA example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to use the ADC3 and DMA to transfer continuously
converted data from ADC3 to memory.
2)
Description

The ADC3 is configured to convert continuously channel7.

Each time an end of conversion occurs the DMA transfers, in circular mode, the
converted data from ADC3 DR register to the ADC3ConvertedValue variable.

In this example, the system clock is 120MHz, APB2 =60MHz and ADC clock =
APB2 /2.

Since ADC3 clock is 30 MHz and sampling time is set to 3 cycles, the total
conversion time is 0.5 us (2Msps).
The voltage at ADC3 channel 7 can be varied by using the evaluation board
potentiometer RV1.The converted voltage is displayed on the evaluation Board LCD
(only if the define PRINT_ON_LCD is enabled in main.c file)
4.7 DAC example
The DAC folder contains one example:

1)
DAC_SignalsGeneration
Purpose
This example demonstrates how to use the DAC peripheral to generate several
analog signals using DMA controller.
2)
Description
When the user presses the USER1 push-button, DMA transfers the two selected
waveforms to the DAC.
For each press on USER1 button, 2 signals are selected and can be monitored on the
two DAC channels:
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
Escalator waveform (Channel 1) and Sine waveform (Channel 2).

Noise waveform (Channel 1) and Triangle waveform (Channel 2).
4.8 USART example
The UASRT folder contains two examples:

USART_IRDA

USART_Printf
4.8.1 USART_Printf
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to retarget the C library printf function to the USART. This
will output the printf message on the Hyperterminal using USART3.
2)
Description
The USART3 is configured as below:
- BaudRate = 115200 baud
- Word Length = 8 Bits
- One Stop Bit
- No parity
- Hardware flow control disabled (RTS and CTS signals)
- Receive and transmit enabled
When the program is executed, a message will be printed on the Hyperterminal as
follows:
USART Printf Example: retarget the C library printf function to the USART
Try to type a character using keyboard, the character will be sent to DevKit1207 and
printed on the Hyperterminal.
Note:

Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted.

Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9
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connector COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port if you want to display data
on the Hyper Terminal.

Hyperterminal configuration: Word Length = 8 Bits, One Stop Bit, No parity,
BaudRate= 115200 baud,flow control: None
4.8.2 USART_IRDA
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to implement communication between two devices using
Infrared Transceiver Module. MCU communicates with Infrared Transceiver Module
via USART3.
Note:
2)

This example requires two DevKit1207 evaluation board.

Make sure that jumpers JP10 and JP11 are fitted.
Description
In this example:

Infrared Transceiver Module work in simplex mode.
The program for sender need to be modified as below in main.c file:
#define configTYPE
SEND_MODE
//#define configTYPE
RECV_MODE
The program for receiver need to be modified as below in main.c file:

//#define configTYPE
SEND_MODE
#define configTYPE
RECV_MODE
The USART3 is configured as follow:
- BaudRate = 115200 baud
- Word Length = 8 Bits
- One Stop Bit
- No parity
- Hardware flow control disabled (RTS and CTS signals)
Receive and transmit enabled
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When the program is executed, the sender transmits the data while receiver receives
the data with the help of Infrared Transceiver Module. The amount of data sent and
received will be displayed on LCD.
4.9 PWR example
The PWR folder contains five examples:

BOR(Brown out reset)

CurrentConsumption

PWR(Programmable voltage detector)

STANDBY

STOP
BOR example shows how to configure the programmable BOR thresholds using the
FLASH option bytes.
CurrentConsumption example shows how to configure the STM32F2xx system to
measure the current consumption in different Low Power Modes.
PVD example shows how to configure the programmable voltage detector using an
external interrupt line.
STANDBY example shows how to enter the system into STANDBY mode and wake-up
from this mode using external RESET, RTC Alarm A or WKUP pin.
STOP example shows how to enter the system into STOP mode and wake-up from this
mode using RTC Wakeup Timer Event connected to EXTI Line 22.
Now let‟s see the STANDBY example in detail..
STANDBY example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to enter the system into STANDBY mode and wake-up from
this mode using: external RESET, RTC Alarm A or WKUP pin.
2)
Description
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In the associated software

The system clock is set to 120 MHz

The EXTI_Line15 is configured to generate interrupt on falling edge

The EXTI_Line22 connected internally to the RTC Wakeup event is configured to
generate an interrupt on rising edge each 4s

The SysTick is programmed to generate an interrupt each 250 ms

In the SysTick interrupt handler, LED2 is toggled; this is used to indicate whether
the MCU is in STOP or RUN mode.
When the system enters into STOP mode , it will wait for the RTC Wakeup event to
be generated each 4s, or USER1 push button is pressed.
- When MCU wake up from STOP mode due to the RTC WakeUp event
(EXTI_Line22), LED1 is toggled.
- If MCU wake up from STOP mode due to the USER1 button (EXTI_Line15),
LED4 is toggled.
LEDs are used to monitor the system state as following:

LED2 toggling: system is in RUN mode

LED1 toggled: system woken up from STOP mode due to RTC WakeUp Interrupt

LED4 toggled: system woken up from STOP mode due to EXTI_Line15 (USER1
push button)
This behavior is repeated in an infinite loop.
4.10 RCC example
The RCC folder contains one example:

RCC_Example
RCC_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to use (for debug purpose) the RCC_GetClocksFreq
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function to retrieve the current status and frequencies of different on chip clocks.
2)
Description
For debug purposes, the RCC_GetClocksFreq() function is used to retrieve the
current status and frequencies of different on chip clocks.
This example also handles the High Speed External clock (HSE) failure detection. At
the time of the HSE clock failure (broken or disconnected external Quartz); HSE and
PLL are disabled (but no change on PLL config), and HSI is selected as a source for
system clock source and an interrupt (NMI) is generated. Once the HSE clock
recovers, the HSERDY interrupt is generated and the system clock is reconfigured in
the RCC ISR routine to its previous state (before HSE clock failure). HSE clock can
be monitored at the MCO1 pin (PA8).
Four LEDs are toggled with a timing defined by the Delay function.
4.11 RTC example
The RTC folder contains three examples:

BKP_Domain

HW_Calendar

TimeStamp
BKP_Domain example demonstrates and explains how to use the peripherals available
on Backup Domain.
HW_Calendar example demonstrates how to setup the RTC peripheral, in terms of
prescaler and interrupts, to be used to keep time and to generate alarm interrupt.
TimeStamp example provides a short description of how to use the RTC peripheral and
the Time Stamp feature.
Now let‟s see how to use RTC peripheral using TimeStamp example.
TimeStamp
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1)
Purpose
This example shows how to use the RTC peripheral and the Time Stamp feature.
2)
Description
One from the following clock can be used as RTC clock source (uncomment the
corresponding define in main.c):

LSE oscillator clock usually delivered by a 32.768 kHz quartz.

LSI oscillator clock
Note:

Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted.

Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9
connector COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port if you want to display data
on the Hyper Terminal.

Hyperterminal configuration: Word Length = 8 Bits, One Stop Bit, No parity,
BaudRate= 115200 baud,flow control: None
The program behaves as follows:

After startup the program checks the backup data register 0 value:
- BKP_DR0 value not correct: (RTC_BKP_DR0 value is not correct or has
not yet been programmed when the program is executed for the first time)
the RTC is configured and the user is asked to set the time and date
(entered on HyperTerminal).
- BKP_DR0 value correct: this means that the RTC is configured and the
time date and timestamp (time and date) are displayed on HyperTerminal.

When an External Reset occurs the BKP domain is not reset and the RTC
configuration is not lost.

When power on reset occurs:
- If a battery is connected to the VBAT pin: the BKP domain is not reset and
the RTC configuration is not lost.
- If no battery is connected to the VBAT pin: the BKP domain is reset and the
RTC configuration is lost.
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
It configures the RTC_AF1 pin TimeStamp to be falling edge and enables the
TimeStamp detection.

On applying a low level on the RTC_AF1 pin (PC.13), the calendar is saved in
the time-stamp registers thanks to the timestamp event detection.
The example uses HyperTerminal to configure the RTC clock, display the current
time and timestamp registers contents:

Pressing USER2 push button, the current time and date are saved in RTC TSTR
and TSDR registers.

When pressing WAKEUP push button, the TimeStamp Calendar is cleared.

When pressing USER1 push button, the current RTC Calendar (Time and date)
and RTC TimeStamp Calendar (Time and date) are displayed.
4.12 SysTick example
The SysTick folder contains one example:

SysTick_Example
SysTick_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure the SysTick to generate a time base equal to 1
ms. The system clock is set to 120 MHz, and the SysTick is clocked by the AHB clock
(HCLK).
2)
Description
In this example:

The system tick timer is initialized.

The system tick timer interrupt is enabled in the NVIC.

The system tick timer/counter starts in free running mode to generate periodical
interrupts.

The system tick timer interrupt is triggered every 1 ms.

A Delay function is implemented based on the system tick timer end-of-count
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event.
The four LEDs LED1, LED2, LED3 and LED4 are toggled with a timing defined by the
Delay function.
4.13 TIM example
The TIM folder contains a set of examples:
Table 4-1 TIM example
This example shows how to configure the TIM1
6Steps
peripheral to generate 6 Steps.
This example shows how to use the TIM peripheral to
InputCapture
measure the frequency of an external signal.
This example shows how to configure the TIM
OCActive
peripheral to generate four different signals with four
different delays
This example shows how to configure the TIM
OCInactive
peripheral in Output Compare Inactive mode with the
corresponding Interrupt requests for each channel.
TIM
This example shows how to configure the TIM3
OCToggle
peripheral to generate four different signals with four
different frequencies.
This example shows how to use the TIM peripheral to
OnePulse
generate a One pulse Mode after a Rising edge of an
external signal is received at Timer Input pin.
This
example
shows
how
to
synchronize
TIM
Parallel_Synchro
peripherals in parallel mode.
This example shows how to use the TIM peripheral to
PWM_Input
measure the frequency and duty cycle of an external
signal.
PWM_Output
This example shows how to configure the TIM
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peripheral in PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) mode.
This example shows how to synchronize TIM1 and
TIM1_Synchro
Timers (TIM3 and TIM4) in parallel mode.
This example shows how to configure the TIM9
TIM9_OCToggle
TIM
peripheral to generate four different signals with four
different frequencies.
This example shows how to configure the TIM
TIM10_PWMOutput
peripheral in PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) mode.
This example shows how to configure the TIM
peripheral in Output Compare Timing mode with the
TimeBase
corresponding Interrupt requests for each channel in
order to generate 4 different time bases.
Now let‟s discuss about PWM_Output example and TimeBase example to understand
how to use TIM peripheral.
4.13.1 PWM_Output example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure the TIM peripheral in PWM (Pulse Width
Modulation) mode.
2)
Description
The TIM3CLK frequency is set to SystemCoreClock / 2 (Hz), to get TIM3 counter
clock at 20 MHz the Prescaler is computed as following:

Prescaler = (TIM3CLK / TIM3 counter clock) - 1

SystemCoreClock is set to 120 MHz for STM32F2xx Devices RevA, RevZ and
RevB.

The TIM3 is running at 30 KHz:
TIM3 Frequency = TIM3 counter clock/ (ARR + 1) = 20 MHz / 666 = 30 KHz

The TIM3 CCR1 register value is equal to 333, so the TIM3 Channel 1 generates
a PWM signal with a frequency equal to 30 KHz and a duty cycle equal to 50%:
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TIM3 Channel1 duty cycle = (TIM3_CCR1/ TIM3_ARR + 1)* 100 % = 50%

The TIM3 CCR2 register value is equal to 249, so the TIM3 Channel 2 generates
a PWM signal with a frequency equal to 30 KHz and a duty cycle equal to 37.5%:
TIM3 Channel2 duty cycle = (TIM3_CCR2/ TIM3_ARR + 1)* 100 % = 37.5%

The TIM3 CCR3 register value is equal to 166, so the TIM3 Channel 3 generates
a PWM signal with a frequency equal to 30 KHz and a duty cycle equal to 25%:
TIM3 Channel3 duty cycle = (TIM3_CCR3/ TIM3_ARR + 1)* 100 % = 25%

The TIM3 CCR4 register value is equal to 83, so the TIM3 Channel 4 generates
a PWM signal with a frequency equal to 30 KHz and a duty cycle equal to 12.5%:
TIM3 Channel4 duty cycle = (TIM3_CCR4/ TIM3_ARR + 1)* 100 % = 12.5%
The PWM waveform can be displayed using an oscilloscope.
4.13.2 TimeBase
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure the TIM peripheral in Output Compare Timing
mode with the corresponding Interrupt requests for each channel in order to generate
4 different time bases.
2)
Description
The TIM3CLK frequency is set to SystemCoreClock / 2 (Hz), to get TIM3 counter
clock at 6 MHz.

The Prescaler is computed as following:
Prescaler = (TIM3CLK / TIM3 counter clock) - 1

SystemCoreClock is set to 120MHz for STM32F2xx Devices RevA, RevZ and
RevB.

The TIM3 CC1 register value is equal to 40961
CC1 update rate = TIM3 counter clock / CCR1_Val = 146.48 Hz, so the
TIM3 Channel 1 generates an interrupt each 6.8ms

The TIM3 CC2 register is equal to 27309
CC2 update rate = TIM3 counter clock / CCR2_Val = 219.7 Hz, so the
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TIM3 Channel 2 generates an interrupt each 4.55ms

The TIM3 CC3 register is equal to 13654
CC3 update rate = TIM3 counter clock / CCR3_Val = 439.40Hz, so the
TIM3 Channel 3 generates an interrupt each 2.27ms

The TIM3 CC4 register is equal to 6826
CC4 update rate = TIM3 counter clock / CCR4_Val = 878.9 Hz, so the
TIM3 Channel 4 generates an interrupt each 1.13ms.
When the counter value reaches the Output compare registers values, the Output
Compare interrupts are generated and, in the handler routine, 4 pins(PC.07, PG.08,
PG.06, and PD.12) are toggled with the following frequencies:

PC.07: 73.24Hz (CC1)

PG.08: 109.8Hz (CC2)

PG.06: 219.7Hz (CC3)

PD.12: 439.4Hz (CC4)
4.14 IWDG example
The IWDG folder contains one example:

IWDG_Example
IWDG_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to update at regular period the IWDG reload counter and
how to simulate a software fault generating an MCU IWDG reset on expiry of a
programmed time period.
2)
Description
In this example:

The IWDG timeout is set to 250 ms (the timeout may vary due to LSI frequency
dispersion).

The TIM5 timer is configured to measure the LSI frequency as the LSI is
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internally connected to TIM5 CH4, in order to adjust the IWDG clock.

The IWDG reload counter is configured to obtain 250 ms according to the
measured LSI frequency. The IWDG reload counter is refreshed each 240 ms in
the main program infinite loop to prevent a IWDG reset. LED2 is also toggled
each 240 ms indicating that the program is running.

An EXTI Line is connected to a GPIO pin, and configured to generate an interrupt
on the rising edge of the signal.

The EXTI Line is used to simulate a software failure: once the EXTI Line event
occurs, by pressing the USER1 push-button, the corresponding interrupt is
served.
In the ISR, a write to invalid address generates a Hardfault exception containing
an infinite loop and preventing to return to main program (the IWDG reload
counter is not refreshed).As a result, when the IWDG counter reaches 00h, the
IWDG reset occurs.
When the program is executed, If the IWDG reset is generated, after the system
resumes from reset, LED1 turns on. If the EXTI Line event does not occur, the IWDG
counter is indefinitely refreshed in the main program infinite loop, and there is no
IWDG reset.
4.15 WWDG example
The WWDG folder contains one example:

WWDG_Example
WWDG_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to update at regular period the WWDG counter and how to
simulate a software fault generating an MCU WWDG reset on expiry of a
programmed time period.
2)
Description
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
The WWDG timeout is set to 69.9 ms and the refresh window is set to 80.

The WWDG counter is refreshed each 50ms in the main program infinite loop to
prevent a WWDG reset.LED2 is also toggled each 53 ms indicating that the
program is running.

An EXTI Line is connected to a GPIO pin, and configured to generate an interrupt
on the rising edge of the signal.

The EXTI Line is used to simulate a software failure: once the EXTI Line event
occurs, by pressing the USER1 push-button, the corresponding interrupt is
served.
In the ISR, a write to invalid address generates a Hardfault exception containing
an infinite loop and preventing to return to main program (the WWDG counter is
not refreshed).As a result, when the WWDG counter falls to 63, the WWDG reset
occurs.
When the program is executed, if the WWDG reset is generated, after the system
resumes from reset, LED1 turns on. If the EXTI Line event does not occur, the
WWDG counter is indefinitely refreshed in the main program infinite loop, and there is
no WWDG reset.
4.16 CAN example
The CAN folder contains two examples:

LoopBack

Networking
LoopBack example provides a description of how to set a communication with the CAN in
loopback mode.
Networking example shows how to configure the CAN peripheral to send and receive
CAN frames in normal mode. The sent frames are used to control Leds by pressing key
push button.
Now let‟s discuss Networking example in detail to show how to use CAN peripheral.
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Networking example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure the CAN peripheral to send and receive CAN
frames in normal mode. The sent frames are used to control Leds by pressing key
push button.
2)
Description
The CAN serial communication link is a bus to which a number of units may be
connected. This number has no theoretical limit. Practically the total number of units
will be limited by delay times and/or electrical loads on the bus line.
This program behaves as follows:

After reset LED1 is ON.

By Pressing on USER1 Button : LED2 turns ON and all other LEDs are OFF, on
the N evaluation boards connected to the bus.

Press on USER1 Button again to send CAN Frame to command LEDn+1 ON, all
other Leds are OFF on the N evaluation boards.
This example is tested with a bus of 3 units. The same program example is loaded in
all units to send and receive frames. Any unit in the CAN bus may play the role of
sender (by pressing USER1 button) or receiver.
Note:

Make sure that JP9 is fitted.

It requires two evaluation boards.

Use cable to connect two evaluation boards. As shown in figure below:
CAN_H
CAN_H
CAN_L
CAN_L
DevKit1207
I
DevKit1207
II
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4.17 FLASH example
The FLASH folder contains two examples:

Program

Write_Protection
Program example provides a description of how to program the STM32F2xx FLASH.
Write_Protection example provides a description of how to enable and disable the write
protection for the STM32F2xx FLASH.
Now let‟s discuss Program example in detail to show how to use FLASH.
Program example
1)
Purpose
This example provides a description of how to program the STM32F2xx FLASH.
2)
Description
In this example:

After Reset, the Flash memory Program/Erase Controller is locked. To unlock it,
the FLASH_Unlock function is used.

Before programming the desired addresses, an erase operation is performed
using the flash erase sector feature. The erase procedure starts with the
calculation of the number of sector to be used. Then all these sectors will be
erased one by one by calling FLASH_EraseSector function.

Once this operation is finished, the programming operation will be performed by
using the FLASH_ProgramWord function. The written data is then checked and
the result of the programming operation is stored into the MemoryProgramStatus
variable.
4.18 I2C example
The I2C folder contains two examples:
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
EEPROM

GSensor-LIS33DE
4.18.1 EEPROM
1)
Purpose
This firmware provides a basic example of how to use the I2C firmware library and an
associate I2C EEPROM driver to communicate with an I2C EEPROM device (here
the example is interfacing with AT24C02 EEPROM)
2)
Description
I2C peripheral is configured in Master transmitter during write operation and in Master
receiver during read operation from I2C EEPROM.
The peripheral used is I2C1 but can be configured by modifying the defines values in
stm322xg_eval.h file. The speed is set to 100kHz and can be configured by modifying
the relative define in stm322xg_eval_i2c_ee.h file.
For AT24C02 devices all the memory is accessible through the two-bytes addressing
mode and need to define block addresses. In this case, only the physical address has
to be defined (according to the address pins (E0,E1 and E2) connection).
This address is defined in stm322xg_eval_i2c_ee.h (default is 0xA0: E0, E1 and E2
tied to ground).
The EEPROM addresses where the program start the write and the read operations
is defined in the main.c file.
The program behaves as follows:

First, the content of Tx1_Buffer is written to the EEPROM_WriteAddress1 and
the written data are read. The written and the read buffers data are then
compared. Following the read operation, the program waits that the EEPROM
reverts to its Standby state.

A second write operation is, then, performed and this time, Tx2_Buffer is written
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to EEPROM_WriteAddress2, which represents the address just after the last
written one in the first write.

After completion of the second write operation, the written data are read. The
contents of the written and the read buffers are compared.
All transfers are managed in DMA mode (except when 1-byte read/write operation is
required). Once sEE_ReadBuffer() or sEE_WriteBuffer() function is called, the user
application may perform other tasks in parallel while Read/Write operation is
managed by DMA.
This example provides the option to use the DevKit1207 LCD screen for messages
display (transfer status: Ongoing, PASSED, FAILED).To enable this option, user
need to uncomment the define ENABLE_LCD_MSG_DISPLAY in the main.c file.
4.18.2 GSensor-LIS33DE
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to configure the MEMS accelerometer to detect
acceleration on X/Y/Z axes.
Note:

Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted.

Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9
connector COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port if you want to display data
on the Hyper Terminal.

Hyperterminal configuration:Word Length = 8 Bits, One Stop Bit, No parity,
BaudRate= 115200 baud,flow control: None
2)
Description
After startup, the program checks for the G-Sensor (MEMS accelerometer) status
registers and behaves as follows:

If the board is moved as shown below, the acceleration is detected on the X/Y/Z
axis.
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Figure 4-3 Direction of LIS33DE

The values of X/Y/Z axis are printed on Hyperterminal using USART3.
All transfers are managed in DMA mode.
4.19 I2S example
The I2S folder contains one example:

Audio
Audio example
1)
Purpose
This example demonstrates the basic of audio features. It allows playing an audio file
through the I2S peripheral and using the external codec implemented on the
DevKit1207 board.
2)
Description
In this example the I2S input clock, provided by a dedicated PLL (PLLI2S), is
configured to have an audio sampling frequency at 48 KHz with Master clock
enabled.
This example uses an audio codec driver which consists of three independent layers:

Codec Hardware layer: which controls and communicates with the audio codec
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(CS42L52) implemented on the evaluation board.

MAL (Media Access Layer): which controls and interfaces with storage media
storing or providing the audio file/stream.

The high layer: which implements overall control and interfacing API allowing to
perform basic audio operations (Init, Play, Pause, Resume, Stop, Volume control
and audio file pointer management)
In this example the audio file is stored in the internal flash memory (Stereo, 16-bit, 48
KHz). The analog output device is automatically detected (Speaker or Headphone)
when the Headphone is plugged/unplugged in/from the audio jack of the evaluation
board. The example also manages information display and control interface through
push buttons:
- When the application is Playing audio file:
+ USER1
: Pause
+ USER2: Volume UP
+ Wakeup: Volume DOWN
- When the application is Paused:
+ USER1
: Play
+ USER2: Switch output target to Headphone
+ Wakeup: Switch output target to Speaker
Note: User needs to prepare a Speaker (0.25W/8Ω ) and connect it to CON5.
4.20 SDIO example
The SDIO folder contains one example:

uSDCard
uSDCard example
1)
Purpose
This example shows a basic example of how to use the SDIO firmware library and an
associate driver to perform read/write operations on the SD Card memory (SD Card
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V1.0, V1.1, V2.0 and SDHC (High Capacity) protocol) that could be mounted on the
board. This example also migrate the FatFs-R0.08a file system.
2)
Description
The example provides different SD Card transfer states and operations. Steps
involved in this process are given below:

The SDIO peripheral and SD Card are initialized using the SD_Init() function.

SD Card Erase Operation

SD Card Single Block Operation

SD Card Multiple Block Operation

Starts a Multiple Write operation: Write a multi Blocks using the SD_Write
MultiBlocks() function.

Read a multiple Blocks using the SD_ReadMultiBlocks() function

Compare the written Blocks and the read one: check if the TransferStatus2
variable is equal to PASSED.
The program behaves as follows:

Check the Micro SD (TF) card is mounted or not.

Open message.txt test if the file exit.

Create a new Hello.txt

Read Hello.txt create in previous step

Open the root directory
All data transfers are made by DMA. At each operation, the SD Card presence and
status is checked using the SD_GetStatus() function and a global variable "Status"
storing the results of the last operation. LCD will display the status when each
operation finish.
4.21 LCD_Touch example
The LCD_Touch folder contains one example:

STMPE811QTR
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STMPE811QTR example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to do LCD touch screen calibration.
2)
Description
In this example, four points on the corner of touch screen need to be touch to
complete calibration.
The program behaves as follows:

Click calibration points accurately using a touch pen.

LCD will give massage whether calibration is OK. If calibration is OK, then MCU
will enter into Calibration_Test_Dispose function.

In this function LCD will display the value of points touch by the pen. Both ADC
values and coordinate values are displayed.
Note: User should click calibration points in order.
4.22 CRC example
The CRC folder contains one example:

CRC_Example
CRC_Example
1)
Purpose
This example shows how to use CRC (cyclic redundancy check) calculation unit to
get a CRC code of a given buffer of data word(32-bit), based on a fixed generator
polynomial(0x4C11DB7).
2)
Description
The CRC (cyclic redundancy check) calculation unit is used to get a CRC code from a
32-bit data word and a fixed generator polynomial.
In this example, CRC-32 (Ethernet) polynomial is 0x4C11DB7

X32 + X26 + X23 + X22 + X16 + X12 + X11 + X10 +X8 + X7 + X5 + X4 +X2+X+1
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4.23 RNG_Touch example
The RNG folder contains one example:

1)
RNG_MultiRNG
Purpose
This example shows how to use the RNG peripheral to generate Random 32bit
numbers.
2)
Description
In this example, an interactive human interface is developed to allow user to display 8
(arbitrary value, which can be updated by user) random 32bit numbers using the
evaluation board LCD and/or USART (COM1) with PC HyperTerminal. Numbers can
be displayed on LCD and/or PC Hyperteminal by using PRINT_ON_LCD and
PRINT_ON_USART defined in main.c file.
After startup, user is asked to press USER1 button.The 8 Random 32bit numbers are
displayed as soon as the USER1 button is pressed.
Note:

Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted.

Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9
connector COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port if you want to display data
on the Hyper Terminal.

Hyperterminal configuration:Word Length = 8 Bits, One Stop Bit, No parity,
BaudRate= 115200 baud,flow control: None
4.24 Lib_DEBUG example
The Lib_DEBUG folder contains one example:
1)
Purpose
This example demonstrates how to declare a dynamic peripherals pointers used for
Debug mode.
2)
Description
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To use Debug mode, user have to add the stm32f2xx_ip_dbg.c file to your application.
This creates a pointer to the peripheral structure in SRAM. Debugging consequently
becomes easier and all register settings can be obtained by dumping a peripheral
variable.
When the "USE_FULL_ASSERT" label is uncommented (in stm32f2xx_conf.h file),
the assert_param macro is expanded and run-time checking is enabled in the
firmware library code. The run-time checking allows checking that all the library
functions input value lies within the parameter allowed values.
The associated program simulates wrong parameter passed to library function and
the source of the error is printed on Hyperterminal (through USART).
Note:

Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted.

Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9
connector COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port if you want to display data
on the Hyper Terminal.

Hyperterminal configuration:Word Length = 8 Bits, One Stop Bit, No parity,
BaudRate= 115200 baud,flow control: None
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Chapter 5 Ethernet Demonstration
5.1 Description of Ethernet Demonstration
STM32F2x7xx microcontrollers features a high-quality 10/100 Mbit/s Ethernet peripheral
that supports IEEE 1588v2 protocol, both the Media Independent Interface (MII) and
Reduced Media Independent Interface (RMII) to interface with the Physical Layer (PHY).
The CD-ROM provides a demonstration built on top of the LwIP (Lightweight IP) TCP/IP
stack which is an open source stack intended for embedded devices. This demonstration
is located in \code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2 folder.
Figure 5-1 Demonstration structure
The demonstration contains nine applications running on top of the LwIP stack.
1)
Applications running in standalone mode (without an RTOS):

A Web server

A TFTP server

A TCP echo client application

A TCP echo server application
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2)

A UDP echo client application

A UDP echo server application
Applications running with the FreeRTOS operating system:

A Web server based on the netconn API

A Web server based on the socket API

A TCP/UDP echo server application based on the netconn API
Remote PC settings
In order to run the demos provided within the CD-ROM, set up the remote PC network
environment. Make sure that the PC's IP address and the evaluation board's IP address
are on the same network. For example to setup a network in Microsoft Windows XP
operating system:.
1)
On remote PC, select Start > Control Panel > Network connections > Local Area
Connection > Properties, as shown below:
Figure 5-2 Local Area Connection
2)
Click "Properties", this will open the window of Local Area Connection Properties, as
shown below:
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Figure 5-3 Local Area Connection Properties
3)
Double click "TCP / IP Options", opens a window for TCP / IP Properties, as shown
below:
Figure 5-4 TCP / IP Options
4)
Double click the "Advanced" option, open a window for “Advanced TCP / IP settings”,
as shown below:
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Figure 5-5 Advanced TCP / IP settings
5)
Click the "Add" option, open a window for "Add TCP / IP".
Enter the IP address and subnet mask, and then click "Add”, as shown below:
Figure 5-6 Add TCP/IP address
6)
Click “OK” to finish network settings.
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Figure 5-7 TCP/IP address setup ok
5.2 Standalone demos
5.2.1 HTTP server demo
The HTTP server demo shows an implementation of a web server with the following
features:

URL parsing

support of CGI (Common Gateway Interface)

support of SSI (Server Side Includes)

dynamic Header generation

support of HTTP Post request
In order to test the HTTP server demo, please follow the steps below:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board; modify the
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relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement, as shown below.
Figure 5-8 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
You can also uncomment option “USE_DHCP” to enable the DHCP to assign IP
addresses dynamically.
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
5)
On the remote PC, open a web client (Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer) and type
the board‟s IP address in a web browser. By default, the following static IP address is
used: 192.168.0.163.
Figure 5-9 Home page of the HTTP server demo
6)
Click “LED control” to get into LED control interface, select or cancel LED1, LED2,
LED3, LED4 and press “Send”, the LEDs on the board will work accordingly.
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Figure 5-10 Led control page of the HTTP server demo
7)
Click “ADCstatus bar” to get the voltage value of potentiometer RV1 on the board.
Figure 5-11 ADC status bar
5.2.2 TFTP server demo
The TFTP server is a file transfer application that needs a remote TFTP client. The files
are transferred to and from the microSD card located on the DevKit1207 evaluation board.
In order to test the tftpserver demo, please follow the steps below:
1)
Install TFTP Client software on the remote PC.
The software is located in the folder:
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\code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2\Utilities\Third_Party\PC_Software
2)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
3)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement, as shown below.
Figure 5-12 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
4)
DevKit1207 settings.
Plug the microSD™ card into the dedicated connector CON4.
Make sure that jumpers JP5 and JP6 are fitted, JP7, JP8, JP10 and JP11 are not
fitted.
5)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
6)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
7)
On the remote PC, open the TFTP client (for example, TFTPD32), and configure the
TFTP server address (host address in TFTPD32).
Your PC’s IP
address is
dispalyed here
Type DevKit1207's
IP address here
File browser,select
the file to be sent
Type the directory from
where to get or where to
put the file to be
received/sent on PC side
Type the directory from
where to get or where to put
the file to be received/sent
on DevKit1207 side
Press this button to get a
file from the DevKit1207's
microSD card
Press this button to put a
file into the DevKit1207's
microSD card
Press button to
configure the tftpd32
tool: you should enable
the TFTP client
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Figure 5-13 TFTP tool (tftpd32)
8) Start transferring files to and from the microSD card located on the DevKit1207 board.
5.2.3 TCP_echo_client demo
This demo is used to test a basic TCP connection. In this demo, the STM32 acts as a TCP
client that connects to the TCP server. The client sends a string and the server echoes
back the same string to the client.
In order to test the TCP echo client demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement, as shown below.
Figure 5-14 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
5)
On the remote PC , Copy the echotool software to C root directory.
The echotool software is located in the folder of CD-ROM:
\code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2\Utilities\Third_Party\PC_Software
6)
On the remote PC, open a command prompt window. (In Windows, select Start > All
Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.)
7)
At the command prompt, enter:
C:\>echotool /p tcp /s
where;
– /p tcp is the TCP protocol (TCP protocol)
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– /s is the actual mode of connection (Server mode)
8)
When the USER1 button on the DevKit1207 board is pressed, the client sends a
string and the server echoes back the same string to the client. The below screenshot
shows an example of the command string and the module‟s response.
Figure 5-15 TCP echo client demo
5.2.4 TCP_echo_server demo
This demo is used to test a basic TCP connection. In this demo, the STM32 acts as a
TCPserver that waits for client requests. It simply echoes back whatever is sent.
In order to test the TCP echo server demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h depending on your needs, as shown below.
Figure 5-16 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
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5)
On the remote PC , Copy the echotool software to C root directory.
The echotool software is located in the folder of CD-ROM:
\code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2\Utilities\Third_Party\PC_Software
6)
On the remote PC, open a command prompt window. (In Windows, select Start > All
Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.)
7)
At the command prompt, enter:
C:\>echotool.exe IP_address /p tcp /r 7 /n 15 /t 2 /d Testing LwIP TCP echo
server
where;
– IP_address is the actual board’s IP address;
By default the following static IP address is used: 192.168.0.10
– /p tcp is the protocol (TCP protocol)
– /r is the actual remote port on the echo server (echo port)
– /n is the number of echo requests
– /t is the connection timeout in seconds
– /d is the message to be sent for echo
8)
The below screenshot shows an example of this command string and the module‟s
response.
Figure 5-17 TCP echo server demo
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5.2.5 UDP_echo_client demo
This demo is used to test a basic UDP echo connection. In this demo the STM32 acts as a
UDP client that connects to a UDP server.
In order to test the UDP echo client demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement.
Figure 5-18 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
3)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of remote PC, modify the
relevant macro in main.h depending on your needs, as shown below.
Figure 5-19 Configure IP address of remote PC
4)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
5)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
6)
On the remote PC , Copy the echotool software to C root directory.
The echotool software is located in the folder of CD-ROM:
\code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2\Utilities\Third_Party\PC_Software
7)
On the remote PC, open a command prompt window. (In Windows, select Start > All
Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.)
8)
At the command prompt, enter:
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C:\>echotool /p udp /s
where;
– /p udp is the protocol (UDP protocol)
– /s is the actual mode of connection (Server mode)
9)
When the USER1 button on the DevKit1207 board is pressed, the client sends a
string and the server echoes back the same string to the client. The follow figure
shows an example of this command string and the module‟s response.
Figure 5-20 UDP echo client demo
5.2.6 UDP_echo_server demo
This demo is used to test a basic UDP connection. In this demo, the STM32 acts as a
UDP server that waits for client requests.
In order to test the UDP echo server demo, please follow steps below:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement, as shown below.
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Figure 5-21 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
5)
On the remote PC , Copy the echotool software to C root directory.
The echotool software is located in the folder of CD-ROM:
\code\STM32F2x7_ETH_LwIP_V1.0.2\Utilities\Third_Party\PC_Software
6)
On the remote PC, open a command prompt window. (In Windows, select Start > All
Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.)
7)
At the command prompt, enter:
C:\>echotool.exe IP_address /p udp /r 7 /l 7 /n 15 /t 2 /d Testing LwIP UDP echo
server
where;
– IP_address is the actual board’s IP address;
By default the following static IP address is used: 192.168.0.10
– /p udp is the protocol (UDP protocol)
– /r is the actual remote port on the echo server (echo port)
– /l is the actual local for the client (echo port)
– /n is the number of echo requests
– /t is the connection timeout in seconds
– /d is the message to be sent for echo
8)
The below screenshot shows an example of this command string and the module‟s
response.
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Figure 5-22 UDP echo server demo
5.3 FreeRTOS demos
5.3.1 HTTP server netconn demo
The HTTP server netconn demo shows an implementation of a web server application
based on the netconn API. This demo is used to connect the DevKit1207 board with a web
browser and to load HTML pages.
This demo has two HTML pages. The first one contains general information about
STM32F2x7 microcontrollers, the demonstration package and the stack LwIP. The
second one contains the list of running tasks and their status. This page is automatically
updated every second.
In order to test the HTTP server netconn demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to DevKit1207. Connect a crossover cable between
DevKit1207 RJ45 CON1 and PC Ethernet port.
2)
Configure IP address (The default Static IP address) of evaluation board, modify the
relevant macro in main.h file as per your requirement, as shown below.
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Figure 5-23 Configure IP address of DevKit1207
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, LCD will display the IP address of the evaluation board.
5)
On the remote PC, open a web client (Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer) and type
the board‟s IP address in a web browser. By default, the following static IP address is
used: 192.168.0.163.
Figure 5-24 Home page of the HTTP server netconn demo
6)
Click the "List of tasks" into task status monitor page of FreeRTOS real-time system.
As shown below:
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Figure 5-25 List of tasks page of the HTTP server netconn demo
5.3.2 HTTP server_socket demo
The HTTP server socket demo shows an implementation of web server application based
on the socket API. To test this demo, please refer to the Section 5.3.1: HTTP server
netconn demo.
5.3.3 UDP tcp_echo_server_netconn demo
This demo provides the echo service application on both TCP and UDP protocols:
To test the UDP TCP echo server netconn demo in TCP server mode, please refer to the
Section 5.2.4: TCP echo server demo.
To test the UDP TCP echo server netconn demo in UDP server mode, please refer to the
Section 5.2.6: UDP echo server demo.
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Chapter 6 USB Examples
6.1 Description of USB Examples
The STM32F207 embed an USB OTG high-speed and an USB OTG full-speed
device/host/OTG peripheral with integrated transceivers. The USB OTG HS and USB
OTG FS peripheral are compliant with the USB 2.0 specification and with the OTG 1.0
specification.
OTG_FS interface description

On-chip FS OTG PHY

Operates in Full Speed (12 Mbps) and Low Speed (1.2 Mbps) modes as host.

Operates in Full Speed (12 Mbps) modes as device.
OTG_HS interface description

On-chip Full Speed PHY and ULPI (UTMI+ low pin interface) interface

In Host mode, supports high-speed (480 Mbps, need external High Speed PHY),
full-speed(12 Mbps) and low-speed (1.5 Mbps) transfers

In Device mode, only supports high-speed and full-speed transfers.
The following table gives a brief definition of acronyms and abbreviations used in this
section.
Table 6-1 List of terms
Term
Meaning
PHY
Physical Layer (as described in the OSI model)
OTG
USB On-The-Go
LS
Low Speed (1.5 Mbps)
FS
Full Speed (12 Mbps)
HS
High Speed (480 Mbps)
CDC
Communication Device Class
HID
Human Interface Device
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MSC
Mass Storage Class
DFU
Device Firmware Upgrade
DRD
Dual Role Device
DCD
Device Core Driver
HCD
Host Core Driver
The following figure illustrates the tree structure of the USB host and device library folder.
Figure 6-1 USB example structure
The project is composed of three main directories, organized as follows:
1)
Libraries: contains the STM32 USB OTG low-level driver, the standard peripherals
libraries, the host and the device libraries.
2)
Project: contains the workspaces and the source files for the examples given with the
package.
3)

USB_Device_Examples

USB_Host_Device_Examples

USB_Host_Examples
Utilities: contains the STM32 drivers relatived to the used boards (LCD, SD card,
buttons, LED, etc). This folder also contains the FatFs generic file system used for the
Host demos.
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4)
The following figure gives an overview of the USB host and device libraries.
Figure 6-2 USB host and device library organization overview
The USB host and device libraries are built around the common STM32 USB OTG low
level driver and the USB device and host libraries.
6.2 USB_Device_Examples
This folder contains six examples when USB work in device mode.

AUDIO

DFU

DualCore

HID

MSC

VCP
As shown below, the USB device library is composed of two main parts: the library core
and the class drivers.
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Figure 6-3 USB device library architecture
6.2.1 USB AUDIO device example
The Audio device example allows device to communicate with host (PC) as USB Speaker
using isochronous pipe for audio data transfer along with some control commands (Mute,
Next, Previous, Forward, Rewind, Start, Stop, etc.).
Users can switch output target to Headphone or speaker by pressing USER1 button on
the evaluation board. The Headphone is selected as output by default. If you want output
target to speaker, you need to prepare a Speaker (0.25W/8Ω ) and connect it to CON5.
The Audio device works in full speed mode only, so only USB_FS(CON2) is available for
this example. Audio device information is located in usbd_desc.c, as shown below:
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Figure 6-4 USB ADUIO device information
In order to test the USB AUDIO example, please follow the below step:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 USB_FS CON2 and PC USB port.
2)
Plug in Headphone or connect Speaker to CON5.
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-5 USB audio device cable connected display message
5)
At power on, PC will automatically recognize DevKit1207 as USB Audio Device.
6)
Open the music player and play any music file on PC, then you can hear the music
from Headphone or Speaker.
Note:

Supported audio sampling rates are from: 96 kHz to 24 kHz. It is advised to
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set a high and standard sampling rate in order to get best audio quality (i.e.
96 kHz or 48 kHz).

If a low audio sampling rate is configured (define USBD_AUDIO_FREQ
below 24 kHz) it may result in noise issue at pause/resume/stop
operations.
6.2.2 USB DFU device example
The DFU(Device Firmware Upgrade)example allows a device firmware upgrade using the
DFU drivers.
The supported memories for this example are:

Internal Flash memory for STM32F105/7 and STM32F2xx devices

OTP memory for STM32F2xx devices.
The DFU device example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select
High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Figure 6-6 Select USB FS/HS mode for DFU device demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the demo will work in
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Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
DFU device information is located in usbd_desc.c, as shown below:
Figure 6-7 USB DFU device information
In order to test the USB DFU device example, please follow the below steps:
1)
Install DfuSe_Demo_V3.0.2 software on the PC. The software is located in the folder
at CD-ROM:
\code\STM32_F105-07_F2xx_USB-Host-Device_Lib_V2.0.0\Utilities\Third_Party\PC
_Software\ DfuSe_ Demo_V3.0.2
If your PC is 64-bit, please install DfuSe Demo V3.0.2_Setup_amd64.exe.
2)
Generate DFU upgrade file on the PC(Optional)
Note: There is a DFU file for testing the USB DFU example. User can skip this
step.
The DFU file is located in following folder:
\code\STM32_F105-07_F2xx_USB-Host-Device_Lib_V2.0.0\Project\USB_Device_E
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xamples\DFU\binary_template\MDK-ARM
In Installation directory of DfuSe_Demo_V3.0.2, open \BIN folder, this opens a
DfuFileMgr software, as shown below:
Figure 6-8 DFU file manage
Click “OK”, this opens a window as shown below:
Figure 6-9 Generate DFU file
Click “S19 or Hex” button, select the file to be upgraded, then click “generate” button
to generate DFU file.
3)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
4)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
5)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
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Figure 6-10 USB device firmware upgrade cable connected display message
6)
Run DfuSe DEMO software on PC. If PC identify the DFU device (DevKit1207 board),
below window will be displayed, which means board is ready for USB DFU test.
Figure 6-11 STM Device in DFU mode
7)
Select the target area to be programmed, as shown in below figure with number 1.
8)
Select the DFU file to be programmed. Click “Choose” button select the DFU to be
upgraded, as shown in below figure with number 2.
There is a DFU file for USB DFU testing purpose at the folder location:
\code\STM32_F105-07_F2xx_USB-Host-Device_Lib_V2.0.0\Project\USB_Device_E
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xamples\DFU\binary_template\MDK-ARM
Figure 6-12 Upgrade DFU file
9)
In order to update the firmware click “Upgrade” button to start the firmware update.
Once completed a message will appear to indicate upgrade is successful or not.
10) At power on, MCU run in the new firmware.
To go back to the DFU example, you have to reset the device (using RESET button or
software reset) while the KEY button is pushed.
Note: In the DFU DEMO, the application start address is set to 0x0800C000, as
shown below. This address represents the DFU code protected against write
and erase operations. You can modify this address in usbd_conf.h, but you
must make sure that there enough space for DFU code (0x08000000 ~
application start address).
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Figure 6-13 Configure start address of application
6.2.3 USB MSC device example
The MSC (Mass Storage) example gives a typical example of how to use the STM32F2xx
USB OTG Device peripheral to communicate with a PC Host using the bulk transfer while
the microSD card is used as storage media. On PC, user can open, close, create, delete,
copy and paste the files stored in the SD card.
The MSC device example works in High-Speed and F Full-Speed modes. Users can
select High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown
below:
Figure 6-14 Select USB FS/HS mode for MSC device demo
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If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
MSC device information is located in usbd_desc.c, as shown below:
Figure 6-15 USB MSC device information
In order to test the USB MSC device example, follow these steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
2)
Plug in SD card into CON4. Make sure that jumpers JP5 and JP6 are fitted, JP7, JP8,
JP10 and JP11 are not fitted.
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
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Figure 6-16 Cable connected display message
5)
PC will identify the removable disk automatically. Users can use it the same as an
U-disk, as shown below:
Figure 6-17 MSC device displayed on PC
Note: In this example, Kingston's 1GB/2GB microSD card, SanDisk's 2GB microSD
card pass test. It does not guarantee that this example supports all kinds of
SD card.
6.2.4 USB HID device example
This example demonstrates how to use the USB OTG Device peripheral on the
STM32F2xx. The STM32 device is enumerated as an USB Device Joystick Mouse that
uses the native PC Host HID driver. The USER1 and USER2 key mounted on the
DevKit1207 boards are used to emulate the Mouse directions.
The HID device example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select
High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Page 123 of 155
Figure 6-18 Select USB FS/HS mode for HID device demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
HID device information is located in usbd_desc.c, as shown below:
Figure 6-19 Select USB FS/HS mode for HID device demo
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In order to test the USB HID device example, please follow steps below:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-20 Cable connected display message
4)
PC will identify DevKit1207 board as HID device automatically.
5)
Press USER1 button on DevKit1207 board, mouse will move rightward. Press
USER2 button, mouse will move upward. There are no more keys on the board for
moving downward and rightward.
6.2.5 USB DualCore device example
The Dual core USB device example integrates the two mass storage and HID example
described above in same project and uses the multi core support feature. The Mass
storage device is connected to the High speed USB connector (CON3) while the HID is
connected to the Full Speed connector (CON2).
In order to test the USB DualCore device example, please follow steps below:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2 and PC USB port. Connect another
one USB cable (Type A Male to Type Mini-B Male) between CON3 and PC USB port.
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2)
Plug in SD card into CON4. Make sure that jumpers JP5 and JP6 are fitted, JP7, JP8,
JP10 and JP11 are not fitted.
3)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
4)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-21 DualCore Cable connected display message
5)
PC will identify the removable disk automatically. Users can use it the same as an
U-disk, as shown below:
Figure 6-22 MSC device displayed on PC
Note: In this example, Kingston's 1GB/2GB microSD card, SanDisk's 2GB microSD
card pass test. It does not guarantee that this example supports all kinds of
SD card.
6)
PC will identify DevKit1207 board as HID device automatically.
Press USER1 button on DevKit1207 board, mouse will move rightward. Press
USER2 button, mouse will move upward. There are no more keys on the board for
moving downward and rightward.
Page 126 of 155
6.2.6 USB VCP device example
The VCP example illustrates an implementation of the CDC class following the PSTN
subprotocol.
The VCP example allows the STM32 device to behave as a USB-to-RS232 bridge.

On one side, the STM32 communicates with host (PC) through USB interface in
Device mode.

On the other side, the STM32 communicates with other devices (same host, other
host, other devices…) through the USART interface (RS232).
The support of the VCP interface is managed through the ST Virtual Com Port driver.
The VCP device example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select
High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Figure 6-23 Select USB FS/HS mode for VCP device demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
Page 127 of 155
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
VCP device information is located in usbd_desc.c, as shown below:
Figure 6-24 USB VCP device information
In order to facilitate testing, a PC plays as two host of VCP.
Figure 6-25 One single Host for USB and USART
In order to test the USB VCP device example, please follow the below steps:
1)
Install VCP_V1.3.1_Setup.exe on the PC. The software is located CD-ROM at the
following location:
\code\STM32_F105-07_F2xx_USB-Host-Device_Lib_V2.0.0\Utilities\Third_Party\PC
_Software\stm32_vcp
If your PC is 64-bit, please install VCP_V1.3.1_Setup_x64.exe.
2)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
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3)
Connect a null-modem female/female RS232 cable between the DB9 connector
COM1 (USART3) and PC serial port. Make sure that jumpers JP7 and JP8 are fitted,
JP5, JP6, JP10 and JP11 are not fitted.
4)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
5)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-26 USB audio device cable connected display message
6)
USB device (DevKit1207) is enumerated as serial communication port
Figure 6-27 DevKit1207 have been enumerated as VCP device
7)
Configure the virtual com port as below.
Start HyperTerminal by clicking on Start -> Programs -> Accessories ->
Communications ->HyperTerminal.
The „Connect To‟ dialog box appears. Ignore the first three boxes – these are used
with dial-up modem services. In the last box „Connect using‟ select the COM port that
you will be using and press „OK‟.
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Figure 6-28 Create HyperTerminal for the virtual com port
In the following „COM properties‟ dialog box you can set up the communication
parameters for the COM port. Set for 115200 bits per second, 8 data bits, no parity, 1
stop bit and no flow control. Press „OK‟ when done.
Figure 6-29 VCP port settings
8)
Configure com port that connected to DevKit1207 board in the same way.
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9)
Communication test. Try sending some characters with the HyperTerminal of virtual
serial port, the other HyperTerminal (COM3) will receive these characters.
Figure 6-30 Message from VCP COM to True COM
Both the two HyperTerminals can send or receive data. As shown below:
Figure 6-31 Message from True COM to VCP COM
6.3 USB_Host example
This folder contains three examples when USB works in host mode.

DualCore

HID
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
MSC
As shown in the above figure, the USB host library is composed of two main parts: the
library core and the class drivers.
Figure 6-32 USB host library overview
6.3.1 USB MSC host example
This example shows how to use the USB OTG host peripheral on the STM32F2xx
devices.
The STM32 behave as a mass storage Host that can enumerate, show content and
display the supported BMP image in the attached USB flash disk.
The MSC host example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select
High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Page 132 of 155
Figure 6-33 Select USB FS/HS mode for MSC host demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
In order to test the USB MSC host example, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
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Figure 6-34 USB mass storage host display message
Note: The contents circled by red color are USB device information. It depends on
the USB device that plugged in.
4)
When the user press the USER1 button, the application explore the USB flash disk
content and the LCD displays the following messages:
Figure 6-35 USB mass storage explorer display message
Note: The contents circled by red color depend on the USB device that plugged in.
5)
User has to press the USER1 button to display the whole disk (recursion level 2).
Below is a screenshot when the entire flash disk is shown:
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Figure 6-36 USB mass storage explorer display message (last screen)
6)
The user has to press the USER1 button to write a small file, e.g.
Host_Write_Demo.txt (less to 1 KB) on the disk.
Figure 6-37 USB mass storage write file display message
7)
After writing the file to the disk, user can press the USER1 button to start the Image
slide show.Only the BMP files with the following format are supported :

Width:
320

Height:
240

BPP:
16
Page 135 of 155

Compression: RGB bitmap with RGB masks
There are some BMP files for testing purpose located in the following location:
\code\STM32_F105-07_F2xx_USB-Host-Device_Lib_V2.0.0\Utilities\Binary\Media
Copy these files to the root of the USB flash disk, then press the USER1 button to
start the Image slide show:
Figure 6-38 USB mass storage slideshow example
Note: BMP files should be located in the USB Disk root.
6.3.2 USB HID host example
This example shows how to use the USB OTG host peripheral on the STM32F2xx.
When an USB Device is attached to the Host port, the device is enumerated and checked
whether it can support HID device or not, if the attached device supports HID, upon
pressing the USER1 button, the mouse or the keyboard application will be launched.
The HID host example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select
High-Speed/Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Page 136 of 155
Figure 6-39 Select USB FS/HS mode for HID host demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
In order to test the USB HID host example, please follow steps below:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) DevKit1207 between CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Page 137 of 155
Figure 6-40 USB HID Host connected display message
Note: The contents circled by red color are USB device information. It depends on
the USB device that plugged in.
4)
When user presses the USER1 button, the application displays the mouse pointer
and buttons.
Figure 6-41 USB HID Host user key message
Moving the mouse will move the pointer in the display rectangle and if a button is
pressed, the corresponding rectangle will be highlighted in green.
Page 138 of 155
Figure 6-42 USB HID Host user key pressed
6.3.3 USB DualCore host example
In this demonstration, the user can use one or two devices, the mass storage device
should be connected to the high speed port (CON3) while the HID device should be
connected to the full speed port (CON2).
In order to test the USB DualCore host example, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between CON2 and PC USB port. Connect another one USB
cable (Type A Male to Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON3 and PC USB
port.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Page 139 of 155
Figure 6-43 USB dual core host example
Note: The contents circled by red color are USB device information. It depends on
the USB device that plugged in.
4)
User has to use USER2 button to select the item of menu and use USER1 to open it.
The menu structure is as follows.
Figure 6-44 Menu structure
5)
Select item 1 fromf the menu to test MSC host demo. Please refer to the
Section 6.3.1 USB MSC host example
6)
Select item 2 from the menu to test MSC host demo. Please refer to the
Page 140 of 155
Section 6.3.2 USB HID host example
6.4 USB_Host_Device example
This folder contains one example when USB works in OTG mode.

DRD
This example show how to use the USB OTG Device/Host peripheral on the STM32F2xx
devices.
In device mode The STM32 is enumerated as an USB Mass storage Device that uses the
embedded microSD as storage media. In Host mode, the STM32 behave as a mass
storage Host that can enumerate, show content and display the supported BMP image in
the attached USB flash disk.
This example works in High-Speed and Full-Speed modes. Users can select High-Speed/
Full-Speed mode by modifying the relevant macro in MDK, as shown below:
Figure 6-45 Select USB FS/HS mode for OTG demo
If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_FS, the DEMO will work in
Full-Speed mode. If "Preprocessor Symbols" includes USE_USB_OTG_HS, the DEMO
Page 141 of 155
will work in High-Speed mode.
Note: USE_USB_OTG_FS and USE_USB_OTG_HS should not be included in
"Preprocessor Symbols" at the same time.
In order to test the USB_Host_Device example, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207. Connect a USB cable (Type A Male to
Type Mini-B Male) between DevKit1207 CON2/CON3 and PC USB port.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-46 USB OTG example
4)
User has to use USER2 button to select the item from the menu and USER1 to open
it. The menu structure is as follows.
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Figure 6-47 Menu structure
5)
Select item 1 from the menu to test host demo. Please refer to the
Section 6.3.1 USB MSC host example
Select item 2 from the menu to test device demo. Please refer to the
Section 6.2.3 USB MSC host example
6)
Select item 3 of the menu, the LCD displays the following messages.
Figure 6-48 System information
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Chapter 7 uC/OS-II & uC/GUI Demo
This demo is located in the CD-ROM at the below following location:
\code\uCos-ucgui\EvalBoards\ST\Devkit1207-EVAL\RVMDK\OS-Probe
This demo shows an implementation of

uCos-II_v2.86 migration

ucgui_v3.90a migration

uCos-II and ucgui demonstration with LED blink and GUI demo tasks.
In order to test the uCos-II and ucgui demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207.
2)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
3)
At power on,

LED1~LED4 turn on then turn off in an infinite loop.

LCD displays ucgui demo in an infinite loop.
Note: There is a simple one to one relationship between LED1~LED4 in software
and LED6~LED9 in hardware
Page 144 of 155
Chapter 8 G-Sensor Demonstration
This demo is located in the CD-ROM at the below following location:
\code\G-Sensor_image-rotation_App
This demo shows an implementation of

detecting acceleration on X/Y/Z axes

detecting angle on X/Y/Z axes reference to horizon flat

flipping BMP picture according to the angle detected in step 2)
Note: This demo can detect the acceleration on X/Y/Z axes. Pictures can also be
flipped according to acceleration. This demo does not provide this
functionality yet. You can try it yourself.
In order to test the G-Sensor demo, please follow the below steps:
1)
Plug in +5V power supply to the DevKit1207.
2)
Plug in SD card into CON4. Make sure that jumpers JP5 and JP6 are fitted, JP7, JP8,
JP10 and JP11 are not fitted.
3)
Prepare BMP files for testing purpose. There are two BMP pictures in the folder
\code\G-Sensor_image-rotation_App\Utilities\image
Copy these files to the root of the MicroSD card.
User can use other pictures as well; the supported BMP file formats are shown below:

Width:
320

Height:
240

BPP:
16

Compression: RGB bitmap with RGB masks
4)
Rebuild the demo, and then download the program into Flash.
5)
At power on, the LCD displays the following messages. LED 6 will turn ON and then
turn OFF.
Page 145 of 155
Figure 8-1 G-Sensor example
6)
User has to press USER1 button to start the demo.
7)
If user turns the board upside, the picture will be displayed in vertically. If user turn it
downside, the picture will be displayed horizontally.
8)
Press USER1 button once again, the demo go back to the initial status as step 5).
NOTE: In this example, Kingston's 1GB/2GB microSD card, SanDisk's 2GB microSD
card pass test. It does not guarantee that this example supports all kinds of
SD card.
Page 146 of 155
Chapter 9 Various Other Tests Scenario
9.1 LED and Key Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.2 GPIO example.
9.2 ADC Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.6 ADC example.
9.3 DAC Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.7 DAC example.
9.4 USART Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.8.1 USART example.
9.5 IRDA Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.8.2 IRDA example.
9.6 CAN Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.16 CAN example.
9.7 I2S Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.19 I2S example.
9.8 MicroSD Card Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.20 SDIO example.
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9.9 RTC Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.11 RTC example.
9.10 Ethernet Testing
Please refer to the Section 5.2.1 HTTP server demo (Standalone).
9.11 USB Testing
Please refer to the Section 6.3.1 USB MSC host example.
9.12 LCD_Touch Testing
Please refer to the Section 4.21 LCD_Touch example.
9.13 Camera Testing
DevKit1207 supports camera module now. The source code and user manual can be
downloaded from Embest website. Please visit the website to get more information.
Page 148 of 155
Chapter 10 What’s in the BOX
Devkit1207 development kit is supplied in standard configuration with the following
accessories:

One DevKit1207 Evaluation board

One 3.5 inch LCD with Touch screen

One 5V Power adapter

One cross serial cable (DB9 to DB9)

One cross Ethernet cable

One USB cable (Type A Male to Type Mini-B Male)

One USB cable (Type A Female to Type Mini-A Male)

One Product CD (including user manual, schematic in PDF format, datasheet,
uC/OS-II BSP, FreeRTOS source tree, software examples)
Page 149 of 155
Appendix I Operation Notes
In order to protect the LCD module, please pay attention to following tips
1)
Do not remove the LCD module from DevKit1207 evaluation board if not necessary.
2)
Do not touch the FPC (Flexible Printed Circuit) to avoid ESD damage and physical
damage.
Figure Appendix 1 Flexible Printed Circuit
Page 150 of 155
Appendix II PC-Development Platform
The information of the PC for DevKit1207 software development and testing as below:

CPU: Intel Celeron(R) D 3.2GHz

Memory: 1GB

Hard Disk: 80GB

Operation System: Windows XP

Files System: NTFS
The recommended PC configuration for user as below:

CPU: Intel Pentium 4 or above

Memory: 512MB or above

Hard Disk:30GB or above

Operation System: Windows XP

Files System: NTFS
Page 151 of 155
Technical support & Warranty Service
Embest Technology Co.,LTD., established in March of 2000, is a global provider of
embedded hardware and software. Embest aims to help customers to reduce time to
market with improved quality by providing the most effective total solutions for the
embedded industry. In the rapidly growing market of high end embedded systems,
Embest provides comprehensive services to specify develop and produce products and
help customers to implement innovative technology and product features. Progressing
from prototyping to the final product within a short time frame and thus shorten the time to
market, and to achieve the lowest production costs possible. Embest insists on a simple
business model to offer customers high-performance, low-cost products with best quality
and service. The content below is the matters need attention for our products technical
support and warranty service:
Technical support service
Embest provides one year free technical support service for all products. Technical support
service covers:

Embest embedded platform products software/hardware materials

Assist customers compile and run the source code we offer.

Solve the problems occurs on embedded software/hardware platform if users follow
the instructions in the documentation we offer.

Judge whether the product failure exists.
Special explanation, the situations listed below are not included in the range of our free
technical support service, and Embest will handle the situation with discretion:

Software/Hardware issues user meet during the self-develop process
Page 152 of 155

Issues happen when users compile/run the embedded OS which is tailored by users
themselves.

User‟s own applications.

Problems happen during the modification of our software source code
Maintenance service clause
1)
The products except LCD, which are not used properly, will take the warranty since the
day of the sale:
PCB: Provide 12 months free maintenance service.
2)
The situations listed below are not included in the range of our free maintenance service,
Embest will charge the service fees with discretion:
a)
Can‟t provide valid Proof-of-Purchase, the identification label is torn up or
illegible, the identification label is altered or doesn‟t accord with the actual
products;
b)
Don‟t follow the instruction of the manual in order to damage the product;
c)
Due to the natural disasters ( unexpected matters ), or natural attrition of the
components, or unexpected matters leads to the defects of appearance/function;
d)
Due to the power supply, bump, leaking of the roof, pets, moist, impurities into
the boards, all those reasons which lead the defects of appearance/function;
e)
User unauthorized weld or dismantle parts leads the product‟s bad condition, or
let other people or institution which are not authorized by Embest to dismantle,
repair, change the product leads the product bad connection or defects of
appearance/function;
f)
User unauthorized install the software, system or incorrect configuration or
computer virus leads the defects;
g)
Purchase the products through unauthorized channel;
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h)
Those commitments which is committed by other institutions should be
responsible by the institutions, Embest has nothing to do with that;
3)
During the warranty period, the delivery fee which delivery to Embest should be covered
by user, Embest will pay for the return delivery fee to users when the product is repaired.
If the warranty period is expired, all the delivery fees will be charged by users.
4)
When the board needs repair, please contact technical support department.
Note: Those products are returned without the permission of our technician,
we will not take any responsibility for them.
Basic notice to protect and maintenance LCD
1)
Do not use finger nails or hard sharp object to touch the surface of the LCD, otherwise
user can‟t enjoy the above service.
2)
Embest recommend user to purchase a piece of special wiper to wipe the LCD after long
time use, please avoid clean the surface with fingers or hands to leave fingerprint.
3)
Do not clean the surface of the screen with chemicals, otherwise user can not enjoy
above service.
Note: Embest do not supply maintenance service to LCD. We suggest the
customer first check the LCD after getting the goods. In case the LCD can not
run or show no display, customer should inform Embest within 7 business
days from the moment of getting the goods.
Value Added Services
We will provide following value added services:
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 Provided services of driver develop based on Embest embedded platform, like serial
port, USB interface devices, LCD screen.
 Provided the services of control system transplant, BSP drivers development, API
software development.
 Other value added services like power adapter, LCD parts.
 Other OEM/ODM services.
 Technically training.
Please contact Embest to get technical support:
 Support Tel:+86-755-25503401
 Fax:+86-755-25616057
 Pre-Sale consultation: [email protected]
 After-Sale consultation: [email protected]
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