Mobility is POWERful! An In-depth Overview of

Mobility is POWERful! An In-depth Overview of
6/16/2014
Mobility is POWERful!
An In-depth Overview of Power Mobility
Presented by:
Steve Boucher OTR/L, ATP &
Angie Kiger, M.Ed., CTRS, ATP/SMS
Clinical Education Specialist, Sunrise Medical LLC
MANUAL
POWER
ADULT
PEDIATRICS
SEATING
GERIATRICS
CONTROLS
FUNDING
Seminar Content Disclosure
• The authors and presenters of the Sunrise Training &
Education Programs (STEPS) are full-time employees of
Sunrise Medical.
• We do not intend to endorse any particular model, brand
of product or manufacturer.
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Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
• Articulate the steps required to complete a thorough power mobility
evaluation.
• List at least 2 differences in the performance of a rear wheel drive, front
wheel drive, and mid-wheel drive power wheelchair on uphill, downhill, and
even surfaces
• State the 3 clinical justifications for each dynamic power seating functions
including tilt, recline, elevating leg rests, and seat elevate.
• Define the difference between expandable and non-expandable electronics
• Understand the critical components required in a clinical justification letter or
evaluation when requesting funding for a power chair.
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Housekeeping
Breaks
Restrooms
Handouts
CEUs
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CEU Requirements
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IACET CEU CREDIT
Must be paid in full
Must sign in at the registration table
Must provide last 4 of your SSN
– If you didn’t provide it when you pre-registered, there will not be a
certificate onsite
– You can still provide the last 4 of your SSN now on your evaluation,
certificate will be provided within 45 days
• Must complete the evaluation form and turn it in at the close of the
seminar
• It is a requirement that to receive CEU credit, you must attend the
full course
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AGENDA
30 mins
Introduction to Power Mobility
45 mins
Evaluation Process
45 mins
Seating & Positioning for Power Mobility
15 mins
Break
45 mins
Power Mobility Base Options
30 mins
Hands-on Activity
60 mins
Lunch
75 mins
Electronics & Access
45 min
Hands-on Activity
15 mins
Break
30 mins
Training
30 mins
Documentation and Funding
30 mins
Group Activity
15 mins
Questions & Wrap-up
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Words of Wisdom
• “Continuous effort – not strength or intelligence – is the key to
unlocking your potential.” - Winston Churchill
• “Being able to drive a power chair has opened up a world for
our son that experts always told us we could only dream
of…We will NEVER get tired of chasing him!” – Parent
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Power Base
Seating
Funding
Access
Dynamic
positioning
Evaluation
Electronics &
Programming
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Who is appropriate for power??
Pediatrics?
Geriatrics?
Long Term Manual Chair
Propellers?
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Understanding power mobility myths
Providing power mobility will:
• Cause a decrease in independence or function
• Will encourage a person to become lazy
• Prevent a client from ever walking or propelling manually
• Eliminate the use of the end user’s manual wheelchair
which is how they currently exercise!
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Is client appropriate for power?
To be appropriate for power, client does not:
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Need to show a certain set of motor skills
Need a certain set of cognitive abilities
Need to show proficiency in all driving skills…right away
Be completely unable to ambulate or propel manually
Need to be a certain age
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Power: To whom? & where?
WHERE?
WHOM?
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Individuals with diagnoses that may
include:
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Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)
Cerebral Palsy (CP)
Muscular Dystrophy (MD)
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
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Work
School
Community mobility
Vocational use
Clients of all ages (pediatrics to
geriatrics)
Long term manual wheelchair users
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Pediatrics and Power
• Children develop thru exploration/stimulation
• Children without physical impairments begin mobility
at ~12 mo
• Give children with disabilities the same opportunities
– Introduction to power mobility as young as 12-18 months
– Time and practice to learn and make mistakes
– Appropriate supervision
• Marginal ambulation or manual propulsion:
– Risk of stress/damage to muscles, joints
– Requires energy and endurance
– Reduces energy available for other activities
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Geriatrics and Power
Is anyone ever “too old” to utilize power??
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Maintain independent mobility
Maximize function
Provide energy conservation
Protect/conserve upper extremity (UE) function and
health
• Increase socialization
• Increase self esteem and motivation
• Improve quality of life
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Long Term Manual Chair Users
• Manual wheelchair propulsion involves:
– UE muscles propelling weight of chair and user
– UE muscles/joints used in abnormal positions
– UE muscles are over-stretched and overused
• With pre-existing injury:
– Muscle imbalance already exists due to
weakness or paralysis of specific muscles
• At some point power becomes a safer,
more functional option
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Bariatric Considerations
• Dimensions
• Weight
• Altered body proportions
– Increased tissue in the buttocks and lower back
– Increased thigh and abdominal tissue
– Distribution of weight
• Increased risk of RSI and physiological stresses (e.g.
cardiac) due to weight and ergonomics
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Clinical Best Practices
• Are there any related to seating and mobility?
• What would they be?
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Key Assessment Information
Endurance
CardioPulmonary
Status
Strength,
ROM
Ortho Status
Tone
Reimbursable
Non-Reimbursable
Sitting
Tolerance
Or Comfort
Cognition,
Vision
Evaluation
Acceptance
Power Mobility
Change
Size/ Weight
Function
Access to
Fun
Environmental
Needs:
Access
to Terrain
Seating &
Positioning
Needs
Function
& Mobility
Access to
Vocation
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Prior to the evaluation
• Completion of an intake form by the client and/or
caregiver. Information should include:
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Funding
Goals of the evaluation
Brief case history
Current level of function
AT experience
• Contact other team members including assistive living,
outpatient, and/or school/day treatment programs.
• Arrange for loaner equipment (i.e. power w/c, alternative
controls, etc.) as needed
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During the evaluation
• Explain the purpose and process of the evaluation
• Review goals, funding, and case history
• Current medical status and level of function
• Evaluate status in current equipment as appropriate
• Screen cognitive, visual, and hearing status
• Complete a physical assessment and mat evaluation
• Environment assessment and transportation discussion
• Driving assessment
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Mat Evaluation
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Measurements
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Measurements
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Prior to getting your client “Behind the Wheel”
• Observe the client’s movement patterns while in his/her seating
system and on a mat/flat surface.
• If the client has other AT devices (i.e. communication devices,
tablet computer, switches, etc.), ask the client to demonstrate how
he/she uses the item(s).
• Set-up the seating system so that the client is in most functional
position for his/her movements.
• Identify activities or items that are highly motivating to the client .
• Ensure that the client is positioned for function as opposed to
perfection.
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Questions to consider
• Does the client have a progressive condition?
• What type of postural support / seating?
• Is dynamic seating medically necessary?
• Where will the chair be utilized?
• How might the client operate the chair?
• What other devices will the client be controlling through
their wheelchair?
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Evaluate for Potential,
Not a Device!!!
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After the evaluation
• Review recommendations of equipment and/or
therapeutic as appropriate with the client and caregivers.
• Discuss the client’s and/or caregiver’s responsibilities in
the process and the next steps.
• Ensure that the client and/or caregiver are in agreement
with the plan.
• Review order and funding process, including potential
delivery timeframe for recommended equipment.
• Provide contact information and an overview of the
evaluation to the client and/or caregiver.
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Where do we stumble?
• Sometimes shortcuts are taken
with the evaluation
• Sometimes trial is not possible
• Sometimes we battle with the
conflict between therapeutic
perfection – safety and
function.
• Sometimes we do not find out
or understand their funding
situation before the evaluation.
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Seating and Positioning
For each client, consider:
• Size needed
• Potential for growth or weight change
• Potential for change in function
• Postural control and positioning needs
– Seat/back angle and contour
– Pelvic, trunk or head positioning supports
– Skin protection material
• Need for dynamic positioning
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Seating and Positioning
Dynamic Seating
Captain’s Seat
Modular and Rehab Seat
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Captain’s Seat
Appropriate client:
• Fits in standard seat sizes
• Maintains optimal posture with:
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Standard back height
No positioning supports
Minimal contour
Minimal seat to back angle adjustment
• Does not require dynamic seating
• Needs comfortable seating
• Ability to independently complete weight shifts
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Rehab Seat
Appropriate client:
• Requires specific seat/back size
• Might require seat depth growth
• To maintain posture requires:
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Specific back height
Positioning supports
Specific seat or back contour
Specific seat to back angle
• Might require some dynamic seating
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Modular and Adjustable Seating
• Clients can change in size, function,
cognition and environment
• Changes due to progressive condition,
recovery, aging and/or medical
intervention
• Appropriate system should:
– Meet current needs
– Have modularity to adapt to changing needs
• Equipment changes should be:
– Economical and easy to do
– Cause least amount of disruption to client
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Dynamic Seating
• Who is appropriate for tilt, recline, seat
elevator, power elevating leg rests
(ELRS)?
– Consider the client’s:
• Ability to change position / shift weight
• Postural stability
• Physiological risks
• Problems with homeostatic control
• Mobility Related Activities of Daily Living
(MRADLs) needs
• Environment demands
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Clinical Justifications: Tilt
• Provides for pressure
redistribution
• Provides for position change
• Minimizes effects of gravity
• Accommodates joint
contracture(s)
• Provides increased trunk
stability and head control
• Maintains specific seated
angles
• Improves postural alignment
• Adds no resulting shear forces
• Improves visual field (fixed
kyphosis)
• Minimizes extensor spasticity
• Maintains access to specialty
devices mounted on chair
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Clinical Concerns: Tilt
• Poor access to perineal area
Tilt vs. Recline - the Pressure Debate
• No change in hip or knee
position
• Risk of contracture
• Discomfort with sensate
clients?
Upright surface area
Tilted surface area
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Lateral Tilt
• Designed to complement
traditional positioning
solutions.
• Provides pressure
reduction, aids in
transfers and assists in
respiration, swallowing
and gastric emptying
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Clinical Justification: Recline
• Provides change in position & body angles
– Provide relief for sensate clients
• Allow for personal care while in chair
– Bladder management, dressing
– Avoid additional transfers
• Allow supine transfers
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Clinical Justification: Recline
• Shifts and expands weight bearing surfaces
• Decreases peak pressures
• Provides different body angles
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Clinical Concerns: Recline
• Shear Forces During Recline
• Pivot point of equipment does not match client’s pivot
point at hip
• Extensor Spasticity
Low pivot point of recline
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Clinical Justification: Tilt & Recline
• Tilt and recline together
– Maximum amount of pressure redistribution
– Maximum relief from gravity’s forces
– Improve head control and postural
stability
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Justification: Power Center Mount/ELR’s
• Elevates LE to:
– Accommodate knee extension
contractures
– Accommodate orthotics, prosthetics,
casts
– Prevent formation of edema
– Provide position change/support with
power recline
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Justification: Seat Elevator
• Client needs varying seat height to:
– Reduce shoulder pain with transfers
– May help delay secondary complications to the
shoulders
– Degree of the upper arm elevation during reaching
influences the load on the shoulder
– When reaching from a elevated position the load is
reduced
– Interact at peer level
– Access environment
– Perform ADL / IADL
– Perform vocational or school activities
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Additional Power Seating
Power Sliding Seat Pan
• Allows for up to 6” of
forward and rearward
travel
• Assists with transfers
• Assists with COG
placement
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Drive Wheel Base Options
Front-Wheel Drive (FWD)
Rear-Wheel Drive (RWD)
Mid-Wheel Drive (MWD)
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How Does Turning Radius Differ?
RWD
MWD
FWD
Printed with permission from Ian Denison, G.F. Strong Rehab Centre
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What Space is Required to Turn?
RWD
MWD
FWD
Printed with permission from Ian Denison, G.F. Strong Rehab Centre
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Obstacle Climbing
 Is the axle of the front wheel/caster higher
than the obstacle?
 FWD might have greater ability to climb
obstacles compared to RWD or MWD
 RWD and MWD used raised and/or dynamic
stabilizers for assist
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Tracking
• RWD
– Mass over drive wheels increases with acceleration
– Directional stability increases exponentially as speed of chair
increases
• MWD
– Can be directionally stable or unstable based on actual drive
wheel position
• FWD
– Mass over drive wheels decreases with acceleration
– Directional stability decreases exponentially as speed increases
– “Fish Tailing”
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Encoders
Both motors receive equal current.
Encoder reads rev/sec of each
wheel and indicates that right
motor is turning more slowly.
Encoder sends more current to
the right motor and the chair
runs straight again.
Faster
Same Speed
Slower
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With & Without Tracking
FWD without
tracking
technology
FWD with
tracking
technology
Tracks straight while
allowing users to
conquer slopes,
thresholds,
obstacles
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Casters
Front casters
affected by
gravity, directing
front of chair
down slope
Rear casters
affected by
gravity, directing
rear of chair
down slope
Casters or
stabilizers
minimally affected
by gravity, chair
traverses in a
straight line
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Grade Transition
RWD
Fixed anti-tipper
can cause high centering of
the drive wheels
Dynamic rear stabilizers
allow drive wheel to stay on
the ground
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Grade Transition
MWD
Fixed front stabilizers
can cause drive wheels to
high center
Dynamic front stabilizers
allow drive wheels to stay on
the ground
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Grade Transition
FWD
No front or rear anti-tipper or stabilizers –
might more easily transition onto an incline
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Uphill Performance
RWD
• COG moves back towards drive wheels.
• Improves traction - very good control
• Anti-tippers required to prevent chair from flipping over
COG
position
COG
position
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Uphill Performance
FWD
• COG moves towards casters
• Loses traction on drive wheels
• Poorer chair control
COG
position
COG
position
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Uphill Performance
MWD
• COG moves towards casters
• Loses some traction on drive wheels
• Reasonably good control
COG
position
COG
position
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Downhill Performance
RWD
• COG moves forward towards casters
• Reduces traction on drive wheels
• Decreased directional and brake control
COG
position
COG
position
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Downhill Performance
FWD
• COG moves forwards towards drive wheels.
• Increases traction on drive wheels
• Good control
COG
position
COG
position
Risk of lifting rear casters till front anti tips or
footplate touches the ground
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Downhill Performance
MWD
• COG moves forward towards front casters
• Reasonably good control
COG
position
COG
position
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Downhill Performance
Potential Concern :
• Forward pitching on downhill slopes could be a problem
• COG displacement
Solution!
Front suspension acts as a dampener to reduce pitching
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Suspension
Clinical Benefits of Suspension
• Reduces vibration and
jarring for:
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Pain reduction
Postural control
Spasticity reduction
Minimize sliding
 sitting tolerance
• Terrain Navigation
– School
– Work
– Community
• Shopping
• Gravel
• Sidewalks
– Weather elements
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Maneuverability vs Stability
• Problem with MWD - historically:
• Fixed front stabilizers can sacrifice obstacle climbing
ability, however….
• Dynamic front stabilizers can affect stability and comfort
of the ride
• Solution
Base Suspension!
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Stability
• Stability is increased by:
– Larger base of support
– Positioning the center of mass within the base (between drive
wheels and casters)
– Using stabilizers or anti-tippers
• Stability might also be challenged by external forces
– Gravity, acceleration, deceleration, etc
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Stability
RWD and FWD
stable since mass is between
drive wheels and casters


MWD
need stabilizer
wheels since mass
is over drive wheels

Stability is also affected by the position of the client’s COG
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Clinical Justification
• Match client’s needs to necessary PWC package
– Explain need for base
• Match current coding requirements
– Identify how client’s diagnosis and function support choice
– Discuss negative affects to client if chosen base is not approved
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Electronics
Things to consider:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Input device
Location
Programming
Electronics package
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Electronics
• Flexibility
– Clients needs/goals/function determine parts
– Prescribe for today with tomorrow in mind
• User friendly
• Keep It Simple
– Ensure correct use
– Maximize chance of funding
• Adjustability
• Programmability
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Electronics
• Non Expandable:
• Expandable:
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Non-Expandable vs. Expandable
Non-Expandable
Expandable
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Joystick only
≤ 2 actuators
Simple to use
Basic programming options
Useful for client with nonprogressive condition
Specialty Controls
Multiple Drive Input Devices
Multi-actuator Systems
Multiple Drive Profiles
EADL Interfacing
Enhanced programming
options
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Electronics: Programming
• One of the most important things you can do for any
power chair user
• Inappropriate programming can cause:
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Inability to control the chair
Unsafe operation of the chair
Inability to learn to drive
Lack of confidence in the equipment
Refusal to use the equipment
Inefficient driving
Inability to access all environments
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Programming
•
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Speeds
Tremor dampening
Acceleration vs. Deceleration
Torque
Sensitivity
Dead band
Throw
Active Orientation
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Programming
Electronic Customization:
• Programming considerations
– Use existing templates
– Develop and save your own templates
• Assign shortcuts
– Common functions are easier to achieve
• Program buttons and ports
• Customize display menu
• Interfacing with Augmentative/Alternative Communication Devices
or computers via Bluetooth
• EADL functions built into wheelchair
– Access to the environment included through Infrared (IR) for TV,
DVD/Blue ray player, stereo, etc.
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Type of Drive Input Device
• Proportional (joystick)
– Variable speed and 360° of directional control
– More fine-tuned control for course correction
– Requires more user coordination, motor
control
• Non-proportional (switched)
– Pre-programmed speed, no directional control
– Less fine-tuned control for course correction
– Requires less user coordination/motor control
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Mode of Driving
• Momentary - chair only drives when user is actively
operating the input device
– Turning is less controlled and less efficient when using switched
systems
• Latched - once input device is activated, chair drives
without further activation until stop command
– Right and left are still momentary
– Allows course corrections
– Allows control of the arc of turn
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Electronics: Programming
High Spasticity Considerations:
• Decrease acceleration
• Increase deceleration
• Decrease sensitivity
– Smoothes out commands
• Expand neutral zone
– Accommodate excess movements
• Turn joystick into “switch joystick”
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Electronics: Programming
Athetoid Considerations:
• Provide stability
• Decrease acceleration / Increase deceleration
• Expand neutral zone
– Accommodate excess movements
• Turn joystick into “switch joystick”
• Decrease sensitivity
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Electronics: Programming
Specific Directional Weakness and or General Weakness
•
•
•
•
•
•
Active orientation
Reduce joystick throw
Increase sensitivity
Increase acceleration
Program for Auto Mode
Jacks for mode buttons
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Electronics: Programming
Geriatrics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Slower speeds
Decrease acceleration
Decrease overall chair power
Decrease sensitivity
Reduce joystick throw
Reduce torque (depending on environment)
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Electronics: Programming
Pediatrics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Decrease sensitivity
Decrease high speed torque
Increase low speed torque
Lower power :↓ overall chair power for safe use
Programmable short-cut buttons with decals
Limit number of profiles
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Electronics: Programming
Cognitive and Visual Impairments:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Simple joystick with intuitive torque
Programmable short-cut buttons with decals
Lower speeds
Decrease acceleration
Increase deceleration
Decrease overall chair power
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Joystick Positioning & Support Examples
Midline Mount
Standard Mount
Arm Trough
Midline Mount & Tray
Swing away mount
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Alternative Joystick Handles
Evaluation Kit
(Bodypoint)
Custom Handle
(handmade from splinting material)
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Specialty Controls
Drive Station (Switch-It, Inc.)
Head Array (ASL, Inc.)
And MANY
MORE!
Mechanical Switches (ASL, Inc.)
Micro Pilot (Switch-It, Inc.)
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Additional Considerations
• Environment
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Home
Work
School
Work stations/desks
Maneuverability in spaces
Entry and exit of settings
Community
Terrain
City vs. Rural
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Additional Considerations
• Lifestyle
– Leisure activities
– Support network
– Travel
• Transportation
–
–
–
–
Drive automobile independently from power wheelchair.
Personal/family vehicle
Facility/commercial vehicle
Public transportation
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Additional Considerations
• Need for additional medical equipment (i.e. ventilator, feeding pump,
IV pump, etc.)
• Weight capacity – need for heavy duty or bariatric options
• Growth capabilities
• Desire/need for high speed motors
• Attendant control and push options
• Transfer status
• Seat to floor height
• User preference
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Unable to use a power wheelchair?
POWER ASSIST SYSTEMS!
1. Individuals with limited upper extremity strength
2. Individuals with compromised respiratory systems
3. Individuals not “ready” for a power mobility device
– Environment reasons
– Psychological reasons
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Be an investigator!!!!
• REMEMBER!!!! You are evaluating for potential, not a
device!
• Discuss potential barriers to successful implementation
with the family (i.e. accessibility of home and/or
transportation).
• Check with the school team and family to find out their
familiarity and level of comfort with power mobility.
• Interview the parents about their TRUE feelings about
the device and if they’ll use it with the client. Will they be
willing to come for sessions to learn to use the device?
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Which path to take?
• Order a wheelchair immediately
• Driver’s Education Program (aka power mobility training)
• Recommend skills to practice at home and/or school to
further develop the foundation needed for driving a
power mobility system
• Not appropriate for power mobility
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Ready to roll…
• This client will demonstrate clear comprehension of the
task and cause/effect relationships.
• He/she is able to…
– able to stop and go on command within 2 seconds of
verbal cue 90% of the time.
– able to drive straight for 200 feet without stopping.
– avoid bumping into objects 90% of the time.
– able to drive chair in all directions with no more than
minimal verbal cues.
• A device is recommended based on what is known about
the client’s ability, and what is known about his support
network.
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Driver Education Recommended
• This client has at least one reliable access site.
• He/she is able to visually scan and attend to the
environment while driving.
• He/she exhibits the motivation to move and explore the
environment.
• This client is able to follow basic 1 step commands (i.e.
on/off or stop/go).
• This client also has a supportive team (family,
caregivers, teachers, and therapists) that willing to assist
to with carryover of skills training.
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WARNING!
• Training/Exploration sessions are important!
– Misguided recommendations often come from clients who did
not complete proper training or did not have the opportunity to
trial different equipment prior to ordering a system.
– Devices that are too high level may not be supported at home, at
school, and/or abandoned all together.
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Driver’s Education Overview
• Sessions are therapeutic and goal driven.
• Throughout the process caregivers are
given “homework” to do with the client
at home to increase success.
• Suggestions to school teams and
outpatient therapists are also made.
• Members of the patient’s therapy team are
invited to come and observe.
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Training Tips
•
•
•
•
•
•
Get the entire team involved
Scavenger hunts
Create real life scenarios
Red Light/Green Light
Play hide and seek
Use familiar images attached to the switches
when teaching directions.
• Drive in a variety of settings on various
types of terrain.
• Create “game tapes” – video sessions to
review with the clients and caregivers.
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Not right now…
• The client doesn’t exhibit comprehension of cause/effect.
• He/she does not have a reliable access site.
• This client may have positioning issues preventing
successful access at the time of the evaluation.
• Further medical evaluations or interventions may be
necessary (i.e. suspected visual impairment)
• Other behaviors impede successful use of the device
(i.e. self stimulatory or violent behaviors)
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Alternative Recommendations
• Medical consultations
• Seating and positioning
• Computer software programs to practice cause/effect
and switch skills.
• Activities that can be done at home to encourage
learning of skills needed for driving.
• Offer to contact the client’s team to brainstorm skills that
can be implemented into the client’s daily life, therapy, or
school program.
• Consider re-evaluating the client in 6 months-1 year.
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Not Appropriate for Power Mobility
• The client states that he/she refuses to utilize a power
wheelchair.
• Other behaviors impede successful use of the device.
• Put him/herself or others in danger.
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The Big 3
Break down decision into (3) main areas
Base
Seating
Electronics
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Overall Recap
• Drive wheel position?
– Speed?
– Obstacle climbing?
– Battery range?
• Need for alternate controls?
• Weight capacity?
• What electronic customization
is required?
• Seating options?
– Captain
– Rehab
– Modular
• Need for power seating?
– Now, or in the future?
– How many seat functions?
• Progressive condition?
• Does PWC need to interface
with other AT?
– AAC
– Computer
– EADL’s
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WAIT! Don’t Forget the
Most Important Parts
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Pieces of the Power Puzzle
Evaluation
Seating & Positioning
Power base
Electronics & Programming
Access
Training
Documentation & Funding
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Critical Questions
• Who is the funding source?
• What is the client’s medical history?
– Diagnosis (primary, secondary, etc.)
– Surgeries (previous and upcoming)
– Medications (past, present, future)
• What equipment has the patient had?
– Not just wheelchairs
– When was it received, why does it no longer meet their needs
(medical - primary)? Who funded the equipment?
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Common Funding Sources
•
•
•
•
•
•
State Medicaid Programs
Private Insurance
Medicare
Worker’s Compensation
Veterans Affairs
How does secondary insurance work?
– Will it matter to you?
• Others…?
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Simplify
Your time is limited…
• As you go through your evaluation, keep in mind that at
the same time you are also creating your documentation.
• Think about “climbing a ladder” to justify the equipment
selected.
• Tie your thought process and selections to what will be
down on paper.
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The First Steps
Preparation…..
• Think about… Who will review the letter or request
for funding?
• What is this person’s medical background? Do they
have an understanding of the Durable Medical
Equipment (DME) world that we live in every day?
• Remember… The reviewer only knows your patient
by what is on paper. It is your job to “tell” the detailed
story.
• Make a game-plan to keep it simple!
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Suggestions for Funding
• Gather your evidence!
– Write a detailed initial evaluation.
– Create data logs to track distance, success, and level of
independence.
– Take pictures and/or videos of the initiation evaluation and the
“graduation day” from Driver’s Education class.
– Write an addendum to the original report.
– Write a letter of medical necessity (LMN) and include reasons
why the device is medically necessary (be sure to get the client’s
physician to sign the letter).
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Suppliers… The “7” Elements
The order for mobility equipment must contain all of the
following 7 Elements:
1.Beneficiary Name
2.Description of the item ordered (can be specific with mfr name, or general
“power wheelchair” )
3.Date of face to face evaluation with MD
4.Pertinent diagnosis/conditions relating to the need for the equipment ordered
5.Length of need
6.Physician printed name and signature
7.Date of physician signature
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Documentation
• Is your evaluation completed electronically or
hand-written?
• Letter of medical necessity?
• Template or not?
• Important documentation reminders:
– Your clients are individuals
– Proof-read!
– Contradictions
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Final Questions to Ask Yourselves
1.
Does the client and/or caregiver have a clear understanding of the
plan?
2.
Have I specified that the recommended equipment is in fact the
minimal equipment essential to this client?
3.
Have I demonstrated how I ruled out lesser level equipment?
4.
Is the equipment that I am recommending in fact the least costly
alternative?
5.
Do I have all of the information needed for funding?
6.
Has my documentation left the reader with a clear picture of the
consequences to the client in the absence of having the
recommended equipment?
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Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
• Articulate the steps required to complete a thorough power mobility
evaluation.
• List at least 2 differences in the performance of a rear wheel drive, front
wheel drive, and mid-wheel drive power wheelchair on uphill, downhill, and
even surfaces
• State the 3 clinical justifications for each dynamic power seating functions
including tilt, recline, elevating leg rests, and seat elevate.
• Define the difference between expandable and non-expandable electronics
• Understand the critical components required in a clinical justification letter or
evaluation when requesting funding for a power chair.
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Questions
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Thank You For Attending!
“Embrace every challenge! Determination and perseverance will significantly impact someone’s life!”
Steve Boucher,
[email protected]
“Always remember that at the end of the day, your client is your number one priority!”
Angie Kiger, Clinical Education Specialist
[email protected]
MANUAL
POWER
ADULT
PEDIATRICS
SEATING
GERIATRICS
CONTROLS
FUNDING
40
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