Series 90 Micro Field Processor User`s Manual, GFK

Series 90 Micro Field Processor User`s Manual, GFK
ÎÎ
GE Fanuc Automation
Programmable Control Products
t
Series 90 Micr o
Field Processor
User’s Manual
GFK-1171
March 1996
GFL–002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that
hazardous voltages, currents, temperatures, or other conditions that
could cause personal injury exist in this equipment or may be
associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or
damage to equipment, a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is
not taken.
Note
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While
efforts have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not
purport to cover all details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for
every possible contingency in connection with installation, operation, or maintenance.
Features may be described herein which are not present in all hardware and software
systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no obligation of notice to holders of this
document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or
statutory with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,
sufficiency, or usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of
merchantability or fitness for purpose shall apply.
The following are trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Alarm Master
CIMPLICITY
CIMPLICITY PowerTRAC
CIMPLICITY 90–ADS
CIMSTAR
Field Control
GEnet
Genius
Genius PowerTRAC
Helpmate
Logicmaster
Modelmaster
PowerMotion
ProLoop
PROMACRO
Series Five
Series 90
Copyright 1996 GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Series One
Series Six
Series Three
VuMaster
Workmaster
Preface
This manual provides the information necessary to enable you to integrate a Series 90
Micro Field Processor (IC670MFP100) into a Field Control system. The contents of this
manual include hardware description, installation procedures, operation information,
and diagnostics information for the Series 90 Micro Field Processor.
Content of this Manual
Chapter 1. Introduction. Provides an overview of the Series 90 Micro Field Processor
(MFP). Includes physical and functional characteristics and specifications.
Chapter 2. Installation. Describes the procedures for installing the MFP in a Field
Control station and connecting a programming device.
Chapter 3. BIU Configuration. Describes how to configure the BIU and the MFP
parameters within the BIU to operate within a Field Control station.
Chapter 4. MFP Configuration. Describes how to configure the internal parameters of
the MFP.
Chapter 5. Operation. Describes the operation of the MFP. Includes the PLC system
sweep sequence, the system power-up and power-down sequences, clocks and timers,
system security, and I/O scanning.
Chapter 6. Diagnostics. Provides a guide to troubleshooting the MFP. Describes how to
use the LED blink codes that the MFP generates if the unit fails the power-up self-test.
Discusses how the MFP handles system faults.
Appendix A. Software Instructions and Reference Types. Lists the Logicmaster 90
instructions supported by the MFP.
Appendix B. Instruction Timing. Contains tables showing the memory size in bytes and
the execution time in microseconds for each function.
Appendix C. Configuration File Format. Contains an example format for MFP module
configuration within the BIU.
Related Publications
Field Control
Field Control
(GFK-0826)
DistributedI/O and Control System I/O Modules User’s Manual
Field Control
DistributedI/O and Control System Genius Bus Interface Unit User’s
Manual (GFK-0825)
Genius I/O System User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1)
Genius is a registered trademark of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
GFK-1171
Series 90
Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
iii
Preface
Programming Devices
t
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466)
t
Series 90t-30/90-20 ProgrammableControllersReference Manual (GFK-0467)
WorkmasterR II PLC Programming Unit Guide to Operation Manual (GFK-0401)
Series 90t-30 and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402)
Geniusr Hand-Held Monitor User’s Guide (GFK-0121)
Series 90 -30/20/Micro ProgrammableControllersReference Manual (GFK-0467)
Standards and Specifications
GE Fanuc Product Approvals, Standards, General Specifications (GFK-0867B or later)
We Welcome Your Comments and Suggestions
At GE Fanuc automation, we strive to produce quality technical documentation. After
you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Libby Allen
Senior Technical Writer
iv
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
GFK-1171
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-3
Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interface Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-5
Configuration and Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BIU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MFP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6
1-6
1-6
Fault Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Minimum Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Unpacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grounding Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting the MFP on a Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2-2
2-3
Power-up Self-test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
Connecting a Programming Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Hand-Held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connections for Using Logicmaster 90 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5
2-5
2-7
BIU Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Series 90
1-1
3-1
MFP Default Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
I/O Mapping Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
Reference Parameters Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reference Parameter Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
3-4
Default/Hold Last State Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BIU Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BIU Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
3-10
3-10
3-12
How to Configure Reference Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HHM Screen Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Screen Sequence for Reference Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Screen Sequence for Default/Hold Last State Configuration . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages for Reference Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
3-13
3-14
3-16
3-17
Group Data Moves Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-18
How to Configure Group Data Moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Screen Sequence for Configuring Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Configure Default/Hold Last State for Group Moves . . . . . . . . .
How to Configure Selective Scanning of Group Data Moves . . . . . . . . .
3-19
3-19
3-22
3-24
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
v
Contents
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
MFP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the HHP to Configure and Program the MFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
HHP Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
Storing the User Program Using the HHP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
Storing Configuration and Register Data Using the HHP . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
Other HHP Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
Using Logicmaster 90 Software to Configure the MFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
Using Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Placing the MFP in Stop/No I/O Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Datagrams Used for MFP/BIU Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
System Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6
5-1
MFP and BIU Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
Sweep Time Contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Normal Sweep Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Deviations from the Standard Program Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
BIU/MFP Mode Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Software Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Program Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Data Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Power-Up and Power-Down Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Power-Up Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Power-Down Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Clocks and Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
System Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-11
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-11
Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-11
Diagnostic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
Flash Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-2
Faults and Fault Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
Fault Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
Classes of Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
System Response to Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
MFP Fault Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-7
Accessing Additional Fault Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-9
Technical Help
.................................................
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
5-1
PLC Sweep Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-up Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
4-1
6-9
GFK-1171
Contents
Appendix A Software Instructions and Reference Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
Instructions and Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
Basic Instructions (Relay Ladder Contacts and Coils) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
Timers and Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-2
Math Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-2
Conversion Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-2
Relational Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-3
Bit Operation Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-3
Data Move Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-4
Control Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-4
Table Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-5
User References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-6
References for Fault Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-6
Appendix B Instruction Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
Appendix C Configuration File Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
GFK-1171
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
vii
Contents
Figure 1-1. Series 90 Micro Field Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
Figure 1-2. Field Control Station Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
Figure 1-3. Overview of MFP Interaction with the BIU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
Figure 1-4. Micro Field Processor Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5
Figure 2-1. Hand-Held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5
Figure 2-2. Hand-Held Programmer Cable Connection to a Micro Field Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
Figure 2-3. Logicmaster 90 Programmer to MFP Connection through a WSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-7
Figure 2-4. Examples of Serial Connection from Computer to MFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-8
Figure 2-5. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-9
Figure 3-1. BIU Reference Parameters Described as Data Move Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Figure 3-2. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
Figure 3-3. Move Function Blocks for Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Figure 3-4. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Figure 3-5. Move Function Blocks for Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-7
Figure 3-6. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-8
Figure 3-7. Move Function Blocks for Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-9
Figure 3-8. Default/Hold Last State Configuration Parameters for BIU Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-11
Figure 3-9. Case Where Default/Hold Last State Parameter Does Not Apply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-11
Figure 3-10. Default/Hold Last State Configuration Parameters for BIU Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-12
Figure 3-11. Group Data Move Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-18
Figure 3-12. Group Data Move Configuration Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-23
Figure 3-13. BIU Sweep Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-24
Figure 3-14. Configuring Sweeps for Data Move Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-25
Figure 4-1. Bit Map for Hold Last State Default Byte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-9
Figure 5-1. Micro Field Processor Synchronous Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
Figure 5-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Figure 5-3. Power-up Decision Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
viii
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
GFK-1171
Contents
Table 1-1. Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Table 1-2. Physical and Functional Characteristics[ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Table 1-3. Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Table 1-4. Memory Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-8
Table 2-1. Power-up Sequence Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
Table 2-2. RS-422 15-Pin Connector Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-9
Table 3-1. MFP Default Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Table 4-1. MFP Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
Table 4-2. Slot Assignments for HHP Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
Table 4-3. Format for Stop/No I/O Datagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Table 4-4. Datagrams Sent from PLC to BIU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Table 4-5. Format for Write Configuration Datagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
Table 5-1. Sweep Time Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Table 5-2. BIU and MFP Mode Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Table 5-3. Memory Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-6
Table 6-1. Power-up Diagnostic LED Blink Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Table 6-2. Fault Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
Table 6-3. Fault Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
Table 6-4. Fault References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
Table 6-5. Configuration File Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-8
Table 6-6. MFP CPU Software Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-9
Table 6-7. Range and Size of User References for the MFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-6
Table C-1. Example Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
GFK-1171
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
ix
Chapter
1 Introduction
Restarts for autonumbers that do not restart in each
chapter.
these
section level
1 restarts must be in the header frame of chapter 1.
figure bi level 1, reset
a:ebx, l 1 resetA
figure bi level
1 1, resetA
table_big level 1, reset
a:obx:l
chap_big level 1, reset1
a:bigbx
table_big level
1 level 1 resetA
app_big level 1, resetA
a:ftr level 1 resetA
figure_ap level 1, reset
c:ebx, l 1 reset1
table_ap level 1, reset
c:obx:l 1, reset1
figure level 1, reset
c:bigbx level 1 reset1
table level 1, reset Table 1.
c:ftr level 1 reset1
1
Reminders for autonumbers that need to be restarted
manually (first instance will always be 4)
let_in level 1: A. B. C.
letter level 1:A.B.C.
num level 1: 1. 2. 3.
num_in level 1: 1. 2. 3.
rom_in level 1: I. II. III.
roman level 1: I. II. III.
steps level 1: 1. 2. 3.
The Series 90 Micro Field Processor (MFP), shown in Figure 1-1, is a specialized Micro
PLC that provides local input/output logic within a Field Control station.
Field Control is a family of modular distributed I/O and control products. A basic Field
Control station consists of a Bus Interface Unit (IC670GBI002) and up to eight modules.
A Field Control station that includes an MFP can support up to seven I/O modules.
Figures 1-2 and 1-3 provide an overview of MFP operation in a Field Control station.
MFP features include:
D
D
D
D
D
Compatibility with Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software (release 6.0)
Full support for the 90-30 Hand-Held Programmer (HHP)
An alarm processor function
Password protection to limit access to PLC contents
A built-in communications port that supports Series 90 protocols (SNP and SNPX)
a45498
SLOT
FIELD
PROCESSOR
COMM
RUN
OK
ADDR
PWR
B
A
44A731468–010R01
Figure 1-1. Series 90 Micro Field Processor
GFK-1171
1-1
2
%I, %AI
%I, %AI
I/O Modules
(up to 7)
%Q, %AQ
BIU
%Q, %AQ
MFP
Host PLC
Figure 1-2. Field Control Station Block Diagram
BIU reads inputs from I/O modules and
network data tables.
(%I and %AI)
BIU sends inputs to MFP.
BIU synchronized
with MFP
MFP solves local logic.
BIU reads I/O module outputs from MFP.
BIU synchronized
with MFP
BIU writes output data to I/O modules
and network data tables.
(%Q and %AQ)
Figure 1-3. Overview of MFP Interaction with the BIU
1-2
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
For more information about Field Control systems, refer to:
Geniusr Bus Interface Unit User’s Manual (GFK-0825)
Field Control I/O Modules User’s Manual (GFK-0826)
Compatibility
D Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software: release 6.0 (IC641SWP301L, 304J, 306F, 307F)
or later
D
D
D
D
Series 90-30 firmware release 6.0
Series 90-30 Hand-Held Programmer (IC693PRG300)
Series 90 Protocol (SNP) communications
BIU firmware release 2.0
Instructions and function blocks
The MFP supports most 90-30 instruction functions and function blocks. Detailed
descriptions and examples of the use of these instructions can be found in:
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466)
Series 90-30/90-20 Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467)
Series 90-30 and 90-20 Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402)
See Appendix A of this manual for a summary of instructions supported by the MFP.
GFK-1171
Chapter 2 Introduction
1-3
2
Functional Description
The MFP contains a CPU circuit board and backplane communications circuitry. The
MFP sends and receives data to/from the BIU through the MFP backplane on the CPU
and the I/O terminal block backplane.
CPU Board
A block diagram of the functions performed by the CPU board is presented in
Figure 1-4.
CPU
The CPU executes and contains the user program and communicates with the
programmer (Hand-Held Programmer or computer running Logicmaster
90-30/90-20/Micro software). The CPU sends and receives data through the I/O terminal
block backplane, using Field Control communication protocol.
The primary capabilities of the CPU are:
D H8/3003 microprocessor running at 9.84 Mhz
D 256K x 16 sector flash memory for operating system and nonvolatile user program
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
storage (6K words of user flash memory)
128 Kbyte super cap backed RAM
Interrupt for power fail warning (2.0 ms)
Powerup reset circuit
Maximum User Program - 6K words
Registers – 2K words
Internal Coils – 1024
Typical Scan Rate – 1.0ms/K of logic (Boolean contacts)
Super Cap Backup for RAM Memory
The capacitor used to maintain the contents of the CMOS RAM memory in the CPU
provides data retention for three to four days with the power off at 25°C (77°F).
Interface Connectors
Field Control Connector
The MFP uses a standard Field Control connector that plugs into an I/O Terminal Block.
The I/O Terminal Block provides backplane communications between the BIU and I/O
devices, including the MFP.
CPU Serial Port
A 15 pin D-type, female connector on the side of the MFP provides the connection to an
RS-422 compatible serial port which is used to communicate with Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro software, the Hand-Held Programmer or for general purpose
communications using the Series 90 Protocol (SNP). For more information, see
“Connecting a Programming Device” in Chapter 2.
1-4
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Status Indicators
The module contains four LEDs that provide the user with a visual indication of the CPU
and I/O status.
Name
Function
PWR
Lighted if power is supplied to the unit and the power supply is operating correctly.
Not lighted if a power supply fault occurs or if power is not applied.
OK
Blinks during self-diagnostics. Blinks (with RUN indicator) if a fault is detected during self-diagnostics.
When lighted steadily, indicates that self diagnostics have all passed.
RUN
Lighted when the PLC is executing the logic program entered by the user (RUN
mode). Blinks if a fault is detected during self-diagnostics.
COMM
Blinks during communication on the SNP port.
CPU Board
clock
Microprocessor
128 Kbyte RAM
Super Cap
backup
Flash Memory
BIU
RS-422
SNP Port
Reset
control
Hand-Held
Programmer
PWR
OK
RUN
COMM
PWR
LEDs
OK
RUN
COMM
Figure 1-4. Micro Field Processor Functional Block Diagram
GFK-1171
Chapter 2 Introduction
1-5
2
Configuration and Programming
Two types of configuration are required for the MFP to operate in a Field Control system:
The BIU must be configured to recognize the MFP as a Field Control module, and the
MFP internal parameters must be configured.
BIU Configuration
The BIU can be configured using a Hand-Held Monitor (HHM). See Chapter 3 for
details.
t
For information pertaining to use of hand-held devices, refer to the Series 90 -30 and
90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402) and the Geniusr
Hand-Held Monitor User’s Guide (GFK-0121).
MFP Configuration
The MFP can be configured and programmed using any of the following methods (see
Chapter 4 for details):
D Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software on one of the following types of computers
(you need at least 4 megabytes of hard disk space):
h Workmaster II or CIMSTAR I industrial computer
h IBMR PC-AT,PS/2R (Personal System 2R) with 2M byte RAM, an IntelR 386 or
higher processor, and a hard disk drive
h MS-DOS compatible Personal Computer with 2M byte RAM, an Intel 386 or
higher processor, and a hard disk drive
D Series 90-30/90-20 Hand-Held Programmer (IC693PRG300)
D Reference parameters only can be configured through the BIU. (The BIU is
configured using a Hand-held Monitor.)
Both configuration and programming can be accomplished off-line from the PLC, using
the Logicmaster 90 programmer. Configuration and programming using the Hand-Held
Programmer must be done on-line with the Hand-Held Programmer attached to and
interfacing with the MFP.
Use of the programming and configuration software is described in the Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466). The Workmaster II
computer is described in the Workmaster II PLC Programming Unit Guide to Operation
Manual GFK-0401. Use of the Hand-Held Programmer is described in the Series 90-30
and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402).
RIBM, Personal System 2 and PS/2 are registered trademarks of
International Business Machines Corporation.
1-6
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Fault Reporting
The MFP monitors internal operations for system and user problems. These faults are
reported through the %S references and through an internal fault table. The fault table
can be cleared using either the HHP or Logicmaster 90 software.
Access to %S information is available through the Logicmaster 90 software or the
Hand-Held Programmer. Data in the %S reference tables is also available to the BIU and
can be sent to the network.
For more details on faults and fault reporting, see Chapter 6.
Specifications
Table 1-1. Ordering Information
Description
CatalogNumber
Micro Field Processor
IC670MFP100
Accessories
Description
CatalogNumbers
Series 90 Micro PLC Programming Software, Cable Kit, and manuals
Hand-Held Programmer with Cables and Manual (includes IC693CBL303)
Hand-Held ProgrammerMemory Card
IC640HWP300
IC693PRG300
IC693ACC303
Table 1-2. Physical and Functional Characteristics[
Weight
0.35 pounds (0.16kg)
ModuleDimensions
Height: 3.25 inches (8.2 cm)
Width: 2.0 inches (5.25 cm)
Depth: 2.9 inches (7.3 cm)
Typical Scan Rate
1.0 ms/K of logic (Boolean contacts)
[ Refer to GFK-0867B, or later for product standards and general specifications.
Table 1-3. Power Requirements
Power is supplied to the MFP from the Field Control backplane. No other power
connections are necessary.
GFK-1171
Input Voltage
6.5 VDC
Input Current, typical at 24 VDC
with HHP: 300 mA
without HHP: 110 mA
Chapter 2 Introduction
1-7
2
Table 1-4. Memory Allocation
Type
1-8
Series 90
Capacity
Contents
User
6K words
ApplicationProgram
%R
2K words
2048registers
%AI
128 words
128 analog inputs
%AQ
128 words
128 analog outputs
%I
512 bits
512 discrete inputs
%Q
512 bits
512 discrete outputs
%G
1280 bits
1280 discrete Genius global data
%M
1024 bits
1024 discrete internal, selectively retentive data
%T
256 bits
256 discrete, internal, nonretentive data
%S
128 bits
128 bits for fault reporting
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
Chapter
2 Installation
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
2
This chapter describes the procedures for installing the MFP in a Field Control station
and connecting a programming device.
Minimum Requirements
In order to install and set up the MFP, you will need:
D Series 90 Micro Field Processor (MFP) module
D Programming device (this can be one of the following items)
A. Hand-Held Programmer and cable. (Cable must be connected to HHP before
connecting it to the MFP.)
B. Logicmaster 90-30/30/Micro software, a Workmaster II or CIMSTAR I industrial
computer, or an IBM AT, PS/2 or other MS-DOS compatible Personal Computer
(with 386 or higher microprocessor and 2 Mbyte memory) and appropriate
cables.
If the MFP is to be programmed using Logicmaster 90 software, a Workmaster II,
CIMSTAR I, or an IBM or IBM-compatible computer is required to run the software.
Logicmaster 90 software can use either a Work Station Interface (WSI) board, an RS-422
port, or a standard RS-232 interface with an RS-422 to RS-232 converter. The WSI board
is installed in the Workmaster II computer at the factory.
D Bus Interface Unit (BIU) and Field Control base
D Hand-Held Monitor (IC660HHM501) version 4.7 or later for configuring the BIU
Unpacking
1.
Visual inspection. Upon receiving your MFP, carefully inspect all shipping
containers for damage that may have occurred during shipping. If any part of the
system is damaged, notify the carrier immediately. The damaged shipping container
should be saved as evidence for inspection by the carrier.
It is your responsibility to register a claim with the carrier for damage incurred
during shipment. GE Fanuc will fully cooperate with you, if such action is necessary.
GFK-1171
2.
Unpacking. Unpack all shipping cartons and verify the contents. All shipping
containers and packing material should be saved in case it is necessary to transport
or ship any part of the system.
3.
Pre-installation Check. After unpacking the MFP, record all serial numbers. These
serial numbers may be required if you need to request product service during the
warranty period of the equipment.
2-1
2
Installation
8
The MFP must be installed on a Field
Control Terminal Block, which is mounted
on a 35mm x 7.5mm DIN rail. The Field
Control station (also called a “stick” because
the modules are mounted next to each other
on the same DIN rail) can be mounted in any
orientation. As shown below, the BIU must
be mounted at either end of the stick. The
MFP can be mounted in any slot on the stick,
other than that occupied by the BIU.
BIU
0
7
MFP
1
6
2
5
3
4
4
3
5
2
6
1
MFP
7
0
BIU
8
Grounding Procedures
All components of a control system and the devices it controls must be properly
grounded. Ground conductors should be connected in a star fashion, with all branches
routed to a central earth ground point as shown below. This ensures that no ground
conductor carries current from any other branch.
Refer to the Geniusr Bus Interface Unit User’s Manual (GFK-0825) for complete information
about installation and grounding.
Programming
Device
Each Terminal
Block
Earth
Ground
Motor Drives and
Other Electrical
Control
Equipment
Central
Ground Point
Machinery
NOTE
Signal and power
connections not shown
Logicmaster Programming Device Grounding
For proper operation, the programmer for Logicmaster 90 Micro software (Workmaster
II or CIMSTAR I, or IBM-PC or compatible computer) must have a ground connection in
common with the MFP. Normally, this common ground connection is provided by
ensuring that the programmer’s power cord is connected to the same power source
(with the same ground reference point) as the Field Control station, however this will
need to be verified for each installation.
2-2
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Mounting the MFP on a Terminal Block
Warning
For personal safety, avoid contact with module wiring and with the exposed
connectors on the Terminal Block when installing or removing Field
Control modules.
Caution
Electrostatic discharge can damage the MFP when it is not installed on
a Terminal Block. Always observe good ESD protection practices
when handling an un-installed module.
Caution
Do not insert or remove the MFP during operation if the temporarily incorrect
data that may result could cause hazardous or unexpected conditions.
46416
1.
If the protective label is still in place on the
Terminal Block, remove it before attempting
to install the MFP.
2.
Before installing the MFP, remove the cable
slot knockout(s) wherever the module
would cover the terminal board connecting
cables. The knockout can be removed with
pliers, or by pressing out from inside the
module housing.
3.
To install the MFP, position the module so
that the cable slot in the module housing is
over the connecting cable. Press the module
down firmly.
4.
If you feel resistance, remove the module
and remove any obstruction. Also be sure
the connecting cable is seated in the cable
slot.
5.
GFK-1171
After placing the MFP onto the base, tighten
its bolts to secure it. The maximum
recommended torque is 9 in/lbs.
Chapter 2 Installation
End View
Cable Slot
b
Connecting Cable
(cross section)
Terminal Block
46417
Tighten
2-3
2
Power-up Self-test
When power is applied to the MFP through the Field Control Terminal Block, the MFP
automatically performs its power-up sequence, which includes self-diagnostics. You
should observe the power-up sequence to verify that the unit is installed and operating
correctly.
Normal Power-up Sequence
D The Power indicator, labeled PWR, should light.
D The CPU status indicator, labeled OK, blinks during the power-up self diagnostics.
When self-diagnostics have been successfully completed, the OK indicator will
remain lighted.
D The CPU status indicator, labeled RUN, should light if the unit is configured to run
on power-up.
D The COMM indicator does not light until communication is established with an
external SNP device.
After verifying that a valid power-up sequence has occurred, attach a programming
device (Hand-Held Programmer or computer with Logicmaster 90 Micro software) to
configure the MFP and develop programs for the unit.
Error Detection And Correction
If the MFP fails the power-up self-test, one of the conditions listed in Table 2-1 will be
observed after applying power.
Table 2-1. Power-up Sequence Troubleshooting
Symptom
PWR indicator does not light.
Action
1. Check that the Field Control station power
source is on.
2. With power supply off, make sure that MFP
is installed properly on the Terminal Block.
PWR indicator lighted but OK indicator is not
lighted.
(This indicates that the power source is good
and that the CPU has detected an internal
fault.)
Refer to Chapter 6, “Diagnostics”.
PWR indicator on; OK and RUN
indicators are blinking.
Refer to Chapter 6, “Diagnostics”.
Note: The MFP provides built-in blink codes to
assist in troubleshooting. Refer to Chapter 6.
PWR indicator on; OK and RUN
indicators are blinking synchronously
2-4
Series 90
Valid system software is not present in flash
memory and must be restored using the software update utility.
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Connecting a Programming Device
The MFP can be programmed and configured using either the Hand-Held programmer
or the Logicmaster 90 software (included in IC640HWP300). Both of these methods are
described in Chapter 4.
Connecting the Hand-Held Programmer
Note
The Hand-Held Programmer or RS-422 to RS-232 Converter should not
be connected continuously at ambient temperatures above 55_C
(131_F).
The Hand-Held Programmer (IC693PRG300) is a compact programming device that
connects to the MFP 15-pin serial port through a 6 foot (2 meter) cable that conforms to
the RS-485 specification.
a43052
GEFanuc
SERIES 90-30
PROGRAMMABLE
CONTROLLER
HAND HELD PROGRAMMER
LD
OUT
SETM
RSTM
TMR
OUTM
SET
RST
ONDTR
F
NOT
BLK
D
AND
E
A I
AI
BQ
AQ
7
OR
CM
UPCTR
DNCTR
MODE
RUN
T
G
S
FUNC
DEL
8
9
R
#
SRCH
4
5
6
WRITE
1
2
3
0
INS
READ
SLOT
FOR
MEMORY
CARD
VRFY
HEX
DEC
CLR
ENT
SERIAL PORT CONNECTOR
TO CPU SERIAL PORT
Figure 2-1. Hand-Held Programmer
GFK-1171
Chapter 2 Installation
2-5
2
Warning
Always connect the cable to the Hand-Held Programmer first, then
connect the cable to the MFP. This avoids any chance of shorting the
+5 volt supply on the MFP which could cause incorrect operation of
the MFP. Incorrect operation of the MFP could damage the equipment
or cause personal injury to an operator.
To connect the Hand-Held Programmer cable for the first time:
D Attach the 15-pin male D connector on one end to the mating 15-pin female D
connector on the Hand-Held Programmer.
D Attach the connector on the other end of the cable to the 15-pin female connector on
the MFP. These connections are shown in the following figure.
Hand-held
Programmer
(IC693PRG300)
Cable (IC693CBL303)
Micro Field
Processor
Figure 2-2. Hand-Held Programmer Cable Connection to a Micro Field Processor
2-6
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Connections for Using Logicmaster 90 Software
You need a Software and Cable Kit package (IC640HWP300) to use Logicmaster 90
Micro software with the MFP.
Workmaster II Computer with WSI
The cable connection for this configuration is from the connector on the WSI board
(IC647WMI920) to the MFP serial port as shown below.
WSI Serial
Serial Cable (IC647CBL704)
Micro Field Processor
Workmaster II
Figure 2-3. Logicmaster 90 Programmer to MFP Connection through a WSI
GFK-1171
Chapter 2 Installation
2-7
2
lBM-PC Compatible Computer
This configuration uses a standard RS-422 or RS-232 serial communications port on the
IBM-PC compatible computer. An RS-422/RS-232 converter (IC690ACC901) is required.
Examples of cable connections for this type of interface are shown below.
RS–232
IC690CBL701
10 feet
(3 meters)
RS-422
Micro Field
Processor
RS485/RS232
Converter
IBM PC (XT), Workmaster
IC693CBL303
6 feet (2 meters)
Hand-held Programmer Cable
IC693CBL303
6 feet (1.83 meters)
Hand-held Programmer
Cable
RS-422
IC690CBL702 RS–232
10 feet
RS485/RS232
(3 meters)
Converter
IBM PC (AT)
RS-232
IBM PS/2, Workmaster II
Micro Field
Processor
RS-422
IC693CBL303
IC690CBL705
6 feet (1.83 meters)
10 feet
RS485/RS232
Hand-held Programmer
(3 meters)
Converter with
Cable
9-pin to 25-pin converter
Micro Field
Processor
RS-422
(See 15 pin connector assignment)
Micro Field
Processor
IBM-compatible PCwith RS-422 interface
Figure 2-4. Examples of Serial Connection from Computer to MFP
2-8
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
2
Table 2-2. RS-422 15-Pin Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Signal Name
1
Shield
6
RTS (A)
7
OV
8
CTS (B)
9
RT
10
RD (A)
11
RD (B)
12
SD (A)
13
SD (B)
14
RTS (B)
15
CTS (A)
Installing the RS-422 to RS-232 Converter
Caution
The Miniconverter and cables should be installed with the Field
Control station powered down.
The Miniconverter Kit (IC690ACC901) consists of an RS-422 (SNP) to RS-232
Miniconverter, a 6 foot (2 meter) serial extension cable, and a 9-pin to 25-pin Converter
Plug assembly. The 15-pin SNP port connector on the Miniconverter plugs directly into
the serial port connector on the MFP. The 9-pin RS-232 port connector on the
Miniconverter connects to an RS-232 compatible device.
When used with an IBM PC-AT, or compatible computer, one end of the extension cable
plugs into the Miniconverter’s 9-pin serial port connector, the other end plugs into the
9-pin serial port of the computer. When used with a GE Fanuc Workmaster II computer
or an IBM PS/2 Personal Computer, the Converter plug (supplied with kit) is required to
convert the 9-pin serial port connector on the Miniconverter to the 25-pin serial port
connector on the computer.
For more information see the Series 90-30 Programmable Controller Installation Manual
(GFK-0356).
a44985
RS-422
PORT
RS-232
PORT
Figure 2-5. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Adapter
GFK-1171
Chapter 2 Installation
2-9
Chapter
3
3 BIU Configuration
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
A Field Control station is configured through the BIU, using a Hand-Held Monitor. BIU
configuration includes communications configuration and module configuration.
Communications configuration consists of setting the BIU parameters related to the
communications network used by the Field Control station and includes network
mapping. Module configuration consists of all other configuration pertaining to the
mapping of I/O data and setting specific module parameters. Module configuration is
the phase of BIU configuration that directly relates to the MFP.
For more information concerning BIU configuration, refer to the “Operation” and
“Station Configuration” chapters in the Geniusr Bus Interface Unit Users Manual
(GFK-0825).
MFP Default Configuration
When the Field Control station is powered up with the MFP installed, the BIU detects
the MFP’s presence. If the BIU does not have a valid configuration for the MFP, it
obtains a default configuration from the MFP. The MFP creates a default configuration at
power up. This default configuration will be replaced with the new configuration that
will be created when you configure the BIU. An example configuration file for the MFP
is provided in Appendix C.
Table 3-1. MFP Default Configuration File
GFK-1171
Direction
Segment Selector
Offset
Length
MFP –>BIU
%Q
next available reference
0
MFP –>BIU
%AQ
next available reference
0
BIU –>MFP
%I
next available reference
0
BIU –>MFP
%AI
next available reference
0
3-1
3
I/O Mapping Overview
The I/O function of the MFP is configured by the BIU, which sends a configuration file to
the MFP. The configuration file contains I/O type and length data that maps BIU
reference parameters to input/output tables in MFP memory. The configuration file can
be created using the Hand-Held Monitor or using a Genius WRITE CONFIGURATION
datagram. (Datagrams, which are messages used by devices on a bus, are discussed on
page 4-7.)
The BIU has %I, %AI, %Q, and %AQ internal memories that are used for I/O data. The
following table lists the amount of memory of each type that can be transferred to the
controller CPU across the network, and the highest address that can be used for each
reference type.
I/O Table
in BIU
Memory
Type
FROM_NET_DISC
Purpose
Maximum
Transferred
Highest Available
Reference Address
%I
discrete inputs
1024 bits
65535
FROM_NET_WORD
%AI
analog inputs
up to 64 words
65535
TO_NET–DISC
%Q
discreteoutputs
1024 bits
9999
%AQ
analog outputs
up to 64 words
9999
TO_NET_WORD
Individual I/O modules, including the MFP, can be configured anywhere within available
BIU memory. If a module is to exchange data with the CPU, the module must be placed
inside the configured I/O map. Any I/O modules (or portions of modules) configured
outside the I/O map will be scanned by the Bus Interface Unit, but the data will not be
derived from or supplied to the CPU.
Data in the MFP I/O tables can be mapped to the BIU’s four I/O tables using either of
two methods: reference parameters (see the following discussion) or group data moves (see
page 3-18). Both of these methods include Default/Hold Last State configuration, which
is discussed on page 3-10.
3-2
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3
Reference Parameters Overview
For each reference parameter, you can configure:
D Segment selector – which BIU table
D Length – how many bits (discrete data) or words (analog data) to move to or
from the MFP to the corresponding table in the BIU.
D Start address (offset) – starting address within the BIU table that the data is
being written to or read from
The BIU’s four reference parameters are associated with the four I/O tables in the MFP
as follows:
BIU Reference Parameter
I/O Table in MFP
1 (discrete inputs)
%Q (discrete outputs)
2 (analog inputs)
%AQ (analog outputs)
3 (discrete outputs)
%I (discrete inputs)
4 (analog outputs)
%AI (analog inputs)
The reference parameters operate in a manner similar to the data Move functions in
ladder logic programming. Move function blocks are used to describe the operation of
the reference parameters in Figure 3-1. For details on Move function blocks, see the
Series 90t-30/90-20 Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467).
Reference parameter 1
enable
MOVE
ok
Reference parameter 3
enable
INT
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %Q1
MOVE
BIU %Q table
ok
BIU %I table
Q
IN
LEN
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %I1
Reference parameter 4
enable
INT
MFP %AQ1
ok
INT
Reference parameter 2
enable
MOVE
MOVE
ok
INT
BIU %AQ table
BIU Inputs/MFP Outputs
BIU %AI table
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %AI1
BIU Outputs/MFP Inputs
Figure 3-1. BIU Reference Parameters Described as Data Move Function Blocks
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-3
3
Reference Parameter Examples
Example 1
Local MFP control of station outputs using station inputs as inputs to the MFP:
Outputs from the MFP directly control station outputs. No inputs or outputs are
mapped to the network. In this mode, the MFP, in conjunction with the BIU station,
functions as a stand-alone PLC.
BIU Tables
%Q
local outputs
MFP Tables
Reference Parameter 1
%Q
Network
Outputs
Reference Parameter 2
%AQ
local outputs
%I
local inputs
Network
Inputs
Reference Parameter 3
Reference Parameter 4
%AI
local inputs
%AQ
%I
%AI
Figure 3-2. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 1
3-4
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GFK-1171
3
Reference parameter 1
enable
MOVE
ok
Reference parameter 3
enable
Q
IN
LEN
BIU %Q
BIU %I
Reference parameter 2
enable
MOVE
ok
Q
IN
LEN
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %I
Reference parameter 4
enable
MOVE
ok
INT
INT
MFP %AQ
ok
INT
INT
MFP %Q
MOVE
BIU %AQ
BIU %AI
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %AI
Figure 3-3. Move Function Blocks for Example 1
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-5
3
Example 2
Local MFP control of station outputs using control inputs from the network and from
local discrete inputs: Outputs from the MFP control station outputs and are sent back
to the network as inputs to the system controller.
MFP Tables
Reference Parameter 1
%Q
BIU Tables
%Q
local outputs
Network
Outputs
%AQ
Reference Parameter 4
%AI
local outputs
%I
Reference Parameter 3
%I
Reference Parameter 2
%AQ
local inputs
Network
Inputs
%AI
local inputs
Figure 3-4. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 2
3-6
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GFK-1171
3
Reference parameter 3
Reference parameter 1
enable
MOVE
ok
enable
MOVE
INT
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %Q
INT
BIU %Q
local discrete
outputs under
MFP control
BIU %I
local discrete
inputs
MOVE
ok
enable
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %I
MOVE
ok
INT
INT
BIU %AQ
network outputs
used as MFP
inputs
Q
IN
LEN
Reference parameter 2
Reference parameter 4
enable
ok
MFP %AI
MFP %AQ
Q
IN
LEN
BIU %AI
MFP solved data
sent back to network as ilnputs to
system controller
Figure 3-5. Move Function Blocks for Example 2
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-7
3
Example 3
Local MFP control of station outputs with network backup: MFP-solved outputs from
local inputs control the station outputs. If the MFP fails, the network outputs will
control the station outputs.
BIU Tables
%Q
local outputs
MFP Tables
Reference Parameter 1
%Q
Network
Outputs
Reference Parameter 2
%AQ
local outputs
%I
local inputs
Reference Parameter 3
%AQ
%I
Network
Inputs
Reference Parameter 4
%AI
local inputs
%AI
Figure 3-6. Reference Parameter Mapping for Example 3
3-8
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3
Reference parameter 3
Reference parameter 1
enable
MOVE
ok
enable
Q
IN
LEN
BIU %Q
BIU %I
MOVE
ok
enable
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %I
MOVE
ok
INT
INT
MFP %AQ
Q
IN
LEN
Reference parameter 4
Reference parameter 2
enable
ok
INT
INT
MFP %Q
MOVE
BIU %AQ
BIU %AI
Q
IN
LEN
MFP %AI
Figure 3-7. Move Function Blocks for Example 3
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-9
3
Default/Hold Last State Configuration Overview
The BIU default/hold last state configuration determines what will happen to MFP data
if network communications or communication between the MFP and the BIU is lost.
Network Mapping
The BIU contains four internal tables that are used to send data onto the system network
and receive data from the network:
D TO_NET_WORD – word data going out on the network from the Field Control
station (%AI)
D TO_NET_DISC – bit data going out on the network from the Field Control
station (%I)
D FROM_NET_WORD – word data coming from the network into the Field
Control station (%AQ)
D FROM_NET_DISC – bit data coming from the network into the Field Control
station (%Q)
BIU Outputs
The output default/hold last state configuration parameters apply to any data sent to the
MFP by the BIU, where the ultimate source of that data is the communication network.
One parameter applies to the FROM_NET_DISC table. The other applies to the
FROM_NET_WORD table. These parameters specify what data to send to the MFP
when the network communications are not operating. Hold last state indicates send the
last valid data received from the network. Default means send all zeros to the module.
The value of these parameters at powerup is default.
3-10
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GFK-1171
3
BIU
Network
ÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉ
Hold last state/
default Q parameter
MFP
Discrete data
FROM_NET DISCRETE (Q)
ÉÉÉ
FROM_NET_WORD (AQ)
Word data
Hold last state/
default AQ parameter
Figure 3-8. Default/Hold Last State Configuration Parameters for BIU Outputs
If data from a FROM_NET table is sent to the MFP, but the source of that data is not the
network, the parameter does not apply, as shown in Figure 3-9. Also, if no data is sent
from a FROM_NET table to the MFP, the parameter for that table will not be needed.
BIU
FROM_NET_DISCRETE (Q)
Network
ÉÉÉ
ÇÇÇ
ÉÉÉ
ÇÇÇ
Parameter does
not apply
MFP
Figure 3-9. Case Where Default/Hold Last State Parameter Does Not Apply
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-11
3
BIU Inputs
There are two input default/hold last state configuration parameters (one for each BIU
input table). These parameters specify to the BIU what to put in the tables when the
MFP fails, is in stop-faulted mode, or is not present, in place of the data that would be
normally read from the MFP. At powerup, this parameter is set to default and the
default values are off. When the MFP is in stop mode, it always sets to 0 the data read by
the BIU.
BIU
MFP
FROM_NET_DISCRETE (Q)
TO_NET_DISC (I)
default/hold last state
FROM_NET_WORD (AQ)
TO_NET_DISCRETE (I)
TO_NET_WORD (AI)
default/hold last state
TO_NET_WORD (AI)
Figure 3-10. Default/Hold Last State Configuration Parameters for BIU Inputs
3-12
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3
How to Configure Reference Parameters
HHM Screen Elements
If reference parameters for the MFP have not been configured, the initial screen you see
for each reference parameter will indicate that it is not assigned. For example, when you
access the screen for reference parameter 4 (%AI) the following screen will appear.
S:1 MFPAI
Unassigned
< >
chg
entr
D In the top line of the screen, S:1 indicates slot 1 in the Field Control station. (The
MFP can be installed in any slot except for the one occupied by the BIU, which is
always in slot 0.) MFPAI identifies the reference parameter that the screen is
displaying (%AI) within the MFP.
D In the second line, unassigned indicates that this reference parameter is not
assigned.
D The abbreviations at the bottom of the screen indicate the functions assigned to
keys F1 through F4 for this screen. The < and > arrows on the screen indicate
that you can move to the previous or next parameter. Pressing F3 (chg) allows
you to toggle through the BIU table selectors. After editing the reference
parameter assignment, you must press F4 (entr) for the change to take place.
If reference parameters have been assigned for the MFP, you will see a screen similar to
the following for each reference parameter.
S:1 MFPAI AQ:008
%AQ00001–00008
< >
chg
entr
D In the first line, AQ:008 indicates that 8 words of data in the BIU’s AQ table has
been assigned to the AI table in the MFP.
D In the second line, %AQ00001 – 00008 indicates the range of references in the
BIU tables that is assigned to begin at AI001 in the MFP.
For information pertaining to the use of hand-held devices, refer to the Series 90t-30
and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402) and the Geniusr
Hand-Held Monitor User’s Guide (GFK-0121).
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-13
3
Sample Screen Sequence for Reference Parameters
In this example, the MFP is installed in slot 1 of the Field Control station. The MFP can
be installed in any slot other than that occupied by the BIU (slot 0).
1.
Configure the BIU I/O mapping. (Refer to the Geniusr Bus Interface Unit Users
Manual – GFK-0825 for this procedure). (The Sync Module screen will be the final
screen in this process before you proceed to the individual module configuration
screens.) If reference parameters have not been assigned for the MFP, the first
screen you will see for MFP configuration will appear as follows.
S:1
<
2.
EMPTY
>
tgl read
Press the read function key (F4) to read slot 1. The following screen will appear.
S:1
<
3.
>
MFP1.0
del zoom
To begin assigning reference parameters, press the zoom key (F4). The following
screen, which shows the first table (discrete outputs) selected, will appear.
S:1 MFPQ1
Unassigned
<
3-14
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>
chg entr
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GFK-1171
3
4.
Configure BIU table, length, and offset (Ref Addr) for the selected table in the MFP.
A. To assign the reference parameter, press the chg key (F3). The following screen
will appear.
S:1 MFPQ1
Select table
I
tgl entr
B. To toggle through the allowed BIU tables, press F3. When you have selected the
table you want to map the first MFP reference parameter to, press the entr key
(F4). The following screen will appear.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:000
Select length
clr entr
C. Enter the length, using the numeric keys on the HHM keypad. The length you
enter will be in bits if the table selector is a discrete table and in words if the
table selector is an analog table. If you enter a length that is not on a byte
boundary (a multiple of 8) for discrete data, the BIU will round down to the
nearest correct offset.
To accept the length you have entered, press the entr key (F4). (If you have
not entered a value for length, the reference parameter will remain unassigned.)
A screen that shows the default (next available) reference address will appear.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:008
Ref Addr 00001
clr entr
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-15
3
D. To change the default reference address, use the numeric keys. To accept the
reference parameter assignment, press the entr key (F4). The message,
PLEASE WAIT, will be displayed, followed by the screen shown below.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:008
I00001–00008
<
>
chg entr
E. The first reference parameter has now been configured. To go to the next
reference parameter (MFPAQ), press F2.
5.
Repeat steps 4A through 4E for the remaining reference parameters. As you press
the > key (F2), Reference parameters are displayed in the following order: Q1, AQ,
I1, and AI.
6.
When you have assigned the final reference parameter, press F2 to go to the first
Default/Hold Last State screen.
Screen Sequence for Default/Hold Last State Configuration
1.
Note that you will see Default/Hold Last State screens only for tables that have a
configured reference parameter. If a reference parameter is unassigned, the
corresponding Default/Hold Last State screen will not be displayed.
S:1 Module–>
DEFAULT:ZERO
<
>
%I
tgl entr
When DEFAULT is set to ZERO, all zeros will be sent if communication is lost. When
DEFAULT is set to HOLD, the last valid data received will be sent.
2.
To change the default setting, press F3 and then accept the change by pressing F4.
To go to the next screen, press F2. By pressing F2, you can toggle through the
Default/Hold Last State parameters in the following order:
Module –> %I
Module –> %AI
Network –> %AQ
Network –> %Q
When you have finished configuring the Default/Hold Last State parameters, BIU
configuration for the MFP is complete. When the MFP accepts the new reference
parameter and default/hold last state configuration from the BIU, it updates its copy of
the configuration file to reflect the new values. The BIU then builds a scanning structure
that includes the MFP.
3-16
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3
Error Messages for Reference Parameters
D If you enter an invalid length value, the HHM will display the following screen. If
this happens, press the Clear key to return to the “Select length” screen.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:612
bad length err
exit
D If you assign a reference parameter length and offset so that it overlaps an
assignment in the BIU for another input module, a bad ref address message will be
displayed. This screen will also be displayed if you enter an offset that is not within
the boundaries of the selected table. Press the Clear key to reassign the reference
parameter.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:504
bad ref address
exit
If the module rejects the configuration, the BIU and the MFP will return to the
original configuration state. The HHM will show the following screen. If this
happens, press the clear key. The HHM will return the display to the original
configuration.
S:1 MFPQ1 I:504
cfg rejected
exit
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-17
3
Group Data Moves Overview
Group data moves provide an alternate means of mapping MFP I/O tables to I/O tables
in the BIU. Up to four types of data in the MFP can be moved by defining a single
Group. You can configure up to 16 Group data moves.
Groups differ from reference parameters in the following ways:
D The data within the MFP does not have to be mapped to a table within the BIU, but
can be mapped directly to another smart module.
D The data within the MFP can be mapped with an offset.
D The data moved can be scanned selectively. It does not have to be scanned every
input or output scan of the BIU.
A Group data move can be thought of as a super move that contains from one to four
individual Moves, as shown in Figure 3-11. Note that bit data can be moved to word
data areas, and vice versa.
D Each Group data move has a source slot and a destination slot, either of which can
be slot 0. Slot 0 represents the BIU’s internal tables.
D The Moves inside the Group can be from any table inside the source to any table
inside the destination.
D The following data types within the MFP module are bidirectional. That is, they can
be read from or written to by the BIU: R, AI, AQ, A, I, Q, M, T, G.
D The tables S, SA, SB, and SC have MFP to BIU direction only. The BIU only has read
access to these tables.
source ref.
source slot
(slot 1)
Move 1
dest. ref.
length
source ref.
Move 2
destination
slot
(slot 0)
dest. ref.
length
source ref.
Move 3
dest. ref.
length
source ref.
Move 4
dest. ref.
length
Figure 3-11. Group Data Move Example
3-18
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GFK-1171
3
How to Configure Group Data Moves
Five parameters are configured for each Move within the Group data move: source slot,
destination slot, source reference, destination reference, and byte length. In addition,
move defaults and selective sweeping for a cycle of sixteen sweeps can be defined for
each Move.
Screen Sequence for Configuring Groups
1.
To configure data Groups, begin at the main menu for the BIU:
F1 Monitor
F2 Configuration
2.
Press F2 to select the Configuration option. The following screen will be displayed:
F1 GENIUS CONFIG
F2 Module Config
more
3.
Press the more function key (F4). The following screen will be displayed:
F1 Grp Data Move
F2 Previous Menu
more
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-19
3
4.
Press F1 to select Grp Data Move. The first data Group move screen will be
displayed. On this screen, each of the 16 potential data Groups is represented by a
letter N (no Moves defined for that Group) or Y (at least one Move is defined for
that Group). The number of the data Group indicated by the cursor appears in the
upper right corner of the screen.
Grp Data Move 01
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
<
5.
>
del zoom
To set up a Group move, place the cursor under the number of the Group and press
the zoom function key (F4). The configuration screen for the first parameter, the
source slot, will be displayed.
A. Configure parameter 1 – Source Slot.
Enter the slot number of the module that will be the source of the data (0 for the
BIU, 1 to 8 for the MFP). The BIU will verify that a smart module is configured
in the selected slot.
Group Move
1:0
Source Slot:0
<
>
entr
Define the source slot of the Group data move.
Default: 0
Valid keystrokes: numeric 0– 8, previous
parameter (<), next parameter (>), accept
parameter (entr), up arrow
Press F4 (enter) to accept the slot. Press F2 (>) to go to the next configuration
screen.
B. Configure parameter 2 – Destination Slot
Enter the slot number of the module that will receive the data (0 for the BIU, 1 to
8 for the MFP). The destination module can be the same as the source module.
The BIU will verify that a smart module is configured in the selected slot.
Group Move
Dest Slot:1
<
>
1:0
entr
Define the destination slot of the Group data
move.
Default: 0
Valid keystrokes: numeric 0–8, previous
parameter, next parameter, enter parameter, up
arrow
Press F4 (enter) to accept the destination slot. Press F2 (>) to go to the next
configuration screen.
3-20
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3
C. Configure parameter 3 – Move 1 Source Reference
For each data type, a starting offset and length can be specified.
To select a table type, press the F3 (tgl) key to toggle through the list of valid
table types for the MFP. The following data types can be read or written: R, AI,
AQ, A, I, Q, M, T, G. In addition, S, SA, SB, and SC data can be moved from the
MFP to the BIU. (The BIU has read access only to S, SA, SB, and SC tables.) To
enter the start address within the table, use the numeric keys.
Press F4 (enter) to accept the source reference. Press F2 (>) to go to the next
configuration screen.
1:1
Group Move
Src Ref:%AI00009
Define the source reference for the first Group
of data to be moved.
<
Valid keystrokes: tgl, numeric, previous
parameter, next parameter, enter, up arrow
>
tgl entr
D. Configure parameter 4 – Move 1 Destination Reference
To configure the destination reference, enter the table selection and the starting
address within the table. Press F3 to toggle through the table types. To enter the
start address within the table, use the numeric keys.
Press F4 (enter) to accept the destination reference. Press F2 (>) to go to the
next configuration screen.
GFK-1171
1:1
Group Move
Des Ref:%R00001
Define the destination reference for the first
Group of data to be moved.
<
Valid keystrokes: tgl, numeric, previous
parameter, next parameter, enter, up arrow
>
tgl entr
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-21
3
E. Configure parameter 5 – Move 1 Byte Length
This screen defines the number of bytes to be moved from the source to the
destination. The BIU will insure that the value is valid for the source slot and
the destination slot.
Press F4 (enter) to accept the length you have specified. Press F2 (>) to go to the
next configuration screen.
6.
1:1
Group Move
Byte Len:000
Define the byte length of the Group of data to
be moved.
<
Valid keystrokes: numeric, previous
parameter, next parameter, up arrow
>
tgl entr
When you have finished entering the parameters for the first Move in the Group
press F2 (>) to go to the next Move. Up to four moves can be configured for a
Group.
When all four Moves in a Group are configured, the Move Deflt (Move Default)
screen will be displayed.
How to Configure Default/Hold Last State for Group Moves
Move Deflt
YYYY
_
<
>
1:1
tgl entr
Define the default values (0 or hold last state)
the BIU will send to the MFP if network communications are lost.
Valid keystrokes: previous, next, tgl, entr
The Move Deflt screen allows you to select the default values that the BIU will send
to the MFP if the BIU loses communication with the module that is the source of the
data.
You will be able to change the setting (Y or N) in the Move Default screen for a
Move with a source slot of 0 only if the following conditions are met:
D data type is Q or AQ,
D data is included in the BIU’s configured I/O map
1.
To select the default for a Move, place the cursor under the selection for each Move
(Move 1 of Group 1 in the example above). Press F3 (tgl) to select either Y (default to
0) or N (hold last state).
2.
Press F4 (enter) to accept the configuration. Press F2 (>) to go to the next
configuration screen, which will be the Sweep Enab screen for configuring selective
sweeps.
An overview of the configuration process for a Group data move is shown in
Figure 3-12. The procedure for configuring selective sweeps is explained on page 3-24.
3-22
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3
Group Move 1:1
Source Ref:_
<
>
entr
Group Move
Byte Len:_
<
>
1:1
tgl entr
Move Deflt
yyyy
<
>
1:1
tgl entr
Selective Sweeps
Figure 3-12. Group Data Move Configuration Process
GFK-1171
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-23
3
How to Configure Selective Scanning of Group Data Moves
There are 16 individually programmable sweeps within the BIU. An important
characteristic of Group Data is that it does not have to be moved during each BIU sweep.
By configuring a Group to be selectively scanned by the BIU, you can decrease the
overall average sweep time of the BIU. The last step in configuring a Group is to specify
the BIU sweeps during which the data should be moved.
The BIU sweep sequence is illustrated in Figure 3-13. Using the HHM, a Group can be
programmed to be scanned on any one or more of the 16 sweeps.
Sweep 1:
Scan all reference parameter data, all dumb modules,
and group moves that are programmed for this sweep.
Sweep 2:
Scan all reference parameter data, all dumb modules,
and group moves that are programmed for this sweep.
Sweep 16:
Scan all reference parameter data, all dumb modules,
and group moves that are programmed for this sweep.
Figure 3-13. BIU Sweep Sequence
In the Sweep Enab screen, shown, in Figure 3-8, the selective sweep configuration for a
Group is represented as a 16-bit word with each bit in the word representing a sweep.
(Bit 0 corresponds to sweep 1.) A Y in a bit position indicates that this Group will be
scanned in the corresponding sweep. To configure sweeps, press the left or right arrow
keys to move to each bit in the word and press F3 to toggle between Y (yes) and N (no).
After completing this screen, press F4 (entr) to save the configuration. This procedure
completes the configuration of a Group. To return to the Group screen, press the Clear
key or F1 (<).
3-24
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GFK-1171
3
Sweep Enab 02:01
–YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
<
>
tgl entr
Select whether Group data will be sent during
each BIU sweep.
The number 02:01 in this example represents
Group 2:BIU sweep 1.
Default: Y
Valid keystrokes: previous, next, tgl, entr, clr
Sweep Enab 02:02
YNYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
–
<
>
tgl entr
Clr
Grp Data Move 01
YNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
<
>
del zoom
Figure 3-14. Configuring Sweeps for Data Move Groups
In the screen below, the Y indicates that at least one Move for the first Group has been
defined. Up to four moves can be configured for a Group.
GFK-1171
Grp Data Move 01
YNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
Select the Group to be configured, configure
Moves for a Group, or delete a Group.
<
Valid keystrokes: <> (selects Group number),
del (removes Group), zoom (configures Moves
within group)
>
del zoom
Chapter 3 BIU Configuration
3-25
Chapter
4
4 MFP Configuration
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
MFP internal functions can be configured using Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software or
a Series 90-30/90-20 Hand-Held Programmer. The configurable parameters for these
functions are listed in Table 4-1.
Both configuration and programming can be done off-line from the MFP, using the
Logicmaster 90 software. Configuration and programming using the Hand-Held
Programmer must be done with the Hand-Held Programmer (HHP) attached to and
interfacing with the MFP.
For more information about the use of these programmers, refer to:
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466)
Series 90-30/90-20 Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467)
Workmaster II PLC Programming Unit Guide to Operation Manual (GFK-0401)
Series 90-30 and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402)
GFK-1171
4-1
4
Table 4-1. MFP Configuration Parameters
Parameter
Description
Possible Values
Default Value
I/OScan-Stop
Determines whether I/O is to be scanned while
the MFP is in STOP mode
YES
NO
NO
Pwr Up Mode
Selects powerup mode.
LAST
STOP
RUN
LAST
Cfg From
Source of configuration when the MFP is powered up. (Logic source is always flash memory.)
RAM
PROM (flash memory)
RAM
Registers
Selects source of register data when the MFP is
powered up.
RAM
PROM (flash memory)
RAM
Passwords
Determines whether the password feature is enabled or disabled. (Note: If passwords are disabled, the only way to re-enable them is to clear
the MFP memory by power cycling the unit and
pressing the appropriate keys on the HHP.) See
page 4-5.
ENABLED
DISABLED
ENABLED
Baud Rate
SNP Port data transmission rate (in bits per second).
300
600
1200
2400
19200
Data Bits
Determines whether the CPU recognizes 7-bit or
8-bit words (SNP requires 8 bits.)
7
8
8
Parity
Determines whether parity is added to words
ODD
EVEN
NONE
ODD
Stop Bits
Number of stop bits used in transmission. (Most
serial devices use one stop bit; slower devices use
two.)
1
2
1
Modem TT
Modem turnaround time (10ms/unit) This is the
time required for the modem to start data transmission after receiving the transmit request.
0–255
0
Idle Time
Time (in seconds) the CPU waits for the next
message to be received from the programming
device before it assumes that the programming
device has failed and proceeds to its base state
1–60
10
Sweep Mode
Normal – the sweep runs until it is complete
NORMAL
CNST SWP
NORMAL
NORMALmode:N/A
CNST SWP mode: 5– 200
N/A
100
4800
9600
19200
Constant – the sweep runs for the time
specified in Sweep Tmr
Sweep Tmr
4-2
Constant sweep time (in milliseconds). Editable
when Sweep Mode is CNST SWP; non-editable
otherwise.
Series 90
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GFK-1171
4
Using the HHP to Configure and Program the MFP
You can use the HHP to perform the following tasks:
D Statement List logic program development. The Statement List programming
instructions provide basic (boolean) instructions to execute logical operations such as
AND and OR, and many functions that execute advanced operations including
arithmetic operations, data conversion, and data transfer.
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
On-line program changes
Search logic programs for instructions and/or specific references
Monitor reference data while viewing logic program
Monitor reference data in table form in binary, hexadecimal, or decimal formats
Monitor timer and counter values
View MFP scan time, firmware revision code and current logic memory use
Transfer logic and configuration between the Hand-Held Programmer and a
removable Memory Card (IC693ACC303). This feature allows programs to be
moved between PLCs or loaded into multiple PLCs
D Start or stop the MFP from any mode of operation
HHP Configuration Screens
1.
The following screen (Main Menu) will be displayed on the Hand-Held Programmer
after the MFP has successfully completed its power-up sequence.
__1. PROGRAM
2. DATA
<S
This screen allows you to select the mode of operation of the HHP. The choices are:
PROGRAM, DATA, PROTECTION, and CONFIGURATION. (Use the Up and Down
cursor keys to scroll the menu selection display.) For information on using these modes
refer to the Series 90-30 and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402).
2.
Enter the configuration mode by pressing the 4 key then the ENT key from the Main
Menu screen.
The up and down cursor keys allow you to move between CPU configuration and
I/O configuration. The left and right arrows allow selection of parameters within
each of the configurations.
R0:01 PLC
KEY CLK: OFF
<S
The screen shown above shows the first configuration item which allows you to
change the Hand-Held Programmer Key Click feature. The default is KEY CLK:
OFF. This screen also indicates that the CPU function is located in rack 0 and slot 01
(R0:01). For compatibility with Series 90-30 PLCs, the different functions mimic the
rack and slot locations. The MFP module is always in rack 0. The fixed slot
assignments for the different functions of the MFP are shown in Table 4-2.
GFK-1171
Chapter 4 MFP Configuration
4-3
4
Table 4-2. Slot Assignments for HHP Functions
Slot
(as seen on HHP)
3.
Function
Fixed/Configurable
0
Power Supply
Fixed
1
CPU Parameters
Configurable
Pressing the up arrow key causes the next screen to be displayed.
R0:00 PWR SUP <S
I/O BASE:MFP
4.
Pressing the down arrow key causes the previous screen (shown below) to be
displayed.
R0:01 PLC
KEY CLK: OFF
<S
Use the left and right arrow keys to view the other MFP parameters for
configuration and the -/+ key to select the items within each parameter. Acceptable
values and default values for MFP parameters are shown in Table 4-1.
Storing the User Program Using the HHP
After editing a program, you must save it in nonvolatile flash memory. To do this,
perform the following steps:
1.
With the HHP showing a screen that resembles the following, press the WRITE key.
#XXXX
<S
<END OF PROGRAM>
The following screen will appear.
WRITE MEM CARD<S
PRG CFG REG
2.
Press the Ç key twice. The following screen will appear.
WRITE USR PRG <S
ONLY
3.
4-4
Press the ENT key. This will store the edited user program to non-volatile flash
memory. Note that this may take 5 to 10 seconds.
Series 90
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GFK-1171
4
When the program has been stored, the following screen will be displayed. (At this
point the program can be put into RUN mode.)
WRITE OK
4.
<S
To return to the program edit mode, press the ENT key.
Storing Configuration and Register Data Using the HHP
Because the user program is stored in non-volatile flash memory, only one copy is
maintained, even after you invoke the Write to EEPROM/FLASH function in
Logicmaster 90, or using the Hand-Held Programmer. However, separate copies of the
User Configuration and Reference Tables are maintained in the EEPROM/FLASH areas
of the flash memory.
To store the configuration and register data:
1.
From the END OF PROGRAM screen, press the WRITE key (see step 1 on page
4-4.)
2.
Press the Ç key until the following screen appears.
WRITE PROM
CFG REG ONLY
<S
3.
Press the ENT key. This will store the configuration and register data only. (Program data will not be stored.) When the store operation is complete, the WRITE OK
screen will be displayed.
4.
To return to the edit mode, press the ENT key.
Other HHP Functions
Clearing User Memory with the HHP
To clear user RAM (configuration, registers, user program and passwords), power cycle
or reset the Field Control station (including the MFP) with the following HHP keys
pressed.
M
CLR
and
T
To boot up without loading memory from the EEPROM, power cycle or reset the Field
Control station with the following HHP keys pressed.
LD
NOT
and
Booting up in Stop Mode without Clearing Memory
Power cycle or reset the Field Control station with the following HHP keys pressed.
RUN
NOT
and
GFK-1171
Chapter 4 MFP Configuration
4-5
4
Using Logicmaster 90 Software to Configure the MFP
Using the configuration software, which is included as a part of the Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro software package, you can do the following tasks:
D Specify a name for the system
D Configure CPU parameters
D Archive or save the configuration in a file
D Transfer configurations between the MFP and the programmer
The programming software portion of the Logicmaster 90 software package provides the
following capabilities:
D Develop ladder diagram programs off-line
D Monitor and change reference values on-line
D Edit a program on-line
D Transfer programs and configurations between the MFP and programmer
D Store programs and configuration data on disk
D Annotate programs
D Print programs with annotation and/or cross references
D Display help information
D Use symbolic references
D Cut and paste program fragments
D Print programs and configurations on various printers
The MFP parameters are shown in the following configuration screen. Acceptable
values, including default values, for these parameters are listed on page 4-2. The
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466) provides
details on the use of the configuration and programming software.
4-6
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GFK-1171
4
Using Datagrams
Datagrams are messages sent from one device on a bus to one or more other devices on
that bus. They can be sent from an application program in the BIU.
For general information about the use of datagrams, refer to :
Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1)
For information about the use of datagrams in a Field Control system, refer to:
Field Controlt Distributed I/O and Control System Geniusr Bus Interface Unit
User’s Manual (GFK-0825)
Placing the MFP in Stop/No I/O Mode
The MFP can be placed in the Stop/No I/O mode using the following datagram message
from the Genius bus.
Table 4-3. Format for Stop/No I/O Datagram
Byte
Value
Description
0
20 (hex)
Genius function code
1
21 (hex)
Genius sub-function code for TEST message
2
F6 (hex)
GBIU-specific test message code
3
18 (hex)
SEND_A_SEND_TEST_DATA command code
4
slot
slot to send the SEND_TEST_DATA command to
5
0
reserved
6
0
offset of data least significant byte
7
00
offset of data most significant byte
8
04
byte length of data
9
47 (hex)
password byte 1
10
45 (hex)
password byte 2
11
46 (hex)
password byte 3
12
01
put MFP in Stop/No IO mode
Datagrams Used for MFP/BIU Communication
Table 4-4. Datagrams Sent from PLC to BIU
Datagram
GFK-1171
Genius Subfunction Code
(hex)
WriteConfiguration
04
Begin Packet Sequence
06
End Packet Sequence
07
Chapter 4 MFP Configuration
4-7
4
Note
The Write Configuration datagram must be preceded by a Begin Packet
Sequence datagram and followed by an End Packet Sequence datagram.
Table 4-5. Format for Write Configuration Datagram
Byte
4-8
Value
Description
0
20 (hex)
Genius function code
1
4
Genius sub-function code for WriteConfiguration
2
1
slot for module (MFP should be slot 1)
3
1F (hex)
Smart Module Id
4
0
reserved
5
4
MFP module Id
6
0
reserved
7
3
reference types (3=inputs and outputs)
8
0
reserved
9
24 (hex)
byte length configuration
10
0
reserved
11
0
reserved
12
0
reserved
13
0
reserved
14
0
reserved
15
0 to 1F
hold last state default byte (see bit map on page 4-9)
16
0
reserved
17
2
number of input reference parameters
18
2
number of output reference parameters
19, 20
0 to 64
byte length number of inputs to BIU from MFP %Q table
21, 22
16, 18, 10, 12
BIU table to put %Q data from MFP, 16=%I, 18=%Q, 10=%AI, 12=%AQ
23, 24
0 to 255
byte offset from start of selected BIU table to put MFP %Q table data
25, 26
0 to 254
byte length of number of inputs to BIU from MFP %AQ table
27, 28
16, 18, 10, 12
BIU table to put %AQ data from MFP, 16=%I, 18=%Q, 10=%AI, 12=%AQ
29, 30
0 to 255
byte offset from start of selected BIU table to put MFP %AQ table
31, 32
0 to 64
byte length of number of outputs from BIU to MFP %I table
33, 34
16, 18, 10, 12
BIU table to get %I data to MFP, 16=%I, 18=%Q, 10=%AI, 12=%AQ
35, 36
0 to 255
byte offset from start of selected BIU table to get MFP %I table data
37, 38
0 to 254
byte length of number of outputs from BIU to MFP %AI table
39, 40
16, 18, 10, 12
BIU table to get %AI data to MFP, 16=%I, 18=%Q, 10=%AI, 12=%AQ
41, 42
0 to 255
byte offset from start of selected BIU table to get MFP %AI table data
Series 90
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GFK-1171
4
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
HOLD LAST STATE Default (Byte 15)
data to BIU %I table: 0=default to 0, 1=hold last state
data to BIU %AI table: 0=default to 0, 1=hold last state
data to BIU %Q table: 0=default to 0, 1=hold last state
data to BIU %AQ table: 0=default to 0, 1=hold last state
data from network to BIU %Q table mapped as outputs to module:
0=default to 1, 1=hold last state
data from network to BIU %AQ table mapped as outputs to module:
0=default to 1, 1=hold last state
Figure 4-1. Bit Map for Hold Last State Default Byte
GFK-1171
Chapter 4 MFP Configuration
4-9
Chapter
5
5 System Operation
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the operation of the MFP. It includes a discussion of the sweep
sequence, power-up and power-down sequences, clocks and timers, system security
through password assignment, and the I/O system.
PLC Sweep Summary
The logic program in a PLC executes in a repetitive fashion until stopped by a command
from the programmer or by a command from another device, such as a host computer.
This repetitive cycle, which includes the sequence of operations necessary to execute a
program one time, is called a sweep. In addition to executing the logic program, the
sweep includes obtaining data from input devices, sending data to output devices,
performing internal housekeeping, and servicing the programmer.
The MFP is different from a typical PLC in that it does not perform an I/O scan. This
function is performed by the BIU. Therefore, in a Field Control station, the sweep is
shared by the BIU and the MFP in a synchronous relationship, as shown in Figure 5-1.
Numbers 1–3 in the figure indicate the points in the sweep where the MFP and the BIU
are synchronized.
Note that Figure 5-1 shows the processes that occur during a normal sweep.
Interrupt-driven processes that could also affect the sweep, such as those initiated by the
programmer serial port or backplane driver, are not shown.
The following configuration items affect the MFP sweep:
I/OScan-Stop: Stop with I/O Disabled (No)
Stop with I/O Enabled (Yes)
Sweep Mode: Normal
Constant sweep (CNST SWP)
GFK-1171
5-1
5
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Start-of-sweep
Housekeeping
1
Input Scan
YES
MFP in run
mode?
BIU in scan
mode?
YES
Wait for data from BIU
to be used as inputs
Wait for group data
BIU –>MFP
NO
NO
Wait for reference
parameter data
Run programmer
window
Run programmer
window
BIU –>MFP
2
Run logic program
3
Output Scan
BIU in scan
mode?
YES
Wait for reference
parameter data
MFP–>BIU
NO
Run programmer
window
Wait for BIU
to scan data
from MFP to
be used as
outputs
Wait for group data
MFP–>BIU
Run programmer
window
Start Next Sweep
Figure 5-1. Micro Field Processor Synchronous Sweep
MFP and BIU Synchronization
Synchronization between the MFP and the BIU occurs at three points in the MFP’s
sweep. Synchronization is only necessary when both the MFP and BIU are running (the
BIU is scanning I/O). These points of synchronization are marked 1–3 in Figure 5-1.
5-2
1.
At the beginning of its input scan, the MFP waits for group data from the BIU (if any
data groups are defined) and then any data from the BIU defined in reference
parameters (if any output reference parameters exist).
2.
After receiving the input data from the BIU, the MFP solves its logic program.
3.
After solving the logic program, the MFP will wait for the BIU to request data from
the MFP defined in reference parameters (if any input reference parameters exist)
and then wait for the BIU to request any group data from the MFP (if any data
groups are defined).
Series 90
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GFK-1171
5
Sweep Time Contribution
Five items contribute to the sweep time of the MFP (Table 5-1). The sweep time consists
of fixed times (housekeeping and diagnostics) and variable times. The lengths of the
variable times depend on the duration of interrupt-driven processes, the size of the user
program, and the type of programming device connected to the MFP.
Table 5-1. Sweep Time Contributions
Sweep Element
Description
Time Contribution (ms)
Data Input
Program Execution
• Schedule start of next sweep
• Determine mode of next sweep
• Update fault reference tables
• Reset watchdog timer
Input data is received from BIU
User logic is solved
Data output
Communications
Services
Output data is sent to BIU.
Service requests from programming
device via a serial port interrupt.
Housekeeping
0.260
Determined by BIU
Execution time depends on the length of the program and the types of instructions used in the program. Appendix B lists instruction execution times.
Determined by BIU
Logicmaster 90: 0.108
HHP: 1.14
Normal Sweep Processes
Housekeeping
The housekeeping portion of the sweep performs the tasks necessary to prepare for the
start of the sweep. If the MFP is in the constant sweep mode, the sweep will be delayed
until the required sweep time elapses. If the required time has already elapsed, the
ov_swp %SA0002 contact is set and the sweep continues without delay.
Next, the timer values (hundredths, tenths, and seconds) are updated by calculating the
difference from the start of the previous sweep and the new sweep time. To maintain
accuracy, the actual start of sweep is recorded in 100 microsecond increments. The
remainder field of each timer contains the number of 100 microsecond ticks that have
occurred since the last time the timer value was incremented.
I/O Scanning
The input and output scan portion of the MFP consists of reading and writing data to a
data transfer buffer. The MFP’s backplane driver reads and writes information to this
buffer.
I/O scanning is configured by the BIU, which sends a configuration file that contains I/O
type and length data to the MFP. The MFP sends and receives data to/from the BIU
through the backplane on the IO terminal block.
The input and output scans are based on MFP references I1–I512, Q1–Q512,
AI1–AI128, and AQ1–A Q128. References used by the host PLC will map to these MFP
references. See the Field Control
Distributed I/O and Control System Genius Bus
Interface Unit User’s Manual (GFK-0825) for examples of I/O mapping.
t
Input Scan
If the MFP is in STOP mode and the I/OScan-Stop parameter is configured to NO, the
input scan will be skipped. (The BIU could still be scanning I/O.)
GFK-1171
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-3
5
Output Scan
If the MFP is in STOP mode and the I/OScan-Stop parameter is configured to NO, the
output scan will be skipped. (The BIU could still be scanning I/O.)
If the MFP is in STOP mode with I/O scan enabled (I/OScan-Stop configured to YES),
the scan is executed, but the outputs will hold the states of the most recent scan.
Program Execution
The application program is executed by the microprocessor on the CPU board. The logic
solution always begins with the first instruction in the application program immediately
following the completion of the input scan. Solving the logic provides a new set of
outputs. The logic solution ends when the END instruction is executed.
Many program control capabilities are provided by the Control Functions, which are
described in the Series 90-30/90-20 Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467)
and in the Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual for Series 90-30/90-20 Programmable
Controllers (GFK-0402). A list of execution times for each programming function can be
found in Appendix B of this manual.
Programmer Window
This part of the sweep is dedicated to communicating with the programmer. If there is a
programmer attached, the CPU executes the Programmer Communications Window as
shown in Figure 5-2. Support is provided for the Hand-Held Programmer (HHP) and
for other programmers that can connect to the serial port and use SNP.
The CPU performs one operation for the programmer each sweep, that is, it honors one
service request or response to one key press. If the programmer makes a request that
requires more than 6 milliseconds to process, the request processing will be spread out
over several sweeps so that no sweep is impacted by more than 6 milliseconds.
Start
Not
attached
Previous
status
?
Not
attached
No
Programmer
request
?
Hand-Held
Programmer
attached
status
Attached
Attached
Not
attached
Abort
operation
in progress
Setup for
Hand-Held
Programmer
Previous
Status
?
Attached
Key
Pressed
?
Yes
No
Yes
Process request
Setup for
Series 90
protocol
Send initial
display
Process key
Send new display
Stop
Figure 5-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart
5-4
Series 90
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GFK-1171
5
Deviations from the Standard Program Sweep
The user can select certain deviations from the Standard Program Sweep by
configuration or by program instructions. These variations are described in the
following paragraphs.
Constant Sweep Time Mode
In the Standard Program Sweep, each sweep executes as quickly as possible with a
varying amount of time consumed each sweep. An alternative to this is the Constant
Sweep Time mode. In the Constant Sweep Time mode, each sweep consumes the same
amount of time, which can be selected during configuration to be from 5 to 200
milliseconds. For more information on the constant sweep timer, refer to “Clocks and
Timers”.
MFP Sweep When in STOP Mode
When the MFP is in STOP mode, the application program is not executed. In this mode,
you can choose whether or not the I/O is scanned, and communications with the
programmer will continue. For efficiency, the operating system uses larger time-slice
values than those that are typically used in RUN mode (usually about 50 ms per
window).
BIU/MFP Mode Correlation
The MFP’s sweep manager always performs housekeeping and programmer window
functions regardless of the combination of BIU and MFP modes. The correlation of
modes between the BIU and MFP is shown in Table 5-2.
An interrupt from the backplane driver can occur at any point in the MFP sweep as the
result of a command from the BIU. When the BIU is in I/O scan mode and the MFP is in
Stop-No IO or Stop Fault mode, the data the BIU requests from the MFP will either be
defaulted or held last state, depending on the configuration of the MFP.
Table 5-2. BIU and MFP Mode Correlation
BIU Mode
GFK-1171
MFP Mode
Resulting MFP Actions
notscanning I/O
stop/noI/O
no additional actions performed
notscanningI/O
stop/I/O
scan
no additional actions performed
notscanningI/O
running
no additional actions performed
scanningI/O
stop no I/O
waits for data transfer (BIU to MFP)
waits for data transfer (MFP to BIU)
scanningI/O
stop/I/O
scan
waits for data transfer (BIU to MFP)
waits for data transfer (MFP to BIU)
scanningI/O
running
waits for data transfer (BIU to MFP), executes logic
waits for data transfer (MFP to BIU)
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-5
5
Software Structure
The Series 90 software structure supports program execution and basic housekeeping
tasks such as diagnostic routines, input/output scanners, and alarm processing. The
operating system also contains routines for communication with the programmer. These
routines provide for the uploading and downloading of application programs, return of
status information, and control of the MFP. The application (user logic) program which
controls the end process to which the MFP is applied, is called a control program.
Program Structure
Each control program is comprised of a single program block. This includes the user
program and some system overhead. The program block must be less than or equal to
6K words.
Data Structure
The MFP has nine data memories, each for a specific purpose. The following table lists
these memories.
Table 5-3. Memory Data Types
Memory Type
Discrete Input
Discrete Output
Discrete User Internals
Discrete Temporaries
Discrete System
Discrete Global
Register
Analog Input
Analog Output
User Reference
Data Type
%I
%Q
%M
%T
%S
%G
%R
%AI
%AQ
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
word
word
word
Note: The % symbol is used to distinguish machine references from
nicknames and is only used with Logicmaster 90 software.
5-6
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GFK-1171
5
Discrete Memory Reference Definitions
Type
Definition
Function
%I
Discrete reference input point
The state of the input as detected during
the last input scan
%Q
Discrete reference output point
The state of the output as last set by the
applicationprogram
%M
User internal
Internal coil used for boolean logic when
the result of a rung is only required to be
used later in the program as conditional
logic
%T
Temporary
Internal coil – similar to %M
reference except that it is
non-retentive
%S
System discretes (S, SA, SB, SC)
Include system bits used internally by the
CPU, fault bits for holding system fault
data, and reserved bits for future system
expansion
%G
Global
Used to access data shared among PLCs.
Alwaysretentive.
User internals (%M) are useful when the coil in a rung is only required to be used later in
the logic solution as conditional logic and not outside the PLC. The following example
shows %I0012 and %I0016 being used to set user internal %M0005, in a manner similar
to the use of a control relay in electromechanical logic.
|%I0012 %I0016
%M0005
|——] [——————] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————( )———
|
Temporary references (%T) are not saved across a power failure; that is, they are
non-retentive. %M and %Q memories are retentive unless used with a “normal” coil,
e.g., ––( )––, which is non-retentive. Retentive memory is backed up by a super cap,
which maintains the memory for approximately one week at 25_C.
System discretes (S, SA, SB, SC) include: system bits which are used internally by the CPU,
fault bits for holding system fault data, and reserved bits for future system expansion.
Many of the fault bits are referenced by the application program to determine which
faults exist in the MFP. Examples of these fault contacts are over sweep condition
(ov_swp), and low battery (low_bat). The first scan contact (fst_scn) also resides here.
Refer to Chapter 6 for more information on fault bits.
Transition Bits
Transition bits are discrete memory locations used internally by the MFP when solving
logic that involves transitional coils. This data is not accessible to the user. The MFP sets
and resets this transition data based upon changes in the associated status table.
GFK-1171
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-7
5
Power-Up and Power-Down Sequences
Power-Up Sequence
1.
The CPU runs self-diagnostics. This includes checking a portion of RAM to
determine whether or not the RAM contains valid data.
2.
The CPU creates a default configuration and waits for the BIU to initiate
handshaking.
3.
BIU-MFP handshaking takes place.
A. If the module feature set for the MFP is valid and the revision levels for the BIU
and MFP are compatible, the BIU configures the MFP reference parameters.
B. If the MFP and the BIU are not compatible, a LOSS OF MODULE fault is
generated.
4.
In the final portion of the power-up sequence, the mode of the first sweep is
determined based on CPU configuration (MFP internal parameters configuration).
Figure 5-3 shows the decision sequence followed by the CPU when it decides
whether to copy from flash memory or to power-up in STOP or RUN mode. In the
figure, text in bold refers to commands entered using the HHP. For details on using
the HHP commands listed in the table below, see page 4-5.
Command
clear
ld_not
ostop
HHP Key Combination
PressCLR] and M/T] simultaneously (using HHP)
Press LD] and NOT] simultaneously (using HHP)
Press NOT] and RUN] simultaneously (using HHP)
Power-Down Conditions
System power-down occurs automatically if the power supply detects that incoming AC
power has dropped. The minimum hold time is one half cycle.
5-8
Series 90
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GFK-1171
5
Start
True
Clear
False
False
Flash checksum
good?
True
Config. from
Flash?
False
False
True
RAM checksum
good?
True
ld_not
True
Config. from
RAM?
False
STOP mode
True
False
Copy config. to RAM
True
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Clear Flash
program
True
ostop
False
True
Power up in
STOP mode
False
True
Power up in
RUN mode
False
Battery voltage
low
True
False
True
Power down in
STOP mode
False
RUN mode
STOP mode
Figure 5-3. Power-up Decision Sequence
GFK-1171
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-9
5
Clocks and Timers
Elapsed Time Clock
The elapsed time clock uses 100 microsecond “ticks” to track the time elapsed since the
CPU powered-on. The clock is not retentive across a power failure; it restarts on each
power-up. Once per second the hardware interrupts the CPU to enable a seconds count
to be recorded. This seconds count rolls over approximately 100 years after the clock
begins timing.
Because the elapsed time clock provides the base for system software operations and
timer function blocks, it cannot be reset from the user program or the programmer.
However, the application program can read the current value of the elapsed time clock
by using Function Number 16 of the SVC_REQ (SerViCe_REQuest) Function.
Watchdog Timer
A watchdog timer in the MFP is designed to catch catastrophic failure conditions. The
timer value for the watchdog timer is 400 milliseconds; this is a fixed value which cannot
be changed. The watchdog timer starts from zero at the beginning of each sweep.
If the watchdog timeout value is exceeded, the OK LED goes off, the CPU goes through
its power-up sequence and the MFP is left in STOP mode with a watchdog timer fault
recorded.
Constant Sweep Timer
The Constant Sweep Timer controls the length of a program sweep when the MFP
operates in Constant Sweep Time mode. In this mode of operation, each sweep
consumes the same amount of time. For most application programs, the Input Scan,
Application Program Logic Scan, and Output Scan do not require exactly the same
amount of execution time in each sweep. The value of the Constant Sweep Timer is set
by the programmer and can be any value from 5 to 200 milliseconds. The default value
is 100 ms.
If the Constant Sweep Timer expires before the completion of the sweep, the previous
sweep was not complete, and the ov_swp fault is not set, the MFP places an over-sweep
alarm in its fault table. At the beginning of the next sweep, the MFP sets the ov_swp
fault contact. The ov_swp contact is reset when the MFP is not in Constant Sweep Time
Mode or if the time of the last sweep did not exceed the Constant Sweep Timer.
Timer Function Blocks
The MFP supports three types of timer function blocks in the Logicmaster 90 software:
on-delay timer, off-delay timer, and elapsed time.
Timed Contacts
Four timed contacts, each of which cycles on and off for a specified interval, are available
to the user: .01 second, 0.1 second, 1 second, and 1 minute.
5-10
Series 90
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GFK-1171
5
System Security
Overview
Security in the MFP is designed to restrict access to selected functions. The MFP
supports two types of system security: password protection and OEM protection. Both
types of protection can be accessed through the Status and Control portion of the
Logicmaster 90 software or the Hand-Held Programmer.
Password protection and OEM protection are described briefly here. Refer to the
Logicmaster 90 Series 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466) or
the Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402) for further details on the use of
these system security features.
t
Password Protection
Privilege Levels
There are four security or privilege levels in the MFP password system. The default level
(level 4), in a system with no passwords, allows read and write access to all
configuration, logic, and data memories. Levels 2–4 can be protected by a password.
There is one password for each of levels 2–4 in the MFP, and each password may be
unique. However, the same password can be used for more than one level. Passwords
can only be entered or changed using the Logicmaster 90 programmer or the HHP.
Passwords are one to four ASCII characters in length. The HHP only allows the ASCII
characters 0 to 9 and A to F.
The privileges granted at each level are a combination of that level, plus all lower levels.
The levels and their privileges are:
Level 1
Any data, except passwords may be read. This includes all data memories (%I, %Q,
%AQ, %R, etc.), fault tables, and all program block types: data, value, and constant.
No values may be changed in the MFP. This is the default level for a system with
passwords.
Level 2
This level allows level 1 privileges plus write access to the data memories (%I, %R,
etc.).
Level 3
This level allows levels 1 and 2 privileges plus write access to the application
program in STOP mode only.
Level 4
This is the default level in a system with no passwords assigned. This level, the highest,
allows levels 1–3 privileges, plus read and write access to all memories, and the
ability to display, set, or delete passwords for levels 1–3 in both RUN and STOP
mode (configuration data can written only in STOP mode).
GFK-1171
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-11
5
Privilege Level Change Requests
To enter or change passwords, the programmer must be in on-line mode and
communicating with the MFP. Entering or changing passwords requires access to the
highest level. If no passwords have been set up for the system, this level is automatically
available.
Note
Once passwords have been entered, they can only be changed by:
D Entering the correct password to access the highest-level privileges
D In the configuration software, by placing the master diskette in the
system disk drive of the computer and pressing the ALT and O keys. (It
is important to keep the original software master diskettes in a secure
location because this allows passwords to be overridden, .)
A programmer requests a privilege level change by supplying the new privilege level
and the password for that level. A privilege level change will be denied if the password
sent by the programmer does not agree with the password stored in the MFP’s
password access table for the requested level. If you attempt to access or modify
information in the MFP using the HHP without the proper privilege level, the HHP will
respond with an error message stating that access is denied.
When communicating over a serial link, a privilege level change remains in effect only as
long as communications between the MFP and the programmer are intact. There does
not need to be any activity, but the communications link must not be broken. If there is
no communication for 15 seconds, the privilege level returns to the highest unprotected
level.
When the Logicmaster 90 programmer is connected through the serial connection, either
the MFP or the Logicmaster programmer may detect a disconnect. The MFP detects a
disconnect of the HHP using a dedicated hardware signal. When the MFP is
reconnected to the programmer, Logicmaster 90 requests the protection status of each
privilege level from the MFP. Logicmaster 90 then requests the MFP to move to the
highest unprotected level, thereby giving the programmer access to the highest
unprotected level without it having to request any particular level. When the HHP is
reconnected to the MFP, the MFP reverts to the highest unprotected level.
OEM Protection
The OEM protection feature provides a higher level of security than password
protection and is used by an original equipment manufacturer to further restrict access
to program logic and configuration parameters. When OEM protection is enabled
(locked), the user has no access to the logic program, and read-only access to the
configuration. The OEM protection state is retentive across a power cycle.
Refer to the Logicmastert 90 Series 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual
(GFK-0466), and to the Logicmaster 90 on-line HELP screens for details on the use of this
feature.
5-12
Series 90
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GFK-1171
5
Diagnostic Data
Diagnostic bits are available in the %S memory that indicate a mismatch in I/O
configuration. Refer to Chapter 6 for more information on fault handling.
Flash Memory
The MFP provides flash memory for non-volatile user-program storage and for system
firmware. In addition, the Read/Write/Verify EE/Flash PROM with PLC User Memory
function, initiated from either the Logicmaster 90 software or the HHP, uses flash
memory for storage of the configuration and reference data. Because the executable
version of the user program is already resident in the non-volatile flash memory, a
separate copy of the user program is not maintained for the Read/Write/VerifyEE/Flash
PROM function. However, separate copies of the User Configuration and Reference
Tables are maintained in the EEPROM/FLASH areas of the flash memory.
In addition, it should be noted that editing the user program with the HHP uses RAM
memory for the edited copy of the user program. If you do not save the edited version
of the program to flash memory, the changes will be lost. See “Storing the User Program
Using the HHP” on page 4-4, for the key sequence for this procedure.
GFK-1171
Chapter 5 System Operation
5-13
Chapter
6
6 Diagnostics
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter provides a guide to troubleshooting the MFP and consists of two sections:
D Power-Up Diagnostics describes how to use the LED blink codes that the MFP
generates if the unit fails the power-up self-test described in Chapter 2.
D Faults and Fault Handling discusses how the MFP handles system faults. These
faults can be diagnosed and corrected using Logicmaster 90 software or the
Hand-Held Programmer.
GFK-1171
6-1
6
Power-up Diagnostics
If the MFP fails the power-up self-test (see page 2-4), it will generate an error message in
the form of an LED blink code.
Table 6-1. Power-up Diagnostic LED Blink Error Codes
Number of Blinks
6-2
RUN LED
OK LED
1
1
Flags or ALU failed
1
2
Bad registers
1
3
Bad stack mechanism
1
4
Bad stack memory area
1
5
DMA 0 transfer failed
1
6
DMA 1 transfer failed
1
7
DMA 2 transfer failed
1
8
DMA 3 transfer failed
1
9
Addr line fail
2
1
Timer 0 not counting
2
2
Timer 1 not counting
2
3
Timer 2 not counting
2
4
Timer 3 not counting
2
5
Timer 4 not counting
2
6
Interrupt vector RAM failed
2
7
Bad diagnostics memory area
2
8
Bad cache memory area
3
1
Bad system heap RAM
3
2
WDT (watchdog timer) timeout
3
3
XILINX test failed
9
9
Other error
Series 90
Error
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
6
Faults and Fault Handling
Faults occur in the MFP when certain failures or conditions that affect the operation and
performance of the system occur. These conditions may affect the ability of the MFP to
control a machine or process.
Fault Handling
The condition or failure itself is called a fault. When a fault has been received and
processed by the Alarm Processor software in the CPU, it is called an alarm. Faults are
recorded in a fault table and displayed on either the MFP Fault Table screen or the I/O
Fault Table screens in the Logicmaster 90 programming software.
More information on faults and fault handling can be found in the Logicmaster Series
90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual (GFK-0466) and the Logicmaster
Series 90-30/20/Micro90-30 Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467). For
information on error detection and correction for Statement List programs, refer to
the Series 90-30 and 90-20 Hand-Held Programmer Manual (GFK-0402).
Classes of Faults
The MFP detects three classes of faults: internal failures, external failures, and
operational failures. Following are examples of these failures.
D Internal Failures
Non-responding circuit boards
Memory checksum errors
D External Failures
Sequence fault
D Operational Failures
Communication failures
Configuration failures
Password access failures
GFK-1171
Chapter 6 Diagnostics
6-3
6
System Response to Faults
Some faults can be tolerated, while others require that the system be shut down. I/O
failures may be tolerated by the system, but may be intolerable by the application or the
process being controlled. Operational failures can normally be tolerated. MFP faults
have two attributes:
Fault Table Affected:
Fault Action:
I/OFault Table
PLC Fault Table
Fatal
Diagnostic
Informational
Fatal faults are recorded in the appropriate table, diagnostic variables (if any) are set, and
the system is halted. Diagnostic faults are recorded in the appropriate table and any
diagnostic variables are set. Informational faults are only recorded in the appropriate
table. Possible fault actions are listed in Table 6-2.
Table 6-2. Fault Actions
Fault Action
Response by CPU
Fatal
Log fault in Fault Table
Set fault references
Go to STOP/FAULT mode
Diagnostic
Log fault in Fault Table
Set fault references
Informational
Log fault in Fault Table
Fault groups, their fault actions, the fault tables affected, and the mnemonic for system
discrete (%S) points that are affected are listed in Table 6-3.
Table 6-3. Fault Summary
Fault Group
6-4
Fault Action
Fault Table
Special Discretes
SystemConfiguration Mismatch
PLC CPU Hardware Failure
Fatal
Fatal
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
cfg_mm
hrd_cpu
Program Checksum Failure
Low Battery
PLC Fault Table Full
I/OFault Table Full
Fatal
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
-
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_full
io_full
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
pb_sum
low_bat
ApplicationFault
No User Program on Power-up
Corrupted User RAM
PasswordAccess Failure
Diagnostic
Fatal
Fatal
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault table
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
no_prog
sy_pres
sy_pres
apl_flt
bad_ram
bad_pwd
PLC Software Failure
PLC Store Failure
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded
Fatal
Fatal
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
sy_pres
sft_cpu
stor_er
ov_swp
Unknown PLC Fault
Unknown I/O Fault
Fatal
Fatal
PLC Fault Table
I/OfaultTable
sy_flt
io_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
io_pres
Series 90
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GFK-1171
6
Fault Summary References
Fault summary references are set to indicate what fault occurred. The fault reference
remains on until the MFP is cleared or until the application program clears the fault.
An example of a fault bit being set and then clearing the bit is shown in the following
example. In this example, the coil light_01 is turned on when an over sweep condition
occurs. The light and the ov_swp contact remain on until the %I0035 contact is closed.
| ov_swp
light_01
|——] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )———
|
|%I0035
ov_swp
|——] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————(R)———
|
Fault Reference Definitions
The Alarm Processor maintains the states of the 128 system discrete bits in %S memory.
These fault references can be used to indicate where a fault has occurred, and what type
of fault it is. Fault references are assigned, with a nickname, to %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC
memory. These references are available for use in the application program as required.
The mnemonic for these discrete bits and a description of each bit is provided in
Table 6-4. Some discrete bits are reserved for future use.
GFK-1171
Chapter 6 Diagnostics
6-5
6
Table 6-4. Fault References
Reference
Definition
%S0001
fst_scn
Current sweep is the first sweep.
%S0002
lst_scn
Current sweep is the last sweep.
%S0003
T_10MS
0.01 second timer contact
%S0004
T_100MS
0.1 second timer contact
%S0005
T_SEC
1.0 second timer contact
%S0006
T_MIN
1.0 minute timer contact
%S0007
alw_on
Always On
%S0008
alw_off
Always Off
%S0009
sy_full
Set when the PLC Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from the
PLC Fault Table and when the PLC Fault Table is cleared.
%S0010
io_full
Set when the I/O Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from the
I/OFault Table and when the I/O Fault Table is cleared.
%S0013
prg_chk
Set when background program check is active.
%SA0002
6-6
Nickname
ov_swp
Set when the PLC detects that the previous sweep took longer than the time
specified by the user. Cleared when the PLC detects that the previous sweep did
not take longer than the specified time. It is also cleared during the transition from
STOP to RUN mode.
%SA0003
apl_flt
Set when an application fault occurs. Cleared when the PLC transitions from STOP
mode to RUN mode.
%SA0009
cfg_mm
Set when a configuration mismatch is detected during system power-up. Cleared
by powering-up the PLC when no mismatches are present.
%SA0010
hrd_cpu
Set when the diagnostics detect a problem with the CPU hardware. Cleared by replacing the CPU module.
%SB0009
no_prog
Set when an attempt is made to put the PLC in RUN mode when there is no
executable application program stored in the CPU. Cleared by storing an
application program to the CPU and putting the PLC in RUN mode.
%SB0010
bad_ram
Set when the CPU detects corrupted RAM memory at power-up. Cleared when
the CPU detects that RAM memory is valid at power-up.
%SB0011
bad_pwd
%SB0014
stor_er
Set when an error occurs during a programmer store operation. Cleared when a
store operation is completed successfully.
%SC0009
any_flt
Set when any fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables are cleared.
%SC0010
sy_flt
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the PLC Fault Table.
Cleared when the PLC Fault table is cleared.
%SC0011
io_flt
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the I/O Fault Table.
Cleared when the I/O Fault table is cleared.
%SC0012
sy_pres
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the PLC Fault Table. Cleared when the
PLC Fault Table has no entries.
%SC0013
io_pres
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the I/O Fault Table. Cleared when
the I/O Fault Table has no entries.
Series 90
Set when a password access violation occurs. Cleared when a password is
successfully used to gain a privilege level.
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
6
MFP Fault Conditions
The following faults have effects on system operation that are unique to the MFP.
PLC CPU Software Failure
Whenever a PLC CPU Software Failure is logged, the MFP immediately goes into a
special Error Sweep mode. No activity is permitted when the MFP is in this mode. The
only method of clearing this condition is to reset the MFP (i.e., cycle power).
PLC Sequence Store Failure
A sequencestore is the storage of program blocks and other data preceded by the special
Start-of-Sequence command and ending with the End-of-Sequence command. If
communication with a programming device performing a sequence store is interrupted
or any other failure occurs that terminates the download, the PLC Sequence Store
Failure fault is logged and the data areas being written to are cleared. As long as this
fault is present in the system, the MFP will not transition to RUN mode.
Program Block Checksum Failure
A fatal Program Block Checksum Failure will result if you replace the MFP in a Field
Control stick with an MFP that has a different ladder program. This feature prevents
unexpected I/O behavior that could result if MFPs are swapped.
A copy of the checksum of the ladder program that is loaded in the MFP is embedded in
the configuration file. When the BIU sends the configuration file, the MFP compares the
checksum in the file to the checksum of the ladder program currently loaded in the MFP.
If the checksums do not agree, a Program Block Checksum Failure fault is logged in the
fault table, and the MFP goes to Stop/Faulted mode.
To correct this situation:
1.
Perform either of the following steps.
A. Store the correct ladder program to the MFP.
or
B. Clear the the MFP’s memory (if you do not know what the correct ladder
program is).
2.
Clear the faults and transition modes.
The format of the configuration file that the BIU sends to the MFP is provided in
Table 6-5. An example configuration file is provided in Appendix C.
If a configuration is stored to the MFP from the network, you may not know what the
checksums should be. If this is the case, fill in 0s for bytes 26 through 29 of the
configuration file that is to be sent to the MFP. When the MFP sees 0s in these bytes, it
will fill in the checksums and request the BIU to read the configuration file so the BIU’s
copy of the configuration file will then have the correct checksums. In this special case,
the MFP will not go to Stop/Faulted mode.
GFK-1171
Chapter 6 Diagnostics
6-7
6
Table 6-5. Configuration File Format
Byte
6-8
Series 90
Definition
0
number of input reference parameters
1
number of output reference parameters
2,3
byte length of discrete input data (reference parameter 0)
4,5
%I table segment selector (reference parameter 0)
6,7
relative offset for reference parameter 0
8,9
byte length of analog input data (reference parameter 1)
10,11
%AI table segment selector (reference parameter 1)
12,13
relative offset for reference parameter 1
14,15
byte length of output command discrete data (reference parameter 2)
16,17
%Q table segment selector (reference parameter 2)
18,19
relative offset for reference parameter 2
20,21
byte length of analog output data (reference parameter 3)
22,23
%AQ table segment selector (reference parameter 3)
24, 25
relative offset for reference parameter 3
26
number of program checksums
27
additive program checksum
28, 29
LRC program checksum
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
6
Accessing Additional Fault Information
The Fault Table displays contain basic information regarding the fault. If more detailed
information is needed, a hexadecimal dump of the fault can be obtained by positioning
the cursor on the fault entry and pressing the Ctrl/F keys simultaneously. The
hexadecimal information will be displayed on the line directly below the function key
display.
Two faults, Flash Memory Alarm and Watchdog Timer Application Fault, are unique to
the family of Series 90 Micro PLCs, which includes the MFP. Refer to the table below for
descriptions and corrective actions for these faults. All other faults applicable to the MFP
are described in the Logicmaster 90 Series 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s
Manual (GFK-0466).
t
If you find it necessary to contact Field Service concerning a fault, you should be
prepared to tell them the information that is provided in the Fault Table and the
hexadecimal information you see when you press the Ctrl/F keys. Field Service personnel will
give you further instructions.
Table 6-6. MFP CPU Software Faults
Name:
Flash Memory Alarm
Error Code:
BAD_FLASH_OP = 32
Description:
The PLC operating system generates this fault when it detects an internal
flash device error during a flash write or erase operation.
Correction:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Field Service, giving them all the information in the fault table.
Name:
Watchdog Timer Application Fault
Error Code:
SFTWR_WD_EXPIRED = 2
Description:
The logic program execution time exceeds the watchdog setting of 400 ms.
Correction:
Modify program so time is not exceeded.
Technical Help
PLCHotline
GFK-1171
Phone numbers
1-800-828-5747(or804-978-5747)
Internet address
[email protected]
Fax number
804-978-5099
GE Fanuc Bulletin Board
Files on this bulletin board are provided by GE
Fanuc “as-is” and no warranties apply. The
phone number is 804-978-5458 (up to 19200
baud, 8 bits, no parity).
Fax Link
804-978-5824
Chapter 6 Diagnostics
6-9
Appendix A Software Instructions and Reference Types
A
section level
section
1 level 1
section level 1
figure_apfigure_ap
level 1 level 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level
table_ap
1 level 1
table_ap level 1
Instructions and Function Blocks
The MFP supports most 90-30 instruction functions and function blocks. Detailed
descriptions of the use of these instructions can be found in the Series 90-30/20/Micro
Programmable Controllers Reference Manual (GFK-0467), and the Series 90-30 and 90-20
Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual (GFK-0402).
Basic Instructions (Relay Ladder Contacts and Coils)
Type
Contact
Coil
Link
GFK-1171
Description
Basic Instruction
normally open contact
normallyclosed
contact
normally open coil
negated coil
set coil
reset coil
positivetransition
coil
negativetransition
coil
retentive coil
negated retentive
coil
retentive set coil
retentive reset coil
horizontal link
verticallink
––]
[––
Mnemonic
&NOCON
––] / [––
&NCCON
––(
––(
––(
––(
––(
&NOCOIL
&NCCOIL
&SLAT
&RLAT
&PCOIL
)––
/ )––
S )––
R )––
↑ )––
––( ↓ )––
&NCOIL
––(M)––
––(/M)––
&NOMCOIL
&NCMCOIL
––(SM)––
––(RM)––
–––––––
|
&SMLAT
&RMLAT
&HO
&VE
A-1
A
Note
The mnemonics listed for the functions in the following tables are
shown as they appear on the Hand-Held Programmer ’s display.
Timers and Counters
The following four function blocks are updated each time they are encountered in the
logic: timers by the amount of time consumed by the last sweep, counters by one count.
Description
Stopwatch timer
On-delay timer
Up counter
Down counter
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
TMR
ONDTR
UPCTR
DNCTR
10
13
15
16
Math Functions
Each math function can be used on Integer (INT) or Double Integer (DINT) data types.
Mnemonic
Description
Add
Subtract
Multiply
Divide
Modulo
Square Root
Double Precision:
Add
Subtract
Multiply
Divide
Modulo
Square Root
HHP Function
Number
ADD
SUB
MUL
DIV
MOD
SQRT
60
62
64
66
68
70
DPADD
DPSUB
DPMUL
DPDIV
DPMOD
DPSQRT
61
63
65
67
69
71
Conversion Functions
Description
Integer To BCD (16-bit integer to
4-digit binary coded decimal)
BCD To Integer (4-digit binary
coded decimal to 16-bit integer)
A-2
Series 90
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
BCD
80
INT
81
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
A
Relational Functions
Description
Equal
Not Equal
Greater Than
Greater Than or Equal
Less Than
Less Than or Equal
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
EQ
NE
GT
GE
LT
LE
52
53
57
55
56
54
DPEQ
DPNE
DPGT
DPGE
DPLT
DPLE
&RANG
72
73
77
75
76
74
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
AND
OR
XOR
NOT
MSKOMP
SHL
SHR
ROL
ROR
BITSET
BITCLR
BITTST
BITPOS
23
25
27
29
Double Precision:
Equal
Not Equal
Greater Than
Greater Than or Equal
Less Than
Less Than or Equal To
Range
Bit Operation Functions
Description
LogicalAnd
Logical Or
Logical exclusive Or
Logicalinvert
Masked compare
Shift bit left
Shift bit right
Rotate bit left
Rotate bit right
Set a bit to 1
Set a bit to 0
Test a bit
Locate a bit set to 1
GFK-1171
Appendix A Software Instructions and Reference Types
30
31
32
33
22
24
26
28
A-3
A
Data Move Functions
Description
Constant block move
Block clear
Bit sequencer
Shift register, word
Shift register, bit
Constant block move, integer
Multiple word move
Multiple integer move
Multiple bit move
Communicationsrequest
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
BMOVW
BLKCL
SEQB
SHFRW
SHFRB
BMOVI
MOVWN
MOVIN
MOVBN
COMRQ
43
44
47
45
46
38
42
37
40
88
Mnemonic
HHP Function
Number
ENDSW
NOOP
JUMP
MCR
LABEL
ENDMCR
DOIO
SVCREQ
0
1
3
4
7
8
85
89
Control Functions
Description
Terminate program execution
No operation
Nested jump
Nested master control relay
Target number for jump
Master control sequence end
Do I/O update*
System service request:
#13 Shut down PLC
#14 Clear fault tables
#15 Read last fault
#16 Read elapsed time clock
PID
PID – IND algorithm
PID – ISA algorithm
PIDIND
PIDISA
87
86
*The Do I/O function is not supported. Although you can store a DOIO or Fast DOIO
function block, it will have no effect in your logic program.
A-4
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
A
Table Functions
The array search functions supported by the MFP can be operated on by four different
data types (Byte, Word, INT, DINT). The array move function can be operated on by five
different data types (Bit, Byte, Word, INT, DINT).
Description
Search equal to
Search not equal to
Search less than
Search less than or equal to
Search greater than
Search greater than or equal to
Copy array source to definition
GFK-1171
Mnemonic
SREQ
SRNE
SRLT
SRLE
SRGT
SRGE
MOVA
Appendix A Software Instructions and Reference Types
HHP Function
Number
101 to 104
105 to 108
109 to 112
113 to 116
117 to 120
121 to 124
130 to 134
A-5
A
User References
Data in Series 90-30/20/Micro PLC programs is referenced by its address in the system. A
reference specifies both a memory type and a precise address within that memory type.
For example:
%I00001
%R00256
specifies address 1 in input memory
specifies address 256 in register memory
The % symbol is used to distinguish machine references from nicknames and is only
used with Logicmaster 90 software. The % symbol is not used with the Hand-Held
Programmer.
The prefix of a user reference indicates where data is stored in the MFP. References in
the MFP are either discrete or register data types.
Table 6-7. Range and Size of User References for the MFP
Reference Type
User program logic
Discrete inputs, internal
Discrete outputs, internal
Discreteglobals
Discrete internal coils
Discretetemporary coils
System status references
Reference Range
Notapplicable
%I0001 - %I0512
%Q0001 - %Q0512
%G0001 - %G1280
%M0001 - %M1024
%T0001 - %T0256
%S0001 - %S0032
%SA0001 - %SA0032
%SB0001 - %SB0032
%SC0001 - %SC0032
%R0001 - %R2048
%AI0001 - %AI0128
%AQ0001 - %AQ0128
%SR0001 - %SR0016
System register references
Analoginputs
Analogoutputs
System registers [
Size
6K words
512 bits
512 bits
1280 bits
1024 bits
256 bits
32 bits
32 bits
32 bits
32 bits
2K words
128 words
128 words
16 words
[ For reference table viewing only; may not be referenced in a user logic program.
References for Fault Reporting
The MFP monitors internal operations for either system or user problems called faults.
These faults are reported through the %S references and through an internal fault table.
Access to %S information is available through Logicmaster 90 software or with the
Hand-Held Programmer. For more details on faults and fault reporting, see Chapter 6.
A-6
Series 90
Reference
Nickname
Description
%SA0002
%SA0009
%SB0011
ov_swp
cfg_mm
bad_pwd
Exceeded constant sweep time
System configuration mismatch
PasswordAccess Failure
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
Appendix B Instruction Timing
B
The MFP supports many different functions and function blocks. This appendix contains
tables showing the memory size in bytes and the execution time in microseconds for
each function. Memory size is the number of bytes required by the function in a ladder
diagram application program. The execution times shown are as measured without the
BIU sweep enabled.
Two execution times are shown for each function:
Execution Time
Description
Enabled
Time required to execute the function or function block when power
flows into and out of the function. Typically, best-case times are when
the data used by the block is contained in user RAM (word-oriented
memory) and not in the the discrete memory.
Disabled
Time required to execute the function when power flows into the
function or function block; however, it is in an inactive state, as when a
timer is held in the reset state.
Notes
GFK-1171
1.
Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 6.0 of Logicmaster 90-30/90-20/Micro
software.
2.
Timers and counters are updated each time they are encountered in the logic; timers
by the amount of time consumed by the last sweep and counters by one count.
3.
For bit operation functions, L = the number of bits. For bit position, N = the bit that
is set. For data move functions, N = the number of bits or words.
4.
For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.
5.
Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
6.
JUMPs, LABELs, COMMENTs, and non-nested MCRs are included in the boolean
timing spec, which is 1ms/1K logic.
7.
Boolean contact execution times are 1.0µs for fast %I (%I1–%I64) references and fast
%Q (%Q1–%Q64) references. Boolean execution times are 1.2µs for normal inputs
and 1.6µs for normal outputs.
B-1
B
Instruction Timing
Execution Time
Group
Enabled
(µ sec.)
Disabled
(µ sec.)
Increment
Size
(bytes)
Coils/Relays
Coils/Relays
See note 7 on page B-1.
–
2
Timers
Off Delay Timer
30.4
38.4
–
15
On Delay Timer
Elapsed Timer
Up Counter
Down Counter
39.2
35.2
41.6
41.
31.2
28.0
40.8
41.6
–
–
–
–
15
15
11
11
Math
Addition(INT)
Addition(DINT)
Subtraction(INT)
Subtraction(DINT)
Multiplication(INT)
Multiplication(DINT)
Division(INT)
Division(DINT)
Modulo Division (INT)
Modulo Division (DINT)
Square Root (INT)
Square Root (DINT)
29.6
30.4
28.8
30.4
32.8
61.6
40.0
65.6
40.8
66.4
52.0
90.4
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
–
–
Relational
Equal(INT)
Equal(DINT)
Not Equal (INT)
Not Equal (DINT)
Greater Than (INT)
Greater Than (DINT)
GreaterThan/Equal
(INT)
GreaterThan/Equal
(DINT)
Less Than (INT)
Less Than (DINT)
LessThan/Equal(INT)
LessThan/Equal(DINT)
Range (INT)
Range (DINT)
19.2
22.4
19.2
22.4
19.2
22.4
19.2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
22.4
–
–
9
19.2
22.4
19.2
22.4
25.6
28.8
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
9
9
9
9
9
Counters
B-2
Function
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
B
Execution Time
Group
Function
Bit Operation
Data Move
GFK-1171
LogicalAND
Logical OR
Logical Exclusive OR
Logical Invert, NOT
Shift Bit Left
Shift Bit Right
Rotate Bit Left
Rotate Bit Right
Bit Position
Bit Clear
Bit Test
Bit Set
Mask Compare (WORD)
Mask Compare
(DWORD)
Move (INT)
Move (BIT)
Move (WORD)
Block Move
Block Clear
Shift Register (BIT)
Shift Register (WORD)
Bit Sequencer
Appendix B Instruction Timing
Enabled
(µ sec.)
Disabled
(µ sec.)
Increment
Size
(bytes)
32.0
32.0
32.0
27.2
68.0
73.6
78.4
77.6
36.0
35.2
25.6
35.2
92.0
95.2
–
–
–
–
7.2
6.4
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
13.06W+1.81B
13.66W+1.92B
14.26W+1.87B
4.15W+2.6B
–
–
–
–
12.86W+1.65B
25.38W+1.14B
13
13
13
9
15
15
15
15
13
13
13
13
25
25
32.0
42.4
32.0
53.6
27.2
83.2
42.4
40.8
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
19.2
4.56W
4.06W
4.06W
–
3.37W
0.176B
6.34W
–
13
13
13
9
15
15
15
B-3
B
Execution Time
Enabled
(µ sec.)
Disabled
(µ sec.)
Increment
Size
(bytes)
Array Move
INT
DINT
BIT
BYTE
65.6
72.8
98.4
61.6
5.6
5.6
4.8
5.6
7.13W
14.64W
5.14B
3.52B
21
21
21
21
Search Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.4
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
Search Not Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.4
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
SearchGreaterThan/
Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.4
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
Search Greater Than
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.4
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
Search Less Than
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.2
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
SearchLessThan/Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
42.4
46.4
41.6
4.8
4.8
4.8
2.90W
5.89W
2.35B
19
19
19
Convert to INT
Convert to BCD-4
DoI/O*
23.2
20.8
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
9
12
PID–ISA Algorithm
–
60.8
–
15
PID–IND Algorithm
–
60.8
–
15
143.2
66.4
66.4
27.2
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
–
–
20.0
8
–
8
Group
Table
Conversion
Control
Function
Service Request
#14
#15
#16
#18
NestedMCR/
Nested ENDMCR
*The Do I/O function is not supported. Although you can store a DOIO or Fast DOIO function, it
will have no effect in your logic program.
B-4
Series 90
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
GFK-1171
Appendix C Configuration File Format
C
If the BIU does not have a valid configuration for the MFP at powerup, it will obtain a
default configuration from the MFP. The configuration file for the MFP (and all other
smart modules) starts with the number of input reference parameters and the number of
output reference parameters, followed by the reference parameter data. For each
reference parameter, the order of data items is: data byte length, data table selector, and
finally, data offset. Reference parameters must be in the following order: %I, %AI, %Q,
%AQ.
Table C-1. Example Configuration File
GFK-1171
Byte
Value
Definition
0
2
number of input reference parameters
1
2
number of output reference parameters
2,3
32
byte length of discrete input data (sequence id 0)
4,5
16
%I table segment selector
6,7
2
relative offset from start of selected table
8,9
16
byte length of analog input data (sequence id 1)
10,11
10
%AI table segment selector
12,13
0
relative offset from start of selected table
14,15
2
byte length of output command discrete data (sequence id 2)
16,17
18
%Q table segment selector
18,19
8
relative offset from start of selected table
20,21
12
byte length of analog output data (sequence id 3)
22,23
16
%AQ table segment selector
24, 25
0
relative offset from start of selected table
26
0
number of program checksums
27
0
additive program checksum
28, 29
0
LRC program checksum
C-1
Index
A
Alarm Processor software, 6-3, 6-5
B
Backplane driver interrupts, 5-5
Baud rate settings, 4-2
Bit operation functions, A-3
Bits, transition, 5-7
Bulletin board, 6-9
Bus Interface Unit
configuring, 3-1
default/hold last state configuration,
3-10, 3-22–3-23
configuring, 3-16
Configuration
BIU, 1-6
default for MFP, 3-1
MFP, 1-6
using HHP, 4-3
using Logicmaster 90 software, 4-6
parameters for MFP, 4-2
Configuration and register data, storing to
flash, 4-5
Configuration file
example, C-1
format, 6-8
Connectors, 1-4
Constant sweep time mode, 5-5
Control functions, A-4
Conversion functions, A-2
CPU, features, 1-4
Byte Length, 3-22
C
D
Data move functions, A-4
Data structure, 5-6
Cable connections
Hand-Held Programmer, 2-5
work station interface, 2-7
Datagrams, 4-7
Stop/NoI/O, 4-7
WRITE CONFIGURATION, 3-2, 4-8
Catalog numbers
BIU, IC670GBI002, 1-1
Cables
IC690CBL303, 2-8
IC690CBL701, 2-8
IC690CBL702, 2-8
IC690CBL705, 2-8
Converter, IC690ACC901, 2-8, 2-9
HHM, IC660HHM501, 2-1
HHP, IC693PRG300, 1-3, 1-7, 2-5
HHP Memory Card, IC693ACC303, 1-7,
4-3
PLC, IC750MFP100, 1-7
Software, IC641SWP301L, 304J, 306F,
307F, 1-3
Software, Cable Kit & Manuals,
IC640HWP300, 1-7, 2-5, 2-7
WSI board, IC647WMI920, 2-7
Default, configuration for MFP in BIU, 3-1
Default/hold last state
BIU, 3-10
configuring with Group moves,
3-22–3-23
configuring with reference parameters,
3-16
Destination reference, 3-21
Destination slot, 3-20
Diagnostic data, 5-13
Dimensions, 1-7
Discrete memory reference definitions,
5-7
Do I/O function, A-4, B-4
E
Clearing memory, 4-5
Clock, elapsed time, 5-10
Clocks and timers, 5-10
Communications link, broken, 5-12
Compatibility, 1-3
GFK-1171
E–mail address, 6-9
Elapsed time clock, 5-10
Error detection and correction, power-up
self-test, 2-4
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
Index-1
Index
Examples
configuration file format, C-1
reference parameters, 3-4
Hand-Held Programmer
configuration screens, 4-3
useful functions, 4-5
Hexadecimal dump, faults, 6-9
F
HHP, Memory Card, 4-3
Housekeeping, 5-3
Fault handling, 6-3–6-9
Fault reporting, 1-7, A-6
I
Fault summary references, 6-5
Faults
Checksum failure, 6-7
classes of, 6-3
Flash memory alarm, 6-9
hexadecimal dump, 6-9
non-configurable, 6-7
PLC CPU software failure, 6-7
PLC sequence store failure, 6-7
reference definitions, 6-5–6-8
references, table of, 6-6
system response to, 6-4
Watchdog Timer Application fault, 6-9
Flash memory, 1-4, 4-2, 5-13
alarm, 6-9
saving configuration and register data
in, 4-5
saving the user program in, 4-4
Format
configuration file, 6-8–6-9, C-1
WRITE CONFIGURATION datagram,
4-8
Function blocks, A-1
Functional characteristics, 1-7
Functional description, 1-4
Functions, B-2
I/O mapping, 3-2
I/O scanning, 5-3
Indicators, 1-5
power-up sequence, 2-4
Input scan, 5-3
Installation, 2-2–2-3
grounding procedures, 2-2
programmer grounding, 2-2
RS-422 to RS-232 converter, 2-9
Instruction timing, B-2
Instructions, A-1
basic, A-1
Interrupt, from BIU, 5-5
L
LED blink error codes, 2-4, 6-2
LED indicators, 1-5
Levels, privilege
change requests, 5-12
defined, 5-11
Logic solution, 5-4
Loss of module fault, 5-8
G
M
GE Fanuc bulletin board, 6-9
Math functions, A-2
Grounding, 2-2
Memory, clearing, 4-5
Group data moves, 3-18–3-24
how to configure, 3-19
selective sweep configuration, 3-24
Memory allocation, 1-8
Memory size, A-6
Memory types, accessible to group data
moves, 3-18
H
Hand-Held Monitor, 3-1
Index-2
Micro Field Processor
configuring internal functions, 4-1–4-2
I/O function, configuring, 3-2
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
GFK-1171
Index
specifications, 1-7
Micro PLC, functional description, 1-4
Modes, correlation between BIU and MFP,
5-5
Move default screen, 3-22
N
Network mapping, 3-10
R
RAM memory backup, 1-4
Reference parameters
error messages, 3-17
examples, 3-4
HHM screen sequence, 3-14
how to configure, 3-13
mapping, 3-3
Reference types, 5-6, A-6
discrete memory, 5-7
References, user, range and size, A-6
O
OEM protection, 5-12
Relational functions, A-3
RS-422 serial port, 1-4
RS-422 to RS-232 converter, installation,
2-9
Output scan, 5-4
S
P
Passwords, 5-11
Scan
input, 5-3
output, 5-4
Phone numbers, 6-9
Security, system, 5-11
PLC sweep
software structure, 5-6
summary, 5-1
when in STOP mode, 5-5
Selective sweep, how to configure for
group moves, 3-24
Port, RS-422, 1-4
Series 90-30 PLC, compatibility with, 4-3
Power requirements, DC, 1-7
Slot assignments, MFP functions, 4-3
Power-down conditions, 5-8
Slot designations, 3-13
Power-up self-test, 2-4, 6-2
Software packages, 2-7
Power-up sequence, 5-8
Source reference, 3-21
Privilege levels
change requests, 5-12
defined, 5-11
Source slot, 3-20
Program structure, 5-6
GFK-1171
Sequence, power-up, 5-8
Serial port, 1-4
Specifications
functional, 1-7
memory allocation, 1-8
physical, 1-7
Program sweep
deviations, 5-5
summary, 5-1
sweep time contribution, 5-3
Stick, 2-2
Programmer window, 5-4
Super Cap backup for RAM memory, 1-4
Programming the MFP, Hand-Held Programmer, 4-3
SVC_REQ function, 5-10
Protocols, 1-1
Sweep time contribution, 5-3
Stop mode, Genius command for, 4-7
Storing the user program, 4-4
Sweep, PLC, 5-1
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
Index-3
Index
Symbol, %, A-6
T
Troubleshooting
Checksum failure, 6-7
OK indicator blinking, 6-2
PLC CPU software failure, 6-7
PLC sequence store failure, 6-7
RUN LED blinking, 6-2
Table functions, A-5
Technical help, 6-9
U
Timed contacts, 5-10
Timer
constant sweep, 5-10
system security, 5-11
watchdog, 5-10
Timer function blocks, 5-10
Timers and counters, A-2
Timing, instruction, B-1
Transition bits, 5-7
Index-4
User references, A-6
W
Watchdog timer, 5-10
application fault, 6-9
Weight, 1-7
WRITE CONFIGURATION datagram, 3-2
format for, 4-8
t Micro Field Processor User’s Manual – March 1996
Series 90
GFK-1171
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