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The MEM Difference
WHO’S MAKING MISSOURI WORKPLACES SAFER?
MASONRY SAFETY
www.mem-ins.com
1/09
These materials are provided for informational purposes only. Missouri Employers Mutual assumes no liability for the
use or sufficiency of the information provided. The applicability of this information to your specific workplace can be
determined only in consultation with your own legal counsel and/or safety professional.
Our Mission
We provide innovative, cost-effective solutions
employers need to create
safe, healthy and injury-free workplaces.
This guide is intended to explain in easily understood terms
the safe work practices contractors can utilize to eliminate
injury and assist in meeting some OSHA requirements.
This guide does not replace any requirements detailed in actual
OSHA regulations for construction, and it should be used only
as a companion to the actual regulations.
Vision
Our Vision
Safe, healthy and injury-free workplaces.
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Table of Contents
WorkSAFESM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Scaffolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
Fall Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Ladders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-32
Forklift Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-40
Manual Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Personal Protective Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Openings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48-55
Fleet Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Work Comp Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Tool Box Talks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Scaffolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Seat Belt Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Eye Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Fire Extinguisher Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Horseplay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Ladder Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Personal Protective Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Power Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Masonry: Sprains and Strains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Safe Attitudes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Safety Commitment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Construction Slips, Trips and Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Working with Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Cutoff Saw Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Working Around Rebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Selecting Rebar Safety Caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
WorkSAFE
6
A WorkSAFESM company is one that strives to create and maintain an injury-free
workplace as demonstrated through a systematic approach using sound safety
practices, accountability, training and resources.
The WorkSAFE System
consists of four critical components:
Management Commitment
Management’s commitment to
keeping the workforce safe
Education
All employees are properly trained
on how to work safely
Best Safety Practices
Consists of all those policies,
procedures, best practices and
equipment that encourage and
enable employees to work safely
Injury Management
Actions taken to reduce
the severity and cost of an accident
after it has occurred
The WorkSAFE System applies to all types
and sizes of accounts. Management
commitment must exist for the system to
work. The extent of education, best safety
practices and injury management tools
needed will depend on the hazard and
potential for loss.
To find out more about MEM’s WorkSAFE
System, call the toll-free safety resource
hotline at 1.888.499.SAFE (7233) to request
information or a visit from one of our Loss
Prevention Consultants.
• Regularly communicate with employees about workplace safety and health matters
and involve employees in hazard identification, assessment, prioritization, training
and program evaluation.
• Establish a way and encourage employees to report job-related fatalities, injuries,
illnesses, incidents and hazards promptly. Make recommendations about appropriate
ways to control those hazards.
• Employers must ensure that all employees have a safe work environment and
that the employees follow safety and health standards and company policies. This
becomes more challenging when the employer is a contractor and the work sites
continually change with each project.
WorkSAFE
Employer Responsibilities
• Employers should enforce safety and health standards along with the company’s
safety and health policies by periodically monitoring employee work practices. The
employer routinely conducts scheduled and unscheduled work site inspections and
addresses any reported or observed unsafe practices can accomplish this.
7
Injuries
Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries in the construction industry—in fact, half of all
work-related fatal falls in the United States occur in the construction industry. Buildings
and structures, scaffolds and ladders are the primary locations from which fatal falls occur
in the construction industry.
One of every five workplace fatalities
is a construction employee.
Struck by falling objects—20%
Average cost per injury = $42,232
X
Falls from ladders—16%
Average cost per injury = $14,224
Falls, all other types including
scaffolding—31%
Average cost per injury = $13,114
Lifting/material handling—10%
Average cost per injury = $27,330
8
*Based on MEM’s loss data 2002-2004.
A qualified person has a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing—
or by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated the
ability to solve problems related to the subject, the work, or the project.
A competent person can identify hazardous working conditions and has authorization
to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them. The competent person, who has
primary responsibility for supervising and directing all scaffolding erection, dismantling
and altering work, must:
• Know OSHA’S 1926.32 sub Part L requirements applicable to the types of scaffolds
used.
• Be able to identify and correct hazards encountered in scaffold work.
• Be trained in the structural integrity of the types of scaffolds used.
• Have the authority to promptly abate hazardous worksite conditions.
Scaffolds
Competent Person and Qualified Person
A competent person’s duties can be shared as long as each person is qualified to perform
the duty and has authority to abate hazards promptly.
9
Scaffolds
10
Only a competent person can:
• Determine feasible safe access for persons erecting and dismantling scaffolds.
• Inspect scaffolds and components for hazards before each work shift and after
any event that could affect the scaffolds’ structural integrity.
• Supervise and direct all scaffold erection, dismantling and altering work.
• Determine the feasibility of providing fall protection for each scaffold erection
and dismantling operation.
• Determine whether it is safe to work on scaffolds during storms or high winds.
• Determine whether scaffold components made from different metals can be used
together.
• Determine whether scaffold components made by different manufacturers can be
used together.
• Identify the cause and significance of a deteriorated scaffold component and
correct the hazard.
A scaffold is simply an elevated platform that supports workers and materials. Lay
boards across a couple of tall buckets and you have a supported scaffold—
but not a safe one.
Most scaffolds used for construction work are complex structures and workers need to
know how to erect, dismantle and work from them safely.
Unsafe scaffolds endanger workers in many ways.
• Components can break, collapse, or give
way.
• Planks, boards, decks, or handrails can fail.
• In some cases, entire structures have
collapsed.
• Even on sound scaffolds, workers can slip or
lose their balance, and without appropriate
protection, they don’t have to fall far to get
hurt.
• Scaffold accidents generally can be traced
to improperly trained workers or component
failure.
Scaffolds
The scaffold as a temporary work platform
11
Scaffolds
Scaffold Construction Capacities
Scaffolds must be able to:
• Support their own weight and at least four times the maximum intended load
applied to them.
• Unless otherwise noted in OSHA 1926 Sub Part L, scaffold components have to
meet the 4-to- 1 safety factor too, but only for that portion of the maximum
intended load applied to them.
• The maximum intended load for a
component depends on the scaffold
type and its configuration.
Note that scaffolds and components must
be able to support four times the maximum
intended load—not the rated load.
The intended load includes workers,
equipment and supplies.
The intended load should never exceed the
rated load unless the design is approved by
an engineer and the manufacturer.
12
Scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames and uprights must be on base plates and mud sills on
firm foundations.
This photo is a great example of WHAT NOT TO DO for
scaffold bases and sills.
• The concrete blocks are stacked six high.
• There are no base plates on some legs.
• Scaffold legs are bearing on unstable objects.
• There is improper/inadequate bracing.
Scaffolds
Scaffold Construction
This support is not adequate!
This support is good!
Base Plate
Mud sills
13
Scaffolds
Scaffold Platform Construction
The height of the scaffold should not be more than four times its minimum base
dimension unless guy lines, ties, or braces are used.
Each end of a platform, unless cleated or otherwise
restrained by hooks, must extend over its support
by at least 6 inches.
Improper
No cleats
14
Platform gaps. Platform units must be placed
so that the spaces between the units do not
exceed 1 inch—unless more space is necessary;
fitting around uprights with side brackets to
extend platform width. The maximum opening cannot exceed 9 1/2 inches. OSHA 1926.451(b)(1)(i)
Platform and walkway widths. Platforms
and walkways must be at least 18 inches wide.
If work areas are too narrow for 18-inch platforms or walkways, workers can use narrower
platforms, but they must be protected from fall
hazards by guardrails and/or personal fall-arrest
systems.
Scaffolds
Scaffold Platform Construction
OSHA allows 12-inch widths for ladder jack, topplate bracket, roof bracket, and pump-jack scaffolds.
OSHA 1926.451(b)(2) & 1926.451(b)(2)(ii)
15
Scaffolds
Scaffold Platform Construction
Front edge of platforms. The
front edge of a scaffold platform cannot
be more than 14 inches from the face of
a structure unless guardrails or personal
fall-arrest systems are used to protect
workers from falling between the structure and the platform. There are two
exceptions to this requirement:
(1) the front edge distance for out rigger scaffolds must be no more than 3 inches, and
(2) scaffolds used for plastering and lathing work can be no more than 18 inches from the face of a structure. 1926.451(b)(3)
A platform longer than 10 feet can extend
no more than 18 inches beyond a support
unless the excess length is guarded or can
support workers and material without tipping.
Overhang 10 feet or less
6-12 Feet
Overhang more than 10 feet
16
Platform lengths. A platform 10
feet or less in length must extend at
least 6 inches, but no more than 12
inches, beyond its support unless the
excess length is guarded or can support
workers and material without tipping.
6-18 Feet
Abutted planks. When platform
planks are abutted to create a long platform, each abutted end must rest on a
separate support. Abutted planks touch
end to end on separate support surfaces;
they do not rest on one another.
Direction changes. Any platform that
rests on a bearer at an angle other than a
right angle must be laid first. Platforms that
rest at right angles over the same bearer
must rest on top of the first platform.
Overlapped planks. Platform planks
overlapped to create a long platform must
overlap at least 12 inches over supports
unless the planks are nailed together or
otherwise restrained so they do not move.
Scaffolds
Working Safely on Scaffolds
This directional change is not at a right angle.
The planks that form the change need to be
laid first, to help prevent plank displacement.
This scaffold also has unsafe guardrails, in
that there are no midrails or toeboards, and
the toprail is held together with #9 wire. Also,
the toprail has a gap between the rail and the
platform.
Improper overlapping and support
17
Scaffolds
Working Safely on Scaffolds
Access to scaffolds. Employers must provide
all workers with safe access to scaffolds and scaffold
platforms. Workers must use ladders or stairways to
reach platforms that are more than 2 feet above or
below the access point. Do not use cross braces as a
means of access.
The competent person, designated by the employer,
must determine if safe access is feasible at each
stage of the erecting and dismantling process.
• Hook-on or attachable ladders must be installed
as soon as possible after scaffold erection begins.
• End frames of tubular welded frame scaffolds
that have parallel, level horizontal members
may be used for access.
• Cross bracing is not an acceptable means of access.
Don’t do this! Don’t climb braces to reach a scaffold platform. Use stairways or ladders to reach platforms more than 2 feet above or below the access point.
18
Erecting, moving, dismantling. Scaffolds must be erected, moved, dismantled,
or altered only under the supervision of a competent person. The competent person must
be on the worksite to direct and supervise all scaffold erecting, dismantling, altering, and
moving operations. Work must be performed only by trained, experienced persons selected
by the competent person.
Power lines. Be aware of electrocution hazards when
assembling, using, or dismantling scaffolds near power lines.
Minimum clearance distances:
• Uninsulated electrical lines: 10 feet
• Insulated lines more than 300 volts: 10 feet
• Insulated lines less than 300 volts: 3 feet
Scaffolds
Working Safely on Scaffolds
Call the electrical utility company for assistance.
NOTE: Because it may be difficult to determine if a power line
is insulated, or what its exact voltage is, the 10 foot rule should
always be applied.
Example of scaffold being built dangerously close to power lines
19
Scaffolds
Working safely on scaffolds
Scaffold inspection. Scaffolds and components
must be inspected by a competent person before each
workday and after any incident that could weaken them.
Defective parts must be immediately repaired.
Deformed bearer.
Damage to a welded frame
scaffold leg (excessive rust, bent,
etc.). This cannot be repaired
and should be destroyed.
20
Those who work from scaffolds
Those who erect/dismantle scaffolds
Critical scaffold issues
• Scaffold design criteria
• Scaffold erecting, disassembling, moving
and maintenance procedures
• Scaffold erecting, disassembling and
moving hazards
• Scaffold load capacities
• Falling objects
• Fall protection
• Material handling on scaffolds
• Scaffold load capacities
Scaffolds
Training Requirements
What they need to know
• How to use appropriate fall-protection
systems
• How to control scaffold hazards
• How to use scaffold walkways, platform
components, and access areas
• Maximum-intended and load-carrying
capacities of scaffolds
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hazards involved in erecting/dismantling
Erection/dismantling planning procedures
How to deal with electrical hazards
How to inspect components
Appropriate design criteria
Maximum-intended and load carrying
capacities of scaffolds
21
Scaffolds
Training Requirements
Those who work from scaffolds
Those who erect/dismantle scaffolds
Who can train them
Any person who has training and experience Any person who has training and experience
in the critical scaffold issues (above) and
in the critical scaffold issues (above), who
who can teach the issues to scaffold users can teach the issues to erectors/dismantlers,
and who has authority to control scaffold
hazards.
how often to train them
• Before they begin a new job
• Whenever changes at the worksite
present new hazards
• Whenever they fail to demonstrate skills
related to any of the critical scaffold issues
22
• Before they begin a new job
• Whenever changes at the worksite
present new hazards
• Whenever they fail to demonstrate skills
related to any of the critical scaffold issues
Avoid the Main Hazards of Scaffolds
• Falls from elevation
• Bad planking
• Scaffold collapse
• Getting struck by falling tools or debris
• Electrocution
Remember To:
• Use appropriate scaffold construction methods
– Erect, move or alter scaffold properly
– Protect from falling objects or tools
• Ensure stable access
• Use a competent person
– Train on scaffold construction and the hazards involved with scaffolds
– Inspect scaffold before each shift and after alterations
– Determine fall protection requirements
Scaffolds
Scaffold Summary
23
Scaffolds
Scaffold Safe Practice Checklist
Access
 Maintain a safe access to scaffolds and scaffold platforms.
 Don’t climb cross-braces to reach a scaffold platform.
 Use ladders or stairways to reach platforms that are more than 2 feet above or below the access point.
Components and connections
 Never use damaged scaffold components. Repair or replace them immediately. Make sure a competent person inspects the components before each work shift.
 Do not modify components. Use only manufacturer’s connection pins.
 Don’t mix components made by different manufacturers.
 Never use damaged wire rope.
Environment
 Watch for electrical hazards.
 Don’t work on slippery platforms or during strong winds.
Erecting, dismantling and moving
 Have only trained and experienced workers erect scaffolds.
 Never roll a scaffold while you are on it.
 Never use wood outrigger systems.
24
Inspection
 Inspect components, connections, planks, and structures regularly for hazards.
 Unprotected rebar should be capped.
Ladders
 Don’t use ladders for any reason on a standard scaffold platform.
Scaffolds
Fall protection and falling objects
 Match fall-protection systems with the appropriate type of scaffold.
 Make sure platforms are guarded to keep workers and equipment from falling.
 Don’t drop anything from a scaffold.
Leveling
 Keep the scaffold level, plumb and square.
 Don’t use bricks, blocks, barrels or other unstable objects to level a scaffold.
Platforms
 Don’t work on slippery platforms.
 Never use a stage that is too long or too short for the job.
 Planking must be sound and meet OSHA requirements.
 Don’t use makeshift methods to increase the working height of a scaffold platform.
25
INJURIES
Concrete and Masonry Construction
(1926.700-706) Top OSHA Citations 2005
Standard—1926
701(b)
225
Formwork—Capable of supporting loads
701(a)(1)
11
Masonry walls—Bracing
706(b)
7
Masonry walls—Limited access zone prior to start
706(a)(1)
26
Reinforcing steel—Guard by capping rebar
6
Fall Protection
Limited Access Zone and Wall Bracing
When a masonry wall is being constructed, employers must establish a limited access zone
prior to the start of construction. The limited access zone must be as follows:
• Equal to the height of the wall to be constructed plus 4 feet, and shall run the entire
length of the wall;
• On the side of the wall that will be unscaffolded;
• Restricted to entry only by employees actively engaged in constructing the wall; and
• Kept in place until the wall is adequately supported to prevent overturning and collapse unless the height of wall is more than 8 feet unsupported; in such case, it must
be braced. The bracing must remain in place until permanent supporting elements of
the structure are in place.
All masonry walls over eight feet in height shall be adequately braced to prevent overturning
and to prevent collapse unless the wall is adequately supported. The bracing shall remain
in place until permanent supporting elements of the structure are in place. Bracing needs
to be based on both dimensions and environmental conditions. Provide adequate bracing
so if there is a failure of one brace there isn’t collapse.
27
Falling Objects
28
Falling Objects
Workers on scaffolds must wear hardhats and be protected by toeboards, screens, guardrail systems, debris nets, catch platforms, or canopies when falling objects are a hazard.
Hardhats cannot be the only means of protecting workers from falling objects.
Persons working below:
If tools, materials, or equipment could fall from a scaffold and strike others, the area below the scaffold must be:
Barricaded or a toe board must be placed along the edge of the scaffold platform.
Paneling or screening must protect persons below when tools, materials, or equipment
are piled higher than the top edge of the toe board.
Keep materials and equipment (except masonry and mortar) at least four feet from the
working edge.
Ladders
Guidelines for Use
• Avoid using ladders with metallic components near electrical work and overhead
power lines.
• Clear scrap and material away from the base and top of ladder, since getting on/off
the ladder is relatively hazardous.
• Always face the ladder when climbing up or down and while working from it.
• Always face the ladder and hold on with both hands when climbing up or down.
It works best if you maintain 3 points of contact. The easiest way to do this is instead
of grabbing the rungs, slide your hands along the back of the rails, maintaining contact
at all times.
• Do not carry any object or load while climbing ladder.
• Keep your center of gravity between the side rails. Your belt buckle should never be
outside of the side rails.
• Keep boots/shoes clean of mud, grease or any other slippery materials which could
cause loss of footing.
29
Ladders
30
Ladder Safe Practices
Safe practice guidelines for ladder work:
• Select a ladder that’s correct for the job.
• For extension ladders, the ladder top must extend at least 36 inches above the access area it serves.
• Tie the ladder off at the top to prevent shifting or slipping.
• Inspect the ladder before using it. It should be dry, clean and undamaged.
• Use the four-to-one rule to determine the angle of the ladder. The base of the
ladder should be one foot away from the structure for every four feet between the
ground and the support at the top of the ladder.
• Protect the base of the ladder so that people or vehicles won’t strike it.
• Keep scrap and materials away from base and top of ladders, since getting on and
off the ladder is relatively hazardous.
• Crossbracing on the rear section of stepladders should not be used for climbing unless designed for that.
• Face the ladder and keep both hands on the side rails.
• Raise and lower loads with a hand line or hoist.
• Make sure metal ladders have steps and rungs with skid-resistant surfaces.
• Allow only one person to work from a ladder.
• Use a scaffold when two or more people must work together.
• Keep off the top steps of portable ladders.
• Keep ladders with conductive side rails away from exposed, energized equipment.
• Keep your center of gravity between the side rails. Your belt buckle should never be
outside the side rails.
• To erect long, awkward or heavy ladders get help to avoid overexertion.
• Pay attention to manufactured ladders warning markings and labels,
such as “CAUTION“ and “DANGER,” which are usually in
red or yellow.
• Manufactured ladders often have
safety labels, which give information on how to use the ladder
safely.
Ladders
Ladder Safe Practices
• Before you use a ladder, check its
rating to see if you have the right
ladder for the job.
• Be sure not to subject the ladder to
a workload greater than its rated
capacity.
• Always read manufacturer’s labels
and follow their recommendations.
• Ladders must be inspected by a
competent person for visual defects
periodically and after any incident
that could affect their safe use.
31
Ladders
Guidelines for General Use
There are many types of portable ladders, but they all receive one of four ratings, based
on their maximum working load (the maximum weight they can safely support).
Rating working load:
• Extra heavy duty (I-A) 300 pounds (recommended)
• Heavy duty (I) 250 pounds
• Medium duty (II) 225 pounds
• Light duty (III) 200 pounds
Before using a ladder, check its rating. And be sure not to subject it to a load greater than
its rated capacity.
32
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Forklift Trucks
34
Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks
Per the Associated General Contractors, 37,000 forklift accidents occur annually on jobsites.
Safely operating forklifts on jobsites requires constant awareness and good techniques to
prevent damage to the load, the forklift and most importantly all workers.
To drive a forklift safely you must know:
• How it works
• How to inspect it
• How to operate it
That means getting proper training and following the manufacturer’s recommendations.
All operators should be trained and certified on each type of forklift they operate.
The following best practices and tips are not a substitute for certified training.
Three factors influence a forklift’s ability to do its job:
• Rated capacity
–Top weight the forklift can lift. It is listed on identification plate,
load chart or operations manual.
–NEVER exceed the manufacturer’s recommendations.
• Stability
–Is the forklift’s ability to resist tipping forward or sideways?
• Load
–Determine the load correctly and keep the center of balance within the “stability
triangle.”
Forklift Trucks
Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks
35
Stability Triangle
36
Stability Triangle
Notes:
1.When the vehicle is loaded, the combined center of gravity (CG) shifts toward line
B-C. Theoretically the maximum load will result in the CG at the line B-C. In actual
practice, the combined CG should never be at line B-C.
2.The addition of additional counterweight will cause the truck CG to shift toward point
A and result in a truck that is less stable laterally.
Stability Triangle
Stability Triangle
37
Forklift Trucks
Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks
Inspect Regularly

Check carriage for broken or cracked weld points.

Lubricate to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Forks-crack free.

Check hydraulics
___For leaking fluids; loose fittings; damaged cylinders
___Fluid levels
___Mounting hardware on the cylinders

___Oil, coolant, fuel
___Check under forklift for signs of leaks

38
Check fluid levels
Check tires for excessive wear, or splitting of pneumatics, nail punctures; nuts/splits/
bulges and tightness of wheel nuts.
Check boom, frame structure and overhead guard for cracks or damage.

Check gauges.

Check brakes.

Check frame leveling function.

Raise forks to eye level, extend and retract telescoping boom.

Raise boom to maximum height.

Check steering in all modes.

Check horn, backup alarm and lights.


Where inspection finds that parts need replaced or machine needs repair, report it to the supervisor and get the forklift fixed before beginning operations.
Keep all inspection forms and repair records on file.
Forklift Trucks

39
Forklift Trucks
40
Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks Moving the Load

Operators must be certified and properly trained.

Follow manufacturer’s instructions.

Square up/center load, keep load stable and level.

Check boom angle indicator and boom extensions guide.

Never raise the load while moving.

Never exceed the manufacturer’s load requirements.

Stay aware of surroundings for overhead electrical lines; scaffolds, other equipment
and people. Take the needed time.

Always wear a safety belt.
Manually handling materials

When lifting objects, lift with your legs, keep your back
straight, do not twist, and use handling aids.
Seek help:

When a load is too bulky to properly grasp or lift.

When a person can’t see around or over the load.

When the load can’t be safely handled.

Attach handles to loads to reduce the chances of getting
fingers smashed.

Stack bricks in a manner that will keep them from falling.

Do not stack them more than 7 feet high.

Taper back a loose brick stack after it is 4 feet high.
Manual Handling
Manual Handling and Lifting
41
PPE
Personal Protective Equipment
To ensure the greatest possible protection for employees in the workplace, the cooperative efforts of both employers and employees will help in establishing and maintaining a
safe and healthful work environment.
In general, employers are responsible for:
• Performing a “hazard assessment” of the workplace to identify and control physical
and health hazards.
• Identifying and providing appropriate PPE for employees.
• Training employees in the use and care of the PPE.
• Maintaining PPE, including replacing worn or damaged PPE.
• Periodically reviewing, updating and evaluating the effectiveness of the PPE program.
In general, employees should:
• Properly wear PPE.
• Attend training sessions on PPE.
• Care for, clean and maintain PPE.
• Inform a supervisor of the need to repair or replace PPE.
Hazards and work situations where PPE may be required:
• Utilize full face shield while chipping.
• Use full face shield when sawing and cutting.
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• Use respirator when sawing.
• Use respirator when mixing.
• For loads with sharp or rough edges, wear gloves or other hand and forearm
protection.
• When loads are heavy or bulky, wear steel-toed safety shoes to prevent foot
injuries if the load is dropped.
PPE
Personal Protective Equipment
43
Openings
44
Floor and Wall Openings
Use at least one of the following whenever employees are exposed to a fall of 6 feet or
more above a lower level.
Floor hole
• Guardrail Systems
covers must
Hole
support at
• Safety Net Systems
Cover
least twice the
• Personal Fall Arrest Systems
weight of all
• Cover or guard floor holes as soon
employees,
equipment
as they are created during new
and materials
construction.
2 times the intended load.
that may be
• For existing structures, survey the site
placed on the
before working and continually audit
cover at any
one time.
as work continues. Guard or cover
any openings or holes immediately.
• Construct all floor hole covers so they will effectively support two times the weight of
employees, equipment and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any one
time.
• In general, it is better to use fall prevention systems, such as safety nets or fall arrest
devices, because they provide more positive safety means.
Did you Know: Falls From elevation account for one
third of all deaths in construction?
Improperly Covered
Openings
Floor and Wall Openings
if no cover, guard with a guardrail
45
Housekeeping
46
Housekeeping
• Housekeeping occurs constantly on the job, not just once a week or at the end of the
project.
• Everyone does housekeeping, not just laborers.
• Keep storage areas free from accumulated materials that cause tripping, fires or
explosions, or that may contribute to harboring rats and pets.
• Keep debris cleared from work surfaces, passages and stairs.
• Route air hoses, extension cords, welding leads and power cords out of travel paths.
• Sufficient waste or trash containers should be provided, used and emptied when
appropriate.
• Remove all scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish from the immediate work area
as work progresses.
Material Storage
Material Storage
• Designate specific material storage areas on the jobsite and stage materials at storage areas to ease and facilitate the moving and transferring of materials/supplies to
the production work area.
—Plan the way materials are to be taken from a pile or stack at the time materials
are delivered.
• Secure materials stored in tiers by stacking, racking, blocking or interlocking to prevent them from falling.
—Brick stacks should not be over 7 feet high, when over 4 feet high taper back.
—Masonry stacks over 6 feet high taper back.
—Surplus materials should be returned to the stockpile
• Store flammable materials in closed containers, prohibit smoking in flammable liquid
storage areas.
• Keep all solvent waste, oily rags and flammable liquids in fire resistant covered containers until removed.
• Incompatible chemical products (which may cause hazardous reaction if they come in
contact) should not be stored together.
47
Hazard Info
48
Hazard Information for Construction Employees
What is crystalline silica?
Crystalline silica is a basic component of soil, sand, granite, and many other minerals.
Quartz is the most common form of crystalline silica. Material may become respirable size
particles when workers chip, cut, drill, or grind objects that contain crystalline silica.
What are the hazards of crystalline silica?
Silica exposure remains a serious threat to nearly 2 million U.S. workers. The seriousness
of the health hazards associated with silica exposure is demonstrated by the fatalities
and disabling illnesses that continue to occur in sandblasters and rock drillers. Crystalline
silica has been classified as a human lung carcinogen. Additionally, breathing crystalline
silica dust can cause silicosis, which in severe cases can be disabling, or even fatal.
The respirable silica dust enters the lungs and causes the formation of scar tissue, thus
reducing the lungs’ ability to take in oxygen. There is no cure for silicosis. Since silicosis
affects lung function, it makes one more susceptible to lung infections like tuberculosis.
In addition, smoking causes lung damage and adds to the damage caused by breathing
silica dust.
Silicosis is classified into three types:
Chronic/classic silicosis: the most common, occurs after 15-20 years of moderate
to low exposures to respirable crystalline silica.
Symptoms associated with chronic silicosis may or may not be obvious; therefore,
workers need to have a chest x-ray to determine if there is lung damage. As the
disease progresses, the worker may experience shortness of breath upon exercising
and have clinical signs of poor oxygen/carbon dioxide exchange.
Hazard Info
Hazard Information for Construction Employees
Accelerated silicosis: can occur after 5-10 years of high exposures to respirable
crystalline silica. Symptoms include severe shortness of breath, weakness and weight
loss.
Acute silicosis: occurs after a few months or as long as 2 years following exposures
to extremely high concentrations of respirable crystalline silica. Symptoms include
severe disabling shortness of breath, weakness and weight loss which leads to death.
49
Health Hazard
Health Hazard Information for Construction Employees
What can be done to protect against exposures to crystalline silica?
• Replace crystalline silica materials with safer substitutes whenever possible. 
• Provide engineering or administrative controls where feasible; such as local exhaust
ventilation, and blasting cabinets. Use protective equipment or other protective measures where necessary to reduce exposures below the Permissible Exposure Level.
• Use all available work practices to control dust exposures, such as water sprays.
• Wear only a N95 NIOSH certified respirator, if respirator protection is required. Do
not alter the respirator. Do not wear a tight-fitting respirator with a beard or mustache that prevents a good seal between the respirator and the face.
• Wear only a Type CE abrasive-blast supplied-air respirator for abrasive blasting.
• Wear disposable or washable work clothes and shower if facilities are available.
Vacuum the dust from your clothes or change into clean clothing before leaving the
work site.
• Participate in training, exposure monitoring, and health screening and surveillance
programs to monitor any adverse health effects caused by crystalline silica exposures.
• Be aware of the operations and job tasks creating crystalline silica exposures in your
workplace environment and know how to protect workers.
50
• Be aware of the health hazards related to exposures to crystalline silica. Smoking
adds to the lung damage caused by silica exposures.
• Do not eat, drink, smoke, or apply cosmetics in areas where crystalline silica dust is
Health Hazard
Health Hazard Information for Construction Employees
present. Wash hands and face outside of dusty areas before performing any of these
activities.
•Remember: If it’s silica, it’s not just dust.
51
Weather Hazards
52
Health Hazard Information for Construction Employees
HEAT EXHAUSTION
What happens to the body?
Headaches, dizziness or light-headedness, weakness, mood changes, irritability or
confusion, feeling sick to your stomach, vomiting, fainting, decreased and darkcolored urine and pale, clammy skin.
What should be done?
• Move the person to a cool, shaded area. Don’t leave the person alone. If the person
is dizzy or light-headed, lay him on his back and raise his legs about 6-8 inches. If
the person is sick to his stomach, lay him on his left side.
• Loosen and remove heavy clothing.
• Have the person drink some cool water (a small cup every 15 minutes) if he is not
feeling sick to his stomach.
• Try to cool the person by fanning him. Cool the skin with a cool mist of water or wet
cloth.
• If the person does not feel better in a few minutes, call for emergency help
(ambulance or 911).
If heat exhaustion is not treated, the illness may advance to heat stroke.
HEAT STROKE
What happens to the body?
Dry, pale skin (no sweating); hot, red skin (looks like a sunburn); mood changes;
irritability; confusion and not making any sense; seizures or fits; and collapse
(will not respond).
What should be done?
• Call for emergency help (ambulance or 911).
• Move the person to a cool, shaded area. Don’t leave the person alone. Lay him on
his back and if he is having seizures, remove objects close to him so he won’t hit
them. If the person is sick to his stomach, lay him on his left side.
• Remove heavy and outer clothing.
• Have the person drink some cool water (a small cup every 15 minutes) if he is alert
enough to drink anything and not feeling sick to his stomach.
• Try to cool the person by fanning him. Cool the skin with a cool mist of
water, wet cloth or wet sheet.
• If ice is available, place ice packs in armpits and groin area.
Weather Hazards
Health Hazard Information for Construction Employees
53
Weather Hazards
54
Extreme Weather Conditions
Storms and high winds
Working on a scaffold is prohibited during storms or high winds unless a competent
person has determined that it is safe to be on the scaffold and workers are protected
by personal fall-arrest systems or wind screens.
Reference OSHA 1926.451 (f)(12)
Slippery scaffolds
Working on a scaffold coated with snow, ice, or other slippery material is prohibited
unless it is necessary to remove the slippery material.
Reference OSHA 1926.451 (f)(8)
Weather Hazards
Health Hazard Information for Construction Employees
Be aware of the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke when you’re working in hot, humid
conditions. The table below shows the risks of exposure to high temperature and high humidity.
■ Extreme Danger: Heat stroke highly likely ■ Danger: Muscle cramps, and/or heat exhaustion likely
■ Extreme caution: Muscle cramps and/or heat exhaustion possible ■ Caution: Fatigue possible
55
Fleet Safety
56
Contractor Incidental Fleet Safety
Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of work-related fatalities. Each year
approximately 44,000 people die in work-related motor vehicle accidents. Another
2.3 million people incur disabling injuries.
A Fleet Safety Program* is intended to assist in controlling human suffering and economic
losses resulting from the improper operation and use of company vehicles. Vehicle safety
programs are important to any fleet operation regardless of size or function. The following
elements should be given consideration in developing a contractor fleet safety program.
For a complete review of MEM’s “Fleet Safety Program,” access MEM’s electronic safety
resources via iNet.
*Reference: MEM Management Information Sheet, “Fleet Safety Program.”
Management Commitment
Driver selection/screening/qualification
• Federal/state motor carrier regulations
• Motor vehicle records (MVR)
• Driver interview
• Driver tests
• Driver road tests
Driver Safety Policies
• General safety policies
• Seat Belt policy
• Cell phone
Driver Training
• New employee orientation
• On-going
• Remedial
Driver Supervision
• Motivation program
• Road observation program
Vehicles
• Selection
• Preventive maintenance
• Inspections
Accident Reporting, Investigation
and Review
• Incident Reporting
• Incident Review
• Analyze Trends
Fleet Safety
Contractor Incidental Fleet Safety
57
Work Comp Law
Missouri Workers Compensation Law Reform
August 28, 2005
Safety Rules
• If an employee has an injury caused by the employee’s failure to use safety devices
provided by the employer or failure to obey a reasonable safety rule of the employer,
the compensation and death benefits are reduced at least 25 percent but not more
than 50 percent. (Section 287.120.5 RSMo)
Drug/Alcohol Policy
• If the employee fails to obey any rule or policy adopted by the employer of a drug-free
workplace, for the use of alcohol or non-prescribed controlled drugs in the workplace,
and the employee sustains an injury while using alcohol or non-prescribed drugs,
the compensation and death benefits shall be reduced by 50 percent.
• If the employee’s use of alcohol or non-prescribed controlled drugs in violation of the
employer’s rule or policy is the proximate cause of the employee’s injury, the
benefits for compensation payable for death or disability are forfeited.
• If the employer does request a drug test of the employee when an injury occurs and
the employee refuses to take the test, the employee forfeits all workers’ compensation benefits.
(Section 287.120.6 RSMo)
58
Work Comp Law
Missouri Workers Compensation Law Reform
Information regarding the set up of the programs and sample programs can be found at:
http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/demand/dfmanual/01adf.htm
DEA Website-www.dea.gov
www.mem-ins.com
59
lksfg’
MEM’s WorkSAFE System Education component places emphasis on training all employees
on how to work safely.
Specifically, employees need to know:
• About workplace hazards to which they may be exposed,
• How to recognize hazards, and
• How to minimize their exposure.
The best way to educate employees and for them to learn is through training. The following
Tool Box Talks are designed as a five- to 15-minute pre-work shift discussion that covers
a particular safety topic and can be delivered on the jobsite during a tailgate session.
The talks are related to the workplace hazards and exposures addressed in this guide.
Education
Tool Box Talks
61
Tool Box Talks
62
Tool Box Talks are discussions that cover a specific safety topic. They are generally held prior
to a shift, last five to 15 minutes and are designed to heighten safety awareness and provide
basic safety information on the topic. More detailed training should be done at orientation,
on the job or other regularly scheduled training.
How often should Tool Box Talks be presented?
This will depend on site conditions and safety concerns. On a large construction project it
may be necessary to give the same Tool Box Talk several times to ensure all subcontractors
are addressed. On smaller projects one session could address all personnel on site. It is
recommended that Tool Box Talks be presented at least weekly to all employees. When
possible, this should be at a routine time and day to establish it as a good safety habit.
What Tool Box Talk should be used?
The purpose of the Tool Box Talk is to raise
safety awareness of a particular topic. Ideally,
corresponding the talk with location activities
would provide the maximum impact to keep
the topic fresh in employee’s thoughts. A Tool
Box Talk can be presented to correspond with
a recent near miss or accident.
Summary
Tool Box Talks provide an effective method of
reinforcing and communicating a safety
message to employees. The result will include
a potential reduction in injury accidents and
even save a life.
How to conduct a Tool Box Talk:
1. Read or paraphrase the introduction
of the subject to the group.
2. Review the WorkSAFE tip items
with employees.
3. Discuss how the topic is important
to the health and safety of all
employees.
4. Note any concerns or recommendations for improvements.
5. Record talk attendance and date
presented.
A fall from a scaffold from a height as little as six feet can be fatal or lead to lifelong disabilities. Scaffold accidents are generally the result
of improper set up or component failure.
TIPS
Scaffold Base
• Set on firm, level ground.
• Make sure system is level and plumb.
• Use adjustable screw jacks with mud sills. Legs alone can
sink in soil or cut through other mud sill materials (bricks,
wood, etc.)
• DO NOT use hollow concrete blocks, they can break and
cause scaffold to shift. Use heavy timbers to level scaffold.
• Protect scaffold from settling when set up on frozen soil
that can thaw throughout the day.
• Make sure to inspect for defects or bends in legs and
uprights.
Coupling and Pinning
• DO NOT make alterations to cross braces or couplers.
• DO NOT mix brands of cross bracing.
• Make sure couplers are pinned in place, DO NOT use wire
or nails.
Tool Box Talks
SCAFFOLDS
• Always inspect couplings for cracks, bends or cross braces that
do not match up.
Planking
• Planking must be certified, graded plank material with
certification stamp. Common lumber is less sturdy and can
bend, or deflect or break.
• Fabricated aluminum planks are acceptable.
• Wood planks should be inspected for knots, splits, cuts,
burns, etc., that weaken it.
• Each level of the scaffold should be fully planked with no
more than a one inch gap between planks.
• Planking must overlap on a scaffold support with six inches
on each side of the support, resulting in the total overlap, of
the two planks being 12”.
• Planking that overhangs a support should range from 6”12” if plank is 10’ or less in length. If plank is more than 10’
long it can overhang up to 18”.
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Tool Box Talks
64
• Excessive overhangs can be stepped on and cause the plank
to tip.
• DO NOT climb the frame of end supports unless it has a
built-in ladder of at least 11-1/2” wide. Otherwise access to
each level should be by means of a ladder.
• DO NOT paint or coat plank boards. The coatings can hide
the defects such as cracks or knots.
Fall Protection
• After 10 vertical feet a fall arrest system should be worn or
safety railing put in place.
• Top railing required at 35”- 45” with a mid rail and a toe
board to prevent materials from falling on employees
working below.
improper mud sill
• Rails should enclose all sides except the building side if the
gap to the building is 14” or less.
• Scaffolds must be tied to the building structure every 25’ of
height and every 30’ of length.
Other Safety Concerns
• Avoid working in high winds, icy or slick conditions and
during lightning.
• Set loads over supports. Placing loads on the middle of
planking can cause it to deflect or break.
• Avoid setting scaffold near power lines or building electrical
service entrance.
PLANK stamp PLANK defect
load placement
Tool Box Talks
HOUSEKEEPING
Good housekeeping is the basis of accident prevention. All employees should be concerned about housekeeping and actively work to keep
the site clean and hazard-free. Poor housekeeping leads to accidents, reduces productivity, increases scrap and creates a poor image of the
worksite. Tripping over materials is a common workplace accident. Always put away materials or tools when not in use. Store materials in
a designated area, away from the employee and machinery travel path. Foremost, clean up trash even if you didn’t create it.
TIPS
• To have good housekeeping everyone must participate. Establish cleanup breaks throughout the day instead of
waiting for the end of the day.
• Designate a person to keep a particular area clean.
• Have enough trash receptacles for the location with
reasonable travel distance. Empty regularly.
• Start with good lighting throughout the site. Poor light is
a critical factor in tripping accidents
• Conduct regular housekeeping inspections.
• Have a designated break area. Throw trash in garbage
cans to keep the area clean.
• Keep travel paths clear of trash, mud, ice or snow.
• Store tools with sharp edges turned away from employees.
• Please pick up items you might see lying on the floor.
• Remove or bend over all nails protruding from exposed
surfaces.
• Route air hoses, extension cords, welding leads and power
lines out of travel paths.
• Create a designated smoking area on the site with a
cigarette receptacle.
• Items placed on elevated walkways or platforms should be
protected from falling by use of toe-boards.
• Storage should be on neatly stacked level surfaces.
• All chemical or material spills should be cleaned up immediately.
• A spill kit should be placed within a reasonable travel
distance and be easily visible.
Remember TO WorkSAFE AND MAINTAIN GOOD HOUSEKEEPING.
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Tool Box Talks
66
Topic: __________________________________ Discussion:____________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
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________________________________________
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________________________________________
________________________________________
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Follow-up Items:_ _____________________
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Attendees:_____________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________ Instructor:____________________________
Date of Talk:___________________________ The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) states that research has shown that lap/shoulder belts, when used properly,
reduce the risk of fatal injury to front-seat car passenger by 45 percent and the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. Light truck
occupants reduce the risk of fatal injury by 60 percent if seat belts are worn properly. Rural Americans have a greater risk of being injured or
killed in a traffic crash than people who live in the urban areas. The fatality rates in rural areas are double the rate in urban areas.
These compelling facts should be reason enough to wear seat belts, however, all states’ laws require seat belt use in some form. What happens during a collision?
The car goes through three stages of a collision. When passengers do not wear a seat belt, the following incidents occur:
1. First the car is hit, crashes and usually comes to a stop. The crushing or impact of the car absorbs some of the
crash force. The passenger compartment comes to a more
gradual stop than the front of the car.
2. Next, the vehicle occupants hit the interior of the car in the
second collision. When the car is impacted, the occupant is
still traveling forward at the vehicle’s pre-impact speed. When the vehicle comes to a stop, the occupant will
usually strike the inside of the car in the steering wheel,
windshield or other car interior area. In some collisions,
the occupant will be propelled out of the car and ejected
through the windshield.
3. Finally, after the interior collision with the vehicle, the
occupant’s body is stopped, but the internal organs are
Tool Box Talks
SEAT BELT USE
moving until stopped. These organs will hit the internal body
structure often causing internal tearing and bleeding. This
damage is not visible on the occupant’s body after the collision. Tearing of the heart and other organs often results in a
fatality if medical treatment is not obtained immediately.
How do Seat Belts Help prevent injury?
Seat belts perform a few functions to reduce injury impact. • It will help prevent the occupant from flying forward, striking
the steering wheel and window. It also keeps the passenger
in the car.
• Secondly, the belt will spread the stopping force across a
larger and more durable part of your body. The shoulder
and pelvis can withstand an impact much better than the head. • The seat belt is made out of a softer and more flexible material
than most vehicle materials. The dashboard and windshield
are hard or glass.
It is just a quick click of the belt. Wearing a seat belt correctly and driving smart can save your life.
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Topic: __________________________________ Follow-up Items:_ _____________________
________________________________________
Discussion:____________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________ Attendees:_____________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________
________________________________________ Instructor:____________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ Eye injuries are one of the most devastating in that they have the potential to prevent the injured employee from returning to the same
type of work if eyesight is impaired. In spite of this, employees often fail to use eye protection, using excuses such as: “The glasses are
uncomfortable;” “I forgot them at home/in truck;” “They are in my toolbox across the shop/jobsite;” and the ever popular, “I’ll only be
a minute.” Flying particles can injure an unprotected eye in an instant, therefore prevention must include a thorough explanation by
management on how eye protection is a benefit to employees. One approach is to discuss off-work activities enjoyed by employees and
how they would be impacted by a severe eye injury.
TIPS
• Plan the task. Can the tool to be used produce flying
particles or dust?
• If flying particles or dust are created, eye protection is needed.
• Provide appropriate eye protection for the task: safety
glasses, goggles or face shield.
• Counter objections by discussing the purpose of eye protection
and proper adjustment to wear it properly.
• Review the use of guards on tools that help contain flying
particles.
• Keep eye protection clean–check and clean before use.
• Provide eye protection that is adjustable. If the equipment is
comfortable it is more likely to be used.
• Discuss employee hobbies and off-work activities that could
be impaired by lost eyesight: watching children’s activities;
seeing wife/significant other; watching or participating in
sports, hunting, fishing, driving, etc.
• Inspect tools prior to use to be sure guards are in place.
Remember TO WorkSAFE AND PROTECT YOUR EYESIGHT.
Tool Box Talks
EYE PROTECTION
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Topic: __________________________________ Discussion:____________________________
________________________________________
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Follow-up Items:_ _____________________
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Attendees:_____________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________ Instructor:____________________________
Date of Talk:___________________________ Don’t Let Your Job Go Up In Smoke!
A small fire, unchecked, can quickly become a large one, causing injuries and property loss. Did you know that when a company’s building
and production equipment is destroyed, the odds are against being able to reopen? Use of a fire extinguisher in the early stages of a fire
may either put it out or delay its spread until the Fire Department arrives. Fire extinguishers are only effective for small fires in the early
stages. Only properly trained employees should use fire extinguishers.
Upon Observing Smoke or Fire—Remember R.A.C.E. and P.A.S.S.
R.A.C.E.
R: React, Rescue. Clear all personnel from the area.
A: Alarm.
1. Sound the alarm. Have someone notify the Fire Department.
2. Follow procedures in the emergency evacuation plan.
Life safety is the most important consideration!
C: Contain. Shut off equipment. Shut doors on the way out.
E: Extinguish. Use an extinguisher labeled for the type of fire
present. Having ABC labeled extinguishers saves time by
eliminating that decision.
Once the extinguisher is removed from the wall hanger or
cabinet, stand at least 6 to 8 feet from the fire to avoid splashing
or scattering embers with the spray from the extinguisher.
It’s now time to P.A.S.S.
P.A.S.S.
P: Pull the pin on the extinguisher handle.
A: Aim at the base of the flames.
S: Squeeze the handle.
S: Sweep the spray across the base of the flames.
A dry chemical fire extinguisher can make short work of a 3’ X 4’
pan of burning diesel fuel.
Extinguishers
Type
Fire Type
Extinguishing
A
Ordinary combustibles: wood, paper etc.
Water
B
Flammable liquids
Dry chemical or foam
C
Electrical: energized equipment
Dry chemical
D
Metals: magnesium, titanium, etc.
Specialty dry chemical
Tool Box Talks
FIRE EXTINGUISHER USE
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Topic: __________________________________ Discussion:____________________________
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Date of Talk:___________________________ A sure way to get some laughs on the job is a practical joke. Humor helps increase job satisfaction, but can quickly lead to horseplay
and employee injuries. Practical jokes and horseplay escalate into in-depth elaborate tricks, which cost the company valuable time and
resources. Horseplay is not tolerated here and employees will be reprimanded if engaged in these practices.
TIPS
• Think before you act. Will this joke injure an employee?
• Report pranksters to management before they can injure an
employee.
• Practical jokes are counter-productive. They are not permitted
by company safety rules.
• Let the prankster know that their actions are not appreciated. • Pranks can result in legal problems if actual or perceived
injuries occur.
Remember TO WorkSAFE AND HORSEPLAY IS NOT A GOOD IDEA AND CAN GET YOU
AND OTHERS IN TROUBLE OR INJURED ON THE JOB.
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HORSEPLAY
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________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ Ladders are used throughout our industry daily to help complete our operations. Ladders and falls from ladders account for numerous
employee injuries every year. To avoid these injuries, we have adopted the following safety rules, which we expect you to follow at all
times.
TIPS
Know your ladders.
• Ladders must be inspected by a competent person for visible
defects on a periodic basis and after any incident that could
affect their safe use.
• When ascending or descending a ladder, the employee must
face the ladder.
• Metal ladders should be used with caution, and ladders
should have nonconductive side rails if the employee or
ladder could contact exposed energized electrical equipment.
• Ladders must not be loaded beyond the maximum intended
load for which they were built or beyond their manufacturer’s
rated capacity.
• Ladders must not be moved, shifted or extended while in use.
• Frequently clean the rungs of mud and other foreign material.
• Ladders must be secured and extend a minimum of 36
inches (0.9 m) above the landing.
• The rungs and steps of portable metal ladders must be corrugated, knurled, dimpled, coated with skid-resistant material
or treated to minimize slipping.
• The area around the top and bottom of the ladders must be
kept clear.
Remember TO WorkSAFE AND PROPER LADDER SAFETY
HELPS PREVENT FALLS ON THE JOB.
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LADDER SAFETY
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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Personal Protective Equipment is used to protect you when the hazards of a job can’t be eliminated. Some examples would include protection from falls, noise, punctures or lacerations, overhead or falling objects, and environmental conditions such as sun, heat or cold. PPE
gives you the best possible protection when you know what to use, how to use it, when to use it and how to maintain it properly.
TIPS
PPE works if you know how to use it.
• Know which equipment is designed to guard against
certain types of hazards. If you have any question about
appropriate PPE, ask a supervisor. • Know the proper way to put on PPE, adjust it, determine if
it fits properly, determine whether it is defective and how
to maintain it on a regular basis. If you have any question
about how to put on and adjust your PPE, ask a supervisor. • There are different sizes of PPE. Make sure you use the
correct size to provide you with the maximum amount of
protection from the PPE.
• Store your PPE properly and take it out of service if it is
defective. A respirator shoved into a toolbox can become
distorted and no longer seal properly. Fall protection
equipment can be damaged during use and no longer
provide protection in another fall.
• Safety glasses, goggles and face protection should be worn
by employees exposed to flying particles, liquid chemicals,
acids or caustic liquid splashes.
• Hard hats should be worn where there is a danger of falling
objects. Wear an approved hat liner if working in cold
environments.
• Safety shoes should be worn in work areas where tools or
heavy objects could be dropped on the feet.
• Gloves should be worn for protection from cuts, scrapes, punctures, burns, chemical absorption or temperature extremes.
• Earplugs or earmuffs should be worn in noisy workplaces.
• Wear long sleeve shirts and properly fitting pants to worksites.
Make sure your clothing is not loose or baggy.
• Layer up to stay warm! Two lightweight wool shirts will keep
you warmer than one heavy one.
Remember TO WorkSAFE. WEAR THE PROPER PPE ANd KEEP IT IN GOOD WORKING
ORDER AND IT WILL PROTECT YOU FROM JOB HAZARDS THAT CANNOT BE ELIMINATED.
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POWER TOOLS
Appropriate personal protective equipment, such as safety goggles and gloves, must be worn to protect against hazards that may be
encountered while using power tools. Power tools must be fitted with guards and safety switches. They are extremely hazardous when used
improperly. The types of power tools are determined by their power source: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic and powder-actuated.
TIPS
To prevent hazards associated with the use of power tools,
employees should observe the following general precautions:
• Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
• Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the
receptacle.
• Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil and sharp edges.
• Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, cleaning,
and when changing accessories such as blades, bits and
cutters.
• Keep all people not involved with the work at a safe
distance from the work area.
• Secure the object with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands
to operate the tool.
• Avoid accidental starting. Do not hold fingers on the switch
button while carrying a plugged-in tool.
• Maintain tools with care; keep them sharp and clean for
best performance.
• Follow the instructions in the user’s manual for lubricating and
changing accessories.
• Keep good footing and maintain good balance when operating
power tools.
• Wear proper apparel for the task. Loose clothing, ties or jewelry
can become caught in moving parts.
• Remove all damaged portable electric tools from use and tag
them, “Do not use.”
• Operate tools in locations appropriate for the tool. Never operate
electrical tools in wet area or areas with explosive environments. • Always inspect tools before use. Never use a tool with a cut
cord or missing ground plug.
• Always direct electric saws away from users while cutting. • Transport and store tools in safe areas to prevent falling and
damage.
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________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ Sprains, strains and twisting-type injuries are common for masons. Improper lifting can cause injuries that can take weeks or months
to completely heal.
TIPS
Lifting Basics:
• Properly stage materials. Planning can reduce extra lifting later.
• Is it necessary to lift the item?
• Can equipment be substituted for manual lifting?
• Prepare for the lift.
a. Look at what you are going to lift.
b. How will you grab it?
c. Have you cleared your way?
d. Know the weight.
• Get help and do a team lift if needed.
• Perform the lift.
e. Stand close.
i. Keep your back straight.
f. Bend the knees.
j. Keep the item close to your body.
g. Get a good grip. k. Lift with your legs.
h. Test the weight.
l. Don’t twist.
Tool Box Talks
MASONRY: SPRAINS AND STRAINS
Safety Tips:
• Exercise. This strengthens and conditions your back.
• Stretch. Cold, stiff muscles are more prone to injury.
• Posture. Keep your back straight.
• Watch your weight. Being overweight puts additional
strain on your body.
• Watch the weight. Don’t lift items that are too heavy.
• Get help. If it is heavy, use a team lift or equipment.
• Use the proper technique. Improper lifting, even of light
items, can cause injuries.
• Wear proper footwear. Wear steel-toed boots, in case you
drop tools or materials.
• Use gloves as appropriate. Gloves provide better grip
and protect hands from injuries.
• Save your back. Use dollies or carts.
• Don’t show off. Looking tough to your buddies seems cool
until you prove you’re not.
• Take breaks.
Remember TO WorkSAFE when lifting.
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________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ Webster’s dictionary says it’s “A state of mind or a feeling.” Each day when you wake up you determine your attitude—positive,
negative or somewhere in between. Each day on the job, you determine your attitude—your safety attitude. You make it a safe or
unsafe one. Remember some of the rules you were taught when you first went to school: look both ways before crossing the street,
never talk to strangers and don’t throw rocks. Those rules were taught to keep you safe on your way to and from, and at school. At
work we also have rules that will keep us safe. Your positive attitude about the rules will keep you and your co-workers safe. Your
attitude affects your behavior.
TIPS
• Have the attitude, “It can happen to me.” Have you
ever had a co-worker hurt who thought it couldn’t happen
to them? Did they have an unsafe attitude? Did they
follow all the rules?
• Have the attitude, “It may take longer, but I’ll
only do the job the safe way.” Neglecting safety rules
because we are in a hurry can lead to injuries.
• Have the attitude, “I won’t gamble or take chances.”
Taking chances reflects a poor safety attitude. If you take
a chance and don’t get hurt, will the result be the same
next time? If you take a chance with your co-worker’s life,
will the result be they don’t get hurt? What about the next
time? Will the result be the same?
Tool Box Talks
SAFE ATTITUDES
• Come to work rested. Your attitude will be more positive if
you are rested.
• We sometimes forget a rule or even ignore them from time
to time. If you or someone suggests a safer way to do the
job, or reminds you or others of a rule, have a positive safety
attitude about the suggestion.
• The suggestion may have kept you and your co-worker from
injury.
• Have the attitude, “I won’t disregard safety rules.”
Disregarding a safety rule might result in an injury to you or
your co-worker.
Remember TO WorkSAFE AND Get and maintain a positive safety attitude.
The best accident is the one avoided by having the right attitude.
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________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ “Who is responsible for safety?”
“I am” is the answer. As an employee, you should:
• Learn to work safely and take all rules seriously.
• Recognize hazards and avoid them.
• Report all incidents, accidents, injuries and illness to your
supervisor immediately.
• Inspect tools before use to avoid injury.
• Wear all assigned personal protective equipment.
It is management’s responsibility to:
• Provide a safe, healthy and injury-free workplace.
• Provide appropriate and effective personal protective
equipment.
• Train employees in safe job procedures and hazard
identification.
Everyone must be aware of potential hazards on the job.
• Poor housekeeping results in slips, trips and falls. Clean up
Tool Box Talks
SAFETY COMMITMENT
WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SAFETY? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an average 5,950 fatal occupational injuries
occurred each year from 1997-2002. Nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in 2002 totaled 4.7 million. MEM claims data show the
average cost of a lost-time claim in 2003 was $20,207. With the foundation of a solid safety commitment, an organization can successfully
work toward achieving the vision of a safe, healthy and injury-free workplace. The lack of a solid safety commitment leads to mounting
injuries and increasing losses that make up these tragic injury statistics.
spills/leaks promptly and correctly.
• Electricity can cause shocks, burns or fire if not handled properly.
• Poor material handling may cause back problems or other injuries.
• Tools and equipment can cause injuries if guards or protective
devices are disengaged.
Always use the protections that are provided on the job.
• Guards on machines and tools keep body parts from contacting
moving equipment.
• Lockout/tagout procedures assure equipment is de-energized
before it is repaired.
• Personal protective equipment shields your body from hazards
you may face on the job.
In case of emergency:
• Understand alarms and evacuation routes; know and follow
emergency procedures.
• Know how to notify emergency response personnel.
Safety and health are a responsibility that must be shared equally and without exception by everyone within the organization. A safe,
healthy and injury-free workplace requires that all employees make their safety and the safety of their fellow employees the top priority. With fewer injuries, a business can be more productive and profitable, which clearly benefits all those involved in the operation. 85
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Date of Talk:___________________________ Slips, trips and falls are a leading construction incident. Slips, trips and falls can produce minor injuries but have the capability to produce
severe injury as well. Slips and falls occur in all industries, but construction sites offer many dynamic hazards such as muddy surfaces,
debris and machines. Slips, trips and falls are very easy to prevent. Slips, trips and fall hazards are easy to overlook though. Review the
following information with jobsite employees.
TIPS
EMPOWER EMPLOYEES TO MAKE WORK AREAS SAFE
• All employees on the jobsite are responsible for removing
and preventing slip, trip and fall hazards.
• All employees on the jobsite are responsible for discarding
waste regularly.
• All employees are responsible for keeping walking and
working surfaces clear of slip and trip hazards.
• Employees are responsible for taking action against slip,
trip and fall hazards.
PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
• Wear quality protective footwear
• Wear footwear with grip patterns such as:
Channels for water &
liquid dispersal
Leading edges
in all directions
Leading edges
in all directions
Slip Direction
Well-defined square
leading edges
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CONSTRUCTION SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS
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Date of Talk:___________________________ JOBSITE DESIGN PHASE
• Provide gravel walkways through mud.
• Provide access points for structures under construction.
• Build substantial, quality ramps into structures under
construction.
• Schedule regular scrap pickup and dumpster large enough
to handle regular cleanup.s
INSIDE OF STRUCTURE
• Routinely sweep floor of dirt and waste buildup.
• Wipe up grease and oil left from machines.
• Pick up floor sweep material.
• Clear floor of water by using a wet-dry vacuum, mop and
bucket or squeegee.
• Remove litter, debris and scrap regularly.
• Remove litter, debris and scrap from around work
machines (tile saws, pipe cutters, etc.).
• Install guard railing on all exposed stair openings.
HOLES
• Protect workers from:
—Falling into or through holes.
—Tripping / stepping into or through holes.
—Objects falling through holes.
• Cover holes with a substantial covering.
• Mark hole coverings with “HOLE.”
• Prevent cover movement or accidental removal.
• Larger holes (stairwells, etc.) must have guard railing
installed around hole perimeter.
• Simple rope or warning lines are insufficient.
EXTERIOR OF STRUCTURE
• Scoop away snow and ice from walkways or paths.
• Utilize ice melt on walkways when icy.
• Provide walkways that are out of mud and puddles.
• Provide an area for boots to be scraped clear of mud.
• Provide a mat at entrances during precipitation.
• Routinely pick up and discard waste and scrap.
• Put tools in a pre-determined area, out of walkways.
• Inspect area routinely for hazards and make corrections.
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CONSTRUCTION SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS Cont.
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WORKING WITH CONCRETE
Thousands of Missouri workers pour and work with concrete every day. Homeowners and do-it-yourselfers also do concrete work. Concrete construction involves people, trucks, saws, tools and lots of supplies including rebar and chemicals. Concrete work presents
many hazards from eye injury to slip and fall, to even fatality due to being run over by mixer trucks. Use the below basic safety tips to
prevent injury during concrete construction.
TIPS
CONCRETE AS A CHEMICAL EXPOSURE
• Wet concrete can burn skin.
• Wet concrete can severely burn skin when exposed for
long periods of time.
• Concrete contains strong chemical bases.
• Strong bases are strong acids which can severely burn
the eyes, skin, feet and legs.
• Hydroscopic means water-absorbing.
• Drying concrete which will pull water from anything in
contact including skin.
• Drying concrete can severely dry skin.
• Wet clothing worn during concrete work can transfer the
acidic or hydroscopic effects to the skin resulting in burns
or skin dryness.
• Use waterproof kneepads when finishing concrete to
avoid transferring chemical effects to the knees.
HYGIENE PRACTICES
• Wash hands and skin upon contact with concrete.
• Wash hands with a Ph neutral soap and water.
• Wash clothing after working with concrete.
• Limit skin contact with concrete.
• Avoid contact with accelerator and retarder solutions and
flush skin and eyes if exposed.
FIRST AID INVOLVING CONCRETE
• Flush eyes immediately for 15 minutes if concrete contacts
the eyes.
• Do not rub eyes if exposed to concrete as rubbing will
further the damage.
• Flush skin and gently remove excess concrete.
• Remove clothing if grossly contaminated.
• Please pick up items you might see lying on the floor.
• Remove or bend over all nails protruding from exposed
surfaces.
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Date of Talk:___________________________ • Route air hoses, extension cords, welding leads and power
lines out of travel paths.
• Create a designated smoking area on the site with a
cigarette receptacle.
• Items placed on elevated walkways or platforms should be
protected from falling by use of toe-boards.
• Storage should be on neatly stacked level surfaces.
• All chemical or material spills should be cleaned up immediately.
• A spill kit should be placed within a reasonable travel
distance and be easily visible.
APPROVED CLOTHING
• When placing or floating concrete always wear clothing
listed below:
• Rubber gloves to protect hands from acidic and hydroscopic
concrete effects;
• Rubber boots to protect feet from abrasion, injury and
effects of concrete;
• Long pants keeps concrete from skin;
• Long-sleeve shirt keeps arms and shoulders protected from
sunburn and effects of concrete;
• Keep extra changes of clothes when others become
saturated/contaminated.
Tool Box Talks
WORKING WITH CONCRETE cont.
BEST PRACTICES
• Use non-conductive float handles
• Stay clear of wet concrete unless you are specifically told to
work with it
• Protect others from injury / impalement by capping rebar
including form rods
• Protect your back! Cement is very heavy!
• Get help with heavy loads such as buckets, tools, wheelbarrows and mixer chutes
• Use correct tools (rakes, shovels, comealongs) to push and
move concrete
• Place concrete as close as possible to reduce the need to
push and move it
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Date of Talk:___________________________ Tool Box Talks
CUTOFF SAW SAFETY
Cutoff saws can also be referred to as “quickie saws.” Cutoff saws are used for a variety of reasons in the construction trade, namely cutting
steel rebar or concrete. Cutoff saws use a round cutting wheel / blade that can be metal for concrete and that travel at extremely high
speeds. The blade of the saw is an extremely dangerous object due to its rotating speed and unguarded cutting surface. Cutoff saws can
be powered electrically, with gas engines or hydraulically or with compressed air. Below are safety tips for cutoff saw users:
TIPS
TRAINING REQUIRED
• Always train cutoff saw operators.
• Review the owners manual during saw training.
Cutoff saws have different hazards than chain saws.
• A tool with the capability to cut steel or concrete can most
definitely injure an operator.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIpMENT
• Eye protection due to flying wastes / disc fragments.
• Hearing protection due to extreme noise.
• Dust filtering mask when exposed to airborne particles.
• Protective footwear in case tool is dropped.
• Gloves for flying objects and vibration.
HAZARDS
Cutoff saws expose users to the following hazards:
• Noise from engine and cutting action.
• Vibration transmitted through handles.
• Dust that contains silica from cutting concrete.
• Flying objects as saw makes the cut.
• Cutting disc explosion due to high RPM.
• Pinch points from unguarded drive belt.
PRE-USE INSPECTION
• Blade not cracked, chipped or warped.
• Blade is not excessively worn.
• Saw is fueled when cold.
• Belt and blade guards are present and adjusted.
• Personal Protective Equipment is worn.
• Non-essential personnel are clear of the area.
• Submit maintenance or safety concerns in writing.
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Date of Talk:___________________________ BEST PRACTICES
• Limit persons or bystanders in the area a cutoff saw is
being used.
• Use a cutoff saw only for its intended application.
• Match cutting discs with the object being sawed.
• Leave guards on saws always.
• Maintain guards in good condition.
• Adjust guards with the saw OFF.
• Adjust the guard before cutting.
• Use wet methods when cutting concrete: Concrete dust
cutting exposes the operator to silica, a potentially cancer
causing dust.
• Wear correct respiratory protection when wet cutting methods are not possible—silica is a hazard!
• Match saw RPM with blade RPM—Never use blades with
RPM limits LOWER than saw maximum RPM .
Tool Box Talks
CUTOFF SAW SAFETY cont.
• Follow direction of travel when mounting a cutting wheel.
• Remove cutting wheels when transporting a saw–
transportation movement can damage a blade.
• Mount cutting discs with the correct tools.
• Inspect blades for cracks, warping, overheating or excessive
wear BEFORE USE.
• Fuel gasoline-powered saws only when the saw has cooled.
• Use a funnel and safety gasoline can when fueling cutoff
saws.
• Start saw properly, on the ground—never “jerk start”
cutoff saws.
• NEVER set a saw down unless the blade has stopped
rotating!
• Never “hand off” a saw with the blade rotating!
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WORKING AROUND REBAR
Rebar hazards are present in nearly every construction project. Rebar is used when concrete is poured, from footings to sidewalks. Rebar work also includes tools that make rebar more effective: wire tie, rebar chairs, welded wire or mesh material. Rebar work also
involves tools such as electric and hydraulic rebar cutters. Rebar presents hazards from falls onto exposed edges, lacerations from
sharp edges, and trips. TIPS
BEWARE EXPOSED REBAR
• Never allow employees to work over uncapped and
exposed rebar
• Cap exposed rebar ends to prevent serious puncture injury
during a fall
• Cap rebar with the correct cap:
—Square cap for falls from height
—Rounded caps for standing falls
—Caps receive a 2x4 board and cover several bars
in a line
• Cap all exposed rebar no matter what the circumstances.
• Bent-over rebar still creates a trip hazard.
• Bent-over rebar still creates a foot injury hazard.
• Bent-over rebar still creates a laceration hazard.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
• PPE required for working in concrete or around rebar:
—Eye Protection
—Gloves
—Protective footwear
—Reflective, high-visibility vest if working in traffic
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Date of Talk:___________________________ CONCRETE BUCKETS
• Never ride concrete buckets.
• Vibrator or finish crews shall never work directly beneath
suspended concrete buckets.
• Never use rebar hooks or loops on kibbles or buckets.
BEST PRACTICES
• Use float handles made of non-conductive material.
• Walk—do not run on the jobsite.
• Prevent workers or pedestrians from walking across formwork rebar.
• Limit personnel in the concrete finish area
• Cap all rebar with the correct rebar cap.
• Use caution and be aware of footing when pulling a
“come along” or power screed backward.
• Keep boot laces and pant leg cuffs tucked to prevent
entanglement in rebar or ties.
• Store rebar in neatly stacked piles.
Tool Box Talks
WORKING AROUND REBAR
• Keep rebar off of the ground or floor with 2x4 material
beneath the bundle or pile.
• Always wear gloves when handling rebar.
• Use rebar for concrete work only—never use it as a substitute for handles, hooks, railing or ground rod.
• Bolt cutters or side cutter pliers must be maintained in
sharp condition.
• Clear area of bystanders when cutoff saws or other power
tools are used.
PERSONAL HYGIENE
• Flush eyes for 15 minutes with warm water if contacted
with concrete.
• DO NOT RUB EYES as concrete is an abrasive and will do
further damage.
• Wash concrete from skin immediately.
• Wash hands often.
• Avoid inhaling cement dust—use a quality, approved
filtering mask.
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SELECTING REBAR SAFETY CAPS
Rebar is used on almost every jobsite. Not only is rebar used to improve the structural integrity of concrete, it is used to pin slabs and hold
cement formwork in place. All protruding rebar is hazardous. Employees can fall onto protruding rebar, creating major and even lifethreatening injuries. Cover exposed rebar with the correct protective cap. There are three types of rebar cap, and each has a specific safety
purpose. Use these safety tips when using rebar.
TIPS
WHAT ARE THE HAZARDS?
ALL EXPOSED REBAR IS AN IMPALEMENT HAZARD!
• Exposed rebar creates a trip hazard.
• Employees can fall and be impaled on exposed rebar.
• Concrete formwork pins protruding at low levels.
• Concrete footing rebar protrudes into walking spaces.
• Rebar protrudes from concrete foundation work.
• Rebar scraps left lying about the jobsite.
• Rebar creates trip hazards during flatwork.
PROTECT EMPLOYEES FROM EXPOSED REBAR!
ONLY PURCHASE AND USE QUALITY REBAR CAPS like the examples above. Rebar will push through low-quality caps upon impact!
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Date of Talk:___________________________ PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT REQUIRED
• Wear gloves when handling rebar.
• Rebar is rusty: Flush cuts with water or peroxide, cover,
and see a physician.
• Wear eye protection when tying or handling rebar.
• Wear good protective boots when working in or near
flatwork.
• Tuck in shoestrings and pants legs to prevent “hang-ups”
when walking through flatwork.
BEST PRACTICES
• All jobsite employees should be trained to recognize when
rebar becomes a hazard.
• Routinely pick up scrap rebar to prevent trip hazards.
• When caps are not available, bend rebar over or loop the
protruding end to protect employees from injury.
• Remember that the rebar cap must protect against injury
when the FULL FORCE of a fall is applied!
• NOT ALL REBAR CAPS PROTECT – rebar will push through
poor-quality caps when impacted.
• Use only GOOD QUALITY steel-reinforced rebar caps that
prevent rebar push-through.
• Cut off exposed rebar if it does not serve a purpose.
• Use 2X4 troughs to cover long spans of exposed rebar.
• Please pick up items you might see lying on the floor.
• Remove or bend over all nails protruding from exposed
surfaces.
• Route air hoses, extension cords, welding leads and power
lines out of travel paths.
• Create a designated smoking area on the site with a
cigarette receptacle.
• Items placed on elevated walkways or platforms should be
protected from falling by use of toe-boards.
• Storage should be on neatly stacked level surfaces.
• All chemical or material spills should be cleaned up
immediately.
• A spill kit should be placed within a reasonable travel
distance and be easily visible.
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SELECTING REBAR SAFETY CAPS cont.
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________________________________________ Date of Talk:___________________________ Dimensions is MEM’s revolutionary approach to medical and disability management. Dimensions ensures each and every injured
employee is treated comprehensively with the ultimate goal of a safe and successful return to work. To accomplish this, it relies on
three primary dimensions—our 3-D approach to injury management.
Resources
DIMENSIONS
MEM’s Dimensions Partner, CorVel Corporation, provides a nationwide network of providers experienced in working with typical workers
compensation injuries. You are encouraged to always access the closest hospital regardless of network affiliation in the event of a lifethreatening injury. With routine injuries, however, it is best to utilize a medical provider that is familiar with your business and with whom
you have an established relationship. We encourage you to select this medical provider prior to an injury so supervisors know where to
send an injured employee when an injury occurs.
Dimensions Partner
CorVel Corporation
Designate your provider
Visit CorVel’s website at www.corvel.com/provider_lookup to find
a network provider.
Dimensions 3-D Approach
DEVELOP
Effective loss prevention injury treatment plan
DIRECT
Injured employee to appropriate medical provider
and promptly report injury to MEM
DELIVER
Injured employee safely back to work
Injury reporting service and claims inquiry
www.mem-ins.com Hotline 1.800.442.0593 Fax 1.800.442.0597
107
RESOURCES
Resources
esources
108
Reporting an Injury
MEM focuses on providing employers and injured employees with excellent claims service at the lowest possible cost. To help keep costs
down, it is important that employers promptly report injuries to MEM online at www.mem-ins.com or by calling 1.800.442.0593.
The employer or injured employee may log on or call anytime to get answers to questions relating to the claim.
MEM’s responsive customer service distinguishes us from other insurance providers. When calling MEM, you always have a direct communication link to an informed Customer Service Representative who will answer your questions, provide assistance and make sure
your needs are met.
Fraud Reporting 1.800.442.0592
MEM’s encourages policyholders or employees who suspect fraud to call our toll-free fraud reporting hotline. This service is designated
for confidential, anonymous reports of any suspicious activities.
Loss Prevention 1.888.499.SAFE (7233)
Call our toll-free safety resource hotline with questions about workplace safety. The line is answered by MEM professionals who can
direct you to the resources you need to make your workplace safe.
• OSHA Office of Training and Education, OSHA 10-Hour and 30-Hour Construction Industry Outreach-Trainer Presentation
• OSHA Construction e-tool, ““
Material contained in these publications are in the public domain and may be reproduced fully or partially, without permission
of the Federal Government. Source credit is requested by not required. www.osha.gov
• www.orosha.org “Scaffolds, Temporary elevated work platforms,” Guidelines for Oregon Workers, OROSHA 440-3320
• Company Drug/Alcohol program”
http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/demand/dfmanual/-1adf/htm
DEA Website-www.dea.gov
• Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Division of Workers’ Compensation, “How the Changes in Workers’
Compensation Law Affect You/” WC-137 (05-05) AI
• Missouri Employers Mutual, www.mem-ins.com
Resources
REFERENCES
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jkl;
referenCes
101 N. Keene Street  Columbia, MO 65201
1.888.499.SAFE (7233)  [email protected]
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