556X User ManuaL RevA

556X User ManuaL RevA
Model 556X
User’s Manual
Optical Isolator
550031 Rev. A
2
Is a registered trademark of
New Focus Inc.
Warranty New Focus, Inc. guarantees its products to be
free of defects for one year from the date of shipment. This is in lieu of all other guarantees,
expressed or implied, and does not cover incidental or consequential loss.
Contents Warranty
3
Quick Start
4
Operation
5
Theory
13
Specifications
14
3
Quick Start Feedback into lasers from back reflections can
cause power and wavelength fluctuations and in
extreme cases can damage the laser. Our Faraday
optical isolators give you greater than 35-dB peak
isolation and 25-dB minimum isolation over more
than 20 nm without having to make any adjustments.
The isolator is shipped ready to use and optimized
for operation at the center wavelength. Simply
mount the isolator on the pad provided so that the
polarization plane of your laser is aligned with the
minor axis of the elliptical aperture. See figure 2
on page 7 for more information.
An adjustable output polarizer and a zero-order
half-waveplate are included at the isolator output.
The adjustable output polarizer allows you to optimize the isolation at any wavelength within the
isolators range (see page 10). The zero-order halfwaveplate gives you complete flexibility in output
polarization orientation over a broad band of
wavelengths.
4
Operation As shipped, the isolator is adjusted for optimum
isolation at the center wavelength and is ready
to use.
Caution: The magnetic field around the isolator
will grab tools and components. Use care when
mounting the isolator and protect the optical surfaces.
Mounting the isolator
The isolator can be used with either vertically or
horizontally polarized light. For vertically polarized light, mount the isolator on the pad provided
so that the label is on the top (as shown in Figure
1). For horizontally polarized light, mount the isolator on the pad so that the label is on the side. For
most laser diodes the plane of polarization is along
the minor axis of the beam’s ellipse. Therefore, the
elliptical aperture of the isolator will coincide with
the elliptical laser beam profile for the majority of
laser diodes.* (Shown in Figure 2)
For more detailed information about polarization
and polarization control ask for a free copy of our
Application Note 3.
The mounting pad provides a one-inch beam
height and an 8-32 (M4) threaded hole, that
allows mounting to our pedestal risers or half-inch
* Some strained laser diodes may be polarized along
the major axis of the beam's ellipse. In this case the
major axis of the beam must be reduced to less than
3 mm to clear the isolator aperture. See page 98 of
our 95/96 catalog for details of our circularizing
prism pairs.
5
1.75
"
(44.
4)
N
IN
Opt EW F
C
ical OCU
Mo enter
Isol S, I
del: Wa
ato nc.
#55 vele
r
n
68
gth
: 85
0nm
Ma
OUT
de i
nU
SA
3.24
"
(82.
4)
mounting pad
1.00
"
(25.
4)
Fig. 1
Position of the mounting pad for use with vertically
polarized input.
6
.316" (8.0)
elliptical
aperture
plane of polarization
.118" (3.0)
label
mounting pad
positions
Fig. 2
Sketch showing the elliptical aperture and input plane
of polarization for the Model 556X optical isolators.
7
posts. An adapter plate, Model #5560, is available
which attaches the isolator kinematically to our
6200 series external-cavity diode laser.
Adjusting your isolator
The output polarizer and waveplate are mounted
in rotating knobs that you can adjust as required.
Both the polarizer and waveplate can be locked in
position using the locking screws shown in Figure
3. The output polarizer has ± 10˚ of adjustment
and can be used to peak up the isolation at specific
wavelengths (see the next section).
Light which exits through the output polarizer is
normally polarized at 45˚ relative to the input
polarization plane. A zero-order half-waveplate,
which can be rotated through 360˚, allows you to
rotate the plane of polarization to any desired orientation.
The optical axis of the waveplate is marked with
the symbol “ ”. The “||” mark indicates the
waveplate orientation for the input and output
polarization planes to be parallel. The “ ” mark
indicates the waveplate orientation for the input
and output polarization to be perpendicular.
8
waveplate
locking screw
polarizer
locking screw
polarizer holder
waveplate holder
Fig. 3
Output polarizer and waveplate holders showing the position of the locking screws.
9
To maximize the isolation at a
specific wavelength
The polarization rotation of the Faraday rotator is
wavelength dependent and so 45˚ rotation only
occurs at the center wavelength. As the polarization rotation changes, the isolation decreases
because the polarizers are no longer aligned for
extinction of back-reflected light.
Your isolator will give you isolation of more than
25 dB over a 20-nm band around the center wavelength with no adjustments. (see graph on page
14) The isolator can be used over a 35-nm range
around the center wavelength by using the output
polarizer to peak up the isolation. In fact you can
peak the isolation up to 35 dB at any single wavelength over this 35-nm range. This may cause a
few percent decrease in the transmission.
The half-waveplate we supply is zero order which
means it performs well over a broad band of wavelengths. However, if linear polarization is critical to
your experiment, you will need an additional
polarizer after the isolator because the waveplate
may produce slightly elliptical polarization at
extreme wavelengths.
1) Mount the isolator on the pad to correspond
with your input polarization state, as discussed
in the previous section. Set the polarizer to the
“0” mark and the waveplate to the “||” mark
(remember to loosen the set screws first).
Monitor the transmission through the isolator
using an optical detector. Check that the background light level is more than 45 dB below
10
your signal. It is best not to move the detector
before the next step.
2) Turn the isolator around so that light propagates through the isolator in the direction
opposite to the arrows on the label. Monitor
the amount of light transmitted through the
isolator, which will be very small (-35 dB of
the input). By rotating the polarizer 10˚ in
each direction you should have enough transmission to check if you are clipping the laser
beam.
3) Keeping the position of the waveplate fixed,
adjust the polarizer for lowest transmission.
The polarizer will only need to be moved a few
degrees from the “0” marking. It should be
possible to obtain an extinction greater than
35 dB in a 35-nm band around the center
wavelength.
4) Turn the isolator around again so that light
propagates in the direction of the arrows on
the label. There may be a few percent decrease
in transmission compared to that at the center
wavelength. Do not readjust the polarizer to
maximize the transmission.
Conversion between units of dB and %.
 power out 
dB = 10 x log 

 power in 
11
Theory Optical isolators work by allowing light to be transmitted through the isolator in the forward direction but blocking back-reflected light. The #556X
series optical isolators consist of four main components; an input polarizer, a Faraday rotator, an
output polarizer and a zero-order half-waveplate.
The waveplate is not actually necessary to achieve
isolation, but it makes the device more convenient
to use.
A critical component of the isolator is the Faraday
rotator. This uses a static magnetic field to rotate
the plane of polarization of light traveling through
the rotator using the Faraday effect. The Faraday
rotator is different from a quarter waveplate
because the plane of polarization is rotated in the
same direction irrespective of the direction in
which the light is traveling. The benefits of this are
illustrated in Figures 3a and 3b.
In Figure 3a light traveling in the forward direction passes through the input polarizer and
becomes polarized in the vertical plane. Upon
passing through the Faraday rotator, the plane of
polarization is rotated 45˚ due to the static magnetic field around the rotator. The output polarizer,
which is aligned 45˚ relative to the input polarizer,
then lets the light pass through unimpeded.
Figure 3b shows back-reflected light traveling
through the isolator. Only light polarized at 45˚
can enter through the output polarizer. The rotator
material rotates the plane of polarization an additional 45˚. The light is now polarized in the horizontal plane and will be blocked by the input
polarizer, which only allows light polarized in the
vertical plane to pass.
12
input
polarizer
Faraday
rotator
45°
output
polarizer
Fig. 4a
Light traveling in the forward direction through a
Faraday isolator.
input
polarizer
Faraday
rotator
45°
output
polarizer
Fig. 4b
Back-reflected light traveling through a
Faraday isolator.
13
Specifications
Model #
5566
5567
5568
5569
Center Wavelength
670 nm
780 nm
850 nm
980 nm
Peak Isolation
35 dB
35 dB
35 dB
35 dB
Min. Isolation
25 dB
25 dB
25 dB
25 dB
Wavelength Range
20 nm
20 nm
20 nm
20 nm
Min. Transmission
80%
80%
80%
80%
Damage Threshold
50 W/cm2
50 W/cm2
50 W/cm2
50 W/cm2
Input Polarization
vert. or horiz.
vert. or horiz.
vert. or horiz.
vert. or horiz.
Output Polarization
user variable
user variable
user variable
user variable
Isolation (dB)
50
40
30
20
10
0
840
845
850
855
860
Wavelength (nm)
Typical isolation for a Model 5568 Faraday isolator
without making any adjustments.
14
Notes
15
16
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement