eqServer - Seismology Research Centre

eqServer - Seismology Research Centre
eqServer
EARTHQUAKE DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
141 Palmer Street, Richmond VIC 3121 Australia
T:+61 3 8420 8940
[email protected]
Table of Contents
An Overview ..................................................................................... 1!
The Home Screen.............................................................................. 2!
Settings ............................................................................................ 3!
Server Title ....................................................................................................... 3!
Data Age (hours) ............................................................................................... 3!
Auto Location .................................................................................................... 4!
Database .......................................................................................................... 4!
Email Alerts....................................................................................................... 4!
Forward Incoming Files to Another FTP Site ........................................................... 5!
Maps & Networks ................................................................................................ 6!
Add a Sub-network ............................................................................................ 7!
SeedLink ............................................................................................................. 9!
Live Data Sorting .............................................................................................. 10!
Places ............................................................................................................... 11!
Stations .......................................................................................... 12!
Live Data ........................................................................................ 13!
One Hour ........................................................................................ 14!
One Day .......................................................................................... 16!
Latest Event Report ........................................................................ 18!
Quick Quake for iPad ........................................................................................ 19!
Wave Finder ................................................................................... 20!
Event Finder ................................................................................... 21!
Network Status Maps...................................................................... 22!
Health Graphs ................................................................................................. 23!
The eqServer SQL Database ............................................................ 24!
Introduction ...................................................................................................... 26!
A Basic Definition of Terms ............................................................................... 26!
Tables ............................................................................................................... 27!
File Archive ....................................................................................................... 30!
An Overview
eqServer is a data management system for telemetered earthquake monitoring networks. It
is provided as a dedicated appliance that can be connected to your Ethernet network, or it
can be provided as a cloud-hosted service. In either configuration, the user interface is via a
standard web browser, allowing you to view real-time data, historical data by station or by
sub-network, and monitor the state-of-health of an instrumentation network.
eqServer is also an automatic event detection system that will associate activity at several
stations and attempt to calculate the location and magnitude of the event, also generating
an email notification. This event data can be accessed through eqServer and by using our
Quick Quake iPad app.
An SQL database stores all of the station information, map place names, and automatic
event location information. If you are using eqFocus, you can connect to this database to
add or refine earthquake solutions, using various flags to allow you to filter event lists by
quality, magnitude, location, and many other parameters.
eqServer was designed for use with Kelunji seismographs that have traditionally produced
meta-data rich seismic waveform files in PC-SUDS format, but eqServer can also accept
other data formats such as MiniSEED. eqServer also includes a facility to draw data from
SeedLink servers – a data sharing protocol used by some data acquisition systems and by
organisations such as IRIS.
1
The Home Screen
When you first connect to eqServer you will be presented with a home screen with a default
map.
To the right of the map are icons to access the main functions of eqServer (from top left):
•
The red icon accesses Wave Finder – a feature that allows you to extract waveform
files from the data file archive
•
The orange icon accesses Event Finder – an SQL query generator that produces
event lists from the earthquake database
•
The light green icon displays One Hour of data from multiple stations – either all
stations, or groups of stations as defined by sub-network definitions
•
The dark green icon displays One Day of data from a single station – a modern day
version of the traditional drum recorder
•
The light blue icon shows the Latest Event Report, an automatically generated
bulletin based on triggered data associations. Older reports are also viewable here
•
The dark blue icon displays the last hour of Live Data from all stations as an image
sized to suit a Full HD widescreen display panel, updated every 30 seconds
•
The purple “Stations” button allows the user to easily view, add, edit, or delete
seismic monitoring stations from the database, and the pink “Settings” button will
take you to a screen containing the configuration sections of the eqServer system
2
Settings
The settings page is used when initially setting up eqServer and to modify notification
settings, display settings, data sources and other minor parameters. The immediately
accessible settings are in the grey boxes with the red title bars. If you edit any of these
boxes, click the Save button before changing any other settings boxes.
Server Title
This is the title that will appear above the map on the home screen when you first log in to
eqServer.
Data Age (hours)
The map on the home screen shows the location of the stations that you have selected to
send data to eqServer. Two symbols are available to categorise stations, each with different
time frames to colourise the symbols to indicate the age of the latest data to arrive. We
typically use circles to indicate data from stations that are sending in data continuously, and
triangles for stations that only send in triggered event data. Based on the default values, if
eqServer has received data from a continuous station within the last 0.6 hours, it is
displayed as green, otherwise it will be displayed as yellow (as a warning that there maybe
a telemetry issue), and if it has not sent data in for more than 75 hours the circle turns red
(indicating that some action is needed for this station). These values can be set to whatever
time period is appropriate for your situation.
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Similarly, for triggered (triangle) stations, we expect data to be sent in at least once a day,
so the symbol turns yellow after 25 hours without any data, and turns red after 150 hours
to indicate it has been almost a week since data was received from the station. Some
recorders, such as the Kelunji Echo and EchoPro, can be set to send a state-of-health
message every so often so that eqServer knows that all is OK, otherwise you will be relying
on event triggering to keep the symbols green. Again, these time periods can be changed to
suit your application.
The symbols can be used to categorise your stations in various ways. For example, you may
wish to use the circle and triangle to categorise stations as cellular versus satellite
telemetry, broadband versus short-period sensors, strong motion versus weak motion
stations, structural monitoring versus free field instruments, etc.
Auto Location
eqServer will automatically locate earthquakes to a fixed depth. Enter the typical
earthquake depth (in kilometres) for your region in the field provided. It will also use one of
many preset earth model files. A generic one that can be used worldwide is “JBMod” which
uses the Jeffreys-Bullen time travel tables as the one-dimensional earth model. Please
contact the SRC if you would like a custom layered P and S wave travel time model created
specifically for your region.
Database
This section deals with the SQL database that has been installed on the eqServer computer.
These settings should not be changed unless you are an Advanced User and have
installed an additional database on the eqServer system with a different name/user/pass.
Email Alerts
Mail Settings
You will be able to set your sub-networks to analyse incoming data for events, which will
generate event bulletins and email notifications. eqServer needs to send email through a
mail server. Enter your SMTP mail server address, sender email and password (if required)
into the appropriate fields, ensuring your mail server accepts connections from the network
upon which your eqServer is located. If you are using a Gmail account for sending alerts,
simply type in “gmail” in the Server section and enter your Gmail address and password.
Notification Window
If you have many sub-networks triggering and a large earthquake occurs, it is likely that
multiple sub-networks will generate a notification for the event. Rather than sending one
notification for every sub-network that has triggered, eqServer can be told to associate sub4
network events together should they occur within a particular time period. The Notification
Window defines this time period, which by default is set to 300 seconds. The first subnetwork that triggers will send out a notification message, and if any other sub-networks
trigger within the 300 second window, they will be gathered and sent as a single notification
at the end of this period. If you set this to a very small number (e.g. 1), each sub-network
send out its own notification message, which means you will potentially receive several
notifications for each large event, which could have a cost implication if you are using an
email-to-SMS service to multiple recipients.
Recipients
You can define any number of email recipients for event notifications. There are three styles
of notification message: SMS, Email, and Message. The SMS format is compact and
designed for feature phones. The Email is a long form report with lots of calculation details
with a link to the online report. The Message format is a compacted SMS for smart phones
that just lists the time, location and magnitude, along with a link to the latest online report.
Enter the recipient’s email address, using the comment field for your own purposes. If you
don’t want to receive alerts for events that are older than some number of hours, tick the
“No Old” box for that user and specify the number of hours. This is useful to avoid
notifications from automatic relocations of events when data from stations that have been
offline for some time come back online.
The rest of this line shows all of the defined sub-networks. Tick the box under each subnetwork to enable notifications to that recipient for alerts generated by those sub-networks.
Click the green “+” icon to add another recipient.
Forward Incoming Files to Another FTP Site
Some seismographs will send their data in to eqServer via FTP. These FTP login details and
other technical details related to your eqServer will be provided to you upon delivery.
Triggered “Event Files” should be sent in to my.eqserver.com/trig/in
“Continuous Files” are sent in to my.eqserver.com/cont/in
A copy of these files can then be forwarded onto another FTP site (perhaps another
eqServer, or a backup data repository). Simply enter the destination FTP site credentials
and tick “All” to send data from all incoming stations to the destination, or enter the station
codes of the data files that you wish to forward to another FTP site, with each code (case
sensitive) separated by a space.
Click the green “+” icon to add another FTP destination.
5
Maps & Networks
The home page of eqServer shows you the Main map as defined
on the Maps & Networks settings page. This is the map area that
encompasses all of the stations you expect to receive data from
into eqServer. When you click on the Maps & Networks
settings icon, the current Main map is shown on the left side of
the screen, and any sub-networks you have defined within this
main map are shown on the right side of the screen.
To define a new Main map, click anywhere on the current Main map image and you will be
presented with a map of the world. Click and drag a box* to define an area on the map.
*Note that this function may not be available on touch-based input devices such as smart phones and tablets.
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You can now click on “Create Network” to use this as your Main map, or click on “Zoom” to
load a more detailed map of this area so that you can select more accurate map
boundaries. If you have zoomed in you can continue to zoom, or create your network map.
Add a Sub-network
Once you have defined your Main map, you can start to define your Subnetworks so that
you can generate automatic earthquake locations by station association. You may only wish
to have a single sub-network to start with, and you can add more later as your network
expands. Click on the “Add New” button next to the Subnetworks title.
Your Main map will now load, showing
yellow dots wherever there is a Station
defined in the database to help guide
your sub-network boundaries.
You must type in a Subnetwork Name
before proceeding. You can then drag a
box on the map to define the boundary
(or a zoom box) as you did for the Main
map.
When you are happy with your selection,
click Save to proceed to the detailed
settings for your sub-network.
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All of the stations that are in the database that fall within the sub-network boundary will be
shown on the map as grey dots and in a list on the right side of the screen. As you mouseover the stations in the list they will be highlighted in the map, and vice versa. Click on a
station on the map (or tick the box in the list ) to add it to your sub-network. You can filter
the list of stations displayed based on their Network ID using the drop-down menu at the
top of the list. You can also click on the circle symbol in the list to change it to a triangle
symbol so that it uses the alternate data age symbol on the state-of-health map.
Display Settings
When you view data using the One Hour display function for this sub-network, you can
choose to filter the data to a particular frequency band to make certain events display more
clearly. The display function automatically scales the data so that the average signal for the
hour is just visible, but for broadband sensors this average level can be quite high over this
period, so it may be difficult to see earthquakes above the average signal level. If you are
using broadband sensors but you wish to clearly see local earthquakes on One Hour, we
recommend setting the Frequency range as 2 to 20 Hz.
Bias
When defining the number of stations that need to trigger within a particular time window
to declare an event, you may wish to bias a station to have a greater or lesser impact on
the event association routine. If a station is particularly quiet and only ever triggers on
“real” events, you may wish to give it a weighting of 1.5 or 2.0, but if a station is
particularly susceptible to local noise you may wish to set the bias to 0.3 or 0.5.
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Trigger Settings
If you have stations sending continuous data into eqServer (e.g. from a SeedLink stream or
a Kelunji Gecko) you will need to run an algorithm over the data to generate an event
trigger. If the station you have enabled is a continuous stream, you can tick the “Trig” box
and set STA/LTA, Threshold, and Frequency pass band settings to set the trigger sensitivity.
There is a detailed explanation of STA/LTA triggering routine in the eqWave user manual.
Event Association
To declare an “Event”, eqServer is looking for multiple triggers to occur within a timeframe.
The size of this time window will depend on the size of your network and earthquake wave
travel times, but as a rule of thumb you can set it as 10 seconds for every degree across
your network.
The minimum number of stations that is usually required to reasonably attempt an
earthquake location is 3, but if you have a high density of stations you may wish to increase
this to a higher number to reduce false triggers. The Bias of the station (defined earlier) will
contribute to this Alarm threshold.
After declaring an Event, you may want eqServer to wait for some time before calculating
the location and magnitude to allow data from additional stations to come in. This wait time
is defined in seconds and is set in the last settings field in the Event Association section.
Remember to click on the “Save Changes” button at the top right corner of the page to
save your sub-network settings.
SeedLink
If you wish to add data to your
eqServer from a SeedLink server,
you will need to know the address
of the data host, then get a list of
networks, stations, and channels.
We will use the example of
connecting to IRIS at
rtserve.iris.washington.edu
Simply type in the host address
and click “Get Stations”. A list of
Networks hosted on this server will be displayed. Click on one or more networks to display
the list of available stations and channels for the network, then tick the checkbox for every
station that you wish to subscribe to. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and click the
“Save” button and within a few minutes you will start receiving data from the nominated
stations. Ensure that the Stations are in the database to be able to show them on a map.
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Live Data Sorting
Much like the Subnetwork display settings for One Hour, you can define frequency display
for the Live Data display. You can also manually sort the order that the stations are
displayed, and you can also choose which of the incoming channels to display on Live Data.
To change the order of the stations, place your cursor over a station and it will become
highlighted. Click and drag the station up or down in the list to set the display order. Turn
off any channels that you do not wish to display, and set the frequency pass band of the
data to be displayed on the Live Data screen.
Scroll to the
bottom of the
screen and click
the “Save”
button and
within a few
minutes your
Live Data screen
will refresh with
the updated
display settings.
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Places
The default eqServer SQL database is populated with a list of place names (cities, towns,
lakes, etc) but you will probably need to add more detail for your map regions. You can
export a list of place names, add a new place, edit a place name, or delete places from the
database.
The first (red) section will extract a list of place names from the database. You can set the
boundaries of the extraction using latitudes and longitudes, or where the entry contains a
particular word in the name, region, or country. Places have a defined “size” hierarchy, and
the list can be set to only show places above a certain size. A page will load after you click
the “List” button. You can select all, copy and then paste the results into Excel if required.
To add a new place name to the database, define its coordinates, name, region, country and
category in the yellow section, then click on the “Add” button.
If you wish to edit a site, type partial text into as many fields as possible to target the
intended result. If there are additional entries that match your search field you will see the
message “more than 1 row selected”, so check that the visible result is the correct entry.
To delete an entry from the place name database, enter the name, region and country as it
appears in the List result and click “Delete”. This will remove the entry, so check your entry
to be certain before clicking the button.
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Stations
We use the term “Stations” to define an earthquake monitoring location, which are
sometimes referred to by seismologists and geophysicists as “sites” or “seismographs” or
“nodes”. The default database may contain some stations, which you can view and edit in
much the same way as described in Places.
You can produce a list of stations using latitude and longitude boundaries, station codes and
other parameters. Partial text matching will produce results, e.g. using “aust” to search a
location description will also list stations described using the terms Australia, Austria, and
names such as Faust.
The station code is code of up to five characters made up of letters (typically upper case)
and numbers only. The latitude, longitude and elevation are self-explanatory, and the
description is a human readable text field to help you find stations using relevant
keywords. The owner of a site may be different to the operator of the site, and these are
usually short codes that usually relate to the international network code, such a GB for the
British Geological Survey or AU for Geoscience Australia.
The start dates are useful for historical records, and end dates are used to ensure only
current stations are plotted on the maps when setting up sub-networks.
To edit or delete station, enter the exact station code, proceeding with caution when
deleting a station as the action is immediate and non-reversible.
12
Live Data
The Live Data display web page displays a high resolution image
of the last hour of data received by eqServer. The image is
suited to widescreen television displays that have a screen ratio
of 16:9, but the image is automatically scaled so that it fits to
the browser window resolution.
If your browser
window is wider or
taller than this ratio you will see a gap at the
right or bottom of the image.
Most web browsers have a full screen or
presentation mode that will hide the
navigation and tool bars so that your screen
will only show your seismic data. The Google
Chrome browser has a very clean presentation
mode that is well suited for showing this page
on an LCD television display.
The web page automatically refreshes every
30 seconds.
To prevent image burn-in we do not recommend the use of plasma
displays for Live Data
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One Hour
The One Hour display works in a similar way to Live Data in that
it shows data from many stations for a one hour period. The
difference is that you can browse back in time in one-hour
blocks, and you can view subsets of data as defined by your subnetworks. When you first click on the One Hour icon you will be
presented with your main map and your sub-network maps. If
you click on the main map you will be able to browse data from
all stations (similar to Live Data), but by clicking on a subnetwork you will only see the continuous data from the stations within the sub-network.
When you click on a map, the screen that is displayed shows the waveforms for the current
hour (which may be only partially completed as each page starts on the hour). You will
notice a control panel at the top of the screen:
The red Seismology Research Centre “S” logo in the top left corner will always take you
back to the home page. In the red section you can use the “minus” and “plus” buttons on
either side of the hour menu to step through other hourly images, or you can select a date
and time from the menus then click the “Get” button to jump to a particular hour.
These images are generated on demand and stored in a buffer. If you believe additional
data has been sent in since the image was last rendered, click the “Update” button.
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You can quickly jump back to the current hour by clicking on the “Now” button.
If you see a signal of interest (e.g. above, the teleseism near the end of the hour), you can
click anywhere on the image and a window will pop up that shows a three-minute zoom of
the data from the station you clicked on, and from all stations within 300km of that station.
15
You can then click on the “Get File” button to download the full resolution waveform files to
your computer.
You can also add a tag to the time on the event by clicking on the “Add Event” button,
which allows you to enter a text description that will appear in the top right of this hour’s
One Hour page for future reference (indicated above in blue outline).
One Day
The One Day display works in a similar way to One Hour. It still
shows one hour of data per line, but it shows 24 lines of data
from a single station. The image is scaled to fit the available
screen area in your web browser. The control panel at the top of
the screen is slightly different to One Day as you now use the
“plus” and “minus” buttons to step through days rather than
hours, and you can select which station to view from a list, which
is arranged by sub-networks.
The signal amplitude is scaled based on the average signal level from the first hour of data.
If you need more or less amplitude resolution, use the Amplitude – and + buttons in the
orange section of the control panel.
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The blue markers throughout the day indicate eqServer’s automatic event detections on
that day, which may or may not involve the station you are viewing. If the station you are
viewing triggered during that day you will see a red vertical line at the trigger time.
As with One Hour, you can click on an event of interest and see a pop-up window showing
three minutes of data from that station and the data from stations within 300km. Simply
click on the “Get File” button to download the waveform files. For the data download you
can adjust the number of stations that are downloaded by selecting a distance from the
drop-down menu in the blue section – the default being 300km, as per the preview.
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Latest Event Report
One of the main features of eqServer is its ability to
automatically detect earthquakes and send out a notification of
the estimated location and magnitude. When an event is
declared, a bulletin is generated showing the waveforms, a map
of the estimated location, and a summary of the data related to
the solution. The latest event report can be accessed by clicking
on the blue icon with the epicentral rings, a logo shared with our
interactive calculation program, eqFocus.
The estimated magnitude and location of the event is at the top of the screen, followed by
the date, time, latitude and longitude of the solution. Below this is an image of the
waveforms used in the solution. By clicking on the waveform image you will be taken to the
Wave Finder screen, with the date, time, and stations to download automatically entered
into the relevant fields. You can adjust these as required, which will be discussed later.
Below the waveforms is a map showing a circle where the automatic solution places the
event, with dotted lines connecting it to the location of the stations used in the solution.
Clicking on the map will open a new browser window for Google Maps with a pin dropped at
the estimated location of the event.
To the right of the map are two buttons and a table with the trigger time and amplitude
data from each station. Red text means the data has been deferred from the solution. The
Accuracy number indicates how well the solution fits with the earth model used.
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The Intensity Report button will show a brief report that provides distances to nearby
locations (from your Places database) as well as an estimate of the Modified Mercalli
Intensity at various distances. This uses an attenuation function that applies for SE Australia
and California, but may require customisation for regions with different local attenuation.
The other button initiates the creation of a KML file to Download for Google Earth which
you can open with the Google Earth desktop application.
If there have been several revisions of the automatic solution, you will be looking at the
latest version. To view the first revision of the event (which may better match the
information received in the notification), click on the button below the data table.
On the left of the screen you will see a list of past months. Click on a month to open a
second column that shows a list of automatic event bulletins, in reverse chronological order,
suffixed by the name of the sub-network that created the bulletin. Click on a bulletin to load
it into the main window to the right.
Quick Quake for iPad
These automatic event bulletins are the source of
data for our free Quick Quake iPad app. The app
connects to your eqServer to browse recent and
past bulletins. You can refine automatic solutions
by marking a P & S arrival on a single station and
moving the earthquake until it roughly fits the
expected wave travel times.
For more information visit www.src.com.au/software/quick-quake/
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Wave Finder
As mentioned in the previous section, Wave Finder is a way to
extract waveform files from the archive, based on time and
location. Wave Finder can be accessed from the Event Reports
by clicking on the waveform preview image, or by clicking on the
red waveform icon on the home page. This logo is shared by our
eqWave application, which is used to view the downloaded files.
Opening Wave Finder from the home screen will populate the
red fields with the current UTC date and time, which will be the
start time of the data extraction. Edit these as required to a past date/time. The yellow
section defines the number of minutes of data to extract from the start time, and you can
optionally only extract the vertical channels of data if you have limited download speed.
The orange section tells eqServer which stations to include in the data extraction. You can
get data from all available stations; specific stations (by typing in their station codes,
separated by spaces, or by clicking on a sub-network button to auto-fill the station codes);
from all stations within a certain distance of a particular station code; or from all stations
within a certain distance of a particular latitude/longitude.
The last section deals with the data format. If you are using eqWave to view the waveform
files, we recommend using the SUDS format so that any available meta data is available for
viewing in eqWave. You can alternatively extract the data in MiniSEED format, which is also
readable by eqWave. Click on the “Get Waveform” button to download the file, or simply
preview or download an image of the files using the other buttons.
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Event Finder
Event Finder is a way to extract a list of events from the
database.
By default a filter is set for the “Source Type” to be “L” or “l” to
avoid listing automatic solutions, thereby only displaying events
that have been refined by a seismologist using eqFocus.
By removing this filter you will then get a text table list of all
automatic event solutions.
The form is self-explanatory, defining date and distance ranges for the query, with a
number of filter options available to reduce the results based on the various parameters
stored in the database by eqFocus, as well as by magnitude as stored by eqServer.
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Network Status Maps
Once you have defined
your main map area
and sub-network maps
you will notice that the
sub-network areas will
be drawn as
transparent boxes on
the home screen map.
Within each of these
areas will be markers
showing the location of
your stations, and their
data age as green,
yellow, or red circles or
triangles.
For a more detailed view of your station status, click on a sub-network area to bring up the
Network Status summary page for that sub-network.
Don’t worry if your areas overlap and your click brings up the wrong map – you can change
to another sub-network from the list of Subnetworks that appears at the top of the page.
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The menu at the top of the screen also contains a link to Live Data, which displays the
current One Hour page for this sub-network. This page does not automatically refresh, but
can be manually updated using your browser controls.
The other menu item allows you to Edit the detailed Settings for the sub-network (which
stations appear on the map, display and trigger settings, event association settings) and
edit the Map. The latter option will allow you to redefine the boundaries of the map,
retaining the settings (stations, display, etc) for the stations that remain within the
boundaries of the map.
Health Graphs
If the seismographs that are sending data into eqServer are also sending station health
data, such as battery voltage, temperature, and memory storage remaining (a standard
feature of the Kelunji Echo and EchoPro seismographs) then this data is displayed in a table
on the right of the screen. Data that comes in from SeedLink servers do not have this meta
data and will appear blank. The age of the data is calculated by eqServer. Stations that do
send in health data (like the Kelunji Echo and EchoPro) may include GPS synchronisation
information – if there is an issue with the GPS a message of “no sync” will be displayed, but
this message will also appear if no time synchronisation information is available, as will be
the case for SeedLink data. In this case we assume the data is time synchronised.
This meta data is being stored in the eqServer database and can provide a useful historical
health record for each station. Simply click on the circle/triangle symbol for the station in
the list or on the map to bring up the last 7 days of meta data.
Several graphs will be displayed, showing the history or temperature, battery voltage,
memory free, telemetry delay, and current consumption of the remote equipment.
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Mains-powered stations will usually show a steady voltage, whereas solar panel powered
stations (as in the example above) will vary depending on solar exposure. Equipment
installed in vaults will have stable temperatures, whereas more exposed installations will
vary with ambient temperatures. The telemetry delay is calculated based on the start time
of the file that was received compared to the time it was received, which in the case above
is around one minute as this recorder sends data files every minute.
You can use the control panel in the top left of the screen to view the health graphs for
other stations, for longer periods back from the current date, or from a particular date for a
number of days. These long term trends can be useful in diagnosing issues such as solar
panel damage or degradation, extreme temperature effects, memory issues, changes in
cellular data reception, etc.
This data can also be exported as a text table using the link below the control panel.
The eqServer SQL Database
The eqServer data management system uses an SQL database to store all data apart from
waveform files, which are stored in a file hierarchy that is used by Wave Finder to facilitate
simple data retrieval.
Advanced users may wish to connect to the eqServer database from other systems, and the
credentials for access will be provided with the delivery of the system. The details of the
database tables are provided on the following pages.
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Introduction
The eqSuite Database stores information on earthquakes and the seismographs used to
locate them.
It is used by the eqServer website, the automatic location system programs eqLogger and
eqWatch, and in the programs eqFocus and QuickQuake.
A Basic Definition of Terms
A single earthquake is defined as a single row in the Event table.
An Event can be located automatically by eqWatch, and also by Seismologists using the
programs eqFocus or QuickQuake. Each Event will have one or more Location revisions,
each stored as a row in the Location table. The preferred Location will be declared as the
Best Location, which will be displayed in lists of earthquakes.
Each Location may contain multiple Arrivals with P, S or other Arrival codes.
The Arrival is associated with the seismograph Site where it was detected.
Each Location may contain multiple Magnitudes.
They may be of different magnitude types, such as ML or MB.
Each Magnitude is associated with a seismograph Site.
A final magnitude for the Location is usually calculated as an average of all Magnitudes of
the same type, or set by the user.
Each Arrival and Magnitude has an associated Seismograph Site.
A Site has a geographic location and an owner.
Each Seismograph at a Site can regularly send its current State of Health.
This includes the state of the battery, temperature and how full its storage is.
The history of the Seismograph Health is stored for a year in the Health table.
The most recent health information is stored in the LatestHealth table.
Each Seismograph at a Site will have one or more waveform Channels which produce
waveform files.
To convert the data in these files into usable natural values, we need
Response information.
Sometimes this information in the file, but in MiniSeed format files it can be stored in the
Response table.
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Tables
TABLE `event`
`eventCode` mediumint(9)
`bestLocationCode` mediumint(9)
`eventName` varchar(255)
`network` smallint(5)
Unique ID for this event
ID of chosen best Location
A name for this event. Usually the nearest town.
ID of seismograph network that detected this event.
TABLE `eventNetwork`
`eventCode` int(11)
`network` int(11)
Associate Events with Networks
Unique ID of an event
Unique ID of a network
TABLE `networks`
`name` varchar(20)
`longitude1` float
`latitude1` float
`longitude2` float
`latitude2` float
`eventWindow` smallint(4)
`minTriggers` smallint(3)
`waitTime` smallint(4)
`networkCode` smallint(3)
A geographic region containing seismographs
A name for the network
The bounding rectangle.
Seconds that arrivals must occur within to be in the same event.
Number of arrivals needed to declare an event.
Delay before processing event. To allow more arrivals to arrive.
Unique ID
TABLE `location`
`locationCode` mediumint(9)
`eventCode` mediumint(9)
`dateOfEvent` datetime
`eventms` mediumint(9)
`eventmsUncertainty` mediumint(9)
`longitude` double
`longitudeUncertainty` double
`latitude` double
`latitudeUncertainty` double
`depth` double
`depthUncertainty` double
`depthRestraint` char(1)
`initials` varchar(4)
`authority` varchar(4)
`locationDate` datetime
`checked` mediumint(9)
`accuracyCode` char(2)
`placeName` varchar(255)
`sdArrivalResiduals` double
`programName` varchar(255)
`distanceToNearestSg` double
`nearestSgSite` varchar(5)
`gapAngle` double
`numberSg` mediumint(9)
`numberOfArrivals` mediumint(9)
`earthModel` varchar(255)
`sourceType` char(1)
`dependence` char(1)
`quality` char(1)
`effect` char(1)
`revision` mediumint(9)
`localTimeOffset` double
`locationMagnitude` double
`locationMagnitudeType` varchar(4)
`maximumObservedIntensity` double
A calculated location of an Event
Unique ID
ID of event this location belongs to
Date and Time to the second the event occurred
Millisecond of the second the event occurred
Uncertainty of event time in milliseconds
Longitude
Longitude uncertainty
Latitude
Latitude uncertainty
Depth
Depth uncertainty
The control on depth when locating. Not used.
Initials of person who located the event.
Short code of organisation that located the event.
Date this location was performed
Has the location been checked by another person. Not Used.
1 or 2 character code describing the quality of the location.
Name of nearest Town.
standard deviation of Arrival Residuals
The program that was used to determine this Locatiom
Distance to nearest seismograph site
Sitecode of nearest site
Maximum angle separating 2 seismographs
Number of sites used in location
Number of arrivals used in location
File used that describe wave velocity in earth layers
Local, Blast, Teleseism, Coal, etc
Foreshock, Mainshock Aftershock, Swarm
Initial, Learner, Automatic, Complete, Reviewed
None, Felt, Injuries, Damage, Surface faulting
The number of times this event has been revised.
Local Timezone offset.
User chosen magnitude
Magnitude type. ML, MB, MS etc
not used.
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TABLE `locationarrival`
`locationCode` mediumint(9)
`arrivalCode` mediumint(9)
Associate Arrivals with Locations
Location ID
Arrival ID
TABLE `locationarrivaldeferred`
`locationCode` mediumint(9)
`arrivalCode` mediumint(9)
Deferred Arrivals in Locations
TABLE `locationcomments`
`locationCode` mediumint(9)
`htmlComment` text
TABLE `locationmagnitudes`
`locationCode` mediumint(9)
`source` varchar(4)
`sgStation` varchar(5)
`magnitudeCalcDate` datetime
`magnitudeType` varchar(4)
`magValue` double
`uncertainty` double
`attribute1` double
`attribute1uncertainty` double
`attribute2` double
`attribute2uncertainty`
`Comment` varchar(255)
`equation` varchar(255)
`active` tinyint(4)
TABLE `arrival`
`arrivalCode` mediumint(9)
`site` varchar(5)
`arrivalDate` datetime
`waveformURL` varchar(255)
`arrivalType` varchar(5)
`arrivalms` mediumint(9)
`arrivalmsUncertainty` mediumint(9)
`frequency` double
`frequencyUncertainty` double
`peakAmplitude` double
`peakUnits` char(1)
`peakUncertainty` double
`initials` varchar(4)
`authority` varchar(5)
`pickDate` datetime
`onset` char(1)
`motion` char(1)
`network` smallint(5)
Comments on Location
Magnitude for this location according to a seismograph
Location ID
not used
Seismograph
Date this magnitude was determined
for example “ML”, “MB”
magnitude.
magnitude uncertainty
Value depends on Magnitude Type.
For ML & MS, value = peak amplitude in counts
For MB, value = duration in seconds
For ML, value = frequency at peak in hz
A comment.
Equation used to calculate the magnitude
1 if used by the Location. 0 if determined to be incorrect
UniqueID
SiteCode of seismograph
Time of arrival to second
not used
Arrival Code. P, S.
Milliseconds of time of arrival
Uncertainty of time
Waveform Hz at Time. Not always set.
Uncertainty of Frequency
Peak amplitude near arrival. Not always set
c = counts, d = mm, v = m/s, a = m/s2
Uncertainty of arrival
Initials of person or program that determined the arrival
Organisation that determined the arrival
Date the arrival was determined
e = emergent, i = impulsive, w = weak
‘+’ or ‘-’
seismograph network this arrival is used in.
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TABLE `health`, ‘latesthealth’
`date` datetime
`site` varchar(5)
`voltage` double
`supply` int(11)
`charge` int(11)
`totalbytes` int(11)
`percentfree` int(11)
`sync` double
`synctime` datetime
`ip` varchar(16)
`temperature` int(11)
`recorded` datetime
State of Health of Sites
Date and time the health value is received by eqServer
Seismograph code
Power supply voltage
Supply Milliamps
Charge Milliamps
Storage in bytes
% free storage.
Time adjustment.
Time Sync was determined
Internet IP address
Internal temperature
Time State of Health values determined
TABLE `places`
`name` varchar(50)
`admin1` varchar(60)
`country` varchar(60)
`Class` smallint(6)
1=national capital
2= regional capital
3 = large town
4 = small town
`longitude` float
`latitude` float
Cities, Towns, Mines
Name of the place
Region the place is in
Country the place is in
Size of the place.
TABLE `response`
Counts To Units conversion.
Used when waveform file format does not store response
Seismograph code
Seismograph channel
Conversion value
Timespan this value applies to
`site` varchar(10)
`channel` varchar(10)
`countsPerUnit` double
`startdate` datetime
`enddate` datetime
Geographic location
TABLE `site`
`site` varchar(5)
`longitude` double
`latitude` double
`elevation` double
`sensitivityFactor1` double
`sensitivityFactor2` double
`startdate` datetime
`endDate` datetime
`operator` varchar(50
`owner` varchar(50)
`location` varchar(50)
Seismograph Site
Seismograph code
Geographic location
TABLE `triggers`
and triggering on a site
`networkCode` smallint(3)
`site` varchar(5)
`type` enum('continuous','triggered')
`sta`
`lta`
`threshold`
`lowdispFreq`
`highdispFreq`
`weight` float
`trig` tinyint(1)
`display` int(1)
`lowtrigFreq` float unsigned
`hightrigFreq` float unsigned
eqServer rules for displaying waveform
Elevation on km
Installation date
Shutdown date
Code of organisation that maintains the site
Code for organisation that owns the site
Name of the site.
Network ID
Site code
Is incoming waveforms continuous or triggered
Short term average seconds
Long Term average seconds
Declare trigger when STA/LTA > threshold
Low Pass frequency filter for display
High Pass frequency filter for display
Value when adding up network.minTriggers to declare event
Do we monitor for triggers with this site?
Do we display this site?
Low Pass freq filter to wave for triggering using STA/LTA
High Pass freq filter to wave for triggering using STA/LTA
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File Archive
Incoming waveform files are stored in either a Continuous, or Triggered file archive.
The general directory structure of the Continuous File Archive is
/data/repository/archive/SITE/YEAR/MONTH/DAY/YYYY-MM-DD HHMM SS SITE.dmx.gz
for example:
/data/repository/archive/MLWM/continuous/2015/05/20/2015-05-20 0156 26 MLWM.dmx.gz
The Triggered file archive stores files containing arrivals.
The general directory structure for the Triggered File Archive is
/data/repository/trigarchive/YEAR/MONTH/DAY/YYYY-MM-DD HHMM SS SITE.dmx.gz
for example:
/data/repository/trigarchive/2015/05/20/2015-05-20 0202 40 WRNM.dmx.gz
30
Other SRC
Software Products
eqWave
eqWave is provided free with the purchase of
eqServer, eqFocus, or any Kelunji seismic recorder. It
is the most user-friendly earthquake waveform analysis
tool in the world, allowing you to easily pick arrivals,
filter data, convert between displacement, velocity and
acceleration, view frequency spectra, and even
estimate local Richter earthquake magnitudes.
Quick Quake for iPad
Quick Quake is the SRC’s free iPad app that
can access eqServer earthquake alert
bulletins, and allows users to manually locate
earthquakes using a totally new and
extremely simple method. Download it today
for free from the iPad App Store and use the
demo data to see how easy it is!
eqFocus
eqFocus is the perfect partner to eqWave and
eqServer.
With data from three or more seismograph
stations you can pass arrival times and
amplitudes from eqWave to eqFocus and let it do
the location and magnitude calculations for you.
You can customise earth models, enter your own
place names and station response information,
view earthquakes in Google Earth or Maps, and
more.
Seismology Research Centre | 141 Palmer Street Richmond Victoria 3121 AUSTRALIA
T +61 3 8420 8940 | F +61 3 8420 8900 | [email protected]
www.src.com.au
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