AAton 35-III User guide

AAton 35-III User guide
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35-III
User’s Guide
June 97
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INTRODUCTION
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The AATON 35-III User Guide
AATON
2 rue de la Paix
BP 3002
38000 Grenoble
FRANCE
+33 4 7642 9550
+33 4 7651 3491 fax
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: http://www.aaton.com
(c) June 1997 Aaton / Grenoble , France.
Limitation of Liability
The information contained in this manual is distributed without warranty of any kind, express or implied. To the maximum extent permitted by law, Aaton and its licensors disclaim any and all warranties, express or implied, by statute or
otherwise, regarding this manual, including the fitness for a particular purpose, quality, or merchantability. Under no circumstances shall Aaton or its licensors be liable to the user of this manual or any other person for any incidental, special,
or consequential damages resulting from the use of this manual or the operation of the equipment described therein,
whether arising out of breach of warranty, breach of contract, or otherwise. Under no circumstances shall Aaton or its
licensors be liable for any damages arising out of the operation of the equipment described in this manual, whether operated in a manner which is consistent with or contrary to the instructions contained therein, for physical abuse or misuse
of the equipment. No oral or written information or advice given by Aaton or its licensors, their respective employees,
distributors, dealers, or agents, shall create any warranty. Aaton and its licensors further disclaim any and all warranties,
express or implied, by statute or otherwise, regarding this manual, including the fitness for a particular purpose, quality,
or merchantability, regarding the equipment described in this manual, and in no event shall Aaton or its licensors be
liable for any damages, including but not limited to incidental, special, or consequential damages, arising out of the use
of the equipment, or any exposure of motion picture film used in the equipment.
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TABLE OF CONTENT
1
GENERAL OVERVIEW
Front View
Rear View
Battery Side
Motor Side
LCD Control Panel - Quick Reference
2
12
13
14
15
16
THE CAMERA BODY
2.1 Lenses
Arri PL Lens Port
Installing the Lens
2.2 Viewing System
Viewfinder Options
Installing the Extension Finder
Viewfinder Tension Adjustments
Adjusting the Diopter
The Eyepiece Shutter
Adjusting the Viewing Horizon
Viewing Screen
Changing the Viewing Screen
Adjusting the Viewing Screen
2.3 Mirror Shutter
Concept
Adjusting the Shutter
2.4 Film Gate and Pulldown Claw
Adjusting the Pitch
The Side Pressure Bar
2.5 Flange Focal Distance Adjustment
Concept
Polishing a Spacer
Changing a Spacer
Adjusting the Viewing Screen
Flange Focal Distances
20
20
20
20
20
21
22
22
23
23
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25
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27
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29
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2.6 Magazine
Installing the Magazine
Removing the Magazine
2.7 Power
Installing the Battery on the Camera
Battery Charging
Other Power Options
2.8 Motor
Camera Speeds
Using External Speed Devices
Electronic Inching
Single Frame Operation
2.9 LCD Control Panel and Jog
The Aaton Jog
Understanding the Control Panel
AatonCode
ASA Setting
Battery Voltage
Magazine Number
Camera Preset Speed
Camera Specific Speed
Speed Phasing
Remaining Footage
Elapsed Footage
Camera Software Version Number
Footage Total Recall
Warning
2.10 LED Indicators
Position and Meaning of the Diodes
Camera Test Indicator
Camera Run Indicator
Low Battery Indicator
Low Speed Indicator
2.11 Video Assist
The CD56 Color CCD Assist
Installing the Control Unit
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30
30
31
31
31
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33
34
34
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37
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TABLE OF CONTENT
Menu Operations
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THE MAGAZINE
Concept
Pressure Plate System
The Gate Plate
The Picture Plate
Loading
First Step, in Daylight
Loading, in the Dark
Adjusting the Loop
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42
48
48
48
48
49
49
50
51
THE AATON SYSTEM
Camera Configurations
15mm Front Rods
Sliding Bridgeplate
Handgrip
Mounting the Handgrip
Handgrip On/Off Functions
Handgrip Adjustment
Tripod Use
Shoulder Operation
Carrying Handle
3/8 Accessory Screw
Mounting from the Carrying Handle
Tape Measure Hook
Transport
Extreme Conditions
Cold Weather
Warm Weather
56
56
56
57
57
57
58
58
58
59
59
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60
60
61
61
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CLEANING
5.1 Lens
Lens Elements
Lens Exterior
Mounting Surface
5.2 Body
Exterior
Mounting Surfaces
Camera Gate
5.3 Viewing System
Viewing Screen
Eyepiece
Viewfinder
5.4 Magazine
Exterior
Pressure Plates
Interior / Film Path
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SUPER35
6.1 Super35
The Format
When to Shoot Super35
6.2 Super35 Field Conversions
Changing the Viewing Screen
Shifting the Viewfinder
Shifting the PL Lens Port
Shifting the Video Assist
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70
70
70
71
71
71
71
72
3-PERF FORMAT
7.1 Concept
7.2 The AATON 35-III 3-Perf Camera Body
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64
64
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TABLE OF CONTENT
8
AATONCODE
8.1 Concept
8.2 The Internal Clock
8.3 OriginCplus MasterClock
8.4 Initializing AatonCode in the Camera
Using the OriginCplus - Recommended Method
Using an External SMPTE Device
8.5 Monitoring and Maintaining AatonCode
Monitoring AatonCode with OriginCplus
Maintaining AatonCode without OriginCplus
8.6 GMT1 Smpte Generator
8.7 The Camera’s Assistant Duties
Checking the Diodes
Setting the ASA
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80
80
81
81
82
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83
83
83
84
84
84
85
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
List of Specifications
Connector - Pin Attributions
Viewing Screens
88
89
90
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1
GENERAL OVERVIEW
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1
2
3
4
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9
10
1.1 FRONT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
Eyepiece
Friction Adjusting Ring adjusts the tension of the eyepiece swivel
Diopter Set Ring adjusts the diopter setting of the viewfinder to the operator’s eye
Lateral Lock Knob locks the lateral position of the viewfinder
PL Lens Port
CCD Control Unit
CCD Friction Ring
Lens Locking Ring
Wooden Handgrip
15mm Front Rods
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GENERAL OVERVIEW
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18
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20
1.2 REAR
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Pitch and Mirror Shutter Adjusting Tools
CCD Led - On/Off indicator
Magnetic wheel for the magazine’s sprockets
XLR4 Connector allows for the battery connection
Aperture Opening
Battery Locking Screw
Magnetic Wheel for the magazine’s take-up core
LCD Control Panel displays AatonCode, ASA, speed, voltage, or remaining footage
Jog Wheel provides quick adjustment of ASA, speed, and phasing
Lemo5 Connector for AatonCode and SMPTE communication
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1.3 BATTERY SIDE
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24
25
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27
28
29
30
14
Carrying Handle
Base of the carrying handle and viewing system block
Guiding Pin for the magazine
Amph9 Connector connects the CCD unit to the camera body
Cap covering the viewing screen holder
Magazine Connector
Coupler allows for the handgrip attachment
Guiding Grooves for the Magazine
LED Indicators
Run/Test Switch provides camera Run and half frame inching
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GENERAL OVERVIEW
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40
1.4 MOTORS SIDE
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32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
Eyepiece Shutter blocks light when operator’s eye is away from the viewfinder
Lemo6 Connector
Lemo8 Connector
Led Indicators
Handgrip Run/Test Switch provides camera run and full frame inching
Lemo2 Connector
Magazine’s Take-up Core Motor
Handgrip T-Screw
Mag Release Lever
Magazine’s Sprockets and Camera Pulldown Claw Motor
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1.5 LCD CONTROL PANEL - QUICK REFERENCE
SYNC
Test
VAR
Time speed
ISO
SET
ISO / Batt
Run
IN SHOW MODE
24’ - 080
ISO = 100
Batt = 10’4
MAG =0071
Sp = 27’454
Ela = 042
22=32=54
95-03-25
123456
2321
Camera speed and Remaining footage
Film ASA
Battery voltage
Magazine number
Camera Speed
Elapsed footage during last take
Hours=minutes=seconds in AatonCode
Year-Month-Day in AatonCode
Production ID in AatonCode
Equipment number in AatonCode
(default mode)
(1 x Batt/Iso)
(2 x Batt/Iso)
(3 x Batt/Iso)
(1 x Speed)
(2 x Speed)
(1 x Time)
(2 x Time)
(3 x Time)
(4 x Time)
IN SET MODE
Sp =2 4’
Sp = 27’454
Et
Phase
ISO = 100
Adjusting a preset speed
Adjusting a specific speed
Speed controled by external speed device
Phase Adjusting
ASA Setting
(SET, 1 x SYNC, toggle SYNC or use Jog)
(SET, 1 x VAR, use Jog)
(SET, 2 x VAR)
(Camera running,SET, 2 x VAR, use Jog)
(SET, 1 x ISO, toggle ISO or use Jog)
WARNINGS
Lo Spd
Lo Batt
Loop
Scratch
Empty
Unadjust
16
Camera has not yet reached the selected speed
Battery is too low (below 10V)
Film loop is too small
Something is wrong in the magazine
No more film in the magazine
Please check page 39
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GENERAL OVERVIEW
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2
THE CAMERA BODY
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2.1 LENSES
The AATON 35-III’s flexible lens mounting system allows for the use of
a wide variety of 35mm lenses.
Flange focal distance.
Refers to the critical distance
from the lens seat to the film
plane. With the PL port, the
precise FFD of the AATON
35-III is 52mm -40 to -50
microns as measured with a
depth gauge in the lens port.
With the PV port, the FFD is
57.15mm -60 to -70 microns
It is recommended that these
tolerances be checked and
maintained by a qualified technician. The combination of
FFD and back focus distance
of a lens directly affects precise
focus and overall image sharpness. Make sure these critical
measurements are strictly
upheld. When using an unfamiliar lens for the first time,
check that the eye focus
matches the tape-measured
focus marks on the lens, and/or
shoot a focus test.
2.1.1 ArriPL Lens Port
The ArriPL lens port is the standard mounting system delivered
with the AATON 35-III and allows the use of all 35mm ArriPL
mounted motion picture lenses. PL lenses adaptors are available for
Arri standard and Arri bayonet mounted lenses. This lens port is
ideal for rental facilities, where a mounting system compatible with
other manufacturer’s 35mm cameras is often desired.
If you need to get a Panavision or Nikon mount, please contact a
certified Aaton technician.
2.1.2 Installing the Lens
To install the lens on the camera body, turn the outer locking ring
counter-clockwise. If the port cap is on, remove it. Align the four
protruding flanges on the lens with the four corresponding cutaways
in the locking ring and insert the lens into the camera port so that
its flanges rest evenly against the lens seat. Tighten the locking ring
by turning clockwise until the lens is secured in place and the locking ring is firmly set. Make sure the locking ring is tight enough so
that it cannot be inadvertantly unlocked.
VIEWING SYSTEM
2.2.1 Viewfinder Options
The viewfinder is designed to be fully orientable, providing left or
right side viewing and upright image in any position. The viewfinder comes equipped with a standard short eyepiece that can be used
for handheld and tripod-mounted operation. For more comfortable
tripod and studio applications, the standard extension finder(200
mm) can be fitted in place of the short eyepiece. With an Elemak or
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THE CAMERA BODY
Mitchell type dolly, or in situations requiring additional reach, the
hyperlong (400 mm) finder, which is twice as long as the standard
extension finder, can be used.
The Aaton hyperlong finder integrates as a standard feature a heating system designed to fight mist. A heating system kit is also available for the standard eyepiece.
2.2.2 Attaching the Extension Finder
In order to use an extension finder on the AATON 35-III, the standard eyepiece must first be removed To remove the eyepiece, locate
the eyepiece lock ring, marked a in the image below. Rotate counterclockwise until the ring reaches its stop and gently pull off the eyepiece. To install the extension finder, locate the protruding guide
d
The Pechan Prism
In order to provide a fully
orientable upright image, the
Aaton viewfinder incorporates
a Pechan prism assembly, which is actually comprised of two
triangular prisms sandwiched
together. On some viewfinders,
depending of the construction
of this prism, rotation of the
eyepiece a full 360° will cause
the image in the finder to shift
slightly left or right.
After attaching an extension
finder, if the image in the finder appears to have shifted
slightly, rotate the finder 360°
and choose the preferred centered image.
c
b
a
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pin on the seat of the viewfinder and align the pin with the hole in
the flange of the finder. Make the flange to the seat of the viewfinder and tighten the lock ring until it is set firmly in place. During
this procedure, you will notice that the extension finder needs to
face 180° away from the operator’s eye to be installed on the viewfinder. Because of its optical construction, this is completely normal.
After installation, rotate the finder 180° to regular viewing position.
2.2.3 Viewfinder Tension Adjustments
The large knurled knob at the base of the left/right lateral movement point (B) locks the lateral positioning.
The friction adjusting ring, located behind the eyepiece lock ring,
can be used to adjust the tension of the eyepiece swivel, depending
on the operator’s preference and the viewfinder being used.
When using the standard eyepiece, tension should be relatively light
to allow for movement with a moderate amount of pressure.
When using a standard extension finder, tension should be increased
to hold the additional weight of this finder in place.
To adjust the tension of the swivel, loosen the steel knurled screw
(C) located on the friction adjusting ring. Hold the eyepiece in place, rotate the adjusting ring slightly and retighten the screw; 1/8 of a
turn, at first, will have an effect. To increase the tension of the eyepiece swivel, rotate the adjusting ring clockwise; to decrease the tension, rotate the adjusting ring counter-clockwise.
2.2.4 Adjusting the Diopter
Before shooting, the diopter setting of the viewfinder should be
adjusted to the operator’s eye. To set the diopter, locate the diopter
set ring (D) in front of the carrying handle at the top of the viewfinder, and loosen the small knurled knob. Look through the viewfinder, rotate the diopter set ring until the edge of the cross-hair is at
its sharpest point and retighten the knob. It is recommended that,
for easiest setting, this adjustment be performed with the port cover
off and no lens on the camera.
Notice that the diopter set ring is engraved with numbers and dots
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THE CAMERA BODY
- use this reference to quickly recall your particular setting when
more than one person will be looking through the viewfinder.
If a corrective lens is required, one can be fitted in the recessed area
of the eyecup ring of both the standard eyepiece and the extension
finder.
2.2.5 The Eyepiece Shutter
In order to avoid light seepage through the viewfinder, the eyepiece
shutter must be closed any time the camera is running film and the
operator’s eye is away from the viewfinder.
Locate the black wheel under the base of the carrying handle. To
close the eyepiece shutter, turn this wheel counter-clockwise. To
open it, turn the wheel clockwise.
2.2.6 Adjusting the Viewing Horizon
If the rotation of the image seen through the camera’s viewfinder
does not exactly match what is seen through the naked eye, there is
a fine adjustment that can be made to the image’s relative horizon.
Locate the small slotted screw located on the underside of the viewfinder inside the eyepiece lock ring. Notice that the screw travels in
an elongated cutout. Loosen the screw one turn and, while looking
through the viewfinder, move the screw within its cutout in order to
adjust the horizontal rotation. When the images seen through your
left and right eyes coincide, lock the screw.
Checking your viewing
horizon
there is a simple means of
determining whether adjustment of the horizon needs to
be made. Mount a zoom lens
onto the camera and rest the
camera on your shoulder in a
standard handheld position.
Look through the viewfinder
with your right eye while also
keeping your left eye open.
Compose a frame that includes
vertical or horizontal
lines (a window frame for
example) and adjust the zoom
on the lens so that the focal
length of the lens generally
matches what you see with
your left eye.
Ignore the viewing screen markings for the time being and
determine whether the rotation
of the image you see through
the viewfinder matches what
you see with your left eye. If it
does not, then a find adjustment may be necessary.
2.2.7 Viewing Screen
The AATON 35-III utilizes an interchangeable viewing screen (or
“ground-glass”) system which allows the cinematographer to install
the screen which best suits his particular application. Aaton offers
12 viewing screens as standard (see section Viewing Screens in the
Technical Specifications chapter).
Custom screens can also be manufactured upon request. Contact
your local Aaton representative for details.
2.2.8 Changing the Viewing Screen
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screen
post-it
The viewing screen is designed to be easily removed by the user for
the purpose of interchanging or for cleaning. To remove the screen,
first remove the port cap. Remove the battery and clear the mirror
shutter so that it is positioned safely inside the body by rotating at
the base of the shutter with your finger. Look into the port and
locate the screen directly above the aperture opening. To operate,
use a piece of Post-it, that will take the viewing screen without dirtying it. Put the Post-it on your forefinger, the sticking part of it
facing up. Smoothly put your finger on the viewing screen, and
remove it.
To reinstall the screen, look into the port and locate the right and
left lip of the viewing screen holder. The grounded side of the viewing screen should face down. Proceed as before, with a piece of
Post-it on your finger.
2.2.9. Adjusting the viewing screen :
The image focus on the viewing screen (or “ground-glass”) should
match the lens barrel focus mark and the focus on the film. Before
adjusting the viewing screen, be certain that the flange focal distance
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THE CAMERA BODY
of the camera is set according to the manufacturer specifications. 52
mm ,57.15 mm and that the lens used is correctly adjusted ; this
can be determined by the use of a collimator. It is preferable to use a
“wide angle lens” i.e. : less than 25 mm. To proceed, you must first
unscrew and remove the circular Cap located on the upper side of
the rectangle plate, above the battery locking screw. Inside the access
hole, locate the screen holder that you can unlock by turning its
Allen screw counterclockwise. Set your focusing chart at a measured
distance. Set the focus mark of the lens at the exact same distance (
Adjust the diopter ! ) you can, now, focus the
ground-glass, moving the holder up or down by turning the Aaton
two pins tool. Lock the Allen screw. Double check the focus of the
viewing screen using the focus ring of the lens. If the image is still
not sharp, proceed again.
2.3 MIRROR SHUTTER
2.3.1 Concept
The reflex mirror shutter is designed to provide an optical path to
the viewfinder while the claw movement advances the film to the
next frame.
The shutter features a four-position user-adjustable opening.
• Standard180° for filming
under standard 60 Hz HMI lighting at 24 fps
or under standard 50 Hz HMI lighting at 25 fps
without flicker.
• 172.8° for filming
under 50 Hz HMI lighting at 24 fps
without flicker.
• 150° for filming
under 60 Hz HMI lighting at 25 fps
Always Remove the
Battery
Each time you need to go inside the camera body, you must
first remove the battery. If, by
mistake, the camera starts running while you finger is rotating the mirror shutter, the
mechanism of the camera body
could be seriously damaged.
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without flicker.
• 144°
to minimize the roll bar while filming
NTSC broadcast monitor at 24 fps.
2.3.2 Adjusting the shutter
To adjust the shutter opening, unscrew the shutter tool marked
“Sh” located in the hollow at the rear of the camera’s carrying handle. Make sure that the battery is off the camera and remove the port
cap. Locate the tool guiding hole to the lower right of the inside lens
holder. Gently rotate the shutter at its base with your finger until
the brass driving gear is centered underneath the tool guiding hole.
Insert the shutter tool through the guiding hole and into the brass
gear. Rotate the tool until the appropriate notched shutter setting is
reached ; turning counter-clockwise will reduce the shutter opening,
turning clockwise will increase the opening.
When setting the opening to 172.8°, 150° or 144°, a shutter blade
indicating these settings will be visible from behind the left edge of
the mirror. Make sure the white line to the immediate right of the
172.8°, 150° and 144° markings meet the left edge of the mirror.
tool guiding hole
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THE CAMERA BODY
When the adjustment is complete, remove the tool and store back in
the hollow of the carrying handle.
2.4 FILM GATE AND PULLDOWN CLAW
2.4.1 Adjusting the Pitch
To adjust the pitch, use the tool (Ref 09.203.65) located at the rear
of the camera carrying handle.
Looking at the camera with the lens port facing you, locate the
small opening situated between the two camera front rods, closer to
the left rod. Using the tool, you can undo the Allen screw retaining
the opening cover. Insert the tool inside the opening. You will "feel"
a screw that you will turn counter-clockwise until it stops. The length of the pulldown is now at its maximum.
Put the loaded magazine on the camera, and keeping the tool in
position, inch and run the camera. The camera will run with a "clicking noise", due to the perf being hit by the claw. Turn the tool
clockwise until you reach a more pleasant noise, like a loud "purring". If you go too far, you will hear one "clack" noise indicating
that the claw lost a perforation. If more than one "clack" is heard,
the camera display will show "LOOP".
Once you reach the proper setting, it is recommended to turn the
tool counterclockwise, approximately 20º, to accomodate any variation of the film pitch that occures between different film stocks or
under humid or hotweather conditions. To do this adjustment, use
the film stock you are most likely to use.
2.4.2 The Side Pressure Bar
The film gate also features a side pressure bar which is recessed into
the claw-side rail at the point of image exposure to insure maximum
lateral stability.
2.5 FLANGE FOCAL DISTANCE
ADJUSTMENT
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2.5.1 Concept
For a few years now, Aaton has inserted a spacer between the lens
port and the camera body. This thin (0.3mm) metallic ring is responsible for the precise distance between the lens port seat and the
film plane called the flange focal distance (FFD), and therefore it is
also mainly responsible for the sharpness of the images.
In order to change the FFD of the AATON 35-III, simply change
the spacer, and only the spacer. Do not polish any other surface, or
insert anything else between the lens port and the film plane. For
fine adjustment of the FFD, order some aluminium spacers
(0.35mm) from your Aaton agent, and then safely change the FFD
of your camera.
2.5.2 Polishing a Spacer
In order to fine-adjust the thickness of a specific spacer, Aaton carries a specific tool (ref 35 310 32) designed to hold the spacer firmly
and evenly against polishing paper. When polishing a spacer, always
work on a perfectly flat worktable or stone, and be sure to firmly
hold the tool.
2.5.3 Changing the Spacer
The spacer is placed between the PL lens port and the camera body’s
titanium base. First, remove the lens locking ring: screw two or three
turns its stop (placed on the bottom, inside the PL port), and turn
the ring counterclockwise. Remove the PL port by unscrewing its 6
screws. Then gently remove the aluminium spacer .
Once you have placed a new spacer, install the PL port, then the
lenses locking ring, and do not forget to unsrew two or three turns
the locking ring stop.
2.5.4 Adjusting the Viewing Screen
Because you have changed the distance separating the base of the
lens and the camera body, the image on your viewing screen might
now appear to be less sharp than usual. Most likely, you may need
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THE CAMERA BODY
to readjust the precise focus of the viewing screen. Refer to the 2.9
section of this chapter to proceed.
2.5.5 Flange Focal Distances
Here are the flange focal distances for all the lens ports available for
the AATON 35-III. Remember that these distances are automatically shorter by 0.3mm than the indicated ones (because of the needed
spacer)
2.6 MAGAZINE
Mount
Référence
FFD
Diameter
Adjustment
Arriflex (PL)
Panavision (PV)
Nikon (Ni)
35 340 30
35 330 30
35 360 10
52.00 mm
57.15 mm
46.44 mm
54.00 mm
49.50 mm
43.53 mm
-40 / -50 microns
-60 / -70 microns
-40 / -50 microns
The Aaton magazine holds 400ft (122m) of 35mm film, which represents 4’28’’ shooting at 24fps in 35mm 4-Perf, and 5’26’’ shooting at
24fps in 35mm 3-Perf.
2.6.1 Installing the Magazine
To install the mag, situate yourself at the rear of the camera body,
battery side. Do not forget to remove the aperture plate cover.
Place your left hand underneath the magazine while your right hand
is firmly holding it at the midway point of its rear. Rest the nose of
the magazine on the camera base, hold the camera body with your
left hand while pushing the mag in the bottom dovetail and into the
aperture area with your right hand. Make sure that the top of the
"nose" of the mag is parallel to the camera carrying handle as you
guide the mag in place. Push firmly and evenly until you feel and
hear that the mag snaps against the aperture area. The mag nose
should be pressed against the camera body's rubber seal. This operation should be done without having to force the mag into position.
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2.6.2 Removing the Magazine
To remove the magazine, situate yourself at the rear of the camera
body, battery side. Place your right hand palm on the camera takeup motor and pull the mag lock lever towards the rear of the camera
with your fingers.
The mag will be toward the rear of the camera. The mag is now free
to be pulled offthe camera, using both your hands.
2.7 POWER
The AATON 35-III body requires only 12 volts for all aspects of operation. One standard Aaton on-board (12V, 1.8 Ah, rechargeable, nicad)
will power the camera, CCD and accessories which are connected to the
body’s accessory inputs (such as zoom controls, speed controls, etc.)
through a standard 4 pin XLR connector. One 1.8 ah on-board battery
will run 7-8 magazines on the AATON 35-III, without CCD and
accessories. With accessories in use, this number will decrease.
2.7.1 Installing the Battery on the Camera
The on-board battery fits above the LCD conrol panel. In order to
install, loosen the black knurled screw approximately four or five
turns. Push the battery evenly onto the XLR4 connection of the
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THE CAMERA BODY
body. When snug, tighten the knurled screw onto the battery tab to
hold it in place.
When running AatonCode, get into the practice of having a fresh
battery on hand before removing the one from the camera. Even a
low battery that no longer runs the body (below 10V) will have
enough voltage to keep accurate time counting.
Thanks to a super capacitor built into the camera base you will have
a full minute to change the battery before time is lost. After replacing the battery, confirm that time is still counting by checking the
control panel.
2.7.2 Battery Charging
The Aaton on-board can be recharged with an appropriate 12V
nicad battery charger.
For the best results, use a microprocessor-controlled charger or a
standard trickle charger with a charging output of at least 200ma,
both of which prevent of the overheating and mistreatment of your
nicad cells. Always follow the specific guidelines of the charger
manufacturer. You can use the Aaton Chr1, designed to charge two
standard batteries in 6 hours, without any risk.
Beware of older, timed chargers manufactured when 1.2 and 1.4ah
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batteries where the norm; these chargers where most likely rated for
the lower amperage batteries of that time and will consistently
undercharge the higher rated nicad cells of today.
Nicad Battery Tips
Follow a few simple rules to
insure the long life of your
nicad cells:
• Allow the battery to run
through their normal cycle of
charging and use. Avoid topping off partially full batteries.
Once every few months,
discharge cells to 8-10V using
a standard discharger to minimize their memory.
• Do not rapid-charge your
cells more than necessary, as
the added heat will eventually
shorten their life span. Instead
recharge batteries at a normal
charging rate when your schedule allows.
• If your batteries will not be
used for long periods of time,
always store them in a cool dry
environment fully charged.
2.7.3 Other Power Options
Since the AATON 35-III power input is a standard 4 pin XLR type,
a great varitey of 12-14 volt sources can be used to power the camera. This includes AC power supplies, battery blocks, lithium cells
and car batteries.
Get into the habit of carrying a standard XLR4 powercable in your
package in case an alternative power source is needed.
Regarding AC power supplies, it is recommended that the unit you
use be at least 5 A and 25 W. Before connecting any non-standard
source, always make sure that the pin configuration of the unit is
correct. See the Technical Specifications chapter of this manual for
details for proper wiring.
2.8 MOTOR
The tri-phase samarium design of the AATON 35-III provides low
power consumption and improved stability at high speeds. The
body is capable of speeds between 3 and 40 fps with a standard
12V battery.
2.8.1 Camera Speeds
The AATON 35-III provides boths preset crystal speeds (in sync
mode) and specific crystal speeds (in variable mode) in .001 increments, all accessible from the LCD control panel.
Available preset speeds consist of 6, 12, 18, 23.98, 24, 25, 29.97
and 30. The preset speed selector (SYNC) allows for quick access to
these frequently used speeds.
If any other speed is desired, or if the camera speed must match the
frequency of a monitor to eliminate a roll bar, the specific speed
selector (VAR) should be employed. The specific speed selector
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enables the body to run at any speed between 3 and 40 in .001 frame increments. A phase adjustment of the variable speed is accessible from the VAR selector and jog wheel.
The camera speed can also be adjusted while the camera is running
in either sync or variable mode. For more information on these
speed functions, refer to section LCD Control Panel and Jog of this
chapter.
2.8.2 Using External Speed Devices
The AATON 35-III can be driven externally from devices such as
film/video synchronizers, speed aperture computers and external
speed controls. In these situations, the camera VAR selector must be
set to Et. If such a device is connected and the selector is not set to
Et, the camera will run at the speed indicated on the display.
Keep in mind that, with certain manufacturer’s speed controls, it
may be possible to run the camera at speeds higher than the 40 fps
factory limitation. Overcranking in such a way, however, will increase mechanism wear, increase noise and compromise image registration. Aaton urges to avoid such usage at all cost and will not be responsible for the resulting damage that will occur. This top speed cap
of 40 fps has been designated by Aaton because it is the limit at
which the camera can run safely without any adverse effects on its
mechanics.
2.8.3 Electronic Inching
The inching function of the motor is accomplished electronically
and can be accessed in a number of ways.
From the Handgrip
The wooden handgrip switch, by way of the lemo2 connector, provides camera run and full frame inching for single frame operation
and loop situating.
From the LCD Control Panel
The run/test switch, besides the LCD control panel, not only runs
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the camera, but provides half frame inching for gate inspection and
loop situating when installing a fresh mag.
From a Remote Cable
The Lemo2 connector, as well as Lemo6, Lemo8 and Amph9 accessory connectors, provide the capability of using a remote on/off with
either a half-frame or full-frame inching function.
2.8.4 Single Frame Operation
With the use of electronic inching switch via the wooden handgrip
or a remote cable, the AATON 35-III can be used as a simple intervalometer for single frame operation. Each frame is 1/4 sec exposure.
2.9 LCD CONTROL PANEL AND JOG
The AATON 35-III utilizes a straightforward and intuitive control
panel structure in conjunction with a small jog wheel to access and
adjust all operator functions.
2.9.1 The Aaton Jog
Located to the immediate right of the LCD control panel, Aaton
Jog is a small wheel designed to simplify many user functions. When
used in conjunction with the contol panel the jog allows for quick
adjustment of some of the otherwise time-consuming parameters
(such as the setting of a precise 5-digit speed or a film short end).
2.9.2 Understanding the Control Panel
The control panel consists of a LCD display and four buttons to
access information. The control panel operates in two modes: Show
and SET. To show a parameter without adjusting, go directly to one
of the black function buttons to view relative information. To set a
parameter, first press the white SET button, then go to the appropiate function. Information is changed by either toggling that but34
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ton ot by rotating the jog, depending on the parameter. Pressing
SET afterwards (or waiting for 7 seconds) will enter your selection.
Capped text (SYNC, VAR, ISO) refers to those functions adjustable
while in the SET mode; standard text (Speed, Time, Iso/Batt) refers
to those functions accessible directly in the default Show mode.
Note that, while viewing a Show function on the control panel, any
inactivity longer than 10 seconds will revert the display back to its
default mode (speed and remaining footage). As mentioned previously, any break longer than 7 seconds while in SET mode will
automatically enter the last selection.
The following parameters can be accessed from the LCD control
panel in conjunction with the jog. For more concise information see
the table in the System Features and Controls chapter of this
manual.
2.9.3 AatonCode
As a standard feature the AATON 35-III is equipped with the capability of recording AatonCode in-camera time. TimeCode information is exposed onto the film by optical projection of seven microdiodes into the gate to the left of the aperture opening. These
micro-diodes flash rapidly to form the code as the film rolls through
the gate between exposures.
AatonCode is initialized in the camera, in ASCII or SMPTE form,
through the Lemo5 connector located to the righ of the LCD
control panel. For the most straightforward and reliable communication, OriginCplus, Aaton’s masterclock, comparator, and SMPTE
generator device, should be used.
If AatonCode has been initialized in the camera, press button Time
to view timecode information. Toggling button Time will display
hours/minutes/seconds, then year/month/day, then the six-digit production ID, then the camera’s equipment #, in that order.
2.9.4 ASA Setting
When using AatonCode in the AATON 35-III, the ASA(ISO) setting must be adjusted to the exposure index of the film stock being
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Force Processing and the
AatonCode matrix
Regardless of the situation,
always set the ASA selector to
the actual exposure index of
the film. If you know beforehand that your footage will be
pushed or pulled, don't worry
about compensating for the
sake of the precise exposure of
your timecode matrix. The
matrix is resistant enough to
handle exposure variances of
one and a half stops or more in
either direction.
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used. The ASA/ISO selection will insure that the timecode matrix
recorded on the edge of the film in the gate will be exposed at an
appropriate and useable level.
If AatonCode is not running in the camera, the setting of the
ASA/ISO will have no effect.
Press button Iso/Batt twice to view the ASA selection.
Press SET then button ISO, to adjust the ASA setting. Make your
selection between 25 and 1000 ISO by toggling ISO or by rotating
the jog wheel.
If the ISO selector is adjusted while the camera is in test or run
position, the correction will not take place until the next camera
start.
2.9.5 Battery Voltage
Press button Iso/Batt to read the voltage of the camera’s power source. Notice that if the camera is running and button Iso/Batt is pressed, the control panel will read and display the voltage under load.
2.9.6 Magazine Number
As soon as a magazine is installed in the camera, you can read is
number ID by pressing Iso/Batt three times.
Changing Speeds while
Running the Camera
Any camera speed, whether
preset or specific, can be changed when the camera is running. To do so, run the camera,
then follow these simple steps:
• Operating under a preset
speed (in sync mode), press
SET, then SYNC, then use the
jog wheel to choose a higher or
lower stepped speed.
Under a specific speed (in
variable speed), press SET, then
VAR, then use the jog to ramp
the speed higher or lower in
.001 frame increments.
36
2.9.7 Camera Preset Speed
The default mode of the control panel will automatically display the
camera speed selection, whether it be in sync or variable mode,
when the camera is powered but not running. When the camera is
turned on, the actual running speed to the .01 frame is displayed.
To adjust the preset speed, press SET, then button SYNC. Make
your selection of stepped crystal speed between 6 and 30 fps by
togling SYNC or via the jog wheel.
2.9.8 Camera Specific Speed
To choose a specific speed press SET, then VAR. Make your selection of any .001 incremented crystal speed between 3.000 and
40.000 fps via the jog.
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To set the camera to be driven from an external source (such as
film/video synchronizer or external speed control), press SET, then
VAR twice. Et will be displayed, indicating that camera is set in
external mode.
2.9.9 Speed Phasing
The phasing of the variable speed can be set to eliminate a roll bar
while filming a monitor. Operate first with no magazine on the
camera, because you first need to synchronise the camera speed to
the monitor frequency. Run the camera. Press SET, then VAR once,
turn the jog, until the roll bar seems stable on the screen. Press SET
to enter. Stop the camera, and then install a magazine. Run the
camera. Press SET, then VAR twice. Look through the camera at the
monitor and turn the jog until the roll bar is out of view. Press SET
to enter.
2.9.10 Remaining Footage
The control panel will display the footage remaining any time the
camera is running with a magazine on. The displayed footage is calculated by the magazine itself: it is determined by the measure of the
feed core speed. To modify the footage measurement unit, press
ISO, then TEST and then ISO again to modify.
2.9.11 Elapsed Footage
With the camera stopped, press Speed twice, to view the elapsed
footage of the previous camera run. With the camera running press
Speed twice to view the elapsed footage of that particular take. The
display will revert back to its default mode (speed and remaining
footage) after 10 seconds.
2.9.12 Camera Software Version Number
If you need to know the software version number your camera is
equipped with, proceed as follows. Unplug the battery from the
camera. Put the camera on Test mode. Then, while installing the
battery, watch the LCD control panel carefully. During one second
it will display something like: T4 V2.08, indicating that you own a
Displaying a 5 Digit Speed
If the AATON 35-III is set to a
variable (5-digit) speed, the
control panel will only display
that speed to the .01 digit.
Keep in mind, the display will
not round off the speed, but
simply leave off the last digit.
For example, if the 5 digit
speed of 23.976 is entered, the
control panel will display
23.97, not 23.98.
Remember… Variable
Speed for Phasing
Keep in mind, the speed phase
function of the control panel
will only operate when a
variable speed is initially selected.
When shooting 29.97, for
example, be sure to choose the
specific 29.970 instead of the
preset 29.97 if you plan to
incorporate the phase function
for that particular shot.
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35mm 4-Perf camera, working with the software version number
2.08.
2.9.13 Total Footage Recall
To find out total footage run through the camera since manufacture
install, hook up a battery onto the camera body, press SYNC and
flip the switch to TEST. The footage displays in thousands of
images.
2.9.14 Warning
If for some reason the camera loses its programming parameters,
“UNADJUST” will flash regularly. leaving the camera functionning.
The TCXO then uses default frequency adjustment, insuring a
TimeCoding precision of 10-4 instead of 10-6.
2.10 LED INDICATORS
The AATON 35-III utilizes LED indicators in three locations to convey
information: in the viewfinder and on both left and right sides of the
camera body.
2.10.1 Position and Meaning of the Diodes
• Two yellow diodes, placed on both right and left sides of the camera body indicate that the camera is either on Test or on Run mode.
• Two red diodes, placed on both right and left side of the camera
body, and a third one, visible from the view finder, display a special
warning.
2.10.2 Camera Test Indicator
● Yellow diode is on.
●●● Red diode is blinking fast.
2.10.3 Camera Run Indicator
●Yellow diode is on.
❍ Red diode is off.
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2.10.4 Low Battery Indicator
● Yellow diode is on.
● ● ● Red diode is evenly flashing.
The LCD control panel displays Lo Batt.
2.10.5 Low Speed Indicator
● Yellow diode is on.
● ● ● Red diode is blinking fast.
The LCD control panel displays Lo Speed.
2.11 VIDEO ASSIST
The AATON 35-III accept 4 different video assist: CD52 PAL, CD52
NTSC, CD56 PAl and CD56 NTSC. The CD52 are black & white,
and the CD56 are color.
The control units for all Aaton CCD assists attach quickly to the camera’s housing and can be used with an on-board battery. The video assist
may be used to help the director or operator control their images, or to
prepare the video editing, before the telecine stage.
The following chapter is mostly dedicated to the CD56, which is Aaton’s
high-end model, and is designed to offer high quality, flicker-free color
video assist imaging, burn-in windows, Vitc insertion and a frame line
generator in one integrated system.
2.11.1 The CD56 Color CCD Assist
You may use the CD56 color CCD assist in two different ways.
In some special situations (if you’re filming in the dark for example),
it might be more comfortable to look your images on a monitor
than through the viewfinder. This is why the CD56 is equipped
with a frame line generator: as you can choose the size and position
of the generated frame, the image you see through the viewfinder
(which might be in ratio 1.78 or 1.66 for example) can match exactly the image you see inside the frame on the monitor. Moreover this
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Beware of the high power
consumption of the video
assist
The CD56, as well as the
CD52, is equipped with an
On/Off switch. As soon as you
have finsihed with using the
video assist, witch it to off.
Keep in mind that a CD56
needs up to 700 mA to run.
Vitc lines
• First line is the video timecode line. Each time you switch
on the video assist, the video
timecode is set to 1:00'00'' 00
(the last number is the image
number). Then as soon as the
AATON 35-III is running this
time is incremented.
• Second line is the keycode
line. As the keycode should be
read from the film, this line
cannot be generated. Only synchonization and checksum bits
are inserted.
• Third line is the audio timecode line, i.e. all the timecode
information of the AatonCode
is inserted here.
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frame is easier to locate than the viewing screen’s frame. The director
can then immediatly control his operator’s images.
Of course, the video assist was first created to be used in such a way.
But, now that video editing (including the virtual video editing)
offers new powerfull tools to the editor, the CD56 can be used in a
different way. The CD56 provides a Vitc lines generator, which are
the dots and lines, usually put above the video image, used by video
editing machines. Therefore, images recorded by the video assist
may be directly used to make a video editing of the film; no need to
wait for telecine, no need also to have developped the rushes you
won’t use.
2.11.2 Installing the Control Unit
All of the CCD assists available for the AATON 35-III can be easily
attached on the camera body, in a few seconds without the need for
adjustment.
First locate the video port, above the Lemo 6 connector on the
motor side of the camera. Using a Allen wrench, loosen 3 or 4 turns
its small black screw. Remove the plastic port cover. Check that the
exposed lens of the CCD video assist is free of dust particles. If
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THE CAMERA BODY
necessary, clean this surface with lens fluid applied with a coton Qtip. Install the lens into the camera video port. Connect the control
unit cable to the camera body through the Amph9 connector.
Connect a BNC cable to the monitor and power the AATON 35III. Turn on the toggle switch of the CCD Unit, the yellow diode
should light. Set the video assist iris wide open, and while looking at
the monitor, move the whole control unit until the viewing screen
image is in focus and square to the monitor. Rotating the unit
controls the image horizon, pulling or pushing it controls the image
focus. Tighten the Allen set screw to lock the control unit in position. If the camera lens mount has been shifted from 35 to super 35,
loosen the video tap retaining the screw and refocus.
2.11.3 Menu Operation
The CD56 unit contains six operator buttons: up, down, left, right
arrows, menu and exit keys.
Press MENU to have the menu displayed.
Use arrows to access to the desired parameter.
Press MENU to indicate that you want to modify this parameter.
Use arrows to adjust this parameter.
Press MENU to validate
Press EXIT to memorize the new configuration.
• Std
Choose the video image frequency you need between 24 and 25
frames per second. Keep in mind that choosing 24 fps, provides a
non standard video signal, that you won’t be able to record.
• Color Temp
Depending on the kind of film you’re using (a film for inside or a
film for outside) the colors it will register will not be the sames. To
have the video colors closer to the film colors, you can choose between 3200K (tungstein) and 5600K (daylight).
• Date
Date allows you to choose the position of the current date insertion
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inside the video image. Use the arrows to proceed.
•Time
Time allows you to choose the position of the current time insertion
inside the video image. Use the arrows to proceed.
• Cam
Cam allows you to choose the position of the magazine number
insertion inside the video image. Use the arrows to proceed.
• Frame
Frame/Frame On-Off allows you to choose if you want (On) or not
(Off ) a frame to be inserted in the video image.
Frame/Frame Top Left allows you to choose the position of the top
left position of the frame. Use the arrows to proceed.
Frame/Frame Botton Right allows you to choose the position of the
bottom right position of the frame. Use the arrows to proceed.
Frame/Edge allows you to choose between an Edge around the frame, or No Egde.
• Phase adjust
Phase adjust is designed to move the flicker area outside the video
image. This function is available only when the CD56 and the
AATON 35-III are running at the same speed (both at 25 fps, for
example). Use the up and down arrows for a first quick phase
adjustment. And then, use the left and right arrows for a fine adjustment. To proceed, run the camera and watch the video monitor.
• Options
Options allows you to access to a submenu only dedicated to the
AatonCode insertion.
Options/Screen allows you to choose to insert (On) or not (Off )
AatonCode information, which consists of Time, Date, and Equipment number ID.
Options/Screen Y/C allows you to choose to insert (On) or not
(Off ) the Y/C video exit informations.
Options/Font allows you to choose the font you need for the characters to be inserted. Choose 0 for edged characters, 1 for standard
characters, and 2 for bold characters.
• Technical
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Technical allows you to access to a submenu only dedicated to the
Vitc lines insertion. These lines are automatically inserted in the
video image.
Technical/XTAL Adjust is a parameter adjusted in factory. Keep in
mind that you should never modify it.
Technical/VITC Position allows you to choose the position of the
Vitc lines. Choose between line 16 and line 24.
Technical/VITC Parity allows you to select the parity of the Vitc
lines between Odd and Even. Make sure that your post-production
tools run properly with the selected value.
• About the Vitc lines
In order to have meaningful information encoded in the Vitc lines,
camera and video need to run at the same speed. If the video is set
to run at 25 fps, then the AATON 35-III should run at 25 fps.
And when the video is set to 24 fps, the AATON 35-III should run
at 23.98 fps (this slight variation between these two speeds comes
from some electronical imperious needs).
If the third Vitc line cannot be generated by the CD56, then a (*)
appears on the screen. This might occur because of two different
situations: whether the speeds of the AATON 35-III and the CD56
are different, or AatonCode has not be initialized inside the
AATON 35-III.
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3
THE MAGAZINE
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3.1 CONCEPT
The Aaton magazine has been designed to be instantly installed or
removed, and to be loaded quickly. In order to have a more compact
magazine, both cores (feed and take-up) shift together during filming.
The magazine is driven magnetically from two intermediate drives
connected to the camera motors; two magnetic wheels on the inner
side of the camera body couple with two similar wheels on the
throat of the magazine to transport the film. A magnetic drive system decreases noise and power consumption, and prevents mechanical stress during mis-loads.
The magazine handles up to 400 ft (122m) loads of 35mm film
stock. 400 ft of film is a little more than 4 running minutes at 24
fps
3.2 PRESSURE PLATE SYSTEM
The magazine features two pressure plates which are located at the front
of the magazine’s nose. When the loaded magazine is attached to the
camera, these pressure plates provide the precise stabilization of the film
during exposure and transport.
3.2.1 The Gate Plate
The long plate, called the gate plate, is positioned at the camera’s
gate. Its main function is to stabilize the film as the claw engages the
film perf between exposures. Proper tension and functioning of the
gate plate contribute to reliable transport and quiet operation.
3.2.2 The Picture Plate
The striped pressure plate, called the picture plate, is positioned at
the camera’s aperture opening and is designed to hold the film steady at the point of exposure. Proper setting and functioning of the
picture plate assures the precise focus of each image.
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THE MAGAZINE
3.3 LOADING
3.3.1 First Step, in Daylight
Here you prepare the magazine to receive the film.
• Place the magazine on a table, its throat facing left. Unfasten the
door locks by turning downward and open the door.
• You can now choose to have the footage remaining displayed (on
the magazine as on the LCD control panel on the camera body) in
feet or meters. The red sliding switch, accessible from the inside of
the magazine, sets meters on its right, and feet on its left.
• With your thumbs, push the two spindles towards the nose of the
magazine. This operation is accompanied with a loud clicking
sound: don’t be alarmed, this is completely normal.
• Unscrew both spindle-locks (if necessary, hold the base of the
cores). The spindle-locks are easy to locate: they have the shape of a
rounded rectangle.
• You can now place an empty core on the take-up spindle (the left
one). Check that the core drive pin on the spindle is not caught on
one of the core ribs or the roll will not seat properly. Firmly screw
down the corresponding spindle-lock to secure the empty core to
the spindle.
Attention! Be sure you have put the core in its correct way. To check
so, imagine that you will have to fit the film in its slot. A white
arrow is engraved on the base of the spindle to help you install it
correctly.
• Release both sprocket pinch rollers (they have the shape of a half
circle) by rotating them counter-clockwise. Theses rollers should be
opened to let the film slide between them and the sprockets.
Their half-circles face the nose of the magazine when closed, or face
the chamber of the magazine if they are opened.
• Now closely look at the mechanism inside of the magazine. And
memorize the following diagram and instructions.
• Then, put the magazine in a dark room or changing bag.
3.3.2 Loading, in the Dark
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• Remove the film from its can and bag.
• Place the film roll on the rear spindle. Check that the core drive
pin on the spindle is not caught on one of the core ribs or the roll
will not seat properly. Secure the spindle-lock.
• Thread two feet of film, making sure it passes outside the top guiding rollers.
• Insert the film between the pinch rollers and sprockets making
sure the perforations engage with the sprocket teeth.
• Turn the upper and lower pinch rollers clockwise, to close them.
• Slide the film in the slot of the take-up core. Rotate this core three
or four turns.
• Check that the film is firmly attached and positioned correctly
around the sprocket wheels.
• Close the door, and fasten the door locks by turning them upward.
If you cannot close the film door, it means that you have forgotten
to close one or both pinch rollers.
• The remainder of the procedure can be performed in daylight.
3.3.3 Adjusting the Loop, in daylight
take up core
sprocket pinch roller
sprocket
feed core
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THE MAGAZINE
Once the door is closed, you need to adjust the loop.
•Place the magazine with its digital display facing toward you and
the magazine nose being to your right. The correct loop size can be
adjusted, by using the loop tool delivered with the magazine.
•If you cannot insert the tool between the mag pressure plate and
the fim, you need to enlarge the loop. To do so, push the disk marked "push for loop adjust" with your right tumb while holding the
film against the pressure plate with your right forefinger. Using your
left hand rotate the upper magnetic wheel clockwise until the loop
length allows you to insert the tool.
•If you need to reduce the loop length, simply push the disk marked
"push for loop adjust" with your right thumb and rotate the upper
magnetic wheel counterclockwise before installing the mag on the
camera. DO NOT FORGET to remove any slack existing between
the lower sprocket and the take-up spool. To do so, rotate the
magnetic wheel situated at the left of the loop adjusting disk counterclockwise. The wheel should turn smoothly as the film winds on
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the take-up core indicating that the magazine has been correctly loaded.
•You can then install the mag on the camera body.
•To engage the film, turn the camera's ON/OFF switch to test position and off again. If the loop is too short or not properly centered
into the camera gate, the camera LCD display should show
"LOOP". Desengage the magazine, readjust the loop length if necessary and reinstall the magazine on the camera body.
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THE MAGAZINE
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4
THE AATON SYSTEM
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4.1 CAMERA CONFIGURATIONS
The AATON 35-III is designed to be easily converted between the following two accessory configurations:
4.1.1 15mm Front Rods
The most versatile and popular configuration for accessorizing the
AATON 35-III, the universal 15mm screw-in front rod system can
instantly accept Aaton, Arri, Chrosziel, Petroff and other manufacturers’ mattebox and follow focus system.
Utilizing the front rod system allows for quick conversion from tripod to shoulder operating modes without the need for reconfiguration.
Aaton manufactures 50mm and 120mm length rods that screw
directly into the front housing of the AATON 35-III under the lens
port.
The 15mm front rod system is recommended when standard size
lenses and accessories are to be used or when quick conversion between tripod and handheld modes is necessary.
4.1.2 Sliding Bridgeplate
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THE AATON SYSTEM
The AATON 35-III can also accept standard 15 and 19mm sliding
bridgeplates for building the camera system for high-end studio
work. The bridgeplate configuration can accept Aaton, Arri, Chrosziel and other manufacturer’s mattebox, follow focus and support
equipment that is designed for bridgeplate use.
Standard bridgeplates from Aaton, Arri and other manufacturers can
be attached to the AATON 35-III by means of the 3/8-16 tripod
recepticle on the underside of the camera.
The sliding bridgeplate system is recommended when large 35mm
lenses and accessories are to be used and when the use of a geared
head is necessary.
4.2 HANDGRIP
The AATON 35-III body includes a wooden handgrip, short 15mm
rods, rod coupler and Lemo2 cable as standard. The handgrip which is
designed to be used for comfortable handheld operation, can also be used
to provide on/off control on the motor side of the camera while on the
tripod.
4.2.1 Mounting the Handgrip
Screw in one 15mm short rod in each of the two recepticles on the
front housing of the camera below the lens port. Slide the coupler
over the two rods to the desired location and fasten the center wing
nut to secure the coupler in position. Attach the handgrip to the
coupler by mating the starplate on the coupler to that on the handgrip, adjusting to the desired position and fastening the T screw of
the handgrip. Connect the Lemo2 cable between the handgrip and
camera body to add on/off capability to the handgrip. The Lemo2
connector is located on the motor side of the camera, (between the
two motors), under the Lemo8 and Lemo6 connectors.
4.2.2 Hangrip On/Off Functions
Both camera run and test functions are available from the handgrip.
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While hand-holding the camera, pressing the rocker switch to the
right provides camera run, pressing the switch to the left provides
test. Unlike the body switch, the camera test position of the handgrip is a momentary switch. Pressing and holding the switch opens
the shutter and advances the mechanism 1/2 frame. Pressing and
immediately releasing this switch advances the mechanism one full
frame at a 1/4 sec exposure time. This function allows the use of the
handrip as a simple intervalometer.
4.2.3 Handgrip Adjustment
The handgrip rotation should be adjusted for maximum handheld
operating comfort. Loosen the T screw and rotate the handgrip at
the star plate until a more comfortable position is found. If a more
extreme repositioning is required, whether it be for reasons of comfort or clearance in certain studio rig configurations, this can be
achieved with coupler extenders, spacers and intermediate arms which utilize the star plate system for adjustment. Ask your agent for a
configuration that meets your needs
4.3 TRIPOD USE
In order to use the AATON 35-III on a standard tripod, the tripod’s
quick release plate must be fastened to the underside of the camera
body with its standard 3/8-16 screw. Make sure to use only a quick
release plate screw provided by the manufacturer; non standard
screws longer than 8mm (1/3’’) can fracture the base casting and
damage the camera’s electronics.
4.4 SHOULDER OPERATION
One of the most attractive features of the Aaton system has always
been its comfort and ease of use in handheld situations.
The AATON 35-III does not require the use of shoulder braces or
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additional padding for handheld operation. The wooden handgrip is
attached to the front rod coupler at a slight angle to bring the operator’s elbow into his side and increase stability.
The system can be completely built off the 15mm front rods
without the use of a bridgeplate to allow for quick changing from
shoulder to tripod operating modes.
4.5 CARRYING HANDLE
The carrying handle of the AATON 35-III is reinforced to safely accomodate any carrying, operating or mounting operation.
4.5.1 3/8 Accessory Screw
The handle features a 3/8-16 insert to receive accessories such as
french flags and lightweight monitors. Be sure not to use a 3/8 screw
longer than 11mm (7/16’’); longer screws can fracture the insert and
damage the viewfinder’s optics.
5.2 Mounting from the Carrying Handle
The 3/8 insert can also be used to build a plate to undersling the
camera or to configure the rig for Steadicam low mode use. For this
reason, the handle features a long flat top surface that is parallel to
the bottom of the camera.
4.5.3 Tape Measure Hook
The handle is also equipped with a hideaway tape measure hook,
which is positioned between the rods directly behind the 3/8 insert.
To use this hook, pull it up and fasten the ring of a standard assistant’s tape measure around it; the hook holds the tape measure zero
point precisely at the film plane.
4.6 TRANSPORT
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One often overlooked, yet vital factor in the proper functioning and longevity of your camera equipment is your transportation practices. A few
good shipping habits can avert potential damage caused by careless messenger services and airport handling.
When shipping and carrying your equipment, it is always good
practice to break down the package to its basic components whenever possible. Ship the body, mags and batteries unattached and individually padded. Never, under any circumstances, ship the camera
with a lens attached (especially a zoom lens). Shocks transferred
from the outside of a case could have disastrous effects to the ultracritical back focus of a lens and flange focal distance of a camera if
transported as one.
Make certain there is ample padding between individual components in a case and from the case’s outer edges. Shipping case manufacturers suggest a minimum of 1 1/2’’ padding between high precision components such as the camera and lenses. 1’’ of padding is
acceptable, however, between some of the more rugged components,
such as magazines and batteries. Manufacturers also suggest to allow
2’’ of padding between the components and the outside of the case.
Choose a case design that, not only meets your shipping and travel
requirements, but allows you maximum flexibility and comfort out
in the field. Check with your Aaton agent to determine the case
configuration that best suits your needs.
4.7 EXTREME CONDITIONS
Certain precautions should be taken in order to achieve maximum
performances when operating the AATON 35-III in extreme or
adverse conditions.
4.7.1 Cold Weather
The AATON 35-III features a built-in electronic heating element
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located in its base which is designed to automatically turn on when
needed and maintain the claw mechanism at a temperature of 15°F.
One of the cold, hard facts of cold weather shooting is the considerable reduction of battery life. Do whatever possible to conserve
your batteries and always carry more than usual. Favor many small
batteries, such as on-board and lithium cells (which are easier to
keep warm), over large block batteries. Use a powercable so that the
on-board battery could be kept in a pocket close to the warmth of
your body.
When filming outdoors, use a standard or heated barney to protect
the camera body from direct contact with the wind and cold. To
avoid condensation inside the mechanism, electronics and lens elements, do not take the equipment indoors or expose it to sudden
temperature changes. If and when the equipment must be moved
inside, do so by first placing it in a sealed container and let it thaw
for a few hours before opening.
Always keep your raw stock and loaded magazines above freezing
temperatures at all times during a cold weather shoot.
4.7.2 Warm Weather
The keep the temperature of the camera body down, avoid having
the camera exposed to direct sunlight for long periods of time by
using a barney, all-weather cover, or some form of shading, like an
umbrella.
Most importantly, keep raw stock and magazine in a dry cooler, or
in the coolest location available.
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5
CLEANING
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5.1 LENS
Lens Cleaning Tips
Avoid handling lens tissues on
the surfaces which will contact
the lens. Oil from your hands
transferred to the lens surface
will make an easy cleaning job
tough. Furthermore, never
clean a lens element without
the aid of cleaning fluid. A
good number of scratchs on
lens surfaces are caused by poor
cleaning methods.
5.1.1 Lens Elements
The front and rear surface of your lenses should be inspected regularly and always kept clean of dust particles, smudges, fingerprints,
etc. First, blow off any large particles of debris using an air syringe.
Lens elements should then be cleaned using lens cleaning fluid with
lens tissue. Apply a few drops of cleaning fluid to a fresh lens tissue
or directly to the lens. Wipe the lens in a circular fashion, starting
from the center and working towards the outter edge. Finish with a
fresh dry tissue. If some streaking remains, repeat the procedure
until the surface is sufficiently clean.
5.1.2 Lens Exterior
The exterior of your lenses should be cleaned of dirt and adhesives
as necessary. Use a multi-purpose cleaner or degreaser such as DeSolv-It applied with a Q-tip, lens tissue or cotton cloth.
5.1.3 Mounting Surface
Always inspect and keep the surfaces of your lens mount clean using
alcohol or a multi-purpose cleaner with a Q-tip.
Remember, any debris found on the surface which contacts the lens
seat can directly affect the back focus of your lens. Make sure the Qtip does not leave any cotton fibers behind.
5.2 BODY
5.2.1 Exterior
Keep the external body surface clean using a cotton cloth with alcohol or a multi-purpose cleaner. use a utility brush with soft bristles
to clean dirt from tight crevices.
5.2.2 Mounting Surfaces
Like the lens mount, extra care should be taken to keep the lens
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CLEANING
port ring completely free of dirt and debris. Clean this surface, as
well as the threads of the lens lock ring using alcohol or a multi-purpose cleaner applied to a Q-tip.
5.2.3 Camera Gate
The gate should be cleaned of film particles by means of a pointed
wooden or plastic orange stick. The tool used should be of a soft
and pliable enough material (like wood) to conform to the grooved
side channels of the gate without breaking. Make sure to inspect and
clean the right and left channels, the frame of the aperture opening,
the lateral pressure plate, the tip of the claw, and the timecode
LEDs.
Afterwards, run your fingers across the left and right rails of the
gate, if your hands are clean. The oil of your finger will provide just
enough lubricant for the film to pass these surfaces smoothly. Inspect the gate; if the rails are still dirty or are carrying any debris
(such as the adhesive from recanned rolls of film), with a Q-tip, use
a cleaning fluid that will do the job. Alcohol and lens cleaners are
safe to use on the surface on the gate. Make sure the Q-tip doesn’t
leave any cotton threads behind.
Cleaning the Mirror
Shutter
Do not attempt to clean the
surface of the mirror shutter;
any small dust particles visible
from the lens port will not
come into focus in your viewfinder. If large particles of dirt
must be removed, do so using
an air syringe. Never use canned air on this surface.
If the mirror is in need of a
deeper cleaning, to remove
smudges or oil, take your
camera to a qualified technician to be cleaned.
5.3 VIEWING SYSTEM
WARNING
Remember, the camera gate is a
sensitive and high precision
area directly responsible for the
exact focus of the image; be
careful not use hard, damaging
materials (like metal) on its
surface.
Under no circumstances
should you perform any function within the aperture opening, lens port or near the claw
with power attached to the
camera. Accidently running
the camera while performing
such tasks can cause serious
damage to the shutter and
mechanism.
The following components of the viewing system should be cleaned
whenever dirt particles are visible through the viewfinder. Use lens
fluid applied with a cotton or preferably a foam Q-tip for all areas.
By cleaning the viewing system in the order described below, you
will clean the more dust-prone areas first, which may help you track
down most dirt particles sooner.
5.3.1 Viewing Screen
Look through the lens port at the reflection of the viewing screen in
the miror and check for visible dust particles. Remove the battery
and then clear the mirror shutter so that it is rotated safely inside
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the body. Remove the viewing screen. Clean both upper and lower
surfaces of the screen and reinstall.
Finding the Dirt…
There is a simple means of
locating much of the dirt
within your viewing system.
Look through the viewfinder
with no lens on the camera and
adjust the diopter ring. If the
dust particles remain in focus,
they are most likely located on
either side of the eyepiece. If
the dust comes in and out of
focus as the ring is moved, the
dust is probably located on
either surface of the viewing
screen. Furthermore, if the
dust appears to be on the same
focus plane as the cross hairs of
the viewing screen, it is most
likely on the bottom surface on
the screen and easily accessible.
5.3.2 Eyepiece
Clean the eyepiece lens, which is the outermost element closest to
your eye, by first blowing the surface with canned air, then cleaning
with lens fluid and a Q-tip. Remove the eyepiece and clean the field
lens, which is located on the inside of the eyepiece, in the same
fashion.
5.3.3 Viewfinder
Do not install the eyepiece back right now. First, look inside the
camera’s eyepiece seat, and locate the two triangular lenses (called
the Pechan prism). Clean these two triangular lenses using canned
air or an air syringe. Then install the eyepiece back.
5.4 MAGAZINE
5.4.1 Exterior
Keep the external surface of the magazines clean by wiping down
with a cotton cloth with alcohol or a mutli-purpose cleaner. When a
deeper cleaning is necessary, use De-Solv-It rubbed into the mag’s
surface with a cotton cloth. Finish with alcohol applied with a cloth
to restore its original finish.
5.4.2 Pressure Plates
The magazine pressure plates should be cleaned of dirt and film particles by means of a dust-free cotton or chamois cloth. After cleaning, run your finger across their surface for a slight lubrication.
5.4.3 Interior / Film Path
Open the door of the magazine and inspect all surfaces on which
the film rides. If any film dust buildup is apparent in the sprocket or
roller areas, use alcohol and a Q-tip to clean. Use a utility brush
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CLEANING
with soft bristles to clean particles from tight crevices. Afterwards,
use canned air and thoroughly blow out any remaining dust in the
throat and chamber.
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6
SUPER35
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6.1 SUPER VS STANDARD 35MM
6.1.1 The Super35 Format
Super35 is a comeback to the cinema origins: silent cameras were
exposing all the available area between perforations of the 35mm
film. When came the “talkies” the picture had to be reduced to give
room to the 2.54mm-wide optical sound track. Equipment manufacturers had to shift the optical axis of all their cameras and projectors by 2.54/2 = 1.27mm. Sixty years later Super35 is coming back
because it records 16/9 pictures with much less of a waste than the
so called “Wide-Screen” formats. For a camera to handle both formats, it must be able to align the lens mount and the viewfinder
optical axis either in the middle of the film width (Super35) or
1.27mm away (Standard35).
Standard 35mm
Super35
6.1.2 Why Shooting Super35 ?
If contact prints with analog sound track is not a requirement,
Super35 is the unquestionable choice for maximum resolution.
This format should always be selected when it comes to shoot high
quality 16/9 films for video distribution only ; all telecines are able
to “scan” the wider Super35 pictures with no modification at all.
Super35 will be the format of choice for films treated through
Kodak Cineon and Quantel Domino, or distributed with digital
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cal “reduction and axis shift” at the interpositve stage.
6.2 CAMERA CONVERSION
The 35-III camera can easily be converted from Standard35 to Super35
and back. A quick lateral sliding of the viewfinder and lens mount,
that’s all there is to it.
6.2.1 Lens-Mount Repositionning
The lens-mount is on a titanium seat which rests on the camera
main chassis ; this seat can laterally move by 1.27mm between two
stop pins. To have access to the seat, remove the two front rods and
the lens locking ring, unscrew the four retaining screws of the front
cap and remove the cap. The titanium lens mount seat is now
accessible. Loosen (3 or 4 turns) the three screws which appear in
elongated cut-outs ; push the titanium seat against the pin on the
VIDEO-ASSIST SIDE to set the camera in SUPER35 (or push the
titanium seat against the pin on the DISPLAY SIDE to set the
camera in STANDARD35). Retighten the three screws, reinstall the
front cap, the lens locking ring and the front rods.
Please note: if you are frequently swaping formats, it is advisable to
install a Super35 engraved (or Standard35 engraved) front cap instead of the universal front cap delivered with the 35III camera.
These format specific caps can’t be fixed on the central chassis if the
titanium seat is not in the position engraved on the cap itself ; this
external engraving brings peace of mind to the camera-assistant and
to the prep. people.
6.2.2 Shifting the Viewfinder
The optical axis of the viewfinder need to be set to the optical center of the main taking lens. The viewfinder and the carrying handle
form a block, which can easily be shifted laterally. This block is
attached to the camera central chassis by 4 screws located at the base
of the carrying handle. To set the viewfinder to SUPER35, loosen
the 4 screws, shift the handle toward the VIDEO-ASSIST side
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(until it reaches its stop), and then tighten back the screws. To set
the viewfinder to STANDARD35, shift the handle toward the DISPLAY side.
6.2.3 Selecting a Viewing Screen
There is a wide choice of Standard35 viewing screens and four
Super35 ones to the 1.78, 1.85, 2.35 and Scope aspect ratios. To
install a new one, please read chapter II, viewing screen section.
WARNING: when shooting Standard35 DO NOT leave the camera
in the Super35 alignment, thinking that framing with a Standard35
screen will define the picture to be extracted from the wider
Super35 recorded image. As far as video transfer is concerned, this
practice could be acceptable because the telecine ‘pan-scan’ function
allows to reframe the picture for the lack of 1.27mm optical center
shift, but when it comes to release prints the image would be
1.27mm truncated at the projector gate level: on the left of the
screen some objects would disappear and on the right some unexpected ones would show up (6% of the image width -1.27/22mmeach side).
6.2.4 Adjusting the Video Tap
The beamsplitter which diverts the viewing screen image to the
video-assist CCD target is mounted on the taking lens mount titanium seat, it is thus not necessary to realign its optical axis, but the
focus must to be readjusted. Please read Chapter II, video-assist section.
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SUPER35
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7
3-PERF FORMAT
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7.1 CONCEPT
The only thing we know about tomorrow’s high definition TV is its
aspect ratio of 16/9 (1.78). This new ratio is now taking the place of
the 1.85 (USA) and 1.66 (Europe) ratios. This is why it is time to
re-examine the Moscow’s idea (1962) of the 3-Perf format.
As a matter of fact, an image with the 1.78 ratio, with its both edges
close to the 35mm film perforations, is a little higher than 3 perforations high. Why should we keep a huge amount of unused emulsion between two images (i.e. why should we keep filming in 35mm
4-perf )?
35mm standard
35mm 3-Perf
3-Perf presents three main advantages:
• Saves 25% on raw stock.
• Increases magazine running time (a 400’ roll increase from 4 1/2
to 6 minutes).
• Allows for the camera to run quieter.
7.2 THE AATON 35-III 3-PERF CAMERA
BODY
A 3-Perf camera body is available. This is a special AATON 35-III,
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3-PERF FORMAT
with the sames viewing system, magazines, and lens as on a standard
AATON 35-III (4-Perf ). For one who already owns a AATON 35III, it is only required to buy a 35-III 3-Perf camera body, because
he can use the magazines, viewing systems, batteries, and so on which was aquired for his standard 35-III.
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8
AATONCODE
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8.1 CONCEPT
AatonCode, Aaton’s proprietary in-camera timecode system, is recorded in the AATON 35-III on the edge of the film between the perforations in both matrix and man-readable form. As recorded in the
camera, a six digit production ID, a SMPTE-compatible real time
address (full date and time), an equipment ID and the running
speed of the body.
TimeCode is exposed onto the film by means of seven micro-diodes,
which flash rapidly to form the code as the film rolls through the
gate. The intensity of the diodes is adjusted to the film’s sensitivity
by means of the camera’s ASA selection.
The AATON 35-III can accept timecode information in both
ASCII and SMPTE form, and work with all standard timecode
devices. Beacuse the same time address is running in both the camera and the sound recorder, a slate is no longer needed for syncing
purposes; synchronization becomes fully automatic during the
film/tape transfer or later post-production stages.
An Aaton device called Keylink, which consist of CCD reader heads
and a PC, and which is owned by the telecine house, is designed to
read Keycode and AatonCode off the film during transfer and correlate this to the continuous video timecode and all other transfer data
entry for storage on its hard drive. Keylink can also ingest scene/take
information and notes from the set recorded by means of Aaton’s
ScriptLink software.
The facility can then supply all correlated information in VITC
(vertical interval timecode) and/or burn-in windows on the transferred tape, and also on floppy disk for direct use with non linear editing systems, audio workstations and logging programs.
8.2 THE INTERNAL CLOCK
The AATON 35-III contains an internal clock designed to be initialized from an outside source and keep accurate time (within a half a
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AATON CODE
frame) for 8 hours.
The camera is equipped with an instantly charged supercapacitor
buffer that is designed to keep time between battery changes. Keep
in mind that a battery which is too low to run the camera has
enough energy to drive internal clock for hours. Get into the habit
of leaving an exhausted battery on-board the camera until you have
a fresh battery close by. The supercapacitor allows a full minute for
battery replacement before timecode is lost.
8.3 ORIGINCPLUS MASTERCLOCK
For the most efficient and foolproof means of working with AatonCode, it is highly recommended that an Aaton device called OriginCplus is used. OriginCplus can be quickly programmed with a
production ID, full date and time of day, then initialize timecode
devices in either ASCII or SMPTE form. OriginCplus is TCXOcontrolled and will run for 150 hours with an internal 9V lithium
cell; it is designed to be left on during the shoot day and used as a
comparator to monitor timecode drift between devices.
OriginCplus can also be used as a SMPTE generator to supply accurate timecode for slates and inserters, or to record timecode on one
audio channel of a non timecode audio recorder.
8.4 INITIALIZING AATONCODE IN THE
CAMERA
There are two ways in which AatonCode can be initialized in the
AATON 35-III camera. The preferred method is by means of the OriginCplus, which inputs timecode in ASCII form. It is also possible for the
camera to receive information in SMPTE from directly from a SMPTE
timecode device such as an TC audio recorder. Both methods are detailed
below.
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8.4.1 Using the OriginCplus - Recommended Method
• Program the OriginCplus by inputting Prod ID, accurate date and
time of day. Press the # key to scroll through each field; after all
fields are set as desired, press * to start the clock.
• Make sure the camera has a battery attached.
• Plug the Lemo5 cable of the OriginCplus into the Lemo5 chassis
mount on the base of the camera.
• Press * on the OriginCplus to send the timecode information. The
OriginCplus will display Good OO.O after the timecode has been
accepted in the camera. The control panel of the AATON 35-III
will display hours/minutes/seconds when the button marked Time is
pressed. Toggling this button will also display year/month/day, then
the production ID, then the equipment #.
• Make sure to adjust the ASA selection to the exposure index of the
film stock being used.
• Disconnect the OriginCplus from the body and proceed to the
next device.
8.4.2 Using an External SMPTE Device
• Make sure the AATON 35-III has a battery attached and is not
running.
• Choose the SMPTE timecode device that will be supplying the
timecode (such as a Fostex PD2 or a Nagra IVS-TC). Set the time
of day and date, and set its clock to free run mode.
• Connect a cable from the SMPTE output of the timecode device
to the Lemo5 chassis mount on the base of the camera.
• Set the on/off switch on the camera to run or test position, then
off again; this will send the timecode information to the camera
body. The AATON 35-III will display hours/minutes/seconds when
the button marked Time is pressed. Toggling this button will also
display year/month/day and the equipment #. No production ID
will be recorded.
• Disconnect the cable from the body and proceed to the next device.
8.5 MONITORING AND MAINTAINING
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AATONCODE
After initialization, the OriginCplus should be left on during production to act as a visual reference and for quick drift monitoring. Once
timecode has been initialized into the camera(s) and sound recorder,
accurate time will be individually maintained in each machine for 7
hours. It is suggested, however, that new timecode be re-initialized after
4 hours or so as a precautionary measure. Get into the habit of using the
OriginCplus to monitor timcode drift in each device when possible; every 2-3 hours or so is recommended.
8.5.1 Monitoring AatonCode with OriginCplus
Assuming that the OriginCplus has been left on during the production, follow the simple procedure below to monitor drift in the
camera.
• Plug the Lemo5 cable of the OriginCplus into the Lemo5 chassis
mount at the base of the camera.
• Press * to monitor AatonCode drift. OriginCplus will compare its
own timecode to that of the AATON 35-III. OriginCplus will display Good, fair, bad or diff-time (different time) followed by the
amount of drift in tenth of frame.
• Follow the same procedure for each camera or sound recorder on
the set running AatonCode. When initializing or monitoring timecode in a SMPTE device, press *0 on the OriginCplus.
8.5.2 Maintaining AatonCode without OriginCplus
If the OriginCplus has not been used and timecode has been set
directly from the TC audio recorder, there is no way to monitor
timecode drift between the two devices. In this case, it is recommended to simply re-jam the camera every 2 or 3 hours.
Make sure that the camera on/off is switched to run or test position
for it to accept the newly fed code.
8.6 GMT1 SMPTE GENERATOR
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Because more and more cineasts are using sound recorders not specifically designed for cinema, which means with no integrated timecode, Aaton needed to modify its OriginCplus: now, OriginCplus is
able to serve as a SMPTE generator, which you can connect to any
sound recorder.
But OriginCplus may be too big and too powerful for such an usage.
So Aaton decided to build the GMT1, a mini SMPTE generator
also designed to provide a timecode track for any sound recorder.
The GMT1 is smaller than the OriginCplus, and can work continuously for 150 hours with just a standard 9V battery. Its timecode
informations (time and date) can be initialized with any SMPTE
generator such as OriginCplus.
To choose the SMPTE frame rate you need (according to the speed
of your camera), remove the battery cover and turn the small white
cross, beside the 9V battery, with a screwdriver. You can choose between 24, 25, 29.97 and 30 fps. The selected frame rate LED will
flash every second.
You can also use the GMT1 as an OriginCplus supplier: if one day,
by mistake, you have forgotten to take your OriginCplus with you,
then use the GMT1 to initialize timecode in your camera. The
GMT1, with no timecode initialized inside, is still able to generate a
SMPTE code, starting at 1h 00mn 00s.
8.7 THE CAMERA ASSISTANT’S DUTIES
Although timecode-related practices on the set are very straightforward
and uncomplicated, there are a few duties which should be handled by
a camera assistant as part of his/her routine.
8.7.1 Checking the Diodes
In order to inspect and clean the gate between magazine rolls, the
camera must be set to test position. Not only will test position rotate the shutter 180°, but the seven timecode LEDs in the gate will
illuminate in a three/four sequence. Use this pattern to occasionaly
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AATON CODE
check that all diodes are operational and evenly illuminated. As part
of the normal gate cleaning procedure, clean this area with a Q-tip
moisten with lens cleaning fluid to assure that no dust particles
cover the LED array.
The seven diodes will illuminate in test position whether or not
timecode is running in the camera.
8.7.2 Setting the ASA
When changing magazines, make sure the ASA/ISO setting of the
camera matches the film stock being used.
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9
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
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9.1 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Weight 7kg (16 lbs) with 400’ load and on-board battery.
Power Brushless, high efficiency tri-phase motor; 1.4 amp.
consumption with film at 25°C (77°F) under 12V power supply
(10-15V).
Temperature Range -10°C (14°F) to +40°C (104°F)
Noise Level 4-Perf: 30 / 33 dB. 3-Perf: 27 / 30 dB
Frame Rate Sync speeds: 24, 25, 29.97, 30 fps. Built-in var crystal control to 2 to 40 fps in 0.001 increments.
Steadiness Co-planar claw movement for lateral and vertical steadiness to 1/2000th of image dimension.
Viewing System Interchangeable screens: 1.37, 1.66, 1.78, 1.85
aspect ratios.
Camera Mounts Interchangeable hard front: ArriPL, Panavision,
Nikon.
Shutter Reflex mirror, user-convertible on option; 180° for 24 fps
under 60 Hz lighting, 172.8° for 24 fps under 50 Hz, 150° for 25
fps under 60 Hz, 144° for NTSC monitoir.
35 / Super 35 Quick centering of lens axis for either format.
Time Code AatonCode man-readable figures and rugged SMPTE
matrixes. 1/2 frame accuracy over 8 hours.
Accessory Inputs Amph9 (video sync), Lemo6 (power zoom),
Lemo8 (speed controllers de vitesse), Lemo5 (SMPTE and RS232).
Video Assist Black & White - low power, high sensitivity, integrated CCD assist with manual iris. PAL or NTSC formats.
Color - high sensitivity, flicker-free, integrated CCD assist with
timecode windows and Vitc insertion. PAL or NTSC formats.
Magazine Instant, 400’, reading in feet or meters.
LCD Display Speed selection, remaining footage, ISO selection,
battery voltage, full AatonCode readout via a single rotating jog.
Operator Warning Speed discrepancy, misloading, low battery
indicator.
Camera Shut-off Automatic at end of roll.
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
9.2 CONNECTOR - PIN ATTRIBUTIONS
Type
Fonctions
Diagram
Localisation
Pin Attributions
Between the
two motors.
Looking down.
1 Ground
2 Start
Under
jog wheel.
1 Ground
2 Smpte In
3 ASCII In/Out
4 et 5l Not used
Above the right
motor.
1 -Batt
4 +Batt
6 Start
2, 3 & 5 Not used
Above and to
the right of
the left motor.
1 -Batt
2 TV Sync
3 ASCII In/Out
4 +Batt
5 100 PFF Out
6 Start
7 100 PFF In
8 Ground
Above the
left motor.
1 -Batt
2 TV Sync
3 2400 Hz
4 ASCII In/Out
5 +Batt
6 -Batt
7 Strobe
8 Start
9 +Batt
Above the
jog wheel.
1 -Batt
4 +Batt
2 et 3 Not used
2
Lemo2
On/Off/Test
Lemo5
TimeCode
Interface
1
Lemo6
2
3
5
4
1
6
Power Zoom
2
5
3
4
1
Lemo8
8
2
Speed
Controllers
3
7
6
4
5
5
Amph9
4
9
XLR4
3
2
1
Video Sync
8
3
Power In
7
6
2
4
1
pin
socket
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1.85
ACAD + TVTRANS + TV safe +1.66
1.66
SCOPE 2.35
1.37 + 1.66 & 1.85 markings
1.85 SUPER35
ACAD+TVTRANS+ TV safe + 1.85
1.85 + SCOPE SUPER35
ACAD+TVTRANS+ TV safe
2.35 + SUPER35
88
1.85 SUPER35
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TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
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10
WORLDWIDE SUPPORT
91
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Australia
LEMAC FILM
277 Highett Street
Victoria 3121 RICHMOND
Contact: John Bowring
Belgium
COLOR BY DEJONGHE
Diskmuidekaai 4
B 8500 KORTRIJE
Contact: Dirk Dejonghe
Brazil
HAGA DE
Rua Sergipe 475 cj. 711
Cep 01234-001 SAO PAULO
Contact: Hugo Kovenski
Canada
Cineasst
332 Dupont street
M5R 1V9 Toronto Ontario
Contact: Pierre Careau
Tel
Fax
: 61 39 429 8588
: 61 39 428 3336
Tel
Fax
: 32 5635 0710
: 32 5635 0780
Tel
Fax
: 55 11 258 5752
: 55 11 258 5752
Tel
Fax
: 416 975 2565
: 416 975 0895
Denmark
ZIMMERMANNFILM & VIDEO TEKNIK
H.C. Orstedsvej 11 B
Tel : 45 3325 8525
DK-1879 Frederiksberg C
Fax : 45 3325 8523
Contact: Peter Zimmermann
France
AATON S.A.
2 rue de la Paix BP 3002
38001 Grenoble Cedex
Contact: Danys Bruyère
92
Tel
Fax
: 33 (0) 4 7642 9550
: 33 (0) 4 7651 3491
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WORLDWIDE SUPPORT
Germany
DEDO WEIGERT FILM
Karl-Weinmair Strasse 10
80807 Munich 40
Contact: Victoria Johnson
Great Britain
ICE FILM EQUIPMENT
156 Caledonian Road
N1 9UU London
Contact: Peter Bryant
Greece
CHASSAPIS
Olymbou St 55
152 34 HALANDRI ATHEN
Contact: Stravos Chassapis
Holland
HOLLAND EQUIPMENT
Van Marwijk Kooystraat 14
1096 BR Amsterdam
Contact: Nico Van Den Boogard
Japan
SUZUKI ENTERPRISE
Dai Ichi Nichiya Bldg 2F
Hatagaya Shibuya-Ku
151 Tokyo
Contact: Sadaaki Suzuki
Tel
Fax
: 49 89 356 1601
: 49 89 356 6086
Tel
Fax
: 44 171 278 0908
: 44 171 278 4552
Tel
Fax
: 30 1 682 1237
: 30 1 684 6584
Tel
Fax
: 31 20 694 35 75
: 31 20 668 53 81
Tel
Fax
: 81 353 50 8235
: 81 353 50 8237
93
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Malaysia
TRANS ASIAN & AMERICAN FILMS & CINEMA
7, Tingkat Taman Ipoh - 10
Tel : 605 545 7113
31400 Ipoh, Perak
Fax : 605 547 7873
Contact: Alexander Sange
Portugal
ANIMATOGRAFO
Rua da Rosa 252
1250 LISBOA
Contact: Antonio Cunha Telles
Spain
EPC
Nieremberg 29
28002 MADRID
Contact: Oscar Perez
Sweden
RE FILM SERVICE AB
Strindbergsgatan 58
115 53 STOCKHOLM
Contact: Lars Wedberg
Switzerland
GH team
15 Chemin de la Rochette
CH-1202 Geneva
Contact: Georges Hofer
USA
AbelCine Tech / LA
4110 West Magnolia Blvd
Burbank, CA 91505
Contact: Rich Abel
94
Tel
Fax
: 351 1347 4593
: 351 1347 3252
Tel
Fax
: 34 1 519 4221
: 34 1 519 2198
Tel
Fax
: 46 8 662 25 35
: 46 8 662 25 03
Tel
Fax
: 41 22 733 06 38
: 41 22 734 44 89
Tel
Fax
: 1 (818) 972 9078
: 1 (818) 972 2673
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WORLDWIDE SUPPORT
AbelCine Tech / NY
66 Willow Avenue
NY 10305 Staten Island
Contact: Peter Abel
Tel
Fax
: 1 718 273 8108
: 1 718 273 8137
95
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11
INDEX
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3-Perf 2.6, 7, 7.1, 7.2, 9.1
AatonCode 1.2, 1.5, 2.7.2, 2.9.3, 2.9.4, 2.11.3, 8, 8.1,
8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.5.1, 8.5.2, 9.1
Amph9 1.4, 2.8.3, 2.11.2, 9.1, 9.2
Aperture opening 1.2, 2.2.8, 2.9.3, 3.2.2, 5.2.3
ArriPL 2.1.1, 9.1
ASA 1.2, 1.3, 2.9.4, 8.1, 8.4.1, 8.7.2
Battery 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.3.2, 2.7, 2.7.1, 2.7.2, 2.7.3, 2.9.5,
2.9.12, 2.9.13, 2.10.4, 8.2, 8.4.1, 8.4.2, 8.6, 9.1
Carrying handle 1.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5, 4.5, 4.5.2, 6.2.2
Claw 1.4, 2.3.1, 2.4, 2.4.1, 3.2.1, 4.7.1, 5.2.3, 9.1
Cleaning 2.2.8, 5, 8.7.1
Cold weather 4.7.1
Diopter set ring 1.1, 2.2.4
Empty 1.5, 3.3.1
Eyepiece 1.1, 1.4, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.4, 2.2.5, 5.3.2, 5.3.3
Feet or meters 3.3.1, 9.1
Flicker 2.1.1, 2.11.3
Footage 1.2, 1.5, 2.9.2, 2.9.10, 2.9.11, 2.9.13, 3.3.1, 9.1
Friction adjusting ring 1.1, 2.2.3
Front rods 1.1, 4.11, 4.4
Gate plate 3.2.1
GMT1 8.6
Intervalometer 2.8.4, 4.2.3
Jog wheel 1.2, 2.81, 2.9, 2.94, 2.9.7, 9.2
Keycode 2.11, 8.1
Keylink 8.1
LCD Control Panel 1.2, 1.5, 2.8.1, 2.8.3, 2.9, 2.9.1,
2.9.3, 2.9.12
LEDs 5.2.3, 8.7.1
Lemo2 1.4, 2.8.3, 4.2, 4.2.1, 9.2
Lemo5 1.2, 2.9.3, 8.4.1, 8.4.2, 8.5.1
Lemo6 1.4, 2.8.3, 2.11.2, 4.21, 9.2
Lemo8 1.4, 2.8.3, 4.2.1
Lens 1.1, 2.1, 2.11, 2.12, 2.2.4, 2.2.9, 2.5.3, 4.12, 4.6,
5.1, 5.12, 6.1, 6.2.3, 9.1
Lo Batt 1.5, 2.10.4
Lo Spd 2.10.5
Loading the magazine 3.3, 3.3.2
Loop 1.5, 2.4.1, 2.8.3, 3.3.3
Mag release lever 1.4
Magazine 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2.6, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, 2.9.6,
2.11.3, 3, 4.6, 4.7.1, 5.4, 8.7.2, 9.1
98
Magnetic wheel 1.2, 3.1, 3.3.3
Meters or feet 3.3.1, 9.1
Mirror Shutter 1.2, 2.2.8, 2.3, 5.3.1
Nikon 2.11, 2.5.5, 9.1
Noise 2.4.1, 2.8.2, 3.1, 3.3.1, 9.1
OriginCplus 2.9.3, 8.3, 8.4.1, 8.5, 8.5.1, 8.5.2, 8.6
Panavision 2.1.1, 2.5.5, 9.1
Picture plate 3.2.2
Pitch 1.2, 2.4.1
Power 2.7, 2.7.3, 2.8, 2.9.5, 2.11.2, 9.1
Pressure Plates 3.2, 5.4.2
Pulldown claw 1.4, 2.3.1, 2.4, 2.4.1, 3.2.1, 4.7.1, 5.2.3,
9.1
Run/Test switch 1.3, 1.4, 2.8.3, 2.9.4
Scratch 1.5
Set Mode 1.5, 2.92
Show Mode 1.5, 2.92
Spacer 2.5.2, 2.5.3, 4.2.3
Speed 1.5, 2.8.1, 2.8.2, 2.9.1, 2.9.7, 2.9.8, 2.9.9, 2.10.5,
2.11.3, 8.1, 9.1
Super35 6, 9.3
Tape measure stud 4.5.3
Technical Specifications, 9.1
Timecode 2.9.3, 2.9.4, 5.23, 8
Transport 3.1, 3.2, 4.6
Unadjust 1.5, 2.9.14
Video assist 2.11, 6.2.4, 9.1
Viewfinder 1.1, 2.2.1, 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.10, 5.3, 5.3.2,
6.2.2
Viewing screen 1.3, 2.2.7, 2.2.8, 2.2.9, 2.5.4, 2.11.3,
5.3.1, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.3
Vitc lines 2.11.1, 8.1, 9.1
Warnings 1.5, 2.9.14, 5.2.3, 9.1
Weight 2.2.3, 9.1
Wooden Handgrip 1.1, 2.8.3, 4.2, 4.4
Worldwide Support 10
XLR4 1.2, 2.7.2, 2.7.3, 9.2
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101
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