View / the Complete Manual

View / the Complete Manual
D2--HPP Handheld
Programmer
Manual Number D2--HP--M
WARNING
Thank you for purchasing automation equipment from PLCDirectä. We want your new DirectLOGICä automation
equipment to operate safely. Anyone who installs or uses this equipment should read this publication (and any other
relevant publications) before installing or operating the equipment.
To minimize the risk of potential safety problems, you should follow all applicable local and national codes that regulate
the installation and operation of your equipment. These codes vary from area to area and usually change with time. It is
your responsibility to determine which codes should be followed, and to verify that the equipment, installation, and
operation is in compliance with the latest revision of these codes.
At a minimum, you should follow all applicable sections of the National Fire Code, National Electrical Code, and the
codes of the National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association (NEMA). There may be local regulatory or government
offices that can also help determine which codes and standards are necessary for safe installation and operation.
Equipment damage or serious injury to personnel can result from the failure to follow all applicable codes and
standards. We do not guarantee the products described in this publication are suitable for your particular application,
nor do we assume any responsibility for your product design, installation, or operation.
If you have any questions concerning the installation or operation of this equipment, or if you need additional
information, please call us at 1--800--633--0405.
This publication is based on information that was available at the time it was printed. At PLCDirectä we constantly
strive to improve our products and services, so we reserve the right to make changes to the products and/or
publications at any time without notice and without any obligation. This publication may also discuss features that may
not be available in certain revisions of the product.
Trademarks
This publication may contain references to products produced and/or offered by other companies. The product and
company names may be trademarked and are the sole property of their respective owners. PLCDirectä disclaims any
proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.
Stage is a trademark of Koyo Electronics Industries Co., LTD. Think & Do Software is a trademark of Think & Do
Software, Inc. Texas Instruments is a registered trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc. TI, TIWAY, Series 305, Series
405, TI305, and TI405 are trademarks of Texas Instruments, Inc. Siemens and SIMATIC are registered trademarks of
Siemens, AG. GE is a registered trademark of General Electric Corporation. Series One is a registered trademark of
GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc. MODBUS is a registered trademark of Gould, Inc. IBM is a registered
trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation. Windows and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OPTOMUX and PAMUX are
trademarks of OPTO 22.
Copyright 1998, PLCDirectä Incorporated
All Rights Reserved
No part of this manual shall be copied, reproduced, or transmitted in any way without the prior, written consent of
PLCDirectä Incorporated. PLCDirectä retains the exclusive rights to all information included in this document.
1
Manual Revisions
If you contact us in reference to this manual, be sure and include the revision number.
Title: D2--HPP Handheld Programmer
Manual Number: D2--HP--M
Issue
Date
Effective Pages
Description of Changes
Original
1/94
Complete User Manual
Original Issue
2nd Edition
7/96
New Release
Upgraded Firmware for DL105 & DL205
Rev A
5/98
Manual Revisions
Pages 2--10, 3--7, 4--7
Made minor corrections before reprinting
1
Table of Contents
i
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D2--HPP Handheld Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who should read this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Techncial Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How can I use the Handheld? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
As a Programming Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Monitor Machine Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
As a Debugging Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
As a Low-Cost Message Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Characteristics and Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld Programmer Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connection to the CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keypad Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Four Groups of Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operation Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction/Data Type Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Numeric Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing / Monitoring Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mode Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AUX Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TEST-RUN Display (DL205 Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--3
1--3
1--4
1--4
1--4
1--5
1--5
1--6
1--6
1--6
1--7
1--8
1--8
1--9
1--9
1--9
1--9
1--10
1--10
1--10
1--11
1--12
1--12
Handheld Programmer Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A Few Things to Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the CPU Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Different CPU Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic I/O Configuration (DL205 Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What are Auxiliary Functions? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2--2
2--2
2--2
2--3
2--3
2--3
2--4
2--4
2--5
2--5
2--5
2--6
2--6
Chapter 2: D2--HPP Setup
ii
Table of Contents
Handheld Programmer Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beeper ON/OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing an Existing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initializing System Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the CPU Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retentive Memory Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Retentive Memory Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Press these keystrokes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Clock and Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Press these keystrokes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2--7
2--7
2--8
2--8
2--9
2--10
2--11
2--11
2--12
2--12
Entering Ladder Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld Programmer Key Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Overiew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Previous / Next Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting at Address 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching a Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching the END . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering END command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering a Simple Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Different Element Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Normally Closed Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Series Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Parallel Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining Series Elements in Parallel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining Parallel Branches in Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Combination Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Timers and Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timer Example Using Discrete Status Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accumulating Timers & Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Accumulating Timers (Two Inputs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Relational Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering ASCII Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the INST # key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Octal and Hex Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking for Program Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duplicate Reference Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--2
3--2
3--2
3--2
3--3
3--3
3--3
3--3
3--3
3--3
3--4
3--4
3--4
3--5
3--5
3--6
3--7
3--8
3--9
3--10
3--10
3--10
3--11
3--12
3--13
3--13
3--14
3--15
3--15
3--15
3--16
Two Ways to Edit a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run--Time Edit Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching a Program Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching Start of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--2
4--2
4--2
4--2
4--3
4--4
4--4
Chapter 3: Entering Programs
Chapter 4: Changing Programs
iii
Table of Contents
Finding Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Specific Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing Mode for Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Search and Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Programs During Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Runtime Edits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Constant Values During Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--5
4--5
4--6
4--6
4--7
4--8
4--9
4--10
4--11
4--11
Program Names and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locking the CPU with Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unlocking the CPU Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Programs on EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type of EEPROMs (DL205 ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting a EEPROM in the Handheld Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using HPP EEPROM functions with the DL105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the EEPROM Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking for a Blank EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Erasing a EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying Programs from the CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Memory to copy from CPU -- EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing Programs to the CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparing CPU and Handheld Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verification Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Offline Generated Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5--2
5--2
5--2
5--3
5--3
5--4
5--4
5--5
5--5
5--6
5--6
5--7
5--7
5--8
5--9
5--10
5--11
5--11
Troubleshooting Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Status Monitor Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Discrete I/O Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bit Status Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing Discrete I/O Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Force during Bit Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regular Bit Force using the Status Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Regular Bit Force with Direct Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bit Override Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct bit Forcing (DL240 ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bit Override (DL240 Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring V--Memory Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing V-Memory Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Pointer Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Timer/Counter Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Timer/Counter Current Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring the CPU Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Change Watchdog Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--2
6--2
6--3
6--3
6--4
6--5
6--6
6--6
6--7
6--7
6--8
6--9
6--9
6--10
6--10
6--10
6--11
6--11
Chapter 5: Naming and Storing Programs
Chapter 6: System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
iv
Table of Contents
Test Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TEST-RUN Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Holding Output States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Test Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trapping a Discrete Point or Word of Data (DL240 Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics (DL205 ONLY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Custom Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Program Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Error Message Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two Types of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the Error Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing the Message Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A: DL105/DL205 Memory Map
6--13
6--13
6--14
6--15
6--16
6--17
6--17
6--18
6--19
6--20
6--21
6--21
6--22
6--22
6--23
DL130 Memory Map Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--1
DL230 Memory Map Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--2
DL240 Memory Map Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--3
X Input Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--4
Y Output Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--4
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--5
Stage Control / Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--6
Timer Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--7
Counter Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--7
DL130/DL230 System V-memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--8
DL240 System V-memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--10
Appendix B: Special Relays
DL130/DL230 CPU Special Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL240 CPU Special Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B--1
B--2
Getting Started
11
In This Chapter. . . .
— Introduction
— How can I use the Handheld?
— Physical Characteristics and Specifications
— Keypad Layout
— Mode Indicators
— Display Panel
1--2
Getting Started
Getting Started
Introduction
D2--HPP Handheld
Programmer
Purpose of this
manual
Who should read
this manual
Supplemental
Manuals
Technical Support
The
D2--HPP
(Handheld
Portable
Programmer) is a general purpose tool for
use with the DL105 or DL205 PLC products.
It is well suited for performing basic PLC
maintenance and troubleshooting of
machine automation equipment. The
Handheld programmer is not ideal for
entering large complex PLC programs. In
this
case
please
consider
using
DirectSOFTä,
our
PC--based
programming software.
7654321076543210
This manual provides information on the D2--HPP capabilities and how to operate
the Handheld programmer. Although this manual does not cover all instructions
possible with the Handheld programmer, it should detail all key features and how
they should be used.
This manual is a reference manual for the D2--HPP Handheld programmer, not a
tutorial on the DL105/DL205 instruction set or system operations. It is intended for
new user to become familiar with using the D2--HPP features and functions.
The DL105 and DL205 User Manuals may occasionally be referenced by this
manual. As you become more efficient with the Handheld Programmer, this manual
may not be absolutely necessary, but it may useful as a reference on procedures and
related subjects.
We realize that even though we strive to be the best, we may have arranged our
information in such a way you cannot find what you are looking for. First, check these
resources for help in locating the information:
S Table of Contents -- chapter and section listing of contents, in the front
of this manual
S Quick Guide to Contents -- chapter summary listing on the following
page
S Appendices -- reference material for key topics
S Index -- alphabetical listing of key words, at the end of this manual
You can also check our online resources for the latest product support information:
S Internet -- the address of our Web site is
http://www.plcdirect.com
S Bulletin Board Service (BBS) -- call (770)--844--4209
If you still need assistance, please call us at 800--633--0405. Our technical support
group is glad to work with you in answering your questions. They are available
Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time. If you
have a comment or question about any of our products, services, or manuals, please
fill out and return the ‘Suggestions’ card that was shipped with this manual.
Getting Started
1--3
Chapters The main contents of this manual are organized into the following six chapters:
provides an overview of the Handheld Programmer and provides
general specifications.
2
D2--HPP Setup
provides as overview on general Handheld Programmer features
and how to use them.
3
Entering Programs
4
Changing Programs
5
Naming and Storing
Programs
6
System Monitoring and
Troubleshooting
Appendices
A
B
discusses all the operations used to enter a program.
shows you how to edit an existing program.
discusses using program names, password protection, and
how to store programs on EEPROM memory chips.
provides an overview of the various features used to monitor
and troubleshoot your PLC system.
Additional reference information is in the following two appendices:
Appendix A provides a detailed listing of the DL105/DL205
memory
map for I/O, timers, counters, etc.
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
Special Relays
Appendix B lists the special relay contacts which are available
to the ladder program to indicate system status, error conditions, instruction execution results, etc.
Getting Started
1
Getting Started
1--4
Getting Started
Getting Started
How can I use the Handheld?
As a Programming
Tool
To Monitor
Machine
Operations
The D2--HPP handheld programming
Handheld Programmer
unit is convenient for on-site setup,
maintenance and minor PLC program
changes. With the Handheld programer,
you can change almost any system
setting within the PLC. These settings
7654321076543210
include I/O configuration, retentive
memory range selection, clock and
calender setup, and many more.
The Handheld programmer may be used
to program the complete DL105 and
DL205 PLC systems. The unit only
allows programming the PLC with
instruction mnemonics. Mnemonics are
commands and operand data which will
be processed by the CPU. Both on-line
and off-line features will be described in
detail within this manual.
The diagram to the right shows ladder
Handheld
DirectSOFT
logic which was programmed using the
Mnemonics
RLL
PC based DirectSOFTä programming
software,
and
the
equivalent
X3
Set
STR X3
mnemonics program using the Handheld
Y50
OR X4
programmer.
Both
methods
of
X4
SET Y50
programming have advantages and can
easily be used together or independently
to support your PLC application. Once
again, if you are creating a large
program, it is recommended that you use
DirectSOFTä, which is better suited for
the development environment.
The Handheld programmer may be used to monitor memory status of the PLC
system. The memory locations such as; V-memory, I/O information, timer/counter
values, and system data may be selectively examined. The monitor status functions
are performed in either Test/Run and Run modes. These monitoring modes help
confirm all PLC conditions. Details on how to use the Handheld programmer to
monitor your PLC system are described in later chapters.
Getting Started
If your PLC automation system appears to have a problem, you may use the
Handheld programmer to quickly debug both hardware and software. Auxiliary
functions, when executed, provide information to help diagnose PLC problems.
Here are a few examples of commonly used diagnostics available.
S Program Diagnostics — help locate instruction syntax errors, and
potential duplicate output referencing.
S I/O Diagnostics — displays I/O errors and allows examination of special
V-memory locations. This information may be viewed to help determine
exact base and slot number having a problem.
S Test Mode — allows program logic to be verified without output status.
While changing between Test-Program and Test-Run modes the digital
output conditions are controlled.
Direct
LOGIC
E252
NEW I/O CFG
As a Low-Cost
Message Log
The DL105 and DL205 CPU’s allow embedded message instructions to be
programmed in your control program. The Handheld programmer displays the
messages saved within the CPU message log. If properly programmed, the fault
messages are automatically displayed when the Handheld programmer is
connected to the CPU. Please refer to the proper DL105 or DL205 User Manuals for
examples on how to program these fault messages in your PLC system.
Program Initiates Message
S
S
C0
FAULT Message
Handheld Displays Message
Your message
displayed here
FAULT
K1
S
S
SW3436 JAM
END
DLBL
K1
Data Label and ACON
instructions build the message
ACON
A SW
2 Characters per ACON
(when using with the Handheld)
NCON
K 3436
ACON
A J
ACON
A AM
Getting Started
As a Debugging
Tool
1--5
1--6
Getting Started
Getting Started
Physical Characteristics and Specifications
Handheld
Programmer
Layout
The Handheld programmer is designed for versatility. It provides features commonly
not found on other handheld programmers. The figure below shows the basic
physical characteristics of the Handheld programmer.
Phone Jack Style connector
(RJ12) located on top of HPP
3.54”
90mm
PLC Modes
6.57”
167mm
2 line x 16 character
backlit LCD display
2.99”
76mm
1.06”
27mm
Keypad retracts to
reveal EEPROM Zero
Force Insertion Socket.
Cable for HHP--CPU
connection
6.6 ft. (2m)
0.98”
25mm
The Handheld programmer has a two line, 16 character per line LCD display, which
makes it easy to view the program, examine status and accesss other PLC data. The
Handheld programmer contains a EEPROM socket which is located underneath the
keypad. The EEPROM socket may be accessed by firmly holding the programmer
and sliding the front keypad bezel down. The EEPROM programming feature may
be used to:
S Store DL105 and DL205 CPU data to EEPROM non--volatile memory
S Compare the contents of a CPU to data stored on EEPROM
S Copy data from EEPROM to a CPU
Connection to the
CPU
The Handheld programmer is provided with a 6.6ft. (2m) programming cable (part
number D2--DSCBL). The cable is manufactured with RJ12 connectors at both
ends. Connect the cable between the Handheld programmer and CPU
programming port. When power is applied to the CPU, the Handheld programmer
LED indicator(s) and LCD display should become active.
Getting Started
Specifications
1--7
The D2--HPP Handheld Programmer Specifications.
Programming Operations
Read, write, or erase programs
Insert or delete an instruction
Search and replace instructions
Locate a specific address
Read, write, or clear EEPROM
Run time edit
Password protection
Cables
D2--DSCBL
6.6ft. (2m) Programmer Cable
Machine Monitoring Operations
I/O status
(up to 16 simultaneously)
On / Off status for contacts, coils,
control relays, and bit locations
Timer and counter contacts,
current values, and preset values
Displays values in either HEX,
BCD, Octal or ASCII
Debugging Operations
Forcing (one scan only)
Override forcing (multiple scans)
Run, Program Mode, and
Test Mode (DL240 only)
Program syntax check
Duplicate reference check
Predefined error codes
Message Display
Up to 64, 23-character messages
may be programmed (must be in
RLL program).
Maximum of 16 messages stored
in each log (history and fault).
Environmental
Operating Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shock Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Noise Immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32 to 122 F° (0 to 50 C°)
--4 to 158 F° (--20 to 70 C°)
30 to 95% (non-condensing)
No corrosive gases
MIL STD 810C 514.2
MIL STD 810C 516.2
NEMA ICS3--304
200 mA
obtained through PLC port,
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.7” L x 4.6” H x 1.2” D
145mm W x 118mm H x 30mm D
Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.7 oz. (48.2 g.)
Getting Started
CPUs Supported
DL130, DL230, DL240
1--8
Getting Started
Getting Started
Keypad Layout
Four Groups of
Keys
The Handheld programmer keypad is organized into four key groups as defined
below.
S Operation keys — used to call AUX functions, change
programmer/CPU modes, monitor status and save program changes.
S Instruction/Data type keys — used to select the instruction and data
type.
S Numeric keys — used to enter values in various formats (BCD, decimal,
octal, HEX)
S Editing/Monitoring keys — used to move through the program (search,
delete, etc.)
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Operation Keys
Instruction and Data
Type Keys
Alpha--Numeric Keys
Editing or monitoring
Keys
As you examine the keys, you’ll notice some of the keys have more than one label.
The top label describes the key when the SHFT (Shift) key is pressed. (These keys
work just like the number keys on a computer keyboard.)
Getting Started
Operation Keys
1--9
AUX key — is used to perform various types of operations. Some of these include
program management, I/O Configuration/Diagnostics, CPU configuration,
EEPROM operations, and password protection.
MODE key — is used to select the different modes available with your PLC (RUN,
TEST, PGM and RUNTIME EDITS).
CPU key — is used to select the Handheld programmer programming mode. You
may choose on-line or off-line communications to the PLC.
STAT key — is used to select status monitoring operations.
SAVE key — is used to store offline generated programs to the Handheld
programmer’s EEPROM.
Instruction/Data
Type Keys
These instruction keys allow you to
select corresponding instructions when
pressed. When closely examining the
keypad, notice only some instructions
have dedicated keys. All other
instructions are entered by typing the
instruction characters (mnemonics)
using the secondary alphabet keys. The
INST# key will allow for instruction
numbers to be entered if selected.
Numeric Keys
The numeric keys can be used to enter
instruction identifiers and numbers for or
constants. Some instructions require
Hexadecimal numbers by pressing the
SHFT key to access the alphabetic
characters A ¾ F.
Editing /
Monitoring Keys
These keys are used to navigate, edit,
create, and search through the PLC
program and data.
The PREV and NEXT keys not only allow
you to scroll through your program, they
also provide scrolling list of valid
mnemonics/data types while the cursor
is positioned in the appropriate field
location.
with the INST# key. While in status displays, PREV and NEXT can be used to
show the status of adjacent memory locations.
The CLR key can be used to exit entry operations and clear the display. It may be
necessary to press this key multiple times to clear the entire display.
The SHFT key will allow use of the secondary property located in the top left corner
of the keys. When the shift key is activated, the ^ character is displayed in the top
right corner of the display screen.
Getting Started
These keys are used to select the
following operations and perform various
tasks with the Handheld programmer.
1--10
Getting Started
Getting Started
Mode Indicators
The Mode LED’s are located near the top of the Handheld programmer and indicate
the CPU mode. The figure below shows all possible LED status, depending on the
PLC mode selected. For additional information see the section titled ” Changing the
CPU mode” located in Chapter 2.
- = ON
Mode
Run
RUN
LED
TEST
LED
-
Test-Pgm
(DL240 Only)
-
-
Handheld in
Offline
Runtime Edit
OFFLINE
LED
-
Program
Test-Run
(DL240 Only)
PGM
LED
7654 321076 543210
Flashing
-
Display Panel
As mentioned, the Handheld programmer contains a two line, 16 character per line,
LCD display screen. The user information and display format will change depending
on the mode selected and the function being performed. The different mode display
formats are discussed in later sections of this manual.
Viewing a Program
Bit Status
Run Mode example
STR
X1
Shift Activated
Program Mode example
STR X0
TMRA T1
<
While in Run mode the Handheld
programmer will display instruction and
bit status. The example display on the
right shows a Run Mode screen.
During the Program mode, the display
screen allows viewing two instructions in
your program as shown in the second
example.
Some instruction, as with the
Accumulative Timer (TMRA) will allow up
to eight digits for a reference number. To
view instructions or messages greater
than 16 characters in length, press the
right arrow key (®) to move viewing
display. You may use the left arrow key
(? ) to move the display to include
viewing the instruction address.
K5555559
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Element Reference
Type
Number
Edit Location
Instruction
C0
T1
Operand
K55555598
Getting Started
Status Displays
SHFT
K
JMP
ENT
To select HEX
SHFT
O
INST#
ENT
To select Octal
SHFT
A
ENT
To select ASCII
SHFT
D
ENT
To select Decimal
0
3
The last example display demonstrates
status of Timers T20 and T17. The Timer
and Counter status displays both
maintain typical formats. Timer/Counter
status bits are indicated with the box
symbols. If the box shows solid (J), this
indicates the timer/counter has attained
the preset value.
Getting Started
If the Handheld programmer is placed in
Run or Test--Run modes, different
memory status options are available.
The Status displays will indicate if
instruction or bit status is ON or OFF. The
display will contain the J symbol which
indicates ON and the S character to
indicate status is OFF. The first example
demonstrates Bit status of input contact
(X1) which is ON.
The STAT key will allow viewing status of
a 16 bit range. The display for a range of
bits are shown to the right. Note the
underscore at the C2 position, which
indicates the current cursor position. The
cursor may be moved left and right, by
pressing the corresponding arrow keys
(? ? ). In this mode J indicates ON and
j indicates OFF.
The remaining example displays are
Word Status for register addresses
V2011 and V2010. The examples are
showing the same registers in four
different data formats.
The keystrokes used to switch between
display formats are:
1--11
Bit Status
STR
X1
Bit Status for a Range of bits
C
10
C_
0
Word Status -- HEX
V
2011
0041
V
2010
0042
Word Status -- Octal
V 2011
0001010
V 2010
0001020
Word Status -- ASCII
V
2011
AA
V
2010
BA
Word Status -- Decimal
V 2011
00065D
V 2010
00066D
Timer/Counter Status
T 20
0120
T 17
0000
1--12
Getting Started
Getting Started
AUX Displays
TEST-RUN Display
(DL205 Only)
The Handheld programmer allows
access to various Auxiliary functions by
pressing the AUX key. All Auxiliary
function have a unique display format.
The example display shown to the right is
the AUX 65 Diagnostic display.
Example Auxiliary Display
AUX
AUX
6*
65
CFG
RUN
HPP
DIAG
Some CPU’s, such as, the DL240 support the Test--Run mode. With the Test--Run
mode various groups of information are available. The different groups of
information are labeled and described below. More details concerning Test-Run
mode are provided in Chapter 6.
¬ $
¯
®
±
°
²
¬ Displays the power flow through the instruction just after the
instruction is executed.
J indicates power flow and Y indicates no power flow.
- Displays the power flow of the power rail.
J indicates power flow and M indicates no power flow.
® Displays the contents of the following (where applicable to
the instruction):
-- the accumulator
-- the timer current value
-- the counter current value
¯ If the operand is a data register, this field displays the
contents of the data register.
° If the operand is a bit, this field displays the bit status.
J indicates ON and S indicates OFF
± Displays the instruction address.
² Displays the mnemonic instruction and reference number
D2--HPP Setup
In This Chapter. . . .
— Handheld Programmer Setup
— CPU Setup
— I/O Configuration
— Auxiliary Functions
12
2--2
System Setup
Handheld Programmer Setup
This section provides information on some basic Handheld programmer features
and characteristics. Regardless of which DL105 or DL205 PLC system you are
using, the following operations will apply.
Clearing the
Display
To begin a new function, it may be necessary to clear the Handheld programmer
entry buffer and display screen. Pressing the CLR (clear) key will clear the buffer and
display. You must press the CLR key several times to prepare for new entries. The
CLR key does not delete instructions or data.
Press these keystrokes
System Setup
1.
To clear entry buffer and display screen
CLR
S
Using the Cursor
CLR
...
D2--HPP Display Example
START OF
STR X1
PROGRAM
Repeat pressing CLR until display screen is blank.
The always flashing J symbol indicates the current cursor position. You can move
the cursor position by using the left or right arrow keys (? ,? ). The arrow left key
performs just like the backspace key on a PC keyboard, deleting the character
position contents. The figure below is a example how the display changes by
pressing the left arrow key.
Press these keystrokes
1.
To delete the previous character
2.
To move cursor position right
Cursor position
STRN
X41
STRN
X4
System Setup
2--3
CPU Setup
A Few Things to
Know
Below is a brief list of CPU operations discussed in this section.
CPU Modes
Changing the CPU Modes
Clearing the program (and other memory areas)
How to initialize system memory
Setting the CPU Network address
Setting Retentive memory ranges
Setting the Clock and Calendar
With the Handheld Programmer connected to the CPU, you should examine the four
mode LED’s located near the top of the programming unit. The LED’s will show the
current mode status. Below is a definition for each of the Mode LED’s. Test mode is
not supported by all DirectLOGICä PLC systems. Please refer to the appropriate
DL105 or DL205 User Manual concerning the different CPU modes supported.
S
S
S
S
RUN — executes the program and updates I/O modules.
PGM — allows program entry, does not execute program or update I/O
modules.
TEST — allows CPU to maintain outputs, CRs, and Timer/Counter
values when the CPU is changed from TEST-RUN to TEST-PGM mode.
(See Chapter 6 for additional information.)
RUNTIME EDIT — allows for program editing while the CPU is in RUN
mode. These edits are not “bumpless.” Instead, the CPU scan is
momentarily interrupted (and the outputs are maintained in their current
state) until the program change is complete.
NOTE: If your CPU has an external mode switch, it must be placed in the TERM
position to change modes. This switch does not exist on the DL130 and DL230
CPU’s.
PWR
BATT
RUN
CPU
DL240
CPU
RUN
TERM
CH1
RUN/TERM
Switch
CH2
CH3
CH4
PORT 1
PORT2
System Setup
S
S
S
S
S
S
2--4
System Setup
Changing the
CPU Mode
The Handheld programmer MODE key may be used to change the CPU mode.
Pressing the MODE key will begin the process of changing modes. The keystrokes
below will change the CPU mode from Run to Program.
Press these keys
1.
To begin Mode Change
MODE
2.
System Setup
*MODE
GO TO
CHANGE*
PGM MODE
To select displayed mode
ENT
3.
HPP Display Results
To accept mode change
*MODE CHANGE*
PGM MODE?
ENT
S
Use the NEXT/PREV keys to scroll available modes.
*MODE CHANGE*
CPU PGM
Selecting Different You may use the PREV and NEXT key while performing a Mode Change, to choose
CPU Mode
a different mode. Always examine the Handheld programmer LED indicators to
insure proper mode change, and desired CPU mode is selected.
WARNING: Only authorized personnel, familiar with all equipment concerning the
PLC, should make mode and program changes. Changes during the RUN mode
become effective immediately. Make sure to consider the impact of any mode
change or program changes to minimize the risk of personal injury or equipment
damage.
2--5
System Setup
I/O Configuration
Automatic I/O
Configuration
(DL205 Only)
The DL205 PLC system’s are designed to automatically examine installed I/O
modules (including specialty modules) and establish the correct configuration and
addressing when power is applied to the CPU.
Slot 0
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
S
S
S
S
S
------
16pt Input
8pt Input
Analog Input
8pt Output
8pt Relay
Output
X0
-X7
X10
-X17
X20
-X27
X20
-X27
X30
-X37
Y0
-Y10
Y10
-Y17
Slot 0 Slot 1 Slot 2 Slot 3 Slot 4
Checking I/O
Configuration
The Handheld programmer may be used to view the current I/O configuration, by
using the AUX 41 function. While connected to your PLC, use the following example
to display your I/O configuration.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
Clear complete display screen
CLR
CLR
CLR
To display I/O configuration display
E
4
B
1
AUX
3.
To check I/O information
4.
Use arrow keys to display additional text
5.
NEXT/PREV keys to view next and previous slots
6.
NEXT slot
7.
NEXT slot
ENT
NEXT
NEXT
AUX
AUX
4*
41
I/O CFG
SHOW CFG
AUX 41 I/O BASE
D2-240: I/O BAS
/O BASE
0/SLOTB
I/O BASE
/O
BASE
P/S
0/SLOTP
/O
BASE
CPU
V
0/SLOTC
#.#
NEXT
NEXT etc..
/O BASE
0/SLOT0
8PT Input MDL
System Setup
The I/O addresses are assigned using octal numbering, meaning the I/O numbering
always starts at zero and does not include 8 or 9. For example, a 16 point input
module located in slot zero (the first slot next to the CPU) would be labeled X0--X7 for
the first 8 points and X10--X17 for the second 8 points (never using the number 8 or
9) The addresses are assigned in groups of 8 or 16, depending on the number of
points for the I/O module. Please refer to the DL 205 User Manual for details on
automatic addressing. The following diagram shows a DL205 example I/O scheme.
2--6
System Setup
Auxiliary Functions
System Setup
What are Auxiliary
Functions?
Handheld programmer keypad contains a key labeled AUX, which allows you to
perform various Auxiliary Functions. Auxiliary Functions are divided into several
different categories. Some AUX functions are for the Handheld programmer itself,
and others for the PLC system. If an error occurs while performing a auxiliary
function, the CPU may be in the wrong mode, or invalid data may have been entered.
Throughout this manual, step-by-step procedures for using Auxiliary functions are
provided. Please refer to the DL105 or DL205 User Manual for details on AUX
functions which may not be covered in this manual.
AUX Function and Description
DL130/
DL230
DL240
AUX 2* — RLL Operations
AUX Function and Description
DL130/
DL230
DL240
AUX 6* — Handheld Programmer Configuration
21
Check Program
m
m
61
Show Revision Numbers
m
m
22
Change Reference
m
m
62
Beeper On / Off
HP
HP
23
Clear Ladder Range
m
m
65
Run Self Diagnostics
HP
HP
24
Clear All Ladders
m
m
AUX 3* — V-Memory Operations
31
Clear V Memory
m
m
AUX 4* — I/O Configuration (DL205 CPU’s Only)
AUX 7* — EEPROM Operations
71
Copy CPU memory to
HPP EEPROM
HP
HP
72
Write HPP EEPROM to
CPU
HP
HP
73
Compare CPU to
HPP EEPROM
HP
HP
41
Show I/O Configuration
m
m
42
I/O Diagnostics
m
m
44
Power-up I/O Configuration
Check
m
m
74
Blank Check (HPP EEPROM)
HP
HP
45
Select Configuration
m
m
75
Erase HPP EEPROM
HP
HP
76
Show EEPROM Type
(CPU and HPP)
HP
HP
AUX 5* — CPU Configuration
51
Modify Program Name
m
m
52
Display / Change Calendar
m
m
53
Display Scan Time
m
m
54
Initialize Scratchpad
m
m
55
Set Watchdog Timer
m
m
56
Set CPU Network Address
X
m
57
Set Retentive Ranges
X
m
58
Test Operations
X
m
59
Bit Override
X
m
5B
Counter Interface Configuration
X
m
5C
Display Error / Message
History
X
m
AUX 8* — Password Operations
81
Modify Password
m
m
82
Unlock CPU
m
m
83
Lock CPU
m
m
m
— supported
5
— not supported
HP — Handheld Programmer function
System Setup
Handheld
Programmer
Diagnostics
2--7
The Handheld programmer has built--in self checking diagnostics. You can select
the HPP Diagnostics with the AUX 65 function. When the diagnostic operation is
finished, the main HPP diagnostic menu will be displayed. You may execute any of
the Diagnostics by pressing the ENT key. The following example demonstrates
using the D2--HPP Diagnotic operations.
Press these keystrokes
1.
D2--HPP display results
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
CLR
CLR
Select the Diagnostic operation
G
F
6
5
AUX
3.
AUX
AUX
6*
65
HPP
RUN
DIAG
ENT
4.
To continue with next Diagnostic operation
NEXT
5.
To run Diagnostic operation
ENT
6.
This diagnostic will flash the LCD
display and all the LEDs.
NEXT
7.
The EEPROM check will test the EEPROM
installed in the handheld programmer.
NEXT
Beeper ON/OFF
AUX 65 RUN DIAG
1)KEYPAD CHECK?
S
Press ENT to execute Diagnostic
operation being displayed.
S
Press CLR to exit the diagnostic
operation being displayed.
AUX 65 RUN DIAG
2)DISPLAY CHECK?
AUX 65 RUN DIAG
3)LED&LCD CHECK?
AUX 65 RUN DIAG
4)EEPROM CHECK?
The Handheld programmer contains a beeper which sounds to confirm the operator
keystrokes. This beeper may be toggled ON and OFF with the AUX 62 function.
Press these keystrokes
1.
CLR
2.
D2--HPP display results
Clear complete display screen
CLR
CLR
To toggle beeper ON/OFF
G
6
C
2
AUX
ENT
AUX
AUX
6*
62
CFG HPP
BEEPER ON
System Setup
Run Diagnostic operation
2--8
System Setup
Clearing an
Existing Program
Important note, using this function will delete the PLC ladder program. With the CPU
in Program mode, use the AUX 24 function to clear the entire PLC application
program.
Press these keystrokes
1.
D2--HPP Display Results
Clear complete display screen
CLR
CLR
2.
CLR
Select AUX 24 Clear Ladders display
C
3.
2
E
4
AUX
To select Clear Ladders operation
AUX
AUX
2*
24
CLR
ALL
RLL
CLR
OPERA
LAD A
System Setup
ENT
4.
To clear all ladders
LADDERS?
ENT
OK
S
The PLC must be in Program mode.
To clear specified range of ladder program, or V memory, use the following Auxiliary
functions.
Initializing System
Memory
S AUX 23 — Clear Ladder Range
S AUX 31 — Clear V Memory Range
The CPU setup and configuration data are stored in memory which is called
Scratchpad Memory. The Scratchpad memory may require initializing if major
changes are introduced to your PLC system configuration or setup. For example, if
you specify a range of Control Relays (CRs) as retentive, this setup data will be
stored in scratchpad memory. Basic program changes or loading new programs do
not always demand that the Initialize Scratchpad function be executed. If required
you may default Scratchpad memory with the AUX 54 function.
NOTE: This function may change PLC setup and configuration data in your system.
Press these keystrokes
1.
CLR
CLR
2.
CLR
Select AUX 54 Initialize Scratchpad
F
5
E
4
AUX
3.
To select YES/NO option
4.
To begin initialization
ENT
S
D2--HPP Display Results
Clear complete display screen
Select NO option to exit without initializing.
AUX
AUX
5*
54
AUX
CLR
54 INIT SCRA
XPAD YES/NO
OK
CPU CFG
INIT SCRA
System Setup
Setting the CPU
Network Address
2--9
Some CPU’s, such as the DL240, contain a built-in DirectNETä port (PORT2). The
Handheld programmer may be used to set the Port 2 network address and
parameters. The default parameter settings are:
S Station address 1
S HEX mode (the handheld programmer will only support HEX mode)
S Odd parity
S 9600 baud rate
The DirectNETä User Manual provides additional information about network and
communication parameter settings.
The following example demonstrates how to use the AUX 56 function.
1.
System Setup
Press these keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
Clear complete display
CLR
2.
CLR
CLR
To select the diagnostic operation
F
3.
G
5
6
AUX
To change the network address
ENT
4.
Type new address number
5.
To save the newly entered address
1--90
ENT
6.
To select communications mode use arrow
keys to move cursor position
7.
To save communications mode
ENT
8.
To select communications parity
9.
To save communications parity
ENT
10.
AUX
AUX
5*
56
CPU
CPU
CFG
N/W
A
AUX
N/W
56
#
CPU
01
N/W
A
AUX
N/W
56
#
CPU
01
N/W A
02
AUX
HEX
56 CPU N/W
/ ASCII
AUX 56
NONE /
A
CPU
ODD
N/W
A
AUX 56 CPU
9600/19.2
N/W
A
AUX
OK
N/W
A
To select communications parity
S
Press the CLR key to exit the AUX 56
function.
S
Shaded box indicates cursor position.
56
CPU
2--10
System Setup
Retentive Memory
Ranges
The DL105 and DL205 CPU’s all contain Retentive memory. Retentive memory is
memory ranges which may store information in case of power loss. A super
capacitor will maintain latest register values in case of short period CPU power loss
or failure. If retentive memory ranges are important in your application, make sure to
install a optional backup battery. Battery installation is covered in appropriate DL105
and DL205 User Manuals. Factory defaults for Retentive memory ranges are
suitable for most applications. To change Retentive memory range, use AUX 57 to
select and set the desired range. The table below lists the Retentive memory factory
defaults for the DL105 and DL205 CPU’s.
System Setup
DL130
Memory Area
Default Range
Available
Range
Control Relays
C300 -- C377
C0 -- C377
V Memory
V2000 -- V2377
V0 -- V7777
Timers
None by default T0 -- T77
Counters
CT0 -- CT77
Stages
None by default S0 -- S377
CT0 -- CT77
DL230
Memory Area
Default Range
Available
Range
Control Relays
C300 -- C377
C0 -- C377
V Memory
V2000 -- V2377
V0 -- V7777
Timers
None by default T0 -- T77
Counters
CT0 -- CT77
Stages
None by default S0 -- S377
CT0 -- CT77
DL240
Memory Area
Default Range
Available
Range
Control Relays
C300 -- C377
C0 -- C377
V Memory
V2000 -- V7777
V0 -- V7777
Timers
None by default T0 -- T177
Counters
CT0 -- CT177
Stages
None by default S0 -- S777
CT0 -- CT177
System Setup
Changing
Retentive
Memory Ranges
2--11
The AUX 57 function may be used to change the Retentive memory ranges. When
changing Retentive Memory ranges, keep in mind all memory ranges are defined
with Octal addresses (8 bit boundaries, except for V--memory). For example, the
Retentive memory factory default for CRs (control relays) are C300 thru C377, and
could be reduced to C177 thru C300. You should always enter desired memory
ranges in Octal numbers (e.g. xxx0--xxx7).The following figure demonstrates
changing the Retentive memory range as described.
Press these keystrokes
1.
Clear entire display screen
CLR
CLR
CLR
Select AUX 57 function
F
3.
H
5
7
AUX
To change memory range
ENT
5.
Enter new start address
B
H
1
7
H
ENT
7.
5*
57
CPU
RET
CFG
RANGE
AUX
1st
57 RET
C0300
RANGE
AUX
1st
57 RET
C0300
RANGE
177
AUX
END
57 RET
C0377
RANGE
300
AUX
1ST
57 RET
V02000
RANGE
7
Accept entry
6.
AUX
AUX
Enter new end address
D
A
3
0
A
0
Accept entry
ENT
S
S
Press ENT to continue with other memory types.
Press CLR to exit AUX 57 function.
Cursor position
System Setup
2.
4.
D2--HPP Display Results
2--12
System Setup
System Setup
Setting the Clock
and Calendar
The AUX 52 function allows you to set the Real--time clock and calender. Not all
DirectLogicä PLC’s support the hardware clock and calender feature. For the CPU’s
which feature a clock and calendar the following format is used.
S Date — Year, Month, Date, Day of week (0 -- 6, Sunday thru Saturday)
S Time — 24 hour format, Hours, Minutes, Seconds
If you change the date without updating the day of week (0--6), the CPU will not
automatically correct any discrepancy between the date and the day of the week.
For example, if you change the date to the 15th of the month and the 15th is on a
Thursday, you will also have to change the day of the week (unless the CPU already
shows the date as Thursday). Use the following example to change any component
of the date or time settings.
NOTE: Verify the clock and calender is supported by your CPU, before attempting to
use this Auxiliary function.
Press these keystrokes
1.
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
3.
CLR
Select AUX 57
F
5
C
2
AUX
AUX
AUX
Select date and clock display
ENT
4.
5.
A
0
C
ENT
Enter new time if required
B
C
1
2
D
3
A
CPU CFG
CALENDER
2
To accept press ENT twice
6.
5*
52
AUX 52 CALENDAR
96/01/01/6(SAT)
Enter new date if required
ENT
7.
D2--HPP Display Results
0
AUX 52 CALENDAR
96/01/02/7(SUN)
AUX 52 CALENDAR
TIME 00:06:00
To accept new entry press ENT twice
ENT
ENT
S
The shaded area indicates cursor
position.
S
Press the CLR key to exit date and
clock function.
AUX 52 CALENDAR
TIME 12:30:00
96/01/02
12:30:15
NOTE: If the CPU is without power for an extended period of time a battery is
required to maintain the proper date and time.
Entering Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Entering Simple Ladder Programs
— Checking for Program Errors
13
3--2
Entering Programs
Entering Ladder Programs
Entering Programs
Entering Programs
Purpose of
Section
Handheld
Programmer Key
Sequences
Instruction
Overview
This section will demonstrate how to use the Handheld programmer for mnemonic
programming. The D2--HPP is commonly used for program changes and creating
simple RLL programs. Again, for larger more complex PLC applications, we
recommend DirectSOFTt ,our PC based programming software. Basic knowledge
of boolean logic and PLC programming is helpful to better understand the examples
provided. For more programming examples, you should reference the appropriate
DL105 or DL205 User Manuals for details on specific instructions.
The Handheld programmer will buffers all keystrokes until the ENT (enter) key is
pressed. The instruction syntax is checked for validity, when the enter key is
pressed. If an instruction or data type is invalid an error message will be displayed. For
a complete listing of error messages, please refer to Chapter 6.
The Handheld programmer only allows mnemonic instruction programming. A brief
description of the most common used instructions are given below. The combination
in which the mnemonics are entered will determine the Relay Ladder Logic (RLL)
network structure and result.
S STR -- Stores a normally open element and indicates the beginning of a
rung or network.
S AND -- Joins one element (such as a contact) in series with another
element or group of elements.
S AND STR -- Joins a group of elements in series with another group of
elements. (not available with DL 105)
S OR -- Joins one element in parallel with a previous element or group of
elements.
S OR STR -- Joins parallel branches (not available with DL 105)
S Output -- Each rung must have at least one output (Y, C, or box
instruction)
S NOT -- used with other instructions to utilize normally closed elements.
S END -- All programs must contain an END statement.
All networks must begin with the STR (store) or STRN (Store Not) instruction and are
then combined with other instruction entries. Networks must conclude with at least
one output instruction (Y coil, C coil, or Box instruction). Below is a ladder network
showing how various mnemonics instructions are combined in a single network.
X0
STR
X1
X2
OR
ORSTR
X3
AND X4
X6
NOT
X5
Y0
OUT
Output
ANDSTR
END
END
Entering Programs
3--3
The Handheld programmer display screen, allows program instructions and their
associated data to be viewed by the operator. All instructions are stored with a
instruction addresses (not the same as rung addresses used in DirectSOFTä).
Newly entered instructions may be saved by pressing the ENT (enter) key.
Previous / Next
Keys
Pressing the NEXT or PREV keys, allow scrolling through the mnemonic
instructions in your program. It is not necessary to clear the display, before using
these keys.
When creating a new program, you should always begin the first program instruction
at address zero ($00000). If you are in the Program mode, the ’START OF
PROGRAM’ message will appear, when positioned at the beginning address of your
program. Use the left arrow (¬) key to display the instruction addresses. To search
the first address of your program, follow the example figure below.
Starting at
Address 0
Press these keystrokes
1.
Clear entire display screen
CLR
2.
CLR
CLR
To Search first address ($00000)
SHFT
3.
D2--HPP Display Results
$
STR
START OF
STR X1
NEXT
To view instruction address
Instruction
Element Type
and Reference
You may search for and display instructions in your program by entering the specific
addresses number. The following examples below demonstrate how to search and
find different program items. The entire display screen must be cleared before
performing the following examples.
Press these keystrokes
1.
D2--HPP Display Results
$00001
$00002
To Search specific address
SHFT
$
STR
C
2
NEXT
OUT
STR
Y1
X2
Enter desired address number to search
Searching for
END Instruction
To search for the END command, follow the example below.
Press these keystrokes
1.
To Search END instruction
SHFT
Entering END
Instruction
D2--HPP Display Results
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
SHFT
FD REF
FIND
$00067
$00069
MOV
END
V1000
All programs require a END command. To enter the END instruction press the
following keys.
Press these keystrokes
To program END instruction
1.
SHFT
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
Entering Programs
START OF PROGRAM
$00000 STR X1
Starting
Address
Searching for
Addresses
PROGRAM
Entering Programs
Navigating the
Program
3--4
Entering Programs
Program Mode
The Program Mode is most commonly used to enter program instructions. After
entering instructions, the changes are not executed until the CPU is placed in the
Run mode. This will prevent unexpected machine operation which may be caused
by changes which are performed.
With the Handheld programmer connected to the CPU, press the MODE key to
select the Mode Change display. You may access the various modes by pressing the
NEXT and PREV keys, while viewing the Mode Change display. To change to
program mode follow the example below.
Press these keystrokes
Entering Programs
1.
MODE
NEXT
PREV
ENT
ENT
Mode to
Select
Entering a
Simple Network
*MODE
GO TO
CHANGE*
PGM MODE
All programs begin starting at instruction address $00000. Use the STR (store) key
to start programming your first network which contains a normally open contact
(element) and output coil. The following will create a simple Store network.
Press these keystrokes
1.
$
2.
GX
OUT
A
STR
0
D2--HPP Display Results
Begin Program
entry here
To enter Input contact.
Entering Programs
D2--HPP Display Results
To change modes.
ENT
Enter Ouput coil
B
1
ENT
To type END instruction
3.
SHFT
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
START OF
STR X0
STR
NOP
X0
STR
OUT
X0
Y1
OUT
NOP
Y1
OUT
END
Y1
PROGRAM
Y1
OUT
END
END
NOP
Selecting Different In the example above, you may press the PREV / NEXT keys, after the right (? )
arrow key, to scroll the different element types available. While displaying the
Element Types
desired element type enter the element address, then press ENT (enter).
Now that you have completed your first mnemonic instruction network, please
continue through each of the following program examples. Append each of the
remaining examples to the first network. To continue adding the examples begin
each new networks at the last instruction programmed (END command).
NOTE: Always ensure the last instruction of your program is the END command. If
the END command is missing, the Handheld programmer will not allow you to
change modes, or run the program. Error #4 ’No Program’ may be displayed.
Entering Programs
Entering Normally
Closed Elements
To enter a network which contains a normally closed contact, begin with the STRN
(Store Not) instruction. The following example demonstrates how to enter a network
using the STRN instruction.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
To enter normally closed input
SP
STRN
C
2
Continue program
entry here
ENT
Enter Ouput coil
GX
OUT
C
2
E
4
N
TMR
D
OUT
END
Y 1
OUT Y 1
STRN X2
ENT
END instruction
SHFT
HPP Display Results
3
STRN X2
OUT Y2
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X2
Y2
OUT
END
OUT
NOP
Y2
END
NOP
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
3.
4.
To enter first Input contact
$
B
STR
1
HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
ENT
To enter second Input contact
$
C
STR
2
ENT
OUT
END
Y2
STR
NOP
X1
STR
STR
X1
X2
STR
NOP
X2
OUT
NOP
Y2
To enter Ouput coil
GX
OUT
C
2
ENT
END instruction
SHFT
E
N
TMR
4
D
3
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X1
X2
Y2
OUT
END
END
NOP
Entering Programs
Some networks require more than one element on a branch, this is referred to as
contacts in series. To program elements in series, you begin the network as before
using the store (STR,STRN) instruction. The AND instruction is used to join two
elements in series. The following example demonstrates how to enter two series
contacts and a single output coil.
Entering Programs
3.
Entering Series
Elements
3--5
3--6
Entering Programs
Entering Parallel
Elements
To program a network with parallel elements (more than one branch per network),
you will use the OR instruction. Once again, you begin the network as before using
the store (STR,STRN) instruction for first element, then continue the parallel branch
with the to create and second element data. You join the two parallel rungs using the
coil OUT command. Follow the example below to create the most simple form of a
parallel branch network.
Press these keystrokes
Entering Programs
1.
2.
3.
4.
Enter first Input contact
$
B
STR
1
D2--HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
ENT
To start second branch and element
Q
C
OR
2
ENT
To join parallel branch and enter Ouput coil
GX
OUT
C
2
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
Entering Programs
STR
NOP
X1
ENT
OR X2
OUT Y2
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X1
Y2
STR X1
OR X2
ENT
END instruction
SHFT
OUT
END
Y2
OUT
OUT
NOP
Y2
X2
END
NOP
END
Later in this section, various examples using parallel element programming are
provided. Branch programming examples require close observation of which order
the mnemonic instructions are entered. If the instruction or data are not properly
entered, the Handheld programmer display will response with a error message.
Please take care and caution that the result of entering parallel logic does not
present logical result problems.
Entering Programs
Joining Series
Elements in
Parallel
3--7
Often it is necessary to program networks which contain parallel branches and
series elements together to accomplish desired control. The ORST (or store) key
allows you to program parallel branches with serial elements. The following example
shows a simple network using the ORSTR instruction.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
A
STR
5.
B
ENT
OUT
STR
Y2
X0
C
2
ENT
STR
AND
X0
X1
To enter second parallel contact
V
AND
D
3
ENT
To OR parallel branches
AND
STR
X1
X2
C
2
STR
AND
X2
X3
ENT
Ouput coil
GX
OUT
C
2
ENT
END instruction
SHFT
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
AND X3
ORSTR
ENT
ORSTR
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
X2
X1
Y2
OUT
X3
END
OUT
END
END
NOP
Y2
Entering Programs
7.
1
Y2
To begin parallel branch and contact X2
ORST
6.
ENT
To enter second series conact
V
AND
MSTR
4.
0
OUT
END
Entering Programs
3.
To enter Input conact X0
$
D2--HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
3--8
Entering Programs
Joining Parallel
The ANDSTR instruction joins one or more parallel branches which may be in
Branches in Series series. The following example shows a simple network with parallel and series
branches.
Press these keystrokes
1.
Entering Programs
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Enter first Input conact
$
STR
0
ENT
Enter second Input contact
$
B
STR
1
ENT
OUT
END
Y2
STR
NOP
X0
STR
STR
X0
X1
Create branch and parallel contact
Q
C
OR
2
ENT
To join branch
L
ANDST
ENT
STR X1
OR X2
Enter Ouput coil
GX
OUT
D
3
ENT
OR X2
ANDSTR
END instruction
SHFT
Entering Programs
A
HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
X1
Y3
OUT
X2
END
ANDSTR
OUT Y3
OUT
END
END
NOP
Y3
Entering Programs
Combination
Networks
3--9
For combination networks, you may combine both the series elements and parallel
branches. Combination logic allows you to solve almost any application problem.
The following example is a ladder network, which is marked with MNEMONIC
instructions and lists the order which the instructions may be entered.
X0
STR
X1
ORSTR
X2
OR
X3
AND X4
X6
NOT
X5
Y0
OUT
Output
ANDSTR
END
Example Mnemonic Listing
ADDRESS
STR X0
OR X1
STR X2
STR X3
ANDN X4
ORSTR
AND X5
ORN X6
ANDSTR
OUT Y0
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with X0
Joins X1 in parallel with X0
Starts branch 2 with X2
Starts branch 3 with X3
Joins X4 (NOT) with X3
Joins branches 2 and 3
Starts branch 4 with X5
Joins X6 (NOT) in parallel with X5
Joins branches 4 and 5 with 1--3
Stores the output and finishes the network
Ends the program
There are limits on how many boolean logic instructions can be combined in one
network. The DirectLOGICt CPU’s use an 8 level stack to evaluate the various
logic elements. The stack is a temporary storage area used to help evaluate the
various logic combinations. Each time you enter a STR instruction, the instruction is
placed on the top of the stack. All other instructions on the stack are pushed down
one level. The And Store (ANDSTR) and Or Store (ORSTR) instruction combine
levels of the stack when processed. Since the stack storage is eight levels, an error
will occur if the CPU encounters a network that uses more than eight combined
levels per network. For more details on the 8 level stack, please refer to section titled
’Programming Basics’ in the DL105 or DL205 User Manuals.
Entering Programs
$00000
$00001
$00002
$00003
$00004
$00005
$00006
$00007
$00008
$00009
$00010
INSTRUCTION
Entering Programs
END
3--10
Entering Programs
Entering Timers
and Counters
Entering Programs
Timer Example
Using Discrete
Status Bits
To enter a timer or counter, you also must prepare operand and enter preset values.
This can be a constant value (K memory), or a V-memory location in the case of the
DL240 CPU.
There are two methods of programming timers. You can have the timer with discrete
timer control and status bits, or use comparative contacts, which enable at different
time intervals during the control and status.
The following timer example uses discrete status, with a preset of 3 seconds. If the
timer is enabled for 3 seconds the status bit (T2) will turn ON. The timer will reset if X1
turns off, which in turn will resets the status bit (T2) off, and the accumulative value of
the timer.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
3.
4.
Entering Programs
To enter the first Input contact.
$
B
STR
ENT
Enter the timer reference and preset value.
N
TMR
C
D
2
3
A
ENT
0
OUT
END
Y3
STR
TMR
X1
T2
K30
TMR
TMR
T2
T2
K30
V2300
STR
OUT
T2
Y0
OUT
END
Y0
Begin new network and Timer status element.
$
SHFT
STR
T
MLR
C
2
ENT
To enter Output coil.
GX
OUT
5.
1
HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
A
0
ENT
END instruction
SHFT
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X1
T2
TMR
K30
Y0
T2
END
NOP
OUT
END
The Accumulating Timer which has additional lines connected to the timer
Accumulating
Timers & Counters instruction, can allow separate start and reset elements. All input element contacts
are entered before the timer or counter instruction. The timer inputs may be of
various types, e.g. timer status (T#), control relays (CR), etc. To scroll through the
different operand data types, while programming the example below, press the
NEXT key after the arrow ® key is pressed. Although the Handheld programmer
may allow you to select various data types, please refer to the DL105 or DL205 User
Manual according to which CPU you are programming. For example, the DL240 will
allow V--Memory registers for timer presets, where as the DL130 and DL230 will only
allow K--Memory to be loaded as presets.
Entering Programs
Entering
Accumulating
Timers
(two Inputs)
3--11
This example demonstrates how to program a Accumulating Timer with a preset of 5
seconds. The timer discrete status bit (T0) contact will energize when the timer has
timed for 5 seconds. The timer will reset when input X1 turns on, turning the timer
discrete status bit off and resetting the timer current (timed) value to zero.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
To enter timer start Input conact
$
N
TMR
SHFT
A
A
0
0
Enter Timer preset
5
A
0
Y0
X0
STR
STR
X0
X1
ENT
Begin new network with Timer status bit contact
$
SHFT
STR
T
MLR
A
0
ENT
Enter Output Coil Y0
GX
OUT
7.
oUT
STR
A
0
ENT
Enter END
SHFT
E
4
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
X0
TMRA
T0
STR
OUT
T0
Y0
OUT
END
Y0
END
NOP
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X1
STR X1
TMRA T0
T0
K50
Y0
OUT
END
K50
Entering Programs
6.
Y0
Select Timer type and reference number
F
5.
ENT
B 1
STR
OUT
END
Entering Programs
4.
ENT
0
To enter the reset Input conact
$
3.
A
STR
HPP Display Results
Continue program
entry here
3--12
Entering Programs
Entering Relational Relational contacts may be used to compare various types of information. For
example, you may want to compare the current value of a timer with a constant value
Contacts
(K--Memory) or a V-memory register value. There are several types of compare
operations that can be programmed, such as, less than, greater than, etc. See the
DL105 or DL205 User Manual for more details on all relational contact instructions.
The following example demonstrates how to program a greater than or equal to
relational contact.
Press these keystrokes
Entering Programs
1.
2.
3.
4.
Entering Programs
5.
D2--HPP Display Results
Continue entry
here
Enter first compare reference
$
SHFT
STR
T
MLR
A
0
Select constant reference to compare
B
1
A
0
A
0
ENT
Enter Ouput coil Y0
GX
OUT
A
0
ENT
OUT
END
Y0
OUT
STR
Y0
T0
STR
OUT
T0
Y0
OUT
STR
Y0
T0
V2000
STR
T0
V2000
STR
OUT
T0
Y0
K100
K100
K100
Begin second Compare network and reference
$
SHFT
STR
T
MLR
A
0
Enter compare V--Memory reference
SHFT
V
AND
C
2
A
0
A
0
A
0
ENT
6.
Enter Output Coil Y1
GX
OUT
B
1
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
T0
K100
>=
T0 V2000
>=
®®
Y0
OUT
Y1
OUT
END
Entering Programs
Entering ASCII
Characters
3--13
The DL105 and DL205 allow you to enter ASCII characters as part of the ACON
instruction used for messages. An overview of the ACON instruction is provided in
Chapter 6 of this manual. The example below shows the keystrokes used to enter
the ASCII portion of the instruction with the Handheld programmer.
Press these keystrokes
1.
D2--HPP Display Results
END
ACON
Type ACON instruction
SHFT
2.
A
0
C
2
O
INST#
N
TMR
Enter ASCII instruction
SHFT
ACON
NOP
N
TMR
Enter instruction
AON
Entering Programs
3.
O
INST#
AON
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
END
ACON
ASCII Portion
A ON
Using the INST #
key
Some mnemonic instructions may be entered by using a instruction number. The
instruction number may also be referred to as function number. Use the Handheld
programmer INST# key to begin the function number entry. If known, you may enter
the specific instruction number , or scroll through available function numbers by
pressing the PREV/NEXT keys. The following example demonstrates using the
instruction number function.
Press these keystrokes
1.
2.
Enter function number
O
INST#
D
3
G
6
ENT
D2--HPP Display Results
F036
OUT
F035
OROUT
To scroll previous function number
PREV
S
S
Press ENT key to except function number
Press the CLR key to exit
Entering Programs
NOTE: More detailed information on the ACON instruction may be referenced in the
DL105 and DL205 User Manuals.
3--14
Entering Programs
Entering Octal and For some instructions entries , special number formats are used for reference data.
For example, the LDA (Load Address) instruction requires an octal number for the
Hex Numbers
address reference. Also, you may want to load a hexadecimal value into the
accumulator. The following example demonstrates how to enter octal and
hexadecimal numbers using the Handheld programmer. For specific instruction
information and optional number formats, please refer to the DL 105 and DL205
User Manuals.
Press these keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
To enter LDA instruction
Entering Programs
1.
SHFT
L
ANDST
D
3
A
0
Type Octal number
2.
C
2
A
0
A
0
A
0
LDA
O2000
LDA
O2000
Save entry
3.
ENT
Press these keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
Entering Programs
To enter LD instruction
1.
SHFT
2.
B
L
ANDST
D
PREV
3
LD
K12F
Type Hexadecimal number
1
C
2
SHFT
F
LD K12F
NOP
5
Save entry
3.
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
LDA
Octal Address
02000
LD
K 12F
END
Hexadecimal Address
Entering Programs
3--15
Checking for Program Errors
Error Checking
Syntax Check
The Handheld programmer may also check your program for errors. You may
choose two different types of program error checking.
S Syntax errors check
S Duplicate References check
Use the AUX 21 function, to select the ’CHECK PROGRAM’ operation. Operation 1
performs a syntax check on the entered program logic. The following figure
demonstrates how to access the Syntax check operation.
Clear complete display screen
1.
CLR
CLR
2.
2
B
1
AUX
ENT
Press ENT to select syntax check
3.
2*
21
RLL OPERA
CHECK PRO
CLR
To begin syntax check
C
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
AUX
ENT
This operation may take a few minutes,
depending on the size of your program.
S
When syntax check is complete one of two
displays will appear.
BUSY
$00029 E401
MISSING END
NO
?
SYNTAX
ERROR
Each error is labeled with an Error Code when displayed. Please refer to Chapter 6
for a complete listing of Error Code numbers. Upon receiving an error message,
attempt correcting the problem and continue running the Syntax check until the
message ’NO SYNTAX ERROR’ appears.
Entering Programs
S
AUX 21 CHECK PRO
1:SYN 2:DUP REF
Entering Programs
Press these keystrokes
3--16
Entering Programs
Duplicate
Reference Check
You may also use Check Program, Option 2, for multiple uses of the same output
coil. The following example below demonstrates how to access AUX 21 and perform
a Duplicate Reference check.
Press these keystrokes
1.
AUX
AUX
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
Entering Programs
D2--HPP Display Results
CLR
CLR
To begin syntax check
C
3.
B
2
1
AUX
RLL OPERA
CHECK PRO
AUX 21 CHECK PRO
1:SYN 2:DUP REF
ENT
Position cursor on number 2 for DUP REF check
BUSY
ENT
S
When Program Check is complete
one of these two displays will appear.
$00012 E471
DUP COIL REF
Error Display (example)
NO
?
No Duplicate Reference display
Entering Programs
2*
21
DUP
REFS
If a Duplicate Reference error occurs, please refer to Chapter 6 for a complete listing
of Error Code numbers. You should correct the problem and continue running the
Duplicate Reference check until the message NO DUP REFS appears.
NOTE: You can use the same coil in more than one location. However, the last
occurrence of the element will take priority. Consider the following example.
X0
X5
Y0
Y1
Outputs are ON
Y0 Output Y0 is turned off, even though
X1
OUT
Last occurrence has control
END
previous conditions are still true.
Changing Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Two Ways to Edit a Program
— Displaying a Program
— Finding a Specific Instruction
— Changing an Instruction
— Inserting an Instruction
— Deleting an Instruction
— Using Search and Replace
— Editing Programs During Run Mode
14
4--2
Changing Programs
Two Ways to Edit a Program
Editing Modes
Program Mode
Run--Time
Edit Mode
(DL205 Only)
To edit a program you may select either ’PROGRAM’ or ’RUN--TIME EDIT’ mode.
The Program Mode is most commonly used for editing programs. The Run--Time
Edit mode is helpful for very minor program changes or adjustments. The Handheld
programmer will not allow changing from Program Mode, to Run Modes, if no
program exists or program is missing the END command. This section begins with
explaining the Program Mode and later discusses how to use the Run--Time Edit
mode.
In the Program Mode, you can insert, edit, change, and delete mnemonic
instructions. To enter a new network, you must carefully place the new instructions at
the END or between the existing networks (after an OUT). During the Program edit
mode the DL105 and DL205 CPU does not execute the application program,
preventing unexpected machine control while editing the PLC program.
The DL240 CPU will allow you to edit programs during Run--Time Edits mode. While
in the Run--Time Edits mode, most of the Handheld programmer functions operate
the same as Program mode. For example, you can use the same techniques to
search for a specific instruction, search for a specific address, etc. However, you
cannot use Search and Replace during Run Mode. More details Run--Time Edit
mode are discussed later in this chapter.
The figure below, shows the LED indicator status for the Program and Run--Time
Edit modes.
Run--Time Edit
Changing Programs
LED FLASHES and all other
LED’s are OFF.
Program Mode
This LED is ON and all other
LED’s are OFF.
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Changing Programs
4--3
Displaying a Program
The Handheld programmer display screen allows viewing your program in the
mnemonic instruction format. You may scroll through the individual instructions
which are programmed using the NEXT / PREV keys. Depending on which mode
you have selected, the display will maintain different screen formats. You may view
the instruction address by pressing the left arrow key (¬). The different display
modes and characteristics are discussed in Chapters 1 and 6.
Combination Mnemonic Example
ADDRESS
INSTRUCTION
$00000
$00001
$00002
$00003
$00004
$00005
$00006
$00007
$00008
$00009
$00010
DESCRIPTION
STR X0
OR X1
STR X2
STR X3
ANDN X4
ORSTR
AND X5
ORN X6
ANDSTR
OUT Y0
END
Starts branch 1 with X0
Joins X1 in parallel with X0
Starts branch 2 with X2
Starts branch 3 with X3
Joins X4 (NOT) with X3
Joins branches 2 and 3
Starts branch 4 with X5
Joins X6 (NOT) in parallel with X5
Joins branches 4 and 5 with 1--3
Stores the output and finishes the network
Ends the program
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X2
X5
Y0
OUT
X1
X3
START OF
STR X1
PROGRAM
X4
START OF PROGRAM
$00000 STR X0
X6
END
Starting
Address
Instruction
Element Type
and Reference
Changing Programs
X0
D2--HPP Example Display
4--4
Changing Programs
Searching a
Program Address
Searching
Start of Program
The Handheld programmer allows you to search and view your mnemonic
instruction program. Once again, the display screen may have a different format
depending on the mode selected. The figures below are display examples during the
Run mode. The bit status of the instruction is indicated in the top right corner the
display screen. If the J symbol appears the instructions bit status is true or (ON). If
the S character appears the bit status is false or (OFF). To search the starting
instruction or find a specific instruction address in your program, follow the examples
below.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these keystrokes
1.
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
CLR
To search start of program (address $00000)
SHFT
3.
CLR
$
STR
$00000
NEXT
STR
X0
To display instruction address
D2--HPP Display Results
Searching Specific Address
1.
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
Changing Programs
CLR
To search specific instruction address ($00010)
SHFT
3.
CLR
$
STR
B
1
A
0
To display NEXT instruction
NEXT
S
$00010
OUT
Y6
“S” indicates OFF
When in RUN or TEST-RUN mode
NEXT
$00011
STR
X6
Solid fill indicates ON
When in RUN or TEST-RUN mode
Changing Programs
4--5
Finding Instructions
Finding Specific
Reference
The Handheld programmer may search instruction or reference numbers using the
Find function. Use the FIND key to search an instruction or specific reference
number. To select different instruction types press the NEXT / PREV keys during
operand entry. After completing the entry press the FIND key to begin search. You
may search any instruction type used within your PLC program. The following figure
demonstrates how to search the instruction STR X1 using the Find function.
Press these keystrokes
HPP Display Results
1.
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
CLR
CLR
To find a instruction type and reference
$
D
STR
3
FIND
STR
* Press the NEXT/PREV key after the right
arrow key to select different references.
X1
$00002
$00003
STR
STR
X0
X1
To Search Specific Reference
Clear complete display screen
1.
CLR
CLR
CLR
To find specific reference number
2.
SHFT
X
SET
F
5
SHFT
FD REF
FIND
X5
ORSTR
AND X5
If the memory reference or instruction is not found, one of the following error
messages ’E604 REF MISSING’ or ’E602INST MISSING’ are displayed. (If you
think the message is incorrect, re--enter your keystrokes and try the operation
again.)
Changing Programs
$00005
$00006
4--6
Changing Programs
Changing an Instruction
Preparing Mode
for Changes
The Handheld programmer allows you to change the Mnemonic instructions. If
possible program changes should be performed in Program Mode. When switch
from Run Mode to Program Mode the display screen will display your first instruction
programmed. You should consider which mode the Handheld programmer is in,
prior to attempting a search function. The Handheld programmer must be in one of
the following modes to perform program changes.
S
S
S
Program Mode
Run--Time Edit Mode
Test--Program Mode
The following figures and examples should be performed in the Program Mode. This
example demonstrates how to find and change the X5 contact to X10.
Press these Keystrokes
HPP Display Results
SEARCHING
To Find instruction
Clear complete display screen
1.
CLR
CLR
CLR
$00005
$00006
Enter the reference to search
2.
SHFT
X
SET
F
SHFT
5
FD REF
FIND
ORSTR
AND X5
ORSTR
AND X10
To Change the instruction
Cursor to reference number
B
Changing Programs
3.
1
A
AND
ORN
0
X10
X6
Enter new instruction and display next
4.
ENT
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
X2
X5
Mnemonic Example Program
Y0
ADDRESS INSTRUCTION
OUT
X1
X3
X4
(Change X5 element)
X6
END
$00000
$00001
—
—
$00006
—
—
$00010
STR X0
OR X1
—
—
AND X5
—
—
END
4--7
Changing Programs
Inserting an Instruction
You may insert mnemonic instructions by using the INS (insert ) key. Pressing the
INS key places the instruction after the instruction that is being displayed. You
should first consider the desired location where to insert. The insert function
duplicates the instruction displayed, and increments all remaining addresses. You
should then enter a the desired instruction and reference. Use the following example
to search and insert a new mnemonic instruction.
Press these Keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
SEARCHING
To Find insert location
1. Locate NOT X6 contact
R
AND
G
5
FD REF
FIND
2.
Press INS key to begin insert operation
3.
Press ENT to confirm (or CLR to exit)
ON
INS
ENT
4.
Enter NEW instruction and element
V
AND
H
7
ENT
$00006
$00007
ORSTR
AND X5
INSERT
$00007
INST?
AND X5
$00007
$00008
AND
AND
AND
AND
(Add X7)
X2
X5
X7
Y0
X3
X4
X6
END
Location to
search
$00000
$00001
—
$00006
$00007
—
$00010
STR X0
OR X1
—
AND X5
AND X7
ORN X6
—
END
Changing Programs
OUT
X1
X5
X7
Mnemonic Example Program
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
X5
X5
4--8
Changing Programs
Deleting an Instruction
Use the delete feature to remove an instruction from your program. The DEL key
deletes the instruction that is currently being displayed. Note to make sure you are at
the desired location within program prior to the Delete operation. Once you’ve
deleted the instruction, the remaining addresses will automatically decrement. The
following example demonstrates using the Delete function.
Press these Keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
1.
SEARCHING
Locate X7 contact
V
AND
H
FD REF
FIND
7
2.
To Delete instruction
3.
Press ENT to confirm (or CLR to reject)
OFF
DEL
ENT
$00006
$00007
AND
AND
DELETE
$00007
INST?
AND X7
$00007
$00008
AND
AND
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X2
X1
X3
X5
X7
Y0
OUT
Location to
search
X4
X6
Changing Programs
X7
X7
Mnemonic Example Program
(Delete X7)
X0
X10
X7
END
$00000
$00001
—
$00006
$00007
—
$00010
STR X0
OR X1
—
AND X5
AND X7
ORN X6
—
END
4--9
Changing Programs
Using Search and Replace
The AUX 22 function allows you to Search and Replace all occurrences of a specific
instruction. The example below demonstrates replacing every instance of X5 with
X10.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
Clear complete display screen
CLR
2.
3.
D2--HPP Display Results
CLR
CLR
Use AUX 22 to change memory references
C
2
C
2
AUX
ENT
Enter beginning address for the change
or press ENT to accept the default
ENT
4.
Enter ending address for the change or
press ENT to accept the default
B
5.
6.
7.
1
G
6
ENT
Enter old memory reference
F
5
ENT
Enter new memory reference
B
1
A
0
S
2*
22
RLL OPERA
CHNGE REF
AUX
1st
22 CHNGE
$00000
REF
AUX
END
22 CHNGE
$16
REF
AUX
OLD
22
CHNGE
X5
REF
AUX
TO
22
CHNGE
X10
REF
ENT
Press ENT to confirm change
ENT
AUX
AUX
ENT
AUX 22 CHNGE REF
X0005-> X0010
Use CLR key to exit AUX 22 function
Equivalent Ladder Logic
X0
X2
X5
Mnemonic Example Program
$00000
Y0
—
OUT
X1
X3
STR X0
—
$00006
X4
Replace
with X10
X6
X5
CHANGE
Y1
OUT
END
—
$00010
AND X10
—
STR X10
Changing Programs
REFERENCE
OLD X
4--10
Changing Programs
Editing Programs During Run Mode
The DL205 CPU’s allow you to edit programs during Run mode. To modify a program
in RUN mode use MODE key to select “RUN--TIME EDITS”.
The operations you are able to perform in Program mode also apply in the Run--Time
mode. For example, you can use the same techniques to search for a specific
instruction, search for a specific address, etc. However, you cannot use Search and
Replace during Run Mode.
The Run--Time Edits are not “bumpless”. Instead, the CPU maintains the outputs in
their last state while it accepts the new program information. If an error is found in the
new program, then the CPU will turn all the outputs off and change to Program Mode.
WARNING: Only authorized personnel fully familiar with all aspects of the PLC
application should make changes to the program. Changes during Run Mode
become effective immediately. Make sure you thoroughly consider the impact of any
changes to minimize the risk of personal injury or damage to equipment.
Edits during Run Mode are ideally suited to small changes. If the program requires
major changes it is strongly recommended you switch the system to program mode
and take all necessary precautions just as if you were starting the machine for the
first time.
Changing Programs
There are some important operation sequence changes during Run Time Edits.
1. If there is a syntax error in the new instruction, the CPU will not enter the Run
Mode.
2. If you delete an output coil reference and the output was on at the time, the output
will remain on until it is forced off with a programming device.
3. Input point changes are not acknowledged during Run Time Edits. So, if you’re
using a high-speed operation and a critical input comes on, the CPU may not see the
change.
Changing Programs
Selecting Runtime
Edits
4--11
The figure below demonstrates how to select the Runtime edit feature. Note the
following are some conditions which pertain during Run--Time Edit mode.
S Once you select RUNTIME EDITS the RUN LED starts blinking. This
indicates a edit may be performed while in the Run mode.
S If you had displayed an address just before selecting Run--Time Edit
mode, you may immediately jump to the same address by pressing the
NEXT key. This allows you to search for an address or instruction before
you change the mode.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
*MODE
GO TO
While in the Run Mode
select RUNTIME EDIT mode
MODE
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
NEXT
ENT
*MODE CHANGE*
RUNTIME EDITS?
Confirm mode change
ENT
3.
CHANGE*
PGM MODE
Confirm mode change
CLR
*MODE CHANGE*
RUNTIME EDITS
NEXT
Changing Constant Changing the value of a constant in an instruction during Run Mode works the same
Values During Run as it does during Program Mode. The following example is not reflected in the short
program we have been working with, since it does not contain any instructions with a
Mode
constant value. This example shows how to modify the preset value of an Up Down
Counter.
Press these Keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
S
1.
Locate and display the instruction with
the constant you want to change
2.
Position cursor on constant value and enter new value
6
A
0
ENT
END
S
The change in value is not saved until
you press the ENT key.
S
After pressing the ENT key, the next instruction
programmed will automatically be displayed.
CT16
K50
Changing Programs
G
UDC
Naming and
Storing Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Program Names and Passwords
— Saving Programs on EEPROM
15
5--2
Naming and Storing Programs
Program Names and Passwords
Program Names
Both the DL105 and DL205 PLC’s allow you to name your application programs.
This feature is helpful to store your program in the Handheld programmer EEPROM
memory. The program name can be up to eight characters in length and allows all
alphanumeric characters (A--Z, 0--9) for valid entry.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
AUX
To call AUX 51 function
F
5
B
1
AUX
Press ENT to get the Modify Program display
ENT
3.
4.
5*
51
CPU CFG
MODIFY PG
AUX 51 MODIFY
oooooooo
PG
AUX 51
PRESS1
PG
Enter program name
SHFT
P
SHFT
B
CV
R
ORN
E
4
S
RST
S
RST
1
Press ENT to accept the name
PROGRAM
PRESS1oo
ENT
S
S
MODIFY
Press CLR to exit the Modify Program display
You may also position cursor with arrow ? ?
keys
to change the name and then press ENT
Password
Protection
The DL105 and DL205 PLC’s provide an extra measure of protection by allowing
Password protection. You may enter a password that prevents unauthorized
personnel from performing program operations. A password must consist of eight
digits. The first digit of the password (most left position), may be an alphanumeric
number (A--F, 0--9) and the remaining seven digits may be numeric characters (0--9).
To remove a entered password, enter all zeros (00000000), which defaults the CPU
having no password protection. (This is the default from the factory.)
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
Use AUX 81 to name the CPU program
I
8
B
1
AUX
Naming and Storing
Programs
H
1
7
C
I
2
D
3
E
4
F
5
G
6
8
Press ENT to accept the password
or use the arrow ? ?
keys to change it.
ENT
S
PASSWORD
MODIFY PA
PASSWORD
00000000
Enter password
B
4.
8*
81
Press ENT to get the Password display
ENT
3.
AUX
AUX
Press CLR to exit from Password display
PASSWORD
12345678
This position will accept
(A--F, 0--9 for valid entry.
PROGRAM
PRESS1
The password is stored in the program memory. If you install the program or
EEPROM in another CPU or Handheld, the password protection remains in effect.
Naming and Storing Programs
Locking the CPU
with Password
Protection
5--3
Once you’ve entered a password, you may use the AUX 83 to lock the CPU against
program access. This function will prevent users from changing CPU setups and
modifying the PLC program. There are two ways to lock the CPU.
S The CPU is always locked after a power cycle (if a password is present).
S You can use AUX 83 and AUX 82 to lock and unlock the CPU.
WARNING: Make sure you remember the password before you lock the CPU. Once
the CPU is locked you cannot view, change, or erase the password. You also cannot
erase the EEPROM and start over.
The following example uses the AUX 83 function, to lock a CPU with password
protection.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
Call AUX 83 to Lock the CPU password
I
D
8
AUX
3
8*
83
PASSWORD
LOCK CPU
To select Lock CPU display
CPU LOCK
LOCK?
ENT
3.
AUX
AUX
Confirm Lock operation
ENT
CPU
S
Press ENT to accept the password
or use the arrow ? ?
keys to change it.
S
Press CLR to exit CPU Lock operation
LOCKED
The message ’CPU UNLOCKED’ appears if you attempt to lock a CPU that does not
have a password.
Unlocking the CPU Use the AUX 82 function to unlock CPU’s which have been enabled with the Lock
protection. The Unlock function works similar to the Lock function, but will require
Password
you to enter the password which has been programmed. The following example
Protection
demonstrates how to unlock a password protected CPU.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 83 to Unlock the CPU password
I
8
C
2
AUX
7
C
I
2
D
3
E
4
F
5
G
6
8
Confirm Unlock operation
CPU LOCKED
PASSWD: 12345678
CPU
UNLOCKED
Press CLR to exit CPU Unlock operation
The error message ’E504BAD REF/VAL’ appears if you enter an incorrect
password. If you press CLR you can attempt to enter the password again.
Naming and Storing
Programs
1
ENT
S
PASSWORD
UNLOCK CP
CPU LOCKED
PASSWD:
Enter password to authorize Unlock
B
H
4.
8*
82
To select Unlock CPU display
ENT
3.
AUX
AUX
5--4
Naming and Storing Programs
Saving Programs to EEPROM
As you develop your program with the Handheld programmer, pressing the ENT key
saves the entry to the PLC CPU memory. The DL105 and DL205 use different types
of CPU memory.
The DL205 series PLC’s use a EEPROM IC chip for program and data storage. You
may use the Handheld programmer AUX71 function to program this EEPROM. The
DL105 Micro PLC’s use a non--volatile Flash ROM memory for program information
storage. The DL105 does not require any EEPROM handling, therefore the following
EEPROM functions are not normally used.
Before you attempt to save your program to EEPROM, you must first install a
EEPROM inside the Handheld programmer. The following table indicates which
EEPROM to use in the different DL205 CPU’s.
Types of EEPROMs The DL230 CPU uses a 2K EEPROM and the DL240 CPU uses a 3K EEPROM for
program storage. Either size of EEPROM may be used in the Handheld programmer
(DL205 ONLY)
for offline programming. You may electrically erase already programed EEPROM’s
as explained later in this chapter.
CPU type
EEPROM Part Number
Capacity
DL230
Hitachi HN58C65P--25
2K words
DL240
Hitachi HN58C256P--20
3K words
NOTE: Small programs using common instructions supported by both CPUs is
possible, as long as the program size is within the DL230 capacity (under 2K). These
programs may be used between both of the CPU models. However, the EEPROM
installed in the Handheld Programmer must be the same size (or larger) than the
CPU being used. For example, you could not install a DL240 EEPROM in the
Handheld Programmer and download the program to a DL230, unless the program
size limits are that of a DL230 capacity.
Naming and Storing
Programs
Remove power
from the Handheld
programmer
If the EEPROM you are
using is smaller than
the socket it should be
aligned to the left edge
of the socket.
Keypad retracts to
reveal EEPROM Zero
Force Insertion Socket.
EEPROM key
notch must be
on the right
side
Raise socket
lever prior to
inserting
EEPROM. Use
lever to lock
EEPROM in
place once
properly seated.
Naming and Storing Programs
Inserting a
EEPROM
in the Handheld
Programmer
5--5
The Handheld programmer should not be powered during EEPROM installation.
EEPROM chips can be damaged if not properly handled and/or proper electrical
grounding precautions used. While installing a EEPROM, ensure not to bend any of
the electrical pins. Align the EEPROM with the left side of the pin socket and the key
notch to the right.
EEPROM key
notch must be
on the right
side
Align the EEPROM to
the left edge of the
socket.
Raise socket
lever prior to
inserting
EEPROM.
Keypad retracts to
reveal EEPROM Zero
Force Insertion Socket.
With EEPROM
in socket, close
lever.
1. Disconnect power from the Handheld programmer.
2. Slide keypad door down. The keypad door only slides partially open. Do not force!
3. Lift socket lever, to clear socket pin openings.
4. Insert EEPROM in socket. The key notch must be on the right and the EEPROM
must be aligned with the left side of the socket.
5. Once EEPROM is inserted, press socket lever down.
6. Slide keypad closed.
7. Reconnect power to the Handheld programmer.
WARNING: EEPROMs can be damaged by static electricity, therefore; you should
take precautions to ground yourself before handling the EEPROM. All work
performed should be made on a conductive and grounded surface.
Using EEPROM
functions with
the DL105
The DL105 Micro PLC’s use Flash ROM memory for program and system
information storage. The Handheld programmer may still be used for storing and
uploading DL105 programs. The DL105 may require the Initialize Scratchpad
operation to be performed, before changing to Run mode, after (HPP-->CPU)
EEPROM program has been loaded.
Naming and Storing
Programs
5--6
Naming and Storing Programs
Checking the
EEPROM Type
The AUX 76 function may be used to check the EEPROM size installed in the DL205
CPU or the D2--HPP programmer. The display will indicate both the CPU EEPROM
size and the Handheld programmer EEPROM size if installed. If the EEPROM is not
installed in the Handheld programer, then dashes (--) will be displayed below the
HPP header.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
Use
AUX
76
to
Check
EEPROM
Type
1.
AUX 7* EEPROM
H
2.
7
G
6
AUX
AUX
3.
If HPP has a EEPROM installed, use the arrow right
key to scroll the display.
S
Checking for a
Blank EEPROM
76
SHOW
TYPE
Press CLR key to exit EEPROM check function
CPU
EEPROM
03K
HPP
EEPR
03K
HPP (D2-240)
EEPROM
03K
Before copying your program to a EEPROM make sure the EEPROM does not
contain any information which will be overwritten. You can check for a blank
EEPROM by using AUX function 74, BLANK CHK.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 74 to Check for a blank EEPROM
H
7
E
4
AUX
To select EEPROM blank check
ENT
3.
To execute EEPROM blank check
ENT
4.
S
Naming and Storing
Programs
AUX
To select EEPROM checking
AUX
AUX
7*
74
EEPROM
BLANK CHK
AUX 74
EEPROM
BLANK
BLANK
EEPROM
IS
E621
EEPROM
NOT
E622
NO HPP
EEPROM
CHK
CHK
BLANK
The Handheld programer will respond with
one of these three display messages.
Press CLR to exit EEPROM blank check
BLANK
NOTE: If you copy data to an EEPROM which has existing data stored on it, the new
data could overwrite portions of the existing data and leave other portions as they
previously existed resulting in a unreliable copy of your data. It is always
recommended to clear non-blank memory cartridges prior to copying data to ensure
you get a “clean” copy of your new data.
Naming and Storing Programs
Erasing a
EEPROM
5--7
The AUX 75 function will allow you to erase a EEPROM. Use the following example
to erase (clear) a EEPROM which is installed in the Handheld programmer.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
1. Use AUX 75 to Erase EEPROM
AUX 7* EEPROM
H
2.
7
F
5
AUX
AUX
ENT
3.
75
ERASE
To select Erase function
AUX 75 ERASE
CLEAR EEPROM?
To execute Erase operation
ENT
S
Press CLR to exit Erase EEPROM function
AUX 75
BUSY
ERASE
EEPROM
CLEARED
Copying Programs
from the CPU
To save System V-memory (not system parameters), you will need to modify the
memory range to include the upper memory locations for the DL230 or DL240 CPUs
for option 2: V — V memory. All System V-memory is not saved when you select
either the System or Program + System options.
Option and Memory Type
DL240
Default Range
DL130 / DL230
Default Range
1:PGM — Program
$00000 -- $02559
$00000 -- $02047
2:V — V memory
$00000 -- $4777
$00000 -- $04777
3:SYS — System
Non-selectable copies system parameters
4:etc (ALL) — Program,
System and non-volatile Vmemory only
Non-selectable
Non-selectable
Depending on the size of your program, a single EEPROM may not store your entire
application. If this is the case, use more than one EEPROM, and save only V
memory on a EEPROM by itself. Some copying options require a blank EEPROM
before they will execute. If you receive the error message E621 EEPROM NOT
BLANK, use AUX 75 to erase the EEPROM. Then retry the copy function.
WARNING: Do not try to store more than one of the above options in a single
EEPROM, portions of data can be overwritten, yielding an unreliable copy.
Naming and Storing
Programs
5--8
Naming and Storing Programs
Selecting Memory
to copy from
CPU -- EEPROM
The AUX 71 function may be used copy data from the CPU---->HPP and save to
EEPROM memory. You may select different portions of CPU data to copy. Three
data types may be selected, program, system, and V--memory. The following figure
demonstrates how to use the AUX 71 operation to copy the PGM (program data) into
the Handheld programmer EEPROM.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 71 to copy memory from CPU to HPP
H
7
B
1
AUX
To select CPU Þ HPP
ENT
3.
To select PGM (program) press enter
ENT
4.
Else use the arrow ? ?
key to choose other
area types, then press ENT
ENT
5.
Enter the starting address to copy,
or press enter for default ($00000)
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
AUX
7*
71
EEPROM
CPU-->HPP
AUX 71 CPU-->HPP
PGM/V/SYS/etc
AUX 71 CPU-->HPP
PGM/V/SYS/etc
AUX
PGM
71 CPU-->HPP
/ PGM+SYS
ENT
6.
Enter END program address
of press ENT to select the entire range
(e.g. DL130/DL230 default $02047)
ENT
7.
Enter the destination EEPROM address,
or press enter for default ($00000)
ENT
S
Press CLR to exit AUX 71 Copy operation.
S
This operation may take a few minutes
depending on type and amount of data transferred.
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
1st
$ 00000
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
END
$ 02047
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
DIST
$ 00000
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
$00000-$02047->$
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
EEPROM
08K
01
This value will
increment
Naming and Storing
Programs
OK
If you are copying to an EEPROM
which is not erased you will receive
this message.
CPU-->EEPROM(PGM
EEPROM NOT BLANK
WARNING: Use extreme caution to prevent overwriting information during copy
procedure.
Naming and Storing Programs
Writing Programs
to the CPU
5--9
The AUX 72 function allows data to be transferred from the Handheld programmer
EEPROM to the CPU memory.
The table below shows the different types of information which may be copied.
Option and Memory Type
DL240
Default Range
DL130 / DL230
Default Range
1:PGM — Program
$00000 -- $02559
$00000 -- $02047
2:V — V memory
$00000 -- $4777
$00000 -- $04777
3:SYS — System
Non-selectable (copies all system parameters)
4:etc (ALL) — Program,
System and non-volatile Vmemory only
Non-selectable
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 72 to copy memory from HPP to CPU.
H
7
C
2
AUX
To select HPP Þ CPU copy function.
ENT
3.
To select PGM press enter.
ENT
4.
Else use the arrow ? ?
key to position cursor
and select area desired by pressing ENT.
Non-selectable
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
AUX
7*
72
EEPROM
HPP-->CPU
AUX 72 HPP-->CPU
PGM/V/SYS/etc
AUX
PGM
72 HPP-->CPU
/ PGM+SYS
ENT
5.
Enter the starting address area to copy,
or press enter for default ($00000).
EEPROM-->CPU(PGM
1st
$ 00000
ENT
6.
Enter END address to copy
or press enter to select entire range
(DL130/DL230 default $02047).
ENT
S
Press CLR key to exit AUX 72 function.
S
This operation may take a few minutes depending
on amount and type of data copied.
EEPROM-->CPU(PGM
END
$ 02047
EEPROM-->CPU(PGM
$00000 - $02047?
EEPROM-->CPU(PGM
EEPROM
08K
01
OK
Naming and Storing
Programs
5--10
Naming and Storing Programs
Comparing CPU
and Handheld
Programs
The AUX 73 function compares the CPU and HPP programs. You may choose which
areas of the program to compare, such as; program instruction (PGM), V--memory
contents (V), and System (SYS) memory. The figure below demonstrates how to
compare a program in the HPP to the CPU.
You can compare different types of information.
Option and Memory Type
DL240
Default Range
DL130 / DL230
Default Range
1:PGM — Program
$00000 -- $02559
$00000 -- $02047
2:V — V memory
$00000 -- $4777
$00000 -- $04777
3:SYS — System
Non-selectable copies system parameters
4:etc (ALL) — Program,
System and non-volatile Vmemory only
Non-selectable
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 73 to copy memory from CPU to HPP.
H
7
D
3
AUX
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
AUX
7*
73
EEPROM
HPP<->CPU
To select HPP<--> CPU compare operation
ENT
3.
Non-selectable
To select PGM press enter
AUX 73 HPP<->CPU
PGM/V/SYS/etc
ENT
4.
Use the arrow keys (? ? ) to position cursor
to other area type desired, then press ENT
AUX
PGM
73 HPP<->CPU
/ PGM+SYS
ENT
5.
Enter the starting address area to copy,
or press enter for default ($00000).
ENT
6.
Enter END address to prepare copy
or press enter to select entire range
(DL130/DL230 default $02047).
VERIFY
1st
PGM+SYS
$ 00000
VERIFY
END
PGM
$ 02047
VERIFY
DIST
PGM+SYS
$ 00000
Naming and Storing
Programs
ENT
S
Press CLR key to exit from Copy function
S
This Auxiliary function may take a few minutes
depending on type and amount of data copied.
VERIFY PGM+SYS
$00000-$02047<->
VERIFY
EEPROM
PGM
08K
VERIFICATION
01
OK
5--11
Naming and Storing Programs
Verification Errors
While running the Verification function the Handheld programmer may display one of
the following verification errors. The first display example occurs if the EEPROM
System is different than the CPU. If the Handheld programmer and the CPU
programs are different, the display message will show the first address number
which differs.
Example D2--HPP Display
S
This display appears if the System
programs are different between the HPP
and CPU.
VERIFY
SYS
PGM+SYS
VERIFY ER
Example D2--HPP Display
S
If a Verification error occurs the
display informs which address and
instruction are different in the CPU.
$00021VERIFY
STR SP1
ERR
HINT: Running the Verification program is helpful to ensure PLC backups stored on
EEPROM, are exact copies of those running in your PLC system(s).
Saving Offline
Generated
Programs
If you have been programming off-line, you may temporarily save your program in
RAM memory on Handheld programmers. To save a program being generated in the
Handheld programmer press the SAVE key.
As you’ve seen, entering and storing programs with the Handheld programmer is a
pretty simple task. Once you’ve entered a program and the machine is running, you
can use the Handheld programmer to monitor and change machine operations.
Naming and Storing
Programs
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
In This Chapter. . . .
— Troubleshooting Suggestions
— Monitoring Discrete I/O Points
— Forcing Discrete I/O Points
— Monitoring V-Memory Locations
— Changing V-Memory Values
— Monitoring Timer/Counter Values
— Monitoring the CPU Scan Time
— Test Modes
— I/O Diagnostics
— Custom Messages
— Checking the Error Message Tables
— Error Codes
16
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--2
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Suggestions
The Handheld programmer is useful for monitoring and troubleshooting your PLC
and machine operation. There are several operations and features which help
debug and isolate potential PLC problems. Below are some troubleshooting and
maintenance features commonly used.
S Monitor Discrete I/O Points — to examine I/O power flow for individual
I/O points.
S Force Discrete I/O Points — to examine machine sequences or
inconsistencies.
S Monitor V-Memory Locations — to examine word locations to
determine if correct values are being used.
S Change V-Memory Values — to force word locations with different
values.
S Monitor Timer/Counter Values — to adjust machine timing elements.
S Monitor CPU scan time (in milliseconds) — view the maximum,
minimum, and current scan times to adjust scan related problems.
S Use Test Modes — to examine output status.
S Use I/O Diagnostics — to pinpoint I/O errors.
S Understand Error Codes — to utilize many automatic error checks.
Understanding the The Monitor Status display may be selected by pressing the STAT key. You may
scroll status options using the NEXT/PREV keys. Some options may require the
Status Monitor
Handheld programmer to be on-line. The displays may change format depending on
Options
the CPU mode selected when the Status display operation is performed.
Example displays for Monitor Status options
*MONITOR SELECT
16P STATUS ?
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
*MONITOR SELECT
TRAP WORD STATUS
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Test-Run Mode Only
*MONITOR SELECT
WORD STATUS?
*MONITOR SELECT
T/C CUR STATUS ?
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
*MONITOR SELECT
TRAP 16PT STATUS
* M O N IFuture
TOR SELECT
INTELLIGENT I/O?
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Test-Run Mode Only
HINT: The Handheld programmer will buffer up to 5 Status displays which may be
scrolled by just pressing the STAT key. You can also scroll the display to adjacent
memory locations by pressing the PREV and NEXT keys.
6--3
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
The Handheld programming unit will allow Status Monitoring on the following data
types. You may monitor 16 data points at one time.
X inputs
T--Timer/Counter bits
Y output
S, SP--Special relays
C control relays
GX remote I/O points
(future)
Stage bits
Bit Status Monitor
The Status Monitor may be displayed using the STAT menu or by directly typing in
the memory reference. The following figure shows both methods of selecting Status
monitor.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
*MONITOR SELECT
1. To select Bit Status Monitor mode
STAT
2.
ENT
16P
STATUS
?
16P
BIT
STATUS
REF
C0
To select Status type and enter reference
NEXT
NEXT
A
0
ENT
To call Bit Status directly
1.
To directly call specific Status with reference
SHFT
S
C
2
A
0
STAT
Bit Status for a Range of bits
C
10
C_
0
Press CLR to exit Status function
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Solid fill indicates ON
Blank indicates OFF
If you examine the Handheld programmer, you will notice several numbers printed
on the case, below the LCD display screen. These numbers help you identify which
data points you are monitoring.
7654321076543210
Bit Positions
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Discrete I/O Points
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--4
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Forcing Discrete I/O Points
The DL105 and DL205 supports two methods which may be used to force I/O points.
Both systems will allow you to use the Status Monitor mode and change individual bit
conditions by pressing the ON and OFF keys. With certain DL205 CPU’s you can
also force I/O using AUX 59 the Bit Override function.
The following paragraphs describe the two forcing methods available. (Please refer
to the DL105 and DL205 User Manuals for detailed description of how the CPU
processes each type of forcing request.)
S Regular Forcing — This type of forcing can temporarily change the
status of a discrete bit. For example, you may want to force an input on,
even though it is really off. This allows you to change point status which
is in the image register for one scan. This value will be valid until the
image register location is written to during the next scan. This is
primarily useful during testing situations when you just need to force a
bit on to trigger another event. An example of regular forcing is on the
next page.
S Bit Override — (DL240 Only) Bit override can be enabled on a
point-by-point basis by using AUX 59. You can use Bit Override with X,
Y, C, T, CT, and S data types. Bit override basically disables any
changes to the discrete point by the CPU. For example, if you enable Bit
Override for input X1, and X1 is OFF at the time, then the CPU will not
change the state of X1. This means that even if input X1 turns ON, the
CPU will not acknowledge the change. So, if you used X1 in the
program, it would always be evaluated as OFF in this case. Of course, if
X1 was on when the bit override was enabled, then X1 point would
always be evaluated as ON.
WARNING: Depending on your application, forcing I/O points may cause
unpredictable machine operation that can result in a risk of personal injury or
equipment damage. The Force function is usually performed during troubleshooting
only. Be sure all I/O is unforced when operation testing is done.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--5
Forced I/O Example
X0
X2
X1
X3
X10
X5
X7
Y0
Force Y0 ON
X4
Y1
Force X10 ON
Output ON due to
X10 force.
END
CPU Process Update
1. The CPU first reads the I/O
status from the modules. If
discrete input point X10 is off, the
CPU overwrites the force
command and turns off X10.
2. While X10 is off, even though
previously forced on, Y0 will
remain turned off. The CPU will
scan and process all program
instructions.
3. At the end of the program scan,
the CPU updates the output
status with the results obtained
from the logic execution. Y0 and
Y1 were turned off.
X0
X2
X5
X1
X3
X10
Force is overwritten
X7
Read Inputs
¬X10 is off
À
Update Outputs
À
Y0
X4
Y1
END
®Y0 and Y1
turn off
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Using Force during As mention, the Bit Override feature is not supported by all PLC models. When using
the Bit Override this does not disable using Regular forcing. For example, if you
Bit Override
enabled the Bit Override for Y0 and it was off at the time, then the CPU would not
change the state of Y0. However, you can still use a programming device to change
the bit status. Now, if you use the programming device to force Y0 ON, it will remain
forced and the CPU program will not change the state of the Y0 output. If you then
force Y0 OFF, the CPU will maintain Y0 in the OFF condition. The CPU will never
update the point with the results from the application program or from the I/O update
until the bit override is removed from the point.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--6
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Regular Bit Force
using the Status
Monitor
The Force Bit operation will allow controlling a specific bit ON and OFF within
memory tables. The force function does not overrule the regular execution of your
program logic. Even when a bit has been forced, your program will control the bit
through executed program instruction.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
Begin
the
Bit
Status
Monitor
mode.
1.
*MONITOR SELECT*
STAT
2.
16P
To select 16 Point status.
ENT
Else you may select different Status type
or Data type using the PREV and NEXT keys.
3.
NEXT
A
0
While displaying 16P Status beginning at Y0
4.
ENT
Position cursor and Force Y2 OFF.
5.
?
16P
BIT
STATUS
REF
X
16P
BIT
STATUS
REF
Y0
Y
10
Y
0
Y
10
Y
0
Y
10
Y
0
OFF
DEL
SHFT
S
STATUS
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Press CLR to exit Bit Forcing function
With Y2 forced and the CPU in the Run mode, the executed instructions and result of
logic will overwrite the Force command. In other words, if the program logic solves
Y2 true, then the output coil Y2 will be turned ON at the end of the scan.
D2--HPP Display Results
Regular Bit Force
Press these Keystrokes
with Direct Access 1. To perform the direct Bit Force ON
BIT FORCE
SHFT
Y
MLS
B
1
A
0
SHFT
ON
INS
Y10
To perform the direct Bit Force OFF
2.
SHFT
S
Y
MLS
B
1
A
0
SHFT
OFF
DEL
Press CLR to exit Direct Forcing function
BIT
Y10
FORCE
6--7
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Override bit indicators are also shown on the Handheld programmer status
display. Below are the keystrokes to call the status display for Y10 -- Y20.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
D2--HPP Example Display
To display the status of Y10 -- Y20
STAT
ENT
NEXT
B
1
A
0
Y
20
Y
10
ENT
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Override bit is ON
Point is ON
NOTE: Take care not to confuse the Override Bit marker with the marker used
when Test Operations have been set for a point. The Override Bit marker is on the
left side below the status bit.
Direct bit Forcing
(DL240 ONLY)
The following figures demonstrate how to use Direct Bit Forcing. The Bit force
function is helpful to determine if your PLC I/O is responding according to the
ON/OFF condition.
NOTE: This example uses Y10 for demonstration purpose. Please insure to use a
memory reference which may be forced safely in your PLC. Forcing I/O Bits may
change your control program outputs which can cause personal injury or equipment
damage on your PLC system.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
3.
4.
S
D2--HPP Display Results
To Set Bit Override ON and Force Y10 ON
X
SET
B
1
A
0
SHFT
ON
INS
Set Bit Override OFF and Force Y10 ON
X
SET
B
1
A
0
SHFT
OFF
DEL
To Reset Bit Override OFF and turn Y10 ON
S
RST
B
1
A
0
SHFT
ON
INS
To Reset Bit Override OFF and turn Y10 OFF
S
RST
B
1
A
0
SHFT
OFF
DEL
In the example above use the NEXT and
PREV keys to move to adjacent memory
locations.
BIT
SET
FORCE
Y10
This marker indicates Override Bit is ON.
BIT
SET
FORCE
Y10
BIT
RST
FORCE
Y10
BIT
RST
FORCE
Y10
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Bit Override
Indicators
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--8
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Bit Override
(DL240 Only)
The AUX 59 function may be used to Set or Reset either a single point or a group of
data points. The default is the entire data range for the specified data type. To
change the default enter a data type and address. The figure below shows how to set
the override bit on for Y10 to Y20.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
To Select Aux 59 Bit Override Function
F
5
J
9
AUX
ENT
To Select Area option
ENT
3.
Enter Data type and Starting Reference Address or
Press ENT to accept displayed defaults
SHFT
4.
1
A
0
ENT
Y
MLS
C
2
A
0
ENT
Use ON / OFF keys to command the override
on or off, then press ENT to confirm
SHFT
S
B
Enter Ending Reference Address or
Press ENT to accept displayed default
SHFT
5.
Y
MLS
OFF
DEL
ENT
AUX 59 BIT
PT/AREA
OVRID
AUX 59 BIT
PT/AREA
OVRID
AUX
1st
59 BIT OVRID
X0000 Y10
AUX
END
59 BIT OVRID
Y0477 Y20
AUX 59 BIT OVRID
Y0010-0020 OFF?
Press the CLR key to exit Bit Override
WARNING: Once again, depending on your application, forcing I/O points may
cause unpredictable machine operation that can result in a risk of personal injury or
equipment damage. Please take notice how PLC will respond prior to using the force
function.
6--9
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
You may use the Handheld programmer to monitor and change V memory locations.
This is an especially useful feature, since almost all DL105 and DL205 system data
is mapped into V memory. The following steps show you how to monitor V-memory
locations.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
Select the location to monitor
SHFT
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
V
AND
C
2
A
0
A
0
A
0
V
2001
4552
V
2000
4F50
V
2001
4552
V
2000
4F50
STAT
Use the PREV and NEXT keys to scroll through
adjacent memory locations
NEXT
Changing V-Memory Values
Press these Keystrokes
1.
V
AND
C
2
A
0
A
0
A
0
K
JMP
B
1
C
2
D
Press ENT to enter new value
ENT
3
E
4
2001
4552
V
2000
4F50
V 2001
K1234
V
2000
V
2000
1234
STAT
Use K (constant) to load a new value in memory
location V2000
SHFT
3.
V
Select the location to monitor
SHFT
2.
D2--HPP Display Results
V
2001
4552
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Monitoring V--Memory Locations
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--10
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Pointer Locations
Data in V-memory locations may be used to indirectly reference other memory
locations (this is also known as using pointers). You may monitor Pointer Memory
locations on the Handheld programmer by accessing the “P” data type when using
the STAT key.
In our example V2000 has the value of 0 and V 2001 has the value of 100 (both
values are in octal). At address V0 the value is 1111 and at V100 the value is
2222. When the status display is called with the pointer P2000 the values
stored in memory locations V0 and V100 will be displayed, since the addresses
stored in V2000 and V2001 point to these respective locations.
Press these Keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
1.
P
SHFT
S
P2001
2222
To display the status P2000 and P2001
C
CV
2
A
0
A
0
A
0
STAT
P2000
1111
For Pointers containing an invalid address, the value displayed on the screen will be “--------”.
Monitoring Timer/Counter Values
Timer and Counter current values are mapped into V-memory locations, and may be
displayed the same as any V-memory location, the Handheld programmer also
provides specialized displays to monitor the status of the Timer and Counter current
values and associated status bits. (Appendix A provides a complete listing of the
memory map for the DL105 and DL205 PLC’s.
The display for the timer is similar in form to the one shown for the counter.
Press these Keystrokes
D2--HPP Display Results
1.
To display the status of CT16 -- CT17
STAT
PREV
PREV
NEXT
B
G
1
6
PREV
ENT
CT 17
0005
ENT
Counter bit is OFF
CT 16
0050
Counter bit is ON
Changing Timer/Counter Current Values
To change Timer and Counter current values is much the same as changing
V-memory.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
To enter a new counter current value
SHFT
K
JMP
A
0
ENT
D2--HPP Display Results
CT 17
0005
CT 16
0000
6--11
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
The DL105 and DL205 CPU’s have a Watchdog Timer that is used to monitor the
scan time. The default value set from the factory is 200 ms. If the scan time exceeds
the watchdog time limit, the CPU automatically leaves RUN mode and enters the
PGM mode. The Handheld programmer displays the following message E003 S/W
TIMEOUT when the scan overrun occurs.
You can use AUX 53 to view the minimum, maximum, and current scan time. Use
AUX 55 to increase or decrease the Watchdog timer value.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
To Change
Watchdog Timer
To call AUX 53 function.
F
5
D
3
AUX
ENT
D2--HPP Display Results
SCAN
0004
MAX
0030
MIN
0002
The CPU must be in PGM, TEST--PGM, or Test--Run mode before you can
change the watchdog timer value.
D2--HPP Display Results
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 55 to change the watchdog timer value
F
5
F
5
AUX
ENT
AUX 55 WATCHDOG
0200 mSEC
Current setting
Enter the new time value (in milliseconds)
B
1
A
0
A
0
ENT
Entry location
AUX
OK
55
WATCHDOG
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Monitoring the CPU Scan Time
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--12
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
TEST-RUN and
TEST-PGM Modes
(DL240 Only)
Test Mode allows you to maintain output status while you switch between
TEST-PGM and TEST-RUN Modes and it allows you to trap a value in the middle of
program execution. You can select this operation by using the MODE key.
The primary benefit of using the TEST mode is to maintain certain outputs and other
parameters when the CPU transitions back to Test-Program mode. For example,
you can use AUX 58 to configure the individual outputs, CRs, etc. to hold their output
state. Also, the CPU will maintain timer and counter current values when it switches
to TEST-PGM mode.
Different Test modes are available depending on the mode of operation you are in
when make the selection request. If the CPU is in Run Mode mode, then TEST-RUN
is available. If the mode is Program, then TEST-PGM is available. Once you’ve
selected the TEST Mode, you may switch between TEST-RUN and TEST-PGM
modes. The LED on the Handheld programmer is on while in the Test Mode. The
following figure shows how to select the Test Mode, while in the Run mode.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
To go to Test--Run mode
MODE
2.
NEXT
ENT
Press ENT to confirm TEST-RUN Mode
ENT
S
The TEST LED on the Handheld
programmer indicates that the CPU is
in TEST Mode.
D2--HPP Display Results
*MODE
GO TO
CHANGE*
PGM MODE
*MODE
GO TO
CHANGE*
T-RUN MODE
*MODE CHANGE*
CPU T-RUN
Begin this example in PROGRAM Mode
1. You can return to Run Mode, enter Program Mode,
*MODE
or enter TEST-PGM Mode by using the Mode Key
CLR
2.
MODE
NEXT
NEXT
ENT
Press ENT to confirm TEST-PGM Mode
ENT
S
Press the CLR key to exit Mode change.
GO
TO
CHANGE*
RUN MODE
*MODE CHANGE*
CPU T-PGM
(Note, the TEST LED on the Handheld
indicates that the CPU is in TEST Mode.)
WARNING: The following items should be considered during Run Time Edits.
1. If he program has any instruction syntax errors, the CPU will not enter the Run
Mode.
2. If you delete an output reference while the output is ON, the output will remain ON
until it is forced OFF with a programming device.
3. Input point changes are not acknowledged during Run Time Edits. So, if you’re
using a high-speed operation and a critical input comes on, the CPU may not see the
change.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
TEST-RUN
Displays
With the Handheld Programmer you also have a more detailed display when you use
TEST Mode. The areas which are active are dependant on the instruction being
displayed. For most instructions, the TEST-RUN mode display is more detailed than
the status displays shown in RUN mode.
With the Handheld programmer in the Test--Run mode and the instruction
addresses displayed, various groups of information are available. The different
groups of information are labeled and described below.
®
¬ $
¯
±
°
²
¬ Displays the power flow through the instruction just after the
instruction is executed.
J indicates power flow and Y indicates no power flow.
- Displays the power flow of the power rail.
J indicates power flow and M indicates no power flow.
® Displays the contents of the following (where applicable to
the instruction):
-- the accumulator
-- the timer current value
-- the counter current value
¯ If the operand is a data register, this field displays the
contents of the data register.
° If the operand is a bit, this field displays the bit status.
J indicates ON and S indicates OFF
± Displays the instruction address.
² Displays the mnemonic instruction and reference number
T0 Contact (S is OFF)
Example RUN Mode Display
(
is ON)
TMR
Input to Timer
K1000
Example TEST-RUN Mode
TMR
Power flow to rail
T0
0043
T0 K1000
Current Value
T0 Contact (S is off)
( is on)
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Test Displays
6--13
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--14
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Holding Output
States
The ability to hold output states allows you to maintain key system I/O points. In
some cases you may need to modify the program, but you don’t want certain
operations to stop. In normal Run Mode, the outputs are turned off when you return
to Program Mode. In TEST-RUN mode individual outputs can be set to hold the last
output state on the transition to TEST-PGM mode. This is done with AUX 58 on the
Handheld programmer. The following diagram shows the differences between RUN
and TEST-RUN modes.
RUN Mode to PGM Mode
Status on final scan
X0
X2
X1
X3
X10
Y0
X0
X2
X1
X3
Y0
X4
Outputs are
OFF
Y1
X10
X4
END
Y1
END
TEST-RUN to TEST-PGM
X0
X2
X1
X3
Y0
X4
Hold Y0 ON
Y1
X10
Let Y1 turn OFF
END
Before you decide that Test Mode is the perfect choice, remember that the DL205
CPUs also allow you to edit the program during Run Mode. The primary difference
between the Test Modes and the Run Time Edit feature is that you do not have to
configure each individual I/O point to hold the output status. When you use Run Time
Edits, the CPU automatically maintains all outputs in their current states while the
program is being updated. Run Time Edits should only be performed by trained
personnel.
6--15
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Using the Test
Operation
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Select AUX 58 Test Operation.
F
5
I
8
AUX
ENT
Select AREA to test
ENT
3.
4.
5.
Test Operation
Indicators
AUX 58 TEST
PT/AREA
OPER
AUX
1st
58
Y
TEST
OPER
AUX
1st
58 TEST
Y15
OPER
AUX
END
58 TEST
Y25
OPER
Enter the first address
B
1
F
5
ENT
Enter the ending address
C
2
F
5
ENT
Use ON / OFF keys to command the override on or off
Then press ENT to confirm
ENT
S
D2--HPP Display Results
Press the CLR key to leave AUX 58
AUX 58 TEST OPER
Y0015-0025 ON?
The Test Operation indicators may be displayed on the Handheld programmer
during Status Monitor mode. Below are the keystrokes to call the status display
for Y10 -- Y20.
1.
Keystrokes to display the status of Y10 -- Y20
STAT
ENT
NEXT
B
1
A
0
ENT
Y
20
Y
10
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Status
Override
Test
Test Operations .have
been set for Y15 -Y25
NOTE: Take care not to confuse the Test Operation marker with the marker used
for Bit Override. The Test marker is a small box indicated on the right side below the
Status point.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
The following is an example of using AUX 58 to configure the output state for Y15 to
Y25 when the CPU transitions from TEST-RUN to TEST-PGM.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--16
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Trapping a Discrete With the DL240 CPU, you may use the TEST mode to trap the status of a point or
word during normal program execution. To use this feature you must select the
Point or Word of
Data (DL240 Only) memory location and address in the program where you wish to check the contents
of the memory location.
For example you may read X5 three times during a program scan (at address $0000,
$0090 and $0200) and you want to know what the status of X5 is at address $0090.
$0000
Trap the status of
X5 at address
$0090
X5
X2
X1
X3
Y20
X4
X10
Y25
X5
Y30
$0090
X5
$0200
X23
Y22
X9
This example only works in the TEST-RUN Mode (DL240 Only)
Press these Keystrokes
1.
Use the STAT key to trap the status
STAT
2.
3.
NEXT
ENT
Enter the program address to trap on
J
9
A
0
ENT
Enter the memory location to trap.
F
S
NEXT
5
ENT
PREV / NEXT keys can be used to scroll
through the valid data types
D2--HPP Display Results
*MONITOR SELECT*
TRAP 16PT STATUS
TRAP 16PT STATUS
PGM ADDR 90
TRAP 16PT
BIT REF
X
10
STATUS
X5
X
0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
To trap a word of memory instead of a discrete point use the status monitoring option
of TRAP WORD STATUS and enter the parameters the same way as in the example
above.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--17
Diagnostics
(DL205 ONLY)
The DL205 system provides diagnostic features to that help identify I/O errors.
AUX 42 will report missing modules and new I/O configuration. For the DL240 CPU
I/O communication errors will also be reported. The error codes are listed later in this
chapter, and shows all of the possible I/O error messages. This function is only
possible with the DL205. If present, the error display will automatically be displayed
when Handheld programmer is connected to the CPU. If an I/O error occurs, use the
follow example figure below to determine which base and slot has failed.
Example Error Display
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Select the AUX 42 I/O Diagnostics
E
4
C
2
AUX
E252
NEW I/O
To run the diagnostics
ENT
3.
CFG
D2--HPP Display Results
Use arrow keys to see more information
AUX
AUX
4*
42
AUX 42
E252
I/O
I/O
CFG
DIAGN
I/O BASE
I/O CONF
/O BASE
0/SLOT3
I/O CONFIG Error
If the PLC system detects a change in the I/O configuration at power-up or an I/O
fault, and error message will be displayed. To get more detail on the location of the
error, internal diagnostic locations also exist which specify the module type, module
location and an error code.
The following figure shows a example of the failure indicators. The table on the left
lists the module codes which may be displayed in the failure indicators.
Code
(Hex)
Component Type
04
03
20
21
24
2B
36
37
4A
7F
CPU
I/O Base
8 pt. Output
8 pt. Input
4input/output
combination
12 pt. Output,
16 pt. Output
16 pt. Input
Analog Input
Analog Output
Counter Interface
Abnormal
FF
No module detected
28
Program Control Information
V7752 0020 Desired module ID code
V7753 0021 Current module ID code
V7754 0002 Location of conflict
V7755 0252 Fatal error code
SP47
I/O configuration Error
E252
NEW I/O CFG
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
I/O Diagnostics
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--18
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Custom Messages
The FAULT message instruction may be used to log messages which can be view
with AUX 5C on the Handheld programmer. The Fault messages must be triggered
with a positive differential (one shot) instruction, otherwise the message log buffer
will repeat storing the same message over and over.
The following figure shows how the message display capability works.
Guard is Open
PLC Reads C0
Read Inputs
À
¬ C0 is on
Limit Switch
X1 detects
open guard
Program Initiates Message
S
S
Handheld programer
displays the message.
FAULT Message
C0
X1
C0
PD
FAULT
K1
S
S
Your
message
displayed
here
CHKGUARD
94/01/12 09:08:3
END
DLBL
K1
Data Label and ACON
instructions build the message
2 characters at a time
ACON
A CH
ACON
A KG
ACON
A UA
ACON
A RD
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
A total of 64 Message instructions may be programmed. The messages can be up to
23 characters in length and contain both text and numeric values. These messages
are part of the RLL program and are displayed automatically on the Handheld
Programmer during RUN mode.
There are several instructions that are used to build operator messages. Detailed
explanations of the following instructions are included in the DL105 and DL205 User
Manual.
S FAULT — the Fault instruction is an output box instruction that lets the
program know which message to display.
S DLBL — the Data Label instruction is included after the END statement
and notes the beginning of a message.
S ACON — the ASCII Constant instruction is used as an output box for
the ASCII portion of the message. (You can also display the contents of
a V-memory location instead of ASCII text.)
S NCON — the Numeric Constant instruction is used as an output box for
any numeric constant portion of the message.
S MOVMC (DL240 only) — the Move Data Label to V-memory Area
instruction is used to embed variables, such as timer or counter values,
into a text message.
This Example message program will log message CHKGAURD on the Handheld programmer wehn X1 input i
C0
X1
PD
C0
FAULT
K1
FAULT Message
END
DLBL
K1
Data Label and ACON
instructions build the message
ACON
CH
ACON
KG
ACON
UA
ACON
RD
NOTE: It is much easier to enter text message programs with DirectSOFTä than it is
with the Handheld Programmer. This is because you can only enter two ASCII
characters per ACON instruction with the Handheld programmer. This is not the
case with DirectSOFT, which allows you to enter several per ACON instruction.
DirectSOFTä also supports other characters not available on the handheld keypad.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Message
Instructions
6--19
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--20
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Message Program
Example
The following example figure demonstrates how to program a message using the
Handheld Programmer. Once you’ve entered the program, put the CPU in RUN
mode and force X1 ON to log the message.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Enter the first contact
$
B
STR
P
A
4.
$
3
F
5
1
E
4
NEXT
A
0
ENT
A
0
U
ISG
L
ANDST
T
MLR
3
1
N
TMR
D
3
ENT
L
ANDST
B
1
L
ANDST
A
0
SHFT
C
C
2
2
O
INST#
H
N
TMR
7
Enter the ACON instruction and the next two letters
SHFT
A
0
SHFT
C
2
K
JMP
O
INST#
G
N
TMR
6
Enter the ACON instruction and the next two letters
SHFT
A
0
SHFT
STR
NOP
C0
FAULT
K1
END
NOP
DLBL
NOP
K1
ACON
NOP
ACH
ACON
NOP
AKG
ACON
NOP
AUA
ACON
NOP
ARD
ENT
Enter the ACON instruction and the first two letters
SHFT
PD C0
NOP
ENT
Enter the DLBL instruction
D
X1
ENT
NEXT
B
9.
D
Enter the END statement
SHFT
8.
SHFT
Enter the FAULT instruction
SHFT
7.
0
STR
B
6.
CV
Enter the control relay
SHFT
5.
STR
NOP
ENT
Enter the PD (always use the one shot
when generating FAULT messages)
SHFT
3.
1
D2--HPP Display Results
C
U
2
ISG
O
INST#
A
0
N
TMR
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--21
Two Types of
Tables
The DL240 CPU will automatically log any system error codes and custom
messages created with the FAULT instructions. The CPU logs the error code, the
date, and the time the error occurred. There are two separate tables that store this
information.
S Error Code Table -- the system logs up to 32 errors in the table. When
an error occurs, the errors already on the table are pushed down and
the most recent error is loaded into the top slot. If the table is full when
an error occurs, the oldest error is pushed out (erased) from the table.
S Message Table -- the system logs up to 16 messages in this table. When
a message is triggered, the messages already stored in the table are
pushed down and the most recent message is loaded into the top slot. If
the table is full when an error occurs, the oldest message is pushed out
(erased) of the table.
The following diagram shows an example of an error table for messages.
Date
Time
Message
1996--01--26
08:41:51:11
*Conveyor--2 stopped
1996--02--30
17:01:11:56
* Conveyor--1 stopped
1996--02--30
17:01:11:12
* Limit SW1 failed
1996--02--28
03:25:14:31
* Saw Jam Detect
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Checking the Error Message Tables
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--22
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Viewing the Error
Table
The Handheld programmer maintains a history of Errors and Messages. You may
display the Errors and Messages on the Handheld programmer by using the AUX 5C
function. The figure below demonstrates how to use the AUX 5C function.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
AUX
Use AUX 5C to view Errors
F
5
SHFT
C
2
AUX
ENT
Press ENT to select Error Messages
ENT
S
D2--HPP Display Results
5C HISTORY D
ERROR/MESAGE
E252NEW I/O CFG
94/01/14 13:18:4
The most recent error is displayed. You can also
use the PREV and NXT keys to sequentially step
through the errors. The arrow keys can be used to
scroll the display for more detail.
Viewing the
Message Table
The AUX 5C function, is used to view messages on the Handheld programmer.
Press these Keystrokes
1.
2.
Use AUX 5C to view FAULT messages
F
5
SHFT
C
2
AUX
ENT
Use the arrow key to select MESSAGE
ENT
S
The most recent message is displayed. You can
also use the PREV and NXT keys to sequentially
step through the messages. The arrow keys can be
used to scroll the display for more detail.
D2--HPP Display Results
AUX
5C HISTORY D
ERROR/MESAGE
CHKGUARD
94/01/14
13:35:2
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--23
The following table lists the error codes that may appear on the D2--HPP Handheld programmer.
DL105/DL205
Error Code
Description
E003
SOFTWARE
TIME-OUT
If the program scan time exceeds the time allotted to the watchdog timer, this
error will occur. SP51 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
To correct this problem add RSTWT instructions in FOR NEXT loops and
subroutines or use AUX 55 to extend the time allotted to the watchdog timer.
041
CPU BATTERY LOW
The CPU battery is low and needs replacement. SP43 will be on and the
error code will be stored in V7757.
EE099
PROGRAM
MEMORY
EXCEEDED
If the compiled program length exceeds the amount of available CPU RAM
this error will occur. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in
V7755. Reduce the size of the application program.
E104
WRITE FAILED
A write to the CPU was not successful. Disconnect the power, remove the
CPU, and make sure the EEPROM is not write protected. If the EEPROM is
not write protected, make sure the EEPROM is installed correctly. If both
conditions are OK, replace the CPU.
E151
BAD COMMAND
A parity error has occurred in the application program. SP44 will be on and
the error code will be stored in V7755. This problem may possibly be due to
electrical noise. Clear the memory and download the program again. Correct
any grounding problems. If the error returns replace the EEPROM or the
CPU.
E155
RAM FAILURE
A checksum error has occurred in the system RAM. SP44 will be on and the
error code will be stored in V7755. This problem may possibly be due to a
low battery, electrical noise or a CPU RAM failure. Clear the memory and
download the program again. Correct any grounding problems. If the error
returns replace the CPU.
E202
MISSING I/O
MODULE
An I/O module has failed to communicate with the CPU or is missing from the
base. SP45 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7756. Run AUX42
to determine the slot and base location of the module reporting the error.
E210
POWER FAULT
A short duration power drop-out occurred on the main power line supplying
power to the base.
E250
COMMUNICATION
FAILURE IN THE I/O
CHAIN
A failure has occurred in the local I/O system. The problem could be in the
base I/O bus or the base power supply. SP45 will be on and the error code
will be stored in V7755. Run AUX42 to determine the base location reporting
the error.
E252
NEW I/O CFG
This error occurs when the auto configuration check is turned on in the CPU
and the actual I/O configuration has changed either by moving modules in a
base or changing types of modules in a base. You can return the modules to
the original position/types or run AUX45 to accept the new configuration.
SP47 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E262
I/O OUT OF RANGE
An out of range I/O address has been encountered in the application
program. Correct the invalid address in the program. SP45 will be on and
the error code will be stored in V7755.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Error Codes
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--24
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
Description
E312
HP COMM
ERROR 2
A data error was encountered during communications with the CPU. Clear
the error and retry the request. If the error continues check the cabling
between the two devices, replace the Handheld programmer, then if
necessary replace the CPU. SP46 will be on and the error code will be
stored in V7756.
E313
HP COMM
ERROR 3
An address error was encountered during communications with the CPU.
Clear the error and retry the request. If the error continues check the cabling
between the two devices, replace the Handheld programmer, then if
necessary replace the CPU. SP46 will be on and the error code will be
stored in V7756.
E316
HP COMM
ERROR 6
A mode error was encountered during communications with the CPU. Clear
the error and retry the request. If the error continues replace the Handheld
programmer, then if necessary replace the CPU. SP46 will be on and the
error code will be stored in V7756.
E320
HP COMM
TIME-OUT
The CPU did not respond to the Handheld programmer communication
request. Check to ensure cabling is correct and not defective. Power cycle
the system if the error continues replace the CPU first and then the Handheld
programmer if necessary.
E321
COMM ERROR
A data error was encountered during communication with the CPU. Check to
ensure cabling is correct and not defective. Power cycle the system and if
the error continues replace the CPU first and then the Handheld programmer
if necessary.
E352
BACKGROUND
COMM. ERROR
Communications error between CPU and intelligent module. Incorrect slot
reference while attempting to use the READ/WRITE commands e.g. DCM
module interface. The slot number of module which I/O error occured is
stored in V7760--V7764.
E4**
NO PROGRAM
A syntax error exists in the application program. The most common is a
missing END statement. Run AUX21 to determine which one of the E4**
series of errors is being flagged. SP52 will be on and the error code will be
stored in V7755.
E401
MISSING END
STATEMENT
All application programs must terminate with an END statement. Enter the
END statement in appropriate location in your program. SP52 will be on and
the error code will be stored in V7755.
E402
MISSING LBL
A GOTO, GTS, MOVMC or LDLBL instruction was used without the
appropriate label. Refer to the programming manual for details on these
instructions. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E403
MISSING RET
(DL240 ONLY)
A subroutine in the program does not end with the RET instruction. SP52 will
be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E404
MISSING FOR
(DL240 ONLY)
A NEXT instruction does not have the corresponding FOR instruction. SP52
will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--25
Description
E405
MISSING NEXT
(DL240 ONLY)
A FOR instruction does not have the corresponding NEXT instruction. SP52
will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E406
MISSING IRT
An interrupt routine in the program does not end with the IRT instruction.
SP52 will be ON and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E412
SBR/LBL>64
(DL240 ONLY)
There is greater than 64 SBR, LBL or DLBL instructions in the program. This
error is also returned if there is greater than 128 GTS or GOTO instructions
used in the program. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in
V7755.
E413
FOR/NEXT>64
(DL240 ONLY)
There is greater than 64 FOR/NEXT loops in the application program. SP52
will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E421
DUPLICATE STAGE
REFERENCE
Two or more SG or ISG labels exist in the application program with the same
number. A unique number must be reserved for each Stage and Initial Stage.
SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E422
DUPLICATE
SBR/LBL
REFERENCE
Two or more SBR or LBL instructions exist in the application program with the
same number. A unique number must be allowed for each Subroutine and
Label. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E423
NESTED LOOPS
(DL240 ONLY)
Nested loops (programming one FOR/NEXT loop inside of another) is not
allowed in the DL240 series. SP52 will be on and the error code will be
stored in V7755.
E431
INVALID ISG/SG
ADDRESS
An ISG or SG must not be programmed after the end statement such as in a
subroutine. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E432
INVALID JUMP
(GOTO) ADDRESS
(DL240 ONLY)
A LBL that corresponds to a GOTO instruction must not be programmed after
the end statement such as in a subroutine. SP52 will be on and the error
code will be stored in V7755.
E433
INVALID SBR
ADDRESS
(DL240 ONLY)
A SBR must be programmed after the end statement, not in the main body of
the program or in an interrupt routine. SP52 will be on and the error code will
be stored in V7755.
E435
INVALID RT
ADDRESS
(DL240 ONLY)
A RT must be programmed after the end statement, not in the main body of
the program or in an interrupt routine. SP52 will be on and the error code will
be stored in V7755.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--26
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
Description
E436
INVALID INT
ADDRESS
An INT must be programmed after the end statement, not in the main body of
the program. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E438
INVALID IRT
ADDRESS
An IRT must be programmed after the end statement, not in the main body of
the program. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored in V7755.
E440
INVALID DATA
ADDRESS
Either the DLBL instruction has been programmed in the main program area
(not after the END statement), or the DLBL instruction is on a rung containing
input contact(s).
E441
ACON/NCON
(DL240 ONLY)
An ACON or NCON must be programmed after the end statement, not in the
main body of the program. SP52 will be on and the error code will be stored
in V7755.
E451
BAD MLS/MLR
MLS instructions must be numbered in ascending order from top to bottom.
E452
X AS COIL
An X data type is being used as a coil output.
E453
MISSING T/C
A timer or counter contact is being used where the associated timer or
counter does not exist.
E454
BAD TMRA
One of the contacts is missing from a TMRA instruction.
E455
BAD CNT
One of the contacts is missing from a CNT or UDC instruction.
E456
BAD SR
One of the contacts is missing from the SR instruction.
E461
STACK OVERFLOW
More than nine levels of logic have been stored on the stack. Check the use
of OR STR and AND STR instructions.
E462
STACK
UNDERFLOW
An unmatched number of logic levels have been stored on the stack. Ensure
the number of AND STR and OR STR instructions match the number of STR
instructions.
E463
LOGIC ERROR
A STR instruction was not used to begin a rung of ladder logic.
E464
MISSING CKT
A rung of ladder logic is not terminated properly.
E471
DUPLICATE COIL
REFERENCE
Two or more OUT instructions reference the same I/O point.
E472
DUPLICATE TMR
REFERENCE
Two or more TMR instructions reference the same number.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--27
Description
E473
DUPLICATE CNT
REFERENCE
Two or more CNT instructions reference the same number.
E480
INVALID CV
ADDRESS
The CV instruction is used in a subroutine or program interrupt routine. The
CV instruction may only be used in the main program area (before the END
statement).
E481
CONFLICTING
INSTRUCTIONS
An instruction exists between convergence stages.
E482
MAX. CV
INSTRUCTIONS
EXCEEDED
Number of CV instructions exceeds 17.
E483
INVALID CVJMP
ADDRESS
CVJMP has been used in a subroutine or a program interrupt routine.
E484
MISSING CV
INSTRUCTION
CVJMP is not preceded by the CV instruction. A CVJMP must immediately
follow the CV instruction.
E485
NO CVJMP
A CVJMP instruction is not placed between the CV and the SG, ISG, BLK,
BEND, END instruction.
E486
INVALID BCALL
ADDRESS
A BCALL is used in a subroutine or a program interrupt routine. The
BCALL instruction may only be used in the main program area (before the
END statement).
E487
MISSING BLK
INSTRUCTION
The BCALL instruction is not followed by a BLK instruction.
E488
INVALID BLK
ADDRESS
The BLK instruction is used in a subroutine or a program interrupt. Another
BLK instruction is used between the BCALL and the BEND instructions.
E489
DUPLICATED CR
REFERENCE
The control relay used for the BLK instruction is being used as an output
elsewhere.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--28
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
Description
E490
MISSING SG
INSTRUCTION
The BLK instruction is not immediately followed by the SG instruction.
E491
INVALID ISG
INSTRUCTION
ADDRESS
There is an ISG instruction between the BLK and BEND instructions.
E492
INVALID BEND
ADDRESS
The BEND instruction is used in a subroutine or a program interrupt routine.
The BEND instruction is not followed by a BLK instruction.
E493
A [CV, SG, ISG, BLK, BEND] instruction must immediately follow the BEND
MISSING REQUIRED instruction.
INSTRUCTION
E494
MISSING BEND
INSTRUCTION
The BLK instruction is not followed by a BEND instruction.
E501
BAD ENTRY
An invalid keystroke or series of keystrokes were entered into the Handheld
programmer.
E502
BAD ADDRESS
An invalid or out of range address was entered into the Handheld
programmer.
E503
BAD COMMAND
An invalid instruction was entered into the Handheld programmer.
E504
BAD REF/VAL
An invalid value or reference number was entered with an instruction.
E505
INVALID
INSTRUCTION
An invalid instruction was entered into the Handheld programmer.
E506
INVALID
OPERATION
An invalid operation was attempted by the Handheld programmer.
E520
BAD OP--RUN
An operation which is invalid in the RUN mode was attempted by the
Handheld programmer.
E521
BAD OP--TRUN
An operation which is invalid in the TEST RUN mode was attempted by the
Handheld programmer.
E523
BAD OP--TPGM
An operation which is invalid in the TEST PROGRAM mode was attempted
by the Handheld programmer.
E524
BAD OP--PGM
An operation which is invalid in the PROGRAM mode was attempted by the
Handheld programmer.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--29
Description
E525
MODE SWITCH
(DL240 ONLY)
An operation was attempted by the Handheld programmer while the CPU
mode switch was in a position other than the TERM position.
E526
OFF LINE
The Handheld programmer is in the OFFLINE mode. To change to the
ONLINE mode use the MODE the key.
E527
ON LINE
The Handheld programmer is in the ON LINE mode. To change to the OFF
LINE mode use the MODE the key.
E528
CPU MODE
The operation attempted is not allowed during a Run Time Edit.
E540
CPU LOCKED
The CPU has been password locked. To unlock the CPU use AUX82 with the
password.
E541
WRONG
PASSWORD
The password used to unlock the CPU with AUX82 was incorrect.
E542
PASSWORD RESET
The CPU powered up with an invalid password and reset the password to
00000000. A password may be re-entered using AUX81.
E601
MEMORY FULL
Attempted to enter an instruction which required more memory than is
available in the CPU.
E602
INSTRUCTION
MISSING
A search function was performed and the instruction was not found.
E604
REFERENCE
MISSING
A search function was performed and the reference was not found.
E610
BAD I/O TYPE
The application program has referenced an I/O module as the incorrect type
of module.
E620
OUT OF MEMORY
An attempt to transfer more data between the CPU and Handheld
programmer than the receiving device can hold.
E621
EEPROM NOT
BLANK
An attempt to write to a non-blank EEPROM was made. Erase the EEPROM
and then retry the write.
E622
NO HPP EEPROM
A data transfer was attempted with no EEPROM (or possibly a faulty
EEPROM) installed in the Handheld programmer.
E623
SYSTEM EEPROM
A function was requested with an EEPROM which contains system
information only.
E624
V-MEMORY ONLY
A function was requested with an EEPROM which contains V-memory data
only.
E625
PROGRAM ONLY
A function was requested with an EEPROM which contains program data
only.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--30
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
DL105/DL205
Error Code
Description
E627
BAD WRITE
An attempt to write to a write protected or faulty EEPROM was made. Check
the write protect jumper and replace the EEPROM if necessary.
E628
EEPROM TYPE
ERROR
The wrong size EEPROM is being used. The DL230 and DL240 CPUs use
different size EEPROMs.
E640
COMPARE ERROR
A compare between the EEPROM and the CPU was found to be in error.
E650
HPP SYSTEM
ERROR
A system error has occurred in the Handheld programmer. Power cycle the
Handheld programmer. If the error returns replace the Handheld
programmer.
E651
HPP ROM ERROR
A ROM error has occurred in the Handheld programmer. Power cycle the
Handheld programmer. If the error returns replace the Handheld
programmer.
E652
HPP RAM ERROR
A RAM error has occurred in the Handheld programmer. Power cycle the
Handheld programmer. If the error returns replace the Handheld
programmer.
DL105/DL205
Memory Map
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL130 Memory Map Overview
— DL230 Memory Map Overview
— DL240 Memory Map Overview
— X Input Bit Map
— Y Output Bit Map
— Control Relay Bit Map
— Stage Control / Status Bit Map
— Timer Status Bit Map
— Counter Status Bit Map
— DL130/DL230 System Memory
— DL240 System Memory
1A
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--2
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
DL130 Memory Map Overview
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 -- X177
V40400 -- V40407
128
X0
Output Points
Y0 -- Y177
V40500 -- V40507
128
Y0
Control Relays
C0 -- C377
V40600 -- V40617
256
Special Relays
SP0 -- SP117
SP540 -- SP577
V41200 -- V41204
V41226 -- V41227
112
Timers
T0 -- T77
Timer Current
Values
None
Timer Status Bits T0 -- T77
Counters
C0
SP0
64
V0 -- V77
64
V41100 -- V41103
64
CT0 -- CT77
C0
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
64
CNT CT0
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 -- V1077
64
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 -- CT77
V41140 -- V41143
64
Data Words
None
V2000 -- V2377
256
None specific, used with many
instructions
Data Words
Non--volatile
None
V4000 -- V4177
128
None specific, used with many
instructions
Stages
S0 -- S377
V41000 -- V41017
256
System
V-memory
None
V7620 -- V7647
V7750--V7777
48
V1000
K100
CT0
SG
S0
S 001
None specific, used for various
purposes
1 -- The DL105 systems are limited to 10 discrete Inputs and 8 descrete outputs. There are 8 different DL105 models whcih are configured with
various voltage level capabilities. Please refer to the Product Catalog or DL105 User Manual for specific models and specifications.
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
A--3
+
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 -- X177
V40400 -- V40407
128
X0
Output Points
Y0 -- Y177
V40500 -- V40507
128
Y0
Control Relays
C0 -- C377
V40600 -- V40617
256
Special Relays
SP0 -- SP117
SP540 -- SP577
V41200 -- V41204
V41226 -- V41227
112
Timers
T0 -- T77
Timer Current
Values
None
Timer Status Bits T0 -- T77
Counters
C0
64
V41100 -- V41103
64
CT0 -- CT77
C0
SP0
64
V0 -- V77
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
DL230 Memory Map Overview
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
64
CNT CT0
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 -- V1077
64
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 -- CT77
V41140 -- V41143
64
Data Words
None
V2000 -- V2377
256
None specific, used with many
instructions
Data Words
Non--volatile
None
V4000 -- V4177
128
None specific, used with many
instructions
Stages
S0 -- S377
V41000 -- V41017
256
System
V-memory
None
V7620 -- V7647
V7750--V7777
48
V1000
K100
CT0
SG
S0
S 001
None specific, used for various
purposes
1 -- The DL205 systems are limited to 128 discrete I/O points (total) with the present system hardware available. These can be mixed between input
and output points as necessary.
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--4
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
DL240 Memory Map Overview
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input Points
X0 -- X177
V40400 -- V40407
128 1
X0
Output Points
Y0 -- Y177
V40500 -- V40507
128 1
Y0
Control Relays
C0 -- C377
V40600 -- V40617
256
Special Relays
SP0 -- SP137
SP540 -- SP617
V41200 -- V41205
V41226 -- V41230
144
Timers
T0 -- T177
Timer Current
Values
None
Timer Status Bits T0 -- T177
Counters
C0
SP0
128
V0 -- V177
128
V41100 -- V41107
128
CT0 -- CT177
C0
TMR
K100
V0
T0
K100
T0
128
CNT CT0
K10
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 -- V1177
128
Counter Status
Bits
CT0 -- CT177
V41140 -- V41147
128
Data Words
None
V2000 -- V3777
1024
None specific, used with many
instructions
Data Words
Non--volatile
None
V4000 -- V4377
256
None specific, used with many
instructions
Stages
S0 -- S777
V41000 -- V41037
512
System
V-memory
None
V7620 -- V7737
V7746--V7777
106
V1000
K100
CT0
SG
S0
S 001
None specific, used for various
purposes
1 -- The DL205 systems are limited to 128 discrete I/O points (total) with the present system hardware available. These can be mixed between input
and output points as necessary.
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
A--5
This table provides a listing of the individual Input points associated with each V-memory address bit for the
DL130, 230 and DL240 CPUs.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Input (X) Points
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40400
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40401
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40402
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40403
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40404
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40405
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40406
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40407
Y Output Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual output points associated with each V-memory address bit for
both the DL130, DL230 and DL240 CPUs.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Output (Y) Points
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40500
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40501
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40502
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40503
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40504
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40505
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40506
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40507
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
X Input Bit Map
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--6
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
Control Relay Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual control relays associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Control Relays (C)
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V40600
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V40601
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V40602
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V40603
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V40604
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V40605
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V40606
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V40607
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V40610
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
V40611
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V40612
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V40613
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V40614
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V40615
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V40616
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V40617
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
A--7
This table provides a listing of the individual stage control bits associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41000
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41001
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41002
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41003
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41004
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41005
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41006
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41007
217
216
215
214
213
212
211
210
207
206
205
204
203
202
201
200
V41010
237
236
235
234
233
232
231
230
227
226
225
224
223
222
221
220
V41011
257
256
255
254
253
252
251
250
247
246
245
244
243
242
241
240
V41012
277
276
275
274
273
272
271
270
267
266
265
264
263
262
261
260
V41013
317
316
315
314
313
312
311
310
307
306
305
304
303
302
301
300
V41014
337
336
335
334
333
332
331
330
327
326
325
324
323
322
321
320
V41015
357
356
355
354
353
352
351
350
347
346
345
344
343
342
341
340
V41016
377
376
375
374
373
372
371
370
367
366
365
364
363
362
361
360
V41017
MSB
DL240 Additional Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
417
416
415
414
413
412
411
410
407
406
405
404
403
402
401
400
V41020
437
436
435
434
433
432
431
430
427
426
425
424
423
422
421
420
V41021
457
456
455
454
453
452
451
450
447
446
445
444
443
442
441
440
V41022
477
476
475
474
473
472
471
470
467
466
465
464
463
462
461
460
V41023
517
516
515
514
513
512
511
510
507
506
505
504
503
502
501
500
V41024
537
536
535
534
533
532
531
530
527
526
525
524
523
522
521
520
V41025
557
556
555
554
553
552
551
550
547
546
545
544
543
542
541
540
V41026
577
576
575
574
573
572
571
570
567
566
565
564
563
562
561
560
V41027
617
616
615
614
613
612
611
610
607
606
605
604
603
602
601
600
V41030
637
636
635
634
633
632
631
630
627
626
625
624
623
622
621
620
V41031
657
656
655
654
653
652
651
650
647
646
645
644
643
642
641
640
V41032
677
676
675
674
673
672
671
670
667
666
665
664
663
662
661
660
V41033
717
716
715
714
713
712
711
710
707
706
705
704
703
702
701
700
V41034
737
736
735
734
733
732
731
730
727
726
725
724
723
722
721
720
V41035
757
756
755
754
753
752
751
750
747
746
745
744
743
742
741
740
V41036
777
776
775
774
773
772
771
770
767
766
765
764
763
762
761
760
V41037
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
Stage Control / Status Bit Map
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--8
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
Timer Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual timer contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Timer (T) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41100
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41101
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41102
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41103
MSB
Additional DL240 Timer (T) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41104
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41105
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41106
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41107
Counter Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual counter contacts associated with each V-memory address bit.
MSB
DL130/DL230/DL240 Counter (CT) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
016
015
014
013
012
011
010
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
V41140
037
036
035
034
033
032
031
030
027
026
025
024
023
022
021
020
V41141
057
056
055
054
053
052
051
050
047
046
045
044
043
042
041
040
V41142
077
076
075
074
073
072
071
070
067
066
065
064
063
062
061
060
V41143
MSB
Additional DL240 Counter (CT) Contacts
LSB
Address
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
V41144
137
136
135
134
133
132
131
130
127
126
125
124
123
122
121
120
V41145
157
156
155
154
153
152
151
150
147
146
145
144
143
142
141
140
V41146
177
176
175
174
173
172
171
170
167
166
165
164
163
162
161
160
V41147
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
A--9
The DL205 CPUs reserve several V-memory locations for storing system parameters or certain types of
system data. These memory locations store things like the error codes, counter interface module data, and
other types of system setup information.
System
V-memory
Description of Contents
V2320--V2377
The default location for multiple preset values for the UP counter.
V7620--V7627
Locations for DV--1000 operator interface parameters
Default Values / Ranges
N/A
V7620 Sets the V-memory location that contains the value.
V0 -- V2377
V7621 Sets the V-memory location that contains the message.
V0 -- V2377
V7622 Sets the total number (1 -- 16) of V-memory locations to be displayed.
1 -- 16
V7623 Sets the V-memory location that contains the numbers to be displayed.
V0 -- V2377
V7624 Sets the V-memory location that contains the character code to be displayed.
V0 -- V2377
V7625 Contains the function number that can be assigned to each key.
V-memory location for X,
Y, or C points used.
V7626 Reserved for future use.
V7627 Reserved for future use.
V7630
Starting location for the multi--step presets for channel 1. The default value is
2320, which indicates the first value should be obtained from V2320. Since
there are 24 presets available, the default range is V2320 -- V2377. You can
change the starting point if necessary.
Default: V2320
Range: V0 -- V2320
V7631--V7632
Not used
N/A
V7633
Sets the desired function code for the high speed counter, interrupt, pulse
catch, pulse train, and input filter. Location is also used for setting the
with/without battery option, enable/disable CPU mode change, and power-up
in Run Mode option.
Default: 0000
Lower Byte Range:
Range: 0 -- None
10 -- Up
40 -- Interrupt
50 -- Pulse Catch
60 -- Filtered
discrete In.
Upper Byte Range:
Bits 8 -- 11, 14,15: Unused
Bit 12: With/Without Batt.
Bit 13: Power-up in Run
V7634
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X0 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7635
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X1 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7636
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X2 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7637
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X3 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
DL130/DL230 System V-memory
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--10
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
System
V-memory
Description of Contents
Default Values / Ranges
V7640--V7647
Not used
N/A
V7751
Fault Message Error Code — stores the 4-digit code used with the FAULT
instruction when the instruction is executed.
N/A
V7752
I/O Configuration Error — stores the module ID code for the module that does
not match the current configuration.
N/A
V7753
I/O Configuration Error — stores the correct module ID code.
V7754
I/O Configuration Error — identifies the base and slot number.
V7755
Error code — stores the fatal error code.
V7756
Error code — stores the major error code.
V7757
Error code — stores the minor error code.
V7760--V7764
Module Error — stores the slot number and error code where an I/O error
occurs.
V7765
Scan — stores the total number of scan cycles that have occurred since the
last Program Mode to Run Mode transition.
V7666--V7774
Not used
N/A
V7775
Scan — stores the current scan time (milliseconds).
N/A
V7776
Scan — stores the minimum scan time that has occurred since the last
Program Mode to Run Mode transition (milliseconds).
N/A
V7777
Scan — stores the maximum scan time that has occurred since the last
Program Mode to Run Mode transition (milliseconds).
N/A
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
A--11
*
The DL205 CPUs reserve several V-memory locations for storing system parameters or certain types of
system data. These memory locations store things like the clock / calendar information, analog
potentiometer current values, error codes, and other types of system setup information.
System
V-memory
Description of Contents
Default Values / Ranges
V3630--V3707
The default location for multiple preset values for UP/DWN and UP counter 1
or pulse catch function.
N/A
V3710--V3767
The default location for multiple preset values for UP/DWN and UP counter 2.
N/A
V3770--V3773
Not used
N/A
V3774--V3777
Default locations for analog potentiometer data (channels 1--4, respectively).
Range: 0 -- 9999
V7620--V7627
Locations for DV--1000 operator interface parameters
V7620 Sets the V-memory location that contains the value.
V0 -- V3760
V7621 Sets the V-memory location that contains the message.
V0 -- V3760
V7622 Sets the total number (1 -- 16) of V-memory locations to be displayed.
1 -- 16
V7623 Sets the V-memory location that contains the numbers to be displayed.
V0 -- V3760
V7624 Sets the V-memory location that contains the character code to be displayed.
V0 -- V3760
V7625 Contains the function number that can be assigned to each key.
V-memory location for X,
Y, or C points used.
V7626 Reserved for future use.
V7627 Reserved for future use.
V7630
Starting location for the multi--step presets for channel 1. Since there are 24
presets available, the default range is V3630 -- V3707. You can change the
starting point if necessary.
Default: V3630
Range: V0 -- V3710
V7631
Starting location for the multi--step presets for channel 1. Since there are 24
presets available, the default range is V3710-- 3767. You can change the
starting point if necessary.
Default: V3710
Range: V0 -- V3710
V7632
Contains the baud rate setting for Port 2. You can use AUX 56 (from the
Handheld Programmer) or, use DirectSOFTä to set the port parameters if
9600 baud is unacceptable.
Default: 2 -- 9600 baud
Range: 0 = 300
1 = 1200
2 = 9600
3 = 19.2K
V7633
Sets the desired function code for the high speed counter, interrupt, pulse
catch, pulse train, and input filter. Location is also used for setting the
with/without battery option, enable/disable CPU mode change, and power-up
in Run Mode option.
Default: 0000
Lower Byte Range:
Range: 0 -- None
10 -- Up
20 -- Up/Dwn.
30 -- Pulse Out
40 -- Interrupt
50 -- Pulse Catch
60 -- Filtered Dis.
Upper Byte Range:
Bits 8 -- 11, 13, 15 Unused
Bit 12: With/Without Batt.
Bit 14: Mode chg. enable
V7634
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X0 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
DL240 System V-memory
Appendix A
Memory Map Overview
A--12
DL105/DL205 Memory Map
System
V-memory
Description of Contents
Default Values / Ranges
V7635
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X1 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7636
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X2 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7637
Contains set up information for high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train output, and input filter for X3 (when D2--CNTINT is installed).
Default: 0000
V7640--V7641
Location for setting the lower and upper limits for the CH1 analog pot.
Default: 0000
Range: 0 -- 9999
V7642--V7643
Location for setting the lower and upper limits for the CH2 analog pot.
Default: 0000
Range: 0 -- 9999
V7644--V7645
Location for setting the lower and upper limits for the CH3 analog pot.
Default: 0000
Range: 0 -- 9999
V7646--V7647
Location for setting the lower and upper limits for the CH4 analog pot.
Default: 0000
Range: 0 -- 9999
V7650--V7737
Locations reserved for set up information used with future options (such as remote I/O and data
communications.)
V7746
Location contains the battery voltage, accurate to 0.1V. For example, a value of 32 indicates 3.2 volts.
V7747
Location contains a 10ms counter. This location increments once every 10ms.
V7751
Fault Message Error Code — stores the 4-digit code used with the FAULT instruction when the instruction
is executed. If you’ve used ASCII messages (DL240 only) then the data label (DLBL) reference number for
that message is stored here.
V7752
I/O configuration Error — stores the module ID code for the module that does not match the current
configuration.
V7753
I/O Configuration Error — stores the correct module ID code.
V7754
I/O Configuration Error — identifies the base and slot number.
V7755
Error code — stores the fatal error code.
V7756
Error code — stores the major error code.
V7757
Error code — stores the minor error code.
V7760--V7764
Module Error — stores the slot number and error code where an I/O error occurs.
V7765
Scan — stores the total number of scan cycles that have occurred since the last Program Mode to Run
Mode transition.
V7766
Contains the number of seconds on the clock. (00 to 59).
V7767
Contains the number of minutes on the clock. (00 to 59).
V7770
Contains the number of hours on the clock. (00 to 23).
V7771
Contains the day of the week. (Mon, Tue, etc.).
V7772
Contains the day of the month (1st, 2nd, etc.).
V7773
Contains the month. (01 to 12)
V7774
Contains the year. (00 to 99)
V7775
Scan — stores the current scan time (milliseconds).
V7776
Scan — stores the minimum scan time that has occurred since the last Program Mode to Run Mode
transition (milliseconds).
V7777
Scan — stores the maximum scan time that has occurred since the last Program Mode to Run Mode
transition (milliseconds).
Special Relays
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL130/DL230 CPU Special Relays
— DL240 CPU Special Relays
1B
B--2
Special Relays
DL130/DL230 CPU Special Relays
Appendix B
Special Relays
Startup and
Real-Time Relays
CPU Status Relays
System Monitoring
SP0
First scan
on for the first scan after a power cycle or program to run transition
only. The relay is reset to off on the second scan. It is useful where a
function needs to be performed only on program startup.
SP1
Always ON
provides a contact to insure an instruction is executed every scan.
SP3
1 minute clock
on for 30 seconds and off for 30 seconds.
SP4
1 second clock
on for 0.5 second and off for 0.5 second.
SP5
100 ms clock
on for 50 ms. and off for 50 ms.
SP6
50 ms clock
on for 25 ms. and off for 25 ms.
SP7
Alternate scan
on every other scan.
SP12
Terminal
run mode
on when the CPU is in the run mode.
SP16
Terminal
program mode
on when the CPU is in the program mode.
SP20
Forced
stop mode
on when the STOP instruction is executed.
SP22
Interrupt enabled on when interrupts have been enabled using the ENI instruction.
SP40
Critical error
on when a critical error such as I/O communication loss has
occurred.
SP41
Warning
on when a non critical error such as a low battery has occurred.
SP43
Battery low
on when the CPU battery voltage is low.
SP44
Program
memory error
on when a memory error such as a memory parity error has
occurred.
SP45
I/O error
on when an I/O error occurs. For example, an I/O module is
withdrawn from the base, or an I/O bus error is detected.
SP47
I/O
configuration
error
on if an I/O configuration error has occurred. The CPU power-up I/O
configuration check must be enabled before this relay will be
functional.
SP50
Fault instruction
on when a Fault Instruction is executed.
SP51
Watch Dog
timeout
on if the CPU Watch Dog timer times out.
SP52
Grammatical
error
on if a grammatical error has occurred either while the CPU is
running or if the syntax check is run. V7755 will hold the exact error
code.
SP53
Solve logic error
on if CPU cannot solve the logic.
Special Relays
Accumulator
Status
B--3
Value less than
on when the accumulator value is less than the instruction value.
SP61
Value equal to
on when the accumulator value is equal to the instruction value.
SP62
Greater than
on when the accumulator value is greater than the instruction value.
SP63
Zero
on when the result of the instruction is zero (in the accumulator.)
SP64
Half borrow
on when the 16 bit subtraction instruction results in a borrow.
SP65
Borrow
on when the 32 bit subtraction instruction results in a borrow.
SP66
Half carry
on when the 16 bit addition instruction results in a carry.
SP67
Carry
when the 32 bit addition instruction results in a carry.
SP70
Sign
on anytime the value in the accumulator is negative.
SP71
Invalid octal
number
on when an Invalid octal number was entered. This also occurs when
the V-memory specified by a pointer (P) is not valid.
SP73
Overflow
on if overflow occurs in the accumulator when a signed addition or
subtraction results in an incorrect sign bit.
SP75
Data error
on if a BCD number is expected and a non--BCD number is
encountered.
SP76
Load zero
on when any instruction loads a value of zero into the accumulator.
Counter Interface
Module Relays
SP100 X0 is on
Equal Relays for
Multi-step Presets
with Up/Down
Counter #1 (for use
with a Counter
Interface Module)
SP540 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3640.
SP541 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3642.
SP542 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3644.
SP543 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3646.
SP544 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3650.
SP545 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3652.
SP546 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3654.
SP547 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3656.
SP550 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3660.
SP551 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3662.
SP552 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3664.
SP553 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3666.
SP554 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3670.
SP555 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3672.
SP556 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3674.
SP557 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3676.
SP560 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3700.
SP561 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3702.
SP562 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3704.
SP563 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3706.
SP564 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3710.
SP565 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3712.
SP566 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3714.
SP567 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3716.
X0 — on when corresponding input is on.
Appendix B
Special Relays
SP60
B--4
Special Relays
DL240 CPU Special Relays
Appendix B
Special Relays
Startup and
Real-Time Relays
CPU Status Relays
System Monitoring
Relays
SP0
First scan
on for the first scan after a power cycle or program to run transition
only. The relay is reset to off on the second scan. It is useful where a
function needs to be performed only on program startup.
SP1
Always ON
provides a contact to insure an instruction is executed every scan.
SP3
1 minute clock
on for 30 seconds and off for 30 seconds.
SP4
1 second clock
on for 0.5 second and off for 0.5 second.
SP5
100 ms clock
on for 50 ms. and off for 50 ms.
SP6
50 ms clock
on for 25 ms. and off for 25 ms.
SP7
Alternate scan
on every other scan.
SP11
Forced run mode on anytime the CPU switch is in the RUN position.
SP12
Terminal
run mode
on when the CPU switch is in the TERM position and the CPU is in
the RUN mode.
SP13
Test run mode
on when the CPU switch is in the TERM position and the CPU is in
the test RUN mode.
SP15
Test program
mode
on when the CPU is in the TERM position and the CPU is in the TEST
PROGRAM MODE.
SP16
Terminal
program mode
on when the CPU switch is in the TERM position and the CPU is in
the PROGRAM MODE.
SP20
Forced
stop mode
on when the STOP instruction is executed.
SP22
Interrupt enabled on when interrupts have been enabled using the ENI instruction.
SP40
Critical error
on when a critical error such as I/O communication loss has occurred.
SP41
Warning
on when a non-critical error such as a low battery has occurred.
SP43
Battery low
on when the CPU battery voltage is low.
SP44
Program
memory error
on when a memory error such as a memory parity error has occurred.
SP45
I/O error
on when an I/O error occurs. For example, an I/O module is withdrawn
from the base, or an I/O bus error is detected.
SP46
Communications
error
on when a communications error has occurred on any of the CPU
ports.
SP47
I/O configuration
error
on if an I/O configuration error has occurred. The CPU power-up I/O
configuration check must be enabled before this relay will be
functional.
SP50
Fault instruction
on when a Fault Instruction is executed.
SP51
Watch Dog
timeout
on if the CPU Watch Dog timer times out.
SP52
Grammatical
error
on if a grammatical error has occurred either while the CPU is running
or if the syntax check is run. V7755 contains the exact error code.
SP53
Solve logic error
on if CPU cannot solve the logic.
SP54
Intelligent I/O
error
on when communications with an intelligent module has occurred.
Special Relays
Accumulator
Status Relays
SP60
Value less than
on when the accumulator value is less than the instruction value.
SP61
Value equal to
on when the accumulator value is equal to the instruction value.
SP62
Greater than
on when the accumulator value is greater than the instruction value.
SP63
Zero
on when the result of the instruction is zero (in the accumulator.)
SP64
Half borrow
on when the 16 bit subtraction instruction results in a borrow.
SP65
Borrow
on when the 32 bit subtraction instruction results in a borrow.
SP66
Half carry
on when the 16 bit addition instruction results in a carry.
SP67
Carry
when the 32 bit addition instruction results in a carry.
SP70
Sign
on anytime the value in the accumulator is negative.
SP71
Invalid octal
number
on when an Invalid octal number was entered. This also occurs when
the V-memory specified by a pointer (P) is not valid.
SP73
Overflow
on if overflow occurs in the accumulator when a signed addition or
subtraction results in a incorrect sign bit.
SP75
Data error
on if a BCD number is expected and a non--BCD number is
encountered.
SP76
Load zero
on when any instruction loads a value of zero into the accumulator.
SP100 X0 is on
X0 — on when corresponding input is on.
SP101 X1 is on
X1 — on when corresponding input is on.
SP102 X2 is on
X2 — on when corresponding input is on.
SP103 X3 is on
X3 — on when corresponding input is on.
Appendix B
Special Relays
Counter Interface
Module Relays
B--5
B--6
Special Relays
Appendix B
Special Relays
Communications
Monitoring Relays
SP116
CPU
communication
on when the CPU is communicating with another device
SP120 Module busy
Slot 0
on when the communication module in slot 0 is busy transmitting or
receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX instructions to
prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the module is busy .
SP121 Com. error
Slot 0
on when the communication module in slot 0 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP122 Module busy
Slot 1
on when the communication module in slot 1 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP123 Com. error
Slot 1
on when the communication module in slot 1 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP124 Module busy
Slot 2
on when the communication module in slot 2 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP125 Com. error
Slot 2
on when the communication module in slot 2 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP126 Module busy
Slot 3
on when the communication module in slot 3 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP127 Com. error
Slot 3
on when the communication module in slot 3 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP130 Module busy
Slot 4
on when the communication module in slot 4 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP131 Com. error
Slot 4
on when the communication module in slot 4 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP132 Module busy
Slot 5
on when the communication module in slot 5 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP133 Com. error
Slot 5
on when the communication module in slot 5 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP134 Module busy
Slot 6
on when the communication module in slot 6 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP135 Com. error
Slot 6
on when the communication module in slot 6 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
SP136 Module busy
Slot 7
on when the communication module in slot 7 of the local base is busy
transmitting or receiving. You must use this relay with the RX or WX
instructions to prevent attempting to execute a RX or WX while the
module is busy.
SP137 Com. error
Slot 7
on when the communication module in slot 7 of the local base has
encountered a communication error.
Special Relays
Equal Relays for
Multi-step Presets
with Up/Down
Counter #1 (for use
with a Counter
Interface Module)
B--7
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3640.
SP541 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3642.
SP542 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3644.
SP543 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3646.
SP544 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3650.
SP545 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3652.
SP546 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3654.
SP547 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3656.
SP550 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3660.
SP551 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3662.
SP552 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3664.
SP553 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3666.
SP554 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3670.
SP555 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3672.
SP556 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3674.
SP557 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3676.
SP560 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3700.
SP561 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3702.
SP562 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3704.
SP563 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3706.
SP564 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3710.
SP565 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3712.
SP566 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3714.
SP567 Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3716.
Appendix B
Special Relays
SP540 Current = target value
B--8
Special Relays
Appendix B
Special Relays
Equal Relays for
Multi-step Presets
with Up/Down
Counter #2 (for use
with a Counter
Interface Module)
SP570
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3720.
SP571
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3722.
SP572
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3724.
SP573
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3726.
SP574
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3730.
SP575
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3732.
SP576
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3734.
SP577
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3736.
SP600
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3740.
SP601
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3742.
SP602
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3744.
SP603
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3746.
SP604
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3750.
SP605
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3752.
SP606
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3754.
SP607
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3756.
SP610
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3760.
SP611
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3762.
SP612
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3764.
SP613
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3766.
SP614
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3770.
SP615
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3772.
SP616
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3774.
SP617
Current = target value
on when the counter current value equals the value in V3776.
1
Index
A
D
Address, searching, 3--3
Delete, instruction, 4--8
Auxiliary, diagnostics, 2--7
Display
auxiliary displays, 1--12
clearing, 2--2
cursor control, 2--2
screen format, 1--10
test/run display, 1--12
AUXiliary Function, overview, 2--6
B
Beeper, on/off control, 2--7
Displaying, program, 4--3
Bit Override
DL130, memory map overview, A--2
display indicators, 6--7
forcing, 6--5
set/reset, 6--8
DL230, memory map overview, A--3
C
Changing
timer/counter current values, 6--10
V--Memory, 6--9
watchdog timer, 6--11
Control Relay, bit map, A--6
Counter
accumulating counters, 3--10
counter status bit map, A--8
CPU
hardware clock, 2--12
locking/unlocking, 5--3
mode change, 2--4
mode description, 2--3
network address, 2--9
password protection, 5--3
DL240, memory map overview, A--4
E
Editing
in the Run mode, 4--11
modes, 4--2
programs during Run mode, 4--10
EEPROM
checking EEPROM size, 5--6
compare to CPU, 5--10
EEPROM blank check, 5--6
erasing EEPROM, 5--7
installation, 5--5
location, 5--4
program backups, 5--7
program upload, 5--9
saving programs, 5--4
selecting memory to copy, 5--8
verification, 5--11
operations with a DL105, 5--5
Element
compare, 3--12
parallel branch, 3--6
series/parallel, 3--7
Index--2
Entering
combination logic, 3--9
elements in parrallel, 3--6
elements in series, 3--5
normally closed elements, 3--5
octal/hex numbers, 3--14
parallel branches, 3--8
parallel elements, 3--6
series elements in parallel, 3--7
Error Code, message list, 6--23
F
Find
instruction type, 4--5
specific reference, 4--5
Force
bit force with direct access, 6--6
bit force with status, 6--6
bit status, 6--4
direct bit forcing, 6--7
discrete I/O points, 6--4
during bit override, 6--5
Forcing, decrete bit, 6--4
I
I/O
timer/counter, 3--10
K
Keypad
keys, 1--9
layout, 1--8
L
LED, indicator status, 1--10
M
Memory
changing rententive range, 2--11
initializing, 2--8
retentive ranges, 2--10
scratchpad, 2--8
Message
error code table, 6--21
error codes, 6--23
error history, 6--22
error table, 6--22
instructions, 6--19
overview, 6--18
program example, 6--20
Input, bit map, A--5
Mode
program mode, 3--4
selecting Run--time Edit, 4--11
selecting Run--time Edit mode, 4--10
selection, 3--4
Insert, inserting instruction, 4--7
Monitor, bit status, 6--3
Instruction
ASCII character, 3--13
changing an instruction, 4--6
delete, 4--8
element type, 3--3
insert key, 4--7
load address (LD,LDA), 3--14
message instruction, 6--18
number (#... ), 3--13
octal/hexadecimal, 3--14
Overview, 3--2
search, 3--3
search and replace, 4--9
Monitoring
CPU scan, 6--11
pointer locations, 6--10
timer/counter values, 6--10
V--memory, 6--9
configuration, 2--5
diagnostics, 6--17
monitoring, 6--3
N
Networks
combination example, 3--9
combination logic, 3--9
limitations, 3--9
Index--3
O
Output, bit map, A--5
P
Program
ACON (ASCII) instructions, 3--13
changing an instruction, 4--6
clearing, 2--8
comparision, 5--10
display screen, 4--3
duplicate reference check, 3--16
editing a program, 4--2
EEPROM backups, 5--4
element types, 3--4
entering a network, 3--4
error checking, 3--15
finding an instruction, 4--5
Instructions, 3--2
mnemonic instructions, 3--2
naming a program, 5--2
navigation, 3--3
networks, 3--2
password protection, 5--2
run--time edit, 4--2
saving offline programs, 5--11
searching start of program, 4--4
storage, 5--4
storage to EEPROM, 5--4
syntax check, 3--15
transfering from EEPROM to CPU, 5--9
using instruction numbers, 3--13
Programming
counters, 3--10
parallel branches in series, 3--8
relational contacts, 3--12
timers, 3--10
two input timers, 3--11
R
Reference, duplicate reference check, 3--16
S
Saving, program to EEPROM, 5--4
Search/Replace, memory address, 4--9
Searching
end of program, 3--3
instruction addresses, 3--3
instruction elements, 3--3
specific address, 4--4
start of program, 3--3, 4--4
Special Relays, B--2–B--8
Special Relays (SPxxx)
DL130/DL230, B--2
DL240, B--4
Specifications
cable, 1--7
CPU, 1--7
display screen, 1--7
enviromental, 1--7
physical, 1--7
Stage, control/status bit map, A--7
Status
bit force, 6--6
displays information, 1--11
Status Monitor, displays, 6--2
Syntax, program syntax check, 3--15
System Memory
DL130 system V--memory, A--9
DL230 system V--memory, A--9
DL240 system V--memory, A--11
T
Test
output conditions, 6--14
test--PGM mode, 6--12
test--run display, 6--13
test--Run mode, 6--12
Test Operation
how to use, 6--15
indicators, 6--15
Index--4
Timer
accumulating timers, 3--10
timer status bit map, A--8
Trap, function, 6--16
Trapping
address, 6--16
word, 6--16
Troubleshooting, using the monitor options, 6--2
V
V--Memory, monitoring, 6--9
Viewing, messages, 6--22
W
Watchdog, monitor, 6--11
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